WorldWideScience

Sample records for research transplantation toxicology

  1. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  2. Operational Toxicology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Confcrencc\\ Stanford) California, August. Stapleton, A.R., DelRaso, N., and Chan, V. 2005. Noneholinesterase Mechanism(s) ofChlorpyrifos Neurotoxicity ...Noncholinesterase Meehanism(s) ofChlorpyrifos Neurotoxicity Indicated by Gene Expression Profiles of Rat Brain Tissue. Presented at the Toxicology & Risk...Toxicology of Aluminum Nanoparticles in Rat Lung Macrophages. The Toxicologist 90( I): 353. 49 Hess, K.L., Hussain, S.M., Jones, R.L., Mattie, D.R

  3. Ethics and Medical Toxicology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Optimizing care in medical toxicology necessitates designing and conducting ethical research. Nevertheless, the context of medical toxicology can make clinical research ethically challenging for a variety of reasons: medical toxicology is typified by relative rare conditions; making precise and rapid diagnoses is often fraught with uncertainty; emergent and urgent clinical exigencies make consent difficult or impossible; and some exposures are stigmatized or related to illegal activities that can compromise collecting accurate data from patients. In this paper, we examine some of the ethical issues in medical toxicology research that are especially salient in effort to promote optimal research in the field. The particular issues to be addressed are as follows: (1) rare conditions and orphan agents, (2) randomization and control arms, (3) inclusion and exclusion criteria, (4) outcome measures, (5) consent, (6) confidentiality, (7) registries, (8) oversight, and (9) transparency and reporting. Thinking about these ethical issues prospectively will help researchers and clinicians appropriately navigate them.

  4. Metabolomics in Toxicology and Preclinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Bois, Frederic Y.; Clench, Malcolm R.; Coen, Muireann; Donley, Beth; Fischer, Steven M.; Ekman, Drew R.; Fabian, Eric; Guillou, Claude; Heuer, Joachim; Hogberg, Helena T.; Jungnickel, Harald; Keun, Hector C.; Krennrich, Gerhard; Krupp, Eckart; Luch, Andreas; Noor, Fozia; Peter, Erik; Riefke, Bjoern; Seymour, Mark; Skinner, Nigel; Smirnova, Lena; Verheij, Elwin; Wagner, Silvia; Hartung, Thomas; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Leist, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Metabolomics, the comprehensive analysis of metabolites in a biological system, provides detailed information about the biochemical/physiological status of a biological system, and about the changes caused by chemicals. Metabolomics analysis is used in many fields, ranging from the analysis of the physiological status of genetically modified organisms in safety science to the evaluation of human health conditions. In toxicology, metabolomics is the -omics discipline that is most closely related to classical knowledge of disturbed biochemical pathways. It allows rapid identification of the potential targets of a hazardous compound. It can give information on target organs and often can help to improve our understanding regarding the mode-of-action of a given compound. Such insights aid the discovery of biomarkers that either indicate pathophysiological conditions or help the monitoring of the efficacy of drug therapies. The first toxicological applications of metabolomics were for mechanistic research, but different ways to use the technology in a regulatory context are being explored. Ideally, further progress in that direction will position the metabolomics approach to address the challenges of toxicology of the 21st century. To address these issues, scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory bodies came together in a workshop to discuss the current status of applied metabolomics and its potential in the safety assessment of compounds. We report here on the conclusions of three working groups addressing questions regarding 1) metabolomics for in vitro studies 2) the appropriate use of metabolomics in systems toxicology, and 3) use of metabolomics in a regulatory context. PMID:23665807

  5. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Project Director Penelope Jeggo

    2003-02-15

    Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early

  6. TOXICOLOGICAL RESEARCH INVOLVING HUMANS: ETHICAL AND REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the need for the Society of Toxicology (SOT) to develop a policy for ethical research in humans, and a review for publication of these studies. Observations on human beings have been the foundation upon which toxicologic knowledge has been built since the in...

  7. [Research advances in eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Teng, Hong-Hui; Ren, Bai-Xiang; Shi, Shu-Yun

    2014-09-01

    Soil eco-toxicology provides a theoretical basis for ecological risk assessment of contaminated soils and soil pollution control. Research on eco-toxicological effects and molecular mechanisms of toxic substances in soil environment is the central content of the soil eco-toxicology. Eco-toxicological diagnosis not only gathers all the information of soil pollution, but also provides the overall toxic effects of soil. Therefore, research on the eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution has important theoretical and practical significance. Based on the research of eco-toxicological diagnosis of soil pollution, this paper introduced some common toxicological methods and indicators, with the advantages and disadvantages of various methods discussed. However, conventional biomarkers can only indicate the class of stress, but fail to explain the molecular mechanism of damage or response happened. Biomarkers and molecular diagnostic techniques, which are used to evaluate toxicity of contaminated soil, can explore deeply detoxification mechanisms of organisms under exogenous stress. In this paper, these biomarkers and techniques were introduced systematically, and the future research trends were prospected.

  8. Toxicology research for precautionary decision-making and the role of Human & Experimental Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P

    2015-01-01

    being the strict criteria for scientific proof usually required for decision-making in regard to prevention. The present study ascertains the coverage of environmental chemicals in four volumes of Human & Experimental Toxicology and the presentation and interpretation of research findings in published...... is particularly prone to bias because of the known paucity of false positives and, in particular, the existence of a vast number of toxic hazards which by default are considered innocuous due to lack of documentation. The Precautionary Principle could inspire decision-making on the basis of incomplete......-priority substances, for which toxicology documentation is badly needed, were not covered in the journal issues at all. When reviewing published articles, reliance on p values was standard, and non-significant findings were often called 'negative.' This tradition may contribute to the perceived need to extend...

  9. The metabolic and toxicological considerations for immunosuppressive drugs used during pancreas transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Erika B

    2012-12-01

    Pancreas-kidney transplant is an effective treatment for patients with insulin-dependent dabetes and chronic renal failure. Reduction in technical failure loss and early acute rejection rates contributed to prolong pancreas graft survival. However, drug toxicity affects negatively both short- and long-term follow-ups. This article reviews the existing literature and knowledge of the immunosuppressive drugs that are frequently used in pancreas transplant, including calcineurin inhibitors, sirolimus, corticosteroids, and mycophenolate. The article also discusses the short- and long-term adverse effects of these drugs. The article also reports and discusses the most relevant in vitro studies, providing additional information to in vivo findings. Some clinically relevant drug interactions with immunosuppressive drugs are also highlighted. Over- and underimmunosuppression effects will not be addressed. Immunosuppressive regimen after pancreas transplant is very effective and contributed to pancreas allograft survival. However, they present several side effects that are potentiated when drugs are combined. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors can aggravate metabolic and toxicological effects of immunosuppressive drugs. It is important to critically analyze the results of clinical studies and investigate new immunosuppressive drugs and/or novel drug combinations. It is equally important to comprehend and interpret experimental data. Therefore, minimization of side effects, based on safe approaches, can prolong pancreas allograft survival.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on research needs in toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Osborne, R.V.

    1988-05-01

    A workshop on the theme 'Research Needs in Toxicology' was held at the Chalk River laboratories in November 1987. A program in toxicological protection aims to develop a fundamental and unified understanding of the behaviour of toxic agents in the environment and workplace, and of the consequent effects on human health. This understanding is necessary so that risks from such agents can be assessed quantitatively and realistically. These assessments, together with consideration of economic and social factors, provide a sound basis for decisions made to safeguard health. Where are the gaps in our current knowledge and ability to make such assessments? What research is needed? In these workshop proceedings, a number of eminent toxicologists from Canada and the U.S.A. discuss these questions

  11. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breath. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes adn to estimate the risk they pose by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them. This report contains brief research papers that reflect the scope and recent findings of the Institute's research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, principally through the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The papers are divided into topical sections. The first section, Characterization of Airborne Materials and Generation of Experimental Exposure Atmospheres, reflects the Institute's capabilities for fundamental aerosol research and the application of that expertise to toxicological studies. The second

  12. Bibliometric analysis of lung transplantation research articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, M; Habibi, G; Rahim, M B; Mirkazemi, R; Ghaemi, M; Omidimorad, A; Alavi, A A; Banazadeh, M

    2011-03-01

    In the last 30 years lung transplantation has proven to be a lifesaving therapeutic option for patients with end-stage lung disease. The objective of this study was to perform a bibliometric analysis of lung transplantation research articles. A bibliometric evaluation of the evolution of scientific production in the field of lung transplantations between 1989 and 2009 was conducted using the ISI Web of Science. The search terms selected were "lung transplant" OR "pulmonary transplant". Specific features including year of publication, language, geographical distribution, first author, main journal publishing these articles, journals publishing highly cited articles, and institutional affiliation were analyzed. The citation characteristics of articles were additionally analyzed. A total of 6409 (58.0 %) research articles were found. The time trend of the number of articles showed an increase of more than 6.81 between 1989 and 2009. North America contributed 50.4 % and Europe contributed 46.0 % of published articles. The greatest number of contributions came from the USA (43.6 %), followed by England (9.1 %) and Germany (8.6 %). There were 104 522 citations of these articles by 25 July 2010. The average citation per article was 16.31. The New England Journal of Medicine ranked first with regard to the number of articles and the number of highly cited articles. G. A. Patterson, Washington University, and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) were the top author, institution and funding agency, respectively. The number of publications and the scientific interest in lung transplantation has increased rapidly in recent years. Citations of articles published in the field of lung transplantation are increasing and the numbers of uncited articles are fewer compared to the average citations of articles and uncited articles in the field of medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. 77 FR 57569 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ...] Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... closed to the public. Name of Committee: Science Advisory Board (SAB) to the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR). General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to the...

  14. 75 FR 57967 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ...] Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... closed to the public. Name of Committee: Science Advisory Board (SAB) to the National Center for Toxicological Research (NCTR). General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations to the...

  15. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikula, K.J.; Belinsky, S.A.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.

    1993-11-01

    This annual report for the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute for 1992-1993 consists of 60 individual reports prepared separately by investigators describing progress in their own projects. Most papers are 2-5 pages long.

  16. Communicating and Translating EPA's Computational Toxicology Research (WC10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) develops and uses alternative testing methods to accelerate the pace of chemical evaluations, reduce reliance on animal testing, and address the significant lack of chemical data. The chemical data is generated through ...

  17. 20170821 - Communicating and Translating EPA's Computational Toxicology Research (WC10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) develops and uses alternative testing methods to accelerate the pace of chemical evaluations, reduce reliance on animal testing, and address the significant lack of chemical data. The chemical data is generated th...

  18. Coastal marine pollution and toxicology : overview of current research and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubir Din

    1996-01-01

    The contents are marine pollution and toxicology studies at Universiti Sains Malaysia, their facilities, and research projects have been done on this subject. In coastal pollution monitoring and baseline studies, the emphasis have been on determination of levels of trace-metals in the coastal marine environment, in relation to other physico-chemical parameters. The future needs and goals of marine pollution and toxicology studies in Malaysia also discussed

  19. Mechanistic research in aquatic toxicology: perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Mark E

    2011-10-01

    On the 30th anniversary of the journal, I provide a perspective on some of the questions and opportunities for new understanding that will interest aquatic toxicologists during the next 30 years. I focus on mechanisms of toxicity involving transcription factors, signalling pathways, and gene networks involved in toxic and adaptive responses in aquatic animals. Prominent questions address the value of a toxicity pathways approach in aquatic systems, issues involving extrapolation among species, identification of susceptibility genes and useful biomarkers of adverse effect, new emerging contaminants, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms, effects of multiple stressors, evolutionary toxicology, and the relative roles of technical and conceptual limitations to our understanding of chemical effects on aquatic systems. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 64355 - Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... future research needs in the area of regulatory science for personalized nutrition. Following the public...] Science Advisory Board to the National Center for Toxicological Research; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... closed to the public. Name of Committee: Science Advisory Board (SAB) to the National Center for...

  1. Applications of accelerator mass spectrometry for pharmacological and toxicological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Karen; Tompkins, Elaine M; White, Ian N H

    2006-01-01

    The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), known for radiocarbon dating of archeological specimens, has revolutionized high-sensitivity isotope detection in pharmacology and toxicology by allowing the direct determination of the amount of isotope in a sample rather than measuring its decay. It can quantify many isotopes, including 26Al, 14C, 41Ca, and 3H with detection down to attomole (10(-18)) amounts. Pharmacokinetic data in humans have been achieved with ultra-low levels of radiolabel. One of the most exciting biomedical applications of AMS with 14C-labeled potential carcinogens is the detection of modified proteins or DNA in tissues. The relationship between low-level exposure and covalent binding of genotoxic chemicals has been compared in rodents and humans. Such compounds include heterocyclic amines, benzene, and tamoxifen. Other applications range from measuring the absorption of 26Al to monitoring 41Ca turnover in bone. In epoxy-embedded tissue sections, high-resolution imaging of 14C label in cells is possible. The uses of AMS are becoming more widespread with the availability of instrumentation dedicated to the analysis of biomedical samples. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Virtual Issue #1: Oil Spill Research in the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology has been a venue for publishing oil spill research for over forty years. Rehwoldt et al. (1974) published the first oil spill focused paper in the Bulletin, reporting on the aquatic toxicity of two spill mitigating agents...

  3. Assessing the scientific research productivity of a leading toxicology journal: A case study of Human & Experimental Toxicology from 2003 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M; Awang, Rahmat

    2014-01-01

    Bibliometric studies are increasingly being used for research assessments. Bibliometric indicators involve the application of statistical methods to scientific publications to obtain the bibliographics for each journal. The main objective of this study was to conduct a bibliometric evaluation of Human & Experimental Toxicology retrieved from the Scopus database. This study obtained data from Scopus published from 1 January 2003 till 31 December 2012. The keywords entered in Scopus to accomplish the objective of this study were 'Human', 'Experimental' and 'Toxicology' as 'Source Title'. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analysing (a) total and trends in Human & Experimental Toxicology contributions in research between 2003 and 2012; (b) Human & Experimental Toxicology authorship patterns and productivity; (c) collaboration patterns; and (d) the citations received by the publications. There were 1229 research articles published in Human & Experimental Toxicology. Of the articles included, 947 (77.1%) were original articles and 104 (8.5%) were review articles. The Hirsch-index of the retrieved documents was 35. The largest number of publications in Human & Experimental Toxicology was from the United States (19.6%), followed by India (12.8%) and Turkey (10.9%). The total number of citations was 9119, with a median (interquartile range) of 3 (1-9) in 6797 documents. The highest median (interquartile range) number of citations was 8 (2.7-12.7) for France, followed by 7.5 (2-22.5) for Iran and 6 (3-13.5) for the United Kingdom. The country most often citing articles that were published in Human & Experimental Toxicology was the United States, which made citations in 1508 documents, followed by India with citations in 792 documents. The documents in Human & Experimental Toxicology focus principally on original data, with very few review articles. Review articles tend to have higher citation rates

  4. Institute for Genetics and Toxicology of Fission Materials. Annual report on research and development work in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The report covers the research results achieved in 1989 in the following subject fields: Gene repair and gene regulation, biological carcinogenesis, molecular genetics of eukaryontic genes, radiotoxicology of the actinides, cellular inhalation toxicology, cellular and molecular toxicology, and in vitro fractionation and speciation of actinides. A list of publications of the Institute in 1989 shows printed original reports and conference papers. (MG) [de

  5. Cooperative Training Partnership in Aquatic Toxicology and Ecosystem Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA-ORD seeks applications to enter into a cooperative agreement with EPA that will provide training opportunities for undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral trainees on-site at ORD’s Mid-Continent Ecology Division (MED) research

  6. Space Toxicology: Environmental Health Considerations during Spaceflight Operations and Potential Paths for Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen N.; Sundaresan, Alemalu

    2009-01-01

    Space Toxicology is a specialized discipline for spaceflight, space habitation and occupation of celestial bodies including planets, moons and asteroids [1]. Astronaut explorers face unique challenges to their health while working and living with limited resources for rescue and medical care during space operation. At its core the practice of space toxicology to identify, assess and predict potential chemical contaminants and limit the astronaut s exposure to these environmental factors in order to protect crew health. Space toxicologists are also charged with setting safe exposure limits that will protect the astronaut against a multitude of chemical exposures, in a physiologically altered state. In order to maintain sustained occupation in space, toxicological risks are gauged and managed within the context of isolation, continual exposures, reuse of air and water, limited rescue options, and the necessary use of highly toxic compounds required for propulsion. As the space program move towards human presence and exploration other celestial bodies in situ toxicological risks, such as inhalation of unusual and/or reactive mineral dusts must also be analyzed and controlled. Placing humans for long-term presence in space creates several problems and challenges to the long-term health of the crew, such as bone-loss and immunological challenges and has spurred research into acute, chronic and episodic exposure of the pulmonary system to mineral dusts [2]. NASA has demonstrated that lunar soil contains several types of reactive dusts, including an extremely fine respirable component. In order to protect astronaut health, NASA is now investigating the toxicity of this unique class of dusts. Understanding how these reactive components behave "biochemically" in a moisture-rich pulmonary environment will aid in determining how toxic these particles are to humans. The data obtained from toxicological examination of lunar dusts will determine the human risk criteria for lunar

  7. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fissionable Materials, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The present annual report describes the results of research work done by the Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fissionable Materials (IGT) in 1991. The following eight subjects were dealt with: genetic repair; genetic regulation; biological carcinogenesis; molecular genetics of eukaryontic genes; genetic mouse models for human illnesses; radiation toxicology of actinides; molecular and cellular environmental toxicology, and in vivo fractionation and speciation of actinides. (MG) [de

  8. TRANSPLANTATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stage kidney disease. There is good evidence that transplantation improves both the quality and quantity of life in renal transplant recipients when compared with dialysis.1,2. Living donor kidney transplantation has gained popularity, not only owing ...

  9. Institute of Genetics and of Toxicology of Fissile Materials. Progress report on research and development work in 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    In the year under report, the institute's scope of investigations comprised the seven topics surveyed in the following together with the most recent research results obtained. These were genetic repair and genetic regulation mechanisms, biologic carcinogenesis, molecular genetics of eukaryotic genes, genetic mouse models of human disorders, toxicology of radioactive and non-radioactive heavy metals as well as environmental toxicology at the molecular and cellular levels. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snipes, M.B.; Marshall, T.C.; Martinez, B.S.

    1982-12-01

    Studies are presented of the effect on man of airborne particulates and gaseous emissions associated with the production of energy. Included in the report from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute are papers on: (1) the physical and chemical characterization of energy technology aerosols; (2) laboratory studies of aerosol generation and characterization; (3) in vitro predictors of toxicity; (4) disposition and fate of inhaled materials; (5) dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides; (6) dose-response relationships for inhaled chemical toxicants; (7) biological factors which influence dose-response relationships; and (8) risk assessment

  11. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinsky, S.A.; Hoover, M.D.; Bradley, P.L.

    1994-11-01

    This document from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute includes annual reports in the following general areas: (I) Aerosol Technology and Characterization of Airborne Materials; (II) Deposition, transport, and clearance of inhaled Toxicants; (III) Metabolism and Markers of Inhaled Toxicants; (IV) Carcinogenic Responses to Toxicants; (V) Mechanisms of carcinogenic response to Toxicants; (VI) Non carcinogenic responses to inhaled toxicants; (VII) Mechanisms of noncarcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants; (VIII) The application of Mathematical Modeling to Risk Estimates. 9 appendices are also included. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  12. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinsky, S. A.; Hoover, M. D.; Bradley, P. L. [eds.

    1994-11-01

    This document from the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute includes annual reports in the following general areas: (I) Aerosol Technology and Characterization of Airborne Materials; (II) Deposition, transport, and clearance of inhaled Toxicants; (III) Metabolism and Markers of Inhaled Toxicants; (IV) Carcinogenic Responses to Toxicants; (V) Mechanisms of carcinogenic response to Toxicants; (VI) Non carcinogenic responses to inhaled toxicants; (VII) Mechanisms of noncarcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants; (VIII) The application of Mathematical Modeling to Risk Estimates. 9 appendices are also included. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Advantages of using aquatic animals for biomedical research on reproductive toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottet, N.K.; Landolt, M.L.

    1987-04-01

    Major advantages of the use of aquatic animals, such as trout, English sole, or sea urchins, for studying the mechanisms of reproductive toxicology are discussed. The remarkable synchrony of differentiation of gametes in large quantities for detailed morphologic and biochemical measurements enables research not readily done on mammalian nonseasonal breeders. Structural differences such as the absence of a fibrous sheath in the more simple structure of fish and sea urchin sperm flagella facilitates comparative study of the mechanism of action of microtubules in flagella movement and the coupling of mitochondrial energy production to microtubules movement.

  14. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F.

    1996-12-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is a Government-owned facility leased and operated by the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) as a private, nonprofit research and testing laboratory. LBERI is an operating subsidiary of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Through September 30, 1996, ITRI was a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Lovelace for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a 'Single Program Laboratory' within the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. Work for DOE continues in the privatized ITRI facility under a Cooperative Agreement. At the time of publication, approximately 70% of the Institute's research is funded by DOE, and the remainder is funded by a variety of Federal agency, trade association, individual industry, and university customers. The principal mission of ITRI is to conduct basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the country's largest facility dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry

  15. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is a Government-owned facility leased and operated by the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) as a private, nonprofit research and testing laboratory. LBERI is an operating subsidiary of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Through September 30, 1996, ITRI was a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Lovelace for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a {open_quotes}Single Program Laboratory{close_quotes} within the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. Work for DOE continues in the privatized ITRI facility under a Cooperative Agreement. At the time of publication, approximately 70% of the Institute`s research is funded by DOE, and the remainder is funded by a variety of Federal agency, trade association, individual industry, and university customers. The principal mission of ITRI is to conduct basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the country`s largest facility dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry.

  16. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Neft, R.E.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Bradley, P.L.

    1995-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is to conduct basic and applied research to improve the understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the largest laboratory dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  17. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Hoover, M.D.; Neft, R.E.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is to conduct basic and applied research to improve the understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the largest laboratory dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Multivisceral transplantation in pigs: a model for research and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Ibrahim David

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present a model for research and training inmultivisceral transplantation in pigs. Methods: Eight LargeWhite pigs (four donors and four recipients were operated. Themultivisceral transplant with stomach, duodenum, pancreas,liver and intestine was performed similarly to transplantation inhumans with a few differences, described below. Anastomoseswere performed as follows: end-to-end from the supra-hepaticvena cava of the graft to the recipient juxta diaphragmatic venacava; end-to-end from the infra-hepatic vena cava of the graftto the inferior (suprarenal vena cava of the recipient; and endto-side patch of the aorta of the graft to the infrarenal aortaof the recipient plus digestive reconstruction. Results: Theperformance of the multivisceral transplantion was possible inall four animals. Reperfusions of the multivisceral graft led to asevere ischemia-reperfusion syndrome, despite flushing of thegraft. The animals presented with hypotension and the need forhigh doses of vasoactive drugs, and all of them were sacrificedafter discontinuing these drugs. Conclusion: Some alternativesto minimize the ischemia-reperfusion syndrome, such as the useof another vasoactive drug, use of a third pig merely for bloodtransfusion, presence of an anesthesia team in the operatingroom, and reduction of the graft, will be the next steps to enableexperimental studies.

  19. Reprint Library for Toxicology Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S. N.; Khan, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The Industrial Toxicology Research Center, Lucknow, India, maintains a register of toxicology and provides its research workers with current information mainly through its collection of reprints. (Author)

  20. Research advances on tissue-engineered corneal endothelial cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Jie Zhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the serious shortage of donor cornea materials and the donor limit, clinical popularization of penetrating keratoplasty is severely restricted. It is a hot spot of current research that applying tissue engineering in vitro to culture corneal endothelial cells(CECwith high density, regular hexagonal shape and healthy endothelial function. In this article, we reviewed the latest progress in the study of source of CEC seeder cells, selection of cultivating carries, type of CEC transplantation and immune mechanism that summarized the current research problems and made a prospect to the future.

  1. Ecotoxicity of silver nanomaterials in the aquatic environment: a review of literature and gaps in nano-toxicological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Chavon R; Pool, Edmund J; Somerset, Vernon S

    2014-01-01

    There has been extensive growth in nanoscale technology in the last few decades to such a degree that nanomaterials (NMs) have become a constituent in a wide range of commercial and domestic products. With NMs already in use in several consumer products, concerns have emerged regarding their potential adverse environmental impacts. Although research has been undertaken in order to minimise the gaps in our understanding of NMs in the environment, little is known about their bioavailability and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Nano-toxicology is defined as the study of the toxicity of nanomaterials. Nano-toxicology studies remain poorly and unevenly distributed. To date most of the research undertaken has been restricted to a narrow range of test species such as daphnids. Crabs are bio-indicators that can be used for toxicological research on NMs since they occupy a significant position in the aquatic food chain. In addition, they are often used in conventional ecotoxicological studies due to their high sensitivity to environmental stressors and are abundantly available. Because they are benthic organisms they are prone to contaminant uptake and bioaccumulation. To our knowledge the crab has never been used in nano-toxicological studies. In this context, an extensive review on published scientific literature on the ecotoxicity of silver NPs (AgNPs) on aquatic organisms was conducted. Some of the most common biomarkers used in ecotoxicological studies are described. Emphasis is placed on the use of biomarker responses in crabs as monitoring tools, as well as on its limitations. Additionally, the gaps in nano-toxicological research and recommendations for future research initiatives are addressed.

  2. Kaposi's sarcoma in organ transplant recipients. The Collaborative Transplantation Research Group of Ile de France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, D

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) is a tumour of multicentric origin with increased frequency after organ transplantation. To date, only North American data from the Cincinnati Transplant Tumor Registry have given some information about this disease in organ transplant recipients, but its true prevalence still has to be determined. In order to analyze Kaposi's sarcoma after kidney, liver and heart transplantation, we performed a retrospective study using the oldest registry of organ transplant recipients in Europe. Among all 7923 organ transplant recipients recorded in the Groupe Collaboratif de Recherche en Transplantation de l'Ile de France (GCIF) registry from 1968 to 1990, we analyzed the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Kaposi's sarcoma in 6229 kidney, 727 liver and 967 heart transplant recipients. In the subgroup of kidney transplant recipients, we assessed the role of cyclosporine on disease evolution. Overall prevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma after organ transplantation was 0.52%, but it was significantly higher among liver (1.24%) than among kidney (0.45%) and heart (0.41%) transplant recipients. Chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers were more frequent in liver than in kidney transplant recipients who developed Kaposi's sarcoma (66% vs 21%, p < 0.03). Following kidney transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma was more severe in patients receiving cyclosporine (n = 16) when compared with those under conventional immunosuppression (n = 12). True prevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma among European transplant recipients is high (0.52%) and appeared significantly higher in liver compared with other organ transplant recipients. Cyclosporine seems to increase severity of the disease among kidney transplant recipient.

  3. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A. (eds.)

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the nature and magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breathe. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them.

  4. Structured Development and Promotion of a Research Field: Hormesis in Biology, Toxicology, and Environmental Regulatory Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushak, Paul; Elliott, Kevin C

    2015-12-01

    The ability of powerful and well-funded interest groups to steer scientific research in ways that advance their goals has become a significant social concern. This steering ability is increasingly being recognized in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and in findings of deliberative scientific bodies. This paper provides a case study that illustrates some of the major strategies that can be used to structure and advance a controversial research field. It focuses on hormesis, described as a type of dose-response relationship in toxicology and biology showing low-dose stimulation but high-dose inhibition, or the reverse. Hormesis proponents tout its significance, arguing that substances toxic at high doses and beneficial at lower doses should be regulated less stringently. We identify five strategies employed by hormesis proponents to foster its acceptance: (1) creating institutions focused on supporting hormesis; (2) developing terminology, study designs, and data interpretations that cast it in a favorable light; (3) using bibliometric techniques and surveys to attract attention; (4) aggressively advocating for the phenomenon and challenging critics; and (5) working with outside interest groups to apply the hormesis phenomenon in the economic and political spheres. We also suggest a number of oversight strategies that can be implemented to help promote credible and socially responsible research in cases like this one.

  5. Using Domestic and Free-Ranging Arctic Canid Models for Environmental Molecular Toxicology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, John R; Bammler, Theo K; Farin, Federico M; Beyer, Richard P; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Dunlap, Kriya L; Knott, Katrina K; Ylitalo, Gina M; O'Hara, Todd M

    2016-02-16

    The use of sentinel species for population and ecosystem health assessments has been advocated as part of a One Health perspective. The Arctic is experiencing rapid change, including climate and environmental shifts, as well as increased resource development, which will alter exposure of biota to environmental agents of disease. Arctic canid species have wide geographic ranges and feeding ecologies and are often exposed to high concentrations of both terrestrial and marine-based contaminants. The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) has been used in biomedical research for a number of years and has been advocated as a sentinel for human health due to its proximity to humans and, in some instances, similar diet. Exploiting the potential of molecular tools for describing the toxicogenomics of Arctic canids is critical for their development as biomedical models as well as environmental sentinels. Here, we present three approaches analyzing toxicogenomics of Arctic contaminants in both domestic and free-ranging canids (Arctic fox, Vulpes lagopus). We describe a number of confounding variables that must be addressed when conducting toxicogenomics studies in canid and other mammalian models. The ability for canids to act as models for Arctic molecular toxicology research is unique and significant for advancing our understanding and expanding the tool box for assessing the changing landscape of environmental agents of disease in the Arctic.

  6. Animals and the 3Rs in toxicology research and testing: The way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, W S

    2015-12-01

    Despite efforts to eliminate the use of animals in testing and the availability of many accepted alternative methods, animals are still widely used for toxicological research and testing. While research using in vitro and computational models has dramatically increased in recent years, such efforts have not yet measurably impacted animal use for regulatory testing and are not likely to do so for many years or even decades. Until regulatory authorities have accepted test methods that can totally replace animals and these are fully implemented, large numbers of animals will continue to be used and many will continue to experience significant pain and distress. In order to positively impact the welfare of these animals, accepted alternatives must be implemented, and efforts must be directed at eliminating pain and distress and reducing animal numbers. Animal pain and distress can be reduced by earlier predictive humane endpoints, pain-relieving medications, and supportive clinical care, while sequential testing and routine use of integrated testing and decision strategies can reduce animal numbers. Applying advances in science and technology to the development of scientifically sound alternative testing models and strategies can improve animal welfare and further reduce and replace animal use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ''root causes'' for implementing corrective actions

  8. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  9. National Toxicology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at NTP Study Types Nominations to the Testing Program Study Results & Research Projects Areas of Research Data & ... on for decisions that matter. The National Toxicology Program provides the scientific basis for programs, activities, and ...

  10. American College of Medical Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toxicology Course Registration/Survey/Conditions Committee Members Technology Media Forum Case Notes Links Toxicology Treatment Centers Choosing ... ASM) - Agenda Satellite Session I: Epidemic of Addiction Satellite Session II: Zika Toxicology for Medical Students & Residents FIT Research ... Module 6-7: Psychological Consequences of Mass Exposure and Risk Communication Module 8: Neurotoxins Module 9: Water, Food, and ...

  11. Sex and gender considerations in transplantation research: protocol for a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprise, Claudie; Sridhar, Vikas Srinivasan; West, Lori; Foster, Bethany; Pilote, Louise; Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth

    2017-09-08

    Despite the growing appreciation of the importance of sex and gender considerations in transplantation research, there is currently no framework or good practice guidelines for the appropriate handling of sex and gender issues in human allotransplantation research. We will conduct a scoping review to synthesize the evidence on how matters of sex and gender have been handled in human allotransplantation research. We will survey the literature discussing sex and gender in relation to transplantation, including adult and pediatric patients, hematopoietic and solid organ transplant recipients as well as organ donors. We will search MEDLINE and Embase for literature discussing sex and gender in relation to transplantation. Two reviewers will independently evaluate the eligibility of all identified titles and abstracts for inclusion in the full text review, as well as data extraction. Descriptive data and information on how sex and gender have been considered in human transplantation research will be reported. This scoping review will be an important stepping stone towards the development of good practice guidelines on study design and analysis considerations when handling sex and gender issues in human transplantation research. This scoping review can also help identify methodological issues that restrict the translation of transplantation research findings into clinical practice related to underestimation of sex/gender differences. This review will ultimately identify major gaps, inform donor-recipient selection, guide personalized interventions, and prioritize research recommendations in human transplantation research.

  12. Design and Implementation of the International Genetics and Translational Research in Transplantation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Genetic association studies of transplantation outcomes have been hampered by small samples and highly complex multifactorial phenotypes, hindering investigations of the genetic architecture of a range of comorbidities which significantly impact graft and recipient life expectancy. We describe here the rationale and design of the International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network. The network comprises 22 studies to date, including 16494 transplant recipients and 11669 donors, of whom more than 5000 are of non-European ancestry, all of whom have existing genomewide genotype data sets. We describe the rich genetic and phenotypic information available in this consortium comprising heart, kidney, liver, and lung transplant cohorts. We demonstrate significant power in International Genetics & Translational Research in Transplantation Network to detect main effect association signals across regions such as the MHC region as well as genomewide for transplant outcomes that span all solid organs, such as graft survival, acute rejection, new onset of diabetes after transplantation, and for delayed graft function in kidney only. This consortium is designed and statistically powered to deliver pioneering insights into the genetic architecture of transplant-related outcomes across a range of different solid-organ transplant studies. The study design allows a spectrum of analyses to be performed including recipient-only analyses, donor-recipient HLA mismatches with focus on loss-of-function variants and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms.

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationships and ecological risk assessment: an overview of predictive aquatic toxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, S P

    1995-09-01

    In the field of aquatic toxicology, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have developed as scientifically credible tools for predicting the toxicity of chemicals when little or no empirical data are available. A fundamental understanding of toxicological principles has been considered an important component to the acceptance and application of QSAR approaches as biologically relevant in ecological risk assessments. As a consequence, there has been an evolution of QSAR development and application from that of a chemical-class perspective to one that is more consistent with assumptions regarding modes of toxic action. In this review, techniques to assess modes of toxic action from chemical structure are discussed, with consideration that toxicodynamic knowledge bases must be clearly defined with regard to exposure regimes, biological models/endpoints and compounds that adequately span the diversity of chemicals anticipated for future applications. With such knowledge bases, classification systems, including rule-based expert systems, have been established for use in predictive aquatic toxicology applications. The establishment of QSAR techniques that are based on an understanding of toxic mechanisms is needed to provide a link to physiologically based toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models, which can provide the means to extrapolate adverse effects across species and exposure regimes.

  14. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Axel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational and environmental health. The complexity of modern industrial processes has dramatically changed over the past years and today's areas include effects of atmospheric pollution, carcinogenesis, biological monitoring, ergonomics, epidemiology, product safety and health promotion. We hope that the launch of the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology will aid in the advance of these important areas of research bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings.

  15. Research Priorities in Environmental Risk Assessment. Workshop on Research Needs in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Held in Breckenridge, Colorado on August 16-21, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-30

    management and computerized information-processing capabilities needed for risk assessment is also essential. Aquatic Toxicology In order to quantify and...ASSESSM ENT M ETHODOLOGY ............................................. 21 5.2 AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY .............. ..... .......... ........................ 21...including risk assess- ment methodology, aquatic toxicology , terrestrial toxicology, and chemistry, fate, and modeling. Risk assessment methodology primarily

  16. A Comprehensive Review of Punica granatum (Pomegranate) Properties in Toxicological, Pharmacological, Cellular and Molecular Biology Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Arastoo, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Punica granatum (Pg), commonly known as pomegranate (Pg), is a member of the monogeneric family, Punicaceae, and is mainly found in Iran which is considered to be its primary centre of origin. Pg and its chemical components possess various pharmacological and toxicological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory (by inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines), anti-cancer and anti-angiogenesis activities. They also show inhibitory effects on invasion/motility, cell cycle, apoptosis, and vital enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX), lipooxygenase (LOX), cytochrome P450 (CYP450), phospholipase A2 (PLA2), ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), carbonic anhydrase (CA), 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSDs) and serine protease (SP). Furthermore, they can stimulate cell differentiation and possess anti-mutagenic effects. Pg can also interfere with several signaling pathways including PI3K/AKT, mTOR, PI3K, Bcl-X, Bax, Bad, MAPK, ERK1/2, P38, JNK, and caspase. However, the exact mechanisms for its pharmacological and toxicological properties remain to be unclear and need further evaluation. These properties strongly suggest a wide range use of Pg for clinical applications. This review will discuss the areas for which Pg has shown therapeutic properties in different mechanisms. PMID:24250463

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Activity in Pediatric Cancer between 2008 and 2014 in the United States: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Pooja; Millard, Heather R; Thiel, Elizabeth; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Abraham, Allistair A; Auletta, Jeffery J; Boulad, Farid; Brown, Valerie I; Camitta, Bruce M; Chan, Ka Wah; Chaudhury, Sonali; Cowan, Morton J; Angel-Diaz, Miguel; Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory; Kasow, Kimberly A; Keating, Amy K; Kitko, Carrie L; MacMillan, Margaret L; Olsson, Richard F; Page, Kristin M; Seber, Adriana; Smith, Angela R; Warwick, Anne B; Wirk, Baldeep; Mehta, Parinda A

    2017-08-01

    This Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research report describes the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in pediatric patients with cancer, 4408 undergoing allogeneic (allo) and3076 undergoing autologous (auto) HSCT in the United States between 2008 and 2014. In both settings, there was a greater proportion of boys (n = 4327; 57%), children reports of transplant practices in the United States. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Review and analysis of transplant biological research projects funded by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weihua; Sun, Ruijuan; Dong, Erdan

    2015-08-01

    To study the funding and achievements in the field of organ transplantation support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC). A search of NSFC database was made by using the key word "transplantation" and excluding "bone marrow transplantation" for the projects funded between 1988 and 2013. SCI indexed publications that marked with NSFC project number were collected by searching each grant number in the database of the Web of Science. Six hundreds fifty-five projects were identified and received about 220 million yuan in grant funding. These funded research projects were distributed among 25 provinces and autonomous regions, however, which were mainly in the developed coastal areas; of them, 43 (6.56%) projects were granted in xenotransplantation and 17 projects (2.60%) were funded in the field of traditional Chinese medicine-related organ transplantation; Transplantation on blood vessels, heart, kidney, liver, lung, small intestine, pancreatic, cornea, trachea, skin, etc. were primarily performed in research. Nine hundreds and sixty-one SCI-indexed publications were achieved. Magnitude and intensity of NSFC funding, output of SCI publications have been increasing, suggesting that NSFC positively promotes the development of organ transplantation. Although a great progress of transplantation has been made, basic and translational studies should be vigorously strengthened.

  19. Issues in solid-organ transplantation in children: translational research from bench to bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipshultz, Steven E.; Chandar, Jayanthi J.; Rusconi, Paolo G.; Fornoni, Alessia; Abitbol, Carolyn L.; Burke III, George W.; Zilleruelo, Gaston E.; Pham, Si M.; Perez, Elena E.; Karnik, Ruchika; Hunter, Juanita A.; Dauphin, Danielle D.; Wilkinson, James D.

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we identify important challenges facing physicians responsible for renal and cardiac transplantation in children based on a review of the contemporary medical literature. Regarding pediatric renal transplantation, we discuss the challenge of antibody-mediated rejection, focusing on both acute and chronic antibody-mediated rejection. We review new diagnostic approaches to antibody-mediated rejection, such as panel-reactive antibodies, donor-specific cross-matching, antibody assays, risk assessment and diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection, the pathology of antibody-mediated rejection, the issue of ABO incompatibility in renal transplantation, new therapies for antibody-mediated rejection, inhibiting of residual antibodies, the suppression or depletion of B-cells, genetic approaches to treating acute antibody-mediated rejection, and identifying future translational research directions in kidney transplantation in children. Regarding pediatric cardiac transplantation, we discuss the mechanisms of cardiac transplant rejection, including the role of endomyocardial biopsy in detecting graft rejection and the role of biomarkers in detecting cardiac graft rejection, including biomarkers of inflammation, cardiomyocyte injury, or stress. We review cardiac allograft vasculopathy. We also address the role of genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies, gene expression profiling using entities such as AlloMap®, and adenosine triphosphate release as a measure of immune function using the Cylex® ImmuKnow™ cell function assay. Finally, we identify future translational research directions in heart transplantation in children. PMID:24860861

  20. Toxicology screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the type and approximate amount of legal and illegal drugs a person has taken. How the Test is ... prescription medicines that have not been prescribed, and illegal drugs have not been detected. A blood toxicology screen ...

  1. Discarded human fetal tissue and cell cultures for transplantation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, R.J.; Phillips, T.; Thompson, A.; Vilner, L.; Cleland, M.; Tchaw-ren Chen; Zabrenetzky, V.

    1999-01-01

    A feasibility study has been performed to explore the utility of various tissues from discarded human abortuses for transplantation and related research. Specifically, aborted fetuses plus parental blood samples and all relevant clinical data were obtained through a local hospital complex. Whenever possible, pancreas, skin and skeletal muscle, heart, liver, kidney, cartilage and lung tissues were removed, dissociated and subfractionated for cryopreservation, characterization and cultivation trials in vitro. Existing protocols for these manipulations were compared and improved upon as required. Clonal culture, cell aggregate maintenance techniques and use of feeder cell populations have been utilized where appropriate to develop quantitative comparative data. Histological and biochemical assays were applied both to evaluate separation/cultivation methods and to identify optimal culture conditions for maintaining functional cells. Immunochemical and molecular biological procedures were applied to study expression of Major Histocompatibility Vomplex (MHC) class 1 and 11 molecules on cell lines derived. Tissue and cell culture populations were examined for infections with bacteria, ftingi, mycoplasma, HIV, CMV, hepatitis B and other viruses. Only 1% of the abortuses tested were virally infected. Cytogenetic analyses confin-ned the normal diploid status in the vast majority (>98%) of lines tested. A total of over 250 abortuses have been obtained and processed. Only 25 were found to be contaminated with bacteria or fungi and unsuitable for further cultivation trials. A total of over 200 cell populations were isolated, characterized and cryopreserved for further study. Included were kidney, lung, liver and epidermal epithelia: cartilage-derived cells from the spine and epiphyses plus myogenic myoblasts. Selected lines have been immortalized using HPV I 6E6/E7 sequences. Epithelia from the liver and pancreas and cardiac myocytes were the most problematic in that initial

  2. Solid Organ Transplantation in Older Adults: Current Status and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecassis, M.; Bridges, N.D.; Clancy, C.J.; Dew, M.A.; Eldadah, B.; Englesbe, M.J.; Flessner, M.F.; Frank, J.C.; Friedewald, J.; Gill, J; Gries, C.; Halter, J.B.; Hartmann, E.L.; Hazzard, W.R.; Horne, F.M.; Hosenpud, J.; Jacobson, P.; Kasiske, B.L.; Lake, J.; Loomba, R.; Malani, P.N.; Moore, T.M.; Murray, A.; Nguyen, M-H; Powe, N.R.; Reese, P.P.; Reynolds, H.; Samaniego, M.D.; Schmader, K.E.; Segev, D.L.; Shah, A.S.; Singer, L.G.; Sosa, J.A.; Stewart, Z.A.; Tan, J.C.; Williams, W.W.; Zaas, D.W.; High, K.P.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of patients older than 65 years are referred for and have access to organ transplantation, and an increasing number of older adults are donating organs. Although short-term outcomes are similar in older versus younger transplant recipients, older donor or recipient age is associated with inferior long-term outcomes. However, age is often a proxy for other factors that might predict poor outcomes more strongly and better identify patients at risk for adverse events. Approaches to transplantation in older adults vary across programs, but despite recent gains in access and the increased use of marginal organs, older patients remain less likely than other groups to receive a transplant, and those who do are highly selected. Moreover, few studies have addressed geriatric issues in transplant patient selection or management, or the implications on health span and disability when patients age to late life with a transplanted organ. This paper summarizes a recent trans-disciplinary workshop held by ASP, in collaboration with NHLBI, NIA, NIAID, NIDDK, and AGS, to address issues related to kidney, liver, lung, or heart transplantation in older adults and to propose a research agenda in these areas. PMID:22958872

  3. A bibliometric analysis of research productivity of Malaysian publications in leading toxicology journals during a 10-year period (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyoud, Sh; Al-Jabi, Sw; Sweileh, Wm; Awang, R

    2014-12-01

    Toxicology in Malaysia has experienced rapid development and made great progress in education and research in conjunction with economic development in Malaysia over the past two decades. The main objectives of this study were to analyse the research originating from Malaysia and published in toxicology journals and to examine the authorship pattern and the citations retrieved from the Scopus database. Data from 1 January 2003 till 31 December 2012 were searched for documents with specific words in the toxicology field as a 'source title' and Malaysia as an affiliation country. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology we developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analysing: (a) total and trends of contributions in toxicology fields between 2003 and 2012; (b) Malaysian authorship pattern and productivity; (c) collaboration patterns; (d) journals in which Malaysian researchers publish; (e) the classification of journals to Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) or non-ISI; (f) impact factors (IFs) of all publications; and (g) citations received by the publications. In total, 290 documents were retrieved from 55 international peer-reviewed toxicology journals. The quantity of publication increased by around 10-fold from 2003 to 2012. The h-index of the retrieved documents was 20. Of the 55 journal titles, 42 (76.4%) have their IF listed in the journal citation reports 2012. Forty-two documents (14.5%) were published in journals that had no official IF. The total number of citations, at the time of manuscript writing (5 August 2013), was 1707, with a median (interquartile range) of 3 (0-7). Malaysia collaborated mostly with countries in the Asia-Pacific regions (18.3%), especially India and Japan, followed by the Middle East and Africa (10.0%), especially Palestine and Yemen. The present data show a promising rise and a good start for toxicology research activity in Malaysia. The sharing of relevant research questions by developed and

  4. SEURAT: Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing--recommendations for future research in the field of predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daston, George; Knight, Derek J; Schwarz, Michael; Gocht, Tilman; Thomas, Russell S; Mahony, Catherine; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    The development of non-animal methodology to evaluate the potential for a chemical to cause systemic toxicity is one of the grand challenges of modern science. The European research programme SEURAT is active in this field and will conclude its first phase, SEURAT-1, in December 2015. Drawing on the experience gained in SEURAT-1 and appreciating international advancement in both basic and regulatory science, we reflect here on how SEURAT should evolve and propose that further research and development should be directed along two complementary and interconnecting work streams. The first work stream would focus on developing new 'paradigm' approaches for regulatory science. The goal here is the identification of 'critical biological targets' relevant for toxicity and to test their suitability to be used as anchors for predicting toxicity. The second work stream would focus on integration and application of new approach methods for hazard (and risk) assessment within the current regulatory 'paradigm', aiming for acceptance of animal-free testing strategies by regulatory authorities (i.e. translating scientific achievements into regulation). Components for both work streams are discussed and may provide a structure for a future research programme in the field of predictive toxicology.

  5. Science: Aquatic Toxicology Matures, Gains Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagani, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Reviews recent advances in aquatic toxicology, whose major goal is to protect diverse aquatic organisms and whole ecological communities from the dire effects of man-made chemicals. Current legislation is reviewed. Differences in mammalian and aquatic toxicology are listed, and examples of research in aquatic toxicology are discussed. (CS)

  6. National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: The Research Methodology and Study Design Working Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Bronwen E; Hahn, Theresa; Martin, Paul J; Mitchell, Sandra A; Petersdorf, Effie W; Armstrong, Gregory T; Shelburne, Nonniekaye; Storer, Barry E; Bhatia, Smita

    2017-01-01

    The increasing numbers of hematopoietic cell transplantations (HCTs) performed each year, the changing demographics of HCT recipients, the introduction of new transplantation strategies, incremental improvement in survival, and the growing population of HCT survivors demand a comprehensive approach to examining the health and well-being of patients throughout life after HCT. This report summarizes strategies for the conduct of research on late effects after transplantation, including consideration of the study design and analytic approaches; methodologic challenges in handling complex phenotype data; an appreciation of the changing trends in the practice of transplantation; and the availability of biospecimens to support laboratory-based research. It is hoped that these concepts will promote continued research and facilitate the development of new approaches to address fundamental questions in transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Defining Priorities for Future Research: Results of the UK Kidney Transplant Priority Setting Partnership.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon R Knight

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the research priorities of those funding and performing research in transplantation may differ from those of end service users such as patients, carers and healthcare professionals involved in day-to-day care. The Kidney Transplant Priority Setting Partnership (PSP was established with the aim of involving all stakeholders in prioritising future research in the field.The PSP methodology is as outlined by the James Lind Alliance. An initial survey collected unanswered research questions from patients, carers and clinicians. Duplicate and out-of-scope topics were excluded and the existing literature searched to identify topics answered by current evidence. An interim prioritisation survey asked patients and professionals to score the importance of the remaining questions to create a ranked long-list. These were considered at a final consensus workshop using a modified nominal group technique to agree a final top ten.The initial survey identified 497 questions from 183 respondents, covering all aspects of transplantation from assessment through to long-term follow-up. These were grouped into 90 unanswered "indicative" questions. The interim prioritisation survey received 256 responses (34.8% patients/carers, 10.9% donors and 54.3% professionals, resulting in a ranked list of 25 questions that were considered during the final workshop. Participants agreed a top ten priorities for future research that included optimisation of immunosuppression (improved monitoring, choice of regimen, personalisation, prevention of sensitisation and transplanting the sensitised patient, management of antibody-mediated rejection, long-term risks to live donors, methods of organ preservation, induction of tolerance and bioengineering of organs. There was evidence that patient and carer involvement had a significant impact on shaping the final priorities.The final list of priorities relates to all stages of the transplant process, including

  8. Sex and gender considerations in transplantation research: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Laprise, Claudie; Sridhar, Vikas Srinivasan; West, Lori; Foster, Bethany; Pilote, Louise; Sapir-Pichhadze, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite the growing appreciation of the importance of sex and gender considerations in transplantation research, there is currently no framework or good practice guidelines for the appropriate handling of sex and gender issues in human allotransplantation research. Methods We will conduct a scoping review to synthesize the evidence on how matters of sex and gender have been handled in human allotransplantation research. We will survey the literature discussing sex and gender in rel...

  9. Future issues in transplantation ethics: ethical and legal controversies in xenotransplantation, stem cell, and cloning research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Robyn S

    2008-07-01

    With little prospect of developing a sufficient supply of human transplantable organs to meet the large and growing demand, attention has turned to xenotransplantation, as well as stem cell and cloning research, as possible approaches for alleviating this allograft shortage. This article explores ethical and legal issues that surround developments in these fields.

  10. Donor research and matching system based on data mining in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncugil, Ali Serhan; Ozgulbas, Nermin

    2010-06-01

    It is very important to identify the appropriate donor in organ transplantation under the time constraint. Clearly, adequate time must be spent in appropriate donor research in that kind of vital operation. On the other hand, time is very important to search for other alternatives in case of inappropriate donor. However, the possibility for determining the most probable donors as fast as possible has an great importance in using time efficiently. From this point view, the main objective of this paper is developing a system which provides probabilistic prior information in donor transplantation via data mining. While the sytem development process, the basic element is the data of successful organ transplantations. Then, the hidden information and patterns will be discovered from this data. Therefore, this process requires the data mining methods from its definition. In this study, an appropriate donor detection system design based on data mining is suggested.

  11. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Medinsky, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    The report describes research in the following areas: (1) aerosol generation and characterization; (2) deposition and fate of inhaled materials; (3) dose-response relationships for inhaled radionuclides; (4) dose-response relationships for inhaled chemical toxicants; and (5) biological factors that influence dose-response relationships. Project descriptions have been individually entered into the date base

  12. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy.

  13. Strengthening protections for human subjects: proposed restrictions on the publication of transplant research involving prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valapour, Maryam; Paulson, Kristin M; Hilde, Alisha

    2013-04-01

    Publication is one of the primary rewards in the academic research community and is the first step in the dissemination of a new discovery that could lead to recognition and opportunity. Because of this, the publication of research can serve as a tacit endorsement of the methodology behind the science. This becomes a problem when vulnerable populations that are incapable of giving legitimate informed consent, such as prisoners, are used in research. The problem is especially critical in the field of transplant research, in which unverified consent can enable research that exploits the vulnerabilities of prisoners, especially those awaiting execution. Because the doctrine of informed consent is central to the protection of vulnerable populations, we have performed a historical analysis of the standards of informed consent in codes of international human subject protections to form the foundation for our limit and ban recommendations: (1) limit the publication of transplant research involving prisoners in general and (2) ban the publication of transplant research involving executed prisoners in particular. Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Application of metabonomic analytical techniques in the modernization and toxicology research of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Yong-Min; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Yan, Lu

    2009-08-01

    In the recent years, a wide range of metabonomic analytical techniques are widely used in the modern research of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). At the same time, the international community has attached increasing importance to TCM toxicity problems. Thus, many studies have been implemented to investigate the toxicity mechanisms of TCM. Among these studies, many metabonomic-based methods have been implemented to facilitate TCM toxicity investigation. At present, the most prevailing methods for TCM toxicity research are mainly single analysis techniques using only one analytical means. These techniques include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), etc.; with these techniques, some favourable outcomes have been gained in the toxic reaction studies of TCM, such as the action target organs assay, the establishment of action pattern, the elucidation of action mechanism and the exploration of action material foundation. However, every analytical technique has its advantages and drawbacks, no existing analytical technique can be versatile. Multi-analysed techniques can partially overcome the shortcomings of single-analysed techniques. Combination of GC-MS and LC-MS metabolic profiling approaches has unravelled the pathological outcomes of aristolochic acid-induced nephrotoxicity, which can not be achieved by single-analysed techniques. It is believed that with the further development of metabonomic analytical techniques, especially multi-analysed techniques, metabonomics will greatly promote TCM toxicity research and be beneficial to the modernization of TCM in terms of extending the application of modern means in the TCM safety assessment, assisting the formulation of TCM safety norms and establishing the international standards indicators.

  15. Deceased Donor Intervention Research: A Survey of Transplant Surgeons, Organ Procurement Professionals, and Institutional Review Board Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, J R; Feng, S; Johansson, A C; Glazier, A K; Abt, P L

    2016-01-01

    Innovative deceased donor intervention strategies have the potential to increase the number and quality of transplantable organs. Yet there is confusion over regulatory and legal requirements, as well as ethical considerations. We surveyed transplant surgeons (n = 294), organ procurement organization (OPO) professionals (n = 83), and institutional review board (IRB) members (n = 317) and found wide variations in their perceptions about research classification, risk assessment for donors and organ transplant recipients, regulatory oversight requirements, and informed consent in the context of deceased donor intervention research. For instance, when presented with different research scenarios, IRB members were more likely than transplant surgeons and OPO professionals to feel that study review and oversight were necessary by the IRBs at the investigator, donor, and transplant center hospitals. Survey findings underscore the need to clarify ethical, legal, and regulatory requirements and their application to deceased donor intervention research to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery and facilitate more transplants. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Human engineered heart tissue as a versatile tool in basic research and preclinical toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Schaaf

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC progenies hold great promise as surrogates for human primary cells, particularly if the latter are not available as in the case of cardiomyocytes. However, high content experimental platforms are lacking that allow the function of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to be studied under relatively physiological and standardized conditions. Here we describe a simple and robust protocol for the generation of fibrin-based human engineered heart tissue (hEHT in a 24-well format using an unselected population of differentiated human embryonic stem cells containing 30-40% α-actinin-positive cardiac myocytes. Human EHTs started to show coherent contractions 5-10 days after casting, reached regular (mean 0.5 Hz and strong (mean 100 µN contractions for up to 8 weeks. They displayed a dense network of longitudinally oriented, interconnected and cross-striated cardiomyocytes. Spontaneous hEHT contractions were analyzed by automated video-optical recording and showed chronotropic responses to calcium and the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline. The proarrhythmic compounds E-4031, quinidine, procainamide, cisapride, and sertindole exerted robust, concentration-dependent and reversible decreases in relaxation velocity and irregular beating at concentrations that recapitulate findings in hERG channel assays. In conclusion this study establishes hEHT as a simple in vitro model for heart research.

  17. KFK Institute of Genetics and of Toxicology of Fission Materials. 1990 annual report on research and development work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The annual report summarizes the R+D activities of the Institute performed in the year 1990 in accordance with the Institute's R+D framework. The activities cover studies on gene repair, gene regulation, biological carcinogenesis, molecular genetics of enkaryontic genes, genetic mouse models for the study of human disease, radiotoxicology of the actinides, cellular inhalation toxicology, cellular and molecular toxicology, fractionation and speciation of actinides in vivo. There is a bibliography of publications issued by members of the Institute in 1990 and of the IGT primary reports issued in 1989 and 1990, and a list of lectures held but not available in printed form. (VHE) [de

  18. Alcohols toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  19. Verification Survey of Rooms 113, 114, and 208 of the Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkus, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory (ITL) has conducted research for the U.S. Department Energy (DOE) for a number of years. The facility began operations in 1960 as a biomedical research facility under a prime contract to DOE by the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI). The facility changed over to private research in 1996. In conjunction with the changeover to 100% commercial work, numerous laboratories at the LRRI have been undergoing remedial activities to decontaminate or otherwise address contamination that resulted from DOE-funded research. These decontamination activities have been taking place over the past ten years as part of the DOE's Environmental Management (EM) project. The LRRI has prepared a transition plan that discusses the radionuclides used in their research and provides a cross reference of radionuclide usage within individual laboratories at the LRRI (LRRI 2008a). A number of the listed isotopes have short half-lives ranging from hours to less than one year. Therefore, dependent upon the time elapsed since their use, these short-lived radionuclides may or may not contribute to any contamination currently present on surfaces. Multiple radionuclides may have been used within a given laboratory. However, LRRI has indicated in their transition plan that laboratories were decontaminated prior to beginning the next study (LRRI 2008a). In conjunction with the changeover of the ITL to commercial work, DOE requested that LRRI submit the aforementioned transition plan for DOE's review and approval. The LRRI transition plan cover letter states that residual contamination may remain from prior research activities, yet LRRI will assume liability and incorporate residual contamination within their NRC license that the commercial work will be operated under. The most notable residual contamination is that which remains in sewer lines and ductwork. The ITL has committed to evaluating the radiological conditions of those laboratories impacted by

  20. Animal toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdur, M.

    1996-12-31

    The chapter evaluates results of toxicological studies on experimental animals to investigate health effects of air pollutants and examines the animal data have predicted the response to human subject. Data are presented on the comparative toxicity of sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid. The animal data obtained by measurement of airway resistance in guinea pigs and of bronchial clearance of particles in donkeys predicted clearly that sulfuric acid was more irritant than sulfur dioxide. Data obtained on human subjects confirmed this prediction. These acute studies also correctly predicted the comparative toxicity of the two compounds in two year studies of monkeys. Such chronic studies are not possible in human subjects but it is a reasonable to assume that sulfuric acid would be more toxic than sulfur dioxide. Current findings in epidemiological studies certainly support this assumption.

  1. [Yes to research, no to utilization? Medical, pharmacological and toxicological utilization of human embryonic stem cells from an ethical point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, H

    2008-09-01

    In exceptional cases, the German Stem Cell Act allows research on human embryonic stem cells. However, it does not allow the implementation of the research results if this in turn requires the use of further embryonic stem cell lines. It has, in the meantime, transpired that such research results could be of concrete use. Thus, in the distant future, it could be used in the clinical treatment of patients. Already in the nearer future the use of human embryonic stem cell lines can be envisaged for both the development and testing of medicines as well as in the field of toxicology. To this end, research concerning embryo toxicity and neurotoxicity is ground-breaking. The toxicological and pharmacological use of human embryonic stem cell lines should serve the protection of human health as well as the safe and reliable use of medicines. In addition, animal experiments could be reduced, which is desirable from a point of view of animal protection ethics. Since research on human embryonic stem cell lines is actually permitted in Germany, the use of the respective research results should be allowed all the more. This follows from the basic human right to health protection and health care. Legal ambiguities, which still exist in this respect, should be removed.

  2. The role of marketing research in securing a certificate of need for a new renal transplant facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, L R; Laric, M V; McCann, D

    1991-06-01

    The authors describe how a negative Certificate of Need decision on the establishment of a new renal transplantation center was reversed by the reintroduction of arguments based on primary data. Specifically, a research project was undertaken to survey attitudes of past and potential patients toward using the new facility. In addition to overturning the negative decision, the data gathered were of significant value to hospital and transplantation facility administrators.

  3. Using non-human primates to benefit humans: research and organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Emerging biotechnology may soon allow the creation of genetically human organs inside animals, with non-human primates (henceforth simply "primates") and pigs being the best candidate species. This prospect raises the question of whether creating organs in primates in order to then transplant them into humans would be more (or less) acceptable than using them for research. In this paper, we examine the validity of the purported moral distinction between primates and other animals, and analyze the ethical acceptability of using primates to create organs for human use.

  4. Applications of Proteomic Technologies to Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of gene expression at the protein level. This cutting edge technology has been extensively applied to toxicology research recently. The up-to-date development of proteomics has presented the toxicology community with an unprecedented opportunit...

  5. Handbook of systems toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casciano, Daniel A; Sahu, Saura C

    2011-01-01

    "In the first handbook to comprehensively cover the emerging area of systems toxicology, the Handbook of Systems Toxicology provides an authoritative compilation of up-to-date developments presented...

  6. A 6-YEAR EXPERIENCE OF HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN FEDERAL ALMAZOV NORTH-WEST MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shlyakhto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the results of 6-year experience of heart transplantation (HT in Federal Almazov North-West Medical Research Centre. Methods. From 2010 to 2015 we have performed 65 HT. Mean age was 44.3 ± 14 years old (from 10 to 64 years old. We used biventricular assist device (BIVAD, Berlin Heart Excor support in 7 heart transplant candidates before HT. 19 patients (29% received thymoglobulin, whereas 46 patients (71% had basiliximab to induce immunosuppression.Results. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation machines were implanted in 5 patients (7.7% after HT due to acute right ventricular failure. Suture annuloplasty (the Batista procedure for tricuspid valve repair was carried out in 3 cases (4.6%. Venovenous hemodiafi ltration was used in 11 patients (16.9%. A total of 598 endomyocardial biopsies (EMB were performed after HT. Evidence of cellular rejection (R1 and R2 was presented in 286 biopsies (48%. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. The 6-month survival rate after HT was 92%, 1-year – 91% and overall survival for the 6-year period of observation – 89.2%. Maximum observation period was 71 months.Conclusions. The 6-year experience of HT in our Center has shown a high level of survival. BIVAD Excor support can be effectively used as a «bridge» to HT. Prevention of graft loss due to acute rejection in heart transplant recipients can be achieved only through regular EMB monitoring. The rate of viral infection increased in 2 months after HT.

  7. Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here for a deeper conversation on this topic led by Hastings Director of Research Josephine Johnston. Sorry, ... accept people without insurance. Transplant teams rarely consider anyone over 75 years of age. Some centers exclude ...

  8. Toxicological profile for radium. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The ATSDR Toxicological Profile for Radium is intended to characterize succinctly the toxicological and health effects information for the substance. It identifies and reviews the key literature that describes the substances' toxicological properties. Other literature is presented but described in less detail. The profile is not intended to be an exhaustive document; however, more comprehensive sources of specialty information are referenced. The profile begins with a public health statement, which describes in nontechnical language the substance's relevant toxicological properties. Following the statement is material that presents levels of significant human exposure and, where known, significant health effects. The adequacy of information to determine the substance's health effects is described. Research gaps in nontoxic and health effects information are described. Research gaps that are of significance to the protection of public health will be identified in a separate effort. The focus of the document is on health and toxicological information

  9. Toxicological profile for plutonium. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    The ATSDR Toxicological Profile for Plutonium is intended to characterize succinctly the toxicological and health effects information for the substance. It identifies and reviews the key literature that describes the substance's toxicological properties. Other literature is presented but described in less detail. The profile is not intended to be an exhaustive document; however, more comprehensive sources of specialty information are referenced. The profile begins with a public health statement, which describes in nontechnical language the substance's relevant toxicological properties. Following the statement is material that presents levels of significant human exposure and, where known, significant health effects. The adequacy of information to determine the substance's health effects is described. Research gaps in nontoxic and health effects information are described. Research gaps that are of significance to the protection of public health will be identified in a separate effort. The focus of the document is on health and toxicological information

  10. Bone marrow transplantation for research and regenerative therapies in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, David; Alonso, José Ramón; Weruaga, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stem cells are probably the best known stem cell type and have been employed for more than 50 years, especially in pathologies related to the hematopoietic and immune systems. However, their potential for therapeutic application is much broader (because these cells can differentiate into hepatocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes, pneumocytes or neural cells, among others), and they can also presumably be employed to palliate neural diseases. Current research addressing the integration of bone marrow -derived cells in the neural circuits of the central nervous system together with their features and applications are hotspots in current Neurobiology. Nevertheless, as in other leading research lines the efficacy and possibilities of their therapeutic application depend on the technical procedures employed, which are still far from being standardized. In this chapter we shall explain one of these procedures in depth, namely the transplantation of whole bone marrow from harvested bone marrow stem cells for subsequent integration into the encephalon.

  11. Surprises and omissions in toxicology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rašková, H.; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2004), S94-S96 ISSN 1210-7778. [Inderdisciplinary Czech-Slovak Toxicological Conference /8./. Praha, 03.09.2004-05.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : bacterial toxins Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  12. Information resources in toxicology--Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preziosi, Paolo; Dracos, Adriana; Marcello, Ida

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of current resources in the field of toxicology in Italy. The discussion will begin with a brief history of toxicology in this country, which includes the study of the toxicity of plants and other natural substances, and the birth of industrial and forensic toxicology. We will also provide information on research, education, and hazard control in the field of toxicology. Within this context we will examine the public bodies responsible for surveillance and regulatory activities, state-owned and private structures involved in toxicological research, and the educational programs and research activities of universities. Particular emphasis will be placed on the activities of the National Health Service, which plays an important role in areas such as clinical toxicology, food safety, and animal health, as well as those of national and regional agencies dedicated to the protection of the environment. The presentation will be organized as follows: - A Brief History of Toxicology in Italy; - Professional Societies; - National Health Service; - National Bodies; - Resources for the Environment; - Biomedical Websites; - Recent Publications; - Research Structures; - Graduate and Postgraduate Programs; - Legislation

  13. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allow radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that models are needed that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  14. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.; Ullrich, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allows radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that we need models that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  15. Phytochemical, Toxicological and Pharmacological Studies of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-01-23

    Jan 23, 2015 ... Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Metabolic Diseases Research Laboratory, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee. University, Seoul ...... Stuppner H, Ganzera M. Determination of safrole in different Asarum species by headspace gas chromatography. Chromatographia 1998; 47: 685-. 688. 18.

  16. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology is a comprehensive and authoritative resource providing the latest literature enriched with relevant references describing every aspect of this area of science...

  17. Integrative Systems Biology Applied to Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning

    associated with combined exposure to multiple chemicals. Testing all possible combinations of the tens of thousands environmental chemicals is impractical. This PhD project was launched to apply existing computational systems biology methods to toxicological research. In this thesis, I present in three...... projects three different approaches to using computational toxicology to aid classical toxicological investigations. In project I, we predicted human health effects of five pesticides using publicly available data. We obtained a grouping of the chemical according to their potential human health effects...

  18. New Rotifer Bioassays for Aquatic Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    AD-A258 002 AD NEW ROTIFER BIOASSAYS FOR AQUATIC TOXICOLOGY FINAL REPORT TERRY W. SNELL JULY 15, 1991 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND...Incluce Securiy Cawhca•r• on) New Rotifer Bioassays for Aquatic Toxicology 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Terry W. Snell 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. riME COVERED...rotifers. I. A test for brackish and marine environments with Brachionus plicatilis. Aquatic Toxicology . 14: 65-80. Snell, T. W. and G. Persoone. 1989

  19. Green Toxicology – Application of predictive toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Taxvig, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    reduction. This objective is partly achieved through core principles of green chemistry. However, better utilization of existing predictive toxicological tools alongside new inventions is still required. For this, input from toxicologists early in the chemical enterprise is necessary to make informed...... safer chemicals and to identify problematic compounds already in use such as industrial compounds, drugs, pesticides and cosmetics, is required. Green toxicology is the application of predictive toxicology to the production of chemicals with the specific intent of improving their design for hazard...... to be applied in chemical risk assessment to a greater extent than is currently the case. Greater focus on these tools, their strengths and weaknesses, should be part of chemistry training at the university level, thus ensuring constant focus on the issue and fostering new inventions into the future....

  20. On-line sources of toxicological information in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, William J.; Ecobichon, Donald J.; Baril, Marc

    2003-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the on-line resources available in toxicology in Canada. It will describe a brief history of The Society of Toxicology of Canada, with reference to other societies and also provide information on education, research and other resources related to toxicology. Toxicology in Canada emerged as a distinct and vibrant discipline following the thalidomide tragedy of the 1960s. In the pharmaceutical industry and government, toxicology was readily established as an essential component of drug development and safety, and as the need for toxicologists expanded, training programs were established, usually in collaboration with departments of pharmacology. In the last two to three decades other disciplines, environmental biology, analytical chemistry and epidemiology joined the ranks of toxicology. The on-line sources of toxicology information are rapidly expanding. This article describes those sources considered by the authors to be important from a national and international perspective. The majority of these sources are professional organizations and government agencies

  1. Autologous blood cell transplantation versus HLA-identical sibling transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a registry study from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplantation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Armand; DaSilva, Gisela; Pérez, Waleska S.; Gupta, Vikas; Cutler, Corey S.; Ballen, Karen K.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Champlin, Richard E.; Gajewski, James L.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Lill, Michael; Marks, David I.; Nabhan, Chadi; Schiller, Gary J.; Socie, Gerald; Szer, Jeffrey; Tallman, Martin S.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The optimal post-remission treatment for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission remains uncertain. Previous comparisons of autologous versus allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation noted higher relapse, but lower treatment-related mortality though using bone marrow grafts, with treatment-related mortality of 12-20%. Recognizing lower treatment-related mortality using autologous peripheral blood grafts, in an analysis of registry data from the Center for International Blood and Transplant Research, we compared treatment-related mortality, relapse, leukemia-free survival, and overall survival for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (median ages 36-44, range 19-60) receiving myeloablative HLA-matched sibling donor grafts (bone marrow, n=475 or peripheral blood, n=428) versus autologous peripheral blood (n=230). The 5-year cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality was 19% (95% confidence interval, 16-23%), 20% (17-24%) and 8% (5-12%) for allogeneic bone marrow, allogeneic peripheral blood and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients, respectively. The corresponding figures for 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse were 20% (17-24%), 26% (21-30%) and 45% (38-52%), respectively. At 5 years, leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were similar: allogeneic bone marrow 61% (56-65%) and 64% (59-68%); allogeneic peripheral blood 54% (49-59%) and 59% (54-64%); autologous peripheral blood 47% (40-54%) and 54% (47-60%); P=0.13 and P=0.19, respectively. In multivariate analysis the incidence of treatment-related mortality was lower after autologous peripheral blood transplantation than after allogeneic bone marrow/peripheral blood transplants [relative risk 0.37 (0.20-0.69); P=0.001], but treatment failure (death or relapse) after autologous peripheral blood was significantly more likely [relative risk 1.32 (1.06-1.64); P=0.011]. The 5-year overall survival, however, was similar in patients who

  2. Design and Implementation of the International Genetics and Translational Research in Transplantation Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keating, Brendan J.; van Setten, Jessica; Jacobson, Pamala A.; Holmes, Michael V.; Verma, Shefali S.; Chandrupatla, Hareesh R.; Nair, Nikhil; Gao, Hui; Li, Yun R.; Chang, Bao-Li; Wong, Chanel; Phillips, Randy; Cole, Brian S.; Mukhtar, Eyas; Zhang, Weijia; Cao, Hongzhi; Mohebnasab, Maede; Hou, Cuiping; Lee, Takesha; Steel, Laura; Shaked, Oren; Garifallou, James; Miller, Michael B.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Akdere, Abdullah; Gonzalez, Ana; Lloyd, Kelsey M.; McGinn, Daniel; Michaud, Zach; Colasacco, Abigail; Lek, Monkol; Fu, Yao; Pawashe, Mayur; Guettouche, Toumy; Himes, Aubree; Perez, Leat; Guan, Weihua; Wu, Baolin; Schladt, David; Menon, Madhav; Zhang, Zhongyang; Tragante, Vinicius; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Otten, Henny G.; de Weger, Roel A.; van de Graaf, Ed A.; Baan, Carla C.; Manintveld, Olivier C.; de Vlaminck, Iwijn; Piening, Brian D.; Strehl, Calvin; Shaw, Mary; Snieder, Harold; Klintmalm, Goran B.; O'Leary, Jacqueline G.; Amaral, Sandra; Goldfarb, Samuel; Rand, Elizabeth; Rossano, Joseph W.; Kohli, Utkarsh; Heeger, Peter; Stahl, Eli; Christie, Jason D.; Fuentes, Maria Hernandez; Levine, John E.; Aplenc, Richard; Schadt, Eric E.; Stranger, Barbara E.; Kluin, Jolanda; Potena, Luciano; Zuckermann, Andreas; Khush, Kiran; Alzahrani, Alhusain J.; Al-Muhanna, Fahad A.; Al-Ali, Amein K.; Al-Ali, Rudaynah; Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M.; Al-Mueilo, Samir; Byrne, Edna M.; Miller, David; Alexander, Stephen I.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Tedesco, Helio; Saw, Chee L.; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Kfoury, Abdallah G.; Horne, Benjamin; Carlquist, John; Gerstein, Mark B.; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Oberbauer, Rainer; Wijmenga, Cisca; Palmer, Scott; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Segovia, Javier; Alonso-Pulpon, Luis A.; Comez-Bueno, Manuel; Vilches, Carlos; Jaramillo, Natalia; de Borst, Martin H.; Naesens, Maarten; Hao, Ke; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Conlon, Peter J.; Lord, Graham M.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Snyder, Michael; Olthoff, Kim M.; Moore, Jason H.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Kamoun, Malek; Wang, Jun; Monos, Dimitri S.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Murphy, Barbara; Lankree, Matthew B.; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Oetting, William S.; Birdwell, Kelly A.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Israni, Ajay K.; Shaked, Abraham; Asselbergs, Folkert W.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies of transplantation outcomes have been hampered by small samples and highly complex multifactorial phenotypes, hindering investigations of the genetic architecture of a range of comorbidities which significantly impact graft and recipient life expectancy. We describe here

  3. The 50 Most-Cited Articles in Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Research: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Zaira S; Fram, Brianna; Henn, R Frank; Sherman, Seth L; Hammoud, Sommer

    2017-12-01

    Objective To identify the 50 most-cited articles in meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) research and analyze their characteristics. Design In September 2017, the Scopus database was queried to identify the 50 most-cited articles in MAT research. Variables analyzed include number of citations, publication year, journal, institution, country of origin, article type, study design, and level of evidence. Citation density was calculated for each article. The correlation between citation density and publication year and the correlation between level of evidence and number of citations, citation density, and publication year were computed. Results The 50 most-cited articles were published in 12 journals between 1986 and 2011. The number of citations ranged from 59 to 290 (109.3 ± 48.6). Citation density ranged from 2.7 to 17.6 citations per year (7.0 ± 3.3). There was a positive correlation between citation density and publication year ( r = +0.489, P articles were clinical and 44% were basic science. Of the 28 clinical articles, 61% were level IV or V evidence. Level of evidence was not significantly correlated with number of citations ( r = -0.059, P = 0.766), citation density ( r = +0.030, P = 0.880), or publication year ( r = -0.0009, P = 0.996). Conclusion This analysis provides the orthopedic community with a readily accessible list of the classic citations in MAT research and provides insight into the historical development of this procedure. Although there was a moderate positive correlation between citation density and publication year, articles with stronger levels of evidence were not more frequently cited despite the increasing trend toward evidence-based practice.

  4. Translational research and therapeutic applications of stem cell transplantation in periodontal regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong; Xie, Cheng; Zhao, Yi-Min; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have received a great deal of interest from the research community as potential therapeutic "tools" for a variety of chronic debilitating diseases that lack clinically effective therapies. Stem cells are also of interest for the regeneration of tooth-supporting tissues that have been lost to periodontal disease. Indeed, substantial data have demonstrated that the exogenous administration of stem cells or their derivatives in preclinical animal models of periodontal defects can restore damaged tissues to their original form and function. As we discuss here, however, considerable hurdles must be overcome before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel clinical therapies. Generally, the application of stem cells for periodontal therapy in clinics will not be realized until the best cell(s) to use, the optimal dose, and an effective mode of administration are identified. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation in the periodontium and to learn how to preciously control stem cell fates in the pathological environment around a tooth. From a translational perspective, we outline the challenges that may vary across preclinical models for the evaluation of stem cell therapy in situations that require periodontal reconstruction and the safety issues that are related to clinical applications of human stem cells. Although clinical trials that use autologous periodontal ligament stem cells have been approved and have already been initiated, proper consideration of the technical, safety, and regulatory concerns may facilitate, rather than inhibit, the clinical translation of new therapies.

  5. Experience of using advagraf after kidney transplantation in the Sklifosofsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pinchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of the advagraf as the main immunosuppressant in renal transplant recipients in the early postoperative period has been assessed. A good tolerability of the medicament has been confirmed. Satisfactory performance of renal graft function recovery after surgery was marked. Recommendations on the use of the advagraf in the early terms after kidney transplantation, including a condition of a violation of the gastrointestinal tract function.

  6. Iranian kidney transplantation society seeks to answer its questions through a link between scientists and young researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Society of Organ Transplantation (ISOT, in an effort to further invest in transplantation-related research, established a scientific link with Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences (BUMS at the beginning of the year 2006. BUMS instituted a network encom-passing 1 Nephrology and Urology Research Center (NURC, directed by prominent nephro-logists and urologists, 2 Clinical Research Unit (CRU, managed by qualified and competent young researchers, and 3 Medicine and Health Promotion Institute (mhpinstitute.ir , which is a private research and development institute. Study titles were then extracted in discussion sessions between the NURC and CRU, the latter also being responsible for writing research protocols to be reviewed by the University ethical board for research grants. The CRU has hitherto carried out several research grants based on the following criteria: 1 accommodating the main objectives of the ISOT, i.e. the improvement in survival rates and well-being standards as well as the mini-mization of costs, 2 conducting low-budget yet cutting-edge research, and 3 ensuring publi-cation-worthy study titles. This is a review of the tie between scientists and research and metho-dological assistants, which has already come to realization in the face of financial constraints.

  7. Social media and online attention as an early measure of the impact of research in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Simon R

    2014-09-15

    Traditional measures of the impact of published research, such as citation counts, are limited to measuring academic impact. The use of social media and other online tools as alternative measures of research impact is gaining popularity and used by leading medical journals. MEDLINE was searched for articles published with subject headings relating to solid organ transplantation between August 1, 2011, and July 31, 2012. Citation data were retrieved from SCOPUS, and statistics regarding mentions in social media, social bookmarking sites, news outlets, and expert recommendation sites were retrieved from the data at www.altmetric.com. Data were analyzed for associations between alternative metric data and citation rates. The search retrieved 6,981 publications. Sixty-six percent of the articles had at least one citation. Mentions in social media were 19.3%, 13.1% had social bookmarks, 0.9% had expert recommendations, and online news outlets picked up eight articles. Significantly higher citation rates were associated with mention in social media, expert recommendation, social bookmarking, and for articles identified as meta-analyses, multicenter studies, randomized controlled trials, and reviews (all Psocial media (odds ratio, 2.58; Psocial media are more likely to relate to the more controversial and emotive areas of transplantation. Social media and online attention act as early predictors of the impact of transplant research as measured by later citation rate. Blogging and expert recommendation, in particular, are associated with higher citation rates.

  8. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  9. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  10. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  11. Molecular aspects of toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hathway, D. E

    1984-01-01

    The subject matter of this book is organized into chapters that deal wwith separate subjects and, whilst this treatment reveals the structure of molecular aspects of toxicology, it inevitably incurs...

  12. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Menu Search Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health ... Tests for Transplant Care After Kidney Transplant Common Organ Donation and Transplantation Terms The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the ...

  13. Bioethical catch-22: the moratorium on federal funding of fetal tissue transplantation research and the NIH revitalization amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroney, H M

    1993-01-01

    In 1988, a moratorium on the use of federal funds for fetal tissue transplantation research (FTTR) halted the promise of a cure for millions of Americans suffering from Parkinson's disease, diabetes, and other debilitating conditions. Since the moratorium began, private and international experimentation continues with mixed success. In the foreground, however, the debate rages over federal funding for fetal tissue transplantation from induced abortions into humans. In the House of Representatives and the Senate, the debate culminated with the passage of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Revitalization Amendments. In addition to authorizing NIH programs, the $5.4 billion bill included measures designed to overturn the moratorium on federal funding for the transplantation research. Brimming with controversy, the bill was forwarded to the White House where it met President Bush's promised veto. The veto was sustained when the House failed to rally the two-thirds majority vote necessary to override a veto, leaving the moratorium intact and the controversy alive. Modified measures were introduced in both Houses of Congress, but a Senate filibuster in the last hours of the session foreclosed a second veto and placed the bill on the 1993 calendar. The field of fetal tissue research, currently a fraction of human health research but with the potential for a six billion dollar industry, is the focus of inevitable controversy. FTTR, as a sub-field, presents a volatile combination of the politics of abortion, the international research race, and the cries of millions of Americans suffering from Parkinson's disease and other crippling debilitations. Thus, using fetal tissue as a potential cure commands the interest and the passion of many. FTTR from induced abortions distinguishes itself from federally approved fetal tissue research because it connects a potentially beneficial health pursuit with a critically divisive moral issue of our day--abortion. By its very nature

  14. In silico toxicology protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Glenn J; Ahlberg, Ernst; Akahori, Yumi; Allen, David; Amberg, Alexander; Anger, Lennart T; Aptula, Aynur; Auerbach, Scott; Beilke, Lisa; Bellion, Phillip; Benigni, Romualdo; Bercu, Joel; Booth, Ewan D; Bower, Dave; Brigo, Alessandro; Burden, Natalie; Cammerer, Zoryana; Cronin, Mark T D; Cross, Kevin P; Custer, Laura; Dettwiler, Magdalena; Dobo, Krista; Ford, Kevin A; Fortin, Marie C; Gad-McDonald, Samantha E; Gellatly, Nichola; Gervais, Véronique; Glover, Kyle P; Glowienke, Susanne; Van Gompel, Jacky; Gutsell, Steve; Hardy, Barry; Harvey, James S; Hillegass, Jedd; Honma, Masamitsu; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Hsu, Chia-Wen; Hughes, Kathy; Johnson, Candice; Jolly, Robert; Jones, David; Kemper, Ray; Kenyon, Michelle O; Kim, Marlene T; Kruhlak, Naomi L; Kulkarni, Sunil A; Kümmerer, Klaus; Leavitt, Penny; Majer, Bernhard; Masten, Scott; Miller, Scott; Moser, Janet; Mumtaz, Moiz; Muster, Wolfgang; Neilson, Louise; Oprea, Tudor I; Patlewicz, Grace; Paulino, Alexandre; Lo Piparo, Elena; Powley, Mark; Quigley, Donald P; Reddy, M Vijayaraj; Richarz, Andrea-Nicole; Ruiz, Patricia; Schilter, Benoit; Serafimova, Rositsa; Simpson, Wendy; Stavitskaya, Lidiya; Stidl, Reinhard; Suarez-Rodriguez, Diana; Szabo, David T; Teasdale, Andrew; Trejo-Martin, Alejandra; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vuorinen, Anna; Wall, Brian A; Watts, Pete; White, Angela T; Wichard, Joerg; Witt, Kristine L; Woolley, Adam; Woolley, David; Zwickl, Craig; Hasselgren, Catrin

    2018-04-17

    The present publication surveys several applications of in silico (i.e., computational) toxicology approaches across different industries and institutions. It highlights the need to develop standardized protocols when conducting toxicity-related predictions. This contribution articulates the information needed for protocols to support in silico predictions for major toxicological endpoints of concern (e.g., genetic toxicity, carcinogenicity, acute toxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity) across several industries and regulatory bodies. Such novel in silico toxicology (IST) protocols, when fully developed and implemented, will ensure in silico toxicological assessments are performed and evaluated in a consistent, reproducible, and well-documented manner across industries and regulatory bodies to support wider uptake and acceptance of the approaches. The development of IST protocols is an initiative developed through a collaboration among an international consortium to reflect the state-of-the-art in in silico toxicology for hazard identification and characterization. A general outline for describing the development of such protocols is included and it is based on in silico predictions and/or available experimental data for a defined series of relevant toxicological effects or mechanisms. The publication presents a novel approach for determining the reliability of in silico predictions alongside experimental data. In addition, we discuss how to determine the level of confidence in the assessment based on the relevance and reliability of the information. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Non-precautionary aspects of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Empirical studies in toxicology aim at deciphering complex causal relationships, especially in regard to human disease etiologies. Several scientific traditions limit the usefulness of documentation from current toxicological research, in regard to decision-making based on the precautionary principle. Among non-precautionary aspects of toxicology are the focus on simplified model systems and the effects of single hazards, one by one. Thus, less attention is paid to sources of variability and uncertainty, including individual susceptibility, impacts of mixed and variable exposures, susceptible life-stages, and vulnerable communities. In emphasizing the need for confirmatory evidence, toxicology tends to penalize false positives more than false negatives. An important source of uncertainty is measurement error that results in misclassification, especially in regard to exposure assessment. Standard statistical analysis assumes that the exposure is measured without error, and imprecisions will usually result in an underestimation of the dose-effect relationship. In testing whether an effect could be considered a possible result of natural variability, a 5% limit for 'statistical significance' is usually applied, even though it may rule out many findings of causal associations, simply because the study was too small (and thus lacked statistical power) or because some imprecision or limited sensitivity of the parameters precluded a more definitive observation. These limitations may be aggravated when toxicology is influenced by vested interests. Because current toxicology overlooks the important goal of achieving a better characterization of uncertainties and their implications, research approaches should be revised and strengthened to counteract the innate ideological biases, thereby supporting our confidence in using toxicology as a main source of documentation and in using the precautionary principle as a decision procedure in the public policy arena

  16. Aerospace Toxicology and Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Parmet, A. J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicology dates to the very earliest history of humanity with various poisons and venom being recognized as a method of hunting or waging war with the earliest documentation in the Evers papyrus (circa 1500 BCE). The Greeks identified specific poisons such as hemlock, a method of state execution, and the Greek word toxos (arrow) became the root of our modern science. The first scientific approach to the understanding of poisons and toxicology was the work during the late middle ages of Paracelsus. He formulated what were then revolutionary views that a specific toxic agent or "toxicon" caused specific dose-related effects. His principles have established the basis of modern pharmacology and toxicology. In 1700, Bernardo Ramazzini published the book De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases of Workers) describing specific illnesses associated with certain labor, particularly metal workers exposed to mercury, lead, arsenic, and rock dust. Modern toxicology dates from development of the modern industrial chemical processes, the earliest involving an analytical method for arsenic by Marsh in 1836. Industrial organic chemicals were synthesized in the late 1800 s along with anesthetics and disinfectants. In 1908, Hamilton began the long study of occupational toxicology issues, and by WW I the scientific use of toxicants saw Haber creating war gases and defining time-dosage relationships that are used even today.

  17. Cancer and Toxicology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The Cancer and Toxicology Section is concerned with the investigation of the mechanisms by which chemicals, radiation, and viruses cause the changes broadly identified as cancer. In addition, the study of mechanisms has been extended to include the nontumorigenic effects of various agents associated with fossil energy and fuels. Research in molecular genetics of carcinogenesis focuses largely on the transposon properties of the genomes of retroviruses. The transposon structure of the DNA genomes of endogenous murine N-tropic and B-tropic type C retroviruses is being elucidated, and their chromosomal location mapped in hamster-mouse cell hybrids. A model of the mechanism of retrovirus induction by radiation and chemicals is being developed, and experiments have established that compounds such as hydroxyurea act as inducer. There is the possibility that transposition of sequences of this endogenous virus may be linked to leukemogenesis. Research in regulation of gene expression aims at defining in molecular terms the mechanisms determining expression of specific genes, how these are regulated by hormones, and the events responsible for dysfunction of gene expression in cancer. In corollary work, a library of cloned cDNAs specific for products of genes of special interest to regulation is being developed. Improvement of reversed-phase chromatography as a means of isolating bacterial plasmids and restriction fragments of DNA is underway. Newly developed techniques permit the isolation of supercoiled plasmid DNA directly from bacterial extracts. The technology has been developed recently for the photosynthetic growth of the chemo-autotrophic organism Rhodospirillum rubrum and the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase has been produced in quantity

  18. Toxicological risks of selected flame-retardant chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... Committee on Toxicology Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. i Copyrighttrue Please breaks inserted. are Page files. accidentally typesetting been have may original from the errors not typographic original retained, and from the created ca...

  19. Toxicological and performance aspects of oxygenated motor vehicle fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff

    1996-01-01

    ... COMMITTEE ON TOXICOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OXYGENATED MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TOXICOLOGY COMMISSION LIFE SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AND OF BOARD ON AND ON NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the t...

  20. Toxicological and performance aspects of oxygenated motor vehicle fuels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council Staff; Commission on Life Sciences; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council; National Academy of Sciences

    ... COMMITTEE ON TOXICOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASPECTS OXYGENATED MOTOR VEHICLE FUELS ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TOXICOLOGY COMMISSION LIFE SCIENCES NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL AND OF BOARD ON AND ON NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, D.C. 1996 i Copyrightoriginal retained, the be not from cannot book, paper original however, for version formatting, authoritative the t...

  1. Autoradiography in pharmacology and toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    81 abstracts on autoradiography in pharmacology and toxicology were presented, divided into six sessions concerning: 1) methods 2) hormones and receptors, 3) drugs, 4) toxicology, 5) metals, 6) fetal distribution. (author)

  2. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction?

    OpenAIRE

    Macek, K J

    1980-01-01

    A brief history of the development of the field of aquatic toxicology is provided. In order to provide a perspective on the state-of-the-art in aquatic toxicology relative to classical toxicology, the two fields are compared from the standpoint of the type of scientist practicing each field, the respective objectives of each, the forces which drive the activity in each field, and the major advantages and disadvantages accruing to the practitioner of aquatic toxicology as a result of the diffe...

  3. Toxicological aspects of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Puertas, P.

    1991-01-01

    Different toxicological aspects of water have been studied, remarking the activity of various chemical substances in the organism. These substances are divided in: trace metals (Sb, As, Cd, Zn, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se), other contaminants (CN-, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, pesticides, detergents) and radioactivity. Finally, some considerations on this subject are made [es

  4. SHORT COMMUNICATION ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    increase within the study period. Observed changes for these indices from the control values were found significant at 99% confidence level. Possible inhalatory problems are thus anticipated from prolonged accumulation of the dust in the respiratory system. KEY WORDS: Environmental toxicology, Suspended particulate ...

  5. Behavioral Screening for Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; however, only in the past 20 years has this become a standard practice in toxicology. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observational battery (FOB), are derived from protocols use...

  6. Animal-free toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2013-01-01

    assessment, in accordance with the legislation on chemical, medicine and food safety. Toxicology studies based on human mechanistic and exposure information can replace animal studies. These animal-free approaches can be further supplemented by new in silico methods and chemical structure...

  7. Environmental toxicology: current developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rose, John

    1998-01-01

    ... continuation orders which may be cancelled at any time and which provide for automatic billing and shipping of each title in the series upon publication. Please write for details. TITLEEnvironmental Toxicology Current Developments Edited by J.Rose University of Central Lancashire, Preston (UK) GORDON AND BREACH SCIENCE PUBLISHERS Australia * Canada...

  8. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type matches or is compatible to your own. Blood-type incompatible transplants are also possible but require additional medical treatment before and after transplant to reduce the risk of organ rejection. These are known as ABO incompatible kidney transplants. ...

  9. Kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... place a healthy kidney into a person with kidney failure . ... Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Becker Y, Witkowski P. Kidney and pancreas transplantation. In: Townsend CM ... Urology . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  10. Transplante de intestino delgado Small intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ferreira Galvão

    2003-06-01

    to treat special cases of intestinal failure. AIM: This review highlights recent developments in the area of small bowel transplantation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Over 600 reports on clinical and experimental small bowel transplantation were reviewed. Aspects concerning research development, different immunosuppressive strategies, patient and graft monitoring, and improvements in surgical techniques are discussed. RESULTS: About 700 small bowel transplantation were performed in 55 transplant centers, 44% intestine-liver, 41% isolated intestinal graft and 15% multivisceral transplantation. Rejection and infection are the main limitation of this procedure. Actual 5 years post transplantation graft survival of the total international experience is 46% for isolated intestinal graft, 43% for combined intestine-liver and nearly 30% for multivisceral transplantation. Higher graft and patient survival are seen at the more experienced centers. In a series of 165 intestinal transplantation at University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA, actuarial patient survival was reported to be over 75% at one year, 54% at 5 years and 42% at 10 years. Over 90% patients from Pittsburgh program resume an unrestricted oral diet. CONCLUSION: Small bowel transplantation has advanced from an experimental strategy to a feasible alternative for patients with permanent intestinal failure. Further refinements in graft acceptance, immunosuppressive regiments, infection management and prophylaxis, surgical techniques as well as appropriated patient referral and selection are crucial to improve outcomes.

  11. Prospects for applying synthetic biology to toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendorff, James Bruce Yarnton H; Gillam, Elizabeth M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The 30 years since the inception of Chemical Research in Toxicology, game-changing advances in chemical and molecular biology, the fundamental disciplines underpinning molecular toxicology, have been made. While these have led to important advances in the study of mechanisms by which chemicals...... damage cells and systems, there has been less focus on applying these advances to prediction, detection, and mitigation of toxicity. Over the last ∼15 years, synthetic biology, the repurposing of biological "parts" in systems engineered for useful ends, has been explored in other areas of the biomedical...... and life sciences, for such applications as detecting metabolites, drug discovery and delivery, investigating disease mechanisms, improving medical treatment, and producing useful chemicals. These examples provide models for the application of synthetic biology to toxicology, which, for the most part, has...

  12. Aerospace Toxicology: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    through the atmosphere (28), whereas astronautcs s a relatvely new field related to the art and scence of space flght (26). Avaton s another...result of exposures to a sngle chemcal or to multple chemcals (or chemcal mxtures). 2.2 Pesticidal Toxicology Toxcologcal aspects of...chemcals. Snce organophosphorus compounds and carbamates nhbt acetylcholnesterase and cholnesterases, actvtes of these enzymes n red blood

  13. Toxicology of inorganic tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burba, J.V.

    1982-01-01

    Tin(II) or stannous ion as a reducing agent is important in nuclear medicine because it is an essential component and common denominator for many in vivo radiodiagnostic agents, commonly called kits for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This report is intended to alert nuclear medicine community regarding the wide range of biological effects that the stannous ion is capable of producing, and is a review of a large number of selected publications on the toxicological potential of tin(II)

  14. Assessment of food toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gosslau

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interest in food toxicology is evident by the dependency of humankind on nutrition by virtue of their heterotrophic metabolism. By means of modern biochemistry, molecular and cell biology, computer science, bioinformatics as well as high-throughput and high-content screening technologies it has been possible to identify adverse effects and characterize potential toxicants in food. The mechanisms of toxicant actions are multifactorial but many toxic effects converge on the generation of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation resulting in cell death, aging and degenerative diseases. Integration of food toxicology data obtained throughout biochemical and cell-based in vitro, animal in vivo and human clinical settings has enabled the establishment of alternative, highly predictable in silico models. These systems utilize a combination of complex in vitro cell-based models with computer-based algorithms. A decrease of rodent animal testing with its limitations of high costs, low throughput readouts, inconsistent responses, ethical issues and concerns of extrapolability to humans have led to an increased use of these but also alternative lower hierarchy surrogate animal models (e.g. Drosophila melanogaster; Caenorhabditis elegans or Danio rerio and efforts to integrate organotypic systems and stem cell-based assays. Despite those achievements, there are numerous challenges in various disciplines of food toxicology.

  15. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-12-01

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 4th Annual Predictive Toxicology Summit 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhanfeng

    2013-08-01

    This meeting report presents a brief summary on the 4th Annual Predictive Toxicology Summit 2012, which was held on 15 - 16 February 2012 in London. The majority of presentations came from global pharmaceutical companies, although small and medium enterprise (SME) and academic researchers were represented too. Major regulatory bodies were also present. The article highlights the summit, which was considered a good learning opportunity to catch up on the recent advances in predictive toxicology. Predictive toxicology has become more and more important due to social and economic pressure and scientific reasons. Technological developments are rapid, but there is a gulf between the technology developers and the pharmaceutical end users; hence, early engagement is desirable. Stem cell-derived cell-based assays as well as three-dimensional in vitro tissue/organ model development are within the reach now, but a lot needs to be done to optimise and validate the developed protocols and products. The field of predictive toxicology needs fundamental research of interdisciplinary nature, which requires much needed trained personnel and funding.

  17. Developmental toxicology: adequacy of current methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, P W

    1998-01-01

    Toxicology embraces several disciplines such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. Reproductive toxicology is concerned with possible effects of substances on the reproductive process, i.e. on sexual organs and their functions, endocrine regulation, fertilization, transport of the fertilized ovum, implantation, and embryonic, fetal and postnatal development, until the end-differentiation of the organs is achieved. Reproductive toxicology is divided into areas related to male and female fertility, and developmental toxicology. Developmental toxicology can be further broken down into prenatal and postnatal toxicology. Today, much new information is available about the origins of developmental disorders resulting from chemical exposure. While these findings seem to promise important new developments in methodology and research, there is a danger of losing sight of the precepts and principles established in the light of existing knowledge. There is also a danger that we may fail to correct shortcomings in our existing procedures and practice. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the importance of testing substances for their impact in advance of their use and to underline that we must use the best existing tools for carrying out risk assessments. Moreover, it needs to be stressed that there are many substances that are never assessed with respect to reproductive and developmental toxicity. Similarly, our programmes for post-marketing surveillance with respect to developmental toxicology are grossly inadequate. Our ability to identify risks to normal development and reproduction would be much improved, first if a number of straightforward precepts were always followed and second, if we had a clearer understanding of what we mean by risk and acceptable levels of risk in the context of development. Other aims of this paper are: to stress the complexity of the different stages of normal prenatal development; to note the principles that are

  18. Research advances in sorafenib combined with orthotopic liver transplantation, radiofrequency ablation, and transarterial chemoembolization in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Mingjuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide, and traditional surgery and chemotherapy provide limited benefit. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, was proved effective for advanced HCC in phase III clinical trial, which was a breakthrough in the treatment of HCC. In recent years, the studies on sorafenib combined with other therapies in the treatment of HCC have been conducted around the world, and inspiring results have been seen. The research advances in sorafenib combined with orthotopic liver transplantation, radiofrequency ablation, and transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of HCC are summarized. It is thought that sorafenib combined with other anticancer therapies is expected to become a new approach of targeted therapy of HCC.

  19. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  20. Marine toxins and their toxicological significance: An overview

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    This article presents an overview of various types of marine toxins and their toxicological significance in the context of biotechnological research and development. The characteristics and toxic potentials of different marine toxins highlighted...

  1. Stem cell harvesting protocol research in autologous transplantation setting: Large volume vs. conventional cytapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balint Bela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use of peripheral blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (SCs is progressively increasing and has nearly supplanted bone marrow transplantation. Interpatient variability in the degree and kinetics of SC mobilization into peripheral blood is an expected event after conventional chemotherapy-based treatment, followed by sequential administration of recombinant granulocyte-colony- stimulating factor (rHu-CSF. In this study, specific factors associated with the application of two different SC-harvesting approaches, including the use of large volume leukapheresis (LVL vs. repetitive conventional apheresis (RCA, were analyzed. The basic goal of the study was to evaluate the influence of apheresis protocol (collection timing, processed blood volume and cell yield upon the clinical outcome of transplantation. Methods. Results obtained by LVL (76 pts and RCA (20 pts - control group were compared. The SC mobilizing regimen used was cyclophosphamide (4-7 g/m2 or polychemotherapy and rHuG-CSF 10-16 μg/kg of body mess (bm per day. Cell harvesting was performed using COBE-Spectra (Caridian-BCT, USA. The volume of processed blood in LVL setting was ≥ 3.5 - fold of the patient's circulating blood quantity (ranged from 12.7 to 37.8 l. All patients tolerated well the use of intensive treatment, without any side or adverse effects. Our original controlled-rate cryopreservation was carried out with 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO using Planer R203/200R or Planer 560-16 equipments (Planer Products Ltd, UK. Total nucleated cell (NC and mononuclear cell (MNC counts were examined by flow cytometry (Advia-2120 Bayer, Germany; Technicon H-3 System, USA. The CD34+ cell surface antigen was investigated by the EPICS XL-MCL device (Coulter, Germany. Results. Performing LVL-apheresis, high-level MNC and CD34+ cell yields (7.6±4.6 × 108/kg bm and 11.8±6.5 × 106/kg bm, respectively were obtained. As a result, rapid hematopoietic reconstitution

  2. Predictive toxicology in drug safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Jinghai J; Urban, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    .... Each specific area of toxicology relevant for drug discovery is discussed in detail, including theory, experimental approaches, and data interpretation supported by comprehensive up-to-date references...

  3. Aquatic toxicology: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, K J

    1980-02-01

    A brief history of the development of the field of aquatic toxicology is provided. In order to provide a perspective on the state-of-the-art in aquatic toxicology relative to classical toxicology, the two fields are compared from the standpoint of the type of scientist practicing each field, the respective objectives of each, the forces which drive the activity in each field, and the major advantages and disadvantages accruing to the practitioner of aquatic toxicology as a result of the differences in objectives and driving forces.

  4. Report of the Psychosocial Outcomes Workgroup of the Nursing and Social Sciences Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation: present status of research on psychosocial outcomes in cardiothoracic transplantation: review and recommendations for the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Sandra; Dew, Mary Amanda; Grady, Kathleen L; De Geest, Sabina; Dobbels, Fabienne; Lanuza, Dorothy; Paris, Wayne

    2006-06-01

    Cardiothoracic transplantation's success at prolonging life--and its economic costs--must be considered relative to its psychosocial benefits and costs. Moreover, psychosocial outcomes themselves influence long-term post-transplant morbidity and mortality rates. Although psychosocial outcomes--encompassing patients' physical, psychologic and social functioning, their management of their medical regimen and global quality of life--are the focus of many recent studies, these investigations have yet to yield many evidence-based interventions that are routinely applied to improve patient outcomes. Our goals were to summarize existing work on psychosocial outcomes, delineate areas requiring attention, offer recommendations for steps to advance the field, and thereby provide an impetus for the conduct of clinical trials of interventions to improve these outcomes. We concluded that research must generally shift away from descriptive studies and toward prospective and clinical trial designs to: (a) examine a full range of risk factors and clinical sequelae of patients' psychosocial status; and (b) evaluate the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions. In addition, these issues must be considered across all cardiothoracic recipients, including not only heart recipients but the less-studied populations of lung and heart-lung recipients, and must include longer-term (5+ years) outcomes than is typical in most work. The importance of adequately sized samples to ensure statistical power, and the need to construct study samples representative of the larger cardiothoracic transplant population, cannot be overestimated. Implementing these changes in research design and substantive focus will ensure that psychosocial outcomes research will have maximum impact on transplant recipients' clinical care.

  5. Toxicological awakenings: the rebirth of hormesis as a central pillar of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper assesses historical reasons that may account for the marginalization of hormesis as a dose-response model in the biomedical sciences in general and toxicology in particular. The most significant and enduring explanatory factors are the early and close association of the concept of hormesis with the highly controversial medical practice of homeopathy and the difficulty in assessing hormesis with high-dose testing protocols which have dominated the discipline of toxicology, especially regulatory toxicology. The long-standing and intensely acrimonious conflict between homeopathy and 'traditional' medicine (allopathy) lead to the exclusion of the hormesis concept from a vast array of medical- and public health-related activities including research, teaching, grant funding, publishing, professional societal meetings, and regulatory initiatives of governmental agencies and their advisory bodies. Recent publications indicate that the hormetic dose-response is far more common and fundamental than the dose-response models [threshold/linear no threshold (LNT)] used in toxicology and risk assessment, and by governmental regulatory agencies in the establishment of exposure standards for workers and the general public. Acceptance of the possibility of hormesis has the potential to profoundly affect the practice of toxicology and risk assessment, especially with respect to carcinogen assessment

  6. Postmortem Biochemistry and Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Flanagan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of postmortem biochemistry and toxicology is either to help establish the cause of death, or to gain information on events immediately before death. If self-poisoning is suspected, the diagnosis may be straightforward and all that could be required is confirmation of the agents involved. However, if the cause of death is not immediately obvious then suspicion of possible poisoning or of conditions such as alcoholic ketoacidosis is of course crucial. On the other hand, it may be important to investigate adherence to prescribed therapy, for example with anticonvulsants or antipsychotics, hence sensitive methods are required. Blood sampling (needle aspiration, peripheral vein, for example femoral, ideally after proximal ligation before opening the body minimizes the risk of sample contamination with, for example, gut contents or urine. Other specimens (stomach contents, urine, liver, vitreous humor may also be valuable and may be needed to corroborate unexpected or unusual findings in the absence of other evidence. The site of sampling should always be recorded. The availability of antemortem specimens should not necessarily preclude postmortem sampling. Appropriate sample preservation, transport, and storage are mandatory. Interpretation of analytical toxicology results must take into account what is known of the pharmacokinetics and toxicology of the agent(s in question, the circumstances under which death occurred including the mechanism of exposure, and other factors such as the stability of the analyte(s and the analytical methods used. It is important to realise that changes may occur in the composition of body fluids, even peripheral blood, after death. Such changes are likely to be greater after attempted resuscitation, and with centrally-acting drugs with large volumes of distribution given chronically, and may perhaps be minimised by prompt refrigeration of the body and performing the autopsy quickly.

  7. Toxicology of freshwater cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, H M; Arachchi, D N Magana; Abeysekara, T; Guneratne, L

    2016-07-02

    Many chemical contaminants in drinking water have been shown to cause adverse health effects in humans after prolonged exposure. Cyanobacteria are one of the most potent and diverse groups of photosynthetic prokaryotes. One key component of cyanobacterial success in the environment is the production of potent toxins as secondary metabolites, which have been responsible for numerous adverse health impacts in humans. Anthropogenic activities have led to the increase of eutrophication in freshwater bodies' worldwide, causing cyanobacterial blooms to become more frequent. The present article will discuss about harmful cyanobacteria and their toxicology with special references to microcystin, nodularin, and cylindrospermopsin.

  8. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  9. Application of Model Animals in the Study of Drug Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yagang; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-01-01

    Drug safety is a key factor in drug research and development, Drug toxicology test is the main method to evaluate the safety of drugs, The body condition of an animal has important implications for the results of the study, Previous toxicological studies of drugs were carried out in normal animals in the past, There is a great deviation from the clinical practice.The purpose of this study is to investigate the necessity of model animals as a substitute for normal animals for toxicological studies, It is expected to provide exact guidance for future drug safety evaluation.

  10. Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Xu, Shaoyan; Ren, Zhigang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-23

    The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the

  11. Multiscale Toxicology- Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retterer, S. T. [ORNL; Holsapple, M. P. [Battelle Memorial Institute

    2013-10-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established between Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of combining the analytical and synthetic strengths of the National Laboratories with BMI's expertise in basic and translational medical research to develop a collaborative pipeline and suite of high throughput and imaging technologies that could be used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of material and drug toxicology in humans. The Multi-Scale Toxicity Initiative (MSTI), consisting of the team members above, was established to coordinate cellular scale, high-throughput in vitro testing, computational modeling and whole animal in vivo toxicology studies between MSTI team members. Development of a common, well-characterized set of materials for testing was identified as a crucial need for the initiative. Two research tracks were established by BMI during the course of the CRADA. The first research track focused on the development of tools and techniques for understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials, specifically inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). ORNL"s work focused primarily on the synthesis, functionalization and characterization of a common set of NPs for dissemination to the participating laboratories. These particles were synthesized to retain the same surface characteristics and size, but to allow visualization using the variety of imaging technologies present across the team. Characterization included the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical properties of the materials as well as the preliminary assessment of NP toxicity using commercially available toxicity screens and emerging optical imaging strategies. Additional efforts examined the development of high-throughput microfluidic and imaging assays for measuring NP uptake, localization, and

  12. 'I feel stronger and younger all the time'-perspectives of elderly kidney transplant recipients: thematic synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Jule; Hanson, Camilla S; Craig, Jonathan C; Chapman, Jeremy R; Budde, Klemens; Halleck, Fabian; Tong, Allison

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation offers improved survival and quality of life to an increasing number of elderly patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, elderly kidney transplant recipients may face unique challenges due to a higher burden of comorbidity, greater cumulative risk of immunosuppression-related complications and increasing frailty. We aimed to describe the perspectives of elderly kidney transplant recipients. Electronic databases were searched to April 2015. Qualitative studies were eligible if they reported views from elderly kidney transplant recipients (≥60 years). Thematic synthesis was used to analyse the findings. Twenty-one studies involving >116 recipients were included. We identified seven themes. 'Regaining strength and vitality' meant valuing the physical and psychosocial improvements in daily functioning and life participation. 'Extending life' was the willingness to accept any organ, including extended criteria kidneys, to prolong survival. 'Debt of gratitude' entailed conscious appreciation toward their donor while knowing they were unable to repay their sacrifice. 'Moral responsibility to maintain health' motivated adherence to medication and lifestyle recommendations out of an ethical duty to protect their gift for graft survival. 'Unabating and worsening forgetfulness' hindered self-management. 'Disillusionment with side effects and complications' reflected disappointment and exasperation with the unintended consequences of medications. 'Finality of treatment option' was an acute awareness that the current transplant may be their last. Kidney transplantation was perceived to slow and even reverse the experience of aging among elderly recipients, especially compared with dialysis. However, some were frustrated over persistent limitations after transplant, struggled with the burden of medication side effects and worried about a possible return to dialysis if the transplant failed. Clarifying patient expectations of transplantation

  13. Nanotechnology: toxicologic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbs, Ann F; Sargent, Linda M; Porter, Dale W; Sager, Tina M; Chen, Bean T; Frazer, David G; Castranova, Vincent; Sriram, Krishnan; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Reynolds, Steven H; Battelli, Lori A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; McKinney, Walter; Fluharty, Kara L; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology involves technology, science, and engineering in dimensions less than 100 nm. A virtually infinite number of potential nanoscale products can be produced from many different molecules and their combinations. The exponentially increasing number of nanoscale products will solve critical needs in engineering, science, and medicine. However, the virtually infinite number of potential nanotechnology products is a challenge for toxicologic pathologists. Because of their size, nanoparticulates can have therapeutic and toxic effects distinct from micron-sized particulates of the same composition. In the nanoscale, distinct intercellular and intracellular translocation pathways may provide a different distribution than that obtained by micron-sized particulates. Nanoparticulates interact with subcellular structures including microtubules, actin filaments, centrosomes, and chromatin; interactions that may be facilitated in the nanoscale. Features that distinguish nanoparticulates from fine particulates include increased surface area per unit mass and quantum effects. In addition, some nanotechnology products, including the fullerenes, have a novel and reactive surface. Augmented microscopic procedures including enhanced dark-field imaging, immunofluorescence, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy are useful when evaluating nanoparticulate toxicologic pathology. Thus, the pathology assessment is facilitated by understanding the unique features at the nanoscale and the tools that can assist in evaluating nanotoxicology studies.

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans: an emerging model in biomedical and environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Maxwell C K; Williams, Phillip L; Benedetto, Alexandre; Au, Catherine; Helmcke, Kirsten J; Aschner, Michael; Meyer, Joel N

    2008-11-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has emerged as an important animal model in various fields including neurobiology, developmental biology, and genetics. Characteristics of this animal model that have contributed to its success include its genetic manipulability, invariant and fully described developmental program, well-characterized genome, ease of maintenance, short and prolific life cycle, and small body size. These same features have led to an increasing use of C. elegans in toxicology, both for mechanistic studies and high-throughput screening approaches. We describe some of the research that has been carried out in the areas of neurotoxicology, genetic toxicology, and environmental toxicology, as well as high-throughput experiments with C. elegans including genome-wide screening for molecular targets of toxicity and rapid toxicity assessment for new chemicals. We argue for an increased role for C. elegans in complementing other model systems in toxicological research.

  15. Hair transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this procedure: Scarring Unnatural-looking tufts of new hair growth It is possible that the transplanted hair will ... Most hair transplants result in excellent hair growth within several ... may be needed to create best results. The replaced hairs are ...

  16. Transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortness of breath and less ability to exercise (heart transplant) Yellow skin color and easy bleeding (liver transplant) ... accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health ...

  17. Intestine Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... Nursing Care of the Renal Transplant Recipient." UNOS Donation and Transplantation Nursing Curriculum . 1996 This Web site is intended ...

  18. Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be successful. However, transplanting islet cells has several advantages over transplanting a pancreas. First, unlike the pancreas ... Email: Sign Up Thank you for signing up ' + ' '); $('.survey-form').show(); }, success: function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('. ...

  19. Current concept in neural regeneration research: NSCs isolation, characterization and transplantation in various neurodegenerative diseases and stroke: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep K. Vishwakarma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since last few years, an impressive amount of data has been generated regarding the basic in vitro and in vivo biology of neural stem cells (NSCs and there is much far hope for the success in cell replacement therapies for several human neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. The discovery of adult neurogenesis (the endogenous production of new neurons in the mammalian brain more than 40 years ago has resulted in a wealth of knowledge about stem cells biology in neuroscience research. Various studies have done in search of a suitable source for NSCs which could be used in animal models to understand the basic and transplantation biology before treating to human. The difficulties in isolating pure population of NSCs limit the study of neural stem behavior and factors that regulate them. Several studies on human fetal brain and spinal cord derived NSCs in animal models have shown some interesting results for cell replacement therapies in many neurodegenerative diseases and stroke models. Also the methods and conditions used for in vitro culture of these cells provide an important base for their applicability and specificity in a definite target of the disease. Various important developments and modifications have been made in stem cells research which is needed to be more specified and enrolment in clinical studies using advanced approaches. This review explains about the current perspectives and suitable sources for NSCs isolation, characterization, in vitro proliferation and their use in cell replacement therapies for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases and strokes.

  20. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNL’s focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  1. Experimental water toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrushaytis, G.P. (ed.)

    1984-01-01

    The problem of water toxicology and marine ectoxicology, particularly in the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Riga, are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the problem of creating artificial controlled marine ecosystems for the purpose of utilizing them in ecotoxicological studies and for solving problems in the intensification of bioproduction processes and predicting the functional state of water ecosystems under conditions of water pollution by toxic substances. Investigations were conducted on the effects of pesticides, phenols, and heavy metal ions on planktonic crustacea and fish. Studies were also concerned with the effect of gonadotoxic substances, including detergents, on the gametogenesis process in fish. Morphological changes in the ovicells of fish can lead to a reduction in the sensitivity of the receptor zones of the follicular casings to hormonal substances, as well as infertility.

  2. Honey bee toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed M

    2015-01-07

    Insecticides are chemicals used to kill insects, so it is unsurprising that many insecticides have the potential to harm honey bees (Apis mellifera). However, bees are exposed to a great variety of other potentially toxic chemicals, including flavonoids and alkaloids that are produced by plants; mycotoxins produced by fungi; antimicrobials and acaricides that are introduced by beekeepers; and fungicides, herbicides, and other environmental contaminants. Although often regarded as uniquely sensitive to toxic compounds, honey bees are adapted to tolerate and even thrive in the presence of toxic compounds that occur naturally in their environment. The harm caused by exposure to a particular concentration of a toxic compound may depend on the level of simultaneous exposure to other compounds, pathogen levels, nutritional status, and a host of other factors. This review takes a holistic view of bee toxicology by taking into account the spectrum of xenobiotics to which bees are exposed.

  3. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbughuni, Michael M; Jannetto, Paul J; Langman, Loralie J

    2016-12-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used in the Toxicological analysis of drugs, poisons, and metabolites of both. To date, MS applications have permeated all fields of toxicology which include; environmental, clinical, and forensic toxicology. While many different analytical applications are used in these fields, MS and its hyphenated applications such as; gas chromatography MS (GC-MS), liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS), inductively coupled plasma ionization MS (ICP-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS and MS n ) have emerged as powerful tools used in toxicology laboratories. This review will focus on these hyphenated MS technologies and their applications for toxicology.

  4. Coincidence of needs in radiological and toxicological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Research needs for radiological protection and research programs that have evolved to meet these needs parallel closely those in the chemical toxicology field. The similarity of these needs is described as perceived from the radiological side. Further, the frame work for radiologically-related research, out lines of the research programs, and the development of the facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Labs were presented

  5. Diversification in toxicology: man and environment. EUROTOX proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, J.P. [Intercantonal Office for the Control of Medicines (IOCM), Bern (Switzerland); Autrup, J.L.; Autrup, H. [eds.] [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Steno Inst. of Public Health

    1998-12-31

    This volume contains the main papers presented at the 1997 EUROTOX Congress, Aaarhus, Denmark, 24-28 June 1997. Diversification in toxicology is not seen as splitting into subfields, but as the application of basic science to such diverse areas as man and his environment. The pressing issues which have been dealt with not only include reproductive effects of environmental chemicals (`xenoestrogens`), but also receptor-mediated toxic responses, new frontiers in human and ecological toxicology, chemoprevention of cancer and molecular approaches in toxicological research. The practical and ethical facets of toxicology, e.g. ecotoxicological risk assessment, biomarkers of exposure, complex chemical mixtures as well as animal welfare and the ethics of animal experimentation, are also treated. (orig.)

  6. Ninth Triennial Toxicology Salary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Shayne Cox; Sullivan, Dexter Wayne

    2016-01-01

    This survey serves as the ninth in a series of toxicology salary surveys conducted at 3-year intervals and beginning in 1988. An electronic survey instrument was distributed to 5919 individuals including members of the Society of Toxicology, American College of Toxicology, and 23 additional professional organizations. Question items inquired about gender, age, degree, years of experience, certifications held, areas of specialization, society membership, employment and income. Overall, 1293 responses were received (response rate 21.8%). The results of the 2014 survey provide insight into the job market and career path for current and future toxicologists. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Body image in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, C; Pistorio, M L; Sorbello, M; Parrinello, L; Corona, D; Gagliano, M; Giuffrida, G; Giaquinta, A; Sinagra, N; Zerbo, D; Veroux, P; Veroux, M

    2010-05-01

    Psychologic disturbances are becoming more common in kidney transplantation, owing to effects of immunosuppressive therapy. In this study, we explored the incidence and specifity of psychopathology among kidney transplant patients. Twenty kidney transplant recipients underwent the Machover Draw-A-person test to detect significant variables (V1=V6) hypothetically related to chronologic age, education, years from transplantation, and gender differences. Emotional coarctation (V1) in the sense of "mental rigidity," "egocentrism," and "hypercontrol" were present in all transplant recipients (100%), followed by difficulty in interpersonal relationships (V3; 70%) and anxiety (V5; 70%). This research confirmed the hypothesis that transplantation can display a potential risk to the psychologic balance of the patient. Psychologic evaluation may be a fundamental step together with surgical aspects and management of immunosuppression to achieve well-being of kidney transplant recipients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  9. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  10. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  11. Predictive toxicology in drug safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Jinghai J; Urban, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    .... It provides information on the present knowledge of drug side effects and their mitigation strategy during drug discovery, gives guidance for risk assessment, and promotes evidence-based toxicology...

  12. Mass Spectrometry Applications for Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Mbughuni, Michael M.; Jannetto, Paul J.; Langman, Loralie J.

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology is a multidisciplinary study of poisons, aimed to correlate the quantitative and qualitative relationships between poisons and their physiological and behavioural effects in living systems. Other key aspects of toxicology focus on elucidation of the mechanisms of action of poisons and development of remedies and treatment plans for associated toxic effects. In these endeavours, Mass spectrometry (MS) has become a powerful analytical technique with a wide range of application used i...

  13. Behavioral assays in environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental toxicology is too permeated by questions about how the whole organism functions to abandon intact animals as test systems. Behavior does not participate as a single entity or discipline. It ranges across the total spectrum of functional toxicity, from tenuous subjective complaints to subtle sensory and motor disturbances demanding advanced instrumentation for their evaluation. Three facets of behavioral toxicology that illustrate its breadth of interests and potential contributions are discussed.

  14. Green Toxicology: a strategy for sustainable chemical and material development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sarah E; Hartung, Thomas; Hollert, Henner; Mathes, Björn; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Studer, Christoph; Krug, Harald F

    2017-01-01

    Green Toxicology refers to the application of predictive toxicology in the sustainable development and production of new less harmful materials and chemicals, subsequently reducing waste and exposure. Built upon the foundation of "Green Chemistry" and "Green Engineering", "Green Toxicology" aims to shape future manufacturing processes and safe synthesis of chemicals in terms of environmental and human health impacts. Being an integral part of Green Chemistry, the principles of Green Toxicology amplify the role of health-related aspects for the benefit of consumers and the environment, in addition to being economical for manufacturing companies. Due to the costly development and preparation of new materials and chemicals for market entry, it is no longer practical to ignore the safety and environmental status of new products during product development stages. However, this is only possible if toxicologists and chemists work together early on in the development of materials and chemicals to utilize safe design strategies and innovative in vitro and in silico tools. This paper discusses some of the most relevant aspects, advances and limitations of the emergence of Green Toxicology from the perspective of different industry and research groups. The integration of new testing methods and strategies in product development, testing and regulation stages are presented with examples of the application of in silico, omics and in vitro methods. Other tools for Green Toxicology, including the reduction of animal testing, alternative test methods, and read-across approaches are also discussed.

  15. [Toxicologic blood emergency screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sabine; Manat, Aurélie; Dumont, Benoit; Bévalot, Fabien; Manchon, Monique; Berny, Claudette

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the stop marketing by Biorad company of automated high performance liquid chromatograph with UV detection (Remedi), we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and to give an approximation of the overdose of molecules frequently encountered in drug intoxications. Therefore two hundred eighty seventeen blood samples were collected over a period of one year and allowed us to evaluate and compare the performance of these two techniques. As identification, GC-MS does not identify all molecules detected by Remedi in 24.2% of cases; there is a lack of sensitivity for opiates and the systematic absence of certain molecules such as betablockers. However, in 75.8% of cases the GC-MS detects all molecules found by Remedi and other molecules such as meprobamate, paracetamol, benzodiazepines and phenobarbital. The concentrations obtained are interpreted in terms of overdose showed 15.7% of discrepancy and 84.3% of concordance between the two techniques. The GC-MS technique described here is robust, fast and relatively simple to implement; the identification is facilitated by macro commands and the semi quantification remains manual. Despite a sequence of cleaning the column after each sample, carryover of a sample to the next remains possible. This technique can be used for toxicologic screening in acute intoxications. Nevertheless it must be supplemented by a HPLC with UV detection if molecules such as betablockers are suspected.

  16. Toxicology of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the toxicity of Pu in experimental animals. Of the several plutonium isotopes, only 238 Pu and 239 Pu have been studied well. Sufficient results have been obtained to show that the behavior of 238 Pu in biological systems and the resulting biological effects cannot be precisely predicted from studies of 239 Pu. This probably applies also to other radiologically important plutonium isotopes which have half-lives ranging from 45 days to 10 7 years and decay by β-emission, electron capture, and spontaneous fission, as well as by emission of α-particles. All the biological effects of plutonium described in this review are attributed to alpha-particle radiation emitted by the plutonium. However, since plutonium is a chemically active heavy metal, one cannot ignore the possibility of chemical toxicity of the low-specific-activity isotopes, 239 Pu, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu. The preponderance of our knowledge of plutonium toxicology has come from short-term studies of relatively high dosage levels in several animal species. The consequences of high-level internal exposures can be predicted with confidence in experimental animals and probably also in man. However, considering the care with which plutonium is handled in the nuclear industry, a high-level contamination event is unlikely. Considerably less is known about the long-term effects of low levels of contamination. (250 references) (U.S.)

  17. Carinal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed...

  18. The four cornerstones of Evolutionary Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickham, John W

    2011-05-01

    Evolutionary Toxicology is the study of the effects of chemical pollutants on the genetics of natural populations. Research in Evolutionary Toxicology uses experimental designs familiar to the ecotoxicologist with matched reference and contaminated sites and the selection of sentinel species. It uses the methods of molecular genetics and population genetics, and is based on the theories and concepts of evolutionary biology and conservation genetics. Although it is a relatively young field, interest is rapidly growing among ecotoxicologists and more and more field studies and even controlled laboratory experiments are appearing in the literature. A number of population genetic impacts have been observed in organisms exposed to pollutants which I refer to here as the four cornerstones of Evolutionary Toxicology. These include (1) genome-wide changes in genetic diversity, (2) changes in allelic or genotypic frequencies caused by contaminant-induced selection acting at survivorship loci, (3) changes in dispersal patterns or gene flow which alter the genetic relationships among populations, and (4) changes in allelic or genotypic frequencies caused by increased mutation rates. It is concluded that population genetic impacts of pollution exposure are emergent effects that are not necessarily predictable from the mode of toxicity of the pollutant. Thus, to attribute an effect to a particular contaminant requires a careful experimental design which includes selection of appropriate reference sites, detailed chemistry analyses of environmental samples and tissues, and the use of appropriate biomarkers to establish exposure and effect. This paper describes the field of Evolutionary Toxicology and discusses relevant field studies and their findings. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  19. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Biliary Cholangitis Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Liver Transplant View or Print All Sections Definition & ...

  20. Experimental uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Liza; Enskog, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Today, most causes of infertility are successfully treated. Yet there is still a subgroup of female infertility affecting around 4%, which so far is untreatable because of an absolute uterine factor. To acquire motherhood, these women are today referred to either adoption or surrogacy. Research in the field of uterus transplantation has been evaluated in different animal models for decades and has presently reached a human clinical application as a possible treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. Organ transplantation is no longer reserved to those with a life-threatening disease and neither is organ transplantation together with concurrent immunosuppression prohibiting pregnancy. Uterus transplantation involves four parties - recipient, donor, partner of recipient and future child - and is a subject of ethical controversies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High-resolution mass spectrometry in toxicology: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, H H; Meyer, Markus R

    2016-09-01

    This paper reviews high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) approaches using time-of-flight or Orbitrap techniques for research and application in various toxicology fields, particularly in clinical toxicology and forensic toxicology published since 2013 and referenced in PubMed. In the introduction, an overview on applications of HRMS in various toxicology fields is given with reference to current review articles. Papers concerning HRMS in metabolism, screening, and quantification of pharmaceuticals, drugs of abuse, and toxins in human body samples are critically reviewed. Finally, a discussion on advantages as well as limitations and future perspectives of these methods is included.

  2. Transplant Information Portal for Patient Management in Organ Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Godo, Ferenc; Nagy, Geza; Fehervari, Imre; Markovics, Gyula; Brugal, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    The RETRANSPLANT (HC 4028 & IN 4028) project sponsored by European Commission - Directorate General XIII, Telecommunications, Information Market and Exploitation of Research, Telematics Application for Health, aimed to develop a portal to bridge the various and geographically dispersed institutions playing a role in the complex process of organ collection from a donor and transplantation into one or several recipients. The generic model used was kidney transplantation and the information and communication technologies developed so far networked dialysis centers, organ transplant surgery clinics, tissue typing laboratories, organizations coordinating recipient to donor selection, and other health care facilities for organ transplant services in the Central and Eastern European Countries using XML technologies.

  3. Corneal Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard

    Corneal transplantation has been performed for more than 100 years. Until 15 years ago the state-of-the art type of transplantation was penetrating keratoplasty, but since the start of this millennium, newly designed surgical techniques have developed considerably. Today, the vast majority of ker...

  4. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital for 7 to 21 days after a heart transplant. The first 24 to 48 hours will likely be in ... follow your self-care instructions. Biopsies of the heart muscle are ... after transplant, and then less often after that. This helps ...

  5. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant surgery include: You are placed on the heart-lung machine. One or both of your lungs are removed. For people who are having a double lung transplant, most or all of the steps from the first side are completed before the second side is ...

  6. Mammalian Toxicology Testing: Problem Definition Study, Global Army Toxicology Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    antisepsis, anesthesia properties) Artifical Skin and Contouring Material Esophageal/Tracheal Transplant Materials Microencapsulated Antibiotics...Devices Dental Devices Dental Diseases Dental Materiels Biocompatible Tooth Implants Artificial Bone Implant Materials Beryliumin Castings Beryliumin...biocompatible, with nemostasis, antisepsis, anesthesia properties) Artifical Skin and Contouring Material Esophageal/Tracheal Transplant Materials

  7. Uterus transplantation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats

    2017-05-01

    Uterus transplantation is today the only available treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility which is caused by either congenital/surgical uterine absence or that a present uterus is non-functioning. Structured animal-based research, from rodents to nonhuman primates, was the scientific basis for a successful introduction of uterus transplantation as a clinical procedure. The patient groups for uterus transplantation, the preclinical research and data from the published human cases will be covered herein. During recent years the concept of bioengineering of organs and tissues has emerged. Creation of a bioengineered uterus is in the initial research state, with experiments performed in rodents. The research that has been performed to create a bioengineered uterus will be summarized. In conclusion, uterus transplantation is now a clinical experimental procedure for treatment of uterine factor infertility. In parallel to the establishment of this combined assisted reproduction technique and transplantation procedure as a routine clinical procedure, we predict that uterus bioengineering will develop further towards introduction within the human setting, but that this process will take several years.

  8. Carinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed from one dog and transplanted into a second dog. Two dogs lived for over four months with immunosuppression. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that carinal transplantation can succeed if (1) the calibre of the graft is matched with that of the recipient; (2) there is an abundant blood supply to the graft; (3) appropriate immunosuppression is provided; (4) ventilation is adequate during surgery. Images PMID:1465758

  9. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Luis G.

    2009-01-01

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  10. Clinical toxicology and military application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, S A

    2006-01-01

    The changing operational tempo and types of deployment have, since the end of the Cold War, required a change in CBRN training. The threat from weapons of mass destruction has been replaced with the threat from improvised explosive devices and insurgent attempts to develop asymmetric weapons to target military and civilian populations. In addition exposure to hazardous materials as well as environmental hazards and natural toxins requires a greater awareness of the necessary supportive and definitive management. Developing a cadre of specialists with an interest in toxicology and environmental medicine, within either emergency or acute medicine, would be advantageous to deployed units as well as specialised units, including those tasked in support of UK homeland security. An established pathway for sub-specialisation in clinical toxicology does not yet exist. With the establishment of the College of Emergency Medicine, as well as the Acute Medicine Society and Intensive Care Society further development of clinical toxicology is likely.

  11. Abstracts from the 2017 American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Annual Scientific Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    These are the abstracts of the 2017 American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Annual Scientific Meeting. Included here are 120 abstracts that will be presented in March 2017, including research studies from around the globe and the ToxIC collaboration, clinically significant case reports describing new toxicologic phenomena, and encore presentations from other scientific meetings.

  12. Genomics and systems biology - How relevant are the developments to veterinary pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses some of the recent developments in genomics and its current and future relevance for veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. With the rapid progress made in this field several new approaches in pharmacological and toxicological research have developed and drug discovery and

  13. [Establishment and activities of scientific school of industrial toxicology in institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkatchova, T A; Ivanov, N G

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with stages of establishment and development of toxicologic studies in the Institute over 90 years. The authors stress the role of professor N.S. Pravdin and RAMSc Corresponding Member I.V. Sanotsky in formulation and solving major problems of toxicology, in specifying its methodologic background. Priority directions in theoretic and applied research are presented, main results are given.

  14. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21 st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVES: According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-first Century, modem methods ("omics," in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods, etc.) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella ma...

  15. Latin America's present and future challenges in toxicology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, M.

    2005-01-01

    Industrialization that Latin America has experienced during the past 50 years, the increase of population and the growth of chemical-related industries has generated a variety of environmental problems that must be addressed. After assessing these profound changes, greater emphasis should be placed on the study of environmental health and toxicology. Latin American countries face many problems that are common to other developing nations. Therefore, there is a demand for safety assessment and regulatory control of chemicals that create a need for increasing numbers of toxicologists. To meet this demand, educational programs in toxicology have to be designed. This paper utilizes a consultation questionnaire that includes toxicology-network members, scientists and educational institutions where toxicology is taught. An analysis of the information collected is made, with an emphasis on what we currently lack and on future challenges for toxicology professionals. Although the response from the study institutions was 65% (13 countries out of 20), the paper aims to assess the present situation of toxicology. The convenience for a certification/recognition for toxicologists is also evaluated. Action needs to be taken to promote scientific development based on regional specific needs that require increasing at the number of toxicology programs, and promoting of cooperation between academics and researchers. Among the limitations we have are the variability of curricula, objectives and priorities. The increasing globalization of markets and regulations requires the harmonization of graduate/postgraduate programs to ensure that risk assessment and management are dealt with uniformly. Cooperation among our countries and international assistance should play a more prominent role in the promotion of regional integration and the more efficient utilization of international experience in defining educational policies

  16. phytochemical screening, antibacterial and toxicological activities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dealer

    The phytochemical screening, antibacterial and toxicological activities of extracts of the stem bark of Acacia senegal were investigated. ... Keywords: Phytochemical Screening, Antibacterial Activity, Toxicological Activity Acacia senegal,. Extracts. INTRODUCTION ..... Vegetable Drugs; Chemical Industries. Branch; Division of ...

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrolein (2003 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Acrolein: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Acrolein and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database.

  18. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A bibliographic database on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) with references to developmental and reproductive toxicology...

  19. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, a new journal to meet a real need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borm Paul

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This Editorial is to announce Particle and Fibre Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. The field of particle and fibre toxicology has a long and famous history stretching from Agricola and Paracelsus in the 15th and 16th century to the challenges of the 21st century-nanoparticles, nanotubes and particulate matter (PM10 to name just three. Throughout this time there has been no single journal dedicated to the toxicology of particles and fibres and this is finally corrected by the launch of Particle and Fibre Toxicology. The rationale for Particle and Fibre Toxicology rests on this need for a single multi-disciplinary journal that can cover all research relevant to particle and fibre toxicology, from Hygiene studies, through particle generation and characterisation, to animal, cell and human toxicology studies, dosimetry and modelling. The editorial also deals with the philosophy and practicalities of Open Access publishing, the journal's peer-review policy and conflict-of-interest. Particle and Fibre Toxicology is aimed at bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings towards a better understanding of how particles and fibres adversely affect the lungs and the body generally. We hope that the launch of the new journal will aid in the advance of this important discipline to the greater benefit of occupational and public health and invite scientists working in this key discipline to submit their research.

  20. Institute of Genetics and Toxicology of Fission Products (IGT) of Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Progress report on R and D work in 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The main research activities of the IGT in 1985 according to the R and D programme set up for that year have been carried out under the roof of eight different projects or programmes: Gene repair; gene regulation; biological cancerogenesis; molecular genetics of eukaryotes; radiotoxicology of actinides; biochemistry of actinides and other heavy metals; biophysics of organometallic compounds; biochemical principles of decorporation therapy. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Hair Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants Before (left) and after (right) - top ...

  2. Cornea Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swelling of the cornea Signs and symptoms of cornea rejection In some cases, your body's immune system ... the risks of the procedure. Finding a donor cornea Most corneas used in cornea transplants come from ...

  3. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Liver Transplant Back In ...

  4. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings that deal will radioactive particles. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics

  5. Regulatory issues in accreditation of toxicology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    Clinical toxicology laboratories and forensic toxicology laboratories operate in a highly regulated environment. This article outlines major US legal/regulatory issues and requirements relevant to accreditation of toxicology laboratories (state and local regulations are not covered in any depth). The most fundamental regulatory distinction involves the purposes for which the laboratory operates: clinical versus nonclinical. The applicable regulations and the requirements and options for operations depend most basically on this consideration, with clinical toxicology laboratories being directly subject to federal law including mandated options for accreditation and forensic toxicology laboratories being subject to degrees of voluntary or state government–required accreditation.

  6. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, C.E.I. dos; Dias, J.F.; Jobim, P.F.C.; Yoneama, M.L.; Andrade, V.M.; Amaral, L.; Silva, J. da

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  7. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.E.I. dos; Dias, J.F.; Jobim, P.F.C.; Yoneama, M.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Laboratorio de Implantacao Ionica; Andrade, V.M. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular; Amaral, L.; Silva, J. da [Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Toxicologia Generica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  8. Toxicology Testing in Fatally Injured Workers: A Review of Five Years of Iowa FACE Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Peek-Asa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Toxicology testing of fatally injured workers is not routinely conducted. We completed a case-series study of 2005–2009 occupational fatalities captured by Iowa’s Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE Program. The goals of our research were to: (1 measure the proportion of FACE cases that undergo toxicology testing, and describe the factors associated with being tested, and (2 measure the rate of positive toxicology tests, the substances identified and the demographics and occupations of victims who tested positive. Case documents and toxicology laboratory reports were reviewed. There were 427 occupational deaths from 2005 to 2009. Only 69% underwent toxicology testing. Younger workers had greater odds of being tested. Among occupational groups, workers in farming, fishing and forestry had half the odds of being tested compared to other occupational groups. Of the 280 cases with toxicology tests completed, 22% (n = 61 were found to have positive toxicology testing. Commonly identified drug classes included cannabinoids and alcohols. Based on the small number of positive tests, older victims (65+ years tested positive more frequently than younger workers. Management, business, science, arts, service and sales/office workers had proportionately more positive toxicology tests (almost 30% compared with other workers (18–22%. These results identify an area in need of further research efforts and a potential target for injury prevention strategies.

  9. Toxicological effect of consumption of extract of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The leaves of J. tanjorensis are locally consumed as vegetable added to daily foods and has also served a medicinal purpose, however, it toxicological effects is yet to be fully evaluated in our environment. Aim: The present research was to assess the effects of the extract of the leaf of Jatropha tanjorensis on ...

  10. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry at EPA's Western Ecology Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    The facility for the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Western Ecology Division (WED) has been involved in environmental toxicology and chemistry research since its inception in 1961 when it was the Pacific Northwest Water Laboratory. Currently, WED is one of four ecolog...

  11. Kidney-Pancreas Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Menu Search Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health ... Tests for Transplant Care After Kidney Transplant Common Organ Donation and Transplantation Terms The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the ...

  12. The PIERDUB project: International Project on Education and Research in Donation at University of Barcelona: training university students about donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyalich, M; Paredes, D; Ballesté, C; Menjívar, A

    2010-01-01

    Donation and transplantation is an accepted therapeutic option when organ failure or tissue replacements are needed to save or improve the quality of life. However, in most medical schools there is no specific training for it, thus disregarding the key role of university students for the future success of the process. Knowledge diffusion about the donation procedure to clarify doubts and stimulate positive attitudes toward donation. Training university students in the donation and transplantation process. Research about the previous donation knowledge and the impact in donation indexes. Three different phases have been designed: (1) Training the University of Barcelona Health Sciences School students; (2) Training the Health Sciences School students in other faculties of Catalonia, Spain, and International; and (3) research. Since 2005, we have offered yearly an Optional Credits Course to medical students with duration of 45 hours, and two Donation days opened to health sciences students. Since 2007, promotional campaigns have been carried out in medicine and other health sciences faculties. Until now, 818 answered surveys have been collected to evaluate previous knowledge among university students. Training medical and other health sciences students in the donation process will improve quality of medical education and develop a trainer role for future professionals to help improve donation rates.

  13. Everolimus in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper JE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available James E Cooper¹, Uwe Christians², Alexander C Wiseman¹¹Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Transplant Center, ²iC42 Integrated Solutions in Systems Biology for Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Everolimus is a novel target of rapamycin (mTOR-I analog that has recently been approved in combination with cyclosporine A and steroids for use in the prevention of organ rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Compared with rapamycin, everolimus is characterized by a shorter half-life and improved bioavailability. Prior to US Food and Drug Administration approval, a number of Phase II and III clinical trials were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of everolimus in combination with calcineurin inhibitors for preventing acute rejection and promoting allograft survival in kidney transplant recipients. In this report, we review the pharmacokinetic properties of everolimus, the clinical efficacy studies that led to its approval for use in kidney transplantation, as well as reported data on patient safety and tolerability associated with its use.Keywords: mTOR inhibitors, kidney transplantation, everolimus

  14. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Barry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals. The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation. Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure

  15. Tolerogenic therapies in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia K Page

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of immunologic tolerance was discovered in the 1940s, the pursuit of tolerance induction in human transplantation has led to a rapid development of pharmacologic and biologic agents. Short-term graft survival remains an all-time high, but successful withdrawal of immunosuppression to achieve operational tolerance rarely occurs outside of liver transplantation. Collaborative efforts through the NIH sponsored Immune Tolerance Network and the European Commission sponsored Reprogramming the Immune System for Establishment of Tolerance consortia have afforded researchers opportunity to evaluate the safety and efficacy of tolerogenic strategies, investigate mechanisms of tolerance, and identify molecular and genetic markers that distinguish the tolerance phenotype. In this article, we review traditional and novel approaches to inducing tolerance for organ transplantation, with an emphasis on their translation into clinical trials.

  16. Biomarkers in solid organ transplantation: establishing personalized transplantation medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances in molecular and in silico research have enabled significant progress towards personalized transplantation medicine. It is now possible to conduct comprehensive biomarker development studies of transplant organ pathologies, correlating genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information from donor and recipient with clinical and histological phenotypes. Translation of these advances to the clinical setting will allow assessment of an individual patient's risk of allograft damage or accommodation. Transplantation biomarkers are needed for active monitoring of immunosuppression, to reduce patient morbidity, and to improve long-term allograft function and life expectancy. Here, we highlight recent pre- and post-transplantation biomarkers of acute and chronic allograft damage or adaptation, focusing on peripheral blood-based methodologies for non-invasive application. We then critically discuss current findings with respect to their future application in routine clinical transplantation medicine. Complement-system-associated SNPs present potential biomarkers that may be used to indicate the baseline risk for allograft damage prior to transplantation. The detection of antibodies against novel, non-HLA, MICA antigens, and the expression of cytokine genes and proteins and cytotoxicity-related genes have been correlated with allograft damage and are potential post-transplantation biomarkers indicating allograft damage at the molecular level, although these do not have clinical relevance yet. Several multi-gene expression-based biomarker panels have been identified that accurately predicted graft accommodation in liver transplant recipients and may be developed into a predictive biomarker assay. PMID:21658299

  17. Toxicology of Krypton-85

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to obtain biological data to supplement earlier evaluations of the hazards of 85 Kr exposure. The studies include both short-term and chronic exposure of rats, dogs and sheep to determine tissue distribution and retention kinetics for metabolic modeling purposes. Dose-effect studies in rats exposed acutely as newborns or chronically for most of their life span are included to identify tissues at risk and determine tumorigenic potency

  18. Handbook of toxicology of chemical warfare agents

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This groundbreaking book covers every aspect of deadly toxic chemicals used as weapons of mass destruction and employed in conflicts, warfare and terrorism. Including findings from experimental as well as clinical studies, this one-of-a-kind handbook is prepared in a very user- friendly format that can easily be followed by students, teachers and researchers, as well as lay people. Stand-alone chapters on individual chemicals and major topics allow the reader to easily access required information without searching through the entire book. This is the first book that offers in-depth coverage of individual toxicants, target organ toxicity, major incidents, toxic effects in humans, animals and wildlife, biosensors, biomarkers, on-site and laboratory analytical methods, decontamination and detoxification procedures, prophylactic, therapeutic and countermeasures, and the role of homeland security. Presents a comprehensive look at all aspects of chemical warfare toxicology in one reference work. This saves research...

  19. Cadaveric transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokal R

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation is already the optimum treatment for terminal renal failure. Donor organ shortage means that there are large number of patients on dialysis awaiting this treatment. This has in some countries led to unacceptable unscrupulous practices of live non-related graft donation. The outcome of graft and patient after transplantation has improved significantly based on a better understanding of immunopathology, immunosuppression and tissue typing. The future is promising and xenografting may well solve the organ shortage but undoubtedly will raise other issues.

  20. Pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation can be complicated by vascular thrombosis, stenosis, or anastomotic leak, complications that predispose to transplant pancreatectomy. The relative roles of noninvasive radiologic studies in such vascular complications have been correlated with angiographic or pathologic data. The results of 54 scintigraphic studies, 25 CT studies, 16 sonograms, and 23 color Doppler examinations have been correlated with those of 40 angiograms and 28 pathologic studies in a population of 185 recipients. CT (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 75%; accuracy, 92%) and US (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 80%; accuracy, 85%) were most helpful in noninvasive screening for vascular complications, while angiography remains nearly definite in the radiographic diagnosis of these problems

  1. The EPA Comptox Chemistry Dashboard: A Web-Based Data Integration Hub for Toxicology Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  2. Eyebrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, G D

    2001-04-01

    Reconstruction of the eyebrow has historically been accomplished with temporal scalp pedicle flap formation or free composite scalp grafts. These two techniques may be associated with substantial morbidity and a false, overly dense eyebrow appearance. Hair transplantation of the eyebrows has been described with excellent results, but is relatively underreported in the literature. To determine whether modern techniques of micrograft hair transplantation can suitably re-create an aesthetic eyebrow in a case of iatrogenic eyebrow alopecia. A 33-year-old woman with iatrogenic eyebrow alopecia underwent four sessions of eyebrow micrograft hair transplantation to re-create both eyebrows. Suitable aesthetic eyebrows were re-created in a symmetric fashion with proper hair orientation. The process was time consuming and tedious, but highly effective. Eyebrow transplantation is a suitable alternative to pedicle flap formation and composite scalp grafting. It is a straightforward procedure that can be performed in the office under local anesthesia with minimal attendant morbidity. The result may be superior to that seen with more involved eyebrow replacement procedures.

  3. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  4. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  5. 78 FR 49276 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... sciences, economics and statistics, as well as representatives of transplant candidates, transplant...; behavioral sciences; economics and econometrics; organ procurement organizations; transplant candidates... detailed information concerning financial interests, consultancies, research grants, and/or contracts that...

  6. 75 FR 57807 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... sciences, economics and statistics, as well as representatives of transplant candidates, transplant... bioethics; behavioral sciences; economics and econometrics; organ procurement organizations; transplant... information concerning financial interests, consultancies, research grants, and/or contracts that might be...

  7. Toxicology of saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D L

    1984-10-01

    Saccharin, like most of the artificial sweeteners, was discovered quite by accident. The controversy regarding its use as a food additive is reflected by the number of chronic/carcinogenic studies conducted to assess its safety. Two chronic studies were conducted prior to the ban of cyclamates in 1969, at which time 10 additional single-generation studies were initiated using the mouse, rat, and hamster. None of these studies resulted in overt regulatory action. However, subsequent to completion of three two-generation chronic rat feeding studies, saccharin was banned as a food additive in Canada, but a moratorium was placed on its proposed ban in the United States. These events gave rise to a great deal of scientific research into the possible mechanism(s) by which saccharin elicited bladder tumors in rats, and efforts to find epidemiological evidence that saccharin caused cancer in man. At the present time neither effort has produced unequivocal results; however, it seems certain that this latest saccharin controversy may result in changes to the regulations dealing with food additives.

  8. The start of the transplant journey: Referral for pediatric solid organ transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellmer, Diana; Brosig, Cheryl; Wray, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the majority of the psychosocial transplant literature is on post-transplant outcomes but the transplant journey starts much earlier than this, at the point when transplantation is first considered and a referral for transplant evaluation is made. In this review we cover information regarding the meaning of the referral process for solid organ transplantation. We discuss various factors of the referral for transplantation including the impact of referral on the pediatric patient and the family, potential expectations and misconceptions held by pediatric patients and parents, the role of health literacy, decision making factors, and the informational needs of pediatric patients and parents. We elucidate steps that providers can take to enhance transplant referral and provide suggestions for much needed research within this area. PMID:24438194

  9. Applicability of Computational Systems Biology in Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Hadrup, Niels; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2014-01-01

    be used to establish hypotheses on links between the chemical and human diseases. Such information can also be applied for designing more intelligent animal/cell experiments that can test the established hypotheses. Here, we describe how and why to apply an integrative systems biology method......Systems biology as a research field has emerged within the last few decades. Systems biology, often defined as the antithesis of the reductionist approach, integrates information about individual components of a biological system. In integrative systems biology, large data sets from various sources...... and databases are used to model and predict effects of chemicals on, for instance, human health. In toxicology, computational systems biology enables identification of important pathways and molecules from large data sets; tasks that can be extremely laborious when performed by a classical literature search...

  10. The Role of Epigenomics in Aquatic Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brander, Susanne M; Biales, Adam D; Connon, Richard E

    2017-10-01

    Over the past decade, the field of molecular biology has rapidly incorporated epigenetic studies to evaluate organism-environment interactions that can result in chronic effects. Such responses arise from early life stage stress, the utilization of genetic information over an individual's life time, and transgenerational inheritance. Knowledge of epigenetic mechanisms provides the potential for a comprehensive evaluation of multigenerational and heritable effects from environmental stressors, such as contaminants. Focused studies have provided a greater understanding of how many responses to environmental stressors are driven by epigenetic modifiers. We discuss the promise of epigenetics and suggest future research directions within the field of aquatic toxicology, with a particular focus on the potential for identifying key heritable marks with consequential impacts at the organism and population levels. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:2565-2573. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  11. Distance learning and toxicology: New horizons for Paracelsus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggins, Jane; Morris, John; Peterson, C. Erik

    2005-01-01

    Distance learning offers many advantages to students and teachers of almost any scientific discipline. Toxicology is no exception. For example, should Paracelsus be interested in learning more about toxicology at Drexel University, he would have the opportunity to take two courses in this subject utilizing the content management software, WebCT. The two courses would offer a website from which he could view and/or download his notes for each class. He could correspond with the instructor as well as fellow students, participate in discussions about timely topics, and make presentations to the class, all via electronic communication. Moreover, his examinations would also be computerized. Although he might have the option of attending traditional 'face-to-face' lectures with other students in the class, he could also access these lectures at any time from a remote location by using the archive of taped lectures on the class website. Overall, Paracelsus would have access to many tools to enhance his understanding of toxicology, and he probably would never have to worry about parking before class (!). The two WebCT modules in toxicology that we have developed at Drexel represent the successful migration of two courses from a traditional 'face-to-face' model of classroom instruction to hybrid models that combine 'face-to-face' interaction with online instruction. Student and faculty evaluations of these courses have been very positive. Future plans include linking the two modules together so that students in the advanced class can do 'review' or 'remedial' work in the basic module. Furthermore, a library of video clips is also planned in which researchers will be discussing their work on various toxicologic topics. Students will be able to access these clips as resources from which to write research papers

  12. Distance learning and toxicology: new horizons for Paracelsus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane; Morris, John; Peterson, C Erik

    2005-09-01

    Distance learning offers many advantages to students and teachers of almost any scientific discipline. Toxicology is no exception. For example, should Paracelsus be interested in learning more about toxicology at Drexel University, he would have the opportunity to take two courses in this subject utilizing the content management software, WebCT. The two courses would offer a website from which he could view and/or download his notes for each class. He could correspond with the instructor as well as fellow students, participate in discussions about timely topics, and make presentations to the class, all via electronic communication. Moreover, his examinations would also be computerized. Although he might have the option of attending traditional "face-to-face" lectures with other students in the class, he could also access these lectures at any time from a remote location by using the archive of taped lectures on the class website. Overall, Paracelsus would have access to many tools to enhance his understanding of toxicology, and he probably would never have to worry about parking before class (!). The two WebCT modules in toxicology that we have developed at Drexel represent the successful migration of two courses from a traditional "face-to-face" model of classroom instruction to hybrid models that combine "face-to-face" interaction with online instruction. Student and faculty evaluations of these courses have been very positive. Future plans include linking the two modules together so that students in the advanced class can do "review" or "remedial" work in the basic module. Furthermore, a library of video clips is also planned in which researchers will be discussing their work on various toxicologic topics. Students will be able to access these clips as resources from which to write research papers.

  13. Clinical tests in aquatic toxicology: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrle, P M; Mayer, F L

    1980-02-01

    Hazard assessment of chemicals to aquatic organisms involves the use of many toxicity tests. Acute toxicity tests, embryo-larval toxicity tests, and chronic toxicity tests that measure survival, growth, and reproductive effects now provide the most relative utility for evaluation of potential chemical hazards to aquatic life. Physiological, biochemical, and histological measurements have a low relative utility as diagnostic tests in aquatic toxicology because it is not yet possible to relate changes in these sublethal responses to adverse environmental impacts. The problem of interpreting the toxicological significance of chemical-induced changes in biochemical and physiological mechanisms is twofold: (1) the understanding of physiological and biochemical regulatory mechanisms in fish is limited; and (2) parallel changes in these mechanisms are difficult to correlate with toxicant exposure and impaired ability of fish to survive. To overcome this problem, more physiological and biochemical research must be conducted in conjunction with toxicity studies that measure important whole-animal responses. Toxicant-induced biochemical and physiological responses must be correlated unequivocally with responses related to reproduction, growth and development, survival, or fish health if pertinent diagnostic tests are to be developed for use in aquatic toxicology. The use of diagnostic tests in hazard assessment procedures can decrease the time required for safety evaluation of chemicals, define no-effect exposure concentrations more adequately, and provide a better understanding of the mode of action of chemicals. Considerations for improving the status of the "state of the art" of diagnostic or clinical tests in aquatic toxicology are discussed.

  14. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  15. The inhibitory effect of Shaoyao Ruangan formula on mice with transplanted H22 hepatocarcinoma and its mechanism research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Statistical Analysis: Data analyzed using a computer SPSS program. Results and Conclusions: Comparing with blank control group, the tumor inhibitor rate (IR of low, middle and high dose group of SRF was 17.72%, 33.99% and 23.73%, respectively. IR of CTX was 43.95%. The results also showed that each group of SRF could prolong the life span of H22-bearing mice to some extent. In addition, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR results revealed that SRF was able to influence related genes expression in the tumor tissues of H22-bearing mice. The expression of TGF-β receptor type II (TBRII gene was significantly upregulated in each SRF group comparing with normal saline group. On the contrary, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB was significantly downregulated in each SRF group comparing with normal saline group. In summary, SRF showed tumor-suppressing effect on mice with transplanted H22 hepatocarcinoma. The mechanism of antitumor effect may induced by upregulating TBRII expression and down-regulating NF-κB expression.

  16. Transplant Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review and discuss the great variety of ethical issues related to organ donation, organ procurement, transplant activities, and new ethical problems created as a result of technologic and scientific developments. An extensive literature survey was made, and expert opinions were obtained. The gap between demand and supply of organs for transplant has yielded to organ trafficking, organ tourism, and commercialism. This problem seems to be the most important issue, and naturally there are ethical dilemmas related to it. A wide number of ideas have been expressed on the subject, and different solutions have been proposed. The struggle against organ trafficking and commercialism should include legislation, efforts to increase deceased-donor donations, and international cooperation. China's policy to procure organs from prisoners sentenced to death is unethical, and the international community should exert more pressure on the Chinese government to cease this practice. Each particular ethical dilemma should be taken separately and managed.

  17. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Amine promiscuity and toxicology analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther C Y; Steeno, Gregory; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Zhang, Liying; Shah, Falgun; Price, David A

    2017-02-01

    Drug discovery programs often face challenges to obtain sufficient duration of action of the drug (i.e. seek longer half-lives). If the pharmacodynamic response is driven by free plasma concentration of the drug then extending the plasma drug concentration is a valid approach. Half-life is dependent on the volume of distribution, which in turn can be dependent upon the ionization state of the molecule. Basic compounds tend to have a higher volume of distribution leading to longer half-lives. However, it has been shown that bases may also have higher promiscuity. In this work, we describe an analysis of in vitro pharmacological profiling and toxicology data investigating the role of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in imparting promiscuity and thus off-target toxicity. Primary amines are found to be less promiscuous in in vitro assays and have improved profiles in in vivo toxicology studies compared to secondary and tertiary amines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive Development and Learning in the Pediatric Organ Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Steven A.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating neurocognitive changes following organ transplantation in pediatric end-stage renal and liver disease. Findings suggest possible neurocognitive benefits associated with organ transplantation. Recommendations are made for methodological improvements in future research. (DB)

  20. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  1. Electronic cigarettes in the USA: a summary of available toxicology data and suggestions for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the toxicological profiles of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users and the public health. Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted between October 2012 and October 2013 using five electronic databases. Search terms such as ‘e-cigarettes’ and ‘electronic delivery devices’ were used to identify the toxicology information for e-cigarettes. Results As of October 2013, the scientific literature contains very limited information regarding the toxicity of e-cigarettes commercially available in the USA. While some preliminary toxicology data suggests that e-cigarette users are exposed to lower levels of toxicants relative to cigarette smokers, the data available is extremely limited at this time. At present, there is insufficient toxicological data available to perform thorough risk assessment analyses for e-cigarettes; few toxicology studies evaluating e-cigarettes have been conducted to date, and standard toxicological testing paradigms have not been developed for comparing disparate types of tobacco products such as e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes. Conclusions Overall, the limited toxicology data on e-cigarettes in the public domain is insufficient to allow a thorough toxicological evaluation of this new type of tobacco product. In the future, the acquisition of scientific datasets that are derived from scientifically robust standard testing paradigms, include comprehensive chemical characterisation of the aerosol, provide information on users’ toxicant exposure levels, and from studies replicated by independent researchers will improve the scientific community's ability to perform robust toxicological evaluations of e-cigarettes. PMID:24732158

  2. Radiating toxicological and ecological consequences of extraction of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svambaev, Z.A.; Svambaev, E.A.; Sultanbekov, G.A; Tusupbekova, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    In scientific work researchers take up questions of radiation, toxicity and ecological danger at extraction of natural uranium. In work it is resulted results of gauging of radiation in separate parts of a cycle, and also as a whole at underground extractions of uranium. The level of ionization actions of photon radiation in a radiating field with a productive solution which represents the big radiating, toxicological and ecological danger to Wednesday is shown on the average on cycles of feature of work.

  3. Occupational cancer in France: epidemiology, toxicology, prevention, and compensation.

    OpenAIRE

    Aubrun, J C; Binet, S; Bozec, C; Brochard, P; Dimerman, S; Fontaine, B; Guénel, P; Luce, D; Martinet, Y; Moulin, J J; Mur, J M; Pietruszynski, M; Vallayer, C

    1999-01-01

    This article is a description of the current situation in France with regard to occupational cancer: research, prevention, and occupation. Toxicologic experiments are carried out using (italic)in vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) tests, particularly using transgenic mice. Several epidemiologic studies have been conducted over the last decades: population-based case-control studies; mortality studies and cancer incidence studies carried out in historical cohorts of workers employed i...

  4. Mammal toxicology of synthetic pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Ryozo; Yamada, Tomoya; Kawamura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrethroids show moderate acute oral toxicity in rodents, and their typical toxicological signs are tremors (T syndrome) for Type I (generally non-cyano pyrethroids) and choreoathetosis with salivation (CS syndrome) for Type II (generally α-cyano pyrethroids). However, some pyrethroids show mixed clinical signs. Mainly Type II pyrethroids cause paresthesia, which is characterized by transient burning/tingling/itching sensation of the exposed skin. Also, it has been suggested that some pyrethroids cause developmental neurotoxicity, but available evidence has been judged to be insufficient. While some pyrethroids have been shown to cause tumors in rodent models, the tumor induction does not appear to reflect a common carcinogenic endpoint for this particular subset of compounds. Analysis of carcinogenic mode of action in some cases provides evidence not relevant in humans. Pyrethroids produce no common teratogenic effects in a particular species based on similarity in structure or mode of insecticidal action.

  5. Epidemiological Approaches to Metal Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological methods are crucial to extract as much valid information as possible from human metal exposures. Thus, modern epidemiological approaches have elucidated human health effects that were not apparent in the past. At the same time, metal toxicology has served as a useful arena...... for testing and further refining methods for study design and data analysis. In contrast to most organic compounds, metals are not broken down, and many of them are retained in the body for long periods, thereby facilitating exposure assessment. In conjunction with the use of inexpensive metal analytical...... to their propensity to cause chronic or delayed toxicity, epidemiological studies of metal toxicity have focused on a wide variety of organ systems, subtle effects as well as mortality, and differences in susceptibility. Toxic metals often serve as paradigms of environmental and occupational toxicity...

  6. Testing of Binders Toxicological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokova, V.; Nelyubova, V.; Rykunova, M.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents the results of a study of the toxicological effect of binders with different compositions on the vital activity of plant and animal test-objects. The analysis of the effect on plant cultures was made on the basis of the phytotesting data. The study of the effect of binders on objects of animal origin was carried out using the method of short-term testing. Based on the data obtained, binders are ranked according to the degree of increase in the toxic effect: Gypsum → Portland cement → Slag Portland cement. Regardless of the test-object type, the influence of binders is due to the release of various elements (calcium ions or heavy metals) into the solution. In case of plant cultures, the saturation of the solution with elements has a positive effect (there is no inhibitory effect), and in case of animal specimens - an increase in the toxic effect.

  7. Transplante uterino

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Margarida Teixeira Farias Meira de, 1992-

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho Final do Curso de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, 2016 A infertilidade de causa uterina afecta cerca de 3-5% da população geral, sendo a adopção e a gestação de substituição as únicas opções para estes casais atingirem a parentalidade, dado que é um problema ainda sem tratamento. Nas últimas décadas, foram realizados diversos estudos animais com o objectivo de demonstrar a viabilidade, segurança e eficácia do transplante uterino como ...

  8. Predictive toxicology: the paths of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, Ph.; Vallier, L.; Legallais, C.; Leclerc, E.; Prot, J.M.; Choucha, L.; Baudoin, R.; Dufresne, M.; Gautier, A.; Carpentier, B.; Mansuy, D.; Pery, A.; Brochot, C.; Manivet, Ph.; Rabilloud, Th.; Spire, C.; Coumoul, X.; Junot, Ch.; Laprevote, O.; Le pape, A.; Le Guevel, R.; Tourneur, E.; Ben Mkaddem, S.; Chassin, C.; Aloulou, M.; Goujon, J.M.; Hertif, A.; Ouali, N.; Vimont, S.; Monteiro, R.; Rondeau, E.; Elbim, C.; Werts, C.; Vandewalle, A.; Ben Mkaddem, S.; Pedruzzi, E.; Coant, N.; Bens, M.; Cluzeaud, F.; Ogier-Denis, E.; Pongnimitprasert, N.; Babin-Chevaye, C.; Fay, M.; Bernard, M.; Dupuy, C.; Ei Benna, J.; Gougerot-Pocidale, M.A.; Braut-Boucher, F.; Pinton, Ph.; Lucioli, J.; Tsybulskyy, D.; Joly, B.; Laffitte, J.; Bourges-Abella, N.; Oswald, I.P.; Kolf-Clauw, M.; Pierre, St.; Bats, A.S.; Chevallier, A.; Bui, L.Ch.; Ambolet-Camoit, A.; Garlatti, M.; Aggerbeck, M.; Barouki, R.; Al Khansa, I.; Blanck, O.; Guillouzo, A.; Bars, R.; Rouas, C.; Bensoussan, H.; Suhard, D.; Tessier, C.; Grandcolas, L.; Pallardy, M.; Gueguen, Y.; Sparfel, L.; Pinel-Marie, M.L.; Boize, M.; Koscielny, S.; Desmots, S.; Pery, A.; Fardel, O.; Alvergnas, M.; Rouleau, A.; Lucchi, G.; Mantion, G.; Heyd, B.; Richert, L.; Ducoroy, P.; Martin, H.; Val, St.; Martinon, L.; Cachier, H.; Yahyaoui, A.; Marfaing, H.; Baeza-Squiban, A.; Martin-Chouly, C.; Bonvallet, M.; Morzadec, C.; Fardel, O.; Vernhet, L.; Baverel, G.; El Hage, M.; Nazaret, R.; Conjard-Duplany, A.; Ferrier, B.; Martin, G.; Legendre, A.; Desmots, S.; Lecomte, A.; Froment, P.; Habert, R.; Lemazurier, E.; Robinel, F.; Dupont, O.; Sanfins, E.; Dairou, J.; Chaffotte, A.F.; Busi, F.; Rodrigues Lima, F.; Dupret, J.M.; Mayati, A.; Le Ferrec, E.; Levoin, N.; Paris, H.; Uriac, Ph.; N'Diaye, M.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Fardel, O.; Assemat, E.; Boublil, L.; Borot, M.C.; Marano, F.; Baeza-Squiban, A.; Martiny, V.Y.; Moroy, G.; Badel, A.; Miteva, M.A.; Hussain, S.; Ferecatu, I.; Borot, C.; Andreau, K.; Baeza-Squiban, A.; Marano, F.; Boland, S.; Leroux, M.; Zucchini-Pascal, N.; Peyre, L.; Rahmani, R.; Buron, N.; Porcedou, M.; Fromenty, B.; Borgne-Sanchez, A.; Rogue, A.; Spire, C.; Claude, N.; Guillouzo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Prevention of possible noxious effects in relation with the exposure to one or several chemical, physical or biological agents present in our domestic or professional environment is one of today's big public health stakes. Another stake is the better assessment of the risks linked with the use of health-care products. The efficacy and predictiveness of toxicology studies are directly related to the combination of alternate complementary methods and animal experiments (obtaining data from different species and with different models: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo). Despite important efforts, the toxicological evaluation remains perfectible. The proceedings of this 2010 congress of the French Society of cell pharmaco-toxicology deal with recent advances, both scientific and technological, in 'predictive toxicology'. Four main topics are approached: cell and organ models, 'omics', in silico modeling, and new technologies (imaging, cell ships, high-speed processing). Among the different presentations, 3 abstracts present some recent advances in imaging techniques applied to toxicology studies. These are: 1 - first uses in toxicology of TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy imaging (O. Laprevote, Paris-Descartes Univ. (FR)); 2 - Small animal imaging, a tool for predictive toxicology (A. Le Pape, CNRS Orleans (FR)); 3 - uranium localization at cell level using SIMS imaging technique (C. Rouas et al., IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses (FR)). (J.S.)

  9. An abridged photographic history of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Ignazio R; Cirillo, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most remarkable therapeutic advances in modern medicine; it started as an experiment and has become a life-saving practice. We briefly describe the major milestones of this multidisciplinary clinical science, the challenges that it still faces, and we consider the crucial contribution that its example could set for other medical fields. A review of the literature was conducted and a selection of images was made to complete a brief history of organ transplantation, with a particular focus on liver transplantation. The largest problem affecting organ transplantation today is the shortage of organs. Attention should be given to preserving the peculiar high ethical value that characterizes the very nature of organ transplantation. Methods successfully adopted by organ transplantation during the past 60 years can inspire promising fields, such as stem cell research, and provide useful tools to face the ethical challenges posed by scientific discoveries.

  10. Functional genomics in aquatic toxicology-do not forget the function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikinmaa, Mikko; Rytkönen, Kalle T

    2011-10-01

    Toxicological responses of an organism are disturbances of function. This as a starting point we review and discuss issues that we consider important in applying functional genomics to aquatic toxicology. Functional genomics includes all the steps in gene expression pathway. Thus, ultimately the goal is to relate genome information to protein activity. In ecotoxicogenomics the toxicological responses must further be combined with responses to natural environmental changes. We focus on fish, but also consider commonly used invertebrates, mainly Daphnia. We first go through the toxicologically important features of genomes of aquatic animals, and then review the reference gene approach to quantify transcript amount. Thereafter we emphasize the need to relate the mRNA and protein levels, and protein activity of individual genes. Finally we discuss how functional genomic investigations may be important in resolving current environmental problems and give our views of valuable future research topics. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Geriatric issues in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, M J

    1999-01-01

    There are an increasing amount of data which are compelling us to consider the issue of age in dealing with decisions regarding both renal transplant recipients and donors. These geriatric issues in transplantation can be summarized as follows: (1) The explosion of a geriatric population of patients with ESRD, in association with data showing a survival advantage of transplantation over wait-listed dialysis patients, demands an increase in expertise in transplantating patients over 60 years old. (2) The critical shortage in cadaveric organ supply is creating a variety of solutions including expanding the donor pool with older kidneys in which long term survival may be shorter than in kidneys from younger donors. (3) The donor shortage, in association with data demonstrating improved survival of living related and unrelated donor transplants, is generating an increased number of older (> 60 years old) individuals who want to donate to a relative, spouse or friend. Future efforts should be directed toward continued research designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these trends. We also need to provide improved training in geriatrics for nephrologists so that we and transplant surgeons can deliver better medical care to an aging population of patients with ESRD.

  12. Metabolomic application in toxicity evaluation and toxicological biomarker identification of natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan-Qian; Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Tang, Dan-Dan; Miao, Hua; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2016-05-25

    Natural product plays a vital role in disease prevention and treatment since the appearance of civilization, but the toxicity severely hinders its wide use. In order to avoid toxic effect as far as possible and use natural product safely, more comprehensive understandings of toxicity are urgently required. Since the metabolome represents the physiological or pathological status of organisms, metabolomics-based toxicology is of significance to observe potential injury before toxins have caused physiological or pathological damages. Metabolomics-based toxicology can evaluate toxicity and identify toxicological biomarker of natural product, which is helpful to guide clinical medication and reduce adverse drug reactions. In the past decades, dozens of metabolomic researches have been implemented on toxicity evaluation, toxicological biomarker identification and potential mechanism exploration of nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and central nervous system toxicity induced by pure compounds, extracts and compound prescriptions. In this paper, metabolomic technology, sample preparation, data process and analysis, and metabolomics-based toxicological research of natural product are reviewed, and finally, the potential problems and further perspectives in toxicological metabolomic investigations of natural product are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Career Transition Points in Toxicologic Pathology: Management and Consulting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Shambhunath; Osborne, Tanasa; Adler, Rick R; McDorman, Kevin S; Dillberger, John E; Ochoa, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    In the constantly evolving field of toxicologic pathology, a pathologist's career is often characterized by multiple career transitions. However, these transitions can be challenging and/or overwhelming and may require a shift in focus, strategic approach, and acquisition of new skills and expertise. In order to provide a forum to discuss challenges associated with career transitions and skill set/competencies required to navigate career changes effectively and successfully, the Career Development and Outreach Committee of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) sponsored a career development workshop entitled "Transitions in a Pathologist's Career" in conjunction with the STP 36th annual symposium. The presentations at this workshop provided perspectives of managers from pharmaceutical companies and Contract Research Organizations as well as consultants. This article is designed to provide brief summaries of their talks in this well-received career development workshop.

  14. Histo- and cytochemistry as a tool in environmental toxicology. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graumann, W. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Anatomy); Drukker, J. (Rijksuniversiteit Limburg, Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Anatomy and Embryology) (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    Toxicology is expected to play more and more a key role in the context of environmental pollution. The central question taken up by this book is whether histo- and cytochemistry, by virtue of their superior localization capabilities, can make decisive contribution to toxicology. This volume comprises lectures and reviews in different fields of research (e.g. carcinogenesis, Alzheimer's Disease, transport of mercury from silver amalgam restorations) using a spectrum of methodological techniques (e.g. enzyme histochemistry, immunocytochemistry, autometallography, microprobe analysis), presented at the 32nd symposium of the Gesellschaft fuer Histochemie (International Association of Histochemists) in Gargellen (Austria) from September 26-29, 1990. (orig.). With 207 figs., 28 tabs.

  15. Genetic toxicology in the 21st century: Reflections and future ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A symposium at the 40th anniversary of the Environmental Mutagen Society, held from October 24–28, 2009 in St. Louis, MO, surveyed the current status and future directions of genetic toxicology. This article summarizes the presentations and provides a perspective on the future. An abbreviated history is presented, highlighting the current standard battery of genotoxicity assays and persistent challenges. Application of computational toxicology to safety testing within a regulatory setting is discussed as a means for reducing the need for animal testing and human clinical trials, and current approaches and applications of in silico genotoxicity screening approaches across the pharmaceutical industry were surveyed and are reported here. The expanded use of toxicogenomics to illuminate mechanisms and bridge genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, and new public efforts to use high-throughput screening technologies to address lack of toxicity evaluation for the backlog of thousands of industrial chemicals in the environment are detailed. The Tox21 project involves coordinated efforts of four U.S. Government regulatory/research entities to use new and innovative assays to characterize key steps in toxicity pathways, including genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanisms for carcinogenesis. Progress to date, highlighting preliminary test results from the National Toxicology Program is summarized. Finally, an overview is presented of ToxCast™, a related research program of the

  16. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bocxlaer, J F; Clauwaert, K M; Lambert, W E; Deforce, D L; Van den Eeckhout, E G; De Leenheer, A P

    2000-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has evolved from a topic of mainly research interest into a routinely usable tool in various application fields. With the advent of new ionization approaches, especially atmospheric pressure, the technique has established itself firmly in many areas of research. Although many applications prove that LC-MS is a valuable complementary analytical tool to GC-MS and has the potential to largely extend the application field of mass spectrometry to hitherto "MS-phobic" molecules, we must recognize that the use of LC-MS in forensic toxicology remains relatively rare. This rarity is all the more surprising because forensic toxicologists find themselves often confronted with the daunting task of actually searching for evidence materials on a scientific basis without any indication of the direction in which to search. Through the years, mass spectrometry, mainly in the GC-MS form, has gained a leading role in the way such quandaries are tackled. The advent of robust, bioanalytically compatible combinations of liquid chromatographic separation with mass spectrometric detection really opens new perspectives in terms of mass spectrometric identification of difficult molecules (e.g., polar metabolites) or biopolymers with toxicological relevance, high throughput, and versatility. Of course, analytical toxicologists are generally mass spectrometry users rather than mass spectrometrists, and this difference certainly explains the slow start of LC-MS in this field. Nevertheless, some valuable applications have been published, and it seems that the introduction of the more universal atmospheric pressure ionization interfaces really has boosted interests. This review presents an overview of what has been realized in forensic toxicological LC-MS. After a short introduction into LC-MS interfacing operational characteristics (or limitations), it covers applications that range from illicit drugs to often abused prescription medicines and some

  17. [Innate immunity and transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first barrier against pathogen infection and has also the important function of activating the adaptive immunity. The receptors of innate immunity, such as toll-like receptors and other receptors, recognize as danger signals the molecular patterns of pathogens as well as those of endogenous molecules released by dying cells. The information is transmitted to adapter proteins that, through a chain of kinases that translate the signal to transcription factors regulating inflammatory genes. In the inflammatory milieu dendritic cells become mature, intercept the antigen and migrate to lymphoid organs where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Complement also exerts an important role of bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. In donor-deceased kidney transplantation, the innate immunity is triggered in the donor by brain death and is aggravated by the cold ischemia and even more by reperfusion. Once activated, innate immunity produces a local inflammatory environment leading to dendritic cell maturation and complement activation. Dendritic cells present the alloantigen to T cells and induce their differentiation towards effector Th1 and Th17 while inhibiting Th2 and T regulatory cells. A main goal of the current research in transplantation is to obtain an immunological tolerance. Experimental studies showed the possibility of inducing operative tolerance in murine models and even in primates with the infusion of regulatory dendritic cells. However, there are no data with this technique in clinical transplantation.

  18. Kidney injury and renal replacement therapy in heart transplant recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. L. Poz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of kidney injury and the characteristics of renal replacement therapy were considered in patient with dilated cardiomyopathy, who consequently underwent two heart transplantations and two kidney transplantations. Since the number of the patients needed both kidney and heart transplantation increases constantly, the multifaceted thorough research in this specific patient population is extremely important.

  19. Environmental chemistry and toxicology of mercury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2012-01-01

    ... employed in recent studies. The coverage discusses the environmental behavior and toxicological effects of mercury on organisms, including humans, and provides case studies at the end of each chapter...

  20. MINING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION WEB RESOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with...

  1. Comparative BioInformatics and Computational Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reflecting the numerous changes in the field since the publication of the previous edition, this third edition of Developmental Toxicology focuses on the mechanisms of developmental toxicity and incorporates current technologies for testing in the risk assessment process.

  2. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics. (DS)

  3. Food for thought ... A toxicology ontology roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Apic, Gordana; Carthew, Philip; Clark, Dominic; Cook, David; Dix, Ian; Escher, Sylvia; Hastings, Janna; Heard, David J; Jeliazkova, Nina; Judson, Philip; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Shah, Imran; Spjuth, Ola; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Toldo, Luca; Watson, David; White, Andrew; Yang, Chihae

    2012-01-01

    Foreign substances can have a dramatic and unpredictable adverse effect on human health. In the development of new therapeutic agents, it is essential that the potential adverse effects of all candidates be identified as early as possible. The field of predictive toxicology strives to profile the potential for adverse effects of novel chemical substances before they occur, both with traditional in vivo experimental approaches and increasingly through the development of in vitro and computational methods which can supplement and reduce the need for animal testing. To be maximally effective, the field needs access to the largest possible knowledge base of previous toxicology findings, and such results need to be made available in such a fashion so as to be interoperable, comparable, and compatible with standard toolkits. This necessitates the development of open, public, computable, and standardized toxicology vocabularies and ontologies so as to support the applications required by in silico, in vitro, and in vivo toxicology methods and related analysis and reporting activities. Such ontology development will support data management, model building, integrated analysis, validation and reporting, including regulatory reporting and alternative testing submission requirements as required by guidelines such as the REACH legislation, leading to new scientific advances in a mechanistically-based predictive toxicology. Numerous existing ontology and standards initiatives can contribute to the creation of a toxicology ontology supporting the needs of predictive toxicology and risk assessment. Additionally, new ontologies are needed to satisfy practical use cases and scenarios where gaps currently exist. Developing and integrating these resources will require a well-coordinated and sustained effort across numerous stakeholders engaged in a public-private partnership. In this communication, we set out a roadmap for the development of an integrated toxicology ontology

  4. Alcoholic hepatitis: appropriate indication for liver transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneekloth, Terry D; Niazi, Shehzad K; Simonetto, Douglas A

    2017-12-01

    The majority of liver transplantation centers have required patients with alcohol-induced liver disease to demonstrate a period of abstinence (generally 6 months' duration) to qualify for transplant listing. This requirement has excluded patients with alcoholic hepatitis from transplant consideration. Since 2011, several studies have examined the outcomes of patients undergoing liver transplantation with brief abstinence as a lifesaving intervention for alcoholic hepatitis. This review includes each of the recent studies and discusses their implications for general transplant practice. A Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System search revealed five published studies - three prospective and two retrospective - pertaining to liver transplantation for alcoholic hepatitis. Among patients with medication-nonresponsive alcoholic hepatitis, those who underwent transplantation had superior survival. Liver recipients with alcoholic hepatitis had comparable survival to those with 6 or more months of abstinence. Their relapse rates were not statistically different in the short term over those transplanted with longer abstinence, although some patients in each prospective cohort relapsed to drinking despite narrow inclusion criteria and extensive pretransplant staff reviews and posttransplant surveillance. Liver transplantation is a reasonable treatment consideration for highly selective cases of alcoholic hepatitis. Further research is needed to refine inclusion criteria, address posttransplant relapse prevention interventions, and monitor long-term outcomes.

  5. Toxicologically relevant phthalates in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappenstein, Oliver; Vieth, Bärbel; Luch, Andreas; Pfaff, Karla

    2012-01-01

    Various phthalates have been detected in a wide range of food products such as milk, dietary products, fat-enriched food, meat, fish, sea food, beverages, grains, and vegetables as well as in breast milk. Here we present an overview on toxicologically considerable phthalate levels in food reported in the literature. The most common phthalates detected are di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), and di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP). Milk analyses demonstrate that background levels in unprocessed milk are usually low. However, during processing the phthalate contents may significantly increase due to migration from plastic materials in contact with food. Among dietary products fat-enriched food such as cheese and cream were identified with highest levels of DEHP. Plasticized PVC from tubes, conveyor belts, or disposable gloves used in food processing is an important source for contamination of food, especially of fatty food. Paper and cardboard packaging made from recycled fibers are another important source of contamination. In addition, gaskets used in metal lids for glass jars have been identified as possible source for the contamination of foodstuffs with phthalates. The highest concentrations of DEHP reported (>900 mg kg(-1)) were detected in food of high fat content stored in such glass jars. Beyond classical food, DEHP and DnBP were identified in human breast milk samples as the main phthalate contaminants. Phthalate monoesters and some oxidative metabolites were also quantified in breast milk.

  6. [Toxicological evaluation in the childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Amparo; Rodrigo, Carlos; Marrón, M Teresa

    2014-03-01

    Intoxications in infancy require urgent medical treatment within national health systems. In our country they represent 0.3% of paediatric urgencies. Most of them are accidental intoxications but is not infrequent to find some related to child abuse or to suicidal intentions, especially in adolescence. The objectives of the study are to evaluate both clinical health care and medical legal aspects in intoxications in infancy. Medical assistance is described and it includes clinical diagnosis, typology of the more common toxics, percentages and referral to social work and emergency care equipment units of the Ministry of Social Welfare and the Department of Health or, where appropriate, directly to prosecutors and courts for their intervention. In cases of detection of alcohol, drugs or medication in infants, the importance of the correct interpretation of the results of toxicological findings is discussed. Several studies for the interpretation of results concerning the detection of these toxics are reported. Both legal aspects and the forensic medical opinion are assessed. The findings will be analysed by the judicial authority in order to circumscribe responsibilities or to take appropriate decisions concerning the protection of infants' interests. In conclusion intoxication in infancy can lead to legal proceedings requiring specific actions for their protection. Both physicians and hospitals must comply with the legal requirement of the submission to the court of judicial parties. On the other hand, this information is an interesting step toward reinforcing public health surveillance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicological assessment of Ashitaba Chalcone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maronpot, Robert R

    2015-03-01

    The plant Angelica keiskei contains two main physiologically active flavonoid chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol. Known as ashitaba in Japan, powder from the sap is widely consumed for its medicinal properties in Asia as a dietary supplement. Limited previously reported mammalian studies were without evidence of toxicity. GLP studies reported here, including a bacterial reverse mutation assay, a chromosome aberration assay, and an in vivo micronucleus assay are negative for genotoxicity. A GLP- compliant 90-day repeated oral gavage study of ashitaba yellow sap powder containing 8.45% chalcones in Sprague Dawley rats resulted in expected known physiological effects on coagulation parameters and plasma lipids at 300 and 1000 mg/kg/day. Ashitaba-related pathology included a dose-related male rat-specific alpha 2-urinary globulin nephropathy at 100, 300, and 1000 mg/kg/day and jejunal lymphangiectasia in both sexes at 1000 mg/kg/day. All other study parameters and histopathological changes were incidental or not of toxicological concern. Based on these studies ashitaba chalcone powder is not genotoxic with a NOAEL of 300 mg/kg in male and female rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Introduction: biomarkers in neurodevelopment toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, H.L.

    1987-10-01

    The search for markers of toxicant exposure and effect upon the development of organisms presents a set of challenges that differ in many ways from those encountered in the study of markers in reproduction or pregnancy. These latter two fields specify a relatively narrow set of organs or biological systems. The term development, on the other hand, can apply to any organ system, or to any set of phenomena that changes in an ordered way over time. For this reason the papers presented in the session on development were chosen to narrow the focus to neurodevelopmental markers, as such markers may be altered by neurotoxic exposure. In attempting to meet this task, the authors have been able to select a group of investigators who work at the leading edges of their respective fields of developmental neuroanatomy, neurotoxicology, neuroendocrinology, neuropsychology, and infant development. The notion that toxicants could affect behavior certainly is not new. Recent knowledge that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral observation might provide early markers of effect has given rise to two new fields: behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology.

  9. Immunological and toxicological risk assessment of e-cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the long-term toxicological and immunological effects of e-cigarette (e-cig aerosols remains elusive due to the relatively short existence of vaping. Therefore, we performed a systematic search of articles published in public databases and analysed the research evidence in order to provide critical information regarding e-cig safety. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (or e-cigs are an alternative to traditional cigarettes for the delivery of nicotine and are typically filled with glycerol or propylene glycol-based solutions known as e-liquids. Though present in lower quantities, e-cig aerosols are known to contain many of the harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke. However, due to the paucity of experimental data and contradictory evidence, it is difficult to draw conclusive outcomes regarding toxicological, immunological and clinical impacts of e-cig aerosols. Excessive vaping has been reported to induce inflammatory responses including mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription and nuclear factor-κB signalling, similar to that induced by tobacco smoke. Based on recent evidence, prolonged exposure to some constituents of e-cig aerosols might result in respiratory complications such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inflammation. Future studies are warranted that focus on establishing correlations between e-cig types, generations and e-liquid flavours and immunological and toxicological profiles to broaden our understanding about the effects of vaping.

  10. Aerospace toxicology overview: aerial application and cabin air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    encountered chemicals, or aircraft cabin air contaminants and point out the need for future research to better address toxicological evaluation of aircraft-engine oil additives.

  11. Fish 'n' chips: the use of microarrays for aquatic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denslow, Nancy D; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Barber, David S

    2007-03-01

    Gene expression analysis is changing the way that we look at toxicity, allowing toxicologists to perform parallel analyses of entire transcriptomes. While this technology is not as advanced in aquatic toxicology as it is for mammalian models, it has shown promise for determining modes of action, identifying biomarkers and developing "signatures" of chemicals that can be used for field and mixture studies. A major hurdle for the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology is the lack of sequence information for non-model species. Custom arrays based on gene libraries enriched for genes that are expressed in response to specific contaminants have been used with excellent success for some non-model species, suggesting that this approach will work well for ecotoxicology and spurring on the sequencing of cDNA libraries for species of interest. New sequencing technology and development of repositories for gene expression data will accelerate the use of microarrays in aquatic toxicology. Notwithstanding the preliminary successes that have been achieved even with partial cDNA libraries printed on arrays, ecological samples present elevated challenges for this technology due to the high degree of variation of the samples. Furthermore, recent studies that show nonlinear toxic responses for ecological species underscore the necessity of establishing time and dose dependence of effects on gene expression and comparing these results with traditional markers of toxicity. To realize the full potential of microarrays, researchers must do the experiments required to bridge the gap between the 'omics' technologies and traditional toxicology to demonstrate that microarrays have predictive value in ecotoxicology.

  12. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous.” Paracelsus Key Words: Radiation Toxins (RT), Radiation Toxicants (RTc), Radiation Poisons (RP), Radiation Exposure (RE), Radiation Toxicology is the science about radiation poisons. [D.Popov et al. 2012,J.Zhou et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins is a specific proteins with high enzymatic activity produced by living irradiated mammals. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxicants is a substances that produce radiomimetics effects, adverse biological effects which specific for radiation. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxic agent is specific proteins that can produce pathological biological effects specific for physical form of radiation.[D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev 2007] Different Toxic Substances isolated from cells or from blood or lymph circulation. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins may affects many organs or specific organ, tissue, specific group of cells. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007] For example: Radiation Toxins could induce collective toxic clinical states to include: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [T. Azizova et al. 2005, Konchalovsky et al., 2005, D. Popov et al 2012] However, Radiation Toxins could induce specific injury of organs or tissue and induce Acute Radiation Syndromes such as Acute Radiation Cerebrovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Cardiovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Hematopoietic Syndrome, Acute Radiation GastroIntestinal Syndrome. [ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012, V. Maliev et al. 2007] Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure and the dose-response relationship is a fundamental and essential concept in classic Toxicology and Radiation Toxicology.[ D.Popov et al

  13. Too poor for transplant: finance and insurance issues in transplant ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentine, Kyle Alexander; Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2010-06-01

    Donor organs are a scarce gift. Additionally, transplantation is very expensive and the United States lacks universal health insurance for all citizens. These facts combine to make personal finance and insurance some of the criteria for wait listing at US transplant centers. Previous research has shown that the poor and the uninsured (as well as women and nonwhites) are less likely to receive a transplant. Living donor candidates are also limited by the US insurance system. To determine the effect of finance and insurance variables on access to transplant and living donation. A qualitative descriptive study of ethics consultation data contained in a research registry approved by the institutional review board at California Pacific Medical Center. This study analyzes research registry data from a large community hospital in Northern California that serves patients from California, Oregon, and Nevada. The registry data are derived from transplant ethics consultations occurring between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. This study explores the restriction of access to transplantation and of participation in living donation. More than a quarter of all transplant ethics consultation reports described the restriction of transplant-related treatment for reasons rooted in finance or insurance. Individuals on the recipient side and on the donor side were hindered with regard to access. Insurance status and personal ability to pay significantly affect access to transplantation in the United States, and this theme is a frequent feature of ethics consultations at California Pacific Medical Center.

  14. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumor, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. An association with prenatal environmental exposure has been inferred from human and animal studies underlying male reproductive developmental defects. The present study established the links between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes using U.S. EPA animal study (ToxRefDB) and high-throughput screening (ToxCast) databases. This systems-based approach revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across 63 chemicals and a pleiotropic in vitro bioactivity profile. Although estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities have been extensively studied in male reproductive developmental toxicity, the present study showed these receptor targets to be only a subset of the potential landscape of molecular targets. A variety of chemical (e.g. phthalates, conazoles, carbamates, and phenol compounds) and bioactivity (e.g. nuclear receptors, vascular remodeling proteins, and cytochrome-P450 reductases) clusters further suggested multiple pathways leading to the adverse outcomes. This points to the need for multi-scale systems models to predict whether the occurrence of one adverse outcome may predict the risk of another. Imbalances in androgen and estrogen signaling have been a general focus in male reproductive toxicology research. While a number of recent studies have demonstrated that both hormonal

  15. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  16. Experiment research of cisplatin implants inhibiting transplantation tumor growth and regulating the expression of KLK7 and E-cad of tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Gui-Feng; Tan, Yan; Yang, Yuan-Zheng; Zhang, Jie-Wei; Tang, Jing

    2016-06-01

    To study the influence of cisplatin implants on transplantation tumor growth and the expression of tissue kallikrein-7 (KLK7) and E-cadherin (E-cad) in tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer. BALB/c nude mice were collected as experimental animal and were randomly divided into model control group (Group A), tail intravenous injection of cisplatin group (Group B), intratumor injection of cisplatin group (Group C) and cisplatin implants treatment group (Group D). After the drugs intervening, the weight and volume of transplantation tumors were measured on Day 20, Day 30 and Day 40 and serum and KLK7 and E-cad contents in transplanted tumor tissue were examined. On Day 20, Day 30 and Day 40 after treatment, the weight and volume of transplantation tumors of tumor-bearing mice in four groups were different (Group A > Group B > Group C > Group D). The contents of KLK-7 and E-cad in tumor tissue and serum of tumor-bearing mice in four groups were different (Group A > Group B > Group C > Group D in KLK-7) and (Group A Cisplatin implants can inhibit the growth of transplanted tumor tissue and down-regulated KLK7 expression and up-regulated E-cad expression of tumor-bearing mice with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical College. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth speed in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing to renal transplantation between 2000 and 2009 in the Hospital Nacional de Ninos: research protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo Molina, Ana Victoria

    2013-01-01

    The growth speed was investigated in children with chronic renal failure after renal transplantation, in the Hospital Nacional de Ninos during the study period January 2000-December 2009. Factors that have influenced are analyzed: age of onset of renal disease, etiology of renal disease, metabolic acidosis, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, episodes of infection and rejection. Besides, on the growth rate and expected family size, to intervene or prevent them in future cases. Also, the use that has given in the hospital to growth hormone, before and after renal transplantation is determined to eventually use parallel therapies to the transplantation. An echocardiographic study is recommended to perform as part of the treatment of chronic renal failure to identify the existence of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure, which may occur as a result of complications of the failure [es

  18. Predictive Toxicology: Modeling Chemical Induced Toxicological Response Combining Circular Fingerprints with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios eKoutsoukas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern drug discovery and toxicological research are under pressure, as the cost of developing and testing new chemicals for potential toxicological risk is rising. Extensive evaluation of chemical products for potential adverse effects is a challenging task, due to the large number of chemicals and the possible hazardous effects on human health. Safety regulatory agencies around the world are dealing with two major challenges. First, the growth of chemicals introduced every year in household products and medicines that need to be tested, and second the need to protect public welfare. Hence, alternative and more efficient toxicological risk assessment methods are in high demand. The Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 consortium a collaborative effort was formed to develop and investigate alternative assessment methods. A collection of 10,000 compounds composed of environmental chemicals and approved drugs were screened for interference in biochemical pathways and released for crowdsourcing data analysis. The physicochemical space covered by Tox21 library was explored, measured by Molecular Weight (MW and the octanol/water partition coefficient (cLogP. It was found that on average chemical structures had MW of 272.6 Daltons. In case of cLogP the average value was 2.476. Next relationships between assays were examined based on compounds activity profiles across the assays utilizing the Pearson correlation coefficient r. A cluster was observed between the Androgen and Estrogen Receptors and their ligand bind domains accordingly indicating presence of cross talks among the receptors. The highest correlations observed were between NR.AR and NR.AR_LBD, where it was r=0.66 and between NR.ER and NR.ER_LBD, where it was r=0.5.Our approach to model the Tox21 data consisted of utilizing circular molecular fingerprints combined with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine by modeling each assay independently. In all of the 12 sub-challenges our modeling

  19. The U.S. National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wexler, Philip

    2004-01-01

    For nearly 40 years, the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) has been a significant leader in organizing and providing public access to an extensive storehouse of toxicological information through its online databases. With the advent of the Internet, TEHIP has expanded its role to also serve as a pre-eminent portal to toxicological information worldwide. Its primary databases reside within the web-based TOXNET system, and include the scientifically peer-reviewed Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Toxics Release Inventory, the National Cancer Institute's Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS) and the TOXLINE file of over 3 million bibliographic references. TEHIP's ChemIDplus is an extensive chemical dictionary that extends beyond simple nomenclature to offer displays of molecular structures and links from particular chemicals to other databases containing more information. Specialty files in occupational safety and health, and household products have recently been added to TEHIP's suite of resources. Additional databases in risk assessment, drugs, toxicology education, and global resources, are under development. ''Special Topics'' pages lead users to structured summaries and links in areas such as arsenic, chemical warfare agents, biological warfare, and West Nile Virus. A database on alternatives to the use of live animals, a three-module toxicology tutor, and a glossary of terms in toxicology are among TEHIP's other information aids, as well an increasing commitment to serving consumers, as witnessed by the animated ToxTown program. Outside the sphere of TEHIP, NLM offers additional databases, such as PubMed, of significant value to toxicology researchers

  20. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Coordinating Committees Strategic Plans & Reports Research Areas FAQs Jobs at NIDDK Visit Us Contact Us News News ... regularly. A working transplanted kidney does a better job of filtering wastes and keeping you healthy than ...

  1. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation.

  2. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION. AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTS: Oct 1986 - Dec 2007. Multiple Myeloma 90. NHL 39. Hodgkins lymphoma 19. AML 36. APML 9. ALL 2. Amyloidosis 2. Granulocytic Sarcoma 1.

  3. Life After Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  4. Choosing a Transplant Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  5. Treatment Before Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  6. Cord Blood and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  7. Liver Transplantation in the Obese Cirrhotic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Erin K; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Te, Helen S; Rogal, Shari; Pillai, Anjana A; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah; Desai, Archita; Fleming, James N; Ganger, Daniel; Seetharam, Anil; Tsoulfas, Georgios; Montenovo, Martin; Lai, Jennifer C

    2017-10-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing prevalence of obesity in the transplant population, the optimal management of obese liver transplant candidates remains undefined. Setting strict body mass index cutoffs for transplant candidacy remains controversial, with limited data to guide this practice. Body mass index is an imperfect measure of surgical risk in this population, partly due to volume overload and variable visceral adiposity. Weight loss before transplantation may be beneficial, but it remains important to avoid protein calorie malnutrition and sarcopenia. Intensive lifestyle modifications appear to be successful in achieving weight loss, though the durability of these interventions is not known. Pretransplant and intraoperative bariatric surgeries have been performed, but large randomized controlled trials are lacking. Traditional cardiovascular comorbidities are more prevalent in obese individuals and remain the basis for pretransplant cardiovascular evaluation and risk stratification. The recent US liver transplant experience demonstrates comparable patient and graft survival between obese and nonobese liver transplant recipients, but obesity presents important medical and surgical challenges during and after transplant. Specifically, obesity is associated with an increased incidence of wound infections, wound dehiscence, biliary complications and overall infection, and confers a higher risk of posttransplant obesity and metabolic syndrome-related complications. In this review, we examine current practices in the obese liver transplant population, offer recommendations based on the currently available data, and highlight areas where additional research is needed.

  8. Blood and Bone MarrowTransplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant , Hematopoietic Cell Transplant , Autologous Transplant , Allogeneic Transplant A blood or bone marrow ...

  9. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  10. Biennal Report 1979/80 of the Institute for Genetics and Toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotz, G.

    1981-07-01

    The research activities of the Genetics and the Toxicology Divisions of the Institute for Genetics and Toxicology of Fissile Materials during the period January 1979 to December 1980 are decribed. In addition to scientific reports on the various research topics the report gives an overview of the external scientific and teaching activities of the staff members during the review period. The main emphasis of the toxicology program has been on studies of the radiotoxicology of the actinides and other heavy metals, especially in relation to chelation therapy and to the development of biochemical and physical methods for investigation of their metabolic behaviour. In the field of radiation genetics most of the interest has been focussed on the mechanisms of gene repair, gene regulation and the molecular biology of tumor viruses. (orig.) [de

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Bromobenzene (External Review ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Bromobenzene that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and appropriately in derivation of the dose-response assessments and toxicological characterization. The draft Toxicological Review of Bromobenzene provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to subchronic and chronic exposure to bromobenzene.

  12. IRIS Toxicological Review of Acrylamide (External Review ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has conducted a peer review by EPA’s Science Advisory Board (SAB) of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of acrylamide that once finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that the science is used credibly and appropriately in derivation of the dose-response assessments and toxicological characterization. The draft Toxicological Review of Acrylamide provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to a chronic exposure to acrylamide.

  13. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets

  14. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets.

  15. Integrating the Principles of Toxicology into a Chemistry Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Designing safer products, processes and materials requires a commitment to engaging a transdisciplinary, systems approach utilizing the principles of chemistry, toxicology, environmental sciences and other allied disciplines. Chemistry and toxicology are inherently complementary ...

  16. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping strategies, and psychosocial adjustment following kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Renato; Lombardo, Caterina; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Poli, Luca; Bennardi, Linda; Giordanengo, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Violani, Cristiano

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the relations between appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping, and adjustment dimensions following kidney transplantation (KT). Two models were tested: (1) the main effects model proposing that stress appraisal and coping strategies are directly associated with adjustment dimensions; and (2) the moderating model of stress proposing that each coping strategy interacts with stress appraisal. Importantly, there is a lack of research examining the two models simultaneously among recipients of solid organ transplantation. A total of 174 KT recipients completed the questionnaires. Predictors of post-transplant adjustment included appraisal of transplant-related stressors and coping strategies (task-, emotion-, and avoidance-focused). Adjustment dimensions were psychological distress, worries about the transplant, feelings of guilt, fear of disclosure of transplant, adherence, and responsibility for the functioning of the new organ. The main and moderating effects were tested with regression analyses. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping were related to all adjustment dimensions, except of adherence and responsibility. Task-oriented coping was positively related to responsibility. Avoidance-oriented coping was negatively correlated with adherence. Only 1 out of 18 hypothesized interactive terms was significant, yielding a synergistic interaction between appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping on the sense of guilt. The findings have the potential to inform interventions promoting psychosocial adjustment among KT recipients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study's framework for assessing lifelong psychosocial factors in solid-organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Burkhalter, Hanna; Berben, Lut; Bogert, Laura Jane; Denhaerynck, Kris; Glass, Tracy R; Goetzmann, Lutz; Kirsch, Monika; Kiss, Alexander; Koller, Michael T; Piot-Ziegler, Chantal; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2013-09-01

    Understanding outcomes after transplant requires a biopsychosocial model that includes biomedical and psychosocial factors. The latter, to date, are assessed only in a limited way as part of transplant registries or cohort studies. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) is a nationwide open cohort study (starting May 2008) to systematically and prospectively assess psychosocial factors. This article describes the framework underpinning STCS's psychosocial assessment. The STCS framework was adapted from the multidimensional conceptual perspective of Dew et al to describe transplant psychosocial domains and specific outcomes by adding a time perspective, a system perspective, and interaction among domains. We propose a multidimensional, multilevel biopsychosocial framework representing mutually influencing domains from before to after transplant, and exemplify each domain by factors included in STCS and their measurement. The transplant patient, centrally positioned, is described by clinical and sociodemographic characteristics (eg, socioeconomic status, educational, professional, and relationship status). The following psychosocial domains further describe the patient: (1) physical/functional (eg, perceived health status, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness), (2) psychological (eg, depression, stress), (3) behavioral (eg, medication adherence, smoking, drug use, physical activity, sun protection), (4) social (eg, work capacity/return to work), and (5) global quality of life. Factors associated with health care system level (eg, trust in transplant team) are also included in the model. The STCS's psychosocial framework provides a basis for studying the interplay of biomedical, sociodemographic, psychosocial, behavioral, and health care system factors in view of transplant outcomes and therefore has the potential to guide biopsychosocial transplant research.

  18. Cardiopulmonary transplantation service establishment in the 1990s: Australia--a developing country?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmore, D; Williams, T; Bergin, P; Rosenfeldt, F; Cochrane, A; Griffiths, A; Federman, J

    1992-10-01

    1. A National Transplantation Service has been established at the Alfred Hospital performing more than 50 transplants per year. 2. Increased access to transplantation technology has facilitated an improvement in national population servicing from 2.7 to 6.2 transplants per million population per year. National funding of A$4.062 million per year has been secured. 3. Basic research into organ preservation has facilitated transcontinental organ procurement. 4. An active lung transplantation program has been established synchronous with the cardiac transplant service activities. 5. MCS program establishment has paralleled clinical transplantation activities. 6. Budget management and cost containment has been achieved through rationalisation of management protocols.

  19. VASCULAR COMPLICATIONS AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: evaluation of the incidence and the pattern of vessel complications, efficacy of the prophylactic anticoagulation therapy after kidney transplantation. Materials and methods. From March 2007 till January 2013 421 patients: 230 men (54,6% and 191 women (45,4%; mean age 43,07 ± 11,62 undergone 429 kidney transplantations in the department of pancreas and kidney transplantation of the Scientific-Research Institute of Emergency Care named after N.V. Sklifosovsky. In order to evaluate the condition and the function of the kidney transplant ultrasound investigation (daily andacquisition(weekly wereused. In cases of kidney dysfunction and assumption of vessel complications we used computerized tomography. Besides, we used daily analysis of biochemical and clinical parameters of blood and urine. Results. The most common vessel complication was the thrombosis of the microvasculature of the kidney transplant due to acute humoral and combined rejection resistant to antirejection therapy (n = 9; 2,1%; in 4 cases there was a breakage of the transplant due to the acute rejection and the urgent transplantatectomy in an effort to save the patient; thrombosis of the transplantat artery occurred in 1 case (0,23%; we observed 2 cases (0,46% of the artery stenosis and 2 cases (0,46% of venous thrombosis. Conclusion. Summary frequency of vessel complications in our clinic, including thrombosis due to rejection, was 3,49%. It fully corresponds with data obtained from the global medical community. The incidence of great vessel thrombosis was less than 1% which indicates the adequate prophylactic anticoagulation therapy. For the benefit of early diacrisis of complications Doppler sonography is needed. In case of assumption of vessel complications urgent acquisition, computerized tomography and/ or angiography are to be held. 

  20. Population-Based Analysis of Hematologic Malignancy Referrals to a Comprehensive Cancer Center, Referrals for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and Participation in Clinical Trial, Survey, and Biospecimen Research by Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Alyssa; Peoples, Brittany; Zhang, Yali; Moysich, Kirsten; Ross, Levi; McCarthy, Philip; Hahn, Theresa

    2015-08-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities have been reported in clinical trial/research participation, utilization of autologous and allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), and availability of allogeneic donors. We performed a population-based cohort study to investigate adult hematologic malignancy referrals to a US tertiary cancer center, utilization of BMT, and participation in clinical trial, survey, and biospecimen research by race. US Census Data and the New York State Public Access Cancer Epidemiology Database identified the racial distribution of the general population and new hematologic malignancy cases in the primary catchment area. From 2005 to 2011, 1106 patients aged 18 to 75 years were referred for BMT consultation; although the rate of BMT among hematologic malignancy referrals did not differ by race, the reasons for not receiving a BMT did. Participation in biospecimen research did not vary by race; however, African Americans and other minorities were significantly less likely to participate in survey research than European Americans. Although rates of hematologic malignancy referrals and use of BMT for minorities appear to be low (race distribution of all hematologic malignancy cases and the western New York population. African Americans are equally likely as other races to participate in biospecimen banking, but further study is needed to understand reasons for lower participation in survey research. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Pediatric Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Nidhi; Yazigi, Nada

    2017-06-01

    Excellent outcomes over the last 3 decades have made liver transplantation the treatment of choice for many advanced liver disorders. This success also opened liver transplantation to new indications such as liver tumors and metabolic disorders. The emergence of such new indications for liver transplantation is bringing a new stream of patients along with disease-specific challenges. The cumulative number of liver transplant recipients is peaking, requiring novel systems of health care delivery that meet the needs of this special patient population. This article reviews updates and new development in pediatric liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekadja, Mohamed Amine; Brahimi, Mohamed; Osmani, Soufi; Yafour, Nabil; Krim, Amina; Serradj, Faiza; Talhi, Souad; Amani, Kamila; Bouhass, Rachid Amar

    2017-12-01

    Algeria is a country of 40.4 million inhabitants and half of which is under 30years. In Algeria, Health-care insurance covered, 90% of the population. Health care is free and it is supported by the Ministry of Health. 16 university hospitals exist in Algeria and only two (Algiers and Oran) practicing bone marrow transplant. Adult hematologic malignancies account for 10% (about 4000 new cases/year) of the malignancy affecting in most cases young patients under 65years of age. In 2016, 270 transplants were performed in total (Algiers+Oran), including 149 allografts (related donor transplants: 99%) and 121 autografts. 98% of transplants are done in adults and only 2% in children with cord blood transplants. In summary for the two transplant centers, the predominant types of transplantation performed are allogeneic transplant in 55% and autologous transplant in 45%. The particularity of EHU1st November in Oran, is the use of non-cryopreserved stem cells. Stem cell was mobilized using G-CSF alone and the grafts were kept in a conventional blood bank refrigerator at +4°C until reinfusion on day 0. The outcome with non-cryopreserved stem cells are the same as those with cryopreserved stem cells and we conclude that autologous transplant with non cryopreserved hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is a simple, effective and safe method and the cryopreservation is not necessary in our work conditions in developing countries. The projects are achieving the autograft in all University Hospitals with non cryopreserved HSC, achieving a center allograft in the east of the country and the development of bone marrow transplantation in children. Currently in Algeria, the number of transplantation is insufficient and the development of new transplant centers is essential. In the future, we hope to implement the National Society of Bone Marrow transplant and also the National recipient registry and Donor registry in Algeria. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research

  4. The fathead minnow in aquatic toxicology: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankley, Gerald T; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2006-06-10

    This paper reviews the roles of the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) as a small fish model in the field of aquatic toxicology. The species has been (and is) extensively used both for regulatory testing and research, especially in North America. For example, tests with the fathead minnow, ranging from 48-h lethality through partial and full life-cycle assays, are routinely used for regulatory programs aimed at assessing potential risks of new chemicals such as high-production volume materials and pesticides, as well as impacts of complex mixtures like effluents. The species also has been used for a wide variety of research applications focused on topics like the development of quantitative structure-activity relationship models, mixture toxicity, extrapolation of the effects of chemicals across species, and understanding the results of laboratory assays relative to impacts in the field. Attributes of the fathead minnow also make it an excellent model for addressing new challenges in aquatic toxicology, including identification of sensitive life-stages/endpoints for chemicals with differing modes/mechanisms of action, predicting population-level effects based on data collected from lower levels of biological organization, and exploring/understanding the emerging role of genomics in research and regulation.

  5. Interferon-free therapy for genotype 1 hepatitis C in liver transplant recipients: Real-world experience from the hepatitis C therapeutic registry and research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert S; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Kuo, Alexander; Morelli, Giuseppe J; Burton, James R; Stravitz, R Todd; Durand, Christine; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Kwo, Paul; Frenette, Catherine T; Stewart, Thomas G; Nelson, David R; Fried, Michael W; Terrault, Norah A

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Achieving sustained virological response (SVR) with antiviral therapy improves survival. Because interferon (IFN)-based therapy has limited efficacy and is poorly tolerated, there has been rapid transition to IFN-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens. This article describes the experience with DAAs in the treatment of posttransplant genotype (GT) 1 HCV from a consortium of community and academic centers (Hepatitis C Therapeutic Registry and Research Network [HCV-TARGET]). Twenty-one of the 54 centers contributing to the HCV-TARGET consortium participated in this study. Enrollment criteria included positive posttransplant HCV RNA before treatment, HCV GT 1, and documentation of use of a simeprevir (SMV)/sofosbuvir (SOF) containing DAA regimen. Safety and efficacy were assessed. SVR was defined as undetectable HCV RNA 64 days or later after cessation of treatment. A total of 162 patients enrolled in HCV-TARGET started treatment with SMV+SOF with or without ribavirin (RBV) following LT. The study population included 151 patients treated with these regimens for whom outcomes and safety data were available. The majority of the 151 patients were treated with SOF and SMV alone (n = 119; 79%) or with RBV (n = 32; 21%), The duration of therapy was 12 weeks for most patients, although 15 patients received 24 weeks of treatment. Of all patients receiving SOF/SMV with or without RBV, 133/151 (88%) achieved sustained virological response at 12 weeks after therapy and 11 relapsed (7%). One patient had virological breakthrough (n = 1), and 6 patients were lost to posttreatment follow-up. Serious adverse events occurred in 11.9%; 3 patients (all cirrhotic) died due to aspiration pneumonia, suicide, and multiorgan failure. One experienced LT rejection. IFN-free DAA treatment represents a major improvement over prior IFN

  6. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (Ppacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used for implantation. The incidence of pacemaker implantation by technique was 2.0% for

  7. 78 FR 45253 - National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods; Announcement of Meeting; Request for Comments SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative... alternative safety testing methods with regulatory applicability and promotes the scientific validation and...

  8. Management of influenza infection in solid-organ transplant recipients: consensus statement of the Group for the Study of Infection in Transplant Recipients (GESITRA) of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) and the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Medrano, Francisco; Cordero, Elisa; Gavaldá, Joan; Cruzado, Josep M; Marcos, M Ángeles; Pérez-Romero, Pilar; Sabé, Nuria; Gómez-Bravo, Miguel Ángel; Delgado, Juan Francisco; Cabral, Evelyn; Carratalá, Jordi

    2013-10-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at greater risk than the general population for complications and mortality from influenza infection. Researchers and clinicians with experience in SOT infections have developed this consensus document in collaboration with several Spanish scientific societies and study networks related to transplant management. We conducted a systematic review to assess the management and prevention of influenza infection in SOT recipients. Evidence levels based on the available literature are given for each recommendation. This article was written in accordance with international recommendations on consensus statements and the recommendations of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II). Recommendations are provided on the procurement of organs from donors with suspected or confirmed influenza infection. We highlight the importance of the possibility of influenza infection in any SOT recipient presenting upper or lower respiratory symptoms, including pneumonia. The importance of early antiviral treatment of SOT recipients with suspected or confirmed influenza infection and the necessity of annual influenza vaccination are emphasized. The microbiological techniques for diagnosis of influenza infection are reviewed. Guidelines for the use of antiviral prophylaxis in inpatients and outpatients are provided. Recommendations for household contacts of SOT recipients with influenza infection and health care workers in close contact with transplant patients are also included. Finally antiviral dose adjustment guidelines are presented for cases of impaired renal function and for pediatric populations. The latest scientific information available regarding influenza infection in the context of SOT is incorporated into this document. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. High Throughput Transcriptomics @ USEPA (Toxicology Forum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ideal chemical testing approach will provide complete coverage of all relevant toxicological responses. It should be sensitive and specific It should identify the mechanism/mode-of-action (with dose-dependence). It should identify responses relevant to the species of interest...

  10. Toxicological requirements for risk assessment of shellfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing concern by consumers with regard to the health aspects and safety of foodstuffs. Most food additives and contaminants are controlled by regulatory authorities, with Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) having been set on the basis of detailed acute short- and long-term toxicological studies. The situation with ...

  11. Phytochemical Screening, Antibacterial and Toxicological Activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phytochemical screening, antibacterial and toxicological activities of extracts of the stem bark of Acacia senegal were investigated. The phytochemical analyses according to standard screening tests using conventional protocols revealed the presence of tannins, saponins and sterols in the stem bark of the plant.

  12. The rat incisor in toxicologic pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Kooij, A.J. van de; Slootweg, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Microscopic examination of the incisors of rats and mice may reveal toxicologically significant changes. First, the incisor morphology reflects the nutritional status of the animal: fluctuations of mineral metabolism and vitamin availability are disclosed by the rodent incisors, because the incisors

  13. Toxicological Problems with the Redy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broch Møller, B.; Bahnsen, M.; Solgaard, Per Bent

    1976-01-01

    be substituted by another antiseptic. Of special interest was the finding of a very high concentration of boron in the dialysate. It is suggested that this metal, which is a potentially toxic substance, may emanate from the patient. It is concluded that use of the REDY system carries no obvious toxicological...

  14. Chemical constituents, and pharmacological and toxicological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effects”, “toxicological effects” and “chemical composition” in English and Chinese language were retrieved through an extensive literature ... antiaging, neuroprotective, anti-stress, anti- fatigue, anti-virus and anticancer effects ..... heavy metal elements in cynomorium and leek seeds by high resolution continuum source ...

  15. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY, AND WATER QUALITY:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-one participants from Europe, North America and China convened in Chongqing, China, October 12-14, 2005, for the Eighth International Symposium in Fish Physiology, Toxicology and Water Quality. The subject of the meeting was "Hypoxia in vertebrates: Comparisons of terrestr...

  16. Physicochemical, toxicological and ecological analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dams built to supply electricity, irrigation and fresh water, change the characteristics of the region they are located. The ecological, limnological characteristics and the quality of water in the dam reservoir deteriorate with time. In this study, the physicochemical, toxicological and ecological parameters of Gökçekaya Dam ...

  17. Phytochemical analysis and toxicological evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, Flavonoid, Alkaloids, Anthraquinone, Saponin and Cardiac glycosides. This work thus justifies the ethnomedicinal use of the plant in the treatment of anaemia and its safety profile. Keywords: Toxicological, Ethno toxicity, Hematological and phytochemical ...

  18. Toxicological profiles of commercial herbal preparation, Jobelyn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illnesses. Despite its wide use, there is limited report on its toxicological profile. This study examined the acute and shortterm chronic toxicity profiles of the product with emphasis on the LD50, gross morphological and histopathological effects. METHODS: Albino mice (mean weight: 16.45±3.14g) were used in this study.

  19. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis...

  20. Preliminary Toxicological Screening of Ichthyotoxic Compound of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moringa oleifera is an indigenous tree growing in Southwestern Nigeria for food and medicinal property. Therefore this study evaluates the preliminary toxicological screening of ichthyotoxic compounds in Moringa oleifera to freshwater fish, Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings. The morphological parts such as leaf, seed, ...

  1. Evolution of Computational Toxicology-from Primitive ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation at the Health Canada seminar in Ottawa, ON, Canada on Nov. 15. 2016 Presentation at the Health Canada seminar in Ottawa, ON, Canada on Nov. 15. 2016 on the Evolution of Computational Toxicology-from Primitive Beginnings to Sophisticated Application

  2. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis...... than the exception in deaths in alcoholics....

  3. Distance learning in toxicology: Australia's RMIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahokas, Jorma; Donohue, Diana; Rix, Colin; Wright, Paul

    2005-01-01

    RMIT University was the first to offer a comprehensive Masters of Toxicology in Australasia 19 years ago. In 2001 the program was transformed into two stages, leading to a Graduate Diploma and Master of Applied Science in Toxicology. Now, these programs are fully online and suitable for graduates living and working anywhere in the world. The modular distance-learning courses are specifically designed to equip students with essential skills for entering fields such as chemical and drug evaluation; risk assessment of chemicals in the workplace; environmental and food toxicology. RMIT's online course delivery system has made it possible to deliver the toxicology programs, both nationally and internationally. The learning material and interactive activities (tests and quizzes, discussion boards, chat sessions) use Blackboard and WebBoard, each with a different educational function. Students log in to a Learning Hub to access their courses. The Learning Hub enables students to extend their learning beyond the classroom to the home, workplace, library and any other location with Internet access. The teaching staff log in to the Learning Hub to maintain and administer the online programs and courses which they have developed and/or which they teach. The Learning Hub is also a communication tool for students and staff, providing access to email, a diary and announcements. The early experience of delivering a full toxicology program online is very positive. However this mode of teaching continues to present many interesting technical, educational and cultural challenges, including: the design and presentation of the material; copyright issues; internationalisation of content; interactive participation; and the assessment procedures

  4. Triennial report 1981-83 of the Institute for Genetics and for Toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotz, G.

    1984-07-01

    The scientific activity of the Divisions of Genetics and of Toxicology of the Institute for Genetics and for Toxicology during the period January 1981 to December 1983 is described. In addition to reports on the various research topics this second 'Report' also gives an overview of the external scientific and teaching activities of the staff members during the period. In the field of radiation genetics most of the interest has been focussed on the mechanisms of gene repair, gene regulation and the molecular biology of tumor viruses in human and other mammalian cells. The main emphasis of the long term toxicology program has been on studies of radiotoxicology of the actinides and other heavy metals, especially in relation to chelation therapy and to the development of biochemical and physical methods for investigation of their metabolic behaviour. (orig.) [de

  5. Aquatic toxicology of fluoxetine: understanding the knowns and the unknowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Grossman, Leah; Nguyen, Michael; Maximino, Caio; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Echevarria, David J; Kalueff, Allan V

    2014-11-01

    Fluoxetine is one of the most prescribed psychotropic medications, and is an agent of increasing interest for environmental toxicology. Fish and other aquatic organisms are excellent models to study neuroactive small molecules like fluoxetine. However, prone to variance due to experimental factors, data obtained in these models need to be interpreted with caution, using proper experimental protocols, study designs, validated endpoints as well as well-established models and tests. Choosing the treatment protocol and dose range for fluoxetine and other serotonergic drugs is critical for obtaining valid test results and correct data interpretation. Here we discuss the value of aquatic models to study fluoxetine effects, based on prior high-quality research, and outline the directions of future translational studies in the field. We review fluoxetine-evoked phenotypes in acute vs. chronic protocols, discussing them in the contact of complex role of serotonin in behavioral regulation. We conclude that zebrafish and other aquatic models represent a useful in-vivo tool for fluoxetine pharmacology and (eco)toxicology research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An animal protection perspective on 21st century toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L

    2010-02-01

    The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) strongly endorses the vision for the future of toxicity testing proposed in the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century. Although crafted primarily with the aim of better assessing the public health risks from chemical exposures, the vision would have a major impact on advancing both alternative testing methods and animal welfare. Consequently, The HSUS seeks to have the vision implemented expeditiously. The HSUS is pleased that the report has elicited considerable discussion and debate and garnered a certain level of approval and applaud current implementation efforts. However, these efforts do not fully capture the vision and strategy outlined by the NRC. The HSUS believes that the timely implementation of the NRC vision warrants a large-scale "Human Toxicology Project" akin to the Human Genome Project of the late 20th century. The HSUS spearheaded the formation of the Human Toxicology Project Consortium to help marshal the necessary will, funding, and research for this effort. Our sister organization, the Humane Society International, is embarking on a related effort with European partners. The HSUS cofounded a website, AltTox.org, devoted exclusively to the scientific and policy issues central to advancing nonanimal methods of toxicity testing. The NRC report has provided a unified framework by which to systematically incorporate the fruits of modern biology and technology into hazard identification and risk assessment, to the betterment not only of toxicity testing and public health, but also of animal protection.

  7. MRI of pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studniarek, M.; Deschamps, P.Y.; Finas, B.; Pinet, A.

    1993-01-01

    The value of MRI in assessing pancreatic transplants was studied in 37 patients. Sixty-seven MRI examinations were performed in patients with an uncomplicated transplant, 14 in patients with poorly functioning transplant, and 10 in patients with a non-functioning graft. On the basis of 54 follow-up studies, it was shown that the volume of the graft decreased systematically during the 8 months after transplantation. On T1-weighted images the normal transplant was poorly delineated, with an almost homogeneous isointense or slightly hyperintense structure when compared with either renal transplant cortex or muscle. On T2-weighted images the organ was isointense or slightly hypointense compared with fat and hyperintense compared with muscle. T2-weighted delayed echo time image (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 150-200 ms) showed transplanted pancreas as well-delineated, hypointense and with a lobulated structure. This structure was characteristic of normal whole pancreatic grafts. Patent transplant vessels were seen as tubular structures of low signal intensity on T2-weighted short echo time images (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 50 ms). In the 10 patients with a non-functioning pancreatic transplant there were: 4 cases of focal intraparenchymal abnormalities, 6 cases in which the lobular structure was absent, and 4 cases of absence of patent graft main vessels (3 thromboses). There was no configuration of signal intensity of pancreatic parenchyma on MRI which could be considered typical for normal or non-functioning transplant. (orig.)

  8. Initial report of the Korean Organ Transplant Registry: the first report of national kidney transplantation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C; Koo, T Y; Jeong, J C; Kim, M; Yang, J; Lee, J; Min, S I; Lee, J E; Kim, M S; Kwon, O J; Kim, S J; Kim, Y H; Kim, Y H; Choi, B S; Choi, S J N; Lee, D-H; Chung, S Y; Cho, W H; Kim, Y S

    2014-01-01

    A national organ transplant registry is an indispensable organizational requirement for patient care, research, and planning. Even though the Korean Network for Organ Sharing (KONOS) has established a database for a waiting list, organ allocation, and incidence of organ transplantation since 2000, an integrated registry including post-transplantation data is needed for better understanding of organ transplantation. Recently, the Korean Society for Transplantation (KST) and the Korean Center for Disease Control (KCDC) designed a web-based organ transplant registry, named the Korean Organ Transplant Registry (KOTRY). As an initial project of KOTRY, we retrospectively analyzed kidney transplantations (KTs) performed in 2009 and 2010. A total of 2292 KTs (91.9%) from 46 hospitals (80.7%) were collected and analyzed. Ninety-five elements related to KT were selected and analyzed. Proportions of male recipients and retransplantations were 58.4% and 7.1%, respectively. Even though glomerulonephritis was the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (28.4%), the number of diabetic nephropathy cases was increasing. The living donor (LD) to deceased donor (DD) ratio was 1.69:1. Because of a serious organ shortage in Korea, DD kidneys with a low initial estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of transplants for O(+) recipients. The epidemiological profile of transplantation is different from country to country. The number of organ transplantations in East Asian countries is rapidly growing, however, there are few epidemiological data about this region in the literature. With the establishment of KOTRY, it was possible to present the first nationwide epidemiological data of Korean KTs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Applications of Computational Toxicology to the Understanding of Risks of Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to a request from US EPA, the National Research Council (NRC) developed a long-range vision and strategic plan for the future of toxicity testing in the 21st century. The report, published in 2007, called for a transformation in toxicology that would provide a more r...

  10. Docking-based classification models for exploratory toxicology studies on high-quality estrogenic experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exploratory toxicology is a new emerging research area whose ultimate mission is that of protecting human health and environment from risks posed by chemicals. In this regard, the ethical and practical limitation of animal testing has encouraged the promotion of compu...

  11. In silico toxicology models and databases as FDA Critical Path Initiative toolkits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Luis G

    2011-03-01

    In silico toxicology methods are practical, evidence-based and high throughput, with varying accuracy. In silico approaches are of keen interest, not only to scientists in the private sector and to academic researchers worldwide, but also to the public. They are being increasingly evaluated and applied by regulators. Although there are foreseeable beneficial aspects--including maximising use of prior test data and the potential for minimising animal use for future toxicity testing--the primary use of in silico toxicology methods in the pharmaceutical sciences are as decision support information. It is possible for in silico toxicology methods to complement and strengthen the evidence for certain regulatory review processes, and to enhance risk management by supporting a more informed decision regarding priority setting for additional toxicological testing in research and product development. There are also several challenges with these continually evolving methods which clearly must be considered. This mini-review describes in silico methods that have been researched as Critical Path Initiative toolkits for predicting toxicities early in drug development based on prior knowledge derived from preclinical and clinical data at the US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

  12. Amanita phalloides poisoning: A 5-year survey of the Czech Toxicological Information Centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Křenová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2007), s. 345-345 ISSN 0731-3810. [European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists International Congress /27./. 01.05.2007-04.05.2007, Athens] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Czech Toxicological Information Centre * amanita phalloides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. The lived experience of autologous stem cell-transplanted patients: Post-transplantation and before discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnasser, Qasem; Abu Kharmah, Salahel Deen; Attia, Manal; Aljafari, Akram; Agyekum, Felicia; Ahmed, Falak Aftab

    2018-01-18

    To explore the lived experience of the patients post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and specifically after engraftment and before discharge. Patients post-stem cell transplantation experience significant changes in all life aspects. Previous studies carried out by other researchers focused mainly on the postdischarge experience, where patients reported their perceptions that have always been affected by the life post-transplantation and influenced by their surroundings. The lived experience of patients, specifically after engraftment and prior to discharge (the "transition" phase), has not been adequately explored in the literature. Doing so might provide greater insight into the cause of change post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study is a phenomenological description of the participants' perception about their lived experience post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study used Giorgi's method of analysis. Through purposive sampling, 15 post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients were recruited. Data were collected by individual interviews. Data were then analysed based on Giorgi's method of analysis to reveal the meaning of a phenomenon as experienced through the identification of essential themes. The analysis process revealed 12 core themes covered by four categories that detailed patients lived experience post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The four categories were general transplant experience, effects of transplantation, factors of stress alleviation and finally life post-transplantation. This study showed how the haematopoietic stem cell transplantation affected the patients' physical, psychological and spiritual well-being. Transplantation also impacted on the patients' way of thinking and perception of life. Attending to patients' needs during transplantation might help to alleviate the severity of the effects and therefore improve experience. Comprehensive information about transplantation needs

  14. Impact of online toxicology training on health professionals: the Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Dawson, Andrew H; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP), supported by the American College of Medical Toxicology, links countries with and without toxicology services via distance education with the aim to improve education. Due to the lack of toxicology services in some countries there is a knowledge gap in the management of poisonings. We describe our experience with the worldwide delivery of an online introductory toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and other health professionals treating poisoned patients. We delivered a 15-module introductory Internet-based toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and health professionals, conducted from August to December 2016. This Internet-based curriculum was adapted from one used to teach emergency residents toxicology in the United States. Modules covered themes such as pharmaceutical (n = 8), toxidromes (n = 2) and agrochemicals (n = 5) poisoning. Participants completed pre-test and post-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing the online module, respectively, throughout the course. We collected information on participant demographics, education and training, and perception of relevance of the curriculum. Participants gave feedback on the course and how it affected their practice. One hundred and thirty-six health professionals from 33 countries participated in the course: 98 emergency doctors/medical officers, 25 physicians, eight pharmacists/poisons information specialists, two toxicologists, two medical students and one nurse. Median age of participants was 34 years. Median number of years postgraduate was seven. Ninety (65%) had access to either a poisons information centre over the phone or toxicologist and 48 (35%) did not. All participants expected the course to help improve their knowledge. Overall median pre-module MCQ scores were 56% (95%CI: 38, 75%) compared to post-module MCQ scores median 89% (95% CI: 67, 100%) (p education to health professionals treating

  15. Transplant rejection and tolerance – advancing the field through integration of computational and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, Giorgio [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Wood, Kathryn [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Arciero, Julia C [Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2017-05-31

    This Research Topic provides a venue for stimulating these interdisciplinary conversations in the context of transplantation. The articles collected under this Research Topic introduce new theoretical and experimental studies that describe novel techniques and methods for understanding the interactions between the immune response and transplants and for establishing more effective strategies of diagnosis and intervention that will promote transplant tolerance.

  16. Appraisal of the coordinator-based transplant organizational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipponi, F; De Simone, P; Mosca, F

    2005-01-01

    In 1999, the Italian Parliament passed a law aimed at setting the standards of practice and quality in organ, tissue and cell donation, and transplantation. For the first time in the history of Italian transplantation, a coordinator-based model reproducing some of the basic principles of the Spanish system was officially enacted by the Parliament, bringing to an end years of lacking regulation. What differentiates those coordinator-based systems adopted in Southern Europe from Northern European national and multinational transplant organizations is the functional integration of donor and transplant care activities enacted by national governments. The Italian model of transplant health care consists of four levels of transplant coordination: local, regional, interregional, and national. The latter is represented by Centro Nazionale Trapianti (CNT; the Italian National Center for Transplantation). CNT objectives consist of ensuring equitable access to donation and transplant care for all citizens according to the principles of the Italian National Health System. In achieving these goals, CNT acts in cooperation with three interregional transplant agencies: the Nord Italia Transplant program, the Associazione InterRegionale Trapianti, and the Organizzazione Centro Sud Trapianti. Whereas local and interregional coordinators are at the front line of all donation and transplant activities, regional and national coordinators function to monitor, direct, and plan donation and transplant health care activities. Based on the increase in donation and transplant activities recently achieved in those countries that have adopted a governmental coordinator-based transplant care model, we believe that such a system is appropriate to serve patients' interests according to the principles of subsidiary and equity. However, it should further be improved by expansion of the governance model throughout Europe, through implementation of current standards of care, and by adopting the

  17. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  18. [Psychoactive substances in biological samples--toxicological laboratory data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka, Ewa; Wilimowska, Jolanta; Piekoszewski, Wojciech; Groszek, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The subject of the research was the analysis of frequency and type of psychoactive substances used, basing on the determinations the blood and/or urine samples, performed in the toxicological laboratory of the Department of Clinical and Industrial Toxicology Jagiellonian University in Kraków in the period from December 2001 to November 2003. From 17,649 performed determinations--45.5% were positive. 50% of the positive determinations were psychoactive substances. The most often psychoactive substance determined was ethyl alcohol (52.86%), next benzodiazepines (17.41%), amphetamines (10.54%), opiates (8.05%), THC (6.87%), barbiturates (3.74%), and occasionally atropine and cocaine. There was observed a variety of mixed, simultaneously taking psychoactive substances, especially ethyl alcohol, opiates, amphetamine derivatives and cannabinoids. The analysis of the occurrence of psychoactive substances in biological samples from patients treated in different hospital departments, others hospitals and ordered by private persons also was performed. In the last two years 369 private patients ordered psychoactive substances determinations and 78 of them were positive.

  19. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Larry D.; de A. Umbuzeiro, Gisela; DeMarini, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-First Century, modern methods (e.g., “omics,” in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay has been central to the field of genetic toxicology since the 1970s. Here we document the paradigm shifts engendered by the assay, the validation and applications of the assay, and how the assay is a model for future in vitro toxicology assays. Data sources We searched PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge using key words relevant to the Salmonella assay and additional genotoxicity assays. Data extraction We merged the citations, removing duplicates, and categorized the papers by year and topic. Data synthesis The Salmonella assay led to two paradigm shifts: that some carcinogens were mutagens and that some environmental samples (e.g., air, water, soil, food, combustion emissions) were mutagenic. Although there are > 10,000 publications on the Salmonella assay, covering tens of thousands of agents, data on even more agents probably exist in unpublished form, largely as proprietary studies by industry. The Salmonella assay is a model for the development of 21st century in vitro toxicology assays in terms of the establishment of standard procedures, ability to test various agents, transferability across laboratories, validation and testing, and structure–activity analysis. Conclusions Similar to a stethoscope as a first-line, inexpensive tool in medicine, the Salmonella assay can serve a similar, indispensable role in the foreseeable future of 21st century toxicology. PMID:20682480

  20. Pharmacological and toxicological evaluation of Urtica dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Sabzar Ahmad; Ganai, Farooq Ahmad; Yousuf, Abdul Rehman; Balkhi, Masood-Ul-Hassan; Bhat, Towseef Mohsin; Sharma, Poonam

    2013-02-01

    Medicinal plants are a largely unexplored source of drug repository. Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) is used in traditional medicine to treat diverse conditions. The present study describes the antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, antibacterial activity, and toxicological studies of Urtica dioica. U. dioica leaves were subjected to solvent extraction with hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol, and aqueous, respectively, and screened for antidiabetic (300 mg/kg bw by glucose tolerance test; GTT), antiinflammatory (200 mg/kg bw by rat paw edema assay) and antibacterial activities [by disc-diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays]. Toxicological studies were carried on Artemia salina and Wistar rats; phytochemical analyses were carried out, using chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The aqueous extract of U. dioica (AEUD) significantly (p 1000 μg/mL each on A. salina. Our results showed that the U. dioica leaves are an interesting source of bioactive compounds, justifying their use in folk medicine, to treat various diseases.

  1. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of exposure to nano-materials and relates these to the evidence of the effects on health of the ambient aerosol. A number of hypotheses are proposed and the dangers of adopting unsubstantiated hypotheses are stressed. Nano-toxicology presents many challenges and will need substantial financial support if it is to develop at a rate sufficient to cope with developments in nano-technology.

  2. Toxicological profile of therapeutic nanodelivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Peltonen, Leena; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Helder A

    2012-10-01

    Several of the newly developed drug molecules show potent biological activity, but exhibit poor pharmacokinetic properties that may hinder their effective delivery to the intended site of action. In order to improve their pharmacological effect, these molecules can be associated with drug carriers in order to overcome these inherent difficulties. An ideal drug delivery agent requires therefore biocompatibility, improved solubility of a loaded drug or peptide, releasing of the payload at the absorption site and, at the same time, leaving undisturbed cell structure and function, and maintaining the physiological milieu. By taking advantage of the valuable properties of nanoscale delivery systems, such as increased surface area, improved solubility of hydrophobic drugs, possibility to encapsulate and protect drugs from degradation and reduced immunogenic potential and toxicological effect, new therapeutic options can be brought forth and improve the clinical arsenal for numerous diseases. The use of nanodelivery systems can even promote the re-investigation of pharmacokinetically less favourable, but biologically more active compounds. Although very promising, these systems may also encompass inherent toxicological issues, mainly due to their size and shape, physical interaction with cellular membranes and organelles, immunological reactions, long- or short-term tissue accumulation, and degradation products. Pharmaceutical nanodelivery systems, such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers and mesoporous silica and silicon based nanoparticles have shown great potential in preclinical applications and several of these nanosystems are even undergoing clinical trials. They have been found to combine drug delivery properties with an acceptable toxicological profile, which has made them prime candidates for several drug delivery approaches. This review aims to provide and correlate the toxicological studies with the drug delivery properties of the above mentioned

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. The draft Toxicological Review of trichloroacetic acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.

  4. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of ...

  5. Aquatic toxicology: past, present, and prospects.

    OpenAIRE

    Pritchard, J B

    1993-01-01

    Aquatic organisms have played important roles as early warning and monitoring systems for pollutant burdens in our environment. However, they have significant potential to do even more, just as they have in basic biology where preparations like the squid axon have been essential tools in establishing physiological and biochemical mechanisms. This review provides a brief summary of the history of aquatic toxicology, focusing on the nature of aquatic contaminants, the levels of contamination in...

  6. Toxicology in Asia--Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T

    2015-12-01

    The Asian Society of Toxicology (ASIATOX), which consists of the seven national toxicology member societies of Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, and Iran, now boasts of more than 3,000 members from a variety of industries, academia, and regulatory organizations. ASIATOX congresses are spaced three years apart and rotated among the member societies. In 1995, ASIATOX joined the International Union of Toxicology (IUTOX) as a regional society, and now serves as the scientific voice of toxicology in Asia under the IUTOX umbrella. Since its inauguration, the society has worked diligently to handle matters deemed essential to promoting the vision set fourth by its founders. Future perspectives of ASIATOX include the establishment of education and training programs, and the certification and accreditation of toxicologists. As the leading voice of toxicology in Asia, the society seeks to extend knowledge of toxicological issues to developing nations in Asia based on the following missions and goals: (1) to provide leadership as a worldwide scientific organization that objectively addresses global issues involving the toxicological sciences, (2) to broaden the geographical base of toxicology as a discipline and profession to all countries of the world, and (3) to pursue capacity building in toxicology, particularly in developing countries, while utilizing its global perspective and network to contribute to the enhancement of toxicology education and the career development of young toxicologists. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Difficult conversations: Australian Indigenous patients' views on kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Jeannie; Anderson, Kate; Cunningham, Joan; Preece, Cilla; Snelling, Paul; Cass, Alan

    2017-10-11

    Indigenous Australians suffer a disproportionate burden of end stage kidney disease (ESKD) but are significantly less likely to receive a transplant. This study explores Indigenous ESKD patients' views on transplantation as a treatment option. The Improving Access to Kidney Transplants (IMPAKT) research program investigated barriers to kidney transplantation for Indigenous Australians. An interview study, conducted in 2005-2006, elicited illness experience narratives from 146 Indigenous patients, including views on transplant. Interviews were conducted at 26 sites that collectively treat the majority of Indigenous ESKD patients. Key themes were identified via team consensus meetings, providing a flexible framework and focus for continued coding. Four inter-related themes were identified in patient commentary: a very high level (90% of respondents) of positive interest in transplantation; patients experienced a range of communication difficulties and felt uninformed about transplant; family involvement in decision-making was constrained by inadequate information; and patients needed to negotiate cultural and social sensitivities around transplantation. Indigenous ESKD patients demonstrated an intense interest in transplantation preferring deceased over living kidney donation. Patients believe transplant is the path most likely to support the re-establishment of their 'normal' family life. Patients described themselves as poorly informed; most had only a rudimentary knowledge of the notion of transplant but no understanding of eligibility criteria, the transplant procedure and associated risks. Patients experienced multiple communication barriers that - taken together - undermine their engagement in treatment decision-making. Families and communities are disempowered because they also lack information to reach a shared understanding of transplantation. Cultural sensitivities associated with transplantation were described but these did not appear to constrain patients

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Thallium and Compounds ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallium compounds are used in the semiconductor industry, the manufacture of optic lenses and low-melting glass, low-temperature thermometers, alloys, electronic devices, mercury lamps, fireworks, and imitation germs, and clinically as an imaging agent in the diagnosis of certain tumors. EPA's assessment of noncancer health effects and carcinogenic potential of thallium compounds was last prepared and added to the IRIS database between 1988 and 1990. The IRIS program is preparing an assessment that will incorporate current health effects information available for thallium and compounds, and current risk assessment methods. The IRIS assessment for thallium compounds will consist of a Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary. The Toxicological Review is a critical review of the physiochemical and toxicokinetic properties of a chemical, and its toxicity in humans and experimental systems. The assessment will present reference values for the noncancer effects of thallium compounds (RfD and Rfc), and a cancer assessment. The Toxicological Review and IRIS Summary have been subject to Agency review, Interagency review, and external scientific peer review. The final product will reflect the Agency opinion on the overall toxicity of thallium and compounds. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for thallium and compounds. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effec

  9. A toxicological review of the propylene glycols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowles, Jeff R; Banton, Marcy I; Pottenger, Lynn H

    2013-04-01

    The toxicological profiles of monopropylene glycol (MPG), dipropylene glycol (DPG), tripropylene glycol (TPG) and polypropylene glycols (PPG; including tetra-rich oligomers) are collectively reviewed, and assessed considering regulatory toxicology endpoints. The review confirms a rich data set for these compounds, covering all of the major toxicological endpoints of interest. The metabolism of these compounds share common pathways, and a consistent profile of toxicity is observed. The common metabolism provides scientific justification for adopting a read-across approach to describing expected hazard potential from data gaps that may exist for specific oligomers. None of the glycols reviewed presented evidence of carcinogenic, mutagenic or reproductive/developmental toxicity potential to humans. The pathologies reported in some animal studies either occurred at doses that exceeded experimental guidelines, or involved mechanisms that are likely irrelevant to human physiology and therefore are not pertinent to the exposures experienced by consumers or workers. At very high chronic doses, MPG causes a transient, slight decrease in hemoglobin in dogs and at somewhat lower doses causes Heinz bodies to form in cats in the absence of any clinical signs of anemia. Some evidence for rare, idiosyncratic skin reactions exists for MPG. However, the larger data set indicates that these compounds have low sensitization potential in animal studies, and therefore are unlikely to represent human allergens. The existing safety evaluations of the FDA, USEPA, NTP and ATSDR for these compounds are consistent and point to the conclusion that the propylene glycols present a very low risk to human health.

  10. ICPP radiological and toxicological sabotage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubiak, V.R.; Mortensen, F.G.

    1995-01-01

    In June of 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes which states that all significant radiological and toxicological hazards at Department facilities must be examined for potential sabotage. This analysis has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The ICPP radiological and toxicological hazards include spent government and commercial fuels, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), high-level liquid wastes, high-level solid wastes, and process and decontamination chemicals. The analysis effort included identification and assessment of quantities of hazardous materials present at the facility; identification and ranking of hazardous material targets; development of worst case scenarios detailing possible sabotage actions and hazard releases; performance of vulnerability assessments using table top and computer methodologies on credible threat targets; evaluation of potential risks to the public, workers, and the environment; evaluation of sabotage risk reduction options; and selection of cost effective prevention and mitigation options

  11. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II.

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report

  12. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  13. Frequency of forensic toxicological analysis in external cause deaths among nursing home residents: an analysis of trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Georgia; Murphy, Briony; Pilgrim, Jennifer; Bugeja, Lyndal; Ranson, David; Ibrahim, Joseph Elias

    2017-03-01

    There is a paucity of research examining the utility of forensic toxicology in the investigation of premature external cause deaths of residents in nursing homes. The aim of this study is to describe the frequency and characteristics of toxicological analysis conducted in external cause (injury-related) deaths amongst nursing home residents in Victoria, Australia. This study was a retrospective cohort study examining external cause deaths among nursing home residents during the period July 1, 2000 to December 31, 2012 in Victoria, Australia, using the National Coronial Information System (NCIS). The variables examined comprised: sex, age group, year-of-death, cause and manner of death. One-third of deaths among nursing home residents in Victoria resulted from external causes (n = 1296, 33.3%) of which just over one-quarter (361, 27.9%) underwent toxicological analysis as part of the medical death investigation. The use of toxicological analysis varied by cause of death with a relatively low proportion conducted in deaths from unintentional falls (n = 286, 24.9%) and choking (n = 36, 40.4%). The use of toxicological analysis decreased as the decedents age increased. Forensic toxicology has the potential to contribute to improving our understanding of premature deaths in nursing home residents however it remains under used and is possibly undervalued.

  14. Effectiveness of Multimedia for Transplant Preparation for Kidney Transplant Waiting List Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenthanakit, C; Junchotikul, P; Sittiudomsuk, R; Saiyud, A; Pratumphai, P

    2016-04-01

    A multimedia program could effectively advise patients about preparing for transplantation while on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. This study aimed to compare knowledge about transplant preparation for patients on a kidney transplant waiting list before and after participating in a multimedia program, and to evaluate patient satisfaction with the multimedia program. Research design was quasiexperimental with the use of 1 group. Subjects were 186 patients on the kidney transplant waiting list after HLA matching in Ramathibodi Hospital. The questionnaires were developed by the researchers. The statistical tools used were basic statistics, percentage, average, standard deviation, and the difference of score between before and after participation in the multimedia program (t test). The evaluation knowledge for transplant preparation for kidney transplant waiting list patients after participating in the multimedia program averaged 85.40%, and there was an increased improvement of score by an average 3.27 out of a possible full score of 20 (P multimedia program had good average, 4.58. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kidney transplantation after previous liver transplantation: analysis of the organ procurement transplant network database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonwa, Thomas A; McBride, Maureen A; Mai, Martin L; Wadei, Hani M

    2011-07-15

    Patients after liver transplant have a high incidence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated kidney transplantation after liver transplantation using the Organ Procurement Transplant Network database. The Organ Procurement Transplant Network database was queried for patients who received kidney transplantation after previous liver transplantation. These patients were compared with patients who received primary kidney transplantation alone during the same time period. Between 1997 and 2008, 157,086 primary kidney transplants were performed. Of these, 680 deceased donor kidney transplants and 410 living donor kidney transplants were performed in previous recipients of liver transplants. The number of kidney after liver transplants performed each year has increased from 37 per year to 124 per year in 2008. The time from liver transplant to kidney transplant increased from 8.2 to 9.0 years for living donor transplants and from 5.4 to 9.6 years for deceased donor. The 1, 3, and 5 year actuarial graft survival in both living donor kidney after liver transplant and deceased donor kidney after liver transplant are less than the kidney transplant alone patients. However, the death-censored graft survivals are equal. The patient survival is also less but is similar to what would be expected in liver transplant recipients who did not have ESRD. In 2008, kidney after liver transplantation represented 0.9% of the total kidney alone transplants performed in the United States. Kidney transplantation is an appropriate therapy for selected patients who develop ESRD after liver transplantation.

  16. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Using measures to guide the continuous improvement journey: a partnership between quality assurance and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, P E; Sites, D L

    1994-03-01

    It has been said that you cannot improve what you cannot measure. At Eli Lilly and Company, measurement is one of the five pillars of Total Quality. Quality Assurance and Toxicology have partnered in the use of measures to drive improvements in both areas. Quality Assurance and Toxicology have embarked on a journey in Total Quality to achieve customer satisfaction and drive continuous improvement. Measurement in the research and development world has traditionally not been well received. Contrary to popular belief, we have found that many processes can be measured in the research and development environment. Measurement is critical to the continuous improvement of processes because improvements are made using data. In Quality Assurance and Toxicology, the initial measures were put in place to gather baseline data. As we learned from our measures, we customized them to align with all of our processes. This article describes the journey of measuring Quality Assurance and Toxicology, including highlights of implementation strategies and lessons learned along the way.

  18. PHENOMENON OF DEMIKHOV. "Transplantation of vital organs In experiment" (1960. Transplantation immunity, artifi cial circulation in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Glyantsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article (the fourth of five presents the analysis of the 4th and 5th chapters from V.P.Demikhov's monograph "Transplantation of vital organs in experiment" (MedGIz Publisher, Moscow, 1960, where he described his studies of transplantation immunity in originally created models and his use of artificial blood-circulation systems in experimental organ transplantation. It has been shown that V.P.Demikhov changed his views on the tissue biological incompatibility in homoplastic transplants and turned from the Michurin-Pavlov's concepts (1946–1953 to natural-scientific views (1959. Meanwhile, his multiple attempts to study both the morphological and humoral immunological response to transplanted organs did not give conclusive results because of lacking the experience of such studies even in the country's leading scientists and due the imperfection of their techniques. Realizing that the retrieval of a beating heart from a human would have created further problems for its subsequent transplantation, V.P. Demikhov attempted to reanimate human hearts in corpses by means of extracorporeal devices to provide artificial circulation. Methodologically, those devices were based on S.S.Bryukhonenko's research and his "auto-injector" pump modified by V.P.Demikhov. However, by 1960, those studies had not come beyond the experiments.

  19. 20170821 - Comptox Chemistry Dashboard: Web-Based Data Integration Hub for Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Data (ACS Fall meeting 4 of 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrate advances in biology, chemistry, exposure and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and da...

  20. Comptox Chemistry Dashboard: Web-Based Data Integration Hub for Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Data (ACS Fall meeting 4 of 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrate advances in biology, chemistry, exposure and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and da...

  1. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Edmonton, Canada, reported their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine . Their transplant protocol, known as the Edmonton protocol, has since been adapted by transplant centers around the world and continues ... new combination of immunosuppressive medications, also called anti-rejection ...

  2. Liver transplantation : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, R. C.; Van den Berg, A. P.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Porte, R. J.; Haagsma, E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been an accepted treatment for end-stage liver disease since the 1980s. Currently it is a highly successful treatment for this indication. The aim of this review is to give a general update on recent developments in the field of liver transplantation. In the last decades

  3. Rehabilitation following hand transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ericka; Benjamin, Marie-Jose; Sisk, Geoffroy; Sampson, Christian E; Carty, Matthew; Pribaz, Julian J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Talbot, Simon G

    2014-03-01

    Hand allotransplantation can restore motor, sensory and cosmetic functions to upper extremity amputees. Over 70 hand transplant operations have been performed worldwide, but there is little published regarding post-hand transplant rehabilitation. The Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) Hand Transplantation Team's post-hand transplant rehabilitation protocol is presented here. The protocol must be modified to address each transplant recipient's unique needs. It builds on universally used modalities of hand rehabilitation such as splinting, edema and scar management, range of motion exercises, activities of daily living training, electrical stimulation, cognitive training and strengthening. The BWH hand transplant rehabilitation protocol consists of four phases with distinct goals, frequency, and modalities. (1) Pre-operative: functional assessments are completed and goals and expectations of transplantation are established. (2) Initial post-operative (post-operative weeks 1-2): hand protection, minimization of swelling, education, and discharge. (3) Intermediate (post-operative weeks 2-8): therapy aims to prevent and/or decrease scar adhesion, increase tensile strength, flexibility and function, and prevent joint contractures. (4) Late (from 8 weeks forward): maximization of function and strength, and transition to routine activities. The frequency of rehabilitation therapy decreases gradually from the initial to late phases. Rehabilitation therapy after hand transplantation follows a progressive increase in activity in parallel with wound healing and nerve regeneration. Careful documentation of progress and outcomes is essential to demonstrate the utility of interventions and to optimize therapy protocols.

  4. Post-mortem toxicology in young sudden cardiac death victims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjune, Thea; Risgaard, Bjarke; Kruckow, Line

    2018-01-01

    certificates and autopsy reports were retrieved and read to identify cases of sudden death and establish cause of death. All medico-legal autopsied SCD were included and toxicological reports collected. Positive toxicology was defined as the presence of any substance (licit and/or illicit). All toxicological...... findings had previously been evaluated not to have caused the death (i.e. lethal concentrations were excluded). We identified 620 medico-legal autopsied cases of SCD, of which 77% (n = 477) were toxicologically investigated post-mortem, and 57% (n = 270) had a positive toxicology profile. Sudden cardiac...... is displayed in a considerable proportion. SCD with positive toxicology had higher rate of SADS, suggesting that the compounds may play a proarrhythmic role in these cases....

  5. Customizing Fair Use Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, policymakers and commentators across the world have called for the introduction of copyright reform based on the fair use model in the United States. Thus far, Israel, Liberia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka and Taiwan have adopted the fair use regime or its close variants. Other jurisdictions such as Australia, Hong Kong and Ireland have also advanced proposals to facilitate such adoption. This article examines the increasing efforts to transplant fair use into the copyright system based on the U.S. model. It begins by briefly recapturing the strengths and weaknesses of legal transplants. The article then scrutinizes the ongoing effort to transplant fair use from the United States. Specifically, it identifies eight modalities of transplantation. This article concludes with five lessons that can be drawn from studying the ongoing transplant efforts.

  6. Arab Scientific Working Group for Forensic Toxicology (ASWGFT: Guidelines for Method Validation in Forensic Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsallam A. Bakdash

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable results and valid analytical data are an essential requirement for proper interpretation of forensic toxicology cases, especially when evaluating scientific studies and daily routine work, and when presenting any toxicological findings as a criminal evidence. In contrast, the results of unreliable analyses can be disputed in court and can also lead to unfair legal judgments against the defendant, or can result in wrong treatment in cases of rehabilitation for patients. In order to establish strong evidence and make a correct decision, the lab is asked to give high quality data that are based on reliable analytical methods. For that reason, all new analytical methods used in forensic toxicology, including the clinical diagnosis of causes of death, require careful care during the development of the analytical method and during its application. This is also an urgent need in the context of quality management and accreditation, especially as those issues have become increasingly important in the science of poisons and drug analysis in recent years. The Arab Society for forensic sciences and forensic medicine (ASFSFM will publish the first version of Guidelines for Method Validation in Forensic Toxicology issued by the Arab Scientific Working Group of Forensic Toxicology (ASWGFT. This aims to be a distinguished scientific publication written in Arabic which introducing the scientific terms of analytical methods in the field of forensic toxicology to Arab readers. The Arab Scientific Working Group of Forensic Toxicology has chosen the first issue to be a manual of guidelines for method validation in forensic toxicology, similar to the international organizations who are actively publishing in this field. The guidelines contain a systematic scientific message that can be published and circulated among Arab laboratories. It will also encourage other Arab scientific working groups in the field of forensic sciences to produce similar publications

  7. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  8. New Partnership Seeks to Increase Availability of Lifesaving Transplants | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research has entered into a new partnership with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center that if successful, could improve current methods of donor selection and thereby make lifesaving transplant procedure

  9. Post-transplantation Development of Food Allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Erik N; Firszt, Rafael

    2018-01-29

    The development of food allergies is increasingly being recognized as a post-solid organ transplant complication. In this article, we review the spectrum of post-transplant food allergy development and the proposed mechanisms for de novo food allergies and the clinical significance they pose. The development of new food allergies is disproportionately associated with pediatric liver transplants, where it occurs in up to 38% of select populations. The mechanism of food allergy development is not completely understood; however, it is likely promoted by unbalanced immune suppression. De novo food allergy development is a common complication of solid organ transplants with the highest risk occurring in pediatric liver transplant recipients. There are likely multiple mechanisms for food allergy development including passive transfer of membrane-bound IgE and lymphocytes from donor to recipient, as well as loss of food tolerance and active development of new food allergies. The optimal management of food allergies following organ transplants has not been well researched but may include changing the immune suppression regimen if the food allergy does not resolve without intervention.

  10. New horizons in predictive toxicology: current status and application

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, A. G. E

    2012-01-01

    "In this comprehensive discussion of predictive toxicology and its applications, leading experts express their views on the technologies currently available and the potential for future developments...

  11. Positive lidocaine toxicology screen after J-Tip for venipuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupali, Chetan; Cummings, Brian M; Parker, Lois; Young, Robert; Noviski, Natan

    2013-12-01

    Venipuncture is common in children, and topical anesthetics are often used to alleviate the pain of the procedure. The J-Tip (National Medical Products, Inc, Irvine, Calif) device has become popular as a rapid and effective means of delivering lidocaine noninvasively. We report a case of a positive lidocaine blood toxicology screen after the use of the J-Tip device in a child pre-venipuncture. A repeat toxicology screen obtained 1 hour later by venipuncture without J-Tip use was negative. This report serves to remind clinicians that topical anesthetics may interfere with toxicology assays, leading to unreliable toxicology results.

  12. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Aleksandrovich Sklyanik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an analysis of clinical and experimental studies related to post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM – a specific complication after solid organ transplantation.A search of the databases eLibrary, PubMed and Scopus using the keywords «posttransplantation diabetes mellitus», «new onset diabetes after transplantation», «transplantation» and «immunosuppression» yielded in 523 results, including four from Russian literature (one original research manuscript. The analysis included original research, reviews, meta-analyses and monographs published not before 2005 in Russian and English. A total of 60 relevant original researches and reviews were included in this review.Diagnostic criteria, disease risk factors and potential pathogenic mechanisms were all considered. The mechanisms of the diabetogenic effect of modern immunosuppressive drugs were analysed. The principles of pre- and post-transplantation screening for PTDM and optimal management strategies for patients with PTDM are presented. The current controversial issues concerning the various aspects of PTDM are discussed.

  13. Liver transplantation for non-resectable colorectal liver metastases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-resectable colorectal liver metastases (CLMs) are generally considered an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. However, a 2013 Norwegian study transplanted livers in 21 patients with CLMs and reported excellent outcomes. The current article reports on the deliberations of the Wits Human Research ...

  14. Phytochemistry, Pharmacology and Toxicology of Spilanthes acmella: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchita Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spilanthes acmella is an important medicinal plant, found in tropical and subtropical countries mainly India and South America. Popularly, it is known as toothache plant which reduces the pain associated with toothaches and can induce saliva secretion. Various extracts and active metabolites from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. Literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions, which include antifungal, antipyretic, local anaesthetic, bioinsecticide, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, aphrodisiac, analgesic, pancreatic lipase inhibitor, antimicrobial, antinociception, diuretic, vasorelaxant, anti-human immunodeficiency virus, toothache relieve and anti-inflammatory effects. This review is elaborately describing the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. This review would assist researchers to search scientific information in the future.

  15. Adult vertebrate behavioural aquatic toxicology: Reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew O

    2016-01-01

    Current advances in the ability to assay adult aquatic vertebrate behaviour are potentially very useful to aquatic toxicologists wishing to characterise the effects of pollutants on behaviour, cognition or neurodevelopment. This review considers two specific challenges faced by researchers wishing to exploit these technologies: maximising reliability and validity. It will suggest two behavioural procedures, with the potential for automation and high-throughput implementation, which can be used to measure social cohesion and anxiety, two areas of interest in behavioural aquatic toxicology. In addition, the review will make recommendations about how these procedures (and others) could be carried out to maximise reliability and validity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as 'gular.' It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future.

  17. Results of a Wildlife Toxicology Workshop held by the Smithsonian Institution ? Identification and prioritization of problem statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, K.C.; Fairbrother, A.; Monfort, S.; Tan, S.; Rattner, B.A.; Gerould, S.; Beasley, V.; Aguirre, A.; Rowles, T.

    2007-01-01

    On March 13-15, 2007 nearly 50 scientists and administrators from the US and Canada participated in a Smithsonian-sponsored Wildlife Toxicology Workshop. Invitees were from academic, government, conservation and the private organizations and were selected to represent the diverse disciplines that encompass wildlife toxicology. The workshop addressed scientific and policy issues, strengths and weaknesses of current research strategies, interdisciplinary and science-based approaches in the study of complex contaminant issues, mechanisms for disseminating data to policy-makers, and the development of a partner network to meet the challenges facing wildlife toxicology over the next decade. Prior to the meeting, participants were asked to submit issues they deemed to be of highest concern which shaped four thematic groups for discussion: Wildlife Toxicology in Education, Risk Assessment, Multiple Stressors/Complex Mixtures, and Sub-Lethal to Population-Level Effects. From these discussion groups, 18 problem statements were developed and prioritized outlining what were deemed the most important issues to address now and into the future. Along with each problem statement participants developed potential solutions and action steps geared to move each issue forward. The workshop served as a stepping stone for action in the field of wildlife toxicology. These problem statements and the resulting action items are presented to the inter-disciplinary wildlife toxicology community for adoption, and future work and action items in these areas are encouraged. The workshop outcome looks to generate conversation and collaboration that will lead to the development of innovative research, future mechanisms for funding, workshops, working groups, and listserves within the wildlife toxicology community.

  18. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  19. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  20. Troubling dimensions of heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shildrick, M; McKeever, P; Abbey, S; Poole, J; Ross, H

    2009-06-01

    Heart transplantation is now the accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure that is resistant to medical treatment. Families of deceased donors routinely are urged to view the heart as a "gift of life" that will enable the donor to live on by extending and sustaining the life of a stranger. In contrast, heart recipients are encouraged to view the organ mechanistically-as a new pump that was rendered a spare, reusable part when a generous stranger died. Psychosocial and psychoanalytic research, anecdotal evidence and first-person accounts indicate that after transplant, many recipients experience unexpected changes or distress that cannot be understood adequately using biomedical explanatory models alone. In this paper it is argued that phenomenological philosophy offers a promising way to frame an ongoing empirical study that asks recipients to reflect on what it is like to incorporate the heart of another person. Merleau-Ponty and others have posited that any change to the body inevitably transforms the self. Hence, it is argued in this paper that replacing failing hearts with functioning hearts from deceased persons must be considered much more than a complex technical procedure. Acknowledging the disturbances to embodiment and personal identity associated with transplantation may explain adverse outcomes that heretofore have been inexplicable. Ultimately, a phenomenological understanding could lead to improvements in the consent process, preoperative teaching and follow-up care.

  1. Dysfunction of the Lower Urinary Tract in Renal Transplant Children with Nephrological Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weide, M.J.A. van der; Cornelissen, E.A.M.; Achterberg, T. van; Smits, J.P.J.M.; Feitz, W.F.J.

    2006-01-01

    - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between dysfunction of the lower urinary tract after renal transplantation and renal transplant function in children with an underlying nephrologic disease. - METHODS: The research group consisted of 21 renal transplant children (12 girls and 9 boys,

  2. In vitro toxicology studies of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Sayantan; Yan, Irene K; Parasramka, Mansi; Mohankumar, Swathi; Matsuda, Akiko; Patel, Tushar

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-bound vesicles released from cells into the extracellular environment. There is emerging interest in the use of EVs as potential therapeutic interventions. We sought to evaluate the safety of EVs that may be therapeutically used by performing in vitro toxicological assessments. EVs were obtained from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-EV) or from bovine milk (BM-EV) by differential ultracentrifugation, and quantitated using nanoparticle tracking analysis. Genotoxic effects, hematological effects, immunological effects and endotoxin production were evaluated at two dose levels. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs elicited detectable genotoxic effects using either the alkaline comet assay or micronucleus assay. Hemolysis was observed with BM-EVs but not with MSC-EVs. MSC-EVs did not have any significant effect on either spontaneous or collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In contrast, BM-EVs were noted to increase collagen-induced platelet aggregation, even though no spontaneous increase in platelet aggregation was noted. Both types of EVs induced leukocyte proliferation, which was greater with BM-EV. Neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced HL-60 phagocytosis, although BM-EVs decreased zymosan-induced phagocytosis. Furthermore, neither MSC-EVs nor BM-EVs induced nitric oxide production. Unlike MSC-EVs, BM-EVs tested positive for endotoxin and induced complement activation. There are significant differences in toxicological profiles between MSC-EVs and BM-EVs that may reflect variations in techniques for EV isolation, EV content or cross-species differences. The safety of MSC-EV supports their use for disease therapeutics, whereas detailed safety and toxicological assessment will be necessary before the use of BM-EVs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Chromatographic screening techniques in systematic toxicological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummer, O H

    1999-10-15

    A review of techniques used to screen biological specimens for the presence of drugs was conducted with particular reference to systematic toxicological analysis. Extraction systems of both the liquid-liquid and solid-phase type show little apparent difference in their relative ability to extract a range of drugs according to their physio-chemical properties, although mixed-phase SPE extraction is a preferred technique for GC-based applications, and liquid-liquid were preferred for HPLC-based applications. No one chromatographic system has been shown to be capable of detecting a full range of common drugs of abuse, and common ethical drugs, hence two or more assays are required for laboratories wishing to cover a reasonably comprehensive range of drugs of toxicological significance. While immunoassays are invariably used to screen for drugs of abuse, chromatographic systems relying on derivatization and capable of extracting both acidic and basic drugs would be capable of screening a limited range of targeted drugs. Drugs most difficult to detect in systematic toxicological analysis include LSD, psilocin, THC and its metabolites, fentanyl and its designer derivatives, some potent opiates, potent benzodiazepines and some potent neuroleptics, many of the newer anti-convulsants, alkaloids colchicine, amantins, aflatoxins, antineoplastics, coumarin-based anti-coagulants, and a number of cardiovascular drugs. The widespread use of LC-MS and LC-MS-MS for specific drug detection and the emergence of capillary electrophoresis linked to MS and MS-MS provide an exciting possibility for the future to increase the range of drugs detected in any one chromatographic screening system.

  4. Nanotechnology in agriculture: Opportunities, toxicological implications, and occupational risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Beezhold, Donald H; Shvedova, Anna A

    2017-08-15

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make a beneficial impact on several agricultural, forestry, and environmental challenges, such as urbanization, energy constraints, and sustainable use of resources. However, new environmental and human health hazards may emerge from nano-enhanced applications. This raises concerns for agricultural workers who may become primarily exposed to such xenobiotics during their job tasks. The aim of this review is to discuss promising solutions that nanotechnology may provide in agricultural activities, with a specific focus on critical aspects, challenging issues, and research needs for occupational risk assessment and management in this emerging field. Eco-toxicological aspects were not the focus of the review. Nano-fertilizers, (nano-sized nutrients, nano-coated fertilizers, or engineered metal-oxide or carbon-based nanomaterials per se), and nano-pesticides, (nano-formulations of traditional active ingredients or inorganic nanomaterials), may provide a targeted/controlled release of agrochemicals, aimed to obtain their fullest biological efficacy without over-dosage. Nano-sensors and nano-remediation methods may detect and remove environmental contaminants. However, limited knowledge concerning nanomaterial biosafety, adverse effects, fate, and acquired biological reactivity once dispersed into the environment, requires further scientific efforts to assess possible nano-agricultural risks. In this perspective, toxicological research should be aimed to define nanomaterial hazards and levels of exposure along the life-cycle of nano-enabled products, and to assess those physico-chemical features affecting nanomaterial toxicity, possible interactions with agro-system co-formulants, and stressors. Overall, this review highlights the importance to define adequate risk management strategies for workers, occupational safety practices and policies, as well as to develop a responsible regulatory consensus on nanotechnology in agriculture

  5. The Whole Wildlife Toxicology Catalog: a Web Portal for Wildlife Toxicology Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2007, the Smithsonian Institution sponsored a Wildlife Toxicology Workshop attended by over 50 scientists and administrators from academia, government and conservation entities, and the private sector. One of the action items from the meeting was to develop a web portal that ...

  6. The placenta in toxicology. Part IV : Battery of toxicological test systems based on human placenta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göhner, Claudia; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Pfarrer, Christiane; Häger, Jan-Dirk; Faas, Marijke; Ernerudh, Jan; Cline, J Mark; Dixon, Darlene; Buse, Eberhard; Markert, Udo R

    This review summarizes the potential and also some limitations of using human placentas, or placental cells and structures for toxicology testing. The placenta contains a wide spectrum of cell types and tissues, such as trophoblast cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, stem cells, endothelial cells,

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Carbon Tetrachloride (External ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of carbon tetrachloride that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Peer review is meant to ensure that science is used credibly and appropriately in derivation of the dose-response assessments and toxicological characterization. EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of carbon tetrachloride that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trimethylbenzenes (External ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of trimethylbenzenes that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. EPA is reassessing its IRIS toxicological review of Trimethylbenzenes (1,2,3-;1,2,4-;1,3,5-). This trimethylbenzene reassessment consists of an oral reference dose (RfD), an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), an inhalation unit risk (IUR) and a cancer weight of evidence descriptor. This is the first assessment developing an RfC or IUR for this compound. This assessment is intended to provide human health data to support agency regulatory decisions.

  9. Toxicological applications of neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, J.D.; Dale, I.M.; Smith, H.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal neutron-activation analysis is recognised as a useful tool for trace element studies in toxicology. This paper describes some recent applications of the technique to three elements when ingested by people in excess of normal intake Two of the elements (copper and chromium) are essential to life and one (bromine) is as yet unclassified. Three deaths were investiagted and trace element levels compared with normal levels from healthy subjects in the same geographical area who had died as a result of violence. (author)

  10. Donor transplant programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Sulaiman

    1999-01-01

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  11. [Pregnancy after renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, H; Bichler, A; Ortner, A

    1981-12-01

    Since the number of women with renal cadaver transplantation is increasing, the obstetrician seems himself more often confronted with the situation: pregnancy after renal transplantation. The purpose of this paper is to report about our own case, to give a review of international studies written on this subject, and to inform the obstetrician, the surgeon and the pediatrician about the following points: - Common aspects of renal transplantation in fertile women and the information to be given to the patient. - Selection criteria and anticonception. - Pregnancy assessment and delivery - Pediatric problems.

  12. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  13. U.S. Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    pest management of mosquitoes and black files with two Insectaries, electron microscopy facilities, and an extensive aquatic toxicology laboratory...conducted through the In-house aquatic toxicology resources achieved significant productivity In developing short-term tests predictive of aquatic 6...Research In Experimental Toxicology; DA309065; Miller, T.A. * In-House Aquatic Toxicology Research has provided data which suggest that exposure and

  14. Principle of serviceability and gratuitousness in transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashkov, Vitaliy M; Golovanova, Iryna A; Noha, Petro P

    the issue of commercialization of transplantation analyses in the article. Attention is paid to the importance of transplantation as a method of treatment and saving human lives. the clarify the feasibility of the introduction of donation commercialization as an avenue to solve the shortage of donor organs and means of combating with black organ market and finding alternative avenues solving these problems, which are more morally acceptable for society is the aim of this article. the experience of foreign countries has been analyses in the research. Additionally, we used data from international organizations, conclusions scientists and report of Global Financial Integrity in the research. it is impossible to solve most problems by means of paid donation. therapeutic organ and tissue cloning based on genetic technology is the best way out and solving ethical transplantation problems.

  15. Molecular transplantation pathology: the interface between molecules and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Sis, Banu

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput molecular screening methods have revolutionized the transplantation research. This article reviews the new knowledge that has emerged from transplant patient sample-derived 'omics data by examining the interface between molecular signals and allograft pathology. State-of-the-art molecular studies have shed light on the biology of organ transplant diseases and provided several potential molecular tests with diagnostic, prognostic, and theranostic applications for the implementation of personalized medicine in transplantation. By comprehensive molecular profiling of patient samples, we have learned numerous new insights into the effector mechanisms and parenchymal response during allograft diseases. It has become evident that molecular profiles are coordinated and move in patterns similar to histopathology lesions, and therefore lack qualitative specificity. However, molecular tests can empower precision diagnosis and prognostication through their objective and quantitative manner when they are integrated in a holistic approach with histopathology and clinical factors of patients. Despite clever science and large amounts of public money invested in transplant 'omics studies, multiparametric molecular testing has not yet been translated to patient care. There are serious challenges in the implementation of transplant molecular diagnostics that have increased frustration in transplant community. We appeal for a full collaboration between pathologists and researchers to accelerate transition from research to clinical practice in transplantation.

  16. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    23 juin 2012 ... L'infection du site d'émergence a également été notée dans trois cas (37,5%) avec bonne évolution sous traitement antibiotique local et général. Transplantation rénale. Une patiente de 18 ans a été transplantée par le rein de sa mère, avec bonne évolution actuellement à un mois post-greffe et reprise ...

  17. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cure your illness. If the transplant is a success, you can go back to most of your ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  18. Kidney Transplantation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Einollahi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation in patients with end stage renal diseaseis preferred to dialysis because transplantation provides a betterquality of life and improved survival. However, the gapbetween the supply and demand for a renal allograft is wideningand the waiting time is increasing. Iranian protocol, a controlledtransplant program supported by the government forliving unrelated donors, was initiated for solving the problemof organ shortage. Although this system might experiencechallenges, clearly it has advantages over other organ procurementsystems primarily that thousands in need do not diewhile waiting for a compatible donor.In the present review I discuss the history of renal transplantationin Iran, "Iranian model" protocol, the situation ofIran’s kidney transplantation from either living or deceaseddonors compared with the Middle East countries, and our experiencesof unrelated renal transplantation.

  19. Rabies in Transplant Recipients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-19

    Dr. Richard Franka, a CDC scientist, discusses rabies in organ transplant recipients.  Created: 9/19/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/19/2016.

  20. Frailty and Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, Leonie; Slegtenhorst, Bendix R.; Kelm, Matthias; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Quante, Markus; Uehara, Hirofumi; El Khal, Abdala; Tullius, Stefan G.

    Consequences of aging are gaining clinical relevance. In transplantation, aging and immunosenescence impact treatment and outcomes. The impact of aging, however, will critically depend on distinguishing healthy, chronological aging from biological aging that may result into frailty. Approximately

  1. Liver transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100090.htm Liver transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The liver is in the right upper abdomen. The liver ...

  2. Imaging in transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    This book covers all topics related to the imaging of organ transplantation. An introductory section addresses such issues as organ procurement, patient selection, immune responses, and ethical and economic considerations. The main part of the book then offers in-depth coverage of heart, renal, liver, lung, bone marrow and pancreatic and intestinal transplantation. Each of these topics is discussed firstly in a clinical chapter and then in a radiological chapter. The clinical chapters detail the epidemiology, clinical background, and surgical procedures, as well as any clinically relevant issues of which the radiologist should be aware. The radiological chapters describe and depict the imaging manifestations of specific organ transplantations, document the normal radiological appearance of transplanted organs and consider both early and late complications. This is a unique, superbly illustrated volume that will be of great assistance to all who work in this field. (orig.)

  3. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The term "clinical ladder" refers to a "grading structure which facilitates career progression and associated differentiation of ... 20-1589538 Copyright © 2006 - 2014 International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS). No materials, including graphics, may be reused, ...

  4. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute myeloid leukemia - adult Aplastic anemia Bone marrow transplant Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Graft-versus-host disease Hodgkin lymphoma Multiple myeloma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Patient ...

  5. Fecal microbiota transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/26344412 . Surawicz CM, Brandt LJ. Probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  6. Twitter Use in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar S; Majhail, Navneet S

    2018-02-01

    Social media has revolutionized the access and exchange of information in healthcare. The microblogging platform Twitter has been used by blood and marrow transplant physicians over the last several years with increasing enthusiasm. We review the adoption of Twitter in the transplant community and its implications on clinical care, education, and research. Twitter allows instantaneous access to the latest research publications, developments at national and international meetings, networking with colleagues, participation in advocacy, and promoting available clinical trials. Additionally, Twitter serves as a gateway for resources dedicated to education and support for patients undergoing transplantation. We demonstrate the utilization and various applications in using Twitter among hematopoietic cell transplant healthcare professionals, patients, and other affiliated stakeholders. Professionalism concerns with clinician use of such social media platforms, however, also exist. Overall, Twitter has enhanced and increased the opportunities for engagement in the transplant community.

  7. Space Toxicology Challenges and Ethical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Before delineating specific ways that nanotechnology enterprises might contribute to better management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, I will show how ethical considerations and several theories of justice can be applied to nanotechnology strategic plans. The principles that guide an ethical technical enterprise include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, veracity and justice. Veracity (truth) is the underpinning principle; however, beyond this, proponents of nanotechnology must think carefully about balancing conflicting principles. For example, autonomy must yield to beneficence when fearful individuals simply lack knowledge to appreciate nanotechnology's beneficial advances. Justice is a complex topic upon which I will place six models: utilitarian, distributive, free-exchange/choice, individual dignity (social participation), equity vs. greed, and liberation of the poor. After briefly summarizing each model, I will present what I call an iterative-hybrid model of justice to show specifically how our thinking can be applied to nanotechnology enterprises. Within that broad landscape, I will discuss a single feature: how our early effort to understand health risks of carbon nanotubes fits into the iterative model. Finally, I will suggest ways that nanotechnology might advance our management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, but always with an eye toward how such advances might result in a more just world.

  8. External quality assessment schemes for toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John

    2002-08-14

    A variety of external quality assurance (EQA) schemes monitor quantitative performance for routine biochemical analysis of agents such as paracetamol, salicylate, ethanol and carboxyhaemoglobin. Their usefulness for toxicologists can be lessened where the concentrations monitored do not extend fully into the toxic range or where the matrix is synthetic, of animal origin or serum as opposed to whole human blood. A scheme for quantitative determinations of a wider range of toxicological analytes such as opioids, benzodiazepines and tricyclics in human blood has been piloted by the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Scheme (UKNEQAS). Specialist schemes are available for drugs of abuse testing in urine and for hair analysis. Whilst these programmes provide much useful information on the performance of analytical techniques, they fail to monitor the integrated processes that are needed in investigation of toxicological cases. In practice, both qualitative and quantitative tests are used in combination with case information to guide the evaluation of the samples and to develop an interpretation of the analytical findings that is used to provide clinical or forensic advice. EQA programs that combine the analytical and interpretative aspects of case studies are available from EQA providers such as UKNEQAS and the Dutch KKGT program (Stichting Kwaliteitsbewaking Klinische Geneesmiddelanalyse en Toxicologie).

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Revised External ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2013, EPA submitted a revised draft IRIS assessment of ammonia to the agency's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and posted this draft on the IRIS website. EPA had previously released a draft of the assessment for public comment, held a public meeting about the draft, and then revised it based on the comments received. The SAB CAAC-Ammonia panel will review this draft assessment. Details about the meeting dates, times, and location are available via the Federal Register Notice posted on March 25, 2014. The SAB provided information on how the public can participate in the external peer review meetings, as well as instructions about how to provide comments to the SAB in the notice. Additional information on the SAB review of ammonia is on the SAB website. Report Information: The Toxicological Review of Ammonia was originally released for a 60-day public comment period on June 8, 2012. [Federal Register Notice Jun 8, 2012] EPA revised the toxicological review in response to the public comments received. EPA has released the revised external review draft ammonia assessment and the SAB CAAC is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the assessment that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Information regarding the peer review can be found at the SAB review of ammonia website. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database cont

  10. New Toxico-Cheminformatics & Computational Toxicology ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is building capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized forms than traditionally employed in SAR modeling, and in ways that facilitate data-mining, and data read-across. The DSSTox Structure-Browser provides structure searchability across all published DSSTox toxicity-related inventory, and is enabling linkages between previously isolated toxicity data resources. As of early March 2008, the public DSSTox inventory has been integrated into PubChem, allowing a user to take full advantage of PubChem structure-activity and bioassay clustering features. The most recent DSSTox version of the Carcinogenic Potency Database file (CPDBAS) illustrates ways in which various summary definitions of carcinogenic activity can be employed in modeling and data mining. Phase I of the ToxCastTM project is generating high-throughput screening data from several hundred biochemical and cell-based assays for a set of 320 chemicals, mostly pesticide actives, with rich toxicology profiles. Incorporating and expanding traditional SAR concepts into this new high-throughput and data-rich world pose conceptual and practical challenges, but also holds great promise for improving predictive capabilities.

  11. Web tools for predictive toxicology model building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina

    2012-07-01

    The development and use of web tools in chemistry has accumulated more than 15 years of history already. Powered by the advances in the Internet technologies, the current generation of web systems are starting to expand into areas, traditional for desktop applications. The web platforms integrate data storage, cheminformatics and data analysis tools. The ease of use and the collaborative potential of the web is compelling, despite the challenges. The topic of this review is a set of recently published web tools that facilitate predictive toxicology model building. The focus is on software platforms, offering web access to chemical structure-based methods, although some of the frameworks could also provide bioinformatics or hybrid data analysis functionalities. A number of historical and current developments are cited. In order to provide comparable assessment, the following characteristics are considered: support for workflows, descriptor calculations, visualization, modeling algorithms, data management and data sharing capabilities, availability of GUI or programmatic access and implementation details. The success of the Web is largely due to its highly decentralized, yet sufficiently interoperable model for information access. The expected future convergence between cheminformatics and bioinformatics databases provides new challenges toward management and analysis of large data sets. The web tools in predictive toxicology will likely continue to evolve toward the right mix of flexibility, performance, scalability, interoperability, sets of unique features offered, friendly user interfaces, programmatic access for advanced users, platform independence, results reproducibility, curation and crowdsourcing utilities, collaborative sharing and secure access.

  12. Behavioral Screening for Toxicology | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; however, only in the past 20 years has this become a standard practice in toxicology. Current screening batteries, such as the functional observational battery (FOB), are derived from protocols used in pharmacology, toxicology, and psychology. Although there is a range of protocols in use today, all focus on detailed observations and specific tests of reflexes and responses. Several neurological functions are typically assessed, including autonomic, neuromuscular, and sensory, as well as levels of activity and excitability. The tests have been shown to be valid in detecting expected effects of known neurotoxicants, and reliable and reproducible whn compared across laboratories. Regardless of the specific protocol used, proper conduct and statistical analyses of the data are critical. Interpretation is based on the information from individual end points as well as the profile, or pattern, of effects observed. As long as continual refinements are made, behavioral screening methods will continue to be important tools with which to protect human health in the future.autonomic function; behavior; behavioral phenotypes; behavioral toxicity; excitability; functional observational battery ; motor activity; mouse; neuromuscular function; positive controls; rat; screening battery ; sensory function Screening for behavioral toxicity, or neurotoxicity, has been in use for decades; how

  13. Saccharin: a toxicological and historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D L; Krewski, D; Munro, I C

    1983-01-01

    Saccharin, first synthesized in 1879, eventually became popular as an inexpensive substitute for sugar, particularly as a non-caloric sweetner. The dispute concerning the safety of saccharin for human consumption is almost as old as saccharin itself. In this article, the history concerning the uses of saccharin and the accompanying controversy are reviewed. In addition, the spectrum of toxicological and epidemiological studies to which saccharin has been subjected are also examined. While the toxicological data indicate that saccharin is probably the agent solely responsible for the bladder tumors observed in second generation male rats, the epidemiological studies provide, at best, an equivocal relationship between the consumption of saccharin and bladder cancer. A benefit-risk evaluation for saccharin showed few, if any documentable benefits from the use of saccharin and much genuine uncertainty concerning the potential risks for ingestion by man. This element of genuine uncertainty as to the extent of human risk posed to man is the crux of saccharin's past and its foreseeable future.

  14. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  15. IRIS Toxicological Review of Formaldehyde (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 2, 2010, the Toxicological Review of Formaldehyde and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices...

  16. Recent developments in analytical toxicology : for better or for worse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, RA

    1998-01-01

    When considering the state of the art in toxicology from an analytical perspective, the key developments relate to three major areas. (1) Forensic horizon: Today forensic analysis has broadened its scope dramatically, to include workplace toxicology, drug abuse testing, drugs and driving, doping,

  17. Temas 27 a 31. Toxicología de plaguicidas

    OpenAIRE

    García Fernández, Antonio Juan

    2010-01-01

    Toxicología de los plaguicidas. Intoxicaciones en animales y humanos. Mecanismos de acción. Diagnóstico. Tratamiento. Aspectos legales, alimentarios y ambientales. Presentaciones de los temas 27 a 31 de Toxicología de la licenciatura de Veterinaria

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (Noncancer) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On May 3, 2013, the Toxicological Review of Methanol (noncancer) (Revised External Review Draft) was posted for public review and comment. Subsequently, the draft Toxicological Review, Appendices, and draft IRIS Summary were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenci...

  19. 75 FR 52535 - Availability of Draft Toxicological Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... Profile AGENCY: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), ] Department of Health and Human..., the availability of one new draft toxicological profile on unregulated hazardous substances that was prepared for the Department of Defense (DOD). All toxicological profiles issued as ``Drafts for Public...

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone (2003 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Methyl Ethyl Ketone: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Methyl Ethyl Ketone and accompanying toxicological review have been added to the IRIS Database....

  1. Livebirth after uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats; Johannesson, Liza; Bokström, Hans; Kvarnström, Niclas; Mölne, Johan; Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Enskog, Anders; Milenkovic, Milan; Ekberg, Jana; Diaz-Garcia, Cesar; Gäbel, Markus; Hanafy, Ash; Hagberg, Henrik; Olausson, Michael; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-02-14

    Uterus transplantation is the first available treatment for absolute uterine infertility, which is caused by absence of the uterus or the presence of a non-functional uterus. Eleven human uterus transplantation attempts have been done worldwide but no livebirth has yet been reported. In 2013, a 35-year-old woman with congenital absence of the uterus (Rokitansky syndrome) underwent transplantation of the uterus in Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. The uterus was donated from a living, 61-year-old, two-parous woman. In-vitro fertilisation treatment of the recipient and her partner had been done before transplantation, from which 11 embryos were cryopreserved. The recipient and the donor had essentially uneventful postoperative recoveries. The recipient's first menstruation occurred 43 days after transplantation and she continued to menstruate at regular intervals of between 26 and 36 days (median 32 days). 1 year after transplantation, the recipient underwent her first single embryo transfer, which resulted in pregnancy. She was then given triple immunosuppression (tacrolimus, azathioprine, and corticosteroids), which was continued throughout pregnancy. She had three episodes of mild rejection, one of which occurred during pregnancy. These episodes were all reversed by corticosteroid treatment. Fetal growth parameters and blood flows of the uterine arteries and umbilical cord were normal throughout pregnancy. The patient was admitted with pre-eclampsia at 31 full weeks and 5 days, and 16 h later a caesarean section was done because of abnormal cardiotocography. A male baby with a normal birthweight for gestational age (1775 g) and with APGAR scores 9, 9, 10 was born. We describe the first livebirth after uterus transplantation. This report is a proof-of-concept for uterus transplantation as a treatment for uterine factor infertility. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility of live uterus donation, even from a postmenopausal donor. Jane and

  2. Faecal microbiota transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Simon M D; Hansen, Mette Mejlby; Erikstrup, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently being established as a second-line treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. FMT is further being considered for other infectious and inflammatory conditions. Safe and reproducible methods for donor screening, laborat......BACKGROUND: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently being established as a second-line treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. FMT is further being considered for other infectious and inflammatory conditions. Safe and reproducible methods for donor screening...

  3. Gender differences in drug abuse in the forensic toxicological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccelli, C; Della Casa, E; Paternoster, M; Niola, M; Pieri, M

    2016-08-01

    Gender differences in substance use/abuse have been the focus of research in the last 15 years. Initiation, use patterns, acceleration of disease course, and help-seeking patterns are known to be influenced by gender differences with regard to biological, psychological, cultural and socioeconomic factors. This paper presents a systematic review of published data on gender differences in the use/abuse of psychoactive and psychotic drugs, focusing on the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. The basis for this paper was obtained by Medline searches using the search terms "human" and "gender", combined with individual drug names or "drugs of abuse". The reference lists of these papers were further checked for other relevant studies. The gender difference in drug abuse is more evident in adults than in adolescents (13-19 years): adult men are 2-3 times more likely than women to develop drug abuse/dependence disorders and approximately 4 times as likely to have an alcohol use disorder. Such prevalence rates have not been observed in adolescents. Differences between men and women involve: (i) the biological response to the drug, (ii) the progression to drug dependence, and (iii) the comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, which may be due to both sociocultural factors and innate biological differences. A crucial role played by ovarian hormones (oestrogens and progesterone) has been documented in both human and animal model studies. Epidemiological data on how particular psychobiological and physiological characteristics in females influence vulnerability to both drug addiction and toxicological consequences of drugs are still in their infancy. Significant gaps remain in our knowledge, which are primarily attributable to the lack of empirical data that only a systematic and multidisciplinary approach to the topic can generate. The introduction of gender into forensic toxicological evaluations may help elucidate the relationship between the body's absorption of abused drugs

  4. Immunosuppression in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffert, Jenna L; Raza, Kashif

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation can be a life-saving procedure for those with end-stage lung diseases. Unfortunately, long term graft and patient survival are limited by both acute and chronic allograft rejection, with a median survival of just over 6 years. Immunosuppressive regimens are employed to reduce the rate of rejection, and while protocols vary from center to center, conventional maintenance therapy consists of triple drug therapy with a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus), antiproliferative agents [azathioprine (AZA), mycophenolate, sirolimus (srl), everolimus (evl)], and corticosteroids (CS). Roughly 50% of lung transplant centers also utilize induction therapy, with polyclonal antibody preparations [equine or rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)], interleukin 2 receptor antagonists (IL2RAs) (daclizumab or basiliximab), or alemtuzumab. This review summarizes these agents and the data surrounding their use in lung transplantation, as well as additional common and novel therapies in lung transplantation. Despite the progression of the management of lung transplant recipients, they continue to be at high risk of treatment-related complications, and poor graft and patient survival. Randomized clinical trials are needed to allow for the development of better agents, regimens and techniques to address above mentioned issues and reduce morbidity and mortality among lung transplant recipients.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications.Keywords: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complications

  6. Indian transplant registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Shroff

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An ′Indian transplant registry′ has been established over the past two years due to the efforts of the Indian Society of Organ Transplantation. This society is about 20 years old with over 450 members who are doctors and basic scientist. The registry is currently in the first phase of its development and can be partly viewed at www.transplantindia.com. The endeavor has been undertaken with the objective of having a centralized repository of information of the various transplants that are being undertaken in India. In its first phase of the registry ′Fast Fact′ retrospective short datasets are being captured that include the essential details of the transplant programme. The fast fact data includes the number of transplant done yearly, the sex ratio and type of transplant. So far thirteen major institutional data has been entered in the registry. In the second phase of the registry, over twenty fields are likely to be captured and all member institutions would be encouraged to enter the data prospectively. In the third phase data would be derived with ongoing audit features.. The society and its members have supported the formation of the registry and are enthusiastic about its potential.

  7. Phytochemical Content, Health Benefits, and Toxicology of Common Edible Flowers: A Review (2000-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Baiyi; Li, Maiquan; Yin, Ran

    2016-07-29

    Edible flowers contain numerous phytochemicals which contribute to their health benefits, and consumption of edible flowers has increased significantly in recent years. While many researchers have been conducted, no literature review of the health benefits of common edible flowers and their phytochemicals has been compiled. This review aimed to present the findings of research conducted from 2000 to 2015 on the species, traditional application, phytochemicals, health benefits, and the toxicology of common edible flowers. It was found in 15 species of common edible flowers that four flavonols, three flavones, four flavanols, three anthocyanins, three phenolic acids and their derivatives were common phytochemicals and they contributed to the health benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, and neuroprotective effect. Toxicology studies have been conducted to evaluate the safety of common edible flowers and provide information on their dosages and usages.

  8. Profiles in drug metabolism and toxicology: Richard Tecwyn Williams (1909-1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2015-01-01

    This article pays homage to the life and work of a veritable pioneer in toxicology and drug metabolism, namely a Welshman, Richard Tecwyn Williams, FRS. Professor Williams, or RT as he was known, made major contributions to knowledge about the metabolism and toxicology of drugs and xenobiotics during a scientific career spanning nearly 50 years. Author or coauthor of close to 400 research articles and reviews, including a classic book, entitled Detoxication Mechanisms, Williams and his research school investigated virtually all aspects of drug metabolism, especially conjugations. In particular, the concepts of phase 1 and phase II metabolic pathways were introduced by Williams; the biliary excretion of drugs was extensively studied as were species differences in drug metabolism and detoxication. Besides investigating the metabolism of many pharmaceutical drugs, such as sulfonamides and thalidomide, Williams and his group investigated the disposition and fate in the body of organic pesticides and recreational drugs of abuse, such as amphetamine, methamphetamine and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

  9. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  10. Adult cardiothoracic transplant nursing: an ISHLT consensus document on the current adult nursing practice in heart and lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Bernice; Blumenthal, Nancy; Currey, Judy; Dobbels, Fabienne; Velleca, Angela; Grady, Kathleen L; Kugler, Christiane; Murks, Catherine; Ohler, Linda; Sumbi, Christine; Luu, Minh; Dark, John; Kobashigawa, Jon; White-Williams, Connie

    2015-02-01

    The role of nurses in cardiothoracic transplantation has evolved over the last 25 years. Transplant nurses work in a variety of roles in collaboration with multidisciplinary teams to manage complex pre- and post-transplantation issues. There is lack of clarity and consistency regarding required qualifications to practice transplant nursing, delineation of roles and adequate levels of staffing. A consensus conference with workgroup sessions, consisting of 77 nurse participants with clinical experience in cardiothoracic transplantation, was arranged. This was followed by subsequent discussion with the ISHLT Nursing, Health Science and Allied Health Council. Evidence and expert opinions regarding key issues were reviewed. A modified nominal group technique was used to reach consensus. Consensus reached included: (1) a minimum of 2 years nursing experience is required for transplant coordinators, nurse managers or advanced practice nurses; (2) a baccalaureate in nursing is the minimum education level required for a transplant coordinator; (3) transplant coordinator-specific certification is recommended; (4) nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and nurse managers should hold at least a master's degree; and (5) strategies to retain transplant nurses include engaging donor call teams, mentoring programs, having flexible hours and offering career advancement support. Future research should focus on the relationships between staffing levels, nurse education and patient outcomes. Delineation of roles and guidelines for education, certification, licensure and staffing levels of transplant nurses are needed to support all nurses working at the fullest extent of their education and licensure. This consensus document provides such recommendations and draws attention to areas for future research. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-13

    Oct 13, 2017 ... Toxemia was found in 60% of cases, low birth weight in 50%, preterm in 30% and intrauterine growth retardation in 20% of cases. ... Conclusion: Pregnancy in kidney transplanted patients is a high-risk pregnancy, but pregnancy does not appear to affect graft function through certain conditions. Pan African ...

  12. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    2017-10-06

    Oct 6, 2017 ... Gastritis. (non H.pylori associated) in 78 (78.6%), duodenitis in 35 (38.9%) and H. pylori infection in 29 (32.2%), renal transplant recipients. Most of the patients belonged to Sindhi ethnicity, 27 (30%), followed by Punjabi. Hypertension was the most common co-morbid condition in our patients found in 29 ...

  13. Genomics and systems biology--how relevant are the developments to veterinary pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkamp, R F

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses some of the recent developments in genomics and its current and future relevance for veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. With the rapid progress made in this field several new approaches in pharmacological and toxicological research have developed and drug discovery and drug development strategies have changed dramatically. In this review, the term genomics is used to encompass the three sub-disciplines transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics (or metabonomics) to describe the formation and fate of mRNA, proteins and metabolites, respectively. The current status and methods of the technology and some applications are briefly described. Although the DNA sequencing programmes are receiving considerable attention, the real value of genomics for pharmacology and toxicology is brought by the parallel developments in bio-informatics, bio-statistics and the integration of biology with mathematics and information technology. The ultimate level of integration is now mostly called systems biology, where mRNA, proteins and metabolites are being analysed in parallel, using a complete arsenal of analytical techniques (DNA-array, LC-MS/MS, GC-MS/MS, NMR, etc.). The information thus collected is analysed, integrated, linked to database information and translated to pathways and systems. This approach offers an enormous potential to study disease mechanisms and find new drug targets. Thus far, genomics and systems biology have not been introduced significantly in typical veterinary pharmacological and toxicological research programmes. The high costs and complexity connected to these large projects often form major obstacles for research groups with limited budgets. In other veterinary areas and disciplines, including infectious diseases, animal production and food-safety more examples of application are available. Genomics and bio-informatics provide outstanding opportunities to study pharmacology and toxicology in a more holistic way, taking into

  14. Pesticide Exposure According To The Czech Toxicological Information Centre From 1997 To 2005

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rakovcová, H.; Pelclová, D.; Říčařová, B.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 14 (2007), s. 258-259 ISSN 0009-2770. [Mezioborová česko-slovenská toxikologická konference /12./. Praha, 11.06.2007-13.06.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : pesticides * Czech Toxicological Information Centre * rodenticides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.683, year: 2007

  15. Social housing of non-rodents during cardiovascular recordings in safety pharmacology and toxicology studies

    OpenAIRE

    Prior, Helen; Bottomley, Anna; Champéroux, Pascal; Cordes, Jason; Delpy, Eric; Dybdal, Noel; Edmunds, Nick; Engwall, Mike; Foley, Mike; Hoffmann, Michael; Kaiser, Robert; Meecham, Ken; Milano, Stéphane; Milne, Aileen; Nelson, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) and National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) conducted a survey and workshop in 2015 to define current industry practices relating to housing of non-rodents during telemetry recordings in safety pharmacology and toxicology studies. The aim was to share experiences, canvas opinion on the study procedures/designs that could be used and explore the barriers to social housing. Methods Thirty-nine ...

  16. Proceedings of the Conference on Toxicology Held in Dayton, Ohio on 28- 30 October 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Naval Dental School, Naval Dental Clinic, NMCNCR, Bethesda, Maryfand20914-5007 bNaval Medical Research InstitutelToxicology Detachment, Wright-Patterson...NIEHS): I have a question for LCDR Gray. Is there any knowledge of mutagenicity or oncogenicity of tri-n-butyltin? LCDR GRAY (NAVAL DENTAL SCHOOL...the dome exhaust concentration (2,3). Exhaust A Test Materiall Injection •IIDome Entry Figure 1. Cross section of Thomas Dome. The spatial

  17. Plant Poisonings According to the Czech Toxicological Information Centre from 2005 to 2008

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčařová, B.; Rakovcová, H.; Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2009), s. 473-473 ISSN 1556-3650. [The International Congress of the European Association of Poison Centres and Clinical Toxicologists /29./. 12.05.2009-15.05.2009, Stockholm] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Czech Toxicological Information Centre * plant poison ings according Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Immune System and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man

    2017-01-01

    The immune system recognises a transplanted kidney as foreign body and mounts immune response through cellular and humoral mechanisms leading to acute or chronic rejection, which ultimately results in graft loss. Over the last five decades, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the immune responses to transplanted organs in both experimental and clinical transplant settings. Modulation of the immune response by using immunosuppressive agents has led to successful outcomes after kidney transplantation. The paper provides an overview of the general organisation and function of human immune system, immune response to kidney transplantation, and the current practice of immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom.

  19. A population-based study on toxicological findings in Swedish homicide victims and offenders from 2007 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Jonatan; Ahlner, Johan; Kristiansson, Marianne; Sturup, Joakim

    2014-11-01

    Previous research on the toxicology of homicide has shown that about half of offenders and victims have psychoactive substances in their blood. The purpose of this study was to examine this topic in a Swedish setting. Toxicological data were sought in a database for all victims (n=273) and perpetrators (n=257) of homicide in Sweden from 2007 to 2009. Sufficient tests were identified for 97.1% of all victims (n=265) and 46.7% of all offenders (n=120). Additional information was obtained from court records and police reports. A majority of individuals involved in homicides displayed positive toxicology (57.0% of victims and 62.5% of offenders). The most commonly detected substances, in both victims and offenders, were ethanol (44.9% vs. 40.8%) and benzodiazepines (8.3% vs. 19.2%). The difference between offenders and victims concerning benzodiazepines was statistically significant (OR 2.6; p=0.002). Perpetrators of homicide–suicide had a lower prevalence of positive toxicology (30.8%) than other homicide offenders (67.3%; p = 0.01) [corrected] and victims in unsolved cases more often exhibited positive drug toxicology compared to victims in solved cases (36.1% vs. 8.3%; p homicide and to becoming a victim thereof. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Donation after circulatory death heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Kumud K; Chew, Hong C; Macdonald, Peter S

    2017-06-01

    Despite continued expansion in the use of extended-criteria donor hearts following donation after brain death, there remains an unacceptable discrepancy between the supply of suitable donor hearts and the demand from increasing recipient numbers on transplant wait lists. Until recently, the additional approach of utilizing organs following donation after circulatory death (DCD) had not been possible for clinical heart transplantation in the modern era. This review describes relevant advances in translational research and provides an update on the favourable adoption of this donation pathway for clinical heart transplantation. The use of an ex-situ transportable cardiac perfusion platform together with modified cardioplegia, supplemented with postconditioning agents, has allowed three centres to report successful transplantation of distantly procured human DCD hearts. This has been achieved by utilizing either a method of direct procurement and ex-situ perfusion on the device or through an initial in-situ reanimation with extracorporeal normothermic regional perfusion prior to ex-situ perfusion. DCD heart transplantation is feasible with excellent early outcomes. In the face of continued and significant donor organ shortage and inevitable wait list attrition, the rejection of suitable DCD hearts, in jurisdictions permitting this donation pathway, is increasingly difficult to justify.

  1. Risk, Uncertainty and Precaution in Science: The Threshold of the Toxicological Concern Approach in Food Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bschir, Karim

    2017-04-01

    Environmental risk assessment is often affected by severe uncertainty. The frequently invoked precautionary principle helps to guide risk assessment and decision-making in the face of scientific uncertainty. In many contexts, however, uncertainties play a role not only in the application of scientific models but also in their development. Building on recent literature in the philosophy of science, this paper argues that precaution should be exercised at the stage when tools for risk assessment are developed as well as when they are used to inform decision-making. The relevance and consequences of this claim are discussed in the context of the threshold of the toxicological concern approach in food toxicology. I conclude that the approach does not meet the standards of an epistemic version of the precautionary principle.

  2. Psychosocial challenges before and after organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz KH

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Karl-Heinz Schulz,1,2 Sylvia Kroencke,1,2 1Department of Medical Psychology, 2University Transplant Center, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany Abstract: This review addresses psychosocial challenges before and after solid organ transplantation. Stressors, corresponding psychosocial changes of the recipient, and psychological interventions in the different phases of the transplant process are described. Furthermore, important aspects of the preoperative psychosocial evaluation are presented with a special focus on living donors and patients with alcoholic liver disease. For the postoperative period, adherence, quality of life, and return to work are highlighted. Finally, research and clinical implications are presented. Keywords: adherence, alcoholic liver disease, evaluation, living donation, quality of life, return to work

  3. Toxicology of metals and metalloids: Promising issues for future studies in environmental health and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The function and behavior of chemical elements in ecosystems and in human health probably comprise one of the most studied issues and a theme of great interest and fascination in science. Hot topics are emerging on an annual basis in this field. Bearing this in mind, some promising themes to explore in the field of metals and metalloids in the environment and in toxicology are highlighted and briefly discussed herein.

  4. The use of kestrels in toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Lincer, J.L.; Bird, David M.; Bowen, Reed

    1987-01-01

    Various species of kestrels have become important bioindicators of environmental quality and test species for comparative toxicology in captivity. At least 7 species of kestrels have been used to document the presence of environmental contamination primarily organochlorines and metals, in at least 15 countries. Captive kestrels have been used in studies involving a wide variety of environmental contaminants and toxicants examining: bioaccumulation; lethal toxicity using acute, chronic, and secondary exposures; effects on reproduction, eggshell thickness, and related enzyme systems; and effects on a wide variety of physiological and biochemical parameters. Field studies have examined the response of kestrels to exposure to insecticides. Kestrels should continue to play a vital role as a bioindicator and raptorial 'white mouse', especially because of their relationship to other falconiformes, several of which have been shown to be extremely sensitive to environmental changes.

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Vanadium Pentoxide (External ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This vanadium pentoxide reassessment consists of an oral reference dose (RfD), an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), an inhalation unit risk (IUR) and a cancer weight of evidence descriptor. This is the first assessment developing an RfC or IUR for this compound. This assessment is intended to provide human health data to support agency regulatory decisions. EPA is reassessing its IRIS toxicological review of vanadium pentoxide (CASRN 1314-62-1). This vanadium pentoxide reassessment consists of an oral reference dose (RfD), an inhalation reference concentration (RfC), an inhalation unit risk (IUR) and a cancer weight of evidence descriptor. This is the first assessment developing an RfC or IUR for this compound. This assessment is intended to provide human health data to support agency regulatory decisions.

  6. Toxicological and teratological studies of azanidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammiso, R; Olivari, G; Coccoli, C; Garzia, G; Vittadini, G

    1978-01-01

    A toxicological study of 4-[(E)-2-(1-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-ethenyl]-2-pyrimidinamine (azanidazole, Triclose), a new systemic antitrichomonas agent, was run in laboratory animals in order to evaluate its safety. Studies also covered the effects of azanidazole on reproduction in rats treated prior to mating, on fetal development in rabbits and rats, and on fetal survival and growth in rats treated with it during late pregnancy and lactation. The obtained data indicate that azanidazole was well tolerated when administered as a single dose or repeated daily doses for six months. Furthermore, no adverse reproductive effects and no evidence of teratogenic activity were observed in all of the tested animal species. Survival indices were not affected, and body weight of progeny was normal in all studies on reproduction and peri- and post-natal toxicity.

  7. A medical-toxicological view of tattooing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laux, Peter; Tralau, Tewes; Tentschert, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    Long perceived as a form of exotic self-expression in some social fringe groups, tattoos have left their maverick image behind and become mainstream, particularly for young people. Historically, tattoo-related health and safety regulations have focused on rules of hygiene and prevention...... of infections. Meanwhile, the increasing popularity of tattooing has led to the development of many new colours, allowing tattoos to be more spectacular than ever before. However, little is known about the toxicological risks of the ingredients used. For risk assessment, safe intradermal application...... of these pigments needs data for toxicity and biokinetics and increased knowledge about the removal of tattoos. Other concerns are the potential for phototoxicity, substance migration, and the possible metabolic conversion of tattoo ink ingredients into toxic substances. Similar considerations apply to cleavage...

  8. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  9. Functional Toxicogenomics: Mechanism-Centered Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris D. Vulpe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional toxicity testing using animal models is slow, low capacity, expensive and assesses a limited number of endpoints. Such approaches are inadequate to deal with the increasingly large number of compounds found in the environment for which there are no toxicity data. Mechanism-centered high-throughput testing represents an alternative approach to meet this pressing need but is limited by our current understanding of toxicity pathways. Functional toxicogenomics, the global study of the biological function of genes on the modulation of the toxic effect of a compound, can play an important role in identifying the essential cellular components and pathways involved in toxicity response. The combination of the identification of fundamental toxicity pathways and mechanism-centered targeted assays represents an integrated approach to advance molecular toxicology to meet the challenges of toxicity testing in the 21st century.

  10. Aquatic toxicology: past, present, and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, J B

    1993-04-01

    Aquatic organisms have played important roles as early warning and monitoring systems for pollutant burdens in our environment. However, they have significant potential to do even more, just as they have in basic biology where preparations like the squid axon have been essential tools in establishing physiological and biochemical mechanisms. This review provides a brief summary of the history of aquatic toxicology, focusing on the nature of aquatic contaminants, the levels of contamination in our waters, and the origins of these agents. It considers the features of the aquatic environment that determine the availability of xenobiotics to aquatic life and the fate of foreign chemicals within the organism. Finally, toxic effects are considered with primary emphasis on the potential of aquatic models to facilitate identification of the underlying mechanisms of toxicity.

  11. Aquatic toxicology: opportunities for enhancement through histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, P W; van der Ven, L T M; Vethaak, A D; Grinwis, G C M; Vos, J G

    2002-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the application of histopathology as aninstrument or endpoint in toxicity studies in fish. For long this has been applied rather occasionally in (regulatory) toxicology, and was mainly of interest in fundamental studies and limited carcinogenicity experiments. However, nowadays there are various incentives that ask for the application of pathology, such as field monitoring of pollution effects, the wish for optimal use and lower species of laboratory animals, the availability of modern histology techniques, and insight and interest in mechanistic data. This is timely illustrated by the current broad interest in endocrine disrupting pollutants-a threat mainly in the aquatic environment-where histopathological organ and tissue changes in intact sentinel fish species provide pivotal diagnostic and mechanistic features.

  12. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  13. Psychosocial aspects of medication nonadherence after kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Moors-Tielen (Mirjam)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Patients have to take immunosuppressive medication after kidney transplantation to prevent rejection of the graft. This thesis investigated patients’ adherence behavior, attitudes and beliefs about the immunosuppressive regime. The research questions were (1) What is

  14. US Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory Annual Progress Report for FY 83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    Conventional Weapon Systems, Smokes/Obscurants, Synthetic or Alternative Fuels, Environmental Quality, Installation Restoration, Aquatic Toxicology , Chemical...IDENTIFICATION AND HEALTH EFFECTS OF MILITARY POLLUTANTS o o . . . . 39 Basic Research in Aquatic Toxicology . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . 41 3 L1... Aquatic Toxicology Test Method Development . . ........ . 43 PEST MANAGEMENT SCIENCE BASE ...................... 45 Pest Management Science Base

  15. Concurrent validity of kidney transplant questionnaire in US renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisholm-Burns MA

    2011-10-01

    with all KTQ subscales (P < 0.01, ie, KTQ-physical (r = 0.26, KTQ-fatigue (r = 0.48, KTQ-uncertainty/fear (r = 0.33, KTQ-emotional (r = 0.47, and KTQ-appearance (r = 0.28. Conclusion: The findings support the concurrent validity of the KTQ in US renal transplant recipients. Future studies should continue exploring the validity of the KTQ, as well as its practical and research utility in HQoL measurement in the renal transplant population. Keywords: concurrent validity, kidney transplant questionnaire, quality of life, renal transplant recipients, SF-12 Health Survey

  16. [Experimental model of orthotopic uterus transplantation in the laboratory rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionac, M; Jiga, L; Motoc, A; Lupu, C; Bordoş, D

    2002-01-01

    This study develops and standardizes an experimental model of uterus transplantation in the laboratory rat. Twelve orthotropic uterus transplantation were done. Animals were randomized in three groups. Postoperative survival was 100% and 75% at 72 hours. Recipients were euthanased at 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours and the grafts were harvested. Patency of the microsurgical anastomoses was 100% at 24 hours, 63% at 48 hours and 0% at 72 hours. The explanted uterine grafts were fixed in formalize and analyzed under light microscopy. The acute allograft rejection starts during the second day after transplantation. In additional dissection, anatomy of the pelvic region with regard to the topography of the uterus, tube and ovarian vessels was studied. This model of uterus transplantation in rats proposes a standardized tool for further research regarding cellular mechanisms of the acute allograft rejection and, for future, pregnancy of the transplanted uterus.

  17. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Overview of marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references

  19. Heart Transplantation in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee

    2017-04-25

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the effective way to improve quality of life as well as survival in terminal heart failure (HF) patients. Since the first heart transplant in 1968 in Japan and in earnest in 1987 at Taiwan, HTx has been continuously increasing in Asia. Although the current percentage of heart transplants from Asia comprises only 5.7% of cases in the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) registry, the values were under-reported and soon will be greatly increased. HTx in Asia shows comparable with or even better results compared with ISHLT registry data. Several endemic infections, including type B hepatitis, tuberculosis, and cytomegalovirus, are unique aspects of HTx in Asia, and need special attention in transplant care. Although cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is considered as a leading cause of death after HTx globally, multiple observations suggest less prevalence and benign nature of CAV among Asian populations. Although there are many obstacles such as religion, social taboo or legal process, Asian countries will keep overcoming obstacles and broaden the field of HTx.

  20. Predicting Alloreactivity in Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Geneugelijk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte Antigen (HLA mismatching leads to severe complications after solid-organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The alloreactive responses underlying the posttransplantation complications include both direct recognition of allogeneic HLA by HLA-specific alloantibodies and T cells and indirect T-cell recognition. However, the immunogenicity of HLA mismatches is highly variable; some HLA mismatches lead to severe clinical B-cell- and T-cell-mediated alloreactivity, whereas others are well tolerated. Definition of the permissibility of HLA mismatches prior to transplantation allows selection of donor-recipient combinations that will have a reduced chance to develop deleterious host-versus-graft responses after solid-organ transplantation and graft-versus-host responses after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Therefore, several methods have been developed to predict permissible HLA-mismatch combinations. In this review we aim to give a comprehensive overview about the current knowledge regarding HLA-directed alloreactivity and several developed in vitro and in silico tools that aim to predict direct and indirect alloreactivity.

  1. Knowledge and Confidence of Emergency Clinicians in Managing Toxicological Presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Monteith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute poisonings are common presentations to emergency departments (EDs worldwide and require rapid assessment. Consultant emergency physicians (EPs faced with various toxicological presentations must initiate rapid investigations and empirical management. This study aimed to determine emergency department doctors’ level of knowledge and confidence in toxicological presentations, and factors that predicted these outcomes. Methods: Target participants included members of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM and readers of the emergency medicine website, “Life in the Fast Lane”. The survey was distributed electronically via the ACEM bulletin and posted on Life in the Fast Lane. A survey was designed based on toxicology multiple choice questions (MCQs. The questionnaire comprised 59 items: 10 demographic items; 20 items about confidence; 28 MCQs assessing knowledge of common and serious toxicological presentations. Results: There were 467 consenting respondents from 31 countries, with most residing in Australia (306/467, 66%. Respondents comprised similar proportions of consultant emergency physicians (196/467, 42.0%, and trainees (197/467, 42.2%.  Almost two-thirds (292/467; 62.1% had received formal training in toxicological emergencies, while a third (166/467, 35.5% had participated in a relevant conference or workshop. A total of 284/339 (83.8% participants completing all items achieved a knowledge test score >50%. More than 65% incorrectly answered questions on pharmacology of serotonin syndrome and lithium toxicity, and more than half incorrectly answered questions on use of 12 lead ECG in toxicology, calcium channel antagonist or tricyclic antidepressant toxicities. Predictors of overall knowledge for toxicology were receipt of formal toxicology education, and clinicians’ experience and seniority. Conclusion: The knowledge and confidence of doctors working in emergency departments is varied, yet

  2. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth / For Teens / Stem Cell Transplants What's ... Take to Recover? Coping Print What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  3. Heart transplantation from older donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current situation of the shortage of suitable donor organs, heart transplantation from older donors is one of the ways to increase the performance of more heart transplants, particularly, in patients with urgent need of transplantation. While planning a heart transplantation from older donor one should consider increased risk of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, preexisting coronary artery disease, accelerated transplant vasculopathy which may adversely affect early and long-term survival of recipients. Subject to careful selection of donor–recipient pairs, effective prevention and treatment of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, pre-existing atherosclerosis and transplant vasculopathy the early and long-term survival of heart transplant recipients from older donors is comparable to heart transplantation from young donors.

  4. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... Nursing Care of the Renal Transplant Recipient.” UNOS Donation and Transplantation Nursing Curriculum . 1996 This Web site is intended ...

  5. Toxicología clínica comunitaria Community Clinical Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Leal

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available En algunos países de América Latina las intoxicaciones agudas se manejan de manera profesional por médicos especialistas en la mate-ria. Algo similar ocurre con las intoxicaciones crónicas de origen laboral en el sector formal. No obstante, una realidad diferente ocurre en cuanto a la evaluación de las intoxicaciones crónicas de origen ambiental, dado que éstas por su naturaleza, son más difíciles de diagnosticar. Para el tratamiento de las intoxicaciones agudas se han organizado Centros de Información y Atención Toxicológica, pero para las intoxicaciones crónicas ambientales no se ha generado organismos semejantes. Por consiguiente, en este trabajo sugerimos un modelo de atención de la intoxicaciones crónicas a través de grupos multidisciplinarios bajo el esquema de una nueva disciplina: la Toxicología Clínica Comunitaria, cuyo objetivo sería la atención simultánea de las intoxicaciones agudas que generalmente se atienden en un ámbito hospitalario y de las intoxicaciones ambientales que por lo normal se presentan a nivel comunitario. El objetivo final es aprovechar la experiencia que existe en la Región en cuanto a Toxicología Clínica para organizar el trabajo comunitario.In some Latin American countries acute intoxication is professionally managed by specialized physicians qualified in the area. Something similar occurs with work-related chronic intoxication in the formal sector. However, a different reality prevails for the assessment of chronic intoxication of environmental origin, since it is by definition more difficult to diagnose. For treatment of acute intoxication, Toxicological Information and Care Centers have been set up, though similar bodies have not been created for chronic environmental intoxication. Therefore, in this study a model of chronic intoxication care is proposed, using multidisciplinary teams adopting a new approach, namely Community Clinical Toxicology, the goal of which would be the

  6. [Eye banks and available transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettedal, Jon Klokk; Drolsum, Liv; Ramstad, Hanne; Nicolaissen, Bjørn

    2008-04-17

    Eye banks have procured, processed and stored donor corneas for decades. In parallel, new techniques have emerged employing allogeneic transplantation of various cells and tissues from the eye banks. This progress is a consequence of increased knowledge of stem cells, cell kinetics and immunological aspects and improved techniques for cell culturing, tissue storage and microsurgery. Review article on available transplants for treating eye diseases, based on experience with eye banking, clinical ophthalmological practice, own research and literature retrieved from PubMed, Medline and www.google.com. Treatment techniques for eye diseases, which require biological material for grafting, need efficient eye banks for continuous supply of donor material of high quality. New Norwegian legislation, based on implementation of EU Directive 2004/23/EC, demands authorization of all eye banks. The EU Directive sets high and rigorous standards for quality and safety for donation, procurement, testing, processing, storage and distribution of tissues and cells. Well-run eye banks are of great importance for modern treatment of patients suffering from eye diseases and for progress and research in ophthalmology.

  7. Ultra-early onset post-transplantation Lymphoproliferative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khedmat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD can present as early as days to as late as several decades after transplantation. This study, however, tries to research PTLD characteristics including histopathological and clinical features, predictors and prognosis of the disease when occurring within the first month post-transplantation. We conducted a comprehensive search for the available data using the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports indicating presentation time in PTLD patients. Data from 25 previously published studies were included in the analysis. Finally, we found 355 recipients of organs presenting with "ultra-early onset PTLD." Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to have kidney allografts (P = 0.032. Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were comparable to their counterparts in the control group in their demographics, histopathological findings and survival. Patients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to receive induction therapy (100% vs. 49%, respectively; P = 0.013. Pancreas transplant recipients were at a significantly higher risk for development of ultra-early onset PTLD (20% vs. 1%, respectively; P <0.001. Our findings emphasize the importance of immunosuppression potency as well as the type of allograft transplanted on the incidence of PTLD in the early stages after transplantation. However, we found no histopathological or outcome disparities for patients with ultra-early PTLD compared with controls. Further prospective studies with more comparable approaches to the patients are needed to confirm our findings.

  8. Ultra-early onset post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedmat, Hossein; Taheri, Saeed

    2013-11-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) can present as early as days to as late as several decades after transplantation. This study, however, tries to research PTLD characteristics including histopathological and clinical features, predictors and prognosis of the disease when occurring within the first month post-transplantation. We conducted a comprehensive search for the available data using the Pubmed and Google scholar search engines for reports indicating presentation time in PTLD patients. Data from 25 previously published studies were included in the analysis. Finally, we found 355 recipients of organs presenting with "ultra-early onset PTLD." Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to have kidney allografts (P = 0.032). Transplant recipients with ultra-early onset PTLD were comparable to their counterparts in the control group in their demographics, histopathological findings and survival. Patients with ultra-early onset PTLD were significantly more likely to receive induction therapy (100% vs. 49%, respectively; P = 0.013). Pancreas transplant recipients were at a significantly higher risk for development of ultra-early onset PTLD (20% vs. 1%, respectively; P <0.001). Our findings emphasize the importance of immunosuppression potency as well as the type of allograft transplanted on the incidence of PTLD in the early stages after transplantation. However, we found no histopathological or outcome disparities for patients with ultra-early PTLD compared with controls. Further prospective studies with more comparable approaches to the patients are needed to confirm our findings.

  9. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute Annual Report, 1992-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Albuquerque, NM, December 11, 1992. Kelly, G., T. Carpenter and N. F. Johnson: Simian Virus 40 Large T Anti& a Expression in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae ...cultured for 48 h (70%-80% confluent), then exposed to 0.5 Gy alpha particles from a 238pu electroplated copper disc (Thomassen, D. G. et al. Radiat...29, 1992. Snipes, M. B., E. B. Barr, 1. Y. Chang, R. F. Henderson, K. J. Nikula and J. L. Mauderly: Particle Clearance and Sequestration in Lungs of

  10. Research Articles: Pharmacology and Toxicology Acute toxicity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kenya Veterinarian. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 33, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Standard methods for toxicology research in Apis mellifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medrzycki, P.; Giffard, H.; Aupinel, P.; Belzunces, L.P.; Chauzat, M.P.; Classen, C.; Colin, M.E.; Dupont, T.; Girolami, V.; Johnson, R.; Conte, Le Y.; Luckmann, J.; Marzaro, M.; Pistorius, J.; Porrini, C.; Schur, A.; Sgolastra, F.; Delso, N.S.; Steen, van der J.J.M.; Wallner, K.; Alaux, C.; Biron, D.G.; Blot, N.; Bogo, G.; Brunet, J.L.; Delbac, F.; Diogon, M.; Alaoui, El H.; Provost, B.; Tosi, S.; Vidau, C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern agriculture often involves the use of pesticides to protect crops. These substances are harmful to target organisms (pests and pathogens). Nevertheless, they can also damage non-target animals, such as pollinators and entomophagous arthropods. It is obvious that the undesirable side effects

  12. Standard methods for toxicology research in Apis mellifera

    OpenAIRE

    Giffard, Hervé; Aupinel, Pierrick; Belzunces, Luc; Chauzat, Marie-Pierre; Claßen, Christian; Colin, Marc E.; Dupont, Thierry; Girolami, Vincenzo; Johnson, Reed; Le Conte, Yves; Lückmann, Johannes; Marzaro, Matteo; Pistorius, Jens; Porrini, Claudio; Schur, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Modern agriculture often involves the use of pesticides to protect crops. These substances are harmful to target organisms (pests and pathogens). Nevertheless, they can also damage non-target animals, such as pollinators and entomophagous arthropods. It is obvious that the undesirable side effects of pesticides on the environment should be reduced to a minimum. Western honey bees (Apis mellifera) are very important organisms from an agricultural perspective and are vulnerable to pesticide-ind...

  13. THE BARKER HYPOTHESIS: IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN TOXICOLOGY RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review covers the past year’s papers germane to the Barker hypothesis. While much of the literature has centered on maternal and developmental nutrition, new findings have emerged on the ability of toxic exposures during development to impact fetal/developmental programming....

  14. Solid organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlow, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in solid organ donation and transplantation. In addition to confirming the clinical diagnosis of brain death, imaging examinations are used to assess potential organ donors and recipients, evaluate donated organs, and monitor transplantation outcomes. This article introduces the history, biology, ethics, and institutions of organ donation and transplantation medicine. The article also discusses current and emerging imaging applications in the transplantation field and the controversial role of neuroimaging to confirm clinically diagnosed brain death.

  15. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  16. Gaming the Liver Transplant Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Snyder

    2010-01-01

    The liver transplant waiting list is designed to allocate livers to the sickest patients first. Before March 1, 2002, livers were allocated to patients based on objective clinical indicators and subjective factors. In particular, a center placing a prospective transplant recipient in the intensive care unit (ICU) leads to a higher position on the liver transplant waiting list. After March 1, 2002, a policy reform mandated that priority on the liver transplant waiting list no longer be influen...

  17. Preoperative psychological evaluation of transplant patients: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumnig M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Martin Kumnig,1 Sheila Jowsey-Gregoire2 1Center for Advanced Psychology in Plastic and Transplant Surgery (CAPPTS, Department of Medical Psychology, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Psychological assessments are crucial for the evaluation and optimization of the suitability of transplant patients. The interdisciplinary evaluation in modern transplantation medicine focuses on important psychosocial issues, such as assessing patients’ characteristics that predict best postoperative outcome after solid organ transplantation. When assessing patients for reconstructive hand transplantation, the psychological evaluation should identify whether reconstructive hand transplantation is the best treatment option to regain functionality and sensation, to resolve body image concerns, and to improve health-related quality of life (HRQOL for each patient. These psychosocial issues in transplantation medicine are receiving increased attention; however, standardized psychological evaluation and follow-up protocols are still being developed. Previously published reports in transplantation medicine have attempted to identify psychosocial factors important in the evaluation of transplant patients and that predict psychosocial outcomes. This review will provide an overview of recent investigations in solid organ and vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA, including the domains of evaluation, pre- and posttransplant follow-up, psychiatric complications, evaluation of body image, and HRQOL. Recent work highlights the potential for a multicenter research approach utilizing standardized assessment strategies and emphasizing the need for a shared assessment approach to understand psychosocial outcomes. For example, the Chauvet Workgroup convened in 2014 in Paris with stakeholders in the assessment of psychosocial factors to discuss key areas and propose an

  18. Integrative behavioral ecotoxicology: bringing together fields to establish new insight to behavioral ecology, toxicology, and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Elizabeth K.; Buchwalter, David B.; Kerby, Jacob L.; LeFauve, Matthew K.; Varian-Ramos, Claire W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The fields of behavioral ecology, conservation science, and environmental toxicology individually aim to protect and manage the conservation of wildlife in response to anthropogenic stressors, including widespread anthropogenic pollution. Although great emphasis in the field of toxicology has been placed on understanding how single pollutants affect survival, a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach that includes behavioral ecology is essential to address how anthropogenic compounds are a risk for the survival of species and populations in an increasingly polluted world. We provide an integrative framework for behavioral ecotoxicology using Tinbergen’s four postulates (causation and mechanism, development and ontogeny, function and fitness, and evolutionary history and phylogenetic patterns). The aims of this review are: 1) to promote an integrative view and re-define the field of integrative behavioral ecotoxicology; 2) to demonstrate how studying ecotoxicology can promote behavior research; and 3) to identify areas of behavioral ecotoxicology that require further attention to promote the integration and growth of the field. PMID:29491976

  19. Regulatory toxicology in the twenty-first century: challenges, perspectives and possible solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tralau, Tewes; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Gürtler, Rainer; Heinemeyer, Gerhard; Herzler, Matthias; Höfer, Thomas; Itter, Heike; Kuhl, Thomas; Lange, Nikola; Lorenz, Nicole; Müller-Graf, Christine; Pabel, Ulrike; Pirow, Ralph; Ritz, Vera; Schafft, Helmut; Schneider, Heiko; Schulz, Thomas; Schumacher, David; Zellmer, Sebastian; Fleur-Böl, Gaby; Greiner, Matthias; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Lampen, Alfonso; Luch, Andreas; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Solecki, Roland; Wittkowski, Reiner; Hensel, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The advent of new testing systems and "omics"-technologies has left regulatory toxicology facing one of the biggest challenges for decades. That is the question whether and how these methods can be used for regulatory purposes. The new methods undoubtedly enable regulators to address important open questions of toxicology such as species-specific toxicity, mixture toxicity, low-dose effects, endocrine effects or nanotoxicology, while promising faster and more efficient toxicity testing with the use of less animals. Consequently, the respective assays, methods and testing strategies are subject of several research programs worldwide. On the other hand, the practical application of such tests for regulatory purposes is a matter of ongoing debate. This document summarizes key aspects of this debate in the light of the European "regulatory status quo", while elucidating new perspectives for regulatory toxicity testing.

  20. Lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adler, Frederick R; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H; Barr, Mark L; Blackwell, Laura S; Bosma, Otto H; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D R; Jensen, Judy L; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D; Quittner, Alexandra L; Robinson, Walter M; Romero, Sandy L; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J; Verschuuren, Erik A M; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S; Liou, Theodore G

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing

  1. Bacterial urinary tract infection after solid organ transplantation in the RESITRA cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, E; Torre-Cisneros, J; Blanes, M; Montejo, M; Cervera, C; Aguado, J M; Len, O; Carratalá, J; Cordero, E; Bou, G; Muñoz, P; Ramos, A; Gurguí, M; Borrell, N; Fortún, J

    2012-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in renal transplant patients, but it is necessary to determine the risk factors for bacterial UTI in recipients of other solid organ transplants (SOTs), as well as changes in etiology, clinical presentation, and prognosis. In total, 4388 SOT recipients were monitored in 16 transplant centers belonging to the Spanish Network for Research on Infection in Transplantation (RESITRA). The frequency and characteristics of bacterial UTI in transplant patients were obtained prospectively from the cohort (September 2003 to February 2005). A total of 192 patients (4.4%) presented 249 episodes of bacterial UTI (0.23 episodes per 1000 transplantation days); 156 patients were kidney or kidney-pancreas transplant recipients, and 36 patients were liver, heart, and lung transplant recipients. The highest frequency was observed in renal transplants (7.3%). High frequency of cystitis versus pyelonephritis without related mortality was observed in both groups. The most frequent etiology was Escherichia coli (57.8%), with 25.7% producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). In all transplants but renal, most cases occurred in the first month after transplantation. Cases were uniformly distributed during the first 6 months after transplantation in renal recipients. Age (odds ratio [OR] per decade 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.17), female gender (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.42-2.13), and the need for immediate post-transplant dialysis (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.29-2.05) were independent variables associated with bacterial UTI in renal and kidney-pancreas recipients. The independent risk factors identified in non-renal transplants were age (OR per decade 1.79, 95% CI 1.09-3.48), female gender (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.43-2.49), and diabetes (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.001-1.040). UTI was frequent in renal transplants, but also not unusual in non-renal transplants. Because E. coli continues to be the most frequent etiology, the emergence of ESBL

  2. Practices in the evaluation of potential kidney transplant recipients who are elderly: A survey of U.S. transplant centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbrot, Didier A; Fleishman, Aaron; Rodrigue, James R; Norman, Silas P; Samaniego, Milagros

    2017-10-01

    Limited data exist regarding the evaluation and selection of older candidates for transplantation. To help guide the development of program protocols and help define research questions in this area, we surveyed U.S. transplant centers regarding their current practices in the evaluation of older kidney transplant candidates. We emailed a 28-question survey to the medical and surgical directors of 190 adult kidney transplant programs in the USA. We received usable responses from 59 programs, a 31.1% response rate. Most (76.3%) programs do not have absolute age cutoffs for listing patients, but for the 22.0% of programs that do have cutoffs, the mean age was 79, range 70-90. Nearly one-third (29.2%) of programs require a minimum life expectancy to list for transplant, reporting a mean of 4.5 years life expectancy, (range 2-10). Programs vary significantly in evaluating candidates living in a nursing home or with cognitive impairments. Practices regarding the evaluation of older transplant candidates vary widely between U.S. programs. Further studies are needed on the impact of age and other comorbidities on transplant outcomes, to help guide decisions on which older patients are most appropriate for transplant listing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pancreatic transplant imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Wiese, J.A.; Abu-Yousef, M.M.; Rezai, K.; Sato, Y.; Kao, S.C.S.; Hunsicker, L.G.; Corry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two MR studies, 162 radionuclide scintigraphic studies, and 57 sonographic studies were performed on 15 pancreatic transplant patients for evaluation of suspected graft rejection. The results of these studies were correlated with clinical presentations, laboratory data, and pathologic specimens when available. Radionuclide studies provide excellent information for estimating graft size and for evaluation of perfusion. Sonography is valuable for evaluation of the gland texture and peripancreatic abnormalities. MR provides useful information regarding parenchymal changes in rejection and response of the graft to treatment. These three imaging modalities are therefore complementary in the evaluation of pancreatic transplantation

  4. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been increasingly used to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency diseases, severe aplastic anemia, and malignant hematologic diseases, especially leukemia. At the Workshop a number of problems were discussed, e.g., conditioning regimens aimed at overcoming the problem of marrow graft rejection and reducing the incidence of recurrent leukemia, prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), possible mechanisms involved in stable graft-host tolerance, graft-versus-leukemia effect in mice, and finally, the possible use of autologous marrow transplantation

  5. Data-intensive drug development in the information age: applications of Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyosawa, Naoki; Manabe, Sunao

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies continuously face challenges to deliver new drugs with true medical value. R&D productivity of drug development projects depends on 1) the value of the drug concept and 2) data and in-depth knowledge that are used rationally to evaluate the drug concept's validity. A model-based data-intensive drug development approach is a key competitive factor used by innovative pharmaceutical companies to reduce information bias and rationally demonstrate the value of drug concepts. Owing to the accumulation of publicly available biomedical information, our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases has developed considerably; it is the basis for identifying the right drug target and creating a drug concept with true medical value. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of disease animal models can also be improved; it can thus support rational extrapolation of animal experiment results to clinical settings. The Systems Biology approach, which leverages publicly available transcriptome data, is useful for these purposes. Furthermore, applying Systems Pharmacology enables dynamic simulation of drug responses, from which key research questions to be addressed in the subsequent studies can be adequately informed. Application of Systems Biology/Pharmacology to toxicology research, namely Systems Toxicology, should considerably improve the predictability of drug-induced toxicities in clinical situations that are difficult to predict from conventional preclinical toxicology studies. Systems Biology/Pharmacology/Toxicology models can be continuously improved using iterative learn-confirm processes throughout preclinical and clinical drug discovery and development processes. Successful implementation of data-intensive drug development approaches requires cultivation of an adequate R&D culture to appreciate this approach.

  6. Systematic analysis of silver nanoparticle ionic dissolution by tangential flow filtration: toxicological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Elizabeth I; Sharma, Monita; Schlager, John J; Hussain, Saber M

    2014-11-01

    In the field of toxicology of nanomaterials, scientists have not clearly determined if the observed toxicological events are due to the nanoparticles (NPs) themselves or the dissolution of ions released into the biophysiological environment or both phenomenon participate in combination based upon their bioregional and temporal occurrence during exposure conditions. Consequently, research involving the toxicological analysis of silver NPs (Ag-NPs) has shifted towards assessment of 'nanosized' silver in comparison to its solvated 'ionic' counterpart. Current literature suggests that dissolution of ions from Ag-NPs may play a key role in toxicity; however, the present assessment methodology to separate ions from NPs still requires improvement before a definitive cause of toxicity can be determined. Recently, centrifugation-based techniques have been employed to obtain solvated ions from the NP solution, but this approach leads to NP agglomeration, making further toxicological analysis difficult to assess. Additionally, extremely small NPs are retained in the supernatant even after ultracentrifugation, leading to incomplete separation of ions from their respective NPs. To address these complex toxicology issues we applied enhanced separation techniques with the aim to study levels of ions originating from the Ag-NP using separation by a recirculating tangential flow filtration system. This system uses a unique diffusion-driven filtration method that retains large particles within the continuous flow path, while allowing the solution (ions) to pass through molecular filters by lateral diffusion separation. Use of this technique provides reproducible NP separation from their solvated ions which permits for further quantification using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or comparison use in bioassay exposures to biological systems. In this study, we thoroughly characterised NPs in biologically relevant solutions to understand the dissolution of Ag-NPs (10 and

  7. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  8. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  9. Climate change and ocean acidification-interactions with aquatic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2013-01-15

    The possibilities for interactions between toxicants and ocean acidification are reviewed from two angles. First, it is considered how toxicant responses may affect ocean acidification by influencing the carbon dioxide balance. Second, it is introduced, how the possible changes in environmental conditions (temperature, pH and oxygenation), expected to be associated with climate change and ocean acidification, may interact with the toxicant responses of organisms, especially fish. One significant weakness in available data is that toxicological research has seldom been connected with ecological and physiological/biochemical research evaluating the responses of organisms to temperature, pH or oxygenation changes occurring in the natural environment. As a result, although there are significant potential interactions between toxicants and natural environmental responses pertaining to climate change and ocean acidification, it is very poorly known if such interactions actually occur, and can be behind the observed disturbances in the function and distribution of organisms in our seas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanotechnology and nanomaterials: toxicology, risk assessment, and regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Anna M; Alexeeff, George

    2010-12-01

    Nanomaterials have very unique chemical and physical properties that suggest potential health hazards, but limited health and safety information exists for engineered nanomaterials. This review identifies a need for expanding efforts for addressing health and safety concerns in nanotechnology development and in nanotoxicology of engineered nanomaterials. The efforts include research to generate data for safety evaluation, toxicologic evaluation of potential human health effects, risk assessment to support risk-management decision-making, and regulations development to protect human health and the environment. The federal government's current understanding is that existing statutory authorities are adequate to address oversight of nanotechnology and its applications. On the other hand, the present review identifies weaknesses in the current research efforts and inadequacies in existing regulations. A collaborative effort involving multidisciplinary groups is a key element to address the related needs and issues. While federal agencies with regulatory responsibilities are looked upon to develop and implement sound policies and regulations to protect public health and the environment, state agencies may be required to initiate policies which rapidly incorporate new innovations and address public concerns. To address current and futures need related to nanotechnology, the responsible state agencies need to fill the information gaps and address the health and environmental issues. In California, activities have been initiated, but legislative authority and resources are required to provide risk assessment and health protection in an efficient and timely manner.

  11. Gender Equity in Transplantation: A Report from the Women in Transplantation Workshop of The Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Karen M; Clark, Carolyn J; MacDonald, Kelli; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Rogers, Natasha; Ryan, Jessica; Webster, Angela C; Wong, Germaine

    2017-10-01

    The exponential growth of young talented women choosing science and medicine as their professional career over the past decade is substantial. Currently, more than half of the Australian medical doctoral graduates and early career researchers are comprised of women, but less than 20% of all academic professorial staff are women. The loss of female talent in the hierarchical ladder of Australian academia is a considerable waste of government investment, productivity, and scientific innovation. Gender disparity in the professional workforce composition is even more striking within the field of transplantation. Women are grossly underrepresented in leadership roles, with currently no female heads of unit in any of the Australian and New Zealand transplanting centers. At the same time, there is also gender segregation with a greater concentration of women in lower-status academic position compared with their male counterparts. Given the extent and magnitude of the disparity, the Women in Transplantation Committee, a subcommittee of The Transplantation Society of Australia and New Zealand established a workshop comprising 8 female clinicians/scientists in transplantation. The key objectives were to (i) identify potential gender equity issues within the transplantation workforce; (ii) devise and implement potential strategies and interventions to address some of these challenges at a societal level; (iii) set realistic and achievable goals to enhance and facility gender equality, equity, and diversity in transplantation.

  12. Educational intervention for liver transplantation candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes,Karina Dal Sasso; Silva Junior,Orlando de Castro e; Ziviani,Luciana da Costa; Rossin,Fabiana Murad; Zago,Márcia Maria Fontão; Galvão,Cristina Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective in this study was to analyze candidates' knowledge on the liver transplantation process before and after putting in practice an educational intervention. METHOD: A quasi-experimental, one-group pretest-posttest research design was adopted. The final sample included 15 subjects. Research data were collected between January and March 2010 in three phases, which were: pretest, implementation of the educational intervention (two meetings) and posttest. RESULTS: The result...

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (Tca) (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  14. Three dimensional QSAR: applications in pharmacology and toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doucet, Jean-Pierre; Panaye, Annick

    2010-01-01

    ... networks and support vector machines. Three-Dimensional QSAR addresses the scope and limitations of different modeling techniques using case studies from pharmacology, toxicology, and ecotoxicology to demonstrate the utility of each...

  15. LC-MS (/MS) in clinical toxicology screening methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viette, Véronique; Hochstrasser, Denis; Fathi, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Toxicological screening is the analysis of biological samples to detect and identify unknown compounds. The high selectivity and sensitivity of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) or tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) technology provide an attractive alternative to the current methods (LC-UV, GC/MS, etc.). For these reasons, an increasing number of applications are being published. This paper is a brief overview of LC-MS(/MS) screening methods developed for clinical toxicology in recent years. Various sample treatments, chromatographic separations and detection by mass spectrometry can be combined to obtain screening methods adapted to the constraints and needs of clinical toxicology laboratories. Currently the techniques are in the hands of specialists, mainly in academic institutions. However, the evolution in technology should allow application of these techniques as a tool in toxicology laboratories, thus allowing a more widespread exploitation of their potential.

  16. Toxicological and histopathological effects of cheese wood, Alstonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicological and histopathological effects of cheese wood, Alstonia boonei de wild stem bark powder used as cowpea protectant against cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatu (Fab.) [coleoptera: chrysomelidae] on albino rats.

  17. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  18. Clazakizumab in Highly-HLA Sensitized Patients Awaiting Renal Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-26

    Kidney Failure, Chronic; End-Stage Renal Disease; Transplant Glomerulopathy; Transplant;Failure,Kidney; Kidney Transplant Failure and Rejection; Antibody-mediated Rejection; Kidney Transplant; Complications

  19. Sporotrichosis in Renal Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gewehr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current report describes two renal transplant recipients who presented with sporotrichosis. In addition, the authors review the general aspects of sporotrichosis in renal transplant recipients reported in the literature. Sporotrichosis is a rare fungal infection in transplant patients and has been reported primarily in renal transplant recipients not treated with antifungal prophylaxis. Extracutaneous forms of sporotrichosis without skin manifestations and no previous history of traumatic injuries have been described in such patients and are difficult to diagnose. Renal transplant recipients with sporotrichosis described in the present report were successfully treated with antifungal therapy including amphotericin B deoxycholate, lipid amphotericin B formulations, fluconazole and itraconazole.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (Tca) (Final ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health. The draft Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.