WorldWideScience

Sample records for research specialists knowledge

  1. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 22: US academic librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: Results of the phase 3 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis U.S. academic librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries.

  2. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report number 21: US aerospace industry librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries: Results of the phase 2 survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. government technical report is a primary means by which the results of federally funded research and development (R&D) are transferred to the U.S. aerospace industry. However, little is known about this information product in terms of its actual use, importance, and value in the transfer of federally funded R&D. To help establish a body of knowledge, the U.S. government technical report is being investigated as part of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. In this report, we summarize the literature on technical reports and provide a model that depicts the transfer of federally funded aerospace R&D via the U.S. government technical report. We present results from our investigation of aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis the U.S. government technical report, and present the results of research that investigated aerospace knowledge diffusion vis-a-vis U.S. aerospace industry librarians and technical information specialists as information intermediaries.

  3. IT Security Specialist | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The IT Security Specialist takes a strategic role in the delivery of Infrastructure ... on IT Security to project managers, business clients and senior management. ... as a team member or a team leader by undertaking research, investigations, ...

  4. Directory of fire research specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, T. L.; Mandel, G.; Jason, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    Directory indexes, 1,475 researchers and various organizations in the United States or Canada who have recently participated in or made contributions to fire science research or related areas of concern.

  5. Proceedings of fuel safety research specialists' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe

    2002-08-01

    Fuel Safety Research Specialists' Meeting, which was organized by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, was held on March 4-5, 2002 at JAERI in Tokai Establishment. Purposes of the Meeting are to exchange information and views on LWR fuel safety topics among the specialist participants from domestic and foreign organizations, and to discuss the recent and future fuel research activities in JAERI. In the Meeting, presentations were given and discussions were made on general report of fuel safety research activities, fuel behaviors in normal operation and accident conditions, FP release behaviors in severe accident conditions, and JAERI's ''Advanced LWR Fuel Performance and Safety Research Program''. A poster exhibition was also carried out. The Meeting significantly contributed to planning future program and cooperation in fuel research. This proceeding integrates all the pictures and papers presented in the Meeting. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  6. Guideline concerning specialist knowledge of radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The regulation is to be applied to licenses according to paragraphs 3, 15, 16, 20, 20a of the Radiation Protection Law, paragraphs 6, 7, 9 of the Atomic Law, to notices according to paragraphs 4, 17 of the Radiation Protection Law as well as in the prospecting, mining and processing of radioactive minerals. It regulates the extent and evidence of the special knowledge required for radiation protection of radiological safety officers and personnel responsible for radiation protection. (UK)

  7. ICT SPECIALIST SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE – BUSINESS REQUIREMENTS AND EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Maryška

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes partial results of surveys realized amongCzech universities and business units which aim has been to analyzecurrent situation in demand and supply side of ICT (Informationand Communication Technologies specialists at the labor marketin the Czech Republic. The demand and supply side are comparedthrough their requirements on knowledge of ICT specialists. Theresults present typical “product” of Czech education system inICT competencies. General conclusions show that majority ofundergraduates do not have appropriate knowledge profile to enterICT corporate business as qualified employees - ICT specialist -without further additional training. The same fact is valid for a littleless than a half of graduates at master level. During quantitativeanalysis, we have identified that at about 60 per cent of ICTspecialists did not pass a formal ICT education. These facts showlacks in ICT oriented study programs and provoke requirementon further development of ICT oriented curricula in accordance tobusiness requirements and needs.

  8. Academic Information Security Researchers: Hackers or Specialists?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadkhah, Mehdi; Lagzian, Mohammad; Borchardt, Glenn

    2018-04-01

    In this opinion piece, we present a synopsis of our findings from the last 2 years concerning cyber-attacks on web-based academia. We also present some of problems that we have faced and try to resolve any misunderstandings about our work. We are academic information security specialists, not hackers. Finally, we present a brief overview of our methods for detecting cyber fraud in an attempt to present general guidelines for researchers who would like to continue our work. We believe that our work is necessary for protecting the integrity of scholarly publishing against emerging cybercrime.

  9. Quality Control Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),

  10. NCI Research Specialist Award (R50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Award enables scientists to pursue stable research careers within an existing cancer research program, but not serve as independent investigators. Letter of Intent due: January 2, 2017 Application due: February 2, 2017

  11. Communications Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be part of our mission to support research against cancer. We have an exciting opportunity for a talented communicator to join our team and be part of the effort to find cures for cancer. We are looking for a creative, team-oriented communications professional, with strong writing skills to publicize our research advances, employment and training opportunities and clinical

  12. Research competency and specialist registration: Quo vadis?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on the low compliance with the exit outcomes related to registrar requirements to ... individual university level as opposed to the single exit examination which fell under .... the HPCSA requirements and this has been signed off by the research.

  13. Elementary Mathematics Specialists: Ensuring the Intersection of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGatha, Maggie B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a historical overview of the role and impact of elementary mathematics specialists as well as current implications and opportunities for the field. Furthermore, suggestions are offered for the mathematics education field for ensuring the intersection of practice and research. [For complete proceedings, see ED581294.

  14. Applying research to practice: generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jennifer; Long, Airdrie

    2012-01-01

    Ergonomics is a holistic discipline encompassing a wide range of special interest groups. The role of an ergonomics consultant is to provide integrated solutions to improve comfort, safety and productivity. In Australia, there are two types of consultants--generalists and specialists. Both have training in ergonomics but specialist knowledge may be the result of previous education or work experience. This paper presents three projects illustrating generalist and specialist (visual ergonomics) consultancy: development of a vision screening protocol, solving visual discomfort in an office environment and solving postural discomfort in heavy industry. These case studies demonstrate how multiple ergonomics consultants may work together to solve ergonomics problems. It also describes some of the challenges for consultants, for those engaging their services and for the ergonomics profession, e.g. recognizing the boundaries of expertise, sharing information with business competitors, the costs-benefits of engaging multiple consultants and the risk of fragmentation of ergonomics knowledge and solutions. Since ergonomics problems are often multifaceted, ergonomics consultants should have a solid grounding in all domains of ergonomics, even if they ultimately only practice in one specialty or domain. This will benefit the profession and ensure that ergonomics remains a holistic discipline.

  15. [What is parents' and medical health care specialists knowledge about vaccinations?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarczoń, Izabela; Domaradzka, Ewa; Czajka, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to become familiar with parents' and Medical Health Care specialists knowledge and attitude towards vaccinations. The influence of information, provided to patients from various sources, on general opinion about immunization and its coverage within the last year were evaluated. Analysis of questionnaires about vaccinations performed among 151 parents and 180 Medical Health Care specialists. Medical Health Care specialists knowledge was considerably higher in comparison to questioned parents. Surprisingly enough, only approximately 90% of Medical Health Care workers knew about prophylaxis of Hib infections. A doctor is the main and the most reliable source of information for parents. Significant impact on parents' attitude to vaccinations is made not only by campaigns promoting vaccinations, but also by widespread opinions about their harmfulness. The doctor is the major source of reliable information about vaccinations for parents. Therefore, there is the need of continuous improvement of Medical Health Care specialists knowledge, but also the ability of successfully communicating it to parents.

  16. Validation of core medical knowledge by postgraduates and specialists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koens, F.; Rademakers, J.J.; Cate, O.T.J. ten

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Curriculum constructors and teachers must decide on the content and level of objectives and materials included in the medical curriculum. At University Medical Centre Utrecht it was decided to test relatively detailed knowledge at a regular level in study blocks and to design a progress

  17. Competences Evaluation of Transport Management Specialists in Baltic States: Research of Students’ Opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ledauskaitė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available To develop knowledge, advanced technology and skilled labor-based economy in Lithuania, it is necessary to make an effective business interaction and practical training, and preparation of specialists to ensure the ability to compete in European labor markets, and general capacity building. Common started training for professionals is to consider raising questions as to develop people in constantly changing global context. Several years of the research done in Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia transport sectors, has allowed the evaluating of the general competencies of these area specialists, and showed that specialists working in transport/logistics area are faced with lack of practical skills. The eliminating of these lacks requires close cooperation between the educational institutions and transport and/or logistics sector cooperation.Article in Lithuanian

  18. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 21. U.S. Aerospace Industry Librarians and Technical Information Specialists as Information Intermediaries: Results of the Phase 2 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-01

    market pres- sures to promote the use of that knowledge. This model emphasizes the production ol basic re- search as the driving force behind...27-43. Mowery, D. C. and "The Influence of Market Demand Upon Innovation: A Critical N. Rosenberg Review of Some Recent Empirical Studies." Research...N T IS O nline .................................................................... _(_) W ilson Line Index

  19. Establishing a Research Agenda for Understanding the Role and Impact of Mental Health Peer Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; McInnes, D Keith; Eisen, Susan; Ellison, Marsha; Farkas, Marianne; Armstrong, Moe; Resnick, Sandra G

    2017-09-01

    Mental health peer specialists are individuals with serious mental illnesses who receive training to use their lived experiences to help others with serious mental illnesses in clinical settings. This Open Forum discusses the state of the research for mental health peer specialists and suggests a research agenda to advance the field. Studies have suggested that peer specialists vary widely in their roles, settings, and theoretical orientations. Theories of action have been proposed, but none have been tested. Outcome studies have shown benefits of peer specialists; however, many studies have methodological shortcomings. Qualitative descriptions of peer specialists are plentiful but lack grounding in implementation science frameworks. A research agenda advancing the field could include empirically testing theoretical mechanisms of peer specialists, developing a measure of peer specialist fidelity, conducting more rigorous outcomes studies, involving peer specialists in executing the research, and assessing various factors that influence implementing peer specialist services and testing strategies that could address those factors.

  20. The Preparation Experiences of Elementary Mathematics Specialists: Examining Influences on Beliefs, Content Knowledge, and Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swars, Susan L.; Smith, Stephanie Z.; Smith, Marvin E.; Carothers, Jody; Myers, Kayla

    2018-01-01

    Many in the field of mathematics education call for elementary schools to have elementary mathematics specialists (EMSs) who provide needed mathematical expertise and support for children and teachers. EMSs serve as a reasonable, immediate alternative to the challenges generated by elementary teachers needing improved mathematical knowledge for…

  1. Communication Capacity Research in the Majority World: Supporting the human right to communication specialist services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopf, Suzanne C

    2018-02-01

    Receipt of accessible and appropriate specialist services and resources by all people with communication and/or swallowing disability is a human right; however, it is a right rarely achieved in either Minority or Majority World contexts. This paper considers communication specialists' efforts to provide sustainable services for people with communication difficulties living in Majority World countries. The commentary draws on human rights literature, particularly Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Communication Capacity Research program that includes: (1) gathering knowledge from policy and literature; (2) gathering knowledge from the community; (3) understanding speech, language and literacy use and proficiency; and (4) developing culturally and linguistically appropriate resources and assessments. To inform the development of resources and assessments that could be used by speech-language pathologists as well as other communication specialists in Fiji, the Communication Capacity Research program involved collection and analysis of data from multiple sources including 144 community members, 75 school students and their families, and 25 teachers. The Communication Capacity Research program may be applicable for achieving the development of evidence-based, culturally and linguistically sustainable SLP services in similar contexts.

  2. Eating disorders in the context of preconception care: fertility specialists' knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodino, Iolanda S; Byrne, Susan M; Sanders, Katherine A

    2017-02-01

    To gauge fertility specialists' knowledge, clinical practices, and training needs in regard to eating disorders. Cross-sectional study. Fertility clinics. Eighty Australian and New Zealand fertility specialists who were members of the Fertility Society of Australia. None. Responses to an anonymously completed online questionnaire. Approximately 54% of doctors correctly identified the body mass index relevant to anorexia nervosa, and 30% identified menstrual disturbances for anorexia, while 63.8% of doctors incorrectly nominated maladaptive weight control behaviors as a characteristic of binge eating disorder. While clinicians (83.7%) agreed it was important to screen for eating disorders during preconception assessments, 35% routinely screened for eating disorders and 8.8% indicated that their clinics had clinical practice guidelines for management of eating disorders. A minority of participants (13.8%) felt satisfied with their level of university training in eating disorders, 37.5% of doctors felt confident in their ability to recognize symptoms of an eating disorder, and 96.2% indicated a need for further education and clinical guidelines. On most items examined, knowledge and clinical practices regarding eating disorders did not differ according to doctor gender or years of clinical experience working as a fertility specialist. Knowledge about eating disorders in the context of fertility treatment is important. This study highlights the uncertainty among fertility specialists in detecting features of eating disorders. The findings point to the importance of further education and training, including the development of clinical guidelines specific to fertility health care providers. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hypopharyngeal carcinoma: King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahasin, Z.; Khan, B.

    1996-01-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 202 patients with hypopharyngeal cancer were seen at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSHRC). The endoscopic investigation showed that 28.3% of these patients had postcricoid carcinoma; 19.85% had pyriform fossa carcinoma and 52.9% had involvement of both sites. The pathological diagnosis of all cases was squamous cell carcinoma type. The majority of the patients (62.98%) had T4 lesions, which showed a late presentation to KFSHRC. Information related to survival was available for a smaller number of patients to many lost-to-follow-up cases. The overall median survival time was 8.5 months (1-110 months). The survival rate for each site was calculated, as well as the staging of the disease and treatment modality used. It appeared that pyriform fossa (median 21 months) had the best survival rate. In addition the earlier the lesion was detected and the more aggressive the treatment applied, the better the survival rate. Fifty percent of the patients receiving radiation therapy and surgery had a five year survival arte. Factors other than smoking and/on drinking should be looked for in our community as predisposing to this disease in our population. (author)

  4. Knowledge sharing in industrial research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    Over the past decade, the field of organization studies has increasingly focused on knowledge and knowledge processes in organizations. This thesis describes a study of one of those processes, knowledge sharing, in the context of industrial research. Though the attention for knowledge in

  5. Creating a Research Agenda and Setting Research Priorities for Clinical Nurse Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jan; Bautista, Cynthia; Ellstrom, Kathleen; Kalowes, Peggy; Manning, Jennifer; Pasek, Tracy Ann

    The purpose of this article is to describe the evolution and results of the process for establishing a research agenda and identification of research priorities for clinical nurse specialists, approved by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) membership and sanctioned by the NACNS Board of Directors. Development of the research agenda and identification of the priorities were an iterative process and involved a review of the literature; input from multiple stakeholders, including individuals with expertise in conducting research serving as task force members, and NACNS members; and feedback from national board members. A research agenda, which is to provide an enduring research platform, was established and research priorities, which are to be applied in the immediate future, were identified as a result of this process. Development of a research agenda and identification of research priorities are a key method of fulfilling the mission and goals of NACNS. The process and outcomes are described in this article.

  6. NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report Number 23. U.S. Academic Librarians and Technical Information Specialists as Information Intermediaries: Results of the Phase 3 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Federal govern- ment that would not otherwise be produced by the private sector and competitive market pres- sures to promote the use of that knowledge...Technology Policy." Policy 1983 Sciences 16: 27-43. Mowery, D. C. and "The Influence of Market Demand Upon Innovation: A Critical N. Rosenberg Review of...NASA RECON ............................................................ _() NTIS O nline

  7. Characterizing Mathematics Teaching Research Specialists' Mentoring in the Context of Chinese Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Feishi; Gu, Lingyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how mathematics teaching research specialists mentor practicing teachers during post-lesson debriefs of a lesson study in China. Based on a systematic, fine-grained analysis of 107 h of videotaped mentoring meetings of 20 groups of teachers and teaching research specialists from different elementary schools, this study reveals…

  8. Knowledge translation of research findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimshaw Jeremy M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most consistent findings from clinical and health services research is the failure to translate research into practice and policy. As a result of these evidence-practice and policy gaps, patients fail to benefit optimally from advances in healthcare and are exposed to unnecessary risks of iatrogenic harms, and healthcare systems are exposed to unnecessary expenditure resulting in significant opportunity costs. Over the last decade, there has been increasing international policy and research attention on how to reduce the evidence-practice and policy gap. In this paper, we summarise the current concepts and evidence to guide knowledge translation activities, defined as T2 research (the translation of new clinical knowledge into improved health. We structure the article around five key questions: what should be transferred; to whom should research knowledge be transferred; by whom should research knowledge be transferred; how should research knowledge be transferred; and, with what effect should research knowledge be transferred? Discussion We suggest that the basic unit of knowledge translation should usually be up-to-date systematic reviews or other syntheses of research findings. Knowledge translators need to identify the key messages for different target audiences and to fashion these in language and knowledge translation products that are easily assimilated by different audiences. The relative importance of knowledge translation to different target audiences will vary by the type of research and appropriate endpoints of knowledge translation may vary across different stakeholder groups. There are a large number of planned knowledge translation models, derived from different disciplinary, contextual (i.e., setting, and target audience viewpoints. Most of these suggest that planned knowledge translation for healthcare professionals and consumers is more likely to be successful if the choice of knowledge

  9. Knowledge translation of research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Eccles, Martin P; Lavis, John N; Hill, Sophie J; Squires, Janet E

    2012-05-31

    One of the most consistent findings from clinical and health services research is the failure to translate research into practice and policy. As a result of these evidence-practice and policy gaps, patients fail to benefit optimally from advances in healthcare and are exposed to unnecessary risks of iatrogenic harms, and healthcare systems are exposed to unnecessary expenditure resulting in significant opportunity costs. Over the last decade, there has been increasing international policy and research attention on how to reduce the evidence-practice and policy gap. In this paper, we summarise the current concepts and evidence to guide knowledge translation activities, defined as T2 research (the translation of new clinical knowledge into improved health). We structure the article around five key questions: what should be transferred; to whom should research knowledge be transferred; by whom should research knowledge be transferred; how should research knowledge be transferred; and, with what effect should research knowledge be transferred? We suggest that the basic unit of knowledge translation should usually be up-to-date systematic reviews or other syntheses of research findings. Knowledge translators need to identify the key messages for different target audiences and to fashion these in language and knowledge translation products that are easily assimilated by different audiences. The relative importance of knowledge translation to different target audiences will vary by the type of research and appropriate endpoints of knowledge translation may vary across different stakeholder groups. There are a large number of planned knowledge translation models, derived from different disciplinary, contextual (i.e., setting), and target audience viewpoints. Most of these suggest that planned knowledge translation for healthcare professionals and consumers is more likely to be successful if the choice of knowledge translation strategy is informed by an assessment of the

  10. Synthesizing Knowledge in Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piirainen, Kalle A.

    2016-01-01

    The chapter discusses knowledge synthesis in design research, bringing together the perspectives of experimental design research, or Research in Design Context that is treated extensively elsewhere in this book, and Design Inclusive Research as well as Practice-based Design Research. Specific...... attention is paid to the question of how practice-based or problem-driven design research processes can be rigorous and yield contributions to knowledge. The main argument in this chapter is that a key to knowledge synthesis and scientific contribution is setting explicit design propositions...... that are instantiated within design artefacts, and evaluated rigorously. The chapter starts with a discussion of knowledge creation and synthesis within design research.Following this, the chapter moves on to focus on setting a methodological framework for deriving design propositions. Lastly the chapter elaborates...

  11. Knowledge Exchange and Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben

    2018-01-01

    for ‘interesting’ discoveries has a potential to lift off papers with a high level of scientific rigor as well as a high level of relevance for practice. Originality: An outcome focus on the relationship between knowledge exchange activities and management research is to our knowledge new in the debate about......Purpose: The growing involvement of management researchers in knowledge exchange activities and collaborative research does not seem to be reflected in a growing academic output. The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers for academic output from these activities as well as the potential...... derived from knowledge exchange activities and Mode 2 research into academic papers such as low priority of case study research in leading management journals, a growing practice orientation in the research funding systems, methodological challenges due to limited researcher control, and disincentives...

  12. Health Education Specialists' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Jessica; Hanson, Carl L; Magnusson, Brianna; Neiger, Brad

    2016-03-01

    The changing landscape of health care as a result of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) may provide new opportunities for health education specialists (HES). The purpose of this study was to survey HES in the United States on their knowledge and attitudes of the ACA and assess their perceptions of job growth under the law. A random sample of 220 (36% response rate) certified HES completed a 53-item cross sectional survey administered online through Qualtrics. Findings were compared to public opinion on health care reform. HES are highly favorable of the law (70%) compared to the general public (23%). A total of 85% of respondents were able to list a provision of the ACA, and most (81%) thought the ACA would be successful at increasing insured Americans. Over half (64.6%) believe job opportunities will increase. Those who viewed the law favorably were significantly more likely to score better on a knowledge scale related to the ACA. HES understand publicized provisions but are uncertain about common myths and specific provisions related to Title IV, "Prevention of Chronic Disease and Improving Public Health." Directed and continuing education to HES regarding the ACA is warranted. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  13. Knowledge Management - A Necessity For The Training Of Future Specialists Of The Sustainable Entreprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Ionela Magdalena

    2015-09-01

    The world we are living in is shaped by what is a reality for years already: globalisation of economy. The lack of borders makes the impact that technology has on society to be a major one. The virtual world so accessible today is not just about new markets, access to cheaper work force, work online but also fierce competition. The common denominator of most efforts in the area of industry is performance. Limits continuously moving willingness to pay for products that delineate the performance delivered be the same range. Here too we can see the role of the education. For example, Landes shows that both knowledge and know-how are the ones that determine how well off societies are. The education of engineers is therefore critical to every nation to ensure the prosperity of its citizens. This paper here intends to approach the educational process of the engineering specific area of knowledge from the management perspective. The training process becomes sustainable in accordance with the requirements of the future: trained specialists for sustainable enterprises.

  14. Manufacturing/Cell Therapy Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),

  15. Electron Microscopy-Data Analysis Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Cancer Research Technology Program (CRTP) develops and implements emerging technology, cancer biology expertise and research capabilities to accomplish NCI research objectives.  The CRTP is an outward-facing, multi-disciplinary hub purposed to enable the external cancer research community and provides dedicated support to NCI’s intramural Center for

  16. Knowledge of the law about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment by intensivists and other specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ben; Willmott, Lindy; Cartwright, Colleen; Parker, Malcolm H; Williams, Gail

    2016-06-01

    Decisions about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment (WWLST) from adults who lack capacity are an integral part of intensive care (IC) practice. We compare the knowledge, attitudes and practice of intensivists in relation to the law about WWLST with six other specialties most often involved in end-of-life care. We used a cross-sectional postal survey of medical specialists in the three most populous Australian states, and analysed responses from 867 medical specialists from the seven specialties most likely to be involved in WWLST decisions in the acute-care setting (emergency, geriatric, palliative, renal and respiratory medicine, medical oncology and IC). Attitudes to, and knowledge and practice of, the law relating to end-of-life care. Of 2702 surveys sent to eligible practitioners, 867 completed questionnaires were returned. There was an overall response rate of 32% and an IC response rate also of 32% (125/388). Intensivists performed better than average in legal knowledge but important knowledge gaps remain. Intensivists had a more negative attitude to the role of law in this area than other specialty groups but reported being seen as a leading source of information about legal issues by other medical specialists and nurses. Intensivists also reported being the specialists most frequently making decisions about end-of-life treatment. Improved legal knowledge and open engagement with the law can help manage the risk of harm to patients and protect intensivists from liability. IC guidelines and continuing professional development are important strategies to address these issues.

  17. Specialist physician knowledge of chronic kidney disease: A comparison of internists and family physicians in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel I. Agaba

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate training is aimed at equipping the trainee with the necessary skills to practise as an expert. Non-nephrology specialist physicians render the bulk of pre-end-stage renal disease care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We sought to ascertain the knowledge of CKD amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians who serve as trainers and examiners for a training, accrediting and certifying body in postgraduate medicine in West Africa. We also compared the knowledge of family physicians and non-nephrology internists. Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to non-nephrology specialist physicians who serve as examiners for the West African College of Physicians. Results: Only 19 (27.5% of the respondents were aware of the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives guidelines for CKD management. Twenty five (36.2% of the respondents had adequate knowledge of CKD. There was no significant difference in the proportion of family physicians and non-nephrology internists who had adequate knowledge of CKD (27.3% vs. 40.4% respectively; p = 0.28. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were identified by all of the physicians as risk factors for CKD. Non-nephrology internists more frequently identified systemic lupus erythematosus as a risk factor for CKD, urinalysis with microscopy as a laboratory test for CKD evaluation, and bone disease as a complication of CKD than family physicians. Conclusion: There is a lack of adequate CKD knowledge amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians, since many of them are unaware of the CKD management guidelines. Educational efforts are needed to improve the knowledge of CKD amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians. Guidelines on CKD need to be widely disseminated amongst these physicians.

  18. Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists' Use of Knowledge Competencies in Job Tasks When Working with the California Senior Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Erick

    2014-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to explore the association between the knowledge competencies and the job tasks among Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists (CTRS) who are working with the senior population in the State of California by asking the following questions: (1) To what extent are CTRS using the principle of group…

  19. [Level of knowledge and action on lipaemia among Spanish primary and specialist care doctors. Press cholesterol study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán Alemán, José; Leal Hernández, Mariano; Martínez Pastor, Antonio; Hernández Menárguez, Fernando; García-Galbis Marín, José Antonio; Jara Gómez, Purificación

    2006-09-01

    To find the level of knowledge, the guidelines for action and the monitoring of lipaemia by Spanish primary care and specialist doctors. A self-defined questionnaire of 12 items was designed. Data on the population treated and the subjective evaluation of objectives, and on the management and monitoring of lipid parameters were filled in. A total of 1998 doctors from the whole of Spain took part; 68.8% of the doctors interviewed worked in primary health care and 30.2% in specialist centres or hospitals. A 91% of the doctors said they followed international consensus on monitoring lipaemia. The most commonly used objective therapeutic parameter for treating lipaemia was LDL-cholesterol (83%), followed by total cholesterol (62%), HDL-cholesterol (56%) and triglycerides (51%). If the patient's lipaemia was well controlled, then 21.8% of doctors reduced the doses of lipid-lowerers. In general terms, no great differences were appreciated between the criteria followed by PC and by specialist doctors. The criteria for action on lipaemia could be improved. There are no important differences of view or action in clinical and therapeutic criteria for Lipaemia cases between PC and specialist doctors.

  20. Publication of research projects for certification as medical specialists at a peruvian university, 2007-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Ticse, Ray; Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico internista endocrinólogo; magíster en Epidemiología Clínica.; Ygreda, Patricia; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano.; Samalvides, Frine; Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico infectólogo.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the frequency of publication in a scientific journal of the research projects done for medical specialty certification, a search was conducted in Google Scholar, Pubmed, biomedical databases and Peruvian medical society journals. These publications were research projects carried out by medical residents graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, to obtain the certification of medical specialist. Of 351 medical residents graduated ...

  1. State-of-the-art computer technologies used to train nuclear specialists and to conduct research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.A.; Tikhonenko, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses innovative methods used in the process of training nuclear specialists and conducting research which are based on state-of-the-art computer technologies. The approach proposed makes wide use of mathematical modeling and state-of-the-art programming techniques. It is based on the development, improvement and application of problem-oriented computer codes to support the teaching process and to solve fundamental and applied problems of nuclear physics and nuclear engineering.

  2. Knowledge Economy and Research Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastalich, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    The "knowledge economy" has been received with considerable scepticism by scholars within the fields of political economy, social and political philosophy, and higher education. Key arguments within this literature are reviewed in this article to suggest that, despite policy claims, "knowledge economy" does not describe a "new" mode of economic…

  3. Specialist nurses' perceptions of inviting patients to participate in clinical research studies: a qualitative descriptive study of barriers and facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Caroline; Stavropoulou, Charitini

    2016-08-11

    Increasing the number of patients participating in research studies is a current priority in the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom. The role of specialist nurses in inviting patients to participate is important, yet little is known about their experiences of doing so. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of barriers and facilitators held by specialist nurses with experience of inviting adult NHS patients to a wide variety of research studies. A cross-sectional qualitative descriptive study was conducted between March and July 2015. Participants were 12 specialist nurses representing 7 different clinical specialties and 7 different NHS Trusts. We collected data using individual semi-structured interviews, and analysed transcripts using the Framework method to inductively gain a descriptive overview of barriers and facilitators. Barriers and facilitators were complex and interdependent. Perceptions varied among individuals, however barriers and facilitators centred on five main themes: i) assessing patient suitability, ii) teamwork, iii) valuing research, iv) the invitation process and v) understanding the study. Facilitators to inviting patients to participate in research often stemmed from specialist nurses' attitudes, skills and experience. Positive research cultures, effective teamwork and strong relationships between research and clinical teams at the local clinical team level were similarly important. Barriers were reported when specialist nurses felt they were providing patients with insufficient information during the invitation process, and when specialist nurses felt they did not understand studies to their satisfaction. Our study offers several new insights regarding the role of specialist nurses in recruiting patients for research. It shows that strong local research culture and teamwork overcome some wider organisational and workload barriers reported in previous studies. In addition, and in contrast to common practice

  4. A research on the empowerment plan for specialist in RI-biomics field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Wo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Yeom, Yu Sun [Korea Association for Radiation Application, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Hyun [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Increasing utilization of radiation and RI (Radioisotope) in nuclear industry including non-power area has achieved sustainable development of radiation industry. Industries are no longer confined by a single technology or abilities but expanded for application gradually. RIBiomics fields are one of the convergence technology that is recognized on a high-tech industry. Unlike the conventional industry, RI-Biomics field needs to various specialists to perform related task. There is no domestic training program to educate the whole process. This study aims to suggest the plan for improvement of practical skills for specialists in RI-Biomics through development of our training program. For this purpose, we have first investigated the opinion about classification scheme from experts and then analyzed the results in order to reflecting our training program. Based on analyzed results, conformity assessment was executed to organize curriculum through status of constructed device and instructor in domestic. Our training program was performed jointly with KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). RI-Biomics center is prepared with facilities of overall experiment to improve quality of education. Due to the fact that specialists have routine task, we organized a five-day short course to reflect temporal difficulties. We performed a trial operation to 6 participants in RI-Biomics field. Through the survey for the specialists who participated in the program, we evaluated the efficiency of our training program. The results showed that participants were satisfied with the organized curriculum and educational materials. Therefore, our program is expected to be utilized as basic research data to develop feasible program for policy development and to improve practical skills in RI-Biomics.

  5. A research on the empowerment plan for specialist in RI-biomics field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Wo Ho; Park, Tai Jin; Yeom, Yu Sun; Park, Sang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Increasing utilization of radiation and RI (Radioisotope) in nuclear industry including non-power area has achieved sustainable development of radiation industry. Industries are no longer confined by a single technology or abilities but expanded for application gradually. RIBiomics fields are one of the convergence technology that is recognized on a high-tech industry. Unlike the conventional industry, RI-Biomics field needs to various specialists to perform related task. There is no domestic training program to educate the whole process. This study aims to suggest the plan for improvement of practical skills for specialists in RI-Biomics through development of our training program. For this purpose, we have first investigated the opinion about classification scheme from experts and then analyzed the results in order to reflecting our training program. Based on analyzed results, conformity assessment was executed to organize curriculum through status of constructed device and instructor in domestic. Our training program was performed jointly with KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). RI-Biomics center is prepared with facilities of overall experiment to improve quality of education. Due to the fact that specialists have routine task, we organized a five-day short course to reflect temporal difficulties. We performed a trial operation to 6 participants in RI-Biomics field. Through the survey for the specialists who participated in the program, we evaluated the efficiency of our training program. The results showed that participants were satisfied with the organized curriculum and educational materials. Therefore, our program is expected to be utilized as basic research data to develop feasible program for policy development and to improve practical skills in RI-Biomics

  6. Diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury: deficiencies in the knowledge base of non-specialist, trainee medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraju, T M; Lillicrap, M H; Horrocks, J L; Fisher, J M; Clark, R M W; Kanagasundaram, N S

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced education has been recommended to improve non-specialist management of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the extent of any gaps in knowledge has yet to be defined fully. The aim of this study was to assess understanding of trainee doctors in the prevention, diagnosis and initial management of AKI. An anonymised questionnaire was completed by hospital-based trainees across Newcastle Renal Unit's catchment area. Responses were evaluated against a panel of pre-defined ideal answers. The median score was 9.5 out of 20 (n = 146; range 0-17) and was lower in more junior trainees. Fifty percent of trainees could not define AKI, 30% could not name more than two risk factors for AKI and 37% could not name even one indication for renal referral. These serious gaps in knowledge highlight the need for enhanced education aimed at all training grades. Organisational changes may also be required to optimise patient safety.

  7. The Knowledge Management Research of Agricultural Scientific Research Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the perception of knowledge management from experts specializing in different fields,and experts at home and abroad,the knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution can build new platform,offer new approach for realization of explicit or tacit knowledge,and promote resilience and innovative ability of scientific research institution.The thesis has introduced functions of knowledge management research of agricultural science.First,it can transform the tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.Second,it can make all the scientific personnel share knowledge.Third,it is beneficial to the development of prototype system of knowledge management.Fourth,it mainly researches the realization of knowledge management system.Fifth,it can manage the external knowledge via competitive intelligence.Sixth,it can foster talents of knowledge management for agricultural scientific research institution.Seventh,it offers the decision-making service for leaders to manage scientific program.The thesis also discusses the content of knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution as follows:production and innovation of knowledge;attainment and organizing of knowledge;dissemination and share of knowledge;management of human resources and the construction and management of infrastructure.We have put forward corresponding countermeasures to further reinforce the knowledge management research of agricultural scientific research institution.

  8. Research Networks, Mentorship and Sustainability Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, A.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Nepal, M.; Shyamsundar, P.

    2015-12-01

    In South Asia, a majority of institutions are ill-equipped to undertake research on multi-disciplinary environmental problems, though these problems are increasing at a fast rate and connected to the region's poverty and growth objectives. In this context, the South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics (SANDEE) tries to fill a research, training and knowledge gap by building skills in the area of Environment and Development Economics. In this paper, the authors argue that research networks contribute to the growth of sustainability knowledge through (a) knowledge creation, (b) knowledge transfer and (c) knowledge deepening. The paper tries to show the relationship between capacity building, mentorship and research scholarship. It demonstrates that researchers, by associating with the network and its multiple training and mentoring processes, are able to build skills, change curricula and deliver useful knowledge products. The paper discusses the need for interdisciplinary research and the challenges of bridging the gap between research outputs and policy reforms.

  9. Knowledge of disease and access to a specialist reported by Spanish patients with ulcerative colitis. UC-LIFE survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüelles-Arias, Federico; Carpio, Daniel; Calvet, Xavier; Romero, Cristina; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Juliá, Berta; López-Sanromán, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Education of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) about their disease and access to a specialist are important to improve health outcomes. Our objective was to determine, by collecting information directly from the patients, their information sources and knowledge of the disease, and the options for access to the gastroenterologist. The information was collected using a printed survey handed out by 39 gastroenterologists to 15 consecutive adult patients with UC. Patients answered anonymously from their home. The responses were stratified by hospital size (> 900; 500-900; < 500 beds). A total of 585 patients received the survey and 436 responded (74.5%; mean age of 46 years [13.5], 53% men). The main information source was the specialist physician (89.2%). Between 32% and 80% of patients had areas of improvement regarding knowledge of their disease. Knowledge of the disease was better in patients from small hospitals (< 500 beds). The frequency of routine visits was also higher in small hospitals. In case of a flare-up, 60% stated they were able to contact their doctor by phone and 37%, that they could get an appointment on the same day. The percentage stating that they had to ask for an appointment and wait until their physician was available was lower in small hospitals. There are areas of improvement with regard to knowledge of their disease in patients with UC followed in hospital clinics. Patients followed in small hospitals seem to know their disease better, are followed more frequently in the clinic, and have better access in case of a flare-up.

  10. Knowledge of disease and access to a specialist reported by Spanish patients with ulcerative colitis: UC-LIFE survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Argüelles-Arias

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Education of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC about their disease and access to a specialist are important to improve health outcomes. Our objective was to determine, by collecting information directly from the patients, their information sources and knowledge of the disease, and the options for access to the gastroenterologist. Methods: The information was collected using a printed survey handed out by 39 gastroenterologists to 15 consecutive adult patients with UC. Patients answered anonymously from their home. The responses were stratified by hospital size (> 900; 500-900; < 500 beds. Results: A total of 585 patients received the survey and 436 responded (74.5%; mean age of 46 years [13.5], 53% men. The main information source was the specialist physician (89.2%. Between 32% and 80% of patients had areas of improvement regarding knowledge of their disease. Knowledge of the disease was better in patients from small hospitals (< 500 beds. The frequency of routine visits was also higher in small hospitals. In case of a flare-up, 60% stated they were able to contact their doctor by phone and 37%, that they could get an appointment on the same day. The percentage stating that they had to ask for an appointment and wait until their physician was available was lower in small hospitals. Conclusions: There are areas of improvement with regard to knowledge of their disease in patients with UC followed in hospital clinics. Patients followed in small hospitals seem to know their disease better, are followed more frequently in the clinic, and have better access in case of a flare-up.

  11. Creating New Technologists of Research in the 1960s: The Case of the Reproduction of Automated Chromatography Specialists and Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerontas, Apostolos

    2014-08-01

    Chromatographic instrumentation has been really influential in shaping the modern chemical practice, and yet it has been largely overlooked by history of science.Gas chromatography in the 1960s was considered the analytical technique closer to becoming dominant, and being the first automated chromatography set the standards that all the subsequent chromatographic instrumentation had to fulfill. Networks of specialists, groups of actors, corporate strategies and the analytical practice itself, were all affected and in many ways because of the entrance of gas chromatography in the chemical laboratory and in the instrumentation market. This paper gives a view of the early history of the gas chromatography instrumentation, relates it to the broader research-technology phenomenon and discusses issues of education and group reproduction in the case of the groups of technologists of the era. The chaotic elements of knowledge transfer during the instrumentation revolution in chemistry are being highlighted and they are being connected to the observable radical innovation of the period.

  12. Educational research and knowledge policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    The paper is structured in three main sections. The first is a general description of educational research in Denmark and the types of quality assessment used. The second is a discussion of a particular instance of quality assessment, the 2004 OECD review of educational research in Denmark and its...... consequences. The third is a critical discussion of some influential current notions about quality in educational research.   ...

  13. Pediatric Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  14. Qualitative Research and the Legitimization of Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Brent; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Expresses concerns about importing qualitative research methods from education to family therapy. Argues that qualitative researchers cannot establish the trustworthiness of their findings, regardless of the methods they use. Further contends that the legitimacy of research knowledge cannot be determined by researchers, but rather requires the…

  15. Specialist physician knowledge of chronic kidney disease: A comparison of internists and family physicians in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonios H. Tzamaloukas

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postgraduate training is aimed at equipping the trainee with the necessary skills to practise as an expert. Non-nephrology specialist physicians render the bulk of pre-end-stage renal disease care for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We sought to ascertain the knowledge of CKD amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians who serve as trainers and examiners for a training, accrediting and certifying body in postgraduate medicine in West Africa. We also compared the knowledge of family physicians and non-nephrology internists.Methods: Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to non-nephrology specialist physicians who serve as examiners for the West African College of Physicians.Results: Only 19 (27.5% of the respondents were aware of the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives guidelines for CKD management. Twenty five (36.2% of the respondents had adequate knowledge of CKD. There was no significant difference in the proportion of family physicians and non-nephrology internists who had adequate knowledge of CKD (27.3% vs. 40.4% respectively; p = 0.28. Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were identified by all of the physicians as risk factors for CKD. Non-nephrology internists more frequently identified systemic lupus erythematosus as a risk factor for CKD, urinalysis with microscopy as a laboratory test for CKD evaluation, and bone disease as a complication of CKD than family physicians.Conclusion: There is a lack of adequate CKD knowledge amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians, since many of them are unaware of the CKD management guidelines. Educational efforts are needed to improve the knowledge of CKD amongst non-nephrology specialist physicians. Guidelines on CKD need to be widely disseminated amongst these physicians.Connaissances des spécialistes des maladies rénales chroniques : Une comparaison des internistes et des médecins de famille en Afrique de l’OuestContexte: La formation de troisi

  16. Labouring in the Knowledge Fields: Researching Knowledge in Globalising Workspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    While research on globalisation can hardly be said to have ignored the phenomenon of the global corporation or the globally distributed supply chain, the focus has overwhelmingly been on "globalization from above"--on corporate structures and on the movement of global capital in global "knowledge economies". My focus in this…

  17. Specialist nurses’ perceptions of inviting patients to participate in clinical research studies: a qualitative descriptive study of barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline French

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the number of patients participating in research studies is a current priority in the National Health Service (NHS in the United Kingdom. The role of specialist nurses in inviting patients to participate is important, yet little is known about their experiences of doing so. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of barriers and facilitators held by specialist nurses with experience of inviting adult NHS patients to a wide variety of research studies. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative descriptive study was conducted between March and July 2015. Participants were 12 specialist nurses representing 7 different clinical specialties and 7 different NHS Trusts. We collected data using individual semi-structured interviews, and analysed transcripts using the Framework method to inductively gain a descriptive overview of barriers and facilitators. Results Barriers and facilitators were complex and interdependent. Perceptions varied among individuals, however barriers and facilitators centred on five main themes: i assessing patient suitability, ii teamwork, iii valuing research, iv the invitation process and v understanding the study. Facilitators to inviting patients to participate in research often stemmed from specialist nurses’ attitudes, skills and experience. Positive research cultures, effective teamwork and strong relationships between research and clinical teams at the local clinical team level were similarly important. Barriers were reported when specialist nurses felt they were providing patients with insufficient information during the invitation process, and when specialist nurses felt they did not understand studies to their satisfaction. Conclusion Our study offers several new insights regarding the role of specialist nurses in recruiting patients for research. It shows that strong local research culture and teamwork overcome some wider organisational and workload barriers reported in

  18. Organizational knowledge building through action research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Hersted; Frimann, Søren

    learning and change processes in relation to organizational knowledge building and knowledge sharing. The project draws on the dialogue tradition within action research (Coghlan et al.; 2010; Reason & Bradbury, 2001; Ripamonti et al 2016) and social constructionist ideas (Cunliffe 2002, 2004; Gergen 2003...... 2005; Chia 1996; Tsoukas, & Chia (2002)) based on a dialogical approach. Two internal consultants fulfill the roles as process facilitators of the action research process, and the two researchers from Aalborg University (LH and SF) are contributing with ideas, sparring, qualitative research design...... in a collaborative setting for learning, involving employees and managers, including as well the sharing of knowledge throughout the organization? In addition, we are curious to examine whether action research as an inquiry for learning and change can act as an alternative to the New Public Management paradigm...

  19. Special Education Research Advances Knowledge in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Research in special education has yielded beneficial outcomes for students with disabilities as well as typical achieving students. The authors provide examples of the valuable knowledge special education research has generated, including the elements of response to intervention (e.g., screening and progress monitoring), instructional practices…

  20. Improving Knowledge Management and Utilization of Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving Knowledge Management and Utilization of Research Results in Ecohealth Projects. This study brings together lead investigators from 11 past and ongoing Ecohealth projects across Latin America who are interested in achieving better development outcomes guided by research results. Their collective ...

  1. Collaborative Research Partnerships for Knowledge Mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    This study examines elements of collaborative research partnerships (CRPs) between university researchers and organisations who engage in knowledge mobilisation activities in education. The study uses key informant interviews and document analysis from one type of partnership, and a survey of university-community partnerships across Canada to…

  2. Proceedings of the specialist research meetings on semiconductors with research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Tetsuya; Kimura, Itsuro

    1987-01-01

    The meeting was proceeded divided five sessions, (I) structure analysis of semiconductors with neutrons, (II) structure analysis with positrons, (III) neutron transmutation doping and radiation damage, (IV) discussion on the way of research on semiconductors in the Institute. (author)

  3. It Matters Who You Are: Indigenous Knowledge Research and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Moyra; Khupe, Constance; Muza, Blessings

    2016-01-01

    It is common for researchers in Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in science education research to draw on aspects of the scientific paradigm from their science training. The consequent research seeks to be objective. This paradigm is not necessarily appropriate for IK research. While there have been calls for IK-aligned methodologies (Chilisa 2012; Keane…

  4. Shadowing emergency medicine residents by medical education specialists to provide feedback on non-medical knowledge-based ACGME sub-competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Spear Ellinwood, Karen C; Pritchard, T Gail; Bertels, Karen; Johnson, Ariel C; Min, Alice; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2018-01-01

    Non-medical knowledge-based sub-competencies (multitasking, professionalism, accountability, patient-centered communication, and team management) are challenging for a supervising emergency medicine (EM) physician to evaluate in real-time on shift while also managing a busy emergency department (ED). This study examines residents' perceptions of having a medical education specialist shadow and evaluate their nonmedical knowledge skills. Medical education specialists shadowed postgraduate year 1 and postgraduate year 2 EM residents during an ED shift once per academic year. In an attempt to increase meaningful feedback to the residents, these specialists evaluated resident performance in selected non-medical knowledge-based Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) sub-competencies and provided residents with direct, real-time feedback, followed by a written evaluation sent via email. Evaluations provided specific references to examples of behaviors observed during the shift and connected these back to ACGME competencies and milestones. Twelve residents participated in this shadow experience (six post graduate year 1 and six postgraduate year 2). Two residents emailed the medical education specialists ahead of the scheduled shadow shift requesting specific feedback. When queried, five residents voluntarily requested their feedback to be included in their formal biannual review. Residents received milestone scores and narrative feedback on the non-medical knowledge-based ACGME sub-competencies and indicated the shadow experience and subsequent feedback were valuable. Medical education specialists who observe residents over the course of an entire shift and evaluate non-medical knowledge-based skills are perceived by EM residents to provide meaningful feedback and add valuable information for the biannual review process.

  5. Design Research: Aesthetic Epistemology and Explanatory Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Murphy

    Full Text Available The article explores the “what” and the “how” of design research. It discusses the epistemological assumptions of design and design research—the conception of true knowledge that underpins the quest to advance design knowledge through research. The article also examines the media and methods of doing design research—that is, the “how” of such research. As it developed over the past century, the design field has drawn extensively on three pivotal but often tacitly deployed epistemologies: the Platonic-Aristotelian, the pragmatic, and the postmodern. Platonic epistemology is latent in many commonplace design instruction texts. Pragmatic epistemology underscores the industrial-arts ethos of design. Postmodern epistemologies dominate in university programs—especially graduate and Ph.D. programs. The article considers how these competing epistemologies understand the role of imagination in the act of creation. The article then considers the role of explanation in the carrying out of research in creative design and arts fields. It addresses whether, and to what degree, design research ought to rely on explanatory words as its principal medium of research, or whether it is valid to substitute artifactual creation for intellectual explanation in the research process. Key words: Epistemology, Design, Imagination, Knowledge, Explanation, Practice-based research

  6. Radioactive waste handling and disposal at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al Anazi, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre (KFSHRC) is the largest specialized medical center in Saudi Arabia. It performs highly specialized diagnostic imaging procedures with the use of various radionuclides required by sophisticated dual imaging systems. As a leading institution in cancer research, KFSHRC uses both long-lived and short-lived radionuclides. KFSHRC established the first cyclotron facility in the Middle East, which solved the in-house high demand for radionuclides and the difficulty in importing them. As both user and producer of high standard radiopharmaceuticals, KFSHRC generates large volumes of low and high level radioactive wastes. An old and small radioactive facility that was used for storage of radioactive waste was replaced with a bigger warehouse provided with facilities that will reduce radiation exposure of the staff, members of the public, and of the environment in the framework of "as low as reasonably achievable." The experiences and the effectiveness of the radiation protection program on handling and storage of radioactive wastes are presented.

  7. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on scientific and engineering researches of unstable nuclei and on their nuclear methodology (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawade, K.; Taniguchi, A.; Yamada, S.

    1998-01-01

    New research fields with the use of radioactive ion beams are now rapidly developing by virtue of recent progress in radioactive beam accelerators. The scientific and engineering researches on unstable nuclei far from stability are getting particular interests aiming at the full use of their radiation. In the circumstance many laboratories report utilizations and researches of the RI beam, the Tohoku University's renewal plan of the cyclotron and the short-lived nuclear beam facility at KEK have started. To discuss these new subjects on the scientific and engineering researches of unstable nuclei and on their nuclear methodology, the third specialist meeting was held at the KUR on February 16 and 17, 1998. Several noticeable and wide scope works on the method of RI-beam generation and on the new development of nuclear methodology have been reported, such as fundamental researches with laser, new isotope searchings and researches of nuclear structures with ISOL, in-beam nuclear spectroscopies through the deep-inelastic collision. In this meeting, especially, fundamental support-researches are reported, which are precise measurements of absolute disintegration rates, a gamma peak analysis method, evaluations of fundamental nuclear data, measurements of beta detector response functions for reducing Q values and precise measurement of high energy gamma intensities up to 11 MeV. The 14 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Recruiting to cohort studies in specialist healthcare services: Lessons learned from clinical research nurses in UK cleft services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchelli, Fabio; Rumsey, Nichola; Humphries, Kerry; Bennett, Rhiannon; Davies, Amy; Sandy, Jonathan; Stock, Nicola Marie

    2018-03-01

    To explore the experiences of clinical research nurses recruiting patients in a large specialist care-based cohort study. Longitudinal studies are vital to better understand the aetiology and moderators of health conditions. This need is especially salient for congenital conditions, such as cleft lip and/or palate, where establishing large, comprehensive data sets from birth is vital to improve understanding and to inform interventions. Various barriers exist in recruiting patients to large cohort studies. The role of clinical research nurses embedded within health settings has grown over past decades to facilitate data collection, yet challenges remain. Qualitative descriptive study. Individual semi-structured interviews with 12 clinical research nurses based in 10 National Health Service cleft services across the UK, recruiting to the Cleft Collective Birth Cohort Study. Of seven emergent themes, three highlighted challenges to recruiting patients, another three described facilitative factors, and one theme overlapped challenges and facilitators. Challenges included the life circumstances of potential participants; language barriers; and limited clinical research nurse time for study. Facilitative factors included integrating research into clinical practice; patient information shared with clinical research nurses; and support from the university-based research study team. The theme "Method of data collection" related to both challenges and facilitators. The qualitative data from clinical research nurses recruiting to a large birth cohort study provide helpful practical detail for specialist healthcare teams, specialist nurses, clinical research nurses and researchers looking to optimise recruitment and data collection in longitudinal studies. The findings suggest the importance of specialist clinical services and research study teams cooperating to embed research into everyday clinical practice, without compromising care. This should facilitate patients

  9. [Research on Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guang-ying; Zhao, Zhi-he; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Qian, Yu-fen; Li, Wei-ran; Xu, Tian-min

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the results of multiple Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome, to investigate the relevance of different experiment items and to explore the weight of each monomial material. As a randomized clinical trial, with six orthodontic treatment centers and Angle's classification being regarded as two stratification factors, it contained 108 cases with integrity data, which was random extracted from 2383 cases that received orthodontic treatment in six orthodontic treatment centers during the past five years, gathering post-treatment study casts, cephalometrics and photographs of 48 cases as the research subject. Similarly taking Angle's classification as a stratification factor, 108 cases were randomly divided into 9 groups. The randomization of sampling and grouping were both generated by a pseudo-random number generator. According to the monomial and combined subjects, 69 orthodontic specialists were regarded as the raters to rank the 12 cases in each group, and to judge whether the case was qualified. Correlation analysis: the Spearman r between Post-M + C and Post-M + C + P and the Spearman r between Post-M + P and Post-M + C + P were both greater than 0.950. The Spearman r between Post-M and Post-P and the Spearman r between Post-M and Post-C were about 0.300. The Spearman r between Post-P and Post-C was 0.505. Regression analysis: the linear regression results: M + C = 0.782M + 0.308C - 0.150, M + P = 0.804M + 0.233P - 0.091, M + C + P = 0.764M + 0.243P + 0.131C - 0.291. The r(2) of above three models was greater than 0.9. It was applicable to use M + C and M + P instead of M + C + P. Study casts could not replace cephalometrics or photographs when doing subjective evaluation. Cephalometrics and photographs could not substitute for each other either. In the combined materials evaluation, model accounted for the largest percentage. Based on the regression model, for the greater part, the integration of

  10. Creating Science Education Specialists and Scientific Literacy in Students through a Successful Partnership among Scientists, Science Teachers, and Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metoyer, S.; Prouhet, T.; Radencic, S.

    2007-12-01

    The nature of science and the nature of learning are often assumed to have little practical relationship to each other. Scientists conduct research and science teachers teach. Rarely do the scientist and the science teacher have an opportunity to learn from each other. Here we describe results from a program funded by NSF, the Information Technology in Science (ITS) Center for Teaching and Learning. The ITS Center provided the support and structure necessary for successful long-term collaboration among scientists, science teachers, and education researchers that has resulted in the creation of new science education specialists. These specialists are not only among the science teachers, but also include avid recruits to science education from the scientists themselves. Science teachers returned to their classrooms armed with new knowledge of content, inquiry, and ideas for technology tools that could support and enhance students' scientific literacy. Teachers developed and implemented action research plans as a means of exploring educational outcomes of their use and understanding of new technologies and inquiry applied to the classroom. In other words, they tried something different in the class related to authentic inquiry and technology. They then assessed the students' to determine if there was an impact to the students in some way. Many of the scientists, on the other hand, report that they have modified their instructional practices for undergraduate courses based on their experiences with the teachers and the ITS Center. Some joined other collaborative projects pairing scientists and educators. And, many of the scientists continue on-going communication with the science teachers serving as mentors, collaborators, and as an "expert" source for the students to ask questions to. In order to convey the success of this partnership, we illustrate and discuss four interdependent components. First, costs and benefits to the science teacher are discussed through case

  11. Knowledge Asymmetries Between Research and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of implementing scientific knowledge in practice. The discussion is based on a case study of barriers to implementing research-based principles of sustainable organic arable farming. The current literature tends to see this problem either as a dissemination issu...

  12. Experience inheritance from famous specialists based on real-world clinical research paradigm of traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guanli; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Runshun; Liu, Baoyan; Zhou, Xuezhong; Zhou, Xiaji; Zhang, Hong; Guo, Yufeng; Xue, Yanxing; Xu, Lili

    2014-09-01

    The current modes of experience inheritance from famous specialists in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) include master and disciple, literature review, clinical-epidemiology-based clinical research observation, and analysis and data mining via computer and database technologies. Each mode has its advantages and disadvantages. However, a scientific and instructive experience inheritance mode has not been developed. The advent of the big data era as well as the formation and practice accumulation of the TCM clinical research paradigm in the real world have provided new perspectives, techniques, and methods for inheriting experience from famous TCM specialists. Through continuous exploration and practice, the research group proposes the innovation research mode based on the real-world TCM clinical research paradigm, which involves the inheritance and innovation of the existing modes. This mode is formulated in line with its own development regularity of TCM and is expected to become the main mode of experience inheritance in the clinical field.

  13. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH TRENDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu KÖR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As a young and interdisciplinary field, Knowledge Management (KM holds a crucial role in scientific research and development of knowledge-intensive economies.  This study elaborates on the methods used in previous studies regarding the research trends of KM and their contribution to the discipline by examining the KM literature. The purpose of the study is to determine the current research trends of KM by analysing KM citation classics and examining their characteristics as well as presenting a holistic framework of KM publications from the results of citation analysis. A total of 152 articles published in peer review journals between the years 2010-2014 were analysed. As a result of the analysis, a holistic KM framework was developed in order to contribute to a consensus of KM field. The results of the study reveals that the coverage of KM articles expanded into a broad spectrum of concepts, disciplines and environment.

  14. Shadowing emergency medicine residents by medical education specialists to provide feedback on non-medical knowledge-based ACGME sub-competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterbrook AL

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Anna L Waterbrook,1 Karen C Spear Ellinwood,2 T Gail Pritchard,3 Karen Bertels,1 Ariel C Johnson,4 Alice Min,1 Lisa R Stoneking1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Department of Pediatrics, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 4College of Medicine, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Objective: Non-medical knowledge-based sub-competencies (multitasking, professionalism, accountability, patient-centered communication, and team management are challenging for a supervising emergency medicine (EM physician to evaluate in real-time on shift while also managing a busy emergency department (ED. This study examines residents’ perceptions of having a medical education specialist shadow and evaluate their nonmedical knowledge skills.Methods: Medical education specialists shadowed postgraduate year 1 and postgraduate year 2 EM residents during an ED shift once per academic year. In an attempt to increase meaningful feedback to the residents, these specialists evaluated resident performance in selected non-medical knowledge-based Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME sub-competencies and provided residents with direct, real-time feedback, followed by a written evaluation sent via email. Evaluations provided specific references to examples of behaviors observed during the shift and connected these back to ACGME competencies and milestones.Results: Twelve residents participated in this shadow experience (six post graduate year 1 and six postgraduate year 2. Two residents emailed the medical education specialists ahead of the scheduled shadow shift requesting specific feedback. When queried, five residents voluntarily requested their feedback to be included in their formal biannual review. Residents received

  15. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A.; Trukhachev, Vladimir I.; Kostyukova, Elena I.; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Kitas, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and d...

  16. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, James; Lusk, Elizabeth; Harris, Megan; Stolee, Paul

    2013-01-09

    The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network's members. The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and approaches are needed to bring about a valuable

  17. SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH ON THE ANTI-STRESS PREPARATION OF SPECIALISTS IN A QUARTER CENTURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Hryshchenko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an analytical overview of the work on training of human operator counteract the simultaneous action of negative factors, carried out by experts from the Avionics Department. The focus is on the method of training of operators by removing the negative effects of the flight, which are associated with the phenomenon of amplification of the dynamic stereotype in aviation specialists. It should be noted that the author does not fully cover all the anti-stress training methods that have been developed by our experts

  18. Knowledge transfer from public research organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Erik; Knee, Paula; Brown, Neil; Javorka, Zsuzsa; Giarracca, Flora; Sidiqui, Sabeen

    2012-01-01

    This study describes knowledge transfer from European universities and institutes to industry, focusing on the role of the Industrial Liaison / Technology / Knowledge Transfer Office function. It explores practices in European institutions and compares these with international ones, especially from

  19. Working with Indigenous Knowledge: A Guide for Researchers ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In the 1990s, indigenous knowledge has been fertile ground for research, and ... research and will appeal to both seasoned development professional as well as ... indigenous-knowledge issues with the University of Indonesia, the Institute of ...

  20. Staff Views of the Importance of Relationships for Knowledge Development: Is Training by Specialists a Waste of Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jill; Goldbart, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The provision of skilled support is dependent on staff knowledge and understanding (Beadle-Brown J., Beecham J., Mansell J., Baumker T., Leigh J., Whelton R. & Richardson L, unpublished data). Influencing staff knowledge and understanding is an important component of interventions. Materials and Methods: Fourteen individual…

  1. Specialist antenatal clinics for women at high risk of preterm birth: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Reem; Redshaw, Maggie

    2017-02-02

    indicated a specialist clinic may be a means of predicting or preventing preterm birth. Testing this in a randomised controlled trial is desirable, though may be hard to achieve due to the growing focus of such clinics on managing women at high risk of preterm birth. Ongoing research has to recognize women's experiences and perceptions of such a clinic. Further clarification of the optimal referral route and a clear and standardized management and cost economic evaluation plan are also required. Fathers support and experience of PTB clinics should also be included in further research.

  2. Synthesis of knowledge of extreme fire behavior: volume 2 for fire behavior specialists, researchers, and meteorologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul A. Werth; Brian E. Potter; Martin E. Alexander; Craig B. Clements; Miguel G. Cruz; Mark A. Finney; Jason M. Forthofer; Scott L. Goodrick; Chad Hoffman; W. Matt Jolly; Sara S. McAllister; Roger D. Ottmar; Russell A. Parsons

    2016-01-01

    The National Wildfire Coordinating Group’s definition of extreme fire behavior indicates a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning/ spotting, presence of fire whirls, and strong convection column. Predictability is...

  3. Team knowledge research: emerging trends and critical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Jessica L; Thayer, Amanda L; Pavlas, Davin; Salas, Eduardo; Stewart, John E; Howse, William R

    2012-02-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the team knowledge literature and guidance for further research. Recent research has called attention to the need for the improved study and understanding of team knowledge. Team knowledge refers to the higher level knowledge structures that emerge from the interactions of individual team members. We conducted a systematic review of the team knowledge literature, focusing on empirical work that involves the measurement of team knowledge constructs. For each study, we extracted author degree area, study design type, study setting, participant type, task type, construct type, elicitation method, aggregation method, measurement timeline, and criterion domain. Our analyses demonstrate that many of the methodological characteristics of team knowledge research can be linked back to the academic training of the primary author and that there are considerable gaps in our knowledge with regard to the relationships between team knowledge constructs, the mediating mechanisms between team knowledge and performance, and relationships with criteria outside of team performance, among others. We also identify categories of team knowledge not yet examined based on an organizing framework derived from a synthesis of the literature. There are clear opportunities for expansion in the study of team knowledge; the science of team knowledge would benefit from a more holistic theoretical approach. Human factors researchers are increasingly involved in the study of teams. This review and the resulting organizing framework provide researchers with a summary of team knowledge research over the past 10 years and directions for improving further research.

  4. Australian University Research Commercialisation: Perceptions of Technology Transfer Specialists and Science and Technology Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Australian governments in recent years have invested substantially in innovation and research commercialisation with the aim of enhancing international economic competitiveness, making research findings more readily available to research users, and supporting economic and social development. Although there have been a number of evaluations of…

  5. Theoretical Framework of Researcher Knowledge Development in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, Igor'

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a framework of researcher knowledge development in conducting a study in mathematics education. The key components of the framework are: knowledge germane to conducting a particular study, processes of knowledge accumulation, and catalyzing filters that influence a researcher's decision making. The components…

  6. Research methods in indigenous mathematical Knowledge: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Indigenous games are an integral component of indigenous knowledge systems. ... and national activities; mathematical concepts associated with the games; possibilities and implications for general classroom ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. Expert knowledge maps for knowledge management: a case study in Traditional Chinese Medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng; Yang, Shuo; Yu, Tong; Yang, Ce; Gao, Yonghong; Zhu, Haiyan

    2013-10-01

    To design a model to capture information on the state and trends of knowledge creation, at both an individual and an organizational level, in order to enhance knowledge management. We designed a graph-theoretic knowledge model, the expert knowledge map (EKM), based on literature-based annotation. A case study in the domain of Traditional Chinese Medicine research was used to illustrate the usefulness of the model. The EKM successfully captured various aspects of knowledge and enhanced knowledge management within the case-study organization through the provision of knowledge graphs, expert graphs, and expert-knowledge biography. Our model could help to reveal the hot topics, trends, and products of the research done by an organization. It can potentially be used to facilitate knowledge learning, sharing and decision-making among researchers, academicians, students, and administrators of organizations.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of medical specialists for the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Teja Obulareddy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increased risk of periodontal disease has been associated with diabetes mellitus (DM and also periodontitis is considered as the sixth complication of DM. Medical physicians may have an advantageous position compared to the dentists to provide early patient counseling about oral health because patients attend medical offices more often than to dental offices and are more likely to be affiliated to medical than to dental insurance. Hence, the medical practitioners should have sufficient knowledge in this regard. The study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice behaviors of endocrinologists, general medicine practitioners, and diabetologists on the relationship between periodontal disease and DM. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from sixty participants practicing in Nellore, using a structured questionnaire survey. The obtained data were analyzed through percentages. Results: All the participants (100% were aware that there existed a relation between oral health and general health. However, only 17.8% (10 of the participants refer their patients to dentists without patients asking for referral. Conclusion: The endocrinologists were aware of the didactic relationship, whereas general medicine practitioners and diabetologists are not much well-equipped with the knowledge on relationship between DM and periodontitis. There exists a wide gap between their practice behaviors and current scientific evidence. Therefore, more emphasis must be made by medical practitioners for the diabetic patient toward periodontal health which is most important yet neglected aspect of comprehensive health care.

  9. Knowledge Loss: A Defensive Model In Nuclear Research Organization Memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Safuan Bin Sulaiman; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge is an essential part of research based organization. It should be properly managed to ensure that any pitfalls of knowledge retention due to knowledge loss of both tacit and explicit is mitigated. Audit of the knowledge entities exist in the organization is important to identify the size of critical knowledge. It is very much related to how much know-what, know-how and know-why experts exist in the organization. This study conceptually proposed a defensive model for Nuclear Malaysia's organization memory and application of Knowledge Loss Risk Assessment (KLRA) as an important tool for critical knowledge identification. (author)

  10. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on nuclear science information, (5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro; Takeuchi, Takayuki; Mizuma, Mitsuo

    1985-02-01

    The Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University held two meetings on nuclear science information in the academic year of 1984. The titles of the presented papers are: (1) Information retieval in nuclear safety; (2) Information retrieval in high-pressure gas safety; (3) Construction of nuclear science information data base at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University (II); (4) Nuclear science information data base at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University (KURRIP)*; (5) Nuclear structure and disintegration data base; (6) Evaluated nuclear structure data file and (7) World climate data file. This report contains the full text of these papers. (author)

  11. Loyalty Programmes : Current Knowledge and Research Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorotic, Matilda; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Verhoef, Peter C.

    Loyalty programmes (LPs) have increased in number and popularity, but their effects on customer behaviour remain equivocal, due to a lack of understanding of the drivers of LP effectiveness and insufficient generalizable conclusions across prior studies. This paper synthesizes current knowledge

  12. Cooperative research and knowledge flow in the marine commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa R. Johnson

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Integration of fishers’ knowledge into scientific-based fisheries management is difficult due to a history of distrust between fishers and scientists and institutional constraints that limit management to only the best scientific information available. A recent response to the Northeast U.S. fisheries crisis has been to include fishers in scientific research. Cooperative research, where fishers and scientists collaborate to produce knowledge for fisheries management, aims improve the knowledge base of fisheries management and integrate fishers and their knowledge into the science policy process, which together is expected to generate broader acceptance of scientific-based management. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted in the Northeast U.S., this paper discusses the value of cooperative research as a tool for managing the commons. Specifically, it focuses on the flow of knowledge and expertise between fishers and scientists. The flow of knowledge from fishers to science involves a process of translation, where fishers’ knowledge is transformed (proven, verified, etc. into scientific knowledge. This process enables the flow of fishers’ knowledge into the science policy process. Knowledge and expertise also flow from scientists to fishers, where fishers gain understandings of the scientific research process. With this new expertise, fishers develop a greater capacity to participate in science and management discussions. The paper argues that 2-way knowledge flow between fishers and scientists, in particular flow that results in capacity building, can improve commons management through communication, translation, and conflict resolution. Finally, boundary spanners are identified as being critical to success in cooperative research.

  13. Understanding Suicidal Behaviour in Young People Referred to Specialist CAMHS: A Qualitative Psychoanalytic Clinical Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jan; Hurst, Margaret; Marques, Ana; Millar, David; Moya, Sue; Pover, Lesley; Stewart, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative psychoanalytic clinical research project using a post-Kleinian contemporary approach was undertaken by a team of seven qualified and experienced child psychotherapists working in community Tier 3 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). A number of referred young people who deliberately harmed themselves or attempted…

  14. Knowledge synthesis and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR is Canada's premier health-research funding agency. We fund nearly 14,000 researchers and trainees in four theme areas: biomedical, clinical, health services, and population and public-health research. Our mandate is 'to excel according to international standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system'. Knowledge synthesis is a key element of the knowledge-translation objectives of CIHR, as outlined in our definition of knowledge-translation.

  15. Proceedings of the 2nd specialist research meeting on the electromagnetic isotope separators and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Manabu; Kawase, Yoichi; Okano, Kotoyuki

    1992-07-01

    The EMIS-12 International Conference was held at Sendai in September, 1991 for the first time in Japan. It offered a nice opportunity to appeal a great progress in our country on the related fields and many interesting subjects were discussed. The second research meeting on Electromagnetic Isotope Separators and Their Applications was held at Kumatori on March 18 and 19, 1992, six months after the EMIS-12 Conference. Many interesting results obtained by using ISOLs were reported as in the previous meeting. In the present meeting, the measuring methods and the improved instruments were reported and discussed, which are fundamental for application of isotope separation methods to the interdisciplinary research fields. These valuable contributions to the meeting are involved in this Proceedings. (J.P.N.)

  16. Art Appreciation as a Learned Competence: A Museum-Based Qualitative Study of Adult Art Specialist and Art Non-Specialist Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracun Sova, Rajka

    2015-01-01

    Since Bourdieu, it has been argued that art appreciation requires "knowledge". The focus of this qualitative study was to examine art appreciation as a learned competence by exploring two different groups of museum visitors: art specialists and art non-specialists. The research was conducted at Moderna galerija in Ljubljana. Twenty-three…

  17. Cooperation among medical specialists : "pain" or "gain"?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Antoinette Marie-Rose Renée

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the cooperation among medical specialists in multidisciplinary teams as well as its antecedents and consequences. During meetings, medical specialists combine their knowledge and expertise, discuss the health problems of patients, weigh possible treatment options and decide

  18. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  19. Wol man's disease: The King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Essa, M.; Sakati, N.; Joshi, S.; Ozand, P.T.; Nounou, R.; Le Quesne, G.; Archibald, A.

    1998-01-01

    Wolman's disease is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. A recent review indicates that approximately 50 patients have reported in the world. Reports of patients from the Arabian Peninsula are rare due to lack of awareness among pediatricians. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical, radiological, biochemical and histopathological findings of four Saudi patients diagnosed with Wolman's disease at King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre. The diagnosis was confirmed by deficient acid lipase activity in the leukocytes and fibroblasts, which was measured using 4-methylumbelliferyl palmitate. All patients were failing to thrive with progressive heptasplenomegaly. Abdominal x-ray revealed calcifications which were confirmed on abdominal CT scan. Peripheral blood film showed foamy histiocytes. Liver biopsy in one patient showed marked steatosis and elliptical empty clefs predominantly in the Kupffer cells, indicating cholesterol storage in the reticulo-endothelial cells. The acid lipase activity was less than 6% in all patients. In all suspected cases of Wolman's disease, a plane abdominal x-ray should be obtained to check for the typical pattern of adrenal calcification characteristic of the disease, especially ant young infant with failure to thrive and progressive hepatosplenomegaly. (author)

  20. Democratising the Research Imagination: Globalising Knowledge about HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Debbie; Boden, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This paper problematises globalisation and the democratisation of the research imagination, highlighting the potentials for harm and good. We do so, first, by exploring two philosophical/epistemological issues: the definition of "knowledge" and the role of "research" in knowledge creation. The paper then considers some of…

  1. Research on the construction of knowledge base for institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ru

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge base (KB in short) is very important for institutes. It can train employees to improve their ability of work. It can supply more information to directors for making right decisions, and can help constructing learning organization to promote innovation. Institutes possess several information systems, but there are some problems such as inadequate use of documents, and connotative knowledge isn't described and communicated. KB of institute is based on programs. It stress integrity, secrecy of programs and authorized access. Libraries have abilities to construct KB, since it's the center of information for the institute. KB of institute includes: KB of training, communion of technique issues, KB of department, personal KB, KB of specialists. Because of low cost many institutes adopt softwares of free codes such as: DSpace, EPrints, Fedodra, CDSware, Greenstone. KB systems are choosed by institutes, depending on types of knowledge, ability of technique, fund and so on. KB is constructed by collecting, sorting, describing key knowledge, connecting, accessing, updating and innovating. Program KB of different places and majors will unite in the future. (author)

  2. The Role of Integrated Knowledge Translation in Intervention Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathen, C Nadine; MacMillan, Harriet L

    2018-04-01

    There is widespread recognition across the full range of applied research disciplines, including health and social services, about the challenges of integrating scientifically derived research evidence into policy and/or practice decisions. These "disconnects" or "knowledge-practice gaps" between research production and use have spawned a new research field, most commonly known as either "implementation science" or "knowledge translation." The present paper will review key concepts in this area, with a particular focus on "integrated knowledge translation" (IKT)-which focuses on researcher-knowledge user partnership-in the area of mental health and prevention of violence against women and children using case examples from completed and ongoing work. A key distinction is made between the practice of KT (disseminating, communicating, etc.), and the science of KT, i.e., research regarding effective KT approaches. We conclude with a discussion of the relevance of IKT for mental health intervention research with children and adolescents.

  3. Research and International Trade Policy Negotiations: Knowledge ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7 oct. 2009 ... The editor. Mercedes Botto is Senior Researcher at FLACSO, the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Contenus connexes. Politiques d'innovation régionales dans la zone Mercosur - obstacles et possibilités. Cette subvention soutiendra l'exécution d'une étude des ...

  4. Improving Knowledge Management and Utilization of Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They are extremely vulnerable, and they have to cope with few resources, poor health, ... and improve research implementation approaches and instruments through ... The project's long-term aim is to contribute to integrated policies that link health, ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  5. Stakeholder engagement and knowledge exchange in environmental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipson, Jeremy; Lowe, Philip; Proctor, Amy; Ruto, Eric

    2012-03-01

    It is commonly put forward that effective uptake of research in policy or practice must be built upon a foundation of active knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement during the research. However, what is often lacking is a systematic appreciation of the specific practices of knowledge exchange and their relative merits. The paper reports on a 2009 survey of 21 research projects within the UK Research Councils' Rural Economy and Land Use Programme regarding the involvement and perceived impact of over a thousand stakeholders in the research. The survey reveals that most stakeholders were involved as research subjects or as event participants. Large numbers were also engaged in the research process itself, including involvement in shaping the direction of research. Stakeholder engagement is perceived as bringing significant benefits to the process of knowledge production. A close relationship is found between mechanisms and approaches to knowledge exchange and the spread of benefits for researchers and stakeholders. Mutual benefits are gained from exchange of staff or where stakeholders are members of research advisory groups. Different stakeholder sectors are also associated with different patterns of engagement, which lead to contrasting impact patterns. Any efforts to alter knowledge exchange processes and outcomes must overcome these differing engagement tendencies. Overall, much greater attention should be given to early processes of knowledge exchange and stakeholder engagement within the lifetime of research projects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Specialist Bibliographic Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Trukhachev, Vladimir I; Kostyukova, Elena I; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kitas, George D

    2016-05-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls.

  7. Specialist Bibliographic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Specialist bibliographic databases offer essential online tools for researchers and authors who work on specific subjects and perform comprehensive and systematic syntheses of evidence. This article presents examples of the established specialist databases, which may be of interest to those engaged in multidisciplinary science communication. Access to most specialist databases is through subscription schemes and membership in professional associations. Several aggregators of information and database vendors, such as EBSCOhost and ProQuest, facilitate advanced searches supported by specialist keyword thesauri. Searches of items through specialist databases are complementary to those through multidisciplinary research platforms, such as PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. Familiarizing with the functional characteristics of biomedical and nonbiomedical bibliographic search tools is mandatory for researchers, authors, editors, and publishers. The database users are offered updates of the indexed journal lists, abstracts, author profiles, and links to other metadata. Editors and publishers may find particularly useful source selection criteria and apply for coverage of their peer-reviewed journals and grey literature sources. These criteria are aimed at accepting relevant sources with established editorial policies and quality controls. PMID:27134485

  8. Community-based participatory research and integrated knowledge translation: advancing the co-creation of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Janet; Giles, Audrey; Graham, Ian D

    2017-12-19

    Better use of research evidence (one form of "knowledge") in health systems requires partnerships between researchers and those who contend with the real-world needs and constraints of health systems. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and integrated knowledge translation (IKT) are research approaches that emphasize the importance of creating partnerships between researchers and the people for whom the research is ultimately meant to be of use ("knowledge users"). There exist poor understandings of the ways in which these approaches converge and diverge. Better understanding of the similarities and differences between CBPR and IKT will enable researchers to use these approaches appropriately and to leverage best practices and knowledge from each. The co-creation of knowledge conveys promise of significant social impacts, and further understandings of how to engage and involve knowledge users in research are needed. We examine the histories and traditions of CBPR and IKT, as well as their points of convergence and divergence. We critically evaluate the ways in which both have the potential to contribute to the development and integration of knowledge in health systems. As distinct research traditions, the underlying drivers and rationale for CBPR and IKT have similarities and differences across the areas of motivation, social location, and ethics; nevertheless, the practices of CBPR and IKT converge upon a common aim: the co-creation of knowledge that is the result of knowledge user and researcher expertise. We argue that while CBPR and IKT both have the potential to contribute evidence to implementation science and practices for collaborative research, clarity for the purpose of the research-social change or application-is a critical feature in the selection of an appropriate collaborative approach to build knowledge. CBPR and IKT bring distinct strengths to a common aim: to foster democratic processes in the co-creation of knowledge. As research

  9. Assessment of change in knowledge about research methods among delegates attending research methodology workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Shrivastava

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There was increase in knowledge of the delegates after attending research methodology workshops. Participatory research methodology workshops are good methods of imparting knowledge, also the long term effects needs to be evaluated.

  10. Towards a semantic web connecting knowledge in academic research

    CERN Document Server

    Cope, Bill; Magee, Liam

    2011-01-01

    This book addresses the question of how knowledge is currently documented, and may soon be documented in the context of what it calls 'semantic publishing'. This takes two forms: a more narrowly and technically defined 'semantic web'; as well as a broader notion of semantic publishing. This book examines the ways in which knowledge is represented in journal articles and books. By contrast, it goes on to explore the potential impacts of semantic publishing on academic research and authorship. It sets this in the context of changing knowledge ecologies: the way research is done; the way knowledg

  11. Knowledge Translation for Cardiovascular Disease Research and Management in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shommu, Nusrat S; Turin, Tanvir C

    2017-09-01

    Knowledge translation is an essential and emerging arena in healthcare research. It is the process of aiding the application of research knowledge into clinical practice or policymaking. Individuals at all levels of the health care system, including patients, healthcare professionals, and policymakers, are affected by the gaps that exist between research evidence and practice; the process of knowledge translation plays a role in bridging these gaps and incorporating high-quality clinical research into decision-making. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) management is a crucial area of healthcare where information gaps are known to exist. Although Japan has one of the lowest risks and mortality rates from CVDs, an increasing trend of cardiovascular incidence and changes in the risk factor conditions have been observed in recent years. This article provides an overview of knowledge translation and its importance in the cardiovascular health of the Japanese population, and describes the key steps of a typical knowledge translation strategy.

  12. Eliciting and Applying Local Research Knowledge for Peacebuilding ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    gs

    Carnegie Corporation of New York (CCNY) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) are pleased to announce a jointly-funded research initiative Eliciting and Applying Local Research. Knowledge for Peacebuilding and Statebuilding. The research initiative seeks to increase the level of recognition and ...

  13. [Databases for surgical specialists in Cancún, Quintana Roo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contla-Hosking, Jorge Eduardo; Ceballos-Martínez, Zoila Inés; Peralta-Bahena, Mónica Esther

    2004-01-01

    Our aim was to identify the level of knowledge of surgical health-area specialists in Cancún, Quintana Roo, Mexico, from the personal productivity database. We carried out an investigation of 37 surgical specialists: 24 belonged to the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), while 13 belonged to the Mexican Health Secretariat (SSA). In our research, we found that 61% of surgical health-area specialist physicians were familiar with some aspects of the institutional surgical registry, including the following: 54% knew of the existence of a personal registry of surgeries carried out, and 43% keep a record of their personal activities. From the latter percentage, 69% of surgical health-area specialist physicians mentioned keeping their records manually, while 44% used the computer. Results of the research suggest that these physicians would like to have some kind of record of the surgeries carried out by each. An important percentage of these specialists do not keep a personal record on a database; due to this lack of knowledge, we obtain incorrect information in institutional records of the reality of what is actually done. We consider it important to inform surgical specialists concerning the existence of personal institutional records in database form or even of record done manually, as well as correct terminology for the International Codification (CIE-9 & 10). We inform here of the need to encourage a culture in records and databases in the formative stage of surgeon specialists.

  14. Knowledge Exchange: selecting research opportunities through estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudd, Peter; Fowler-Davis, Sally; Evans, Laura; Mawson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    A systematic way to select new ideas for research and development between two organisations is reported. It was applied to ideas that were generated from acute clinical settings by Occupational Therapists with a view to collaborate with nearby university academics from many disciplines. The process, assessment factors, use of ordinal scales with thresholding and an arbitrary formula are described. Challenges in the approach are discussed. Suitability for use by others in the AT field, other care related or even very different contexts is noted with some adaption and caveats.

  15. Relation Analysis of Knowledge Management, Research, and Innovation in University Research Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyder Paez-Logreira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a competitive advantage for companies. Knowledge Management helps to keep this competitiveness. Universities face with challenges in research, innovation and international competitiveness. The purpose of this paper includes studying Knowledge Management Models, and Innovation Models apply to Research Groups of Universities, through an analysis of relation in inter-organizational level. Some researchers and leaders of research groups participated in a survey about knowledge management and innovation. Here we show the relationship between knowledge management, innovation and research, including processes and operations performed by universities around these. We organize the results in three dimensions: Knowledge Management perception, the relationship between Knowledge Management and Innovation, and Strategic Knowledge organization. Too, we identify a generality of good practices, challenges, and limitations on Research Groups for Knowledge Management.

  16. Contemporary HIV/AIDS research: Insights from knowledge management theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Chris William

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge management as a field is concerned with the management of knowledge, including the management of knowledge in research processes. Knowledge management theory has the potential to support research into problems such as HIV, antibiotic resistance and others, particularly in terms of aspects of scientific research related to the contribution of social science. To date, however, these challenges remain with us, and theoretical contributions that can complement natural science efforts to eradicate these problems are needed. This paper seeks to offer a theoretical contribution grounded in Kuhn's paradigm theory of innovation, and in the argument by Lakatos that scientific research can be fundamentally non-innovative, which suggests that social science aspects of knowledge creation may hold the key to more effective biomedical innovation. Given the consequences of ongoing and emerging global crises, and the failure of knowledge systems of scientific research to solve such problems outright, this paper provides a review of theory and literature arguing for a new paradigm in scientific research, based on the development of global systems to maximise research collaborations. A global systems approach effectively includes social science theory development as an important complement to the natural sciences research process. Arguably, information technology and social media technology have developed to the point at which solutions to knowledge aggregation challenges can enable solutions to knowledge problems on a scale hitherto unimaginable. Expert and non-expert crowdsourced inputs can enable problem-solving through exponentially increasing problem-solving inputs, using the 'crowd,' thereby increasing collaborations dramatically. It is argued that these developments herald a new era of participatory research, or a democratisation of research, which offers new hope for solving global social problems. This paper seeks to contribute to this end, and to the recognition

  17. Reflexively exploring knowledge and power in collaborative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Phillips, Louise Jane; Pedersen, Christina Hee

    will be designed in order to stimulate dialogue across different analytical perspectives and empirical research. The analytical perspectives on which facilitation will be based are rooted in social constructionist approaches to dialogic communication theory and action research. The challenges of collaborative...... knowledge forms, knowledge interests and wishes as to the research outcome. In official policy discourse and research practices, a positive picture is often painted of dialogue as a site for mutual learning on the basis of the different knowledge forms that the different participants bring with them...... of mutual learning. There are also tensions between processes of opening up for a plurality of knowledges and processes of closure in order to achieve strategic ends in the form of some kind of outcome. The basic premise underpinning this workshop is that we as researchers can best deal...

  18. Spatial support of knowledge production in higher education: Research paper

    OpenAIRE

    van Sprang, H; Groen, BH; van der Voordt, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of the physical and social dimensions of the work environment on satisfaction and perceived productivity of knowledge workers in Dutch universities of applied sciences. The approach took the form of a literature review, multiple case study of six research centres using interviews and logbook analysis, and web-based survey (N = 188). Optimally facilitating knowledge production requires both space for concentration (to support internalisation of knowledge) and spa...

  19. Knowledge translation in rehabilitation engineering research and development: a knowledge ecosystem framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Tom; Moghimi, Saba; Popovic, Milos R

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation engineering is concerned with technology innovations and technology-mediated treatments for the improvement of quality of care and quality of life of individuals with disability. Unlike many other fields of health research, the knowledge translation (KT) cycle of rehabilitation engineering research and development (R&D) is often considered incomplete until a technology product or technology-facilitated therapy is available to target clientele. As such, the KT journey of rehabilitation engineering R&D is extremely challenging, necessarily involving knowledge exchange among numerous players across multiple sectors. In this article, we draw on recent literature about the knowledge trichotomy in technology-based rehabilitation R&D and propose a knowledge ecosystem to frame the rehabilitation engineering KT process from need to product. Identifying the principal process of the ecosystem as one of knowledge flow, we elucidate the roles of repository and networked knowledge, identify key consumers and producers in a trinity of communities of practice, and draw on knowledge management literature to describe different knowledge flows. The article concludes with instantiations of this knowledge ecosystem for 2 local rehabilitation engineering research-development-commercialization endeavors. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing Knowledge Sharing and Research Collaboration among Academics: The Role of Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Christine Nya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Although knowledge sharing (KS) has been acknowledged as important, universities face issues that may hinder active sharing among its faculty members such as the absence of trust among its members or insufficient incentives rewarded to those who deserved it. The aim of this research is to focus on the impact of knowledge management (KM) factors in…

  1. Research and Development Knowledge Transfer across National Cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiessen, M.; Hendriks, P.H.J.; Essers, C.; Pauleen, David J.

    2007-01-01

    With the increased tendency of multinational corporations (MNCs) to disperse their research and development (R&D) activities over various countries, the integration of the dispersed R&D knowledge via knowledge transfer across cultural borders becomes crucial for understanding and managing MNCs. The

  2. Drug knowledge bases and their applications in biomedical informatics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjun; Elemento, Olivier; Pathak, Jyotishman; Wang, Fei

    2018-01-03

    Recent advances in biomedical research have generated a large volume of drug-related data. To effectively handle this flood of data, many initiatives have been taken to help researchers make good use of them. As the results of these initiatives, many drug knowledge bases have been constructed. They range from simple ones with specific focuses to comprehensive ones that contain information on almost every aspect of a drug. These curated drug knowledge bases have made significant contributions to the development of efficient and effective health information technologies for better health-care service delivery. Understanding and comparing existing drug knowledge bases and how they are applied in various biomedical studies will help us recognize the state of the art and design better knowledge bases in the future. In addition, researchers can get insights on novel applications of the drug knowledge bases through a review of successful use cases. In this study, we provide a review of existing popular drug knowledge bases and their applications in drug-related studies. We discuss challenges in constructing and using drug knowledge bases as well as future research directions toward a better ecosystem of drug knowledge bases. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Introducing a model incorporating early integration of specialist palliative care: A qualitative research study of staff's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Natasha; O'Callaghan, Clare; Brooker, Joanne E; Walker, Helen; Hiscock, Richard; Phillips, David

    2016-03-01

    Palliative care has evolved to encompass early integration, with evaluation of patient and organisational outcomes. However, little is known of staff's experiences and adaptations when change occurs within palliative care services. To explore staff experiences of a transition from a service predominantly focused on end-of-life care to a specialist service encompassing early integration. Qualitative research incorporating interviews, focus groups and anonymous semi-structured questionnaires. Data were analysed using a comparative approach. Service activity data were also aggregated. A total of 32 medical, nursing, allied health and administrative staff serving a 22-bed palliative care unit and community palliative service, within a large health service. Patients cared for within the new model were significantly more likely to be discharged home (7.9% increase, p = 0.003) and less likely to die in the inpatient unit (10.4% decrease, p management was considered valuable, nurses particularly found additional skill expectations challenging, and perceived patients' acute care needs as detracting from emotional and end-of-life care demands. Staff views varied on whether they regarded the new model's faster-paced work-life as consistent with fundamental palliative care principles. Less certainty about care goals, needing to prioritise care tasks, reduced shared support rituals and other losses could intensify stress, leading staff to develop personalised coping strategies. Services introducing and researching innovative models of palliative care need to ensure adequate preparation, maintenance of holistic care principles in faster work-paced contexts and assist staff dealing with demands associated with caring for patients at different stages of illness trajectories. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Research in education and concepts of knowledge: the production of knowledge in question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida, Natalia Regina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of knowledge in education, discussion about the treatment given to its definition as a field, investigative object and different possibilities theoretical-methodological, epistemological, was frequent in the last decades of the twentieth century. In this perspective, the aspects that relate to the process of construction and production of research in the field of education and knowledge of different theoretical and methodological possibilities deserve more theoretical and conceptual investment. Thus, this paper, from the literature, aims to present a brief discussion of the different conceptions of knowledge in the construction of research in the field of knowledge in education and two theoretical and methodological positions the practice of educational research. As a final consideration, the intention of this article is not to exhaust the issue in question, for there are many issues that permeate the practice of educational research.

  5. Research Knowledge Transfer through Business-Driven Student Assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Sas, Corina

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a knowledge transfer method which capitalises on both research and teaching dimensions of academic work. It also proposes a framework for evaluating the impact of such a method on the involved stakeholders.

  6. Resident physician's knowledge and attitudes toward biostatistics and research methods concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Sami H; Aba Al-Khail, Bahaa A

    2015-10-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes of resident physicians toward biostatistics and research methodology concepts. We conducted a cross-sectional study between November 2014 and October 2014 at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all participants. The response rate was 90%. One hundred sixty-two resident completed the questionnaire. Most residents were well-informed in basic concepts, such as, "P" values, study power, and case control studies; more than half had confidence in interpreting the results of scientific papers. Conversely, more than 67% of the residents were not knowledgeable on more sophisticated terms in biostatistics. Residents with previous training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) (p=0.05) and non-specialist residents (p=0.003) were more likely to have better knowledge scores. Females (p=0.003), and those with previous training in biostatistics and epidemiology had positive attitude toward biostatistics (p less than 0.001 in both cases). Residents who read medical journals scored lower than those who never read journals (p=0.001). Prior courses in EBM, as well as male gender were associated with knowledge scores. Reinforcing training after graduation from medical school with special focus on integrating biostatistics with epidemiology and research methods is needed.

  7. The Sydney West Knowledge Portal: Evaluating the Growth of a Knowledge Portal to Support Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Anna; Robinson, Tracy Elizabeth; Provan, Pamela; Shaw, Tim

    2016-06-29

    The Sydney West Translational Cancer Research Centre is an organization funded to build capacity for translational research in cancer. Translational research is essential for ensuring the integration of best available evidence into practice and for improving patient outcomes. However, there is a low level of awareness regarding what it is and how to conduct it optimally. One solution to addressing this gap is the design and deployment of web-based knowledge portals to disseminate new knowledge and engage with and connect dispersed networks of researchers. A knowledge portal is an web-based platform for increasing knowledge dissemination and management in a specialized area. To measure the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal for increasing individual awareness of translational research and to build organizational capacity for the delivery of translational research projects in cancer. An adaptive methodology was used to capture the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal in cancer. This involved stakeholder consultations to inform initial design of the portal. Once the portal was live, site analytics were reviewed to evaluate member usage of the portal and to measure growth in membership. Knowledge portal membership grew consistently for the first 18 months after deployment, before leveling out. Analysis of site metrics revealed members were most likely to visit portal pages with community-generated content, particularly pages with a focus on translational research. This was closely followed by pages that disseminated educational material about translational research. Preliminary data from this study suggest that knowledge portals may be beneficial tools for translating new evidence and fostering an environment of communication and collaboration.

  8. Knowledge Exchange and Management Research: Barriers and Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The growing involvement of management researchers in knowledge exchange activities and collaborative research does not seem to be reflected in a growing academic output. The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers for academic output from these activities as well as the potential...... for ‘interesting’ papers. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses secondary data and statistics as well as an illustrative case study to trace knowledge exchange activities and barriers for academic output based on these activities. Findings: The paper identifies a number of barriers for the turning of data...... derived from knowledge exchange activities and Mode 2 research into academic papers such as low priority of case study research in leading management journals, a growing practice orientation in the research funding systems, methodological challenges due to limited researcher control, and disincentives...

  9. Research governance and scientific knowledge production in The Gambia

    OpenAIRE

    Frederick U. Ozor

    2014-01-01

    Public research institutions and scientists are principal actors in the production and transfer of scientific knowledge, technologies and innovations for application in industry as well for social and economic development. Based on the relevance of science and technology actors, the aim of this study was to identify and explain factors in research governance that influence scientific knowledge production and to contribute to empirical discussions on the impact levels of different governance m...

  10. Building Virtual Collaborative Research Community Using Knowledge Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ling Shih

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many online communities nowadays are emphasized more on peer interactions and information sharing among members; very few online communities are built with knowledge management in nature supported by knowledge management system (KMS. This study aims to present a community of practice on how to effectively adopt a knowledge management system (KMS to neutralize a cyber collaborative learning community for a research lab in a higher education setting. A longitudinal case for 7 years was used to analyze the retention and extension of participants‟ community of practice experiences. Interviews were conducted for the comparison between experiences and theories. It was found that the transformations of tacit and explicit knowledge are in accordance with the framework of Nonaka‟s model of knowledge management from which we elicit the strategies and suggestions to the adoption and implementation of virtual collaborative research community supported by KMS.

  11. Empirical Research on Spatial Diffusion Process of Knowledge Spillovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuehui

    2018-02-01

    Firstly, this paper gave a brief review of the core issues of previous studies on spatial distribution of knowledge spillovers. That laid the theoretical foundation for further research. Secondly, this paper roughly described the diffusion process of solar patents in Bejing-Tianjin-Hebei and the Pearl River Delta regions by means of correlation analysis based on patent information of the application date and address of patentee. After that, this paper introduced the variables of spatial distance, knowledge absorptive capacity, knowledge gap and pollution control and built the empirical model of patent, and then collecting data to test them. The results showed that knowledge absorptive capacity was the most significant factor than the other three, followed by the knowledge gap. The influence of spatial distance on knowledge spillovers was limited and the most weak influence factor was pollution control.

  12. Connecting the Dots: Understanding the Flow of Research Knowledge within a Research Brokering Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Networks are frequently cited as an important knowledge mobilization strategy; however, there is little empirical research that considers how they connect research and practice. Taking a social network perspective, I explore how central office personnel find, understand and share research knowledge within a research brokering network. This mixed…

  13. Knowledge Integration and Inter-Disciplinary Communication in Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn Heidi Ann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a plenary talk at WMSCI 2012 entitled "Planning for Action Research: Looking at Practice through a Different Lens," this author asserted that behavioral science practitioners, often "back into" action research – they start out doing a process improvement or intervention and discover something along the way, i.e., generalizable knowledge, that seems worthwhile to share with their community of practice. It was further asserted that, had the efforts been conceived of as research from the outset, the contributions to the body of knowledge would be more robust and the utility of the projects would improve as well. This paper continues on that theme. Action research and process improvement methods are briefly described and compared. A comparison of two Los Alamos National Laboratory engineering ethics training projects – one developed using a process improvement framework, the other using an action research framework – is put forth to provide evidence that use of a research "lens" can enhance behavioral science interventions and the knowledge that may result from them. The linkage between the Specifying Learning and Diagnosing stages of the Action Research Cycle provides one mechanism for integrating the knowledge gained into the product or process being studied and should provide a reinforcing loop that leads to continual improvement. The collaborative relationships among researchers and the individual, group, or organization that is the subject of the imp rovement op p ortunity (the "client", who are likely from very different backgrounds, and the interpretive epistemology that are among the hallmarks of action research also contribute to the quality of the knowledge gained. This paper closes with a discussion of how Inter-Disciplinary Communication is embedded within the action research paradigm and how this likely also enriches the knowledge gained.

  14. Community Music Knowledge Exchange Research in Scottish Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nikki; Loening, Gica

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the usefulness of Knowledge Exchange (KE) funding streams for higher education community music research projects, with a case study of one particular project that took place between February and April 2010. The project was funded via a KE stream, linking University researchers with a well-established community music charity…

  15. Research on an Agricultural Knowledge Fusion Method for Big Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengfu Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The object of our research is to develop an ontology-based agricultural knowledge fusion method that can be used as a comprehensive basis on which to solve agricultural information inconsistencies, analyze data, and discover new knowledge. A recent survey has provided a detailed comparison of various fusion methods used with Deep Web data (Li, 2013. In this paper, we propose an effective agricultural ontology-based knowledge fusion method by leveraging recent advances in data fusion, such as the semantic web and big data technologies, that will enhance the identification and fusion of new and existing data sets to make big data analytics more possible. We provide a detailed fusion method that includes agricultural ontology building, fusion rule construction, an evaluation module, etc. Empirical results show that this knowledge fusion method is useful for knowledge discovery.

  16. Applying Qualitative Research Methods to Narrative Knowledge Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Brian; Riedl, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We propose a methodology for knowledge engineering for narrative intelligence systems, based on techniques used to elicit themes in qualitative methods research. Our methodology uses coding techniques to identify actions in natural language corpora, and uses these actions to create planning operators and procedural knowledge, such as scripts. In an iterative process, coders create a taxonomy of codes relevant to the corpus, and apply those codes to each element of that corpus. These codes can...

  17. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R and D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects including transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management to R and D project managers and other workers from nuclear R and D organizations.

  18. Knowledge Management for Nuclear Research and Development Organizations (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication elaborates on the role of nuclear knowledge management in a research and development (R&D) context, and on the importance of facilitating innovation and future development of nuclear technologies for nuclear power, its associated fuel cycles, and nuclear applications in medicine, industry and agriculture. It highlights aspects such as transferring and preserving knowledge, exchanging information, establishing and supporting cooperative networks, and training the next generation of nuclear experts. It concludes with basic concepts, trends and key drivers for nuclear knowledge management for R&D project managers and other workers from nuclear R&D organizations.

  19. Research into the development of a knowledge acquisition taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Pamela K.; Herren, L. Tandy

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the research was on the development of a problem solving taxonomy that can support and direct the knowledge engineering process during the development of an intelligent tutoring system. The results of the research are necessarily general. Being only a small initial attempt at a fundamental problem in artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology, the process has had to be bootstrapped and the results can only provide pointers to further, more formal research designs.

  20. A Knowledge Management Technology Architecture for Educational Research Organisations: Scaffolding Research Projects and Workflow Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar; Hedberg, John G.

    2005-01-01

    There is growing recognition that the economic climate of the world is shifting towards a knowledge-based economy where knowledge will be cherished as the most prized asset. In this regard, technology can be leveraged as a useful tool in effectually managing the knowledge capital of an organisation. Although several research studies have advanced…

  1. Knowledge of the Nigerian Code of Health Research Ethics Among Biomedical Researchers in Southern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunrin, Olubunmi A; Daniel, Folasade; Ansa, Victor

    2016-12-01

    Responsibility for protection of research participants from harm and exploitation rests on Research Ethics Committees and principal investigators. The Nigerian National Code of Health Research Ethics defines responsibilities of stakeholders in research so its knowledge among researchers will likely aid ethical conduct of research. The levels of awareness and knowledge of the Code among biomedical researchers in southern Nigerian research institutions was assessed. Four institutions were selected using a stratified random sampling technique. Research participants were selected by purposive sampling and completed a pre-tested structured questionnaire. A total of 102 biomedical researchers completed the questionnaires. Thirty percent of the participants were aware of the National Code though 64% had attended at least one training seminar in research ethics. Twenty-five percent had a fairly acceptable knowledge (scores 50%-74%) and 10% had excellent knowledge of the code (score ≥75%). Ninety-five percent expressed intentions to learn more about the National Code and agreed that it is highly relevant to the ethical conduct of research. Awareness and knowledge of the Code were found to be very limited among biomedical researchers in southern Nigeria. There is need to improve awareness and knowledge through ethics seminars and training. Use of existing Nigeria-specific online training resources is also encouraged.

  2. Find an Endocrinology - Thyroid Specialist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History Resource Center Patients Thyroid Information Find an Endocrinology – Thyroid Specialist Patient Support Links Clinical Thyroidology for ... Access Thyroid Online Access Clinical Thyroidology Online Video Endocrinology Donate Give Online Research Accomplishments Ridgway Legacy Fund ...

  3. Constructing a research network: accounting knowledge in production

    OpenAIRE

    Joannides , Vassili; Berland , Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Avec Nicolas Berland; International audience; Purpose - This paper contributes to the sociology-of-science type of accounting literature, addressing how accounting knowledge is established, advanced and extended. Design/methodology/approach - The research question is answered through the example of research into linkages between accounting and religion. Adopting an Actor-Network Theory (ANT) approach, we follow the actors involved in the construction of accounting as an academic discipline th...

  4. Knowledge basis in safety culture for researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira Neto, Antonio S.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Goncalves, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main characteristics of the knowledge basis in safety culture which is being developed at the IPEN-CNEN/SP, one of the Brazilian nuclear institutes of research. The main objective of this basis is to organize the information about safety culture found in the literature and to make it available to researchers and practitioners. The first stage of the development of this basis is already finished being the subject of this work. (author)

  5. Spatial support of knowledge production in higher education : Research paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sprang, H; Groen, BH; van der Voordt, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of the physical and social dimensions of the work environment on satisfaction and perceived productivity of knowledge workers in Dutch universities of applied sciences. The approach took the form of a literature review, multiple case study of six research centres using

  6. Teen Pregnancy and Education: Politics of Knowledge, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Wanda

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the politics surrounding the education of pregnant/mothering students. Utilizing Title IX, which guarantees the rights of pregnant/mothering students to an education equal to her peers, as an analytical lens, the author specifically identifies how absences in knowledge, research, and practice about the education of…

  7. Enhancing Canadian Civil Society Research and Knowledge-Based ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Enhancing Canadian Civil Society Research and Knowledge-Based Practice in a Rapidly Changing Landscape for International Development ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and ...

  8. A Metadata based Knowledge Discovery Methodology for Seeding Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Cartik R; Payne, Philip R O

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a semantic, metadata based knowledge discovery methodology for identifying teams of researchers from diverse backgrounds who can collaborate on interdisciplinary research projects: projects in areas that have been identified as high-impact areas at The Ohio State University. This methodology involves the semantic annotation of keywords and the postulation of semantic metrics to improve the efficiency of the path exploration algorithm as well as to rank the results. Results indicate that our methodology can discover groups of experts from diverse areas who can collaborate on translational research projects.

  9. Certification of the instructional competence of nuclear training specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollert, T.N.

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to identify the qualification requirements and the means to assess the unique knowledge and skills necessary to perform the instructional activities needed by nuclear training specialist at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. A survey questionnaire with 233 task statements categorized into eleven duty areas was distributed to twenty-three nuclear training specialists at Fort Saint Vrain Nuclear Generating Station. On the basis of the data accumulated for this study, the researcher identified the following findings. A list of 158 task statements were identified as being relevant; this list was considered a core knowledge, skills, and abilities needed as a nuclear training specialist. The list consisted of ten duty areas which were relevant to the effective performance of a nuclear training specialist. Thirty-three task statements were identified as being relevant for the duty area Conductive Training. These were considered the core of knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in the development of the initial test instrument and the instructor classroom skills observation checklist. The significant correlation between the results of these two instruments, using a rank-order correlation coefficient, was interpreted by the researcher as indicating that the initial test instrument possessed concurrent validity. The researcher interpreted the reliability value as a positive indicator that the initial test instrument demonstrated internal consistency. It was concluded that it could be determined whether personnel possessed the level of competence needed to perform the instructional duties of a nuclear training specialist by using a written test. Data from this research supported the use of the initial test developed for this study as a valid means to certify nuclear training specialists for the duty area Conducting Training

  10. Profession based research through Action research. Framing knowledge production in an interdisciplinary perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum; Bladt, Mette; Husted, Mia

    to work on tendencies to privilege some types of knowledge above others when it comes to knowledge production and research processes. The participatory worldview mandates action researchers to consider participants as a collaborative resource and agents of cyclical transformation who bring to the table...... practical knowledge and experience about situations while the recurring pattern of reflection, analysis and action contributes to the constant evolution and redefinition of the original goal. Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources Used This paper is a theoretical reflection on actions...... will be an reflection on action research and participatory research processes as an asvwer to developing a vocational research practice that goes beyond quantitative an qualitative methodologies and into to research as an research and development process. References Bladt, M. (2012): Frirum og værksteder I Duus m...

  11. KNOWLEDGE FROM RESEARCH AS A QUASI-PUBLIC GOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila György

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a special quasi-public good which is delivered by several types of institutions, including public and private universities. Knowledge to be produced in bigger quantities, the state should contribute with budgetary financial support as subsidies or grants to cover a part of expenses. States are supporting research from public resources, especially the basic research which enjoy a smaller interest from the private research units due its small potential to be implemented and recovered throughout price. Public co-founding of research generates problems regarding the regime of patents’ ownership because financing bodies have divergent opinion regarding the utility of research in society’s development. There are different approaches offered in solving this problem, taking into account the forms of realizing this quasi-public good, approaches based especially on different type of joint-ventures. Academic research, perceived as a very important and income generating activity, is done in a very large scale of combinations between universities and private entities. These complicated relations generates information asymmetry specific to principal-agent relations in economy. The control of information asymmetry level is important because a high level corresponds to inefficient use of funds and smaller satisfaction of general needs.

  12. Research governance and scientific knowledge production in The Gambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick U. Ozor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Public research institutions and scientists are principal actors in the production and transfer of scientific knowledge, technologies and innovations for application in industry as well for social and economic development. Based on the relevance of science and technology actors, the aim of this study was to identify and explain factors in research governance that influence scientific knowledge production and to contribute to empirical discussions on the impact levels of different governance models and structures. These discussions appear limited and mixed in the literature, although still are ongoing. No previous study has examined the possible contribution of the scientific committee model of research governance to scientific performance at the individual level of the scientist. In this context, this study contributes to these discussions, firstly, by suggesting that scientific committee structures with significant research steering autonomy could contribute not only directly to scientific output but also indirectly through moderating effects on research practices. Secondly, it is argued that autonomous scientific committee structures tend to play a better steering role than do management-centric models and structures of research governance.

  13. Knowledge-based View in the Franchising Research Literature

    OpenAIRE

    TSAI, Fu-Sheng; KUO, Chin-Chiung; LIU, Chi-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract. This study was conducted to understand the state of research on applications of Knowledge-based View in franchise systems. First, we used SALSA (Search, Appraisal, Synthesis, and Analysis), a simple systematic data search method, to obtain 61 sample papers. Second, the citations of authors and publications were analyzed using the bibliometric method to understand the authors and the publications that had the most impact as well as the trend of current studies in the field of knowled...

  14. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining in Iran's Climatic Researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    Advances in measurement technology and data collection is the database gets larger. Large databases require powerful tools for analysis data. Iterative process of acquiring knowledge from information obtained from data processing is done in various forms in all scientific fields. However, when the data volume large, and many of the problems the Traditional methods cannot respond. in the recent years, use of databases in various scientific fields, especially atmospheric databases in climatology expanded. in addition, increases in the amount of data generated by the climate models is a challenge for analysis of it for extraction of hidden pattern and knowledge. The approach to this problem has been made in recent years uses the process of knowledge discovery and data mining techniques with the use of the concepts of machine learning, artificial intelligence and expert (professional) systems is overall performance. Data manning is analytically process for manning in massive volume data. The ultimate goal of data mining is access to information and finally knowledge. climatology is a part of science that uses variety and massive volume data. Goal of the climate data manning is Achieve to information from variety and massive atmospheric and non-atmospheric data. in fact, Knowledge Discovery performs these activities in a logical and predetermined and almost automatic process. The goal of this research is study of uses knowledge Discovery and data mining technique in Iranian climate research. For Achieve This goal, study content (descriptive) analysis and classify base method and issue. The result shown that in climatic research of Iran most clustering, k-means and wards applied and in terms of issues precipitation and atmospheric circulation patterns most introduced. Although several studies in geography and climate issues with statistical techniques such as clustering and pattern extraction is done, Due to the nature of statistics and data mining, but cannot say for

  15. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  16. Research and production of knowledge in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldaíza Sposati

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns research paths in the field of Social Work. It begins with the polemic concerning the potential and ability of Social Work as a social practice to produce knowledge. It revives the debate concerning the "war of the sciences" between physicists and mathematicians with social analysts, in which the later do not recognize the scientific dimension of research in the social realm. It analyzes the growth of scientific production in Social Work through dissertations and theses in the Graduate Social Work Program. To do so it comments on the analyses of Iamamoto, Silva and Silva and Carvalho and indicates the need to establish a research policy, orient the epistemic community in Social Work and organize a network of researchers centers.

  17. Knowledge Translation Research: The Science of Moving Research into Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hayden, Jill A.; Campbell, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Research findings will not change health outcomes unless health care organizations, systems, and professionals adopt them in practice. Knowledge translation research is the scientific study of the methods to promote the uptake of research findings by patients, health care providers, managers, and policy makers. Many forms of enquiry addressing…

  18. Knowledge, loyalty and the dividual corporate researcher body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Perle; Simonsen, Anja

    It could be assumed that in order to analyze a complex and highly contentious assemblage such as a border world where a multitude of different actors, technological practices, epistemes, and political, commercial and individual interests are at play, nothing would be more obvious than a collabora...... a dividual corporate researcher body where positions can be upheld and where knowledge can be protected because not shared. As a result, our corporate researcher body becomes dividual, a body with organs that operate independently of each other....... on at the border, where some people try to filter movement and manage flows while others try to circumvent or breach such filters, and where biometric technologies are taken into use and altered for both purposes, we could operate through a simple division of knowledge labour. We are thus doing as a group what we...... maintain a checkpoint somewhere along the Schengen border. And we learn things about our interlocutors’ ruses and stratagems. For example about profiling socks. And about where to buy a “clean fake” passport. And we come to question the obviousness of sharing knowledge. In this paper we analyze the chains...

  19. STEM learning research through a funds of knowledge lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil, Marta

    2016-03-01

    This article examines STEM learning as a cultural process with a focus on non-dominant communities. Building on my work in funds of knowledge and mathematics education, I present three vignettes to raise some questions around connections between in-school and out-of-school mathematics. How do we define competence? How do task and environment affect engagement? What is the role of affect, language, and cognition in different settings? These vignettes serve to highlight the complexity of moving across different domains of STEM practice—everyday life, school, and STEM disciplines. Based on findings from occupational interviews I discuss characteristics of learning and engaging in everyday practices and propose several areas for further research, including the nature of everyday STEM practices, valorization of knowledge, language choice, and different forms of engagement.

  20. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets.

  1. Staying Engaged: Knowledge and Research Needs in Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Te; Degol, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we review knowledge about student engagement and look ahead to the future of study in this area. We begin by describing how researchers in the field define and study student engagement. In particular, we describe the levels, contexts, and dimensions that constitute the measurement of engagement, summarize the contexts that shape engagement and the outcomes that result from it, and articulate person-centered approaches for analyzing engagement. We conclude by addressing limitations to the research and providing recommendations for study. Specifically, we point to the importance of incorporating more work on how learning-related emotions, personality characteristics, prior learning experiences, shared values across contexts, and engagement in nonacademic activities influence individual differences in student engagement. We also stress the need to improve our understanding of the nuances involved in developing engagement over time by incorporating more extensive longitudinal analyses, intervention trials, research on affective neuroscience, and interactions among levels and dimensions of engagement. PMID:27087833

  2. How should we assess knowledge translation in research organizations; designing a knowledge translation self-assessment tool for research institutes (SATORI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Jaleh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Nedjat, Sima; Maleki, Katayoun; Ashoorkhani, Mahnaz; Yazdizadeh, Bahareh

    2011-02-22

    The knowledge translation self-assessment tool for research institutes (SATORI) was designed to assess the status of knowledge translation in research institutes. The objective was, to identify the weaknesses and strengths of knowledge translation in research centres and faculties associated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). The tool, consisting of 50 statements in four main domains, was used in 20 TUMS-affiliated research centres and departments after its reliability was established. It was completed in a group discussion by the members of the research council, researchers and research users' representatives from each centre and/or department. The mean score obtained in the four domains of 'The question of research', 'Knowledge production', 'Knowledge transfer' and 'Promoting the use of evidence' were 2.26, 2.92, 2 and 1.89 (out of 5) respectively.Nine out of 12 interventional priorities with the lowest quartile score were related to knowledge transfer resources and strategies, whereas eight of them were in the highest quartile and related to 'The question of research' and 'Knowledge production'. The self-assessment tool identifies the gaps in capacity and infrastructure of knowledge translation support within research organizations. Assessment of research institutes using SATORI pointed out that strengthening knowledge translation through provision of financial support for knowledge translation activities, creating supportive and facilitating infrastructures, and facilitating interactions between researchers and target audiences to exchange questions and research findings are among the priorities of research centres and/or departments.

  3. Maintenance and methods of forming theoretical knowledge and methodical and practical abilities in area of physical culture for students, future specialists on social work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyfa A.V.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The value of theoretical knowledge, methodical, practical studies, skills in forming physical activity of students is rotined. The level of mastering of components of physical activity is closely associate with the basic blocks of professional preparation of students and their future professional activity. Theoretical knowledge on discipline the «Physical culture» assist the certain affecting depth and breadth of mastering of knowledge of professional preparation.

  4. Addressing cultural diversity: the hepatitis B clinical specialist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack; Smith, Elizabeth; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Richmond, Jacqueline; Lucke, Jayne

    2017-08-31

    Hepatitis B is a viral infection primarily affecting people from culturally diverse communities in Australia. While vaccination prevents infection, there is increasing mortality resulting from liver damage associated with chronic infection. Deficits in the national policy and clinical response to hepatitis B result in a low diagnosis rate, inadequate testing and diagnosis processes, and poor access to hepatitis B treatment services. While research identifies inadequate hepatitis B knowledge among people with the virus and primary health care workers, this project sought to identify how specialist clinicians in Australia negotiate cultural diversity, and provide often complex clinical information to people with hepatitis B. A vignette was developed and presented to thirteen viral hepatitis specialist clinicians prior to an electronically recorded interview. Recruitment continued until saturation of themes was reached. Data were thematically coded into themes outlined in the interview schedule. Ethical approval for the research was provided by the La Trobe University Human Research Ethics Committee. Key messages provided to patients with hepatitis B by clinical specialists were identified. These messages were not consistently provided to all patients with hepatitis B, but were determined on perceptions of patient knowledge, age and highest educational level. While the vignette stated that English was not an issue for the patient, most specialists identified the need for an interpreter. Combating stigma related to hepatitis B was seen as important by the specialists and this was done through normalising the virus. Having an awareness of different cultural understandings about hepatitis B specifically, and health and well-being generally, was noted as a communication strategy. Key core competencies need to be developed to deliver educational messages to people with hepatitis B within clinical encounters. The provision of adequate resources to specialist clinics will

  5. Transferring knowledge and know-how from the nuclear power community to the research reactor community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijtsma, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Question What is the best way of transferring knowledge and know-how from the nuclear power community to the research reactor community, e.g. in the fields of quality assurance, safety culture, etc.? To answer the question on how to transfer knowledge and know-how from the nuclear power community to the research reactor community, one should first try to establish what are the differences and similarities between these types of nuclear facilities. Despite the big difference between the primary objectives of these two kinds of facilities, i.e. electricity production versus providing irradiation services, the underlying safety culture should be comparable. For historical reasons, nuclear power plant management took the lead in establishing fully accepted safety standards. However, research reactors can avail themselves of the wide body of nuclear safety experience accumulated at nuclear power plants. This should be applicable to all nuclear facilities. Nonetheless, in transferring their know-how, safety specialists should take into account the huge differences between critical assemblies, university reactors, small research reactors and multi-purpose high power research reactors. The goal to which a specific facility is dedicated bears heavily upon the outlook of its management Question: How can well run research reactors help problem research reactors? To answer this, a basic question should in turn be posed: Should one help a research reactor with operational difficulties? And, if so, to what extent? Who will benefit? Within the framework of this meeting, one should concentrate on nuclear safety, which is determined by: Safety culture (including quality assurance); The level of training of all staff; Ageing (installation, staff and documentation); The front/back end of the fuel cycle; A strong programme versus extended shutdown; Regulatory (nuclear regulatory) inspectorates; National (international) co-operation; The financial situation prevailing at the

  6. General Aspects and First Progress Report on a Frame of a Research on Specific Professional Knowledge of Chemistry Teachers Associated with the Notion of Chemical Nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Andrés Perafán Echeverri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of research about professional teacher’s knowledge, our business is to identify and to characterize with case study method, a kind of specific professional teacher´s knowledge of Chemistry professorate, associated to the chemical nomenclature notion. This kind of research guides the sight to the teaching contents, but it postulates the teacher as an essential actor of that knowledge, rather than ignore of the other actors (didactic community, researchers, specialists, students, etc. our research realizes the specific construction that the teacher makes, beyond the «spontaneous epistemologies» category, between others, which seems to deny an academic and discipline character of the built knowledge by the teachers. First, we show a brief reference to the research program on professional teacher´s knowledge which frames in the development of research line about Specific Professional Teacher´s Knowledge associated with Particular Categories, which belongs to the research group «Por las Aulas Colombianas- INVAUCOL». After that, we show a short justification about the choice of the particular category: chemical nomenclature, as a studied object, besides the historical importance that it has to the professional teaching consolidation, recognizing the teacher´s specific contributions to discipline body construction of school knowledge. Finally, weset in consideration some general methodological criteria defined in this research, and we show too, some preliminary reflections derived from field work in thepresent state of the project.

  7. Research on Knowledge Gap Recognition Mechanism of Virtual Industry Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Cheng

    2013-01-01

    As a new organizing form, VIC gets rid of regional limit of traditional cluster, realizing virtual space agglomeration which crossing space and time. Knowledge sharing and complementary is foundation to form VIC and be one of the main goals. As preparation of the knowledge transfer, recognizing and making up for knowledge gap did not caused most scholars' attention. This study argues that, knowledge gap recognition is the premise of knowledge transfer, combined with knowledge theories, the co...

  8. UK HSE Training of HM Radiation Specialist Inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nattres, E.; Barrett, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    HSE's mission is to ensure that risks to people's health and safety from work activities are properly controlled. Radiation Specialist Inspectors make an essential contribution to HSE's objectives through the application of their professional skills and knowledge. The role of the Radiation Specialist Inspector includes inspection work in the field to ensure compliance by employers with the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, Ionising Radiations Regulations 1999 and associated legislation. They also contribute to research, and the development of technical policy, legislation, standards, and guidance on protection against the possible harm from exposure to electromagnetic fields, optical or ionizing radiation. This paper explains how Radiation Specialist Inspectors are trained. It starts with the recruitment process, with an emphasis on recruiting people who have already gained relevant experience from radiation work practices in previous employments. The interview process is explored, which includes both technical and behavioural interviews, making a presentation and completing a personality questionnaire. The initial twelve months training is then discussed in detail, including the six months as a general Health and Safety Inspector where inspector' skills and techniques' are developed by practical involvement in inspection, followed by a challenging six months with a Radiation Specialist group. The programme for this period is designed to broaden and develop skills and knowledge within the radiation protection specialist. After the initial twelve months probationary period, new Inspectors are expected to confirm and establish themselves in their role of Radiation Specialist Inspectors. However, it does not end there, continuing professional development to ensure that Inspectors have cutting edge knowledge of the latest advances within the radiation field and health and safety as a whole is essential and will be discussed in more detail. (Author) 6 refs

  9. Research and Application of Knowledge Resources Network for Product Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users’ enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  10. Research and application of knowledge resources network for product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Li, Wen-qiang; Li, Yan; Na, Hui-zhen; Shi, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users' enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  11. Use of online knowledge resources by prominent South African researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Treptow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth in online knowledge resources has transformed information securing practices and effects have been especially pronounced for scientific journals. It has therefore become increasingly necessary to understand researchers’ information search and securing preferences. Leading South African researchers were indentified and invited to participate in a web- based survey to this end. Results indicate that electronic resources are favoured for journal articles, but not for books, and researchers commonly employ chaining and browsing behaviour to locate relevant journal articles. Full-text journals are favoured by researchers to undertake searches. These are favoured over other bibliographic databases and other federated searches (Google, Google Scholar and MetaLib. Analyses of the coverage of top rated journals by the two top rated full- text databases EBSCOhost and ScienceDirect reveals significantly lower coverage when compared with the coverage of top journals by the citation databases Scopus and Web of Science. Researchers should therefore make greater use of these resources to effectively locate relevant material.

  12. Scientometric trends and knowledge maps of global health systems research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiang; Chen, Kai; Yao, Lan; Lyu, Peng-hui; Yang, Tian-an; Luo, Fei; Chen, Shan-quan; He, Lu-yang; Liu, Zhi-yong

    2014-06-05

    In the last few decades, health systems research (HSR) has garnered much attention with a rapid increase in the related literature. This study aims to review and evaluate the global progress in HSR and assess the current quantitative trends. Based on data from the Web of Science database, scientometric methods and knowledge visualization techniques were applied to evaluate global scientific production and develop trends of HSR from 1900 to 2012. HSR has increased rapidly over the past 20 years. Currently, there are 28,787 research articles published in 3,674 journals that are listed in 140 Web of Science subject categories. The research in this field has mainly focused on public, environmental and occupational health (6,178, 21.46%), health care sciences and services (5,840, 20.29%), and general and internal medicine (3,783, 13.14%). The top 10 journals had published 2,969 (10.31%) articles and received 5,229 local citations and 40,271 global citations. The top 20 authors together contributed 628 papers, which accounted for a 2.18% share in the cumulative worldwide publications. The most productive author was McKee, from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, with 48 articles. In addition, USA and American institutions ranked the first in health system research productivity, with high citation times, followed by the UK and Canada. HSR is an interdisciplinary area. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries showed they are the leading nations in HSR. Meanwhile, American and Canadian institutions and the World Health Organization play a dominant role in the production, collaboration, and citation of high quality articles. Moreover, health policy and analysis research, health systems and sub-systems research, healthcare and services research, health, epidemiology and economics of communicable and non-communicable diseases, primary care research, health economics and health costs, and pharmacy of hospital have been identified as the

  13. Bipolar disorder research 2.0: Web technologies for research capacity and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Erin E; McBride, Sally; Barnes, Steven J; Wood, Chanel S; Khatri, Nasreen; Balram Elliott, Nusha; Parikh, Sagar V

    2017-12-01

    Current Web technologies offer bipolar disorder (BD) researchers many untapped opportunities for conducting research and for promoting knowledge exchange. In the present paper, we document our experiences with a variety of Web 2.0 technologies in the context of an international BD research network: The Collaborative RESearch Team to Study psychosocial issues in BD (CREST.BD). Three technologies were used as tools for enabling research within CREST.BD and for encouraging the dissemination of the results of our research: (1) the crestbd.ca website, (2) social networking tools (ie, Facebook, Twitter), and (3) several sorts of file sharing (ie YouTube, FileShare). For each Web technology, we collected quantitative assessments of their effectiveness (in reach, exposure, and engagement) over a 6-year timeframe (2010-2016). In general, many of our strategies were deemed successful for promoting knowledge exchange and other network goals. We discuss how we applied our Web analytics to inform adaptations and refinements of our Web 2.0 platforms to maximise knowledge exchange with people with BD, their supporters, and health care providers. We conclude with some general recommendations for other mental health researchers and research networks interested in pursuing Web 2.0 strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Research on application of knowledge engineering to nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Takeo; Kiyohashi, Satoshi

    1990-01-01

    Recently, the research on the software and hardware regarding knowledge engineering has been advanced eagerly. Especially the applicability of expert systems is high. When expert systems are introduced into nuclear power stations, it is necessary to make the plan for introduction based on the detailed knowledge on the works in nuclear power stations, and to improve the system repeatedly by adopting the opinion and request of those in charge upon the trial use. Tohoku Electric Power Co. was able to develop the expert system of practically usable scale 'Supporting system for deciding fuel movement procedure'. The survey and analysis of the works in nuclear power stations, the selection of the system to be developed and so on are reported. In No. 1 plant of Onagawa Nuclear Power Station of BWR type, up to 1/3 of the fuel is replaced at the time of the regular inspection. Some fuel must be taken to outside for ensuring the working space. The works of deciding fuel movement procedure, the development of the system and its evaluation are described. (K.I.)

  15. Research on knowledge support technology for product innovation design based on quality function knowledge deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the relationship between the process of product innovation design and knowledge, this article proposes a theoretical model of quality function knowledge deployment. In order to link up the product innovation design and the knowledge required by the designer, the iterative method of quality function knowledge deployment is refined, as well as the knowledge retrieval model and knowledge support model based on quality function knowledge deployment are established. In the whole life cycle of product design, in view of the different requirements for knowledge in conceptual design stage, components’ configuration stage, process planning stage, and production planning stage, the quality function knowledge deployment model could link up the required knowledge with the engineering characteristics, component characteristics, process characteristics, and production characteristics in the four stages using the mapping relationship between the function characteristics and the knowledge and help the designer to track the required knowledge for realizing product innovation design. In this article, an instance about rewinding machine is given to demonstrate the practicability and validity of product innovation design knowledge support technology based on quality function knowledge deployment.

  16. Knowledges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berling, Trine Villumsen

    2012-01-01

    Scientific knowledge in international relations has generally focused on an epistemological distinction between rationalism and reflectivism over the last 25 years. This chapter argues that this distinction has created a double distinction between theory/reality and theory/practice, which works...... and reflectivism. Bourdieu, on the contrary, lets the challenge to the theory/reality distinction spill over into a challenge to the theory/practice distinction by thrusting the scientist in the foreground as not just a factor (discourse/genre) but as an actor. In this way, studies of IR need to include a focus...... as a ghost distinction structuring IR research. While reflectivist studies have emphasised the impossibility of detached, objective knowledge production through a dissolution of the theory/reality distinction, the theory/practice distinction has been left largely untouched by both rationalism...

  17. Integrating Ecological and Social Knowledge: Learning from CHANS Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Shindler

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Scientists are increasingly called upon to integrate across ecological and social disciplines to tackle complex coupled human and natural system (CHANS problems. Integration of these disciplines is challenging and many scientists do not have experience with large integrated research projects. However, much can be learned about the complicated process of integration from such efforts. We document some of these lessons from a National Science Foundation-funded CHANS project (Forests, People, Fire and present considerations for developing and engaging in coupled human and natural system projects. Certainly we are not the first to undertake this endeavor, and many of our findings complement those of other research teams. We focus here on the process of coming together, learning to work as an integrated science team, and describe the challenges and opportunities of engaging stakeholders (agency personnel and citizen communities of interests in our efforts. Throughout this project our intention was to foster dialogue among diverse interests and, thus, incorporate this knowledge into uncovering primary social and ecological drivers of change. A primary tool was an agent-based model, Envision, that used this information in landscape simulation, visualization models, and scenario development. Although integration can be an end in itself, the proof of value in the approach can be the degree to which it provides new insights or tools to CHANS, including closer interaction among multiple stakeholders, that could not have been reached without it.

  18. Nanoinformatics knowledge infrastructures: bringing efficient information management to nanomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De la Iglesia, D; García-Remesal, M; Maojo, V; Cachau, R E

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology represents an area of particular promise and significant opportunity across multiple scientific disciplines. Ongoing nanotechnology research ranges from the characterization of nanoparticles and nanomaterials to the analysis and processing of experimental data seeking correlations between nanoparticles and their functionalities and side effects. Due to their special properties, nanoparticles are suitable for cellular-level diagnostics and therapy, offering numerous applications in medicine, e.g. development of biomedical devices, tissue repair, drug delivery systems and biosensors. In nanomedicine, recent studies are producing large amounts of structural and property data, highlighting the role for computational approaches in information management. While in vitro and in vivo assays are expensive, the cost of computing is falling. Furthermore, improvements in the accuracy of computational methods (e.g. data mining, knowledge discovery, modeling and simulation) have enabled effective tools to automate the extraction, management and storage of these vast data volumes. Since this information is widely distributed, one major issue is how to locate and access data where it resides (which also poses data-sharing limitations). The novel discipline of nanoinformatics addresses the information challenges related to nanotechnology research. In this paper, we summarize the needs and challenges in the field and present an overview of extant initiatives and efforts. (paper)

  19. Nanoinformatics knowledge infrastructures: bringing efficient information management to nanomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, D; Cachau, R E; García-Remesal, M; Maojo, V

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology represents an area of particular promise and significant opportunity across multiple scientific disciplines. Ongoing nanotechnology research ranges from the characterization of nanoparticles and nanomaterials to the analysis and processing of experimental data seeking correlations between nanoparticles and their functionalities and side effects. Due to their special properties, nanoparticles are suitable for cellular-level diagnostics and therapy, offering numerous applications in medicine, e.g. development of biomedical devices, tissue repair, drug delivery systems and biosensors. In nanomedicine, recent studies are producing large amounts of structural and property data, highlighting the role for computational approaches in information management. While in vitro and in vivo assays are expensive, the cost of computing is falling. Furthermore, improvements in the accuracy of computational methods (e.g. data mining, knowledge discovery, modeling and simulation) have enabled effective tools to automate the extraction, management and storage of these vast data volumes. Since this information is widely distributed, one major issue is how to locate and access data where it resides (which also poses data-sharing limitations). The novel discipline of nanoinformatics addresses the information challenges related to nanotechnology research. In this paper, we summarize the needs and challenges in the field and present an overview of extant initiatives and efforts. PMID:24932210

  20. Integrated Knowledge Translation and Grant Development: Addressing the Research Practice Gap through Stakeholder-informed Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joanna; Brownlie, Elizabeth; Rosenkranz, Susan; Chaim, Gloria; Beitchman, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We describe our stakeholder engagement process for grant application development that occurred as part of our integrated knowledge translation plan and make recommendations for researchers. In phase 1, a stakeholder consultation group was developed. In phase 2, surveys regarding knowledge gathering, research agenda, and research collaboration preferences were sent to 333 cross-sectoral youth-serving organizations in Ontario, including family and consumer organizations. In phase 1, 28 stakeholders from six sectors participated in the consultation group and provided input on multiple aspects of the proposal. Through this process, 19 stakeholders adopted formal roles within the project. In phase 2, 206 surveys were received (response rate = 62%). Survey responses supported the grant focus (concurrent youth mental health and substance use problems). Respondents also prioritized project goals and provided specific feedback on research and knowledge translation. Finally, although some stakeholders chose greater involvement, most survey respondents indicated a preference for a moderate level of participation in research rather than full team membership. Despite short timelines and feasibility challenges, stakeholders can be meaningfully engaged in and contribute to the grant proposal development process. Consideration is needed for the practical challenges that stakeholder organizations face in supporting and participating in research.

  1. Assessment of change in knowledge about research methods among delegates attending research methodology workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Shah, Nehal; Navaid, Seema

    2018-01-01

    In an era of evidence based medicine research is an essential part of medical profession whether clinical or academic. A research methodology workshop intends to help participants, those who are newer to research field or those who are already doing empirical research. The present study was conducted to assess the changes in knowledge of the participants of a research methodology workshop through a structured questionnaire. With administrative and ethical approval, a four day research methodology workshop was planned. The participants were subjected to a structured questionnaire (pre-test) containing 20 multiple choice questions (Q1-Q 20) related to the topics to be covered in research methodology workshop before the commencement of the workshop and then subjected to similar posttest questionnaire after the completion of workshop. The mean values of pre and post-test scores were calculated and the results were analyzed and compared. Out of the total 153 delegates, 45(29 %) were males and 108 were (71 %) females. 92 (60%) participants consented to fill the pre-test questionnaire and 68 (44%) filled the post-test questionnaire. The mean Pre-test and post-test scores at 95% Confidence Interval were 07.62 (SD ±3.220) and 09.66 (SD ±2.477) respectively. The differences were found to be significant using Paired Sample T test ( P research methodology workshops. Participatory research methodology workshops are good methods of imparting knowledge, also the long term effects needs to be evaluated.

  2. How knowledge and technology are created in a research institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: monteiro@ipen.b, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Collaboration within and across R and D teams is a naturally occurring socio-technical process and it seems to be a very good thrust for technology development and knowledge creation, transfer and preservation in R and D organizations. The study has focused on evidence gathered from: (a) the publication data base of IPEN from 2001 to 2008 was used to generate four time evolving networks of co-authorship, considering time slices of two years; (b) authors 'demographic' data were included as node attributes in the networks; and (c) questionnaire surveys and interviews to understand the reasons which influence a person to search and choose partner to co-work in a research. Social network analysis was used extensively to understand the network configurations, their time evolution, the key actors, groups and their role in this network. A few indexes and algorithms were used to get insight into the networks structures. A variety of centrality indicators were used to better characterize key actors and better understand their position and role in the network. Also many grouping techniques were used to find the most prominent/active groups. For the most central authors or groups, demographic data was cross analyzed with their network indexes to get check for a few hypothesis of preferential attachment. Finally, based on the proper theoretical background and the information gathered with questionnaires and interviews a model was devised to explain the propensity to collaborate. This paper reports the general ideas of the whole research and presents the most important results of the network analysis. (author)

  3. How knowledge and technology are created in a research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration within and across R and D teams is a naturally occurring socio-technical process and it seems to be a very good thrust for technology development and knowledge creation, transfer and preservation in R and D organizations. The study has focused on evidence gathered from: (a) the publication data base of IPEN from 2001 to 2008 was used to generate four time evolving networks of co-authorship, considering time slices of two years; (b) authors 'demographic' data were included as node attributes in the networks; and (c) questionnaire surveys and interviews to understand the reasons which influence a person to search and choose partner to co-work in a research. Social network analysis was used extensively to understand the network configurations, their time evolution, the key actors, groups and their role in this network. A few indexes and algorithms were used to get insight into the networks structures. A variety of centrality indicators were used to better characterize key actors and better understand their position and role in the network. Also many grouping techniques were used to find the most prominent/active groups. For the most central authors or groups, demographic data was cross analyzed with their network indexes to get check for a few hypothesis of preferential attachment. Finally, based on the proper theoretical background and the information gathered with questionnaires and interviews a model was devised to explain the propensity to collaborate. This paper reports the general ideas of the whole research and presents the most important results of the network analysis. (author)

  4. Developing Statistical Knowledge for Teaching during Design-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Randall E.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical knowledge for teaching is not precisely equivalent to statistics subject matter knowledge. Teachers must know how to make statistics understandable to others as well as understand the subject matter themselves. This dual demand on teachers calls for the development of viable teacher education models. This paper offers one such model,…

  5. The aptness of knowledge related metaphors: a research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Daan Andriessen

    2010-01-01

    Metaphors are common phenomena intellectual capital and knowledge management theories and practice. An important question to ask is: what are the ‗best‘ metaphors we can use in our theorizing on intellectual capital and knowledge management? This paper addresses the question of the aptness of

  6. Exploring a Knowledge-focused Trajectory for Researching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper draws on social realist curriculum theory, underpinned by critical realism. This theoretical perspective, which includes Bernstein's pedagogic device and particularly recontextualisation of knowledge across the pedagogical landscape, provides a language of description for critically reviewing knowledge and ...

  7. An exploration of knowledge integration problems in interdisciplinary research teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayerl, P.S.; Steinheider, B.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of function-specific expertise into a shared knowledge base is a crucial, but complex process for success in interdisciplinary teams. This paper presents an empirically derived typology of knowledge integration problems and links their occurrence to degree of heterogeneity and

  8. [Adolescents as research subjects and free informed consent: knowledge and opinion of researchers and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guariglia, Fabiana; Bento, Silvana Ferreira; Hardy, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study that evaluated the knowledge and opinions of researchers and adolescents that served as their research subjects on the legal norms that regulate the participation of the latter as research subjects, the capacity of adolescents to make autonomous decisions regarding participation, and the adolescent experience after agreeing to take part in a study. This was a qualitative study with a convenience sample, the size of which was defined by the criteria of informational redundancy. Interviews were conducted with three researchers who had used adolescents as research subjects and nine of these subjects. This number of interviews was sufficient to reach informational redundancy. Data was collected through recorded semi-structured interviews, with open questions. All the researchers were familiar with some legal document related to the participation of adolescents as subjects of research. On the other hand, the adolescents were surprised because they were not aware of the existence of such documents. However, they considered them necessary for their own protection. In general, researchers and adolescents believe that adolescents have the capacity to decide autonomously to participate as research subjects. The adolescents affirmed that they had decided to volunteer conscientiously.

  9. Facilitating knowledge transfer between researchers and wildfire practitioners about trust: An international case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara K. McGee; Allan Curtis; Bonita L. McFarlane; Bruce Shindler; Amy Christianson; Christine Olsen; Sarah M. McCaffrey

    2016-01-01

    The importance of knowledge transfer between researchers, policy makers and practitioners is widely recognized. However, barriers to knowledge transfer can make it difficult for practitioners to apply the results of scientific research. This paper describes a project that addressed barriers to knowledge transfer by involving wildfire management practitioners from three...

  10. Knowledge Sharing among Academics in Institutions of Higher Learning: A Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramayah, T.; Ignatius, Joshua; Leen, Jasmine Yeap Ai

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a research agenda for a funded research project on knowledge sharing among academics in Malaysia. One of the main objectives is to develop validate and measure of knowledge sharing which is suitable for academicians. Previous studies on knowledge sharing have used standard measurement items which do not cater for the multiple…

  11. Exploring a Knowledge-focused Trajectory for Researching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    critically reviewing knowledge and environmental learning. In particular ... inclusive and national curriculum set the scene for mainstreaming ..... in six Foundation Phase classrooms, she identified a number of specific 'modes of enquiry' used.

  12. How Do Trend Researchers Conduct Research? The Production of Knowledge in a Controversial Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Pfadenhauer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The planned research project described in this article focuses on the methods of trend research—not only in a narrow literal sense of techniques of data collection and data evaluation but also in a broader understanding of the logic of knowledge production in this controversial field. Initially trend research can be appointed between market research on the one hand and futurology on the other hand. Criticism regarding trend research as well as its innovative potential is also mentioned. Following the recent studies, trend research is conceived as application-oriented research in a broad sense. As far as the methodology is concerned, the proposed study promises to be an empirically-founded contribution by integrating analysis from sources such as explorative and focused conversations, observations and expert interviews. The study uses the example of trend research and asks the question how research is actually "done" and if it is application oriented or not. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402366

  13. Knowledge translation research in population health: establishing a collaborative research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurendeau Marie-Claire

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the increasing mobilization of researchers and funding organizations around knowledge translation (KT in Canada and elsewhere, many questions have been only partially answered, particularly in the field of population health. This article presents the results of a systematic process to draw out possible avenues of collaboration for researchers, practitioners and decision-makers who work in the area of KT. The main objective was to establish a research agenda on knowledge translation in population health. Methods Using the Concept Mapping approach, the research team wanted to identify priority themes for the development of research on KT in population health. Mapping is based on multivariate statistical analyses (multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis in which statements produced during a brainstorming session are grouped in weighted clusters. The final maps are a visual representation of the priority themes of research on KT. Especially designed for facilitating consensus in the understanding and organization of various concepts, the Concept Mapping method proved suitable for achieving this objective. Results The maps were produced by 19 participants from university settings, and from institutions within the health and social services network. Three main perspectives emerge from this operation: (1 The evaluation of the effectiveness of KT efforts is one of the main research priorities; (2 The importance of taking into consideration user contexts in any KT effort; (3 The challenges related to sharing power for decision-making and action-taking among various stakeholder groups. These perspectives open up avenues of collaboration for stakeholders who are involved in research on KT. Besides these three main perspectives, the concept maps reveal three other trends which should be emphasized. Conclusion The Concept Mapping process reported in this article aimed to provoke collective reflection on the

  14. Experiential Learning and Research Ethics: Enhancing Knowledge through Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Poit, Stephanie M.; Cameron, Abigail E.; Schulman, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    How can instructors use experiential learning strategies to enhance student understanding of research ethics and responsible research conduct? In this article, the authors review literature on using experiential learning to teach research ethics and responsible research conduct. They present a three-step exercise for teaching research ethics and…

  15. Teacher-School Library Media Specialist Collaboration through Social Marketing Strategies: An Information Behavior Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immroth, Barbara; Lukenbill, W. Bernard

    2007-01-01

    This research was supported in part though an IMLS Kent State University Grant supporting Information Literacy. Based on the importance of teacher-school library media specialist collaboration, this study seeks to advance knowledge involving the dynamics of this special relationship. The subjects were a group of student librarians--themselves…

  16. Digital platforms for research collaboration: using design science in developing a South African open knowledge repository

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Biljon, J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ) enabled collaboration through the design and development of a sustainable open knowledge repository (OKR) according to the design science research (DSR) paradigm. OKRs are tools used to support knowledge sharing and collaboration. The theoretical...

  17. Moving knowledge into action for more effective practice, programmes and policy: protocol for a research programme on integrated knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ian D; Kothari, Anita; McCutcheon, Chris

    2018-02-02

    Health research is conducted with the expectation that it advances knowledge and eventually translates into improved health systems and population health. However, research findings are often caught in the know-do gap: they are not acted upon in a timely way or not applied at all. Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) is advanced as a way to increase the relevance, applicability and impact of research. With IKT, knowledge users work with researchers throughout the research process, starting with identification of the research question. Knowledge users represent those who would be able to use research results to inform their decisions (e.g. clinicians, managers, policy makers, patients/families and others). Stakeholders are increasingly interested in the idea that IKT generates greater and faster societal impact. Stakeholders are all those who are interested in the use of research results but may not necessarily use them for their own decision-making (e.g. governments, funders, researchers, health system managers and policy makers, patients and clinicians). Although IKT is broadly accepted, the actual research supporting it is limited and there is uncertainty about how best to conduct and support IKT. This paper presents a protocol for a programme of research testing the assumption that engaging the users of research in phases of its production leads to (a) greater appreciation of and capacity to use research; (b) the production of more relevant, useful and applicable research that results in greater impact; and (c) conditions under which it is more likely that research results will influence policy, managerial and clinical decision-making. The research programme will adopt an interdisciplinary, international, cross-sector approach, using multiple and mixed methods to reflect the complex and social nature of research partnerships. We will use ongoing and future natural IKT experiments as multiple cases to study IKT in depth, and we will take advantage of the team

  18. Knowledge Activism: Bridging the Research/Policy Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald

    2014-01-01

    How research can better inform policy and how policy can have a better research base are longstanding issues both in educational research and across public policy generally. Drawing on the work of Hannah Arendt, this article argues that progress in increasing the impact of research can be made through a clearer understanding of the nature of…

  19. From Professional Competencies to Capacity: A Study of Education and Training for Subject Specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsin Phoebe Chiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Subject specialists are important assets in academic and research libraries. They possess not only the specialized knowledge of a particular subject field, but also the skills in library and information services. Looming shortage of qualified subject specialists resulting from the retirement of current professionals, most likely the baby-boomer generation, persuasively suggests that education and training are in urgent need of rethinking. This empirical study was conducted within the context of Library and Information Science education and academic librarianship in North America. Survey, content analysis, and focus group were employed as data collection methods. This study aims to analyze the status of LIS education for subject specialists, education needs and personal attributes of subject specialists, and the qualifications and responsibilities of becoming subject specialists. The goal of the study is to understand the knowledge, skills, and attitude of becoming subject specialists. Results of the study may provide insight into planning of formal curriculum and on-the-job training. [Article content in Chinese

  20. The University Depoliticized: Research and Knowledge in an Authoritarian State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odencrantz, Joana Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the impact of an authoritarian state on the university as represented by the Faculty of Economics and Political Science at Cairo University in Cairo, Egypt. I examine how academics negotiate their tasks of acquiring, disseminating and producing knowledge within the confines of an authoritarian state. "The 2003 Arab…

  1. Contemporary HIV/AIDS research: Insights from knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-18

    Sep 18, 2017 ... solutions to knowledge problems on a scale hitherto unimaginable. Expert and non-expert .... support or “confirm” their beliefs,' which has led to a bias against the ..... and corrected prior to harm; these derive from the systems theory ..... ecosystem, whose design will make it capable of self-organis- ation and ...

  2. Academic Researchers on the Project Market in the Ethos of Knowledge Capitalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunila, Kristiina; Hannukainen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    How knowledge capitalism retools the scope of academic research and researchers is an issue which this article ties to the project market in the ethos of knowledge capitalism. In Finland, academic research has been forced to apply for funding in project-based activities reflecting European Union policies. The project market, which in this article…

  3. Researching on knowledge architecture of design by analysis based on ASME code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Shiyi; Zhou Yu; He Shuyan

    2003-01-01

    The quality of knowledge-based system's knowledge architecture is one of decisive factors of knowledge-based system's validity and rationality. For designing the ASME code knowledge based system, this paper presents a knowledge acquisition method which is extracting knowledge through document analysis consulted domain experts' knowledge. Then the paper describes knowledge architecture of design by analysis based on the related rules in ASME code. The knowledge of the knowledge architecture is divided into two categories: one is empirical knowledge, and another is ASME code knowledge. Applied as the basement of the knowledge architecture, a general procedural process of design by analysis that is met the engineering design requirements and designers' conventional mode is generalized and explained detailed in the paper. For the sake of improving inference efficiency and concurrent computation of KBS, a kind of knowledge Petri net (KPN) model is proposed and adopted in expressing the knowledge architecture. Furthermore, for validating and verifying of the empirical rules, five knowledge validation and verification theorems are given in the paper. Moreover the research production is applicable to design the knowledge architecture of ASME codes or other engineering standards. (author)

  4. Priors & prejudice : using existing knowledge in social science research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wesel, F.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers in the social sciences usually start their research with the formulation of research goals and questions, which, together with studying the existing literature, lead to the formulation of hypotheses. Next, data is collected using experiments or questionnaires and is subsequently

  5. Research teams as complex systems: implications for knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasileiadou, E.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in research collaboration creates the need to better understand the interaction between individual researchers and the collaborative team. The paper elaborates the conceptualisation of research teams as complex systems which emerge out of the local interactions of individual

  6. Knowledge about the research and ethics committee at Makerere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: All research involving human participants should be reviewed by a competent and independent institutional research and ethics committee. Research conducted at Makerere University College of Health Sciences should be subjected to a rigorous review process by the ethics committee in order to protect ...

  7. Supporting Knowledge Mobilization and Research Impact Strategies in Grant Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, David; Jensen, Krista E.; Johnny, Michael; Poetz, Anneliese

    2016-01-01

    Each application to the National Science Foundation (NSF) must contain a Broader Impact (BI) strategy. Similarly, grant applications for most research funders in Canada and the UK require strategies to support the translation of research into impacts on society; however, the guidance provided to researchers is too general to inform the specific…

  8. Extending Cross-Generational Knowledge Flow Research in Edge Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    the software engineering field, many matured methodologies already exist, such as Rational Unified Process (Hunt, 2003) or Extreme Programming (Beck...letting Protégé generate the basic user interface, and then gradually write widgets and plug-ins to customize its look-and-feel and behavior . 4 3.0...importance of the goal and reminders about rivals. In the same study, knowledge sharing was more likely to occur with individuals with prosocial

  9. Knowledge Creation in Clinical Product Development Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer; Sköld, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the clinical approach to management research and positions it in relation to other similar approaches. It achieves this by pointing out the most important historical milestones in the development of such approaches. The literature on the approach is mapped, including that on t......This paper explores the clinical approach to management research and positions it in relation to other similar approaches. It achieves this by pointing out the most important historical milestones in the development of such approaches. The literature on the approach is mapped, including...... of the approaches, the paper discusses the research issues to which clinical research is relevant and how the research framework should be designed, then practical issues relating to how to approach the study objects, the design of the research instruments, and the conducting of the field research. Finally...

  10. Potential Knowledge Management Contributions to Human Performance Technology Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwen, Thomas M.; Kalman, Howard K.; Hara, Noriko; Kisling, Eric L.

    1998-01-01

    Considers aspects of knowledge management that have the potential to enhance human-performance-technology research and practice. Topics include intellectual capital; learning organization versus organizational learning; the importance of epistemology; the relationship of knowledge, learning, and performance; knowledge creation; socio-technical…

  11. Specialist Drug Knowledge In Patient Treatment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-14

    Sep 14, 1974 ... relieve the physician, at his discretion, in the medication management of patients. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1920 (1974). The practice of medicine has both benefited and suffered from the vast upsurge of drug discovery in the past 30 to 40 years. Thus, in accepting the benefits, there has come the realisation of ...

  12. Research on Efficiency of Knowledge Transfer in Technical Innovation Alliances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-sheng, Jiang

    The knowledge transfer efficiency (KTE) is closely relative to the success or failure of technology innovation in strategic alliances. This paper takes the KTE as the essential variable to establish the benefit function model of technology innovations to explore the KTE's influences on partners' innovative decisions under two different modes: independent innovations and alliance innovations. It is found that the higher the KTE, the greater the reducing extent of production costs is. The results could provide some theoretical supports for selections of the optimal competitive-ooperative relationship and managerial flexibility in technical innovation alliances.

  13. Knowledge gaps and research recommendations for essential tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopfner, F.; Haubenberger, D.; Galpern, W.R.; Gwinn, K.; Veer, A. van der; White, S.; Bhatia, K.; Adler, C.H.; Eidelberg, D.; Ondo, W.; Stebbins, G.T.; Tanner, C.M.; Helmich, R.C.G.; Lenz, F.A.; Sillitoe, R.V.; Vaillancourt, D.; Vitek, J.L.; Louis, E.D.; Shill, H.A.; Frosch, M.P.; Foroud, T.; Kuhlenbaumer, G.; Singleton, A.; Testa, C.M.; Hallett, M.; Elble, R.; Deuschl, G.

    2016-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common cause of significant disability, but its etiologies and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Research has been hampered by the variable definition of ET and by non-standardized research approaches. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (USA)

  14. Knowledge to Policy: Making the Most of Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    5 avr. 2009 ... A major contribution to an understudied, poorly understood, but critical aspect of development. — John Young, Director of Programmes, Research and Policy in Development Group (RAPID), Overseas Development Institute, London. Does research influence public policy and decision-making and, if so, ...

  15. Action Research: A Spiral Inquiry for Valid and Useful Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Alireza

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses methodological and philosophical issues linked to action research. The concepts of subjectivity and objectivity--potential sources of bias that mislead researchers in dealing with these concepts--and how to cope with them are discussed. Controversial issues of truth in positivism, postpositivism, and other schools of…

  16. Taking Research and Knowledge to the Common People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, F.

    2017-12-01

    Most sponsored research in this world is driven by the need to improve livelihood and the environment around us. This is particularly true for the case of earth and environmental issues involving the resources of water, food, energy and health. However, is such research guaranteed of bringing positive benefits for society as soon as it is documented in peer-reviewed forums or in media publications? More than 2 decades ago the United States National Research Council popularized the term "Valley of Death" to describe the region where research findings struggle to survive before reaching maturity for societal applications. Recent experience in the field of earth and environmental sciences shows that many of the potential beneficiaries (i.e., the common people), who are not as familiar with the motivation behind sponsored research in the field, may have a more skeptical view based on their current and archaic practices in their livelihood. This talk will shed light this "Valley of Death" for research and ways to accelerate the societal impact of research to the common people. Using examples drawing from technology, water, food and physical modeling of earth, this talk will also share lessons learned on ways to be effective agents of change for making a direct impact with scientific research.

  17. Research and quality improvement experience and knowledge: a nursing survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jolene; Bagley, Lisa; Day, Suzanne; Holleran, Renee; Handrahan, Diana

    2011-07-01

    To assess nursing staff's background and research and quality improvement (QI) experience. In this corporation, participation in research and QI is encouraged, but little is known about nurses' experiences. A web-based survey was distributed. Nursing staffs from an academic/teaching medical centre and other intra-corporation non-academic facilities were compared. Respondents included: 148 (52.9%) medical centre and 132 (47.1%) non-medical centre subjects. Medical centre respondents had a higher proportion previously engaged in research, currently engaged in research and previously engaged in QI. Productivity (grant, published and presented) was low for both groups but statistically lower for the non-medical centre group. Medical centre employees used research resources more often than the non-medical centre. Time was the most frequently mentioned barrier to participation in research and QI initiatives. A moderate proportion of respondents had research and QI experience, yet productivity and use of resources was low. Nurses at non-academically focused facilities were in most need of assistance. Familiarizing nurses with resources and providing protected time may increase productivity. Developing an infrastructure to support nursing research is a worthy goal. Information about interest and experience of nurses can aid management in determining how to focus financial resources. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Knowledge Generated by Audiovisual Narrative Action Research Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista Garcia-Vera, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We present data collected from the research project funded by the Ministry of Education and Science of Spain entitled "Audiovisual Narratives and Intercultural Relations in Education." One of the aims of the research was to determine the nature of thought processes occurring during audiovisual narratives. We studied the possibility of…

  19. Introductory Graduate Research Courses: An Examination of the Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundfrom, Daniel J.; Shaw, Dale G.; Thomas, Ann; Young, Suzanne; Moore, Alan D.

    This study addresses the question, "What should graduate students know about research and statistics after completing an initial course?" Individuals who teach such courses at various Carnegie classifications of institutions were surveyed about the specific characteristics of an introductory graduate research course at their own institutions to…

  20. Current Knowledge and Recent Advances in Marine Dinoflagellate Transcriptomic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Afiq Akbar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are essential components in marine ecosystems, and they possess two dissimilar flagella to facilitate movement. Dinoflagellates are major components of marine food webs and of extreme importance in balancing the ecosystem energy flux in oceans. They have been reported to be the primary cause of harmful algae bloom (HABs events around the world, causing seafood poisoning and therefore having a direct impact on human health. Interestingly, dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are major components of coral reef foundations. Knowledge regarding their genes and genome organization is currently limited due to their large genome size and other genetic and cytological characteristics that hinder whole genome sequencing of dinoflagellates. Transcriptomic approaches and genetic analyses have been employed to unravel the physiological and metabolic characteristics of dinoflagellates and their complexity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and findings from transcriptomic studies to understand the cell growth, effects on environmental stress, toxin biosynthesis, dynamic of HABs, phylogeny and endosymbiosis of dinoflagellates. With the advancement of high throughput sequencing technologies and lower cost of sequencing, transcriptomic approaches will likely deepen our understanding in other aspects of dinoflagellates’ molecular biology such as gene functional analysis, systems biology and development of model organisms.

  1. Training of radwaste management specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifanova, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    Highly professional and knowledgeable employees for chemical, and especially radiochemical, technology companies are very much sought after these days. Taking into account the advancement of nuclear power and the associated expansion of radioactive waste management facilities, the demand for staff that possesses all the necessary knowledge is set to increase multi-tenfold. In such circumstances, training of personnel is becoming a key element of the human resource management process. The author says that training of personnel at SUE SIA Radon Moscow is conducted in accordance with the Program of Training, Advanced Training and Personnel Qualification, which prescribes areas of training, categories of trainees, approximate number of trainees for each area, schedule and budget of training sessions. The cooperation of SUE SIA Radon Moscow with higher-education institutions in the field of young specialists training and advanced training of managerial, technical and administrative staff is reported [ru

  2. Knowledge to Policy: Making the Most of Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-04-05

    Apr 5, 2009 ... This book is the most recent to address this question, investigating the effects ... public administration, development studies, and international affairs; ... was a Research Fellow in Sustainability Science at Harvard University's ...

  3. Access to Knowledge Southern Africa : Universities, Open Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Journal articles. Research productivity-visibility-accessibility and scholarly communication in Southern African universities. Download PDF ... Call for new OWSD Fellowships for Early Career Women Scientists now open. In partnership with ...

  4. Coastal fisheries research: State of knowledge and needs for Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.

    The status of coastal fisheries for the state of Goa (India) is discussed. The research and development capabilities of various institutions; capture fisheries; culture fisheries; and coastal aquaculture in Goa is discussed. It has been found...

  5. Undergraduates' Perceived Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Interest in Social Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, Stefanie S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between perceived knowledge of research methods, research self-efficacy, interest in learning about research, and interest in performing research-related tasks in one's career. The study also investigated the effect of a research methods course with both didactic and experiential components on these…

  6. THE EVOLUTION OF RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH: CHANGES IN KNOWLEDGE MAPS

    OpenAIRE

    Iwona Gorzeń-Mitka

    2017-01-01

    One of the leading trends in modern academic research is risk management. Over the years, the approach to risk management has changed and affected many different areas. This study aims to investigate changes in risk management and trends of risk management in the past 20 years. Risk management related publications from 1990 to 2016 were retrieved from the Web of Science and Scopus databases. VOS viewer software was used to analyse the research trend. Literature growth related to risk manageme...

  7. More than a Master: Developing, Sharing, and Using Knowledge in School-University Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; Daly, Alan J.; Liou, Yi-Hwa; van Swet, Jacqueline; Beijaard, Douwe; Bergen, Theo C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Postgraduate master's programs for in-service teachers may be a promising new avenue in developing research partnership networks that link schools and university and enable collaborative development, sharing and use of knowledge of teacher research. This study explores the way these knowledge processes originating from master's students' research…

  8. Learning Might Not Equal Liking: Research Methods Course Changes Knowledge But Not Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, O. J.; Lewandowski, Gary W., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Students completed surveys at the beginning and end of a sophomore-level course on research and statistics. We hypothesized that the course would produce advances in knowledge of research and statistics and that those changes would be accompanied by more favorable attitudes toward the subject matter. Results showed that knowledge did increase…

  9. Reconciling collaborative action research with existing institutions: insights from Dutch and German climate knowledge programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termeer, C.J.A.M.; Buuren, van A.; Knieling, J.; Gottschick, M.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and policymakers increasingly aim to set up collaborative research programmes to address the challenges of adaptation to climate change. This does not only apply for technical knowledge, but for governance knowledge also. Both the Netherlands and Germany have set up large scale

  10. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 66: Emerging Trends in the Globalization of Knowledge: The Role of the Technical Report in Aerospace Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli,Thomas E.; Golich, Vicki L.

    1997-01-01

    Economists, management theorists, business strategists, and governments alike recognize knowledge as the single most important resource in today's global economy. Because of its relationship to technological progress and economic growth, many governments have taken a keen interest in knowledge; specifically its production, transfer, and use. This paper focuses on the technical report as a product for disseminating the results of aerospace research and development (R&D) and its use and importance to aerospace engineers and scientists. The emergence of knowledge as an intellectual asset, its relationship to innovation, and its importance in a global economy provides the context for the paper. The relationships between government and knowledge and government and innovation are used to place knowledge within the context of publicly-funded R&D. Data, including the reader preferences of NASA technical reports, are derived from the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, a ten-year study of knowledge diffusion in the U.S. aerospace industry.

  11. Design Science Research For Personal Knowledge Management System Development - Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schmitt

    2016-11-01

    Thirdly, the development process and resulting prototype are verified against accepted general design science research (DSR guidelines. DSR aims at creating innovative IT artifacts (that extend human and social capabilities and meet desired outcomes and at validating design processes (as evidence of their relevance, utility, rigor, resonance, and publishability. Together with the incorporated references to around thirty prior publications covering technical and methodological details, a kind of ‘Long Discussion Case’ emerges aiming to potentially assist IT researchers and entrepreneurs engaged in similar projects.

  12. The role of specialist nurses in multiple sclerosis: a rapid and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Broe, S; Christopher, F; Waugh, N

    2001-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system. The cause is unknown. There are about 80-160 people with MS per 100,000 population, with twice as many women affected as men. The management of individuals with MS includes treatment of acute relapses and chronic symptoms. The care of MS patients is provided by various healthcare professionals, such as general practitioners (GPs), neurologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and nurses. Some MS patients have access to an MS specialist nurse, although this provision varies geographically. The aim of this report is to assess the effectiveness and relative cost-effectiveness of MS specialist nurses in improving care and outcomes for patients with MS. A systematic review of the literature, involving a range of databases, was performed. Full details are described in the main report. Only one study was identified that tried to evaluate the benefit of MS specialist nurses. The study concluded that MS patients and their carers found the MS specialist nurse to be helpful, particularly in improving their knowledge of MS, ability to cope, mood and confidence about the future. GPs also reported finding the nurse to be helpful with their MS patients, and 40% of the GPs stated they would purchase the services of an MS specialist nurse if their practices became fundholding. However, there were considerable methodological weaknesses inherent in the study design, and it was unclear whether the results of the study could be extrapolated to other settings or to other MS patient groups. RESULTS - ONGOING RESEARCH: There are two ongoing research studies regarding MS specialist nurses. One of these studies involves the provision of MS nurses to several areas, but also has two control populations to allow evaluation of the health benefits of the nurses to MS patients and their carers. This study will help to fill the evidence gap. RESULTS - COSTS: The costs of providing MS specialist nurses consist of their

  13. The Effectiveness of "Knowledge Management System" in Research Mentoring Using Knowledge Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwichai, Puangpet; Meksamoot, Komsak; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Dahal, Keshav; Jengjalean, Anchalee

    2014-01-01

    Currently, many old universities in Thailand have been facing the occurrence of lecturer massive retirement. This leads to the large amount of newly Ph. D. graduate recruitment for taking immediate responsibilities to teach and conduct research without mentoring by senior staff as well as in new universities. Therefore, this paper aims to propose…

  14. Indigenous Knowledge Research in Kenya and South Africa: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International databases (OCLC – Online Computer Library Center, MEDLINE and AGRICOLA) and national databases – South Africa's Southern African Bibliographic Information Network (SABINET databases, i.e. Current and Completed Research: CCR, Union Catalogue of Theses and Dissertations: UTD, and Index to ...

  15. Knowledge Is Power. Research Can Help Your Marketing Program Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert M.

    1982-01-01

    Three major types of market research can be helpful in college marketing: exploratory (internal and external to the college); developmental, to test marketing strategies and messages; and evaluative, to complete the market planning cycle. Increasingly sophisticated and accountable marketing techniques can be developed. (MSE)

  16. Organizational Cultural Theory and Research Administration Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Dwayne W.

    2017-01-01

    The administration and management of sponsored projects spans many levels within an institution of higher education. Research administration professionals require an operational understanding of a complex and intertwined set of disciplines that include project management, finance, legal, ethics, communication, and business acumen. The explicit…

  17. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of residents in medical research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    such as literature search, data collection and analysis and critical appraisal of evidence (4). Studies show that only very ... of the importance of doing research or even the need for reading .... In addition, demographic details (age, gender, marital status ..... Rajan P BB: Work related stress and its anticipated solutions among ...

  18. Knowledge as Public Property : The Societal Relevance of Scientific Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouter, Lex M

    2008-01-01

    Universities are funded by public means to a large extend. It’s reasonable to expect that society benefits from the results. For scientific research this means that it should at least have a potential societal impact. Universities and individual investigators must explicitly consider the societal

  19. Knowledge Brokers in the Making: Opportunities to Connect Researchers and Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, K. G.; Pennell, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Environmental science and engineering graduate students often lack training on how to communicate with policy decision makers who are grappling with questions to which research is responding. They communicate directly with mutual experts, but are many times unable to engage with non-experts about their research, thereby limiting the reach and impact of their findings. This presentation highlights opportunities within environmental science and engineering research to create opportunities for researchers to hone skills as knowledge brokers, so they learn ways to meaningfully engage with a range of stakeholders. A knowledge broker is an individual who connects scientific experts and relevant stakeholders with meaningful and useable information. Recognizing that information must flow in multiple directions, the knowledge broker must quickly and effectively translate needs and questions using established relationships. It is these relationships, as well as the synthesis of scientific knowledge into useable information, on which the success of the knowledge broker lies. Using lessons learned, as well as communication science theory related to knowledge brokering, this presentation highlights training opportunities for knowledge brokers who are primarily educated in science and engineering fields, yet seek to engage with societally relevant stakeholders. We present case study examples of knowledge brokering within two large multi-disciplinary research centers. These centers provide unique experiences for researchers to build relationships with stakeholders, so that the scientific experts not only create novel research within their specific discipline, but also inform policy decision makers, community members and regulatory officials.

  20. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 19: Computer and information technology and aerospace knowledge diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Bishop, Ann P.

    1992-01-01

    To remain a world leader in aerospace, the US must improve and maintain the professional competency of its engineers and scientists, increase the research and development (R&D) knowledge base, improve productivity, and maximize the integration of recent technological developments into the R&D process. How well these objectives are met, and at what cost, depends on a variety of factors, but largely on the ability of US aerospace engineers and scientists to acquire and process the results of federally funded R&D. The Federal Government's commitment to high speed computing and networking systems presupposes that computer and information technology will play a major role in the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. However, we know little about information technology needs, uses, and problems within the aerospace knowledge diffusion process. The use of computer and information technology by US aerospace engineers and scientists in academia, government, and industry is reported.

  1. Educational programme on radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, G.; Popovic, D.

    1992-01-01

    The education of radiation protection for veterinary medicine specialists on the University of Belgrade is integrated both in regular graduate studies and in postgraduate studies. Within the graduate studies, students attend courses in physics and biophysics and in radiation hygiene. During postgraduate or specialistic veterinary medicine studies, veterinary medicine specialists expand their knowledge in radiation protection through a number of courses on radiation biophysics, radioecology, nuclear instrumentation and environmental protection. (author)

  2. International Nuclear Information System: Researchers' Platform for Knowledge Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hafizal Yusof; Habibah Adnan; Samsurdin Ahamad

    2011-01-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is an organization under the United Nations (UN), which serves to disseminate accurate information about the nuclear world. In accordance with its role, an International Nuclear Information System (INIS) was established in 1970, provides the opportunities for member countries under the auspices of the IAEA to share information, expertise and knowledge, particularly in the nuclear field. Malaysia has become a member since 1978, and the first country input was posted in the 1980's. INIS member countries are supervised by a specially appointed liaison officers to monitor and oversee matters related to that. Each issue is associated with 49 subject matter (subject heading) will be checked and recorded by using Win fibre before being sent to the INIS database at IAEA headquarters in Vienna, Austria. Material received will be distributed directly to all IAEA member states through the INIS web site and CD distribution to subscribers countries. Today, INIS is still a successful nuclear-related information provider through nearly 3 million data have been recorded including journals, reports, scientific papers, patents, nuclear laws, the web sites contents, and many more. (author)

  3. Analyzing the dialogic turn in the communication of research-based knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    2011-01-01

    Tensions have been identified in the shift to dialogue, whereby researchers produce and communicate research-based knowledge in interaction with different social actors. This paper draws on three perspectives on those tensions  - science and technology studies analyses of public engagement, action...... where the collaborating actors ­(university researchers and practitioners) co-produce knowledge through communication processes in which different expert-identities and knowledge forms are negotiated. The analysis explores the balancing-act between imposing control on the research process and opening up...

  4. Optometry Specialist (AFSC 91255).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, Michael O.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for optometry specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are optometry clinic administration (optometry career and field training, ethical relationships and professionalism, eligibility for optometric care and appointment…

  5. [Toxoplasmosis and cancer: Current knowledge and research perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittecoq, M; Thomas, F

    2017-02-01

    Toxoplasmosis, caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases; it is estimated to affect a third of the world's human population. Many studies showed that latent toxoplasmosis may cause in some patients significant adverse effects including schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. In addition, two recent studies highlighted a positive correlation between the prevalence of brain tumors and that of T. gondii at national and international scale. These studies are correlative, thus they do not demonstrate a causal link between T. gondii and brain tumors. Yet, they call for further research that could shed light on the possible mechanisms underlying this association.

  6. Research on AIDS: knowledge, attitudes and practices among street youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, G

    1993-01-01

    CHILDHOPE (with funding from the United Nations Children's Fund and the aid of nongovernmental organizations in the Philippines, Thailand, Colombia, and Kenya) conducted surveys of street youth in order to ascertain their knowledge, attitudes, and practices in regard to sex and the prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The youth also participated in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention and sex education activities. Youth from all 4 sites reported early sexual activity and multiple partners. Sex was used in all 4 sites to obtain pleasure (recreation), income (prostitution), food or shelter (survival sex), and power (gang rape). Philippine youth reported prostitution and survival sex, including homosexual sex, with foreigners and locals. Kenyan girls reported both prostitution (their main occupation) and survival sex. Kenyan males reported prostitution with foreigners and locals, and rapes of girls. In Bogota, males reported rapes of girls, and gang rapes of females for punishment or initiation. They also reported using sex workers and exchanging sex with men or women for food and shelter. Females from Bogota reported that their "friends" sometimes used survival sex to support their children; nearly all had been previously involved in survival sex on the street. Sexual abuse was common in Kenya and the Philippines; some youth in Manila were abused at shelters. In all 4 sites, there was a high awareness of AIDS and STDs, but information was often incorrect, especially in regard to transmission and treatment of STDs. Although nearly all of the youth knew about modes of transmission of HIV, those from the Philippines and Colombia did not have a personal realization or fear that they could contract it, while those from Kenya and Thailand believed they were at high risk and wanted assistance. 20/21 Kenyan girls were tested by the Undugu Society for HIV after detection of current STD

  7. A roadmap for knowledge exchange and mobilization research in conservation and natural resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vivian M; Young, Nathan; Cooke, Steven J

    2017-08-01

    Scholars across all disciplines have long been interested in how knowledge moves within and beyond their community of peers. Rapid environmental changes and calls for sustainable management practices mean the best knowledge possible is needed to inform decisions, policies, and practices to protect biodiversity and sustainably manage vulnerable natural resources. Although the conservation literature on knowledge exchange (KE) and knowledge mobilization (KM) has grown in recent years, much of it is based on context-specific case studies. This presents a challenge for learning cumulative lessons from KE and KM research and thus effectively using knowledge in conservation and natural resources management. Although continued research on the gap between knowledge and action is valuable, overarching conceptual frameworks are now needed to enable summaries and comparisons across diverse KE-KM research. We propose a knowledge-action framework that provides a conceptual roadmap for future research and practice in KE/KM with the aim of synthesizing lessons learned from contextual case studies and guiding the development and testing of hypotheses in this domain. Our knowledge-action framework has 3 elements that occur at multiple levels and scales: knowledge production (e.g., academia and government), knowledge mediation (e.g., knowledge networks, actors, relational dimension, and contextual dimension), and knowledge-based action (e.g., instrumental, symbolic, and conceptual). The framework integrates concepts from the sociology of science in particular, and serves as a guide to further comprehensive understanding of knowledge exchange and mobilization in conservation and sustainable natural resource management. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Building a Cohesive Body of Design Knowledge: Developments from a Design Science Research Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Piirainen, Kalle A.

    2015-01-01

    researchers have identified difficulties in building on past works, and combining insights from across the field. This work starts to dissolve some of these issues by drawing on Design Science Research to propose an integrated approach for the development of design research knowledge, coupled with pragmatic......Design is an extremely diverse field where there has been widespread debate on how to build a cohesive body of scientific knowledge. To date, no satisfactory proposition has been adopted across the field – hampering scientific development. Without this basis for bringing research together design...... advice for design researchers. This delivers a number of implications for researchers as well as for the field as a whole....

  9. A Strategic Knowledge Map for the Research and Development Department in a Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a corporate resource, being grounds for initiating activities, which is important in a dynamic economy. The difficulties related to obtaining tacit knowledge, related primarily to experience and observation of the knowledge employee (Mendryk, 2011, encourage the companies to use tools supporting knowledge management and location. This article attempts at designing a dedicated, strategic knowledge map for a research and development department in a manufacturing company. Based on the reference works, the detailed characteristics of specific sources of knowledge in a manufacturing company and tools supporting the process of converting the tacit knowledge into explicit one, for example, the knowledge maps, were devised. Then, a strategic knowledge map model was designed for the research and development department (hereinafter abbreviated as SKM – R&D in the manufacturing company, comprising the following components: (1 fields of knowledge, (2 internal and external processes in the R&D department, and (3 sources of knowledge. Then, a practical implementation of the SKM – R&D model was presented.

  10. Guideline implementation strategies for specialist mental healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlanda, Francesca; Fiedler, Ines; Ay, Esra; Barbui, Corrado; Koesters, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Clinical practice guidelines in mental healthcare are viewed as an essential asset if appropriately developed and implemented. The purpose of this article was to review the existing literature on how guidelines should be implemented to optimize their impact on provider performance and patient outcomes in specialist mental healthcare settings. Findings from recent studies suggest a trend toward an improvement in process and patient outcomes following guideline implementation. However, studies are heterogeneous in terms of design, implementation strategies and outcome measures, making it very difficult to draw firm conclusions about which implementation strategy is effective in different healthcare contexts. Current knowledge about how guidelines should be implemented is still sparse and inconclusive in mental healthcare. Future studies should attempt to employ more rigorous designs, including random allocation of patients or clusters of patients, to shed further light on this compelling issue. Research on guideline implementation strategies should additionally take into account potential barriers to knowledge translation, which can heavily influence the implementability of treatment recommendations.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 68: Who is Managing Knowledge? The Implications for Knowledge Production and Management of Global Strategic Alliances in Knowledge Dependent Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golich, Vicki L.; Pinelli, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge is the foundation upon which researchers build as they innovate. Innovation lies at the core of a state's or a firm's ability to survive in a competitive world. Indeed, some economic historians ever that technological innovation, not trade, is the engine to economic growth. Despite the centrality of knowledge to corporate success, analysts have only recently shown an interest in the "knowledge capital" or "intellectual capital" of the firm, often literally trying to assign a value to this resource.

  12. Understanding physicians' professional knowledge and practice in research on skilled migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Anja

    2016-08-01

    Research on the integration of migrant professionals into high-skilled labor markets either focuses on differences between nation states which may be exacerbated by national closure or it celebrates the global versatility of professional knowledge, especially in the natural and health sciences. Building on a pragmatist approach to professional knowledge, the article argues that professional knowledge should not be seen as either universal or local, but both the institutionalized and the incorporated aspects of cultural capital are characterized by 'local universality'. Professionals recreate professional knowledge in specific 'local' situations by relating to universal standards and to internalized 'libraries' of situated expert experience. While the more common notion of knowledge as a socially contested resource continues to be relevant for research on skilled migration, professional knowledge should also be seen as emerging in situations in response to socio-material problems. These problems can be structured by the nation-state, but they can also be transnational in nature.

  13. The mycetoma knowledge gap: identification of research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande, Wendy W J; Maghoub, El Sheikh; Fahal, Ahmed H; Goodfellow, Michael; Welsh, Oliverio; Zijlstra, Ed

    2014-03-01

    Mycetoma is a tropical disease which is caused by a taxonomically diverse range of actinomycetes (actinomycetoma) and fungi (eumycetoma). The disease was only recently listed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a neglected tropical disease (NTD). This recognition is the direct result of a meeting held in Geneva on February 1, 2013, in which experts on the disease from around the world met to identify the key research priorities needed to combat mycetoma. The areas that need to be addressed are highlighted here. The initial priority is to establish the incidence and prevalence of the disease in regions where mycetoma is endemic, prior to determining the primary reservoirs of the predominant causal agents and their mode of transmission to susceptible individuals in order to establish novel interventions that will reduce the impact of the disease on individuals, families, and communities. Critically, economical, reliable, and effective methods are required to achieve early diagnosis of infections and consequential improved therapeutic outcomes. Molecular techniques and serological assays were considered the most promising in the development of novel diagnostic tools to be used in endemic settings. Improved strategies for treating eumycetoma and actinomycetoma are also considered.

  14. A framework to explore the knowledge structure of multidisciplinary research fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Khan, Arif; Baur, Louise A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding emerging areas of a multidisciplinary research field is crucial for researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders. For them a knowledge structure based on longitudinal bibliographic data can be an effective instrument. But with the vast amount of available online information it is often hard to understand the knowledge structure for data. In this paper, we present a novel approach for retrieving online bibliographic data and propose a framework for exploring knowledge structure. We also present several longitudinal analyses to interpret and visualize the last 20 years of published obesity research data.

  15. Knowledge transfer within EU-funded marine science research - a viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Cheallachaín, Cliona Ní

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge transfer, in its most inherent form, can be tracked back to the earliest phase of the Neolithic Revolution, 10,000 years ago, at a time when innovators shared their thoughts on crop cultivation and livestock farming (Bellwood, 2004). Not to be mistaken for science transfer - the export of modern science to non-scientific audiences - it was in the 1960s, that modern knowledge transfer was initiated, when reporting research achievements shifted towards having institutional and political agendas (Lipphardt & Ludwig, 2011). Albeit that the economic contribution of scientific research has been scrutinised for decades; today, there is a pronounced need for the evaluation of its social, cultural and ecological impact. To have impact, it is essential that scientific knowledge is clear and accessible, as well as robust and credible, so that it can be successfully transferred and applied by those identifying solutions for today's societal and environmental challenges. This phenomenon is receiving growing academic interest, where publications including "knowledge transfer" in the title have increased near exponentially for 60 years. Furthermore, we are seeing a definite shift towards embedding a mission of knowledge transfer in Public Research Organisations. This new approach is rewarding researchers whom deliver on all three institutional missions: teaching, research and knowledge transfer. In addition, the European Commission (2008) recommends that "knowledge transfer between universities and industry is made a permanent political and operational priority" and that "sufficient resources and incentives [be] available to public research organisations and their staff to engage in knowledge transfer activities". It is also anticipated that funding agencies will soon make pathways-to-impact statements, also known as knowledge transfer plans, a mandatory requirement of all project proposals. AquaTT is a leader in scientific knowledge management, including knowledge

  16. Investigating issues influencing knowledge sharing in a research organization, using the Appreciative Inquiry Method

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Penny

    2013-01-01

    This research contributes to the literature on the subjective experience of knowledge sharing from the perspective of those actively engaged in it. The sharing of knowledge in organizations is influenced by interconnecting factors, including organizational mission, the use made of information technology, and the motivation of individuals. Much of the existing literature takes a reductionist approach to investigating these, treating knowledge as an asset and humans as rational beings. A re...

  17. A knowledge system approach to the multinational company : conceptual grounding and implications for research

    OpenAIRE

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Santos, José

    2009-01-01

    The role of knowledge, organizational learning, and innovation as levers of competitive advantage is now a commonly acknowledged insight in research in international management. However, while the agglomeration of insights of described as the “knowledge-based view” is a promising theoretical lens, insights are not organized into a unifying framework and there are significant holes in the understanding of how knowledge may be turned into a source of competitive advant...

  18. A research on tenth- to twelfth-formers' knowledge and attitudes towards the culture of behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Žygaitienė, Birutė; Strazdaitė, Vaida

    2005-01-01

    By conducting an empiric research, the authors of the article sought to analyse knowledge about culture of behaviour and attitudes about applying this knowledge in everyday life of the 9-12th form pupils and identified factors which determine their knowledge on the culture of behaviour. The article also analyses pupils’ conception of the basic values of the culture of behaviour as well as their expression. The article discusses the most significant values identified by respondents. The concep...

  19. Infectious Disease Specialist: What Is an Infectious Disease Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical professionals? When do I need an ID specialist? Many common infections can be treated by your ... diseases. Back to Top How was my ID specialist trained? Your ID Physician has 9-10 years ...

  20. Social and natural sciences differ in their research strategies, adapted to work for different knowledge landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Do different fields of knowledge require different research strategies? A numerical model exploring different virtual knowledge landscapes, revealed two diverging optimal search strategies. Trend following is maximized when the popularity of new discoveries determine the number of individuals researching it. This strategy works best when many researchers explore few large areas of knowledge. In contrast, individuals or small groups of researchers are better in discovering small bits of information in dispersed knowledge landscapes. Bibliometric data of scientific publications showed a continuous bipolar distribution of these strategies, ranging from natural sciences, with highly cited publications in journals containing a large number of articles, to the social sciences, with rarely cited publications in many journals containing a small number of articles. The natural sciences seem to adapt their research strategies to landscapes with large concentrated knowledge clusters, whereas social sciences seem to have adapted to search in landscapes with many small isolated knowledge clusters. Similar bipolar distributions were obtained when comparing levels of insularity estimated by indicators of international collaboration and levels of country-self citations: researchers in academic areas with many journals such as social sciences, arts and humanities, were the most isolated, and that was true in different regions of the world. The work shows that quantitative measures estimating differences between academic disciplines improve our understanding of different research strategies, eventually helping interdisciplinary research and may be also help improve science policies worldwide.

  1. The knowledge status EFFEKT: Efficiency shortage. Basis for further research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doorman, Gerard; Grande, Ove S.

    2002-02-01

    This report gives a survey of results from the ''Norges forskningsraad'' ( The Norwegian Research Council) program EFFEKT (1996-2000) and some other relevant projects. The report focuses on areas relevant to the efficiency shortage problems and is made as a part of the foundation for the start of the competence project ''Competence Building - Capacity Shortage''. The challenge is to find adequate solutions that satisfies the demands from market participants, systems operators and market actors. This mainly contains problems of both operational and long term strategic character which primarily touches the following main areas: Peak load coverage, operating security and reserves, network capacity and environmental aspects. The results are reported under these headings from several relevant projects. The major challenges in the future will be: 1) Development of mechanisms that bring the right incentives for improved use of the flexibility in the end consumption. 2) Adaptation of the market and organisational conditions in order to improve the consumer flexibility. 3) Further development of the incentive structures for the network owners and systems operators so that the existing transferring capacity is used as well as possible and the macro economic development of the network is encouraged. 4) Profit estimations and financing of larger co-originated connections particularly across the country borders, in deregulated power markets. Particularly the first two challenges are probably a condition for the deregulated power markets as the Nordic one, shall be able to survive in the long run. In an appendix main data studied in the projects as a basis for this report, are referred

  2. Research on the Method of Enterprise Knowledge Management Based on Web 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Chengyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available [Purpose/significance] It is the key for the research of enterprise knowledge management to improve the efficiency of enterprise knowledge management by using the advantages of Web 2.0, such as its fastness, public participation and strong interaction. [Method/process] Based on the analysis of the characteristics and main technologies of Web 2.0, this paper discussed the role and application of Web 2.0 related technologies in the enterprise knowledge management, and then put forward the enterprise knowledge management methods based on Web 2.0, including knowledge acquisition method, knowledge classification and organization method, knowledge sharing and evaluation method by usingWeb2 .0. [Result/conclusion] Through the introduction of Web 2.0 related technologies into the knowledge management of enterprises, the research provides convenient and low-cost tools and methods for knowledge management related activities, and helps all users to participate in enterprise knowledge management activities quickly and easily.

  3. Ecological research and environmental management: We need different interfaces based on different knowledge types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Frédéric; Cordonnier, Thomas; Bilger, Isabelle; Jappiot, Marielle; Chauvin, Christophe; Gosselin, Marion

    2018-04-25

    The role of ecological science in environmental management has been discussed by many authors who recognize that there is a persistent gap between ecological science and environmental management. Here we develop theory through different perspectives based on knowledge types, research categories and research-management interface types, which we combine into a common framework. To draw out insights for bridging this gap, we build our case by:We point out the complementarities as well as the specificities and limitations of the different types of ecological research, ecological knowledge and research-management interfaces, which is of major importance for environmental management and research policies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Training Nuclear Power Specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    2003-01-01

    Situation of preparation of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. In view with decision to decommission Unit 1, the Ignalina NPP is limiting the number of new personnel to fill in vacancies. The main attention is given to the training courses for improvement skills of existing Ignalina NPP, VATESI personnel. Main topics of the training courses are listed. Comparison with previous years on personnel hired and dismissed in Ignalina NPP is made

  5. Knowledge Building in an Online Environment: A Design-Based Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This article explores knowledge-building in an online distance-learning environment. The research examines how knowledge-building principles can be translated into online classroom practice for graduate students. Specifically, how do the course components and the online learning environments created in two online graduate courses contribute to…

  6. Knowledge Co-production at the Research-Practice Interface: Embedded Case Studies from Urban Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay K. Campbell; Erika S. Svendsen; Lara A. Roman

    2016-01-01

    Cities are increasingly engaging in sustainability efforts and investment in green infrastructure, including large-scale urban tree planting campaigns. In this context, researchers and practitioners are working jointly to develop applicable knowledge for planning and managing the urban forest. This paper presents three case studies of knowledge co-production in the...

  7. Doing Knowledge Transfer: Engaging Management and Labor with Research on Employee Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Desre M.; Cole, Donald C.; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    In workplace health interventions, engaging management and union decision makers is considered important for the success of the project, yet little research has described the process of making this happen. A case study of a knowledge-transfer process is presented to describe the practices and processes adopted by a knowledge broker who engaged…

  8. Linking Research and Practice through Teacher Communities: A Place Where Formal and Practical Knowledge Meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J. B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants' roles and knowledge generated by the teacher community. Three patterns emerged pertaining…

  9. Linking research and practice through teacher communities: A place where formal and practical knowledge meet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Ormel, Bart; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Jules

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the links between research and practice across twelve projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities. Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants’ roles, and knowledge generated by the teacher

  10. Academic Perspectives and Experiences of Knowledge Translation: A Qualitative Study of Public Health Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Alex; Zardo, Pauline; McKenzie, Donna Margaret; Ellis, Niki

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the views and experiences of knowledge translation of 14 Australian public health academics. Capacity to engage in knowledge translation is influenced by factors within the academic context and the interaction of the academic and policy environments. Early and mid-career researchers reported a different set of experiences and…

  11. Using knowledge translation as a framework for the design of a research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, Suzanne; Martorella, Géraldine; Catallo, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Knowledge translation has been defined as the synthesis, dissemination, exchange and ethically sound application of knowledge to improve health, resulting in a stronger health-care system. Using KT activities to aid in the adoption of evidence into practice can address current health-care challenges such as increasing organizational practice standards, alleviating the risk for adverse events and meeting practitioner needs for evidence at the bedside. Two general forms of KT have been identified. These being integrated KT and end-of-grant KT. Integrated KT involves the knowledge users in the research team and in the majority of stages of the research process. End-of-grant KT relates to the translation of findings through a well-developed dissemination plan. This paper describes the process of using an integrated knowledge translation approach to design a research protocol that will examine the effectiveness of a web-based patient educational intervention. It begins with a description of integrated knowledge translation, followed by the presentation of a specific case example in which integrated knowledge translation is used to develop a nursing intervention. The major elements of integrated knowledge translation pertain to need for a knowledge user who represents the broad target user group, and who is knowledgeable in the area under investigation and who as authority to enact changes to practice. Use of knowledge users as equal partners within the research team; exploring all feasible opportunities for knowledge exchange; and working with knowledge users to identify all outcomes related to knowledge translation are the other major elements of integrated knowledge translation that are addressed throughout this paper. Furthermore, the relevance of psychosocial or educational interventions to knowledge translation is also discussed as a source of knowledge. In summary, integrated knowledge translation is an important tool for the development of new interventions, as

  12. Research Methods Teaching in Vocational Environments: Developing Critical Engagement with Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, C.; Turner, R.; Sutton, C.; Petersen, C.; Stevens, S.; Swain, J.; Esmond, B.; Schofield, C.; Thackeray, D.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of research methods is regarded as crucial for the UK economy and workforce. However, research methods teaching is viewed as a challenging area for lecturers and students. The pedagogy of research methods teaching within universities has been noted as underdeveloped, with undergraduate students regularly expressing negative dispositions…

  13. New Virginia Cooperative Extension website connects citizens with research-based knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Sutphin, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Virginia Cooperative Extension has revamped its online presence with a new and improved website that connects citizens with the research-based knowledge at Virginia's land-grant universities, Virginia Tech and Virginia State University.

  14. The Right to Research and the New Ways of Disseminating Scientific Knowledge: “Open Access”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús de Benito-Castanedo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article embodies an introduction to the “open access” movement and the main features and tools derived from it. In addition, it raises awareness about the importance of access to research and to scientific knowledge.

  15. Protocol for a qualitative study of knowledge translation in a participatory research project

    OpenAIRE

    Lillehagen, Ida; V?llestad, Nina; Heggen, Kristin; Engebretsen, Eivind

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In this article, we present a methodological design for qualitative investigation of knowledge translation (KT) between participants in a participatory research project. In spite of a vast expansion of conceptual models and frameworks for conducting KT between research and practice, few models emphasise how KTs come about. Better understanding of the actions and activities involved in a KT process is important for promoting diffusion of knowledge and improving patient care. T...

  16. Nanotechnology knowledge diffusion: measuring the impact of the research networking and a strategy for improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Hsinchun; Larson, Catherine A.; Roco, Mihail C.

    2014-09-01

    Given the global increase in public funding for nanotechnology research and development, it is even more important to support projects with promising return on investment. A main return is the benefit to other researchers and to the entire field through knowledge diffusion, invention, and innovation. The social network of researchers is one of the channels through which this happens. This study considers the scientific publication network in the field of nanotechnology, and evaluates how knowledge diffusion through coauthorship and citations is affected in large institutions by the location and connectivity of individual researchers in the network. The relative position and connectivity of a researcher is measured by various social network metrics, including degree centrality, Bonacich Power centrality, structural holes, and betweenness centrality. Leveraging the Cox regression model, we analyzed the temporal relationships between knowledge diffusion and social network measures of researchers in five leading universities in the United States using papers published from 2000 to 2010. The results showed that the most significant effects on knowledge diffusion in the field of nanotechnology were from the structural holes of the network and the degree centrality of individual researchers. The data suggest that a researcher has potential to perform better in knowledge creation and diffusion on boundary-spanning positions between different communities and when he or she has a high level of connectivity in the knowledge network. These observations may lead to improved strategies in planning, conducting, and evaluating multidisciplinary nanotechnology research. The paper also identifies the researchers who made most significant contributions to nanotechnology knowledge diffusion in the networks of five leading U.S. universities.

  17. Mode 2 Knowledge Production in the Context of Medical Research: A Call for Further Clarifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soofi, Hojjat

    2018-03-01

    The traditional researcher-driven environment of medical knowledge production is losing its dominance with the expansion of, for instance, community-based participatory or participant-led medical research. Over the past few decades, sociologists of science have debated a shift in the production of knowledge from traditional discipline-based (Mode 1) to more socially embedded and transdisciplinary frameworks (Mode 2). Recently, scholars have tried to show the relevance of Mode 2 knowledge production to medical research. However, the existing literature lacks detailed clarifications on how a model of Mode 2 knowledge production can be constructed in the context of medical research. This paper calls for such further clarifications. As a heuristic means, the advocacy for a controversial experimental stem cell therapy (Stamina) is examined. It is discussed that the example cannot be considered a step towards Mode 2 medical knowledge production. Nonetheless, the example brings to the fore some complexities of medical knowledge production that need to be further examined including: (1) the shifting landscape of defining and addressing vulnerability of research participants, (2) the emerging overlap between research and practice, and (3) public health implications of revising the standard notions of quality control and accountability.

  18. A structured approach to introduce knowledge management practice in a national nuclear research institution in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daud, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, the Government of Malaysia has launched the Knowledge Management Master Plan with the aim to transform Malaysian from a production-based economy to a knowledge-based economy. In June 2003, the 2nd National Science and Technology policy was launched. The policy puts in place programmes, institutions and partnerships to enhance Malaysian economic position. Several initiatives developed emphasize on the important roles of national nuclear research institutions in the knowledge based economy. The Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) as a national nuclear research institution is thus expected to make significant contributions to the knowledge economy. To a certain extent MINT has been successful in knowledge acquisition and exploitation from more advanced countries as well as in knowledge generation and in the knowledge application and diffusion to the socio-economic sectors. This paper describes a structured approach to introduce the knowledge management practices or initiatives in MINT. It also describes some of the challenges foreseen in adopting the practices. (author)

  19. Innovation and Integrity in Intervention Research: Conceptual Issues, Methodology, and Knowledge Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Beelmann, Andreas; Noam, Gil G; Sommer, Simon

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we introduce the special issue entitled Innovation and Integrity in Intervention Science. Its focus is on essential problems and prospects for intervention research examining two related topics, i.e., methodological issues and research integrity, and challenges in the transfer of research knowledge into practice and policy. The main aims are to identify how to advance methodology in order to improve research quality, examine scientific integrity in the field of intervention science, and discuss future steps to enhance the transfer of knowledge about evidence-based intervention principles into sustained practice, routine activities, and policy decisions. Themes of the special issue are twofold. The first includes questions about research methodology in intervention science, both in terms of research design and methods, as well as data analyses and the reporting of findings. Second, the issue tackles questions surrounding the types of knowledge translation frameworks that might be beneficial to mobilize the transfer of research-based knowledge into practice and public policies. The issue argues that innovations in methodology and thoughtful approaches to knowledge translation can enable transparency, quality, and sustainability of intervention research.

  20. Collaborative ethnography for information systems research Studying knowledge work practices and designing supportive information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Maier

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding knowledge work and supporting it with information systems (ISs are challenging tasks. Knowledge work has changed substantially recently and studies on how knowledge work is currently performed are scarce. Ethnography is the most suitable qualitative research method for studying knowledge work, yet too time-consuming, costly and unfocused for the fast changing IS domain. Moreover, results from qualitative studies need to be transformed into artefacts useful for IS requirements engineering and design. This paper proposes a procedure for collaborative ethnography to study knowledge work practices and inform IS requirements gathering and design illustrated with the case of a collaborative ethnographic study of seven organisations in four European countries performed in a large-scale international IS research and development project. The paper also critically discusses the procedure’s applicability and limitations.

  1. Knowledge mobilization in bridging patient-practitioner-researcher boundaries: A systematic integrative review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona; Booth, Andrew; Appleby, Ben

    2017-11-01

    To review published literature to identify when and how patients and healthcare practitioners have been involved in knowledge mobilization activity and the impact this may have had on their care. Improving patient outcomes, satisfaction and quality of care is increasingly reliant on shared decision-making between health professionals and patients. Knowledge mobilization, at its simplest: "moving knowledge to where it can be most useful" is a growing field of academic study. To date, it appears that much effort has focused on moving knowledge from researchers to healthcare practitioners. Knowledge mobilization to patients is currently under-researched. Integrative review. Methods of integrative review will be used to address the review problem. PRISMA guidelines were used as a general framework to guide structuring and reporting the review. Elements of method-specific reporting guidelines for specific streams of evidence will be used as required. This review will aim to provide a broad and deep understanding of patient-practitioner-researcher engagement in knowledge mobilization activity. This synthesis of the extant literature should offer insights into the optimum characteristics of methods for bridging patient-practitioner-researcher boundaries in knowledge mobilization action. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Knowledge and attitude of postgraduate students in Kenya on ethics in mental health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Amagune

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available untreated. As effort is made to encourage mental health (MH research as an avenue to optimise the management of mental illness,this should be accompanied by adequate knowledge, correct attitude and practice on ethical conduct of research. This study reports the knowledge and attitude among postgraduate students in Kenya on ethics in MH research. Methods. Consenting students undertaking master’s degree courses (n=40 with interest in carrying out MH research were assessed using adapted standard tools for assessing knowledge and attitude. Primary comparison is made on the level of knowledge and attitude between the different cohorts. Results. Participants undertaking postgraduate degrees in medicine, clinical psychology, pharmacy and nursing were individually scored and collectively found to have a medium (n=32, 79.5% or high (n=8, 20.5% level of knowledge. The general attitude towards most aspects of the consent process and confidentiality was observed to be appropriate. Low knowledge of international ethics guidelines was observed. Conclusion. Gaps in knowledge and attitude on ethics among the participants have been identified, and this may initiate the process of appropriate interventions necessary in maintenance of ethical practices in the management of mental illness.

  3. Focus group interviews examining the contribution of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Slevin, Eamonn; Taggart, Laurence

    2017-10-01

    To explore the contribution of clinical nurse specialists in intellectual disability nursing in Ireland. While clinical nurse specialists exist since the 1940s, they have only been a reality in Ireland since 2001. While the role of clinical nurse specialist has developed over the years, it still however is often seen as a complex multifaceted role that causes confusion, frustration and controversy. A exploratory qualitative approach using focus groups with Irish intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists (n = 31). Five focus group interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data to gain insight into the attitudes, perceptions and opinions of the participants. Data were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using Burnard's (Vital Notes for Nurses: Research for Evidence-Based Practice in Healthcare, 2011, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford) framework. Ethical approval was gained from the researcher's university and access granted by the national council for the professional development of nursing/midwifery in Ireland. The study highlights that intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists contribute to and support care delivery across a range of areas including client-focused and family-centred care, staff support, organisation support, community support and supporting other agencies. Overall, the study shows the importance of intellectual disability clinical nurse specialists and their contribution across a range of services, care environments and the support they offer to clients/families/staff/multidisciplinary team members and outside agencies. Ireland is in a unique position to develop knowledge regarding specialist care for people with intellectual disability that can be shared and adapted by other healthcare professionals in other countries that do not have specialised intellectual disability nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Inside the "Black Box" of a Knowledge Translation Program in Applied Health Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Janet; Day, Jo; Britten, Nicky

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present the findings of a participatory realistic evaluation of a 5-year program of health care research intended to promote the translation of knowledge into routine clinical practice. The program was one of the nine pilot Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care funded by the English National Institute for Health Research between 2008 and 2013. Our aim was to delineate the mechanisms by which, and circumstances in which, some projects carried out under the program achieved success in knowledge translation while others were frustrated. Using qualitative methods, we examined how closer collaboration between academics and clinicians worked in four purposefully chosen case studies. In a synthesis of the findings, we produced a "black box" model of how knowledge translation was enabled by the activation of nine mechanisms. These are summarized in the form of five simple rules for promoting knowledge translation through collaborations based on principles of coproduction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Knowledge, attitudes and practices around health research: the perspective of physicians-in-training in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Sadaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health research training is an essential component of medical education and a vital exercise to help develop physician research skills. This study was carried out to assess the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices towards research amongst a group of Post Graduate Medical Trainees (PGMTs' at Aga Khan University (AKU, Pakistan. Methods A cross sectional health research survey was carried out on all PGMTs' at AKU Pakistan. AKU is a tertiary care health facility which offers residency in 28 specialties and fellowship in 16 programs. Knowledge, attitudes and practices related to health research were assessed using a pretested, structured and validated questionnaire. Health research related practices of the residents were examined using questions graded on Likert scale. Results Mean percentage score ± SD on the knowledge scale was 36.9% ± 20.2 and 47.19% ± 25.18 on the attitude scale. Of 104(55.6% who had previously participated in research 28(26.9% had been involved in basic science research only, 62(59.6% in clinical research and 14(13.5% had participated in both clinical and basic science research projects. 88(47.1% planned to pursue a future research career. Those who planned to pursue a future research career had more positive health research attitudes p Conclusion PGMTs' demonstrate inadequate knowledge, while they have moderate attitudes towards health research. Residency training and research facilities at the institution need to undergo major transformation in order to encourage meaningful research by resident trainees.

  6. Wissensstrukturierung im Unterricht: Neuere Forschung zur Wissensreprasentation und ihre Anwendung in der Didaktik (Knowledge Structuring in Instruction: Recent Research on Knowledge Representation and Its Application in the Classroom).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsiedler, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Asks whether theories of knowledge representation provide a basis for the development of theories of knowledge structuring in instruction. Discusses codes of knowledge, surface versus deep structures, semantic networks, and multiple memory systems. Reviews research on teaching, external representation of cognitive structures, hierarchical…

  7. Regional IS Knowledge Networks: Elaborating the Theme of Relevance of IS Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Söderström

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the theme of the relevance of IS research. Based on recent experiments and experiences in the borderland between research and practice and politics we suggest some additions to the discussion of the IS research relevance in Fitzgerald (2001. One addition concerns relevance to whom, where we suggest considering a regional relevance through cultivation of regional IS knowledge networks. Such networks comprise regional knowledge production in collaboration between researchers and practitioners, and results are made public and tested in other organizations in addition to the research sites. This is closely related to the view of knowledge and research put forward by American pragmatism. A second addition is to complement Fitzgerald's suggestion to expose researchers to practice with the suggestion to expose practitioners to research. It is just as difficult to learn the 'true nature' of research from reading the executive summary in MIS Quarterly as it is to learn the 'true nature' of practice from a couple of interviews with practitioners. A regional IS knowledge network is an excellent opportunity for such double exposure.

  8. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers related to research utilization: a survey among pharmacists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Yee; Hatah, Ernieda

    2017-04-01

    Background Research utilization is part of evidence-based practice referring to the process of reviewing and critiquing scientific research and applying the findings to one's own clinical practice. Many studies on research utilization have been conducted with doctors and nurses, but to our knowledge, none have been investigated amongst pharmacists. Objective To assess research utilization and its barriers among pharmacists and identify potential influencing factors. Setting Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional survey was administered online and by mail to a convenient sample of pharmacists working in hospitals, health clinics, and retail pharmacies in rural and urban areas. Main outcome measure Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results Six hundred surveys were mailed to potential respondents, and 466 were returned (77.7% response rate). Twenty-eight respondents completed the survey online. The respondents' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices were found to be moderate. Research utilization was associated with respondents' knowledge and attitude scores (P < 0.001). When factors related to research utilization were modelled, higher educational level was associated with higher level of research utilization (P < 0.001) while less involvement in journal clubs, more years of service (3-7 years and more than 7 years) were associated with low and moderate research utilization, respectively. The main reported barrier to research utilization was lack of sufficient authority to change patient care procedures. Conclusion Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices can be improved by encouraging pharmacists to pursue higher degrees, promoting active participation in institutions' journal clubs, and introducing senior clinical pharmacist specialization.

  9. How do third sector organisations use research and other knowledge? A systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Rebecca; Anderson, Rob; Cooper, Chris

    2015-06-06

    Third sector organisations (TSOs) are a well-established component of health care provision in the UK's NHS and other health systems, but little is known about how they use research and other forms of knowledge in their work. There is an emerging body of evidence exploring these issues but there is no review of this literature. This scoping review summarises what is known about how health and social care TSOs use research and other forms of knowledge in their work. A systematic search of electronic databases was carried out with initial exploratory searching of knowledge mobilisation websites, contacting authors, and hand searching of journals. The literature was narratively summarised to describe how TSOs use knowledge in decision making. Ten qualitative and mixed methods studies were retrieved. They show that TSOs wish to be "evidence-informed" in their decision making, and organisational context influences the kinds of research and knowledge they prefer, as well as how they use it. Barriers to research use include time, staff skill, resources and the acontextual nature of some academic research. Appropriate approaches to knowledge mobilisation may include using research intermediaries, involving TSOs in research, and better description of interventions and contexts in academic publications to aid applying it in the multi-disciplinary contexts of TSOs. TSOs identified specific benefits of using research, such as confidence that services were good quality, ability to negotiate with stakeholders and funders, and saving time and resources through implementing interventions shown to be effective. The small number of included studies means the findings need further confirmation through primary research. As the contribution of health and social care TSOs to service delivery is growing, the need to understand how they mobilise research and other forms of knowledge will continue. The research community could 1) develop relationships with TSOs to support the design and

  10. Proceedings of the specialist research meeting on 'the latest study on analysis of trace amount of elements using activation analysis and the results and future prospects of activation analysis using KUR'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebihara, Mitsuru; Shibata, Seiichi; Sekimoto, Shun

    2014-01-01

    This Specialist Research Meeting report is the summary of the lectures that were delivered at the Specialist Research Meeting of Kyoto University Reactor Research Institute on January 25, 2013 and October 30, 2013. These meetings were held under the subtitles of 'Current state of trace element analysis using activation analysis' and 'Achievements and future prospects of activation analysis using Kyoto University research reactor (KUR)', respectively. At the former meeting, 14 speeches were delivered including the following: (1) introduction of Australia Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), (2) determination of element concentration in the hairs in frequent ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) occurrence zones, (3) effects of vegetation on the acid neutralizing capacity of soil, (4) activation analysis of geological samples, and (5) current situation of KUR. At the latter meeting, 15 speeches were delivered including the following: (1) neutron activation analysis of iron meteorites and Chinese herbal medicines / herbs, (2) neutron activation analysis at KUR using IAEA-k0 method, (3) current state of KUR, (4) development and applications of automatic prompt gamma-ray analysis equipment. (A.O.)

  11. Review and reflection of research on the knowledge structure of physical education teachers in the past 20 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Bochun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available From the view of knowledge,methodology and other perspectives of regression and reflection on the knowledge structure of the PE teachers of the status quo in the past 20 years,it is considered that the base of the existing knowledge of research is primarily on the knowledge view of objectivism,the perspective of research is restricted.For many years research category of the knowledge structure of PE teachers was consistently confined to discipline knowledge + educational knowledge + culture knowledge.Research Methodology and methods are mainly confined to Speculative theory research guided by rational debate methodology and questionnaire survey research guided by positivist methodology.Due to the impact of the knowledge view of objectivism,rational debate focuses on the objectivity theory knowledge ought status in knowledge structure of PE teachers.Questionnaire survey research is mainly based on attitude survey research,reflecting the ideal state of knowledge structure of physical education teachers.Suggestion: update knowledge,enrich methodological the guidance,pay more attention to the actual condition of knowledge structure of physical education teachers,reveal physical education teachers in the context of the formation,development,and application patterns of their knowledge structure in sports teaching situation,etc.

  12. Beyond "on" or "with": Questioning Power Dynamics and Knowledge Production in "Child-Oriented" Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunleth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    By taking a reflexive approach to research methodology, this article contributes to discussions on power dynamics and knowledge production in the social studies of children. The author describes and analyzes three research methods that she used with children--drawing, child-led tape-recording and focus group discussions. These methods were carried…

  13. Leveraging the Relationship: Knowledge Processes in School-University Research Networks of Master's Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; Daly, Alan J.; Liou, Yi-Hwa; Van Swet, Jacqueline; Beijaard, Douwe; Bergen, Theo C. M.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the way developing, sharing and using of research-based knowledge occurred in the school-university research network of a master's programme for in-service teachers in the Netherlands. Over a 10-month period, a combination of quantitative and qualitative network data was collected. Data were analysed at three network…

  14. Experience, Knowledge and Evidence: A Comparison of Research Relations in Health and Anthropology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKevitt, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Patient and public involvement in health research has been promoted by the United Kingdom's Department of Health and its research funding agencies for at least a decade. The policy rhetoric through which it is promoted is based on the idea that patients' experiential knowledge can be harnessed to improve the quality and relevance of health…

  15. Social Impact of Participatory Health Research: Collaborative Non-Linear Processes of Knowledge Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, Tineke A.; Cook, Tina; Rämgård, Margaretha; Kleba, Elisabeth; Harris, Janet; Wallerstein, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Social impact, defined as an effect on society, culture, quality of life, community services, or public policy beyond academia, is widely considered as a relevant requirement for scientific research, especially in the field of health care. Traditionally, in health research, the process of knowledge transfer is rather linear and one-sided and has…

  16. Acts of Discovery: Using Collaborative Research to Mobilize and Generate Knowledge about Visual Arts Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donna Mathewson

    2014-01-01

    Visual arts teachers engage in complex work on a daily basis. This work is informed by practical knowledge that is rarely examined or drawn on in research or in the development of policy. Focusing on the work of secondary visual arts teachers, this article reports on a research program conducted in a regional area of New South Wales, Australia.…

  17. Teachers' Reported Knowledge and Implementation of Research-Based Classroom and Behavior Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tara C.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Oliver, Regina M.; Chow, Jason C.; Gordon, Jason R.; Mahany, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers' reported knowledge about and implementation of research-based classroom and behavior management strategies were examined. A total of 160 elementary teachers from two districts in different regions of the same state completed the researcher-developed "Survey of Classroom and Behavior Management." On average, teachers reported to…

  18. Feminist Approaches to Triangulation: Uncovering Subjugated Knowledge and Fostering Social Change in Mixed Methods Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the deployment of triangulation in the service of uncovering subjugated knowledge and promoting social change for women and other oppressed groups. Feminist approaches to mixed methods praxis create a tight link between the research problem and the research design. An analysis of selected case studies of feminist praxis…

  19. Perspectives of an Interdisciplinaryg Research Team to Engage Practice: Lessons from a Knowledge Exchange Trainee Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Robin L.; Johnston, Grace M.; McVorran, Shauna M.; Burge, Fred I.

    2010-01-01

    End-of-life (EOL) care is an area of health services that will ultimately affect us all. To share the knowledge emerging from EOL research and to address inequities in the quality of EOL care in Nova Scotia, a knowledge exchange (KE) trainee was hired to translate research and surveillance into a Surveillance Report. The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon this initiative and share the research team's perspectives on their KE experiences. We describe four key competencies of the KE trainee selected, and discuss lessons learned from this KE trainee experience, to expand our understanding of KE. PMID:21532769

  20. Implementing Knowledge Translation Strategies in Funded Research in Canada and Australia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Moore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature describing the use of knowledge translation strategies to increase the relevance and usability of research, yet there are few real-world examples of how this works in practice. This case study reports on the steps taken to embed knowledge translation strategies in the Movember Foundation's Men’s Mental Health Grant Rounds in 2013–14, which were implemented in Australia and Canada, and on the support provided to the applicants in developing their knowledge translation plans. It identifies the challenges faced by the Men’s Mental Health Program Team and how these were resolved. The strategies explored include articulating knowledge translation requirements, ensuring a common understanding of knowledge translation, assessing knowledge translation plans, methods of engaging end users, and building capacity with applicants. An iterative approach to facilitating knowledge translation planning within project development was rolled out in Australia just prior to Canada so that lessons learned were immediately available to refine the second roll out. Implementation included the use of external knowledge translation expertise, the development of knowledge translation plans, and the need for internal infrastructure to support monitoring and reporting. Differences in the Australian and Canadian contexts may point to differential exposure to the concepts and practices of knowledge translation. This case study details an example of designing and implementing an integrated knowledge translation strategy that moves beyond traditional dissemination models. Lessons learned point to the importance of a long lead-up time, the use of knowledge translation expertise for capacity building, the need for flexible implementation, and the need for efficiencies in supporting applicants.

  1. Health researchers in Alberta: an exploratory comparison of defining characteristics and knowledge translation activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birdsell Judy M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canadian funding agencies are no longer content to support research that solely advances scientific knowledge, and key directives are now in place to promote research transfer to policy- and decision-makers. Therefore, it is necessary to improve our understanding of how researchers are trained and supported to facilitate knowledge translation activities. In this study, we investigated differences in health researcher characteristics and knowledge translation activities. Methods Our sample consisted of 240 health researchers from three Alberta universities. Respondents were classified by research domain [basic (n = 72 or applied (n = 168] and faculty [medical school (n = 128 or other health science (n = 112]. We examined our findings using Mode I and Mode II archetypes of knowledge production, which allowed us to consider the scholarly and social contexts of knowledge production and translation. Results Differences among health researcher professional characteristics were not statistically significant. There was a significant gender difference in the applied researcher faculty group, which was predominantly female (p p p = .01; Mode II, p p = .025 and number of publications (medical school > other faculties; p = .004. There was an interaction effect for research domain and faculty group for number of publications (p = .01, in that applied researchers in medical faculties published more than their peers in other faculty groups. Conclusion Our findings illustrate important differences between health researchers and provide beginning insights into their professional characteristics and engagement in Mode I and Mode II activities. A future study designed to examine these dimensions in greater detail, including potential covariates across more varied institutions, would yield richer insights and enable an examination of relative influences, needs and costs of each mode of activity.

  2. Education of specialists-cartographers in Lviv Polytechnic National University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ярема

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the system of future specialists-cartographers education in Lviv polytechnic national university. Main targets of the department of cartography and geospatial modelling are listed. Key research areas of the department, the educational specifics of students at «Bachelor» and «Master‘s» levels are described. At present, the main task of the department is to train specialists with good knowledge of cartographic investigation method, GIS technologies, because digital cartography, web-mapping, web-portal are things of the future. Cartography specialists must know how to create traditional maps (topographic, thematic, tourist using computer technologies and electronic maps that can be used in the creation of GIS systems, informational resources in navigation, military affairs and so on. The main scientific direction of the department is general geographic and thematic mapping, GIS mapping and development of GIS, history of the cartography, mathematic modelling in geodesy, astronomy and geophysics. The department trains bachelors on specialty 103 «Earth sciences», specialization 103.02 «Cartography». The feature of master’s education is maximum approach to education content for future employment. Master degree students are improving their professional knowledge and skills received during their study for the bachelor’s degree. They are deeply studying modern methods of cartographic digital terrain models with GIS technologies, combining their work with development of cartographic databases. They get acquainted with the principles of base sets of geospatial data, conduct thematic evaluation and forecast maps, using GIS. The students also study methods and order of design, edition, and maps development in detail. Modern mapping needs to be more efficient in the use of both natural and human resources, reflect a complex system man - society - environment. Such problem can be solved using various modeling techniques with

  3. Evaluation Research as a Mechanism for Critical Inquiry and Knowledge Construction in Architectural and Urban Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf M. Salama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article responds to the misconceptions that continue to characterize the delivery of knowledge content in architectural courses. Based on reviewing the literature on pedagogy the paper explores the value and benefits of introducing evaluation research as a mechanism for critical inquiry and knowledge construction in theory courses in architecture and urbanism. A framework is developed and employed to demonstrate the way in which this type of learning can be incorporated.   The development and implementation of a series of in-class and off campus exercises in two different contexts reveal that structured actions and experiences help students to be in control over their learning while invigorating their understanding of the body of knowledge delivered in a typical lecture format. It firmly believed that this would offer students multiple learning opportunities while fostering their capabilities to shift from passive listeners to active learners and from knowledge consumers to knowledge producers.

  4. Identified research directions for using manufacturing knowledge earlier in the product lifecycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Thomas D; Hartman, Nathan W; Rosche, Phil; Fischer, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Design for Manufacturing (DFM), especially the use of manufacturing knowledge to support design decisions, has received attention in the academic domain. However, industry practice has not been studied enough to provide solutions that are mature for industry. The current state of the art for DFM is often rule-based functionality within Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems that enforce specific design requirements. That rule-based functionality may or may not dynamically affect geometry definition. And, if rule-based functionality exists in the CAD system, it is typically a customization on a case-by-case basis. Manufacturing knowledge is a phrase with vast meanings, which may include knowledge on the effects of material properties decisions, machine and process capabilities, or understanding the unintended consequences of design decisions on manufacturing. One of the DFM questions to answer is how can manufacturing knowledge, depending on its definition, be used earlier in the product lifecycle to enable a more collaborative development environment? This paper will discuss the results of a workshop on manufacturing knowledge that highlights several research questions needing more study. This paper proposes recommendations for investigating the relationship of manufacturing knowledge with shape, behavior, and context characteristics of product to produce a better understanding of what knowledge is most important. In addition, the proposal includes recommendations for investigating the system-level barriers to reusing manufacturing knowledge and how model-based manufacturing may ease the burden of knowledge sharing. Lastly, the proposal addresses the direction of future research for holistic solutions of using manufacturing knowledge earlier in the product lifecycle.

  5. A Descriptive Research on Knowledge Management Practices in Educational Institutions at Jalandhar and Phagwara

    OpenAIRE

    Thakur, Preeti

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper seeks to find out the various Knowledge Management Practices used by education institutes in Jalandhar and Phagwara and to find out the factors which increase the performance of employees by using the Knowledge Management Practices in their institutions. Primary as well as secondary data has been used to carry out the research. Sample size of 150 has been taken from 5 educational institutes located in city of jalandher. Data collection sources are Apeejay Institute o...

  6. Knowledge of the Animal Welfare Act and Animal Welfare Regulations Influences Attitudes toward Animal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recent public-opinion polls indicate that Americans have shown a decline in support for animal experimentation, and several reports suggest a relationship between people's knowledge of animal welfare regulations and their attitudes toward animal research. Therefore, this study was designed to assess respondent's knowledge of several provisions in the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and Animal Welfare Regulations (AWR), and determine whether exposure to elements of this legislation would influence an individual's attitudes toward the use of animals in research. A survey was used to assess knowledge of animal research regulations and attitudes toward animal research from a sample of individuals recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing marketplace. Results from study 1 confirmed the hypothesis that respondents had little knowledge of various federal regulations that govern animal research activities. Data from study 2 revealed that exposure to elements of the AWA and AWR influenced participants’ attitudes toward the use of animals in research. These results suggest that providing information to the general public about the AWA and AWR that protect laboratory animals from abuse and neglect may help alleviate concerns about using animals in research settings. PMID:25651094

  7. [Translation of knowledge on cervical cancer: is there a gap between research on causes and research on patient care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, David; Ochoa, Héctor; García, Luis; Castaño, Víctor

    2014-02-01

    This article constructs a map on the translation of knowledge concerning cervical cancer, based on citation networks analysis and the use of Gene Ontology terms and Medical Subject Headings. We identified two areas of research that are poorly interconnected and differ in structure, content, and evolution. One focuses on causes of cancer and the other on patient care. The first research area showed a knowledge translation process where basic research and clinical research are communicated through a set of articles that consolidate human papillomavirus infection as the necessary cause of cervical cancer. The first area aims to prevent HPV infection and the development of cervical cancer, while the second aims to stage and treat the disease.

  8. Knowledge Translation Tools are Emerging to Move Neck Pain Research into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Joy C; Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita R

    2013-01-01

    Development or synthesis of the best clinical research is in itself insufficient to change practice. Knowledge translation (KT) is an emerging field focused on moving knowledge into practice, which is a non-linear, dynamic process that involves knowledge synthesis, transfer, adoption, implementation, and sustained use. Successful implementation requires using KT strategies based on theory, evidence, and best practice, including tools and processes that engage knowledge developers and knowledge users. Tools can provide instrumental help in implementing evidence. A variety of theoretical frameworks underlie KT and provide guidance on how tools should be developed or implemented. A taxonomy that outlines different purposes for engaging in KT and target audiences can also be useful in developing or implementing tools. Theoretical frameworks that underlie KT typically take different perspectives on KT with differential focus on the characteristics of the knowledge, knowledge users, context/environment, or the cognitive and social processes that are involved in change. Knowledge users include consumers, clinicians, and policymakers. A variety of KT tools have supporting evidence, including: clinical practice guidelines, patient decision aids, and evidence summaries or toolkits. Exemplars are provided of two KT tools to implement best practice in management of neck pain-a clinician implementation guide (toolkit) and a patient decision aid. KT frameworks, taxonomies, clinical expertise, and evidence must be integrated to develop clinical tools that implement best evidence in the management of neck pain.

  9. Sharing Wisdom(s) to Enrich Knowledge: Working in a Transdisciplinary Research Team in Medical Anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceller-Maicas, Natalia

    2015-06-01

    This paper explains our experience working in a transdisciplinary research team focused on adolescence mental health. It introduces briefly the two key theoretical concepts: participation and transdisciplinarity. In order to be followed with a deep description of the methodology and the creation of the two principal materials resulting from our research: a guide of best practices in adolescent mental health, and a documentary film. Showing in a practical way how the research could be enhanced by the sharing of knowledge.

  10. How Could Nurse Researchers Apply Theory to Generate Knowledge More Efficiently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lor, Maichou; Backonja, Uba; Lauver, Diane R

    2017-09-01

    Reports of nursing research often do not provide adequate information about whether, and how, researchers applied theory when conducting their studies. Unfortunately, the lack of adequate application and explication of theory in research impedes development of knowledge to guide nursing practice. To clarify and exemplify how to apply theory in research. First we describe how researchers can apply theory in phases of research. Then we share examples of how three research teams applied one theory to these phases of research in three different studies of preventive behaviors. Nurse researchers can review and refine ways in which they apply theory in guiding research and writing publications. Scholars can appreciate how one theory can guide researchers in building knowledge about a given condition such as preventive behaviors. Clinicians and researchers can collaborate to apply and examine the usefulness of theory. If nurses had improved understanding of theory-guided research, they could better assess, select, and apply theory-guided interventions in their practices. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Attitudes regarding specialist referrals in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, G; Durham, J A; Preshaw, P M

    2007-02-24

    To examine the attitudes of dental practitioners towards specialist periodontal referral in the North East of England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 10 practitioners. Interviews continued until data saturation occurred. The data were organised using a framework and analysed by two researchers working independently. Perceptions of periodontal disease and treatment appear to be heavily influenced by the NHS remuneration system. Treatment in general practice was limited to simple scaling and there was an apparent reluctance to treat advanced periodontitis. Such cases were commonly referred to specialists, confirming the demand for a referral service in periodontics. The perceived potential for medico-legal consequences was a strong driver of referrals. Distance to the referral centre and the perceived costs of treatment were significant barriers to referral. Dentists valued the specialist's personal reputation and clinical skills more highly than academic status. Deficiencies in communication between primary and secondary care were highlighted. Increased resources are required to manage periodontal diseases within the NHS. There is a need for a periodontal referral service in the North East of England to improve accessibility to specialist care. This would appear to be most appropriately delivered by increased numbers of specialist practitioners.

  12. Treatment Algorithm of a Hypertension Specialist

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Peleška, Jan; Anger, Z.; Buchtela, David; Tomečková, Marie; Veselý, Arnošt; Zvárová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, Suppl. 2 (2007), S 383-S 383 ISSN 0952-1178. [European Meeting on Hypertension /17./. 15.06.2007-19.06.2007, Milan] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET200300413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : treatment algorithm for hypertension * hypertension specialist Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  13. Framing of scientific knowledge as a new category of health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, Luis; Fernandez, Ana; Madden, Rosamond; Lukersmith, Sue; Colagiuri, Ruth; Torkfar, Ghazal; Sturmberg, Joachim

    2014-12-01

    The new area of health system research requires a revision of the taxonomy of scientific knowledge that may facilitate a better understanding and representation of complex health phenomena in research discovery, corroboration and implementation. A position paper by an expert group following and iterative approach. 'Scientific evidence' should be differentiated from 'elicited knowledge' of experts and users, and this latter typology should be described beyond the traditional qualitative framework. Within this context 'framing of scientific knowledge' (FSK) is defined as a group of studies of prior expert knowledge specifically aimed at generating formal scientific frames. To be distinguished from other unstructured frames, FSK must be explicit, standardized, based on the available evidence, agreed by a group of experts and subdued to the principles of commensurability, transparency for corroboration and transferability that characterize scientific research. A preliminary typology of scientific framing studies is presented. This typology includes, among others, health declarations, position papers, expert-based clinical guides, conceptual maps, classifications, expert-driven health atlases and expert-driven studies of costs and burden of illness. This grouping of expert-based studies constitutes a different kind of scientific knowledge and should be clearly differentiated from 'evidence' gathered from experimental and observational studies in health system research. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Using a research framework to identify knowledge gaps in research on food marketing to children in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kathy; Kelly, Bridget; King, Lesley

    2009-06-01

    Research in the field of food marketing to children requires a better understanding of the research gaps in order to inform policy development. The purpose of this paper was to propose a framework for classifying food marketing research, using Australian research on food marketing to children to demonstrate how this framework can be used to determine knowledge gaps. A literature review of research databases and 'grey' material was conducted to identify research from the previous 10 years. Studies were classified according to their research focus, and media type, as either: exposure, including content analyses; effects of exposure, including opinions, attitudes and actions resulting from food marketing exposure; regulations, including the type and level of regulation that applies to food marketing; or breaches of regulations, including instances where marketing regulations have been violated. The majority of Australian research on food marketing to children has focused on television advertising and exposure research. Research has consistently shown that the content of food marketing directed at children is predominately for unhealthy foods. There is a lack of research on the effects of food marketing, which would be valuable to inform policy. The development of a logical framework for food marketing research allows for the identification of research gaps and enables research priorities to be identified.

  15. The changing role of the subject specialist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Cotta-Schønberg

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available As we all know, libraries are these years rapidly undergoing change on unparalleled scale. Evidently, this applies to librarians, too, and not the least to that important category of library staff, the subject specialist. As recruiting and education of library workers differ from country to country it is difficult to give a detailed, generally valid description of the subject librarian in libraries, but I believe that you can describe an ideal model of subject librarianship as follows: Within each of the major subject disciplines covered by the library, the library should have a subject specialist preferably with a master degree or at least a bachelor degree in the particular subject discipline. The role of the subject specialist is to perform four basic functions where extensive subject knowledge is considered to be necessary: selecting and classifying books, assisting users with advanced subject inquiries, giving subject-specific courses in information retrieval, and maintaining liaison with relevant academic departments and centres. Personally, I know this system very well since I got employment in the Royal Library in Copenhagen as a subject specialist in psychology in the very month I finished my degree in psychology from the University of Copenhagen, back in 1973. The subject librarian system at the Royal Library in Copenhagen was patterned on the ideal model, as I just described it, and it was closely paralleled in the other academic libraries in Denmark, also the new university libraries which were founded in the seventies.

  16. Does the specialist nurse enhance or deskill the general nurse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Z; Luffingham, N

    Much conflict and confusion surrounds the title and role of the specialist nurse, leading in some instances to disharmony between general and specialist nurses. It has been suggested that too many highly specialized nurses in a general area may lead to a deskilled workforce and fragmented care. Attempts to define the key concepts of specialist practice as described by the UKCC has resulted in elitism, conflict and abuse of the title. One suggestion to eliminate this conflict is for specialist nurses to achieve key competencies that encompass the role of the clinical expert. These key competencies should be devised by specialist nurses, in the absence of national guidelines, and be agreed by employers. They should incorporate the key roles of: change agent, expert clinician, educator, researcher and coordinator. It is contended that if all concerned have a clearer definition of the title, role and what is expected from the specialist nurse then this will result in reduced conflict and improved quality of care.

  17. Methodological bases of innovative training of specialists in nanotechnology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGOVSKY Oleg Lvovich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of innovative training system aimed at highly intellectual specialists in the area of nanotechnologies for Kazakhstan’s economy demands establishment and development of nanotechnological market in the country, teaching of innovative engineering combined with consistent research, integration of trained specialists with latest technologies and sciences at the international level. Methodological aspects of training competitive specialists for nanotechnological field are specific. The paper presents methodological principles of innovative training of specialists for science-intensive industry that were realized according to grant given by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

  18. Hegemonic structure of basic, clinical and patented knowledge on Ebola research: a US army reductionist initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Ortiz, David; Ortega-Sánchez-de-Tagle, José; Castaño, Victor M

    2015-04-19

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola) is still a highly lethal infectious disease long affecting mainly neglected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, this disease is now considered a potential worldwide threat. In this paper, we present an approach to understand how the basic, clinical and patent knowledge on Ebola is organized and intercommunicated and what leading factor could be shaping the evolution of the knowledge translation process for this disease. A combination of citation network analysis; analysis of Medical heading Subject (MeSH) and Gene Ontology (GO) terms, and quantitative content analysis for patents and scientific literature, aimed to map the organization of Ebola research was carried out. We found six putative research fronts (i.e. clusters of high interconnected papers). Three research fronts are basic research on Ebola virus structural proteins: glycoprotein, VP40 and VP35, respectively. There is a fourth research front of basic research papers on pathogenesis, which is the organizing hub of Ebola research. A fifth research front is pre-clinical research focused on vaccines and glycoproteins. Finally, a clinical-epidemiology research front related to the disease outbreaks was identified. The network structure of patent families shows that the dominant design is the use of Ebola virus proteins as targets of vaccines and other immunological treatments. Therefore, patents network organization resembles the organization of the scientific literature. Specifically, the knowledge on Ebola would flow from higher (clinical-epidemiology) to intermediated (cellular-tissular pathogenesis) to lower (molecular interactions) levels of organization. Our results suggest a strong reductionist approach for Ebola research probably influenced by the lethality of the disease. On the other hand, the ownership profile of the patent families network and the main researches relationship with the United State Army suggest a strong involvement of this military

  19. Action-research and the elaboration of teaching knowledge in sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nizete de Azevedo

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze the way in which a training process, in which the methodological option approaches an action-research in teacher education, contributes with the elaboration of teaching knowledge in sciences by a group of teachers of the initial school years. In colaborative situations of teaching knowledge, those teachers elect education problems, for which they seek for solutions through planned, developed and reflected actions. We explored data obtained from a wide research, realized in a public school which took as basis this formative process. The results analysed under a qualitative approach show that the action-research contributes with the elaboration of the teaching knowledge, creating situations of learning necessary to the organization and development of education. We identified important knowledge related to indicating elements of learning about teaching, such as self-organization and formation, the disposition to study and to research, a way to teach sciences through investigative activities, the construction of cooperative practice at school, the articulation of science teaching with the alphabetization process in the native language, the consideration of the school's social and cultural context in its teaching plans, among others. Those results take us to reinforce the potential of action-research on teacher’s formation and on the improvement of the practiced teaching.

  20. The educator professional knowledge: research trends and field of action in teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Adriana Castañeda Mosquera

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring diverse stages in the research on the educator, passing through three specific moments: in the first one, the research focuses on the teacher’s skills; in the second, on the education philosophy, and finally, the knowledge of the educator is analyzed in the third one.  The professional knowledge of teaching diverges from the exercise of a specific discipline; thus, for example, to be a teacher of music is not the same thing as being a musician. From this perspective, two different research approaches on the professional knowledge of the teacher are herein presented: the first one is that of the Research and School Renewal Group (IRES from the University of Seville, while the other comes from the research group Through the Classrooms of Colombia (INVAUCOL, from the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional of Colombia.  After analyzing the panorama about the teacher’s professional knowledge, the article closes by asking some questions and advancing some proposals on the formation of music educators.

  1. An Analytical Framework for Delirium Research in Palliative Care Settings: Integrated Epidemiologic, Clinician-Researcher, and Knowledge User Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mohammed; Hosie, Annmarie; Kanji, Salmaan; Momoli, Franco; Bush, Shirley H.; Watanabe, Sharon; Currow, David C.; Gagnon, Bruno; Agar, Meera; Bruera, Eduardo; Meagher, David J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.J.A.; Adamis, Dimitrios; Caraceni, Augusto; Marchington, Katie; Stewart, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Context Delirium often presents difficult management challenges in the context of goals of care in palliative care settings. Objectives The aim was to formulate an analytical framework for further research on delirium in palliative care settings, prioritize the associated research questions, discuss the inherent methodological challenges associated with relevant studies, and outline the next steps in a program of delirium research. Methods We combined multidisciplinary input from delirium researchers and knowledge users at an international delirium study planning meeting, relevant literature searches, focused input of epidemiologic expertise, and a meeting participant and coauthor survey to formulate a conceptual research framework and prioritize research questions. Results Our proposed framework incorporates three main groups of research questions: the first was predominantly epidemiologic, such as delirium occurrence rates, risk factor evaluation, screening, and diagnosis; the second covers pragmatic management questions; and the third relates to the development of predictive models for delirium outcomes. Based on aggregated survey responses to each research question or domain, the combined modal ratings of “very” or “extremely” important confirmed their priority. Conclusion Using an analytical framework to represent the full clinical care pathway of delirium in palliative care settings, we identified multiple knowledge gaps in relation to the occurrence rates, assessment, management, and outcome prediction of delirium in this population. The knowledge synthesis generated from adequately powered, multicenter studies to answer the framework’s research questions will inform decision making and policy development regarding delirium detection and management and thus help to achieve better outcomes for patients in palliative care settings. PMID:24726762

  2. Critical Issues in Radiation Protection Knowledge Management for Preserving Radiation Protection Research and Development Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-02-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. However, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  3. Knowledge loss risk assessment in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, Minodora; Constantin, Marin; Balaceanu, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a method developed in Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti for knowledge loss risk assessment in nuclear sector, in order to obtain a risk map at departmental and organizational level, by analyzing each position/people. The method starts from the classical method for knowledge loss risk assessment but takes into account the INR characteristics, the particularities of Romanian nuclear market and the difficulties of the classical method to estimate correctly the risk at the job level. A short description of the classical method of knowledge loss risk assessment, the improved method by introducing five new parameters for risk factor of vacant job are presented, how this last method has been applied in some departments from INR Pitesti and the preliminary risk matrix for knowledge loss at organization level is discussed. (authors)

  4. Research in Social Work: the future in the present. Reflections on the portuguese knowledge building process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Marta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The debate surrounding the construction of scientific knowledge within social work is discussed. The social work class seeks new foundations that allow within the context of structural change, the strengthening of professional identity and challenge of the vestiges of intellectual segregation that historical constraints have left. This paper seeks to outline a research strategy for reconciliation and coordination of intellectual and professional work in order to give visibility to new and different domains of interpretation and action, while claiming that considering pluri-perspectives potentiates the knowledge transformation process. Underlining this confluence of complex thinking elements, this article incorporates the space-time dimension and discusses and recognizes the unavoidable circularity as a way to interrogate knowledge that is compartmentalized and fragmented, placing an emphasis both on knowledge and on the interrelationship between knowing, doing, being and relating. In addition, examines the recognition of the nature of those relationships among various disciplines and perspectives.

  5. Critical issues in radiation protection knowledge management for preserving radiation protection research and development capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewji, Shaheen Azim

    2017-01-01

    As a hub of domestic radiation protection capabilities, Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Center for Radiation Protection Knowledge has a mandate to develop and actuate a formal knowledge management (KM) effort. This KM approach exceeds recruitment and training efforts but focuses on formalized strategies for knowledge transfer from outgoing subject matter experts in radiation protection to incoming generations. It is envisioned that such an effort will provide one avenue for preserving domestic capabilities to support stakeholder needs in the federal government and the nuclear industry while continuing to lead and innovate in research and development on a global scale. Furthermore, in the absence of broader coordination within the United States, preservation of radiation protection knowledge continues to be in jeopardy in the absence of a dedicated KM effort.

  6. Once upon a time: Storytelling as a knowledge translation strategy for qualitative researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbonnais, Anne; Michaud, Cécile

    2018-06-10

    Qualitative research should strive for knowledge translation toward the goal of closing the gap between knowledge and practice. However, it is often a challenge in nursing to identify knowledge translation strategies able to illustrate the usefulness of qualitative results in any given context. This article defines storytelling and uses pragmatism to examine storytelling as a strategy to promote the knowledge translation of qualitative results. Pragmatism posits that usefulness is defined by the people affected by the problem and that usefulness is promoted by modalities, like storytelling, that increase sensitivity to an experience. Indeed, stories have the power to give meaning to human behaviors and to trigger emotions, and in doing so bring many advantages. For example, by contextualizing research results and appealing to both the reason and the emotions of audiences, storytelling can help us grasp the usefulness of these research results. Various strategies exist to create stories that will produce an emotional experience capable of influencing readers' or listeners' actions. To illustrate the potential of storytelling as a knowledge translation strategy in health care, we will use our story of discovering this strategy during a qualitative study in a nursing home as an example. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The way you see is what you get. Market research as modes of knowledge production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrisgaard, Sofie Møller; Kjeldgaard, Dannie

    2012-01-01

    Overview This chapter addresses the topic of global market research and questions the conventional understanding of market research techniques as managerial devices used to improve marketing decisions. Instead, this chapter considers market research as a cultural practice. This means that market...... upon market research addresses the question of how the type of insights generated about consumers/markets is structured by the choice of market research method. Based upon an ethnographic study of a global market research technique within the context of advertising, this chapter demonstrates how...... divergent practices and orientations of market research frame the kind of knowledge generated about consumers, markets, products and brands in global markets. The implications of such a reconceptualization of market research concern the refl exivity of managers upon their own marketplace embeddedness...

  8. Discourse, Power, and Knowledge in the Management of "Big Science": The Production of Consensus in a Nuclear Fusion Research Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Extends a Foucauldian view of power/knowledge to the archetypical knowledge-intensive organization, the scientific research laboratory. Describes the discursive production of power/knowledge at the "big science" laboratory conducting nuclear fusion research and illuminates a critical incident in which the fusion research…

  9. [Research in ethnobotany and the return of systematized knowledge to the community: a complex issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzlaff, Rubia Graciela; Peixoto, Ariane Luna

    2009-01-01

    How should information gathered in ethnobotanical research be returned to the social environment where it was generated? What should be taken to the community? These questions motivated the accompaniment of two ethnobotanical studies and their respective proposals for how to return to the community the knowledge associated to plants, systematized by the scientist. It is common for research data to be returned to a community by means of manuals, information booklets, illustrated lists of plants, lectures and courses. Nevertheless, other forms have been prepared that characterize an exchange of knowledge among the scientist and the community, with mutual gains. This study corroborates these alternatives and suggests that the definition of the activities to return knowledge to the community, even that proposed and agreed to at the beginning of the study, be flexible, allowing the inclusion of new needs that arise during the execution of the study.

  10. The Relationship between Research Method and Visual Display: A Study of Conference Proceedings in the Field of Knowledge Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: "Research method" refers to how to conduct research, how to measure progress, and what constitutes success. Visualisation has become the platform for communicating research findings according to Friedman and Smiraglia. Knowledge organization aims to organize knowledge and many researchers employ visualisation in their…

  11. Assessing the effectiveness of a longitudinal knowledge dissemination intervention: Sharing research findings in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhian Twine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination interventions (KDIs are integral to knowledge brokerage activities in research as part of the ethics of practice, but are seldom evaluated. In this case study, we critically reflect on an annual KDI as part of knowledge brokerage activities in the MRC/Wits-Agincourt Unit health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS in rural South Africa from 2001 to 2015. The HDSS findings on births, deaths and migrations, as well as nested research project results, were shared with villagers, village leaders and service providers. The data used for this case study comprised secondary analysis of 13 reports and 762 evaluation forms of annual village-based meetings; records of requests for data from stakeholders; and qualitative analysis of 15 individual and five focus group interviews with local leaders and service providers involving 60 people. Over time, the KDI evolved from taking place over one week a year to being extended over six months, and to include briefings with service providers and local leaders. Attendance at village-level meetings remained low at an average of 3 per cent of the total adult population. Since 2011, the KDI village-based meetings have developed into an embedded community forum for discussion of topical village issues. There has been a decrease in requests for health-care and other services from the research unit, with a concurrent increase in research-related questions and requests for data from service providers, village leaders and political representatives. We conclude that, in this setting, the dissemination of research findings is not a linear exchange of information from the researchers to village residents and their leadership, but is increasingly multi-directional. KDIs are a key component of knowledge brokerage activities and involve, influence and are influenced by other aspects of knowledge brokerage, such as identifying, engaging and connecting with stakeholders and supporting sustainability.

  12. Members' of Parliament knowledge of and attitudes toward health research and funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel R; McGrath, Patrick J; MacDonald, Noni

    2007-10-23

    Establishment of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) in 2000 resulted in increased funding for health research in Canada. Since 2001, the number of proposals submitted to CIHR that, following peer review, are judged to be of scientific merit to warrant funding, has grown by 77%. But many of these proposals do not receive funding because of budget constraints. Given the role of Members of Parliament in setting government funding priorities, we surveyed Members of Parliament about their knowledge of and attitudes toward health research, health research funding and CIHR. All Members of Parliament were invited to participate, or to designate a senior aide to participate, in a 15-minute survey of knowledge of and attitudes toward health research, health research funding and CIHR. Interviews were conducted between July 15, 2006, and Dec. 20, 2006. Responses were analyzed by party affiliation, region and years of service as a Member of Parliament. A total of 101 of 308 Members of Parliament or their designated senior aides participated in the survey. Almost one-third of respondents were senior aides. Most of the respondents (84%) were aware of CIHR, but 32% knew nothing about its role. Participants believed that health research is a critical component of a strong health care system and that it is underfunded. Overall, 78% felt that the percentage of total government spending directed to health research funding was too low; 85% felt the same way about the percentage of government health care spending directed to health research. Fifty-four percent believed that the federal government should provide both funding and guidelines for health research, and 66% believed that the business sector should be the primary source of health research funding. Participants (57%) most frequently defined health research as study into cures or treatments of disease, and 22% of participants were aware that CIHR is the main federal government funding organization for health

  13. Integrating knowledge generation with knowledge diffusion and utilization: a case study analysis of the Consortium for Applied Research and Evaluation in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingilis, Evelyn; Hartford, Kathleen; Schrecker, Ted; Mitchell, Beth; Lent, Barbara; Bishop, Joan

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge diffusion and utilization (KDU) have become a key focus in the health research community because of the limited success to date of research findings to inform health policies, programs and services. Yet, evidence indicates that successful KDU is often predicated on the early involvement of potential knowledge users in the conceptualization and conduct of the research and on the development of a "partnership culture". This study describes the integration of KDU theory with practice via a case study analysis of the Consortium for Applied Research and Evaluation in Mental Health (CAREMH). This qualitative study, using a single-case design, included a number of data sources: proposals, meeting minutes, presentations, publications, reports and curricula vitae of CAREMH members. CAREMH has adopted the following operational strategies to increase KDU capacity: 1) viewing research as a means and not as an end; 2) bringing the university and researcher to the community; 3) using participatory research methods; 4) embracing transdisciplinary research and interactions; and 5) using connectors. Examples of the iterative process between researchers and potential knowledge users in their contribution to knowledge generation, diffusion and utilization are provided. This case study supports the importance of early and ongoing involvement of relevant potential knowledge users in research to enhance its utilization potential. It also highlights the need for re-thinking research funding approaches.

  14. Knowledge Management in Startups: Systematic Literature Review and Future Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Piera Centobelli; Roberto Cerchione; Emilio Esposito

    2017-01-01

    This paper conducts a systematic literature review on knowledge management (KM) in the context of startups in order to analyze the state of the art, identify research gaps and define a future research agenda. The main findings highlight that, even though there is an increasing number of papers on the topic of KM in startups, several issues are still neglected. Specifically, the paper identifies four main gaps in the body of literature. The first gap deals with the environmental and socio-poli...

  15. Context Based Inferences in Research Methodology: The Role of Culture in Justifying Knowledge Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Colin W.; Mason, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on work in epistemology and the philosophy of science, this paper seeks to provide very general reasons for why a comparative perspective needs to be applied to the inferential procedures of research methodologies where these concern the issue of justifying knowledge claims. In particular, the paper explores the role of culture on a number…

  16. Publishing Not Perishing: How Research Students Transition from Novice to Knowledgeable Using Systematic Quantitative Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Catherine; Grignon, Julien; Steven, Rochelle; Guitart, Daniela; Byrne, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Current understandings suggest that three aspects of writing practice underpin the research student publication process: knowledge creation, text production and identity formation. Publishing a literature review is the first opportunity most students have to publish. This article compares the pedagogical benefits of different literature review…

  17. Too much coffee... - Negotiation of Knowledge Forms in Participatory Research Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    Based on a Bakhtinian approach negotiations of knowledge in a workshop with health professionals at two psychiatric wards were analyzed. Our analysis reveals that there is a mismatch between the dialogical context we as participatory-oriented researchers want to invoke and the monological context...

  18. The Relationship between Academics' Conceptions of Knowledge, Research and Teaching--A Metaphor Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Wijnveen, Gerda J.; Van Driel, Jan H.; Van Der Rijst, Roeland M.; Verloop, Nico; Visser, Anthonya

    2009-01-01

    Universities are supposed to be institutes where research and teaching are closely related. To understand this relationship fully, it is necessary to learn how academics perceive these key components. Different conceptions among academics may stem from varying conceptions of knowledge. Thirty academics were interviewed by means of metaphors about…

  19. Understanding and Promoting Thinking about Knowledge: Origins, Issues, and Future Directions of Research on Epistemic Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, William A.; Greene, Jeffrey A.; Bråten, Ivar

    2016-01-01

    Epistemic cognition is the thinking that people do about what and how they know. Education has long been concerned with promoting reflection on knowledge and processes of knowing, but research into epistemic cognition began really in the past half century, with a tremendous expansion in the past 20 years. This review summarizes the broad range of…

  20. Using the Knowledge Base of Health Services Research to Redefine Health Care Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert H; Vaiana, Mary E

    2015-10-01

    This Perspective discusses 12 key facts derived from 50 years of health services research and argues that this knowledge base can stimulate innovative thinking about how to make health care systems safer, more efficient, more cost effective, and more patient centered, even as they respond to the needs of diverse communities.

  1. Bridging Professional Teacher Knowledge for Science and Literary Integration via Design-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Xavier; Gallagher, Tiffany L.

    2018-01-01

    We offer insights for using design-based research (DBR) as a model for constructing professional development that supports curriculum and instructional knowledge regarding science and literacy integration. We spotlight experiences in the DBR process from data collected from a sample of four elementary teachers. Findings from interviews, focus…

  2. Sport Physiology Research and Governing Gender in Sport--A Power-Knowledge Relation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    This article sets out to show how physiological knowledge about sex/gender relates to power issues within sport. The sport physiology research at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (Swedish acronym: GIH) during the twentieth century is analysed in relation to the political rationality concerning gender at GIH and within the Swedish…

  3. Research as Praxis: Perspectives on Interpreting Data from a Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhalevilo, Emilia Afonso; Ogunniyi, Meshach

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a reflection on an aspect of research methodology, particularly on the interpretation strategy of data from a Science and Indigenous Knowledge Systems Project (SIKSP) in a South African university. The data interpretation problem arose while we were analysing the effects of a series of SIKSP-based workshops on the views of a…

  4. The Influence of the Pedagogical Content Knowledge Theoretical Framework on Research on Preservice Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecoli, Storey

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Lee S. Shulman's theoretical framework, has had a substantial influence on research in preservice teacher education, and consequently, schools of education. This review builds from Grossman's case studies that concluded that beginning teachers provided with excellent teacher education developed more substantial PCK…

  5. Survey Team On: Conceptualisation of the Role of Competencies, Knowing and Knowledge in Mathematics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss, Mogens; Bruder, Regina; Planas, Núria; Turner, Ross; Villa-Ochoa, Jhony Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the work of the ICME 13 Survey Team on "Conceptualisation and the role of competencies, knowing and knowledge in mathematics education research". It surveys a variety of historical and contemporary views and conceptualisations of what it means to master mathematics, focusing on notions such as…

  6. Knowledge services in science and technology - improving the university/research centre - company relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Adriana Braz Vendramini Bicca

    2009-01-01

    This research proposes a conceptual model for Knowledge Services Structure applicable to Science and Technology Parks (STP) and targeted to micro, small and medium enterprises, in order to improve the business - university - research centers relationship. The idea emerged from exploratory studies on STP and the observation of a knowledge gap on this subject: academic studies that have proposed support services structures to link companies - university - research centers in STP were not available. The study methodology is composed by: exploratory studies complemented by action research. Five aspects of analysis (knowledge services, business development, ordinary/ S and T infrastructure services, expansion of area, and image / visibility) were chosen; a questionnaire based on the these aspects were elaborated and applied by e-mail (e-survey), using as data-base the IASP associated members for the selection of potential respondents. The questionnaire was answered by STP managers from different countries (Spain, Italy, Portugal, Germany, United Kingdom, China, Brazil, Turkey and Uruguay) and, for a deeper and better answers understanding, presential interviews were conducted in certain European STP. After presentation, analysis and discussion of the results, a conceptual model of knowledge service structure for STP has been made, using as basis the Technology Park of Sao Paulo structure. During the formulation of the conceptual model stage, a brief discussion on the importance of knowing and meet the customer needs meant on the inclusion of a customer-interface in the final model. (author)

  7. Developing a Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research to Mobilise Evidence in and for Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Carol; Pollock, Katina; Briscoe, Patricia; Carr-Harris, Shasta; Tuters, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: The importance of "evidence-informed practice" has risen dramatically in education and in other public policy areas. This article focuses on the importance of knowledge mobilisation strategies, processes and outputs. It is concerned with how these can support the adaptation and implementation of evidence from research and…

  8. Study Links Learning Design to Changes in Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors. Lessons from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen

    2015-01-01

    In this study of 16 teachers in two primary schools in the Netherlands, researchers built on findings from previous studies to demonstrate that a thoughtfully designed professional development program can be "effective and sustainable, if certain conditions are met" (p. 772) in changing teachers' knowledge, beliefs, perceived problems,…

  9. Education of nuclear energy specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulikas, V.

    1999-01-01

    Preparation system of nuclear energy specialists in Lithuania is presented. Nuclear engineers are being prepared at Kaunas University of Technology. Post-graduates students usually continue studies at Obninsk Nuclear Energy Institute in Russia. Many western countries like Sweden, Finland and US is providing assistance in education of Lithuanian specialists. Many of them were trained in these countries

  10. Cross-disciplinary research in cancer: an opportunity to narrow the knowledge-practice gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, R; Grunfeld, E; Jackson, L; Sargeant, J; Porter, G A

    2013-12-01

    Health services researchers have consistently identified a gap between what is identified as "best practice" and what actually happens in clinical care. Despite nearly two decades of a growing evidence-based practice movement, narrowing the knowledge-practice gap continues to be a slow, complex, and poorly understood process. Here, we contend that cross-disciplinary research is increasingly relevant and important to reducing that gap, particularly research that encompasses the notion of transdisciplinarity, wherein multiple academic disciplines and non-academic individuals and groups are integrated into the research process. The assimilation of diverse perspectives, research approaches, and types of knowledge is potentially effective in helping research teams tackle real-world patient care issues, create more practice-based evidence, and translate the results to clinical and community care settings. The goals of this paper are to present and discuss cross-disciplinary approaches to health research and to provide two examples of how engaging in such research may optimize the use of research in cancer care.

  11. Challenge in Sharing Tacit Knowledge: Academicians’ Behavior towards Developing A Web Portal for Sharing Research Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiza Adenan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Academicians’ collective memories soft information, such as research ideas, expertise, experiences, academic skills, know-what, know-how and know-why which inevitability it is considered should made accessible. The Higher Education Institution needs to identify, collect, classify, verbalize and diffuse the academicians’ soft information specifically research ideas present in the university for knowledge enrichment. This can be implemented by the academicians actively sharing their research ideas with others. Actively sharing research ideas by academicians will have great impact on the enrichment of their intellectual capability as most of the valuable knowledge resides in one’s brain. However, as there is no specific medium to bring their research ideas into the surface and be visible to others, the precious research ideas still remain in the academicians’ brains. Therefore, the objective of the study is to explore academicians’ behavior toward the development of a sharing research ideas web portal at private university colleges in Malaysia. This study used the qualitative method that is a multiple cases study. The study refers to four private university colleges in Malaysia. In-depth interview, focus group discussion and document analysis were formed the data collection for this study. The theory of Planned Behavior by Ajzen (1991 was used to determine academicians’ behavior. This study showed that the academicians’ attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control towards developing a web portal for sharing research ideas all affect their intention to share their research ideas with others.

  12. The use of concept maps for knowledge management: from classrooms to research labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Paulo Rogério Miranda

    2012-02-01

    Our contemporary society asks for new strategies to manage knowledge. The main activities developed by academics involve knowledge transmission (teaching) and production (research). Creativity and collaboration are valuable assets for establishing learning organizations in classrooms and research labs. Concept mapping is a useful graphical technique to foster some of the disciplines required to create and develop high-performance teams. The need for a linking phrase to clearly state conceptual relationships makes concept maps (Cmaps) very useful for organizing our own ideas (externalization), as well as, sharing them with other people (elicitation and consensus building). The collaborative knowledge construction (CKC) is supported by Cmaps because they improve the communication signal-to-noise ratio among participants with high information asymmetry. In other words, we can identify knowledge gaps and insightful ideas in our own Cmaps when discussing them with our counterparts. Collaboration involving low and high information asymmetry can also be explored through peer review and student-professor/advisor interactions, respectively. In conclusion, when it is used properly, concept mapping can provide a competitive advantage to produce and share knowledge in our contemporary society. To map is to know, as stated by Wandersee in 1990.

  13. Socio-epistemic analysis of scientific knowledge production in little science research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pepe

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes that drive knowledge production and dissemination in scientific environments are embedded within the social, technical, cultural and epistemic practices of the constituent research communities. This article presents a methodology to unpack specific social and epistemic dimensions of scientific knowledge production using, as a case study,  the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS, a National Science Foundation “little science” research center involved in theoretical and applied work in the field of wireless communication and sensor networks. By analysis of its scholarly record, I construct a social network of coauthorship, linking individuals that have coauthored scholarly artifacts (journal articles and conference papers, and an epistemic network of topic co-occurrence, linking concepts and knowledge constructs in the same scholarly artifacts. This article reports on ongoing work directed at the study of the emergence and evolution of these networks of scientific interaction. I present some preliminary results and introduce a socio-epistemic method for an historical analysis of network co-evolution. I outline a research design to support further investigations of knowledge production in scientific circles.

  14. Knowledge management and informatics considerations for comparative effectiveness research: a case-driven exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embi, Peter J; Hebert, Courtney; Gordillo, Gayle; Kelleher, Kelly; Payne, Philip R O

    2013-08-01

    As clinical data are increasingly collected and stored electronically, their potential use for comparative effectiveness research (CER) grows. Despite this promise, challenges face those wishing to leverage such data. In this paper we aim to enumerate some of the knowledge management and informatics issues common to such data reuse. After reviewing the current state of knowledge regarding biomedical informatics challenges and best practices related to CER, we then present 2 research projects at our institution. We analyze these and highlight several common themes and challenges related to the conduct of CER studies. Finally, we represent these emergent themes. The informatics challenges commonly encountered by those conducting CER studies include issues related to data information and knowledge management (eg, data reuse, data preparation) as well as those related to people and organizational issues (eg, sociotechnical factors and organizational factors). Examples of these are described in further detail and a formal framework for describing these findings is presented. Significant challenges face researchers attempting to use often diverse and heterogeneous datasets for CER. These challenges must be understood in order to be dealt with successfully and can often be overcome with the appropriate use of informatics best practices. Many research and policy questions remain to be answered in order to realize the full potential of the increasingly electronic clinical data available for such research.

  15. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    abstract A collaborative consortium, named “TRANSAUTOPHAGY,” has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27046256

  16. TRANSAUTOPHAGY: European network for multidisciplinary research and translation of autophagy knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Caty; Codogno, Patrice; Pinti, Marcello; Batoko, Henri; Morán, María; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Reggiori, Fulvio; Sirko, Agnieszka; Soengas, María S; Velasco, Guillermo; Lafont, Frank; Lane, Jon; Faure, Mathias; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A collaborative consortium, named "TRANSAUTOPHAGY," has been created among European research groups, comprising more than 150 scientists from 21 countries studying diverse branches of basic and translational autophagy. The consortium was approved in the framework of the Horizon 2020 Program in November 2015 as a COST Action of the European Union (COST means: CO-operation in Science and Technology), and will be sponsored for 4 years. TRANSAUTOPHAGY will form an interdisciplinary platform for basic and translational researchers, enterprises and stakeholders of diverse disciplines (including nanotechnology, bioinformatics, physics, chemistry, biology and various medical disciplines). TRANSAUTOPHAGY will establish 5 different thematic working groups, formulated to cooperate in research projects, share ideas, and results through workshops, meetings and short term exchanges of personnel (among other initiatives). TRANSAUTOPHAGY aims to generate breakthrough multidisciplinary knowledge about autophagy regulation, and to boost translation of this knowledge into biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  17. Construction of anthropological knowledge and ethnographic co-research. Problems and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena L. Achilli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discussing anthropological knowledge construction processes entails reflecting upon different connected dimensions. Epistemological and theoretical-methodological  positionings with different political consequences are intertwined. In addition, institutional conditions and the socio-historical context in which certain local and global disciplinary trends are inscribed must be taken into account. This paper looks into the processes of socio-anthropological research I have participated in over the last decades with schools, teachers, teacher unions, indigenous peoples and groups in conditions of structural poverty. I will particularly focus on the modalities of ethnographic co-research that we have implemented in several projects. I will attempt to show some of the theoretical-methodological potentialities that ethnography contributes to group/collective processes of research as well as limits in its development. Finally, I will mention some of the contemporary challenges anthropological knowledge faces in present Latin America.

  18. Deriving evaluation indicators for knowledge transfer and dialogue processes in the context of climate research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffeisen, Renate; Grosfeld, Klaus; Kuhlmann, Franziska

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge transfer and dialogue processes in the field of climate science have captured intensive attention in recent years as being an important part of research activities. Therefore, the demand and pressure to develop a set of indicators for the evaluation of different activities in this field have increased, too. Research institutes are being asked more and more to build up structures in order to map these activities and, thus, are obliged to demonstrate the success of these efforts. This paper aims to serve as an input to stimulate further reflection on the field of evaluation of knowledge transfer and dialogue processes in the context of climate sciences. The work performed in this paper is embedded in the efforts of the German Helmholtz Association in the research field of earth and environment and is driven by the need to apply suitable indicators for knowledge transfer and dialogue processes in climate research center evaluations. We carry out a comparative analysis of three long-term activities and derive a set of indicators for measuring their output and outcome by balancing the wide diversity and range of activity contents as well as the different tools to realize them. The case examples are based on activities which are part of the regional Helmholtz Climate Initiative Regional Climate Change (REKLIM) and the Climate Office for Polar Regions and Sea Level Rise at the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research. Both institutional units have been working on a wide range of different knowledge transfer and dialogue processes since 2008/2009. We demonstrate that indicators for the evaluation must be based on the unique objectives of the individual activities and the framework they are embedded in (e.g., research foci which provide the background for the performed knowledge transfer and dialogue processes) but can partly be classified in a principle two-dimensional scheme. This scheme might serve as a usable basis for climate

  19. An Analysis of Research Topics within a Community : the Example of Knowledge Science

    OpenAIRE

    NIE, Kun; JI, Zhe; NAKAMORI, Yoshiteru

    2007-01-01

    This Paper presents a new approach how to analyze research topics within a given research community. Under the guidance of the I-system methodology, this paper conducts both top-down and bottom-up analysis. For the bottom-up analysis, similarity measurement and hierarchical clustering are applied to obtain a tree-like dendrogram structure of research topics; for the top-down analysis, the experts' knowledge is included. Then resulting from the iterative dialogue between the above two stages o...

  20. Motives and preferences of general practitioners for new collaboration models with medical specialists: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klazinga Niek S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates GPs to initiate and continue participating with medical specialists in new collaborative care models. The following two questions are addressed in this study: What motivates GPs to initiate and sustain new models for collaborating with medical specialists? What kind of new collaboration models do GPs suggest? Methods A qualitative study design was used. Starting in 2003 and finishing in 2005, we conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 21 Dutch GPs. The sampling criteria were age, gender, type of practice, and practice site. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, and analysed by two researchers working independently. The resulting motivational factors and preferences were grouped into categories. Results 'Developing personal relationships' and 'gaining mutual respect' appeared to dominate when the motivational factors were considered. Besides developing personal relationships with specialists, the GPs were also interested in familiarizing specialists with the competencies attached to the profession of family medicine. Additionally, they were eager to increase their medical knowledge to the benefit of their patients. The GPs stated a variety of preferences with respect to the design of new models of collaboration. Conclusion Developing personal relationships with specialists appeared to be one of the dominant motives for increased collaboration. Once the relationships have been formed, an informal network with occasional professional contact seemed sufficient. Although GPs are interested in increasing their knowledge, once they have reached a certain level of expertise, they shift their focus to another specialty. The preferences for new collaboration

  1. Knowledge Management in the Project Life Cycle - Initial Research on Polish Smes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łapuńka Iwona

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organizations run their activities in an environment, which might be defined as fully uncertain and turbulent. Due to variations that occur in the surrounding environment, an increased attention of management practitioners and theoreticians is paid to new management concepts frequently in an integrated version. The authors express a deep belief that consolidation of approaches to project management and knowledge management constitutes a response to challenge for modern organizations. Research into the issue was based on an attempt to determine significance of the knowledge management issue in a life of projects performed by Polish small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs. Systemizing of desired knowledge management results in a project, from the point of view of its crucial success factors, is essentially substantiated in providing success of projects performed.

  2. Knowledge in the energy sector : what research and development expenditures and patents reveal about innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bointner, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work is dealing with knowledge in the energy sector and structured in three main parts. Part I is dealing with energy research expenditures and patents in IEA countries. A broad literature review on innovation drivers and barriers is followed by an analysis of the knowledge induced by public research and development expenditures (R&D) and patents in the energy sector. The cumulative knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures in 14 investigated IEA-countries is 102.3 bn. EUR in 2013. Nuclear energy has the largest share of 43.9 bn. EUR, followed by energy efficiency accounting for 14.9 bn. EUR, fossil fuels with 13.5 bn. EUR, and renewable energy with 12.1 bn. EUR. A regression analysis indicates a linear relation between the GDP and the cumulative knowledge, with each billion EUR of GDP leading to an additional knowledge of 3.1 mil. EUR. However, linearity is not given for single energy technologies. Further, the results show that appropriate public R&D funding for research and development associated with a subsequent promotion of the market diffusion of a niche technology may lead to a breakthrough of the respective technology. Part II aims to examine public expenditures for energy R&D in the European Union and the resulting energy knowledge stock. The energy R&D distribution among technologies of the EU member states and the European Commission was similar in the 1980s with a strong focus on nuclear energy. Nowadays energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are of growing importance. For instance, the new programme Horizon 2020 is expected to have an equal distribution between non-nuclear and nuclear R&D expenditures. The cumulative energy knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures amounts to 35.8 bn. EUR in 2013, whereupon the EU member states’ share is more than three times larger than the European Commission’s share. Moreover, knowledge stock scenarios for the next decade are provided, followed by an investigation, if there

  3. International Society of Nephrology-Hydration and Kidney Health Initiative - Expanding Research and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moist, Louise M; Clark, William F; Segantini, Luca; Damster, Sandrine; Le Bellego, Laurent; Wong, Germaine; Tonelli, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a collaborative research initiative to explore the role of hydration in kidney health. Our understanding of the effects of hydration in health and disease is surprisingly limited, particularly when we consider the vital role of hydration in basic human physiology. Recent initiatives and research outcomes have challenged the global medical community to expand our knowledge about hydration, including the differences between water, sugared beverages and other consumables. Identification of the potential mechanisms contributing to the benefits of hydration has stimulated the global nephrology community to advance research regarding hydration for kidney health. Hydration and kidney health has been a focus of research for several research centers with a rapidly expanding world literature and knowledge. The International Society of Nephrology has collaborated with Danone Nutricia Research to promote development of kidney research initiatives, which focus on the role of hydration in kidney health and the global translation of this new information. This initiative supports the use of existing data in different regions and countries to expand dialogue among experts in the field of hydration and health, and to increase scientific interaction and productivity with the ultimate goal of improving kidney health. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Knowledge Management in Startups: Systematic Literature Review and Future Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piera Centobelli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper conducts a systematic literature review on knowledge management (KM in the context of startups in order to analyze the state of the art, identify research gaps and define a future research agenda. The main findings highlight that, even though there is an increasing number of papers on the topic of KM in startups, several issues are still neglected. Specifically, the paper identifies four main gaps in the body of literature. The first gap deals with the environmental and socio-political factors influencing the adoption of KM in startups. The second gap regards the lack of a comprehensive taxonomy of knowledge management systems (KMSs that may support the processes of knowledge creation, acquisition, storage, transfer, sharing and application. This second gap allows us to identify a third gap concerning the level of alignment between startup’s strategies and technologies adopted. Finally, the fourth gap deals with the issue of the impact of KM on startup’s performances with regard to economic, financial, market, technical, technological, organizational, human and relational performance. From these four gaps, six research questions (RQs have been proposed. These RQs allow us to identify possible areas of analysis to define a future research agenda. Neglecting these issues means underestimating all the possible advantages of KM adoption for a startup to achieve efficiency, effectiveness and scalability goals.

  5. Is knowledge important? Empirical research on nuclear risk communication in two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Tanja; Zeleznik, Nadja; Turcanu, Catrinel; Thijssen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Increasing audience knowledge is often set as a primary objective of risk communication efforts. But is it worthwhile focusing risk communication strategies solely on enhancing specific knowledge? The main research questions tackled in this paper were: (1) if prior audience knowledge related to specific radiation risks is influential for the perception of these risks and the acceptance of communicated messages and (2) if gender, attitudes, risk perception of other radiation risks, confidence in authorities, and living in the vicinity of nuclear/radiological installations may also play an important role in this matter. The goal of this study was to test empirically the mentioned predictors in two independent case studies in different countries. The first case study was an information campaign for iodine pre-distribution in Belgium (N = 1035). The second was the information campaign on long-term radioactive waste disposal in Slovenia (N = 1,200). In both cases, recurrent and intensive communication campaigns were carried out by the authorities aiming, among other things, at increasing specific audience knowledge. Results show that higher prior audience knowledge leads to more willingness to accept communicated messages, but it does not affect people’s perception of the specific risk communicated. In addition, the influence of prior audience knowledge on the acceptance of communicated messages is shown to be no stronger than that of general radiation risk perception. The results in both case studies suggest that effective risk communication has to focus not only on knowledge but also on other more heuristic predictors, such as risk perception or attitudes toward communicated risks.

  6. Research on the Green Purchase Intentions from the Perspective of Product Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of planned behavior, the moderating effects of product knowledge on the relationships between three independent variables and green purchase intentions were explored. Independent variables included green purchase attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavior control. After that, the difference of moderating effects of product knowledge between convenience goods and shopping goods was further analyzed. The scales of the study passed the test of reliability and validity through confirmatory factor analysis, and 306 valid questionnaires were collected. The hypotheses were tested by stepwise regression analysis. The results of the study showed that product knowledge had a significant moderating effect on the relationship between three independent variables and green purchase intentions, and the explanatory power of three independent variables would decrease in the context of high product knowledge. Interesting conclusions were reached from the perspective of product classification. This study contributes to the literature by treating product knowledge as a moderating variable in the theory of planned behavior in the field of green purchase behavior and exploring from a new research angle—the perspective of product classification.

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 6: Aerospace knowledge diffusion in the academic community: A report of phase 3 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of aerospace-based scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic community are presented. An overview is provided of the Federal Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, illustrating a five-year program on aerospace knowledge diffusion. Preliminary results are presented of the project's research concerning the information-seeking habits, practices, and attitudes of U.S. aerospace engineering and science students and faculty. The type and amount of education and training in the use of information sources are examined. The use and importance ascribed to various information products by U.S. aerospace faculty and students including computer and other information technology is assessed. An evaluation of NASA technical reports is presented and it is concluded that NASA technical reports are rated high in terms of quality and comprehensiveness, citing Engineering Index and IAA as the most frequently used materials by faculty and students.

  8. Mapping local knowledge of hazards to inform research, practice and policy in the Americas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coles, Ashley; Eosco, Gina; Norton, Todd; Ruiz, Jorge; Tate, Eric; Weathers, Melinda

    2011-01-01

    Hazards are fundamentally understood and experienced spatially; therefore, it is not surprising that hazards research, management, communication, and policy have relied heavily on spatial representations using geomatics tools such as remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS). As powerful and useful as these tools have been, they tend to privilege the collection and utilization of quantifiable data at the expense of qualitative data (e.g., experiential local knowledge). Local knowledge has been increasingly used both to challenge and to supplement mapping strategies, although less so in the realm of hazards than in other areas such as natural resource management. In this paper, we propose a unique framework for taking these approaches one-step further through the development of a knowledge management system that integrates local knowledge of hazards with spatial visualization tools. First, we discuss relevant literature related to current tools and practices for visualizing hazard information. Next we propose a methodology for mapping mental models of individuals. Finally, we discuss the potential applications of such a framework for hazards research, practice, and policy, as well as discuss the challenges associated with this framework.

  9. Excellence in the knowledge-based economy: from scientific to research excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.; Bloch, Carter Walter; Young, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the European Union (EU) unveiled its new ‘Composite Indicator for Scientific and Technological Research Excellence’. This is not an isolated occurrence; policy-based interest in excellence is growing all over the world. The heightened focus on excellence and, in particular, attempts...... to define it through quantitative indicators can have important implications for research policy and for the conduct of research itself. This paper examines how the EU's understanding of excellence has evolved in recent years, from the presentation of the Lisbon strategy in 2000 to the current Europe 2020...... strategy. We find a distinct shift in the understanding of excellence and how success in the knowledge-based economy should be achieved: in the early period, excellence is a fuzzy concept, intrinsically embedded in research and researchers and revealed by peer review. In the later period, excellence...

  10. An approach to research on embodiment and forms of knowledge : methodological challenges for interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars Emmerik Damgaard

    argues. Studying a teacher training program, specifically the relation between placement and teaching, this presentation argues for a ‘meeting point’ and theoretical frame of Merleau-Ponty, Aristotle and Højrup that all dialectally grasps the relations between researcher and interviewee by understanding......Abstract: This paper is on the researcher’s role and the status of the data s/he is inclined to use. The outset is theories on embodied knowledge and knowledge forms such as Pierre Bourdieu, Hubert & Stuart Dreyfus and Jean Lave who all have troubles of how to view embodiment from either...... them as either bodily interwoven, life-mode or virtuously related. The inclusion of subjective perspectives and cultural conditions enlightens educational research as a process of interpretation where the embodied and life mode structured observation both opens and closes ways of interpretation...

  11. Transition from specialist to primary diabetes care: A qualitative study of perspectives of primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liddy Clare

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing prevalence of diabetes and heightened awareness of the benefits of early and intensive disease management have increased service demands and expectations not only of primary care physicians but also of diabetes specialists. While research has addressed issues related to referral into specialist care, much less has been published about the transition from diabetes specialists back to primary care. Understanding the concerns of family physicians related to discharge of diabetes care from specialist centers can support the development of strategies that facilitate this transition and result in broader access to limited specialist services. This study was undertaken to explore primary care physician (PCP perspectives and concerns related to reassuming responsibility for diabetes care after referral to a specialized diabetes center. Methods Qualitative data were collected through three focus groups. Sessions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Data were coded and sorted with themes identified using a constant comparison method. The study was undertaken through the regional academic referral center for adult diabetes care in Ottawa, Canada. Participants included 22 primary care physicians representing a variety of referral frequencies, practice types and settings. Results Participants described facilitators and barriers to successful transition of diabetes care at the provider, patient and systems level. Major facilitators included clear communication of a detailed, structured plan of care, ongoing access to specialist services for advice or re-referral, continuing education and mentoring for PCPs. Identified provider barriers were gaps in PCP knowledge and confidence related to diabetes treatment, excessive workload and competing time demands. Systems deterrents included reimbursement policies for health professionals and inadequate funding for diabetes medications and supplies. At the PCP-patient interface

  12. Future research in technological enablers for knowledge management: A worldwide expert study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarka, Peter; Caldwell, Nicholas H. M.; Ipsen, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) is widely considered as an important part of knowledge management (KM). However, failures of KM in organisational practice have been attributed to an overemphasis of IT in KM. An improved understanding of the role of IT within KM in organisations could help to improve...... key research themes articulated by the KM experts to enhance and develop KM in relation to technological enablers....

  13. Systematic Review of Knowledge Translation Strategies to Promote Research Uptake in Child Health Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Lauren; Archibald, Mandy; Snelgrove-Clarke, Erna; Scott, Shannon D

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to assist evidence-based decision-making for healthcare professionals are crucial to ensure high quality patient care and outcomes. The goal of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize the evidence on knowledge translation interventions aimed at putting explicit research evidence into child health practice. A comprehensive search of thirteen electronic databases was conducted, restricted by date (1985-2011) and language (English). Articles were included if: 1) studies were randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), or controlled before-and-after (CBA) studies; 2) target population was child health professionals; 3) interventions implemented research in child health practice; and 4) outcomes were measured at the professional/process, patient, or economic level. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed methodological quality. Study data were aggregated and analyzed using evidence tables. Twenty-one studies (13 RCT, 2 CCT, 6 CBA) were included. The studies employed single (n=9) and multiple interventions (n=12). The methodological quality of the included studies was largely moderate (n=8) or weak (n=11). Of the studies with moderate to strong methodological quality ratings, three demonstrated consistent, positive effect(s) on the primary outcome(s); effective knowledge translation interventions were two single, non-educational interventions and one multiple, educational intervention. This multidisciplinary systematic review in child health setting identified effective knowledge translation strategies assessed by the most rigorous research designs. Given the overall poor quality of the research literature, specific recommendations were made to improve knowledge translation efforts in child health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. An introduction to the Research Innovation and Knowledge Management Roadmap for the South African Maritime Sector

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Funke, Nicola S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS We have a maritime culture and recognise and learn from our maritime history 1 Foster national maritime pride 3 Develop and communicate a co-authored discourse on South Africa’s maritime history 2 Support maritime historical... and training facilities 6 Build and retain skills in the maritime sector 2 Support and develop maritime-focused technology and innovation 7 OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS Conduct humanities and social science research on pertinent issues 3 Create knowledge...

  15. Recent research on the aesthetics of knowledge in science and in religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Borrelli

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As an introduction to the case studies collected in the current special issue, this review article provides a brief, and by no means exhaustive, overview of research that proves to be relevant to the development of a concept of an aesthetics of knowledge in the academic study of religion and in science and technology studies. Finally, it briefly discusses recent work explicitly addressing the aesthetic entangle-ment of science and religion.

  16. From science to action: Principles for undertaking environmental research that enables knowledge exchange and evidence-based decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvitanovic, C; McDonald, J; Hobday, A J

    2016-12-01

    Effective conservation requires knowledge exchange among scientists and decision-makers to enable learning and support evidence-based decision-making. Efforts to improve knowledge exchange have been hindered by a paucity of empirically-grounded guidance to help scientists and practitioners design and implement research programs that actively facilitate knowledge exchange. To address this, we evaluated the Ningaloo Research Program (NRP), which was designed to generate new scientific knowledge to support evidence-based decisions about the management of the Ningaloo Marine Park in north-western Australia. Specifically, we evaluated (1) outcomes of the NRP, including the extent to which new knowledge informed management decisions; (2) the barriers that prevented knowledge exchange among scientists and managers; (3) the key requirements for improving knowledge exchange processes in the future; and (4) the core capacities that are required to support knowledge exchange processes. While the NRP generated expansive and multidisciplinary science outputs directly relevant to the management of the Ningaloo Marine Park, decision-makers are largely unaware of this knowledge and little has been integrated into decision-making processes. A range of barriers prevented efficient and effective knowledge exchange among scientists and decision-makers including cultural differences among the groups, institutional barriers within decision-making agencies, scientific outputs that were not translated for decision-makers and poor alignment between research design and actual knowledge needs. We identify a set of principles to be implemented routinely as part of any applied research program, including; (i) stakeholder mapping prior to the commencement of research programs to identify all stakeholders, (ii) research questions to be co-developed with stakeholders, (iii) implementation of participatory research approaches, (iv) use of a knowledge broker, and (v) tailored knowledge management

  17. Creating a Knowledge Translation Platform: nine lessons from the Zambia Forum for Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasonde Joseph M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concept of the Knowledge Translation Platform (KTP provides cohesion and leadership for national–level knowledge translation efforts. In this review, we discuss nine key lessons documenting the experience of the Zambia Forum for Health Research, primarily to inform and exchange experience with the growing community of African KTPs. Lessons from ZAMFOHR’s organizational development include the necessity of selecting a multi-stakeholder and -sectoral Board of Directors; performing comprehensive situation analyses to understand not only the prevailing research-and-policy dynamics but a precise operational niche; and selecting a leader that bridges the worlds of research and policy. Programmatic lessons include focusing on building the capacity of both policy-makers and researchers; building a database of local evidence and national-level actors involved in research and policy; and catalyzing work in particular issue areas by identifying leaders from the research community, creating policy-maker demand for research evidence, and fostering the next generation by mentoring both up-and-coming researchers and policy–makers. Ultimately, ZAMFOHR’s experience shows that an African KTP must pay significant attention to its organizational details. A KTP must also invest in the skill base of the wider community and, more importantly, of its own staff. Given the very real deficit of research-support skills in most low-income countries – in synthesis, in communications, in brokering, in training – a KTP must spend significant time and resources in building these types of in-house expertise. And lastly, the role of networking cannot be underestimated. As a fully-networked KTP, ZAMFOHR has benefited from the innovations of other KTPs, from funding opportunities and partnerships, and from invaluable technical support from both African and northern colleagues.

  18. Visualizing the knowledge structure and evolution of big data research in healthcare informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dongxiao; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xingguo; Liang, Changyong

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the literature associated with healthcare big data has grown rapidly, but few studies have used bibliometrics and a visualization approach to conduct deep mining and reveal a panorama of the healthcare big data field. To explore the foundational knowledge and research hotspots of big data research in the field of healthcare informatics, this study conducted a series of bibliometric analyses on the related literature, including papers' production trends in the field and the trend of each paper's co-author number, the distribution of core institutions and countries, the core literature distribution, the related information of prolific authors and innovation paths in the field, a keyword co-occurrence analysis, and research hotspots and trends for the future. By conducting a literature content analysis and structure analysis, we found the following: (a) In the early stage, researchers from the United States, the People's Republic of China, the United Kingdom, and Germany made the most contributions to the literature associated with healthcare big data research and the innovation path in this field. (b) The innovation path in healthcare big data consists of three stages: the disease early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis phase, the life and health promotion phase, and the nursing phase. (c) Research hotspots are mainly concentrated in three dimensions: the disease dimension (e.g., epidemiology, breast cancer, obesity, and diabetes), the technical dimension (e.g., data mining and machine learning), and the health service dimension (e.g., customized service and elderly nursing). This study will provide scholars in the healthcare informatics community with panoramic knowledge of healthcare big data research, as well as research hotspots and future research directions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists ...

  20. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If ... in the PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists ...

  1. Preparation of qualified specialists for the field of it from D-Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Romasevich

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the consideration of D-Link's experience in the development and implementation of educational programs for the training of qualified specialists for the field of IT. To remain competitive, a specialist needs to be constantly trained, especially in such a rapidly changing field as IT. The training programs developed by D-Link for IT professionals help to gain knowledge about new technologies and their application in industrial conditions. You can confirm the high level of professionalism by getting the D-Link certificate. To obtain a certificate, you must pass one or two certification exams, depending on the chosen training course. Training of specialists engaged in the development, implementation and support of solutions based on D-Link solutions, in addition to the company's specialists, is carried out by authorized training centers and academic partners of D-Link. On the D-Link’s distance learning and certification portal, distance learning courses are available for studying. The article focuses on various forms of cooperation between D-Link and higher education institutions: the development of original teaching materials, the organization of distance learning and its integration into the learning process, the creation of laboratories to support practical classes and research activities, the management of course and diploma work, the organization of industrial practice.

  2. The competences postulated as requirements for occupational medicine training in Europe as viewed by Polish specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczkowski, A

    2001-01-01

    A questionnaire has been developed and disseminated in several European countries to determine common key competences required of occupational medicine specialists. The questionnaire contained 115 subjects relating to eight fields of activity of an occupational medicine physician (occupational hazards to health, assessment of disability and fitness for work, communications, research methods, management, environmental medicine, occupational health law and ethics, and health promotion). Items in each part were classified into three categories: knowledge, skills and experience. For each of the subjects respondents were asked to allocate a score from 0 (not necessary) to 5 (most important or essential). In Poland the questionnaire was distributed among two groups of specialists: (1) chief administrators of occupational health services, and (2) relatively young occupational medicine physicians attending a specialist training. A comprehensive analysis of the completed questionnaires had three dimensions: (a) substantive (classification of the importance of particular key competences, as perceived by Polish specialists in occupational medicine); (b) personal (differences in opinions among occupational medicine physicians and an attempt to explain these differences in sociological terms); and (c) comparative (evaluation and interpretation of similarities and differences between two groups).

  3. The Common Body of Knowledge: A Framework to Promote Relevant Information Security Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Knapp

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes using an established common body of knowledge (CBK as one means of organizing information security literature.  Consistent with calls for more relevant information systems (IS research, this industry-developed framework can motivate future research towards topics that are important to the security practitioner.  In this review, forty-eight articles from ten IS journals from 1995 to 2004 are selected and cross-referenced to the ten domains of the information security CBK.  Further, we distinguish articles as empirical research, frameworks, or tutorials.  Generally, this study identified a need for additional empirical research in every CBK domain including topics related to legal aspects of information security.  Specifically, this study identified a need for additional IS security research relating to applications development, physical security, operations security, and business continuity.  The CBK framework is inherently practitioner oriented and using it will promote relevancy by steering IS research towards topics important to practitioners.  This is important considering the frequent calls by prominent information systems scholars for more relevant research.  Few research frameworks have emerged from the literature that specifically classify the diversity of security threats and range of problems that businesses today face.  With the recent surge of interest in security, the need for a comprehensive framework that also promotes relevant research can be of great value.

  4. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff’s skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices. PMID:28886088

  5. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff's skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices.

  6. Current knowledge on the genetics of autism and propositions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeron, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a heterogeneous group of neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by problems in social communication, as well as by the presence of restricted interests, stereotyped and repetitive behaviours. In the last 40years, genetic studies have provided crucial information on the causes of ASD and its diversity. In this article, I will first review the current knowledge on the genetics of ASD and then suggest three propositions to foster research in this field. Twin and familial studies estimated the heritability of ASD to be 50%. While most of the inherited part of ASD is captured by common variants, our current knowledge on the genetics of ASD comes almost exclusively from the identification of highly penetrant de novo mutations through candidate gene or whole exome/genome sequencing studies. Approximately 10% of patients with ASD, especially those with intellectual disability, are carriers of de novo copy-number (CNV) or single nucleotide variants (SNV) affecting clinically relevant genes for ASD. Given the function of these genes, it was hypothesized that abnormal synaptic plasticity and failure of neuronal/synaptic homeostasis could increase the risk of ASD. In addition to these discoveries, three propositions coming from institutions, researchers and/or communities of patients and families can be made to foster research on ASD: (i) to use more dimensional and quantitative data than diagnostic categories; (ii) to increase data sharing and research on genetic and brain diversity in human populations; (iii) to involve patients and relatives as participants for research. Hopefully, this knowledge will lead to a better diagnosis, care and integration of individuals with ASD. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Mapping the global research landscape and knowledge gaps on multimorbidity: a bibliometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin; Mishra, Gita D; Jones, Mark

    2017-06-01

    To summarize global research trends and activities on multimorbidity; then to assess the knowledge gaps and to identify implications for knowledge exchange between high income countries (HICs) and low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). A comprehensive search was conducted to identify research publications on multimorbidity in the Web of Science TM , as well as diabetes, depression, hypertension, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The time frame for the search was from 1900 to June, 2016. Information (such as publication date, subject category, author, country of origin, title, abstract, and keywords) were extracted and the full texts were obtained for the co-citation analysis. Data were linked with the life expectancy at birth (years) and Gross National Income (GNI). Co-citation and hierarchal clustering analysis was used to map the trends and research networks with CiteSpace II (JAVA freeware, copyright Chaomei Chen, http://cluster.cis.drexel.edu/~cchen/citespace/). We identified 2864 relevant publications as at June 2016, with the first paper on this topic indexed in 1974 from Germany, but 80% were published after 2010. Further analysis yielded two knowledge gaps: (1) compared with single conditions (diabetes, hypertension, depression, and COPD), there is a mismatch between the high prevalence of multimorbidity and its research outputs (ratio of articles on multimorbidity vs other four single conditions is 1:13-150); (2) although a total of 76 countries have contributed to this research area, only 5% of research originated from LMICs where 73% of non-communicable disease (NCD) related deaths had occurred. Additional analysis showed the median year of first publication occurred 15 years later in the LMICs compared with HICs (2010 vs 1995); and longer life expectancy was associated with exponentially higher publication outputs (Pearson correlation coefficient r  = 0.95) at the global level. The life expectancy at the median year (1994) of

  8. Setting health research priorities using the CHNRI method: V. Quantitative properties of human collective knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudan, Igor; Yoshida, Sachiyo; Wazny, Kerri; Chan, Kit Yee; Cousens, Simon

    2016-06-01

    The CHNRI method for setting health research priorities has crowdsourcing as the major component. It uses the collective opinion of a group of experts to generate, assess and prioritize between many competing health research ideas. It is difficult to compare the accuracy of human individual and collective opinions in predicting uncertain future outcomes before the outcomes are known. However, this limitation does not apply to existing knowledge, which is an important component underlying opinion. In this paper, we report several experiments to explore the quantitative properties of human collective knowledge and discuss their relevance to the CHNRI method. We conducted a series of experiments in groups of about 160 (range: 122-175) undergraduate Year 2 medical students to compare their collective knowledge to their individual knowledge. We asked them to answer 10 questions on each of the following: (i) an area in which they have a degree of expertise (undergraduate Year 1 medical curriculum); (ii) an area in which they likely have some knowledge (general knowledge); and (iii) an area in which they are not expected to have any knowledge (astronomy). We also presented them with 20 pairs of well-known celebrities and asked them to identify the older person of the pair. In all these experiments our goal was to examine how the collective answer compares to the distribution of students' individual answers. When answering the questions in their own area of expertise, the collective answer (the median) was in the top 20.83% of the most accurate individual responses; in general knowledge, it was in the top 11.93%; and in an area with no expertise, the group answer was in the top 7.02%. However, the collective answer based on mean values fared much worse, ranging from top 75.60% to top 95.91%. Also, when confronted with guessing the older of the two celebrities, the collective response was correct in 18/20 cases (90%), while the 8 most successful individuals among the

  9. CSHCN in Texas: meeting the need for specialist care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M Cherilyn; Drayton, Vonna L C; Menon, Ramdas; Walker, Lesa R; Parker, Colleen M; Cooper, Sam B; Bultman, Linda L

    2005-06-01

    Assuring the sufficiency and suitability of systems of care and services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) presents a challenge to Texas providers, agencies, and state Title V programs. To meet the need for specialist care, referrals from primary care doctors are often necessary. The objective of this study was to describe the factors associated with the need for specialist care and problems associated with obtaining referrals in Texas. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) weighted sample for Texas (n = 719,014) to identify variables associated with the need for specialist care and problems obtaining referrals for specialist care. Medical need of the CSHCN and sensitivity to family values/customs was associated with greater need for specialist care, and Hispanic ethnicity and lower maternal education were associated with less need. Medical need, amount of time spent with doctors and sensitivity to values/customs, living in a large metropolitan statistical area, and lack of medical information were associated with problems obtaining a specialist care referral. Findings revealed some similarities and differences with meeting the need for specialist care when comparing Texas results to other studies. In Texas, aspects of customer satisfaction variables, especially doctors' sensitivity to family values/customs and parents' not receiving enough information on medical problems, were significantly associated with problems obtaining specialist referrals. Findings indicate a need to further research relationships and communication among doctors, CSHCN, and their families.

  10. Knowledge evolution in physics research: An analysis of bibliographic coupling networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Liu

    Full Text Available Even as we advance the frontiers of physics knowledge, our understanding of how this knowledge evolves remains at the descriptive levels of Popper and Kuhn. Using the American Physical Society (APS publications data sets, we ask in this paper how new knowledge is built upon old knowledge. We do so by constructing year-to-year bibliographic coupling networks, and identify in them validated communities that represent different research fields. We then visualize their evolutionary relationships in the form of alluvial diagrams, and show how they remain intact through APS journal splits. Quantitatively, we see that most fields undergo weak Popperian mixing, and it is rare for a field to remain isolated/undergo strong mixing. The sizes of fields obey a simple linear growth with recombination. We can also reliably predict the merging between two fields, but not for the considerably more complex splitting. Finally, we report a case study of two fields that underwent repeated merging and splitting around 1995, and how these Kuhnian events are correlated with breakthroughs on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC, quantum teleportation, and slow light. This impact showed up quantitatively in the citations of the BEC field as a larger proportion of references from during and shortly after these events.

  11. Uncovering the Boundary-spanning Role of Information Systems Research in Trans-Disciplinary Knowledge Advancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fei; Lim, Eric T. K.; Tan, Chee-Wee

    2017-01-01

    Intrigued by the important yet underexplored inter-disciplinary impact of IS discipline, this study investigates the inter-disciplinary role played by IS discipline in trans-disciplinary knowledge advancement. To achieve this objective, this study firstly advanced a Model of Trans-Disciplinary Kn......Intrigued by the important yet underexplored inter-disciplinary impact of IS discipline, this study investigates the inter-disciplinary role played by IS discipline in trans-disciplinary knowledge advancement. To achieve this objective, this study firstly advanced a Model of Trans......-Disciplinary Knowledge Advancement that posits a process that consists of three stages of thesis, antithesis, and synthesis with two transitions, namely knowledge liquidization and crystallization, in two modes, namely boundary-reinforcing and boundary-spanning. In light of this model, this study conducted...... elicited. Results from an in-depth bibliographic analysis on these central articles shed light on four distinct trans-disciplinary roles (i.e., spanner, innovator, aggregator, and reinforcer) and trans-disciplinary characteristics of IS research....

  12. Iodine-129. Proceedings of an NEA specialist meeting. Paris, 13-16 June 1977. Iode-129. Compte rendu d'une reunion de specialistes de l'AEN. Paris, 13-16 juin 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    In the framework of its programme on effluent releases from the nuclear fuel cycle and its radiological significance, the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health decided to organise meetings of specialists directly involved with research or regulatory aspects of effluent releases in order to note the status of present knowledge in this field. A first meeting of this type on iodine 129 was organised by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. This publication reproduces papers presented at this meeting.

  13. PARTAKE survey of public knowledge and perceptions of clinical research in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Burt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A public that is an informed partner in clinical research is important for ethical, methodological, and operational reasons. There are indications that the public is unaware or misinformed, and not sufficiently engaged in clinical research but studies on the topic are lacking. PARTAKE - Public Awareness of Research for Therapeutic Advancements through Knowledge and Empowerment is a program aimed at increasing public awareness and partnership in clinical research. The PARTAKE Survey is a component of the program. OBJECTIVE: To study public knowledge and perceptions of clinical research. METHODS: A 40-item questionnaire combining multiple-choice and open-ended questions was administered to 175 English- or Hindi-speaking individuals in 8 public locations representing various socioeconomic strata in New Delhi, India. RESULTS: Interviewees were 18-84 old (mean: 39.6, SD ± 16.6, 23.6% female, 68.6% employed, 7.3% illiterate, 26.3% had heard of research, 2.9% had participated and 58.9% expressed willingness to participate in clinical research. The following perceptions were reported (% true/% false/% not aware: 'research benefits society' (94.1%/3.5%/2.3%, 'the government protects against unethical clinical research' (56.7%/26.3%/16.9%, 'research hospitals provide better care' (67.2%/8.7%/23.9%, 'confidentiality is adequately protected' (54.1%/12.3%/33.5%, 'participation in research is voluntary' (85.3%/5.8%/8.7%; 'participants treated like 'guinea pigs'' (20.7%/53.2%/26.0%, and 'compensation for participation is adequate' (24.7%/12.9%/62.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest the Indian public is aware of some key features of clinical research (e.g., purpose, value, voluntary nature of participation, and supports clinical research in general but is unaware of other key features (e.g., compensation, confidentiality, protection of human participants and exhibits some distrust in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials. Larger, cross

  14. Diabetes knowledge translation status in developing countries: A mixed method study among diabetes researchers in case of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Valinejadi; Farahnaz Sadoughi; Masoud Salehi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite considerable investment in research, the existing research evidence is frequently not implemented and/or leads to useless or detrimental care in healthcare. The knowledge-practice gap proposed as one of the main causes of not achieving the treatment goals in diabetes. Iran also is facing a difference between the production and utilization of the knowledge of diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the status of diabetes knowledge translation (KT) in Iran. Methods...

  15. Knowledge and Perception about Clinical Research Shapes Behavior: Face to Face Survey in Korean General Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun Jung; Beck, Sung-Ho; Kang, Woon Yong; Yoo, Soyoung; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Lee, Ji Sung; Burt, Tal; Kim, Tae Won

    2016-05-01

    Considering general public as potential patients, identifying factors that hinder public participation poses great importance, especially in a research environment where demands for clinical trial participants outpace the supply. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge and perception about clinical research in general public. A total of 400 Seoul residents with no previous experience of clinical trial participation were selected, as representative of population in Seoul in terms of age and sex. To minimize selection bias, every fifth passer-by was invited to interview, and if in a cluster, person on the very right side was asked. To ensure the uniform use of survey, written instructions have been added to the questionnaire. Followed by pilot test in 40 subjects, the survey was administered face-to-face in December 2014. To investigate how perception shapes behavior, we compared perception scores in those who expressed willingness to participate and those who did not. Remarkably higher percentage of responders stated that they have heard of clinical research, and knew someone who participated (both, P perceptions and lack of knowledge will be effective in enhancing public engaged in clinical research.

  16. Influence of Research Components and Knowledge on GDP Growth in the European Union Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branimir Skoko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is often much more complex to explore economic growth at a regional level than at a national level due to regional differences, specialization and concentration of certain activities. Therefore, specific economic policy measures and instruments applied in one region will not produce the same effects in another region or at a national level. Consequently, research components and knowledge have become widely accepted indicators of efforts invested in technological advancement that enables higher economic growth rate and creates overall social well-being. In view of that, this paper aims to look into the interdependence between research components and knowledge on the one hand and economic growth rates at the regional level in the European Union on the other. Because of statistical determination, the research has been carried out in the second-level EU regions. Since the data were not coordinated with other research components in terms of time and geography, it was not possible to break down financial support by regional, national and supra-national affiliation.

  17. Beyond the Law: A Review of Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions in ADA Employment Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gould

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA, 1990 is the cornerstone of civil rights policy for people with disabilities. Although enforced through the justice system, the legacy of the ADA transcends well beyond its legal ramifications. The policy’s framework and the rhetoric of Disability Rights suggest both an embrace of the spirit and the letter of the law, or promulgating both legislative and cultural change to ensure that the rights of people with disabilities are met.  In attempting to understand how and if such change has happened, researchers have gathered extensive evidence since 1990.  Much of this research evidence, however, remains fragmented, under-utilized, and at times inconclusive.  This article presents the results of a rapid evidence review of a sample of such research that is crucial to understand the ADA’s progress.  The study examines evidence about the ADA’s influence on knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about employment of people with disabilities. The research illustrates the importance of moving beyond the law to incorporate changes in knowledge about the law, perceptions of employability, and workplace culture.

  18. Evaluation of the Processes and Outcomes of Implementing a Competency Model to Foster Research Knowledge Utilization in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand-Lamarche, Mélodie; Pinard, Renée; Thériault, Pascale; Dagenais, Christian

    2016-01-01

    To encourage the use of research-based information (RBI) in education in Quebec, the "Centre de transfert pour la réussite educative du Québec" CTREQ and the RENARD team, a knowledge transfer research team, developed the Competency Model for Knowledge Translation to Support Educational Achievement among Quebec Youth. They then developed…

  19. Talking the talk…but walking the walk? How do non-specialist mathematics teachers come to see themselves as mathematics teachers?

    OpenAIRE

    Crisan, C.; Rodd, M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the shortage of mathematics teachers in England, the UK government has funded various in-service subject knowledge courses for practising teachers, who are not mathematics specialists. These courses aim to develop these teachers’ mathematical subject knowledge (e.g., DfE 2014). In this TAS session we will report on a research project which was set up to investigate how teachers on the in-service programmes offered by our institution developed as teachers of mathematics. We...

  20. Identifying the conditions needed for integrated knowledge translation (IKT) in health care organizations: qualitative interviews with researchers and research users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Anna R; Dobrow, Mark J

    2016-07-12

    Collaboration among researchers and research users, or integrated knowledge translation (IKT), enhances the relevance and uptake of evidence into policy and practice. However, it is not widely practiced and, even when well-resourced, desired impacts may not be achieved. Given that large-scale investment is not the norm, further research is needed to identify how IKT can be optimized. Interviews were conducted with researchers and research users (clinicians, managers) in a health care delivery (HCDO) and health care monitoring (HCMO) organization that differed in size and infrastructure, and were IKT-naïve. Basic qualitative description was used. Participants were asked about IKT activities and challenges, and recommendations for optimizing IKT. Data were analysed inductively using constant comparative technique. Forty-three interviews were conducted (28 HCDO, 15 HCMO) with 13 researchers, 8 clinicians, and 22 managers. Little to no IKT took place. Participants articulated similar challenges and recommendations revealing that a considerable number of changes were needed at the organizational, professional and individual levels. Given the IKT-absent state of participating organizations, this research identified a core set of conditions which must be addressed to prepare an environment conducive to IKT. These conditions were compiled into a framework by which organizations can plan for, or evaluate their capacity for IKT. The IKT capacity framework is relevant for organizations in which there is no current IKT activity. Use of the IKT framework may result in more organizations that are ready to initiate and establish IKT, perhaps ultimately leading to more, and higher-quality collaboration for health system innovation. Further research is needed to confirm these findings in other organizations not yet resourced for, or undertaking IKT, and to explore the resource implications and mechanisms for establishing the conditions identified here as essential to preparing for

  1. The KINDRA H2020 Project: a knowledge inventory for hydrogeology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitta, Marco; Bodo, Balazs; Caschetto, Mariachiara; Correia, Victor; Cseko, Adrienn; Fernandez, Isabel; Hartai, Eva; Hinsby, Klaus; Madarasz, Tamas; Garcia Padilla, Mercedes; Szucs, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogeology-related research activities cover a wide spectrum of research areas at EU and national levels. This fact is due to the intrinsic nature of the "water" topic, representing a key-aspect of the modern society: water is not only necessary for human, biological and environmental requirements, but it is one basic "engine" of several interconnected research topics, including energy, health, climate, food, security and others as exemplified by the water-food-energy-climate nexus described by e.g. the World Economic Forum. With respect to the water cycle, the management of groundwater brings additional challenges to the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and climate change adaptation (such as integrated transboundary management of groundwater resources). This fact is related to the nature of groundwater, which represents the "hidden" part of the water cycle, difficult to evaluate, communicate and appreciate, although it sustains the health of both humans and ecosystems as well as industrial and agricultural production. In general, groundwater has been considered mainly for its relationships with surface waters, influencing river flow, e-flows, GDE (groundwater-dependent ecosystems), pollutant fate, agricultural practices, water scarcity and others. In this framework, the importance of groundwater inside the WFD has been reinforced by the daughter directive on groundwater. In the last years, particular insights have been developed on surface waters/groundwater interactions and several related research projects have been carried out. Nevertheless, a specific focus on hydrogeology, the science branch studying groundwater, has not looked into until now, despite of its utmost importance as renewable, high-quality, naturally protected (but still vulnerable) resource. At the same time the European knowledge-base that has been acquired on this important topic is widespread into several projects, plans, actions, realized at national and fragmented

  2. Identifying knowledge gaps for gene drive research to control invasive animal species: The next CRISPR step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian Moro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive animals have been linked to the extinctions of native wildlife, and to significant agricultural financial losses or impacts. Current approaches to control invasive species require ongoing resources and management over large geographic scales, and often result in the short-term suppression of populations. New and innovative approaches are warranted. Recently, the RNA guided gene drive system based on CRISPR/Cas9 is being proposed as a potential gene editing tool that could be used by wildlife managers as a non-lethal addition or alternative to help reduce pest animal populations. While regulatory control and social acceptance are crucial issues that must be addressed, there is an opportunity now to identify the knowledge and research gaps that exist for some important invasive species. Here we systematically determine the knowledge gaps for pest species for which gene drives could potentially be applied. We apply a conceptual ecological risk framework within the gene drive context within an Australian environment to identify key requirements for undertaking work on seven exemplar invasive species in Australia. This framework allows an evaluation of the potential research on an invasive species of interest and within a gene drive and risk context. We consider the currently available biological, genetic and ecological information for the house mouse, European red fox, feral cat, European rabbit, cane toad, black rat and European starling to evaluate knowledge gaps and identify candidate species for future research. We discuss these findings in the context of future thematic areas of research worth pursuing in preparation for a more formal assessment of the use of gene drives as a novel strategy for the control of these and other invasive species. Keywords: Invasive species, Gene drive, CRISPR, Pest management, Islands

  3. PARTAKE Survey of Public Knowledge and Perceptions of Clinical Research in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Tal; Dhillon, Savita; Sharma, Pooja; Khan, Danish; MV, Deepa; Alam, Sazid; Jain, Sarika; Alapati, Bhavana; Mittal, Sanjay; Singh, Padam

    2013-01-01

    Background A public that is an informed partner in clinical research is important for ethical, methodological, and operational reasons. There are indications that the public is unaware or misinformed, and not sufficiently engaged in clinical research but studies on the topic are lacking. PARTAKE – Public Awareness of Research for Therapeutic Advancements through Knowledge and Empowerment is a program aimed at increasing public awareness and partnership in clinical research. The PARTAKE Survey is a component of the program. Objective To study public knowledge and perceptions of clinical research. Methods A 40-item questionnaire combining multiple-choice and open-ended questions was administered to 175 English- or Hindi-speaking individuals in 8 public locations representing various socioeconomic strata in New Delhi, India. Results Interviewees were 18–84 old (mean: 39.6, SD±16.6), 23.6% female, 68.6% employed, 7.3% illiterate, 26.3% had heard of research, 2.9% had participated and 58.9% expressed willingness to participate in clinical research. The following perceptions were reported (% true/% false/% not aware): ‘research benefits society’ (94.1%/3.5%/2.3%), ‘the government protects against unethical clinical research’ (56.7%/26.3%/16.9%), ‘research hospitals provide better care’ (67.2%/8.7%/23.9%), ‘confidentiality is adequately protected’ (54.1%/12.3%/33.5%), ‘participation in research is voluntary’ (85.3%/5.8%/8.7%); ‘participants treated like ‘guinea pigs’’ (20.7%/53.2%/26.0%), and ‘compensation for participation is adequate’ (24.7%/12.9%/62.3%). Conclusions Results suggest the Indian public is aware of some key features of clinical research (e.g., purpose, value, voluntary nature of participation), and supports clinical research in general but is unaware of other key features (e.g., compensation, confidentiality, protection of human participants) and exhibits some distrust in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials

  4. Research integrity and rights of indigenous peoples: appropriating Foucault's critique of knowledge/power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swazo, Norman K

    2005-09-01

    In this paper I appropriate the philosophical critique of Michel Foucault as it applies to the engagement of Western science and indigenous peoples in the context of biomedical research. The science of population genetics, specifically as pursued in the Human Genome Diversity Project, is the obvious example to illustrate (a) the contraposition of modern science and 'indigenous science', (b) the tendency to depreciate and marginalize indigenous knowledge systems, and (c) the subsumption of indigenous moral preferences in the juridical armature of international human rights law. I suggest that international bioethicists may learn from Foucault's critique, specifically of the need for vigilance about the knowledge/power relation expressed by the contraposition of modern science and 'indigeneity'.

  5. A review of higher education image and reputation literature: Knowledge gaps and a research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaia Lafuente-Ruiz-de-Sabando

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions are investing increasing resources in order to achieve favourable perceptions among their stakeholders. However, image and reputation management is a complex issue and how stakeholders perceive universities does not always coincide with the image the latter wish to project. For this reason, in this article we address a review of the literature on higher education image and reputation to identify the main knowledge gaps and establish the research lines that merit deeper examination in the future. The gaps identified highlight the need to improve knowledge about the way perceptions (image and reputation of university institutions are shaped, pinpointing the dimensions or essential aspects that influence their formation and determining whether their degree of influence differs when considering the perspectives of different stakeholders or individuals from different geographical areas. Theoretical propositions related to the identified gaps have been set out.

  6. Effective knowledge translation approaches and practices in Indigenous health research: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody E. Morton Ninomiya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective knowledge translation (KT is critical to implementing program and policy changes that require shared understandings of knowledge systems, assumptions, and practices. Within mainstream research institutions and funding agencies, systemic and insidious inequities, privileges, and power relationships inhibit Indigenous peoples’ control, input, and benefits over research. This systematic review will examine literature on KT initiatives in Indigenous health research to help identify wise and promising Indigenous KT practices and language in Canada and abroad. Methods Indexed databases including Aboriginal Health Abstract Database, Bibliography of Native North Americans, CINAHL, Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database, Dissertation Abstracts, First Nations Periodical Index, Medline, National Indigenous Studies Portal, ProQuest Conference Papers Index, PsycInfo, Social Services Abstracts, Social Work Abstracts, and Web of Science will be searched. A comprehensive list of non-indexed and grey literature sources will also be searched. For inclusion, documents must be published in English; linked to Indigenous health and wellbeing; focused on Indigenous people; document KT goals, activities, and rationale; and include an evaluation of their KT strategy. Identified quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods’ studies that meet the inclusion criteria will then be appraised using a quality appraisal tool for research with Indigenous people. Studies that score 6 or higher on the quality appraisal tool will be included for analysis. Discussion This unique systematic review involves robust Indigenous community engagement strategies throughout the life of the project, starting with the development of the review protocol. The review is being guided by senior Indigenous researchers who will purposefully include literature sources characterized by Indigenous authorship, community engagement, and representation; screen and

  7. Physicist or computer specialist?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, J S [University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1966-06-15

    Since to most clinicians physical and computer science are two of the great mysteries of the world, the physicist in a hospital is expected by clinicians to be fully conversant with, and competent to make profound pronouncements on, all methods of computing. specific computing problems, and the suitability of computing machinery ranging from desk calculators to Atlas. This is not surprising since the proportion of the syllabus devoted to physics and mathematics in an M. B. degree is indeed meagre, and the word 'computer' has been surrounded with an aura of mysticism which suggests that it is some fantastic piece of electronic gadgetry comprehensible only to a veritable genius. The clinician consequently turns to the only scientific colleague with whom he has direct contact - the medical physicist - and expects him to be an authority. The physicist is thus thrust, however unwillingly, into the forefront of the advance of computer assistance to scientific medicine. It is therefore essential for him to acquire sufficient knowledge of computing science to enable him to provide satisfactory answers for the clinicianst queries, to proffer more detailed advice as to programming convince clinicians that the computer is really a 'simpleton' which can only add and subtract and even that only under instruction.

  8. Explorative Materiality and Knowledge. The Role of Creative Exploration and Artefacts in Design Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Niedderer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Juxtaposing the nature of design and the foundations of research in the traditional science and humanities disciplines puts their differences into sharp relief. The comparison highlights the key characteristics of design – its creative and experiential nature – which any design research must take into account, as well as the theoretical foundations of research. The aim of this article is to develop an understanding of the ontological, epistemological and methodological issues of design research, and to offer a framework that can embrace equally the notions of creativity and experiential knowledge, and of academic rigour. Furthermore,the potential roles of the design process and artefact within research are examined within this theoretical framework, which suggests that design processes and artefacts can – if appropriately framed – play an important partin the research process, facilitating an approach commensurate with the aims ofdesign enquiry. A case study of the Niedderer’s own work serves to illustratethe balance and integration of theory and (creative practice within the research process, and how this integration can enable a multi-layered contribution to the theoretical and practical advancement of the field.

  9. Researches on nuclear wastes. Knowledge gained and perspectives at the 2006 date line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The law from December 30, 1991, precisely defines 3 axes of researches for the management of high level and long-lived radioactive wastes: separation/transmutation, surface storage and underground disposal. A global evaluation report about these researches is to be supplied in 2006 by the French government to the Parliament. The responsibility of these researches is given to the French atomic energy commission (CEA) and to the national agency for radioactive wastes (ANDRA) who have to coordinate their works with other research organizations and industrialists. The aim of this colloquium is to make a status of the scientific knowledge gained before the implementation of the public and parliamentary debates on nuclear wastes management. This document gathers the presentations (slides) given at the colloquium and dealing with: separation/transmutation, storage and conditioning of waste packages; geologic disposal, the inter-disciplinary PACE program of the CNRS; synthesis of the researches evaluation process; general principles for a sustainable management of radioactive wastes; technical experience implemented by industrialists since 15 years; point of view of the nuclear safety authority; international context of nuclear waste management and related researches; a sociological enlightening: researches advance as seen by the public. (J.S.)

  10. Knowledge exchange in the Pacific: The TROPIC (Translational Research into Obesity Prevention Policies for Communities) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Policies targeting obesogenic environments and behaviours are critical to counter rising obesity rates and lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Policies are likely to be most effective and enduring when they are based on the best available evidence. Evidence-informed policy making is especially challenging in countries with limited resources. The Pacific TROPIC (Translational Research for Obesity Prevention in Communities) project aims to implement and evaluate a tailored knowledge-brokering approach to evidence-informed policy making to address obesity in Fiji, a Pacific nation challenged by increasingly high rates of obesity and concomitant NCDs. Methods The TROPIC project draws on the concept of ‘knowledge exchange’ between policy developers (individuals; organisations) and researchers to deliver a knowledge broking programme that maps policy environments, conducts workshops on evidence-informed policy making, supports the development of evidence-informed policy briefs, and embeds evidence-informed policy making into organisational culture. Recruitment of government and nongovernment organisational representatives will be based on potential to: develop policies relevant to obesity, reach broad audiences, and commit to resourcing staff and building a culture that supports evidence-informed policy development. Workshops will increase awareness of both obesity and policy cycles, as well as develop participants’ skills in accessing, assessing and applying relevant evidence to policy briefs. The knowledge-broking team will then support participants to: 1) develop evidence-informed policy briefs that are both commensurate with national and organisational plans and also informed by evidence from the Pacific Obesity Prevention in Communities project and elsewhere; and 2) collaborate with participating organisations to embed evidence-informed policy making structures and processes. This knowledge broking initiative will be evaluated via

  11. What knowledge counts? Insights from an action research project using participatory video with grassroots innovation experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, A.; Leivas, M.; Talon, A.; De La Fuente, T.; Pellicer-Sifres, V.; Belda-Miquel, S.; Lopez-Fogues, A.; Arias, B

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution on a participatory action-research process using Participatory Video (PV) methodology. Duringsix months, a group of 6 facilitators and 9 members of two grassroots innovation initiatives (Solar Dómada and Fuel Poverty Group) took part of the process and produced two videos during a five-st age PV process, from initial definition and planning to public screening and debate of the videos. We present some insightrs from that research using an original framework developed to analyze PV process: the eParc Cube. This framework examines the interaction between knowledge production, participation and communicative spaces that happen during PV. We conclude reflecting on the social relevance of that kind of research considering the impact among of the coresearchers of both process and products. (Author)

  12. Storylines as an alternative method to communicate river research via a knowledge platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes Arevalo, Juliette; Verbrugge, Laura N. H.; den Haan, Robert Jan; Baart, Fedor; Hulscher, Suzanne J. M. H.; van der Voort, Mascha C.

    2017-04-01

    Sustainable river management relies on diverse and multi-faceted knowledge from fundamental and applied research. Communicating the context, added value and potential use of river research to actors working in multiple disciplines or organizations is challenging. RiverCare is a research programme studying the mid-term effects of innovative river interventions in the Netherlands. Effective communication between researchers and potential users of scientific information, such as water professionals, requires an interactive, two-way communication approach. As part of the communication strategy, we are designing a knowledge platform to provide access to, explain and gather feedback about the potential use of results from water professionals. The knowledge platform is a combination of online services including: a content management system in which storylines are the main component; a data repository to the underlying research data and; hyperlinks to existing online sites that present our results via short news articles. Storylines engage water professionals via experiences or stories of river management actors to explain research outputs instead of or in addition to more technical means such as scientific papers and reports. The use of storylines enables us to explain research outcomes in a way that is captivating and easily understood by a multi-disciplinary audience. To explore its usefulness as communication approach, we developed a storyline example for research about stakeholder perceptions of a re-landscaping intervention in the Waal river in the Netherlands. The storyline's layout consisted of a menu outline and three tabs: (1) storyline's content; (2) contact details; and (3) links to available resources or related publications. The storyline's content was divided in four sections including subsections to navigate. Each section had a heading statement or question to engage users: "Imagine this!"; "What matters? Places matter to people"; "Surveying people

  13. From university research to innovation: Detecting knowledge transfer via text mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woltmann, S.; Clemmensen, L.; Alkærsig, L

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge transfer by universities is a top priority in innovation policy and a primary purpose for public research funding, due to being an important driver of technical change and innovation. Current empirical research on the impact of university research relies mainly on formal databases and indicators such as patents, collaborative publications and license agreements, to assess the contribution to the socioeconomic surrounding of universities. In this study, we present an extension of the current empirical framework by applying new computational methods, namely text mining and pattern recognition. Text samples for this purpose can include files containing social media contents, company websites and annual reports. The empirical focus in the present study is on the technical sciences and in particular on the case of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). We generated two independent text collections (corpora) to identify correlations of university publications and company webpages. One corpus representing the company sites, serving as sample of the private economy and a second corpus, providing the reference to the university research, containing relevant publications. We associated the former with the latter to obtain insights into possible text and semantic relatedness. The text mining methods are extrapolating the correlations, semantic patterns and content comparison of the two corpora to define the document relatedness. We expect the development of a novel tool using contemporary techniques for the measurement of public research impact. The approach aims to be applicable across universities and thus enable a more holistic comparable assessment. This rely less on formal databases, which is certainly beneficial in terms of the data reliability. We seek to provide a supplementary perspective for the detection of the dissemination of university research and hereby enable policy makers to gain additional insights of (informal) contributions of knowledge

  14. The need for PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragucci, Kelly R; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Campbell, Kristin Bova; Buck, Marcia L; Dager, William E; Donovan, Jennifer L; Emerson, Kayleigh; Gubbins, Paul O; Haight, Robert J; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Murphy, John E; Prohaska, Emily

    2014-06-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and other stakeholder organizations seek to advance clinical pharmacist practitioners, educators, and researchers. Unfortunately, there remains an inadequate supply of residency-trained clinical specialists to meet the needs of our health care system, and nonspecialists often are called on to fill open specialist positions. The impact of clinical pharmacy specialists on pharmacotherapy outcomes in both acute care and primary care settings demonstrates the value of these specialists. This commentary articulates the need for postgraduate year two (PGY2)-trained clinical specialists within the health care system by discussing various clinical and policy rationales, interprofessional support, economic justifications, and their impact on quality of care and drug safety. The integrated practice model that has grown out of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) could threaten the growth and development of future clinical specialists. Therefore, the ways in which PGY2-trained clinical pharmacist specialists are deployed in the PPMI require further consideration. PGY2 residencies provide education and training opportunities that cannot be achieved in traditional professional degree programs or postgraduate year one residencies. These specialists are needed to provide direct patient care to complex patient populations and to educate and train pharmacy students and postgraduate residents. Limitations to training and hiring PGY2-trained clinical pharmacy specialists include site capacity limitations and lack of funding. A gap analysis is needed to define the extent of the mismatch between the demand for specialists by health care systems and educational institutions versus the capacity to train clinical pharmacists at the specialty level. © 2014 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  15. The Present of Environmental Psychology Researches in China: Base on the Bibliometric Analysis and Knowledge Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junhua; Wang, Qi; Zhu, Leiye; Qing, Wu; Jin, Meidong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Haibin

    2018-03-01

    Environmental psychology is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on the interplay between individuals and their surroundings. Chinese researchers conducted extensive research on the field and produced a wealth of academic achievements, especially on the application of environmental psychology, such as the protection of minority towns and villages and the prevention and solution of air pollution. To reveal the current situation of the researches in China, 388 related papers from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were analyzed by bibliometric and Knowledge Mapping. The results show that: (1) these studies stared since 1982 and demonstrated a year-on-year growth trend since 2001, which reaches a historical peak in 2016. Peiwen Zhan, Hu Zhao and Xiaofeng Lu top the list with a total of eighteen articles and Heilongjiang University is the best performer among the contributing organizations. (2)“Environmental Psychology” is the most frequently cited keywords and “Environmental perception”, “Physical environment” and “living environment” have the longest span of the bursts. the top seven largest clusters, which were environment, surroundings, application, privacy, environmental perception environmental art and physical environment.

  16. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Francesca C. [Editor; Mendius, E. Louise [Editor

    2003-09-23

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  17. Taking power, politics, and policy problems seriously: the limits of knowledge translation for urban health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelly; Fafard, Patrick

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge translation (KT) is a growing movement in clinical and health services research, aimed to help make research more relevant and to move research into practice and policy. This paper examines the conventional model of policy change presented in KT and assesses its applicability for increasing the impact of urban health research on urban health policy. In general, KT conceptualizes research utilization in terms of the technical implementation of scientific findings, on the part of individual decision-makers who can be "targeted" for a KT intervention, in a context that is absent of political interests. However, complex urban health problems and interventions infrequently resemble this single decision, single decision-maker model posited by KT. In order to clarify the conditions under which urban health research is more likely or not to have an influence on public policy development, we propose to supplement the conventional model with three concepts drawn from the social science: policy stages, policy networks, and a discourse analysis approach for theorizing power in policy-making.

  18. Proceedings of the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, Francesca C.; Mendius, E. Louise

    2003-01-01

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 25th Seismic Research Review -- Nuclear Explosion Monitoring: Building the Knowledge Base, held 23-25 September, 2003 in Tucson, Arizona. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), US Army Space and Missile Defense Command, and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  19. Current knowledge from experimental works with radioprotective drugs from the viewpoint of latest scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalka, J.

    2008-01-01

    The protection of both human and animal population against a radiation impairment proves to be an impulse for continuous intensive searching for plants with radioprotective properties, identification of their radioprotective components and examination of their effects both in vivo an in vitro. I am presenting the results as well as knowledge of a latest scientific research in this field with testing the following plants: Vigna radiata, Mentha piperita, Citrus aurantium var. amara, Syzygium cumini, Tinospora cordifolia, Aegle marmelos, Phyllanthus amarus, Aloe vera, Angelica sinensis, Rosemarinus officinalis, Panax ginseng, Hippophae rhamnoides, Ocimum sanctum, Crataegus microphylla. (authors)

  20. Contribution of health researches in national knowledge production: A scientometrics study on 15-year research products of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Djalalinia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Researchers, practitioners, and policymakers call for updated valid evidence to monitor, prevent, and control of alarming trends of health problems. To respond to these needs, health researches provide the vast multidisciplinary scientific fields. We quantify the national trends of health research outputs and its contribution in total science products. Methods: We systematically searched Scopus database with the most coverage in health and biomedicine discipline as the only sources for multidisciplinary citation reports, for all total and health-related publications, from 2000 to 2014. These scientometrics analyses covered the trends of main index of scientific products, citations, and collaborative papers. We also provided information on top institutions, journals, and collaborative research centers in the fields of health researches. Results: In Iran, over a 15-year period, 237,056 scientific papers have been published, of which 81,867 (34.53% were assigned to health-related fields. Pearson's Chi-square test showed significant time trends between published papers and their citations. Tehran University of Medical Sciences was responsible for 21.87% of knowledge productions share. The second and the third ranks with 11.15% and 7.28% belonged to Azad University and Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, respectively. In total fields, Iran had the most collaborative papers with the USA (4.17%, the UK (2.41%, and Canada (0.02%. In health-related papers, similar patterns of collaboration followed by 4.75%, 2.77%, and 1.93% of papers. Conclusions: Despite the ascending trends in health research outputs, more efforts required for the promotion of collaborative outputs that cause synergy of resources and the use of practical results. These analyses also could be useful for better planning and management of planning and conducting studies in these fields.

  1. A protocol for a systematic review of the use of process evaluations in knowledge translation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shannon D; Rotter, Thomas; Hartling, Lisa; Chambers, Thane; Bannar-Martin, Katherine H

    2014-12-23

    Experimental designs for evaluating knowledge translation (KT) interventions for professional behavior change can provide strong estimates of intervention effectiveness but offer limited insight how the intervention worked or not. Furthermore, trials provide little insight into the ways through which interventions lead to behavior change and how they are moderated by different facilitators and barriers. As a result, the ability to generalize the findings from one study to a different context, organization, or clinical problem is severely compromised. Consequently, researchers have started to explore the causal mechanisms in complementary studies (process evaluations) alongside experimental designs for evaluating KT interventions. This study focuses on improving process evaluations by synthesizing current evidence on process evaluations conducted alongside experimental designs for evaluating KT interventions. A medical research librarian will develop and implement search strategies designed to identify evidence that is relevant to process evaluations in health research. Studies will not be excluded based on design. Included studies must contain a process evaluation component aimed at understanding or evaluating a KT intervention targeting professional behavior change. Two reviewers will perform study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction using standard forms. Disagreements will be resolved through discussion or third party adjudication. Data to be collected include study design, details about data collection approaches and types, theoretical influences, approaches to evaluate intervention dose delivered, intervention dose received, intervention fidelity, intervention reach, data analysis, and study outcomes. This study is not registered with PROSPERO. There is widespread acceptance that the generalizability of quantitative trials of KT interventions would be significantly enhanced to other contexts, health professional groups, and clinical conditions

  2. TRAINING SYSTEM OF FUTURE SPECIALISTS: QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Romanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is development of innovative strategy of quality control training of engineers and skilled workers (hereinafter – future specialists in educational professional organizations on the principles of social partnership.Methods. Theoretic: theoretic and methodological analysis, polytheoretic synthesis, modeling. Empirical: research and generalization of the system, process and competence – based approaches experience, experiment, observation, surveys, expert evaluation, SWOT-analysis as a method of strategic planning which is to identify the internal and external factors (socio-cultural of the organization surrounding.Results. The strategy of the development of the process of quality control training in educational professional organizations and a predictive model of the system of quality control training for future engineers and workers have been created on the analysis and synthesis of a quantitative specification of the quality, the obtained experience and success in control training of future specialists in educational professional organizations in recent economic and educational conditions.Scientific novelty. There has been built a predicative model of quality control training of future specialists to meet modern standards and the principles of social partnership; the control algorithm of the learning process, developed in accordance with the standards (international of quality ISO in the implementation of the quality control systems of the process approach (matrix-based responsibility, competence and remit of those responsible for the education process in the educational organization, the «problem» terms and diagnostic tools for assessing the quality of professional training of future specialists. The perspective directions of innovation in the control of the quality of future professionals training have been determined; the parameters of a comprehensive analysis of the state of the system to ensure the

  3. Aspects that play a role in developing, sharing and using knowledge in school-university research networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof dr Douwe Beijaard; Dr. Jacqueline van Swet; prof dr Theo Bergen; dr Frank Cornelissen

    2011-01-01

    School-university research networks aim at closer integration of research and practice by means of teacher research. Such practice-oriented research can enhance teachers' professional knowledge development, and can benefit both schools and university. This paper reports on 21 participants of a

  4. A descriptive qualitative examination of knowledge translation practice among health researchers in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Roche, Patricia L; Bell, Courtney P; Temple, Beverley; Wittmeier, Kristy D M

    2017-09-06

    The importance of effective translation of health research findings into action has been well recognized, but there is evidence to suggest that the practice of knowledge translation (KT) among health researchers is still evolving. Compared to research user stakeholders, researchers (knowledge producers) have been under-studied in this context. The goals of this study were to understand the experiences of health researchers in practicing KT in Manitoba, Canada, and identify their support needs to sustain and increase their participation in KT. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 researchers studying in biomedical; clinical; health systems and services; and social, cultural, environmental and population health research. Interview questions were open-ended and probed participants' understanding of KT, their experiences in practicing KT, barriers and facilitators to practicing KT, and their needs for KT practice support. KT was broadly conceptualized across participants. Participants described a range of KT practice experiences, most of which related to dissemination. Participants also expressed a number of negative emotions associated with the practice of KT. Many individual, logistical, and systemic or organizational barriers to practicing KT were identified, which included a lack of institutional support for KT in both academic and non-academic systems. Participants described the presence of good relationships with stakeholders as a critical facilitator for practicing KT. The most commonly identified needs for supporting KT practice were access to education and training, and access to resources to increase awareness and promotion of KT. While there were few major variations in response trends across most areas of health research, the responses of biomedical researchers suggested a unique KT context, reflected by distinct conceptualizations of KT (such as commercialization as a core component), experiences (including frustration and lack of

  5. 48 CFR 552.236-72 - Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specialist. 552.236-72... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.236-72 Specialist. As prescribed in 536.570-3, insert the following clause: Specialist (APR 1984) The term “Specialist...

  6. Tell Me Why! Content Knowledge Predicts Process-Orientation of Math Researchers' and Math Teachers' Explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachner, Andreas; Nückles, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    In two studies, we investigated the impact of instructors' different knowledge bases on the quality of their instructional explanations. In Study 1, we asked 20 mathematics teachers (with high pedagogical content knowledge, but lower content knowledge) and 15 mathematicians (with lower pedagogical content knowledge, but high content knowledge) to…

  7. Mycobacterium bovis infection in the lion (Panthera leo): Current knowledge, conundrums and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Ignatius M; van Helden, Paul D; Millar, Robert P

    2015-06-12

    Mycobacterium bovis has global public-health and socio-economic significance and can infect a wide range of species including the lion (Panthera leo) resulting in tuberculosis. Lions are classified as vulnerable under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and have experienced a 30% population decline in the past two decades. However, no attempt has been made to collate and critically evaluate the available knowledge of M. bovis infections in lions and potential effects on population. In this review we set out to redress this. Arguments suggesting that ingestion of infected prey animals are the main route of infection for lions have not been scientifically proven and research is needed into other possible sources and routes of infection. The paucity of knowledge on host susceptibility, transmission directions and therefore host status, manifestation of pathology, and epidemiology of the disease in lions also needs to be addressed. Advances have been made in diagnosing the presence of M. bovis in lions. However, these diagnostic tests are unable to differentiate between exposure, presence of infection, or stage of disease. Furthermore, there are contradictory reports on the effects of M. bovis on lion populations with more data needed on disease dynamics versus the lion population's reproductive dynamics. Knowledge on disease effects on the lion reproduction and how additional stressors such as drought or co-morbidities may interact with tuberculosis is also lacking. Filling these knowledge gaps will contribute to the understanding of mycobacterial infections and disease in captive and wild lions and assist in lion conservation endeavours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based practice, research utilization, and knowledge translation in chiropractic: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, André E; Al Zoubi, Fadi; Stuber, Kent; French, Simon D; Boruff, Jill; Corrigan, John; Thomas, Aliki

    2016-07-13

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) gaps are widespread across health disciplines. Understanding factors supporting the uptake of evidence can inform the design of strategies to narrow these EBP gaps. Although research utilization (RU) and the factors associated with EBP have been reported in several health disciplines, to date this area has not been reviewed comprehensively in the chiropractic profession. The purpose of this review was to report on the current state of knowledge on EBP, RU, and knowledge translation (KT) in chiropractic. A scoping review using the Arksey and O'Malley framework was used to systematically select and summarize existing literature. Searches were conducted using a combination of keywords and MeSH terms from the earliest date available in each database to May 2015. Quantitative and thematic analyses of the selected literature were conducted. Nearly 85 % (56/67) of the included studies were conducted in Canada, USA, UK or Australia. Thematic analysis for the three categories (EBP, RU, KT) revealed two themes related to EBP (attitudes and beliefs of chiropractors; implementation of EBP), three related to RU (guideline adherence; frequency and sources of information accessed; and perceived value of websites and search engines), and three related to KT (knowledge practice gaps; barriers and facilitators to knowledge use; and selection, tailoring, and implementation of interventions). EBP gaps were noted in the areas of assessment of activity limitation, determination of psychosocial factors influencing pain, general health indicators, establishing a prognosis, and exercise prescription. While most practitioners believed EBP and research to be important and a few studies suggested that traditional and online educational strategies could improve patient care, use of EBP and guideline adherence varied widely. Findings suggest that the majority of chiropractors hold favourable attitudes and beliefs toward EBP. However, much remains to be done for

  9. The evolution of local participation and the mode of knowledge production in Arctic research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas D. Brunet

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arctic science is often claimed to have been transformed by the increased involvement of local people, but these claims of a new research paradigm have not been empirically evaluated. We argue that the "new" participatory research paradigm emerging in Arctic science embodies many of the principles of the Mode 2 knowledge production framework. Using the Mode 2 thesis as an assessment framework, we examined research articles appearing between 1965 and 2010 in the journal Arctic to assess the extent to which there has been a paradigm shift toward more participatory approaches. Results suggest that the involvement of local people has increased only slightly over the last half century and continues to vary systematically among disciplines, organizations, and regions. Analysis of three additional journals focused on Arctic and circumpolar science establishes the generality of these slight increases in local involvement. There is clearly room for more community involvement in Arctic science, but achieving this will require either increasing the proportional representation of the organizations, disciplines, and regions with a track record of successful Mode 2 research, or encouraging Mode 2 research innovation within the organizations, disciplines, and regions currently predominated by Mode 1 approaches.

  10. The Longitudinal Study of Aging in Human Young Adults: Knowledge Gaps and Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Belsky, Daniel W; Danese, Andrea; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2017-02-01

    To prevent onset of age-related diseases and physical and cognitive decline, interventions to slow human aging and extend health span must eventually be applied to people while they are still young and healthy. Yet most human aging research examines older adults, many with chronic disease, and little is known about aging in healthy young humans. This article explains how this knowledge gap is a barrier to extending health span and puts forward the case that geroscience should invest in researching the pace of aging in young adults. As one illustrative example, we describe an initial effort to study the pace of aging in a young-adult birth cohort by using repeated waves of biomarkers collected across the third and fourth decades to quantify the pace of coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple organ systems (eg, pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, metabolic, and immune function). Findings provided proof of principle that it is possible to quantify individual variation in the pace of aging in young adults still free of age-related diseases. This article articulates research needs to improve longitudinal measurement of the pace of aging in young people, to pinpoint factors that slow or speed the pace of aging, to compare pace of aging against genomic clocks, to explain slow-aging young adults, and to apply pace of aging in preventive clinical trials of antiaging therapies. This article puts forward a research agenda to fill the knowledge gap concerning lifelong causes of aging. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Knowledge generation about care-giving in the UK: a critical review of research paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alisoun; Larkin, Mary

    2015-01-01

    While discourse about care and caring is well developed in the UK, the nature of knowledge generation about care and the research paradigms that underpin it have been subjected to limited critical reflection and analysis. An overarching synthesis of evidence - intended to promote debate and facilitate new understandings - identifies two largely separate bodies of carer-related research. The first body of work - referred to as Gathering and Evaluating - provides evidence of the extent of care-giving, who provides care to whom and with what impact; it also focuses on evaluating policy and service efficacy. This type of research tends to dominate public perception about caring, influences the type and extent of policy and support for carers and attracts funding from policy and health-related sources. However, it also tends to be conceptually and theoretically narrow, has limited engagement with carers' perspectives and adopts an atomistic purview on the care-giving landscape. The second body of work - Conceptualising and Theorising - explores the conceptual and experiential nature of care and aims to extend thinking and theory about caring. It is concerned with promoting understanding of care as an integral part of human relationships, embedded in the life course, and a product of interdependence and reciprocity. This work conceptualises care as both an activity and a disposition and foregrounds the development of an 'ethic of care', thereby providing a perspective within which to recognise both the challenges care-giving may present and the significance of care as a normative activity. It tends to be funded from social science sources and, while strong in capturing carers' experiences, has limited policy and service-related purchase. Much could be gained for citizens, carers and families, and the generation of knowledge advanced, if the two bodies of research were integrated to a greater degree. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Value of Information Systems Teaching and Research in the Knowledge Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Hemingway

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Governments and businesses are becoming ever more interested in the production and capitalisation of knowledge, so much so that the 'knowledge economy' is now regarded as the paradigm of economic progress. This has significant implications for teaching and research generally, and for the IS community in particular. This paper provides a brief analysis of general developments in higher education to provide a context for discussing the developments specific to IS. Stakeholder analysis is then used to identify the main responsibilities and pressures placed upon the IS academic community. Using the stakeholder analysis as a set of 'requirements' that the IS academic community must balance, several ways in which IS teaching and research can better contribute value to the various stakeholder groups are identified. Throughout the paper, several 'policy level' recommendations are made that could lead to the IS community being better able to manage the pressures exerted by different stakeholder groups and, consequently, being more able to address a broad range of commercial and social issues.

  13. Studying the Relations of Social Capital Factors With Knowledge Sharing: A Case Study at Research Department of Irib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan DARVISH

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to further develop an understanding of social capital in organizational knowledge sharing. We first developed a measurement tool and then a theoretical framework in which six social capital factors (social interaction ties, trust, identification, norm of reciprocity, openmindedness, and shared language & goals can have effect on two sides of knowledge sharing; attitude and expectations about knowledge sharing, and quality of knowledge sharing. We surveyed 144 managers and researchers from a research department of IRIB, and then examined their relationships using step-wise multiple regression analysis. We confirm that social interaction ties, trust, norm of reciprocity, and shared language & goals significantly contributed to a person’s attitude and expectations about knowledge sharing, but only shared language and goals directly contributed to quality of knowledge sharing.

  14. Understanding the performance and impact of public knowledge translation funding interventions: protocol for an evaluation of Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation funding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Robert K D; Graham, Ian D; Bosompra, Kwadwo; Choudhry, Yumna; Coen, Stephanie E; Macleod, Martha; Manuel, Christopher; McCarthy, Ryan; Mota, Adrian; Peckham, David; Tetroe, Jacqueline M; Tucker, Joanne

    2012-06-22

    The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has defined knowledge translation (KT) as a dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically-sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products, and strengthen the healthcare system. CIHR, the national health research funding agency in Canada, has undertaken to advance this concept through direct research funding opportunities in KT. Because CIHR is recognized within Canada and internationally for leading and funding the advancement of KT science and practice, it is essential and timely to evaluate this intervention, and specifically, these funding opportunities. The study will employ a novel method of participatory, utilization-focused evaluation inspired by the principles of integrated KT. It will use a mixed methods approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, and will elicit participation from CIHR funded researchers, knowledge users, KT experts, as well as other health research funding agencies. Lines of inquiry will include an international environmental scan, document/data reviews, in-depth interviews, targeted surveys, case studies, and an expert review panel. The study will investigate how efficiently and effectively the CIHR model of KT funding programs operates, what immediate outcomes these funding mechanisms have produced, and what impact these programs have had on the broader state of health research, health research uptake, and health improvement. The protocol and results of this evaluation will be of interest to those engaged in the theory, practice, and evaluation of KT. The dissemination of the study protocol and results to both practitioners and theorists will help to fill a gap in knowledge in three areas: the role of a public research funding agency in facilitating KT, the outcomes and impacts KT funding interventions, and how KT can best be evaluated.

  15. Whose Knowledge, Whose Values? The Contribution of Local Knowledge to Education Policy Processes: A Case Study of Research Development Initiatives in the Small State of Saint Lucia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Keith; Crossley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper draws upon a case study of education in the small Caribbean state of Saint Lucia (population 154,000) to examine how local knowledge and values can influence the education policy process. It is argued that recent research development initiatives have strengthened the ability of Saint Lucia to mediate international education agendas to…

  16. Exploring the situational motivation of medical specialists: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burgt, Stéphanie M E; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Croiset, Gerda; Peerdeman, Saskia M

    2018-02-26

    The aim was to obtain insight into the factors in the work environment that motivate or demotivate a medical specialist during his/her working day. A qualitative ethnographic design was used, and a constructivist approach was adopted with the Self-Determination theory of motivation as a framework. Six medical specialists from VU University Medical Center in the Netherlands, recruited through convenience, snowball, and purposive sampling, were shadowed for one day each. Data were transcribed and open-coded. Themes were finalized through discussion and consensus. Sixty hours of observation data identified motivating and demotivating factors categorized into four themes that are important for specialists' motivation. Informational technology issues are demotivating factors. Working with colleagues can be both a motivating and demotivating factor, e.g., filling in for each other through feelings of relatedness was motivating. Being in control of one's planning through feelings of autonomy was motivating. Furthermore, patient care and teaching, especially in combination, stimulated specialists' motivation. Regarding the design of the study, we found that situational motivation is indeed observable. The basic psychological needs autonomy, competence, and relatedness are important for specialists' motivation. Investing in a more motivating, open, transparent, and basic-needs- supportive work environment for medical specialists is necessary. Keywords: Continuing professional development, motivation, medical specialists, self-determination theory, qualitative research.

  17. A diabetes management mentor program: outcomes of a clinical nurse specialist initiative to empower staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modic, Mary Beth; Canfield, Christina; Kaser, Nancy; Sauvey, Rebecca; Kukla, Aniko

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to enhance the knowledge of the bedside nurse in diabetes management. A forum for ongoing support and exploration of clinical problems, along with the distribution of educational tools were the components of this program. Diabetes accounts for 30% of patients admitted to the hospital. It has become more challenging to manage as the treatment choices have increased. There are a number of researchers who have identified nurse and physician knowledge of diabetes management principles as suboptimal. DESCRIPTION OF THE INNOVATION: Staff nurses are educated for a role as a Diabetes Management Mentor and are expected to educate/dialogue with peers monthly, model advocacy and diabetes patient education skills, facilitate referrals for diabetes education, and direct staff to resources for diabetes management. Diabetes Management Mentors feel more confident in their knowledge of diabetes and their ability to resolve clinical issues as they arise. The Diabetes Management Mentor role is another avenue for nurses to refine their clinical knowledge base and acquire skills to share with colleagues while remaining at the bedside. The clinical nurse specialist is expertly prepared to foster the professional development of bedside nurses while simultaneously making a positive impact on disease management. Opportunity for future investigation includes efficacy of teaching tools on diabetes mastery, the effect of clinical nurse specialist mentoring on a select group of bedside nurses, and the Diabetes Management Mentor's impact on prevention of near-miss events.

  18. Pest Management Specialist (AFSC 56650).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air Univ., Gunter AFS, Ala. Extension Course Inst.

    This eight-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for pest management specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are civil engineering; pest management (entomology, pest management planning and coordination, and safety and protective equipment); pest management chemicals and…

  19. ISD Designed Medical Specialist Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Samuel K., Jr.; Chagalis, George P.

    The Basic Medical Specialist course has one of the largest enrollments of the U.S. Army's Academy of Health Sciences; 11,000 soldiers were trained in this course in 1977 and 1978. Training encompasses both emergency first aid (for field medics) and basic nursing skills. A task force working to improve Army training developed this course, in…

  20. Current Research on Containment Technologies for Verification Activities: Advanced Tools for Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, H.; Kuhn, M.; Krementz, D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Non-proliferation and Verification Research and Development currently funds research on advanced containment technologies to support Continuity of Knowledge (CoK) objectives for verification regimes. One effort in this area is the Advanced Tools for Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge (ATCK) project. Recognizing that CoK assurances must withstand potential threats from sophisticated adversaries, and that containment options must therefore keep pace with technology advances, the NNSA research and development on advanced containment tools is an important investment. The two ATCK efforts underway at present address the technical containment requirements for securing access points (loop seals) and protecting defined volumes. Multiple U.S. national laboratories are supporting this project: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SNL and SRNL are developing the ''Ceramic Seal,'' an active loop seal that integrates multiple advanced security capabilities and improved efficiency housed within a small-volume ceramic body. The development includes an associated handheld reader and interface software. Currently at the prototype stage, the Ceramic Seal will undergo a series of tests to determine operational readiness. It will be field tested in a representative verification trial in 2016. ORNL is developing the Whole Volume Containment Seal (WCS), a flexible conductive fabric capable of enclosing various sizes and shapes of monitored items. The WCS includes a distributed impedance measurement system for imaging the fabric surface area and passive tamper-indicating features such as permanent-staining conductive ink. With the expected technology advances from the Ceramic Seal and WCS, the ATCK project takes significant steps in advancing containment technologies to help maintain CoK for various verification

  1. Knowledge Management in Sustainability Research Projects: Concepts, Effective Models, and Examples in a Multi-Stakeholder Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, David Brian; Köhler, Thomas; Weith, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to sketch a conceptual design for an information and knowledge management system in sustainability research projects. The suitable frameworks to implement knowledge transfer models constitute social communities, because the mutual exchange and learning processes among all stakeholders promote key sustainable developments through…

  2. A Qualitative Research on the University Administrators' Capacity to Use Management Knowledge Tools (The Case of TRNC Universities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Gokmen; Silman, Fatos; Birol, Cem

    2009-01-01

    In order to reach goals and continue the ongoing learning process, like other organizations, universities also need the effective use of knowledge management. Knowledge management is an ongoing process and it has to be organized in a manner that is always open to new ideas. In universities where research and development studies play an important…

  3. Effect of Participatory Research on Farmers' Knowledge and Practice of IPM: The Case of Cotton in Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togbé, Codjo Euloge; Haagsma, Rein; Aoudji, Augustin K. N.; Vodouhê, Simplice D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the effect of participatory research on farmers' knowledge and practice of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Benin. The participatory field experiments were carried out during the 2011-2012 cotton growing season, and focused on the development and application of pest management knowledge. Methodology: A…

  4. The Production and Dissemination of Knowledge: A Scoping Review of Arts-Based Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine M. Boydell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of arts-based research is shifting our understanding of what counts as evidence and highlights the complexity and multidimensionality involved in creating new knowledge. A scoping review of arts-based health research was undertaken to identify the breadth of peer-reviewed literature, summarize findings and identify gaps. A literature database search identified 71 original studies meeting our criteria for review. Studies were characterized by diverse art genres, designs, and substantive health topics. The arts in qualitative research were considered an opportunity for enhanced engagement of participants and audiences alike, a way to enrich communication and make research accessible beyond academia, and a method for generating data beyond the scope of most interview-based methods. Three central gaps were identified: the need for critical dialogue regarding the impact of arts-based health research, the need to focus on how the quality of such projects is judged, and the need to address the ethical challenges of engaging in this work. We suggest that the broadening of qualitative methodologies to include arts-based approaches offers more than simply adjuncts to typical data collection and dissemination approaches, and instead, presents different ways of knowing. We believe that this may be a significant moment in the field in which to question whether or not we are witness to a paradigmatic shift in the ways we approach inquiry into the social world and/or the emergence of an innovative set of techniques that researchers can draw upon to enhance traditional methods of conducting qualitative inquiry. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1201327

  5. Epistemological Beliefs and Knowledge Sharing in Work Teams: A New Model and Research Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Frankie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a knowledge-sharing model that explains individual members' motivation to share knowledge (knowledge donation and knowledge collection). Design/methodology/approach: The model is based on social-constructivist theories of epistemological beliefs, learning and distributed cognition, and is organized…

  6. Research on the construction of three level customer service knowledge graph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Shen, Jiajie; Shi, Quan; Cheng, Xianyi

    2017-09-01

    With the explosion of knowledge and information of the enterprise and the growing demand for intelligent knowledge management and application and improve business performance the knowledge expression and processing of the enterprise has become a hot topic. Aim at the problems of the electric marketing customer service knowledge map (customer service knowledge map) in building theory and method, electric marketing knowledge map of three levels of customer service was discussed, and realizing knowledge reasoning based on Neo4j, achieve good results in practical application.

  7. Beyond "the West as Method": Repositioning the Japanese Education Research Communities in/against the Global Structure of Academic Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on the recent critiques of the global knowledge economy of social science research, this article explores possible ways in which the Japanese education research communities can reposition themselves in the wider international education research community. The premises of this discussion are that there exists a global structure of academic…

  8. Coastal erosion management in Accra: Combining local knowledge and empirical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwasi Appeaning Addo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal erosion along the Accra coast has become a chronic phenomenon that threatens both life and property. The issue has assumed a centre stage of national debate in recent times because of its impact on the coastal communities. Lack of reliable geospatial data hinders effective scientific investigations into the changing trends in the shoreline position. However, knowledge about coastal erosion, by the local people, and how far the shoreline has migrated inland over time is high in the coastal communities in Accra. This opens a new chapter in coastal erosion research to include local knowledge of the local settlers in developing sustainable coastal management. This article adopted a scientific approach to estimate rate of erosion and tested the results against perceived erosion trend by the local settlers. The study used a 1974 digital topographic map and 1996 aerial photographs. The end point rate statistical method in DSAS was used to compute the rates of change. The short-term rate of change for the 22-year period under study was estimated as -0.91 m/annum ± 0.49 m/annum. It was revealed that about 79% of the shoreline is eroding, while the remaining 21% is either stabilised or accreting. It emerged, from semi-structured interviews with inhabitants in the Accra coastal communities, that an average of about 30 m of coastal lands are perceived to have been lost to erosion for a period of about 20 years. This translates to a historic rate of change of about 1.5 m/year, which corroborates the results of the scientific study. Again this study has established that the local knowledge of the inhabitants, about coastal erosion, can serve as reliable information under scarcity of scientific data for coastal erosion analyses in developing countries.

  9. The research on construction and application of machining process knowledge base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tan; Qiao, Lihong; Qie, Yifan; Guo, Kai

    2018-03-01

    In order to realize the application of knowledge in machining process design, from the perspective of knowledge in the application of computer aided process planning(CAPP), a hierarchical structure of knowledge classification is established according to the characteristics of mechanical engineering field. The expression of machining process knowledge is structured by means of production rules and the object-oriented methods. Three kinds of knowledge base models are constructed according to the representation of machining process knowledge. In this paper, the definition and classification of machining process knowledge, knowledge model, and the application flow of the process design based on the knowledge base are given, and the main steps of the design decision of the machine tool are carried out as an application by using the knowledge base.

  10. Exploring arts-based knowledge translation: sharing research findings through performing the patterns, rehearsing the results, staging the synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Kendra; Schultz, Annette S H

    2014-04-01

    Cultivation of knowledge translation (KT) strategies that actively engage health professionals in critical reflection of their practice and research-based evidence are imperative to address the research-practice gap. While research-based evidence is exponentially growing, our ability to facilitate uptake by nurses and other health professionals has not kept pace. Innovative approaches that extend epistemological bias beyond a singular standpoint of postpositivism, such as the utilization of arts-based methods, expand the possibility to address the complexities of context, engage audience members, promote dissemination within communities of practice, and foster new audiences interested in research findings. In this paper, we address the importance of adopting a social constructivist epistemological stance to facilitate knowledge translation to diverse audiences, explore various arts-based knowledge translation (ABKT) strategies, and open a dialogue concerning evaluative tenets of ABKT. ABKT utilizes various art forms to disseminate research knowledge to diverse audiences and promote evidence-informed practice. ABKT initiatives translate knowledge not based upon a linear model, which views knowledge as an objective entity, but rather operate from the premise that knowledge is socially situated, which demands acknowledging and engaging the learner within their context. Theatre, dance, photography, and poetry are art forms that are commonly used to communicate research findings to diverse audiences. Given the emerging interest and importance of utilizing this KT strategy situated within a social constructivist epistemology, potential challenges and plausible evaluative criteria specific to ABKT are presented. ABKT is an emerging KT strategy that is grounded in social constructivist epistemological tenets, and holds potential for meaningfully sharing new research knowledge with diverse audiences. ABKT is an innovative and synergistic approach to traditional

  11. Insideness and Outsideness: An Autoethnography of a Primary Physical Education Specialist Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Caroline; Thompson, Maree Dinan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an authentic and legitimate voice to the physical education (PE) specialist teacher in the primary school and to give an insight into professional knowledge. An autoethnographic approach has been used to invite readers to enter my world of the primary PE specialist teacher and observe and respond to its…

  12. Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis 2015 (HESPA 2015): Process and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, James F.; Dennis, Dixie; Auld, M. Elaine; Lysoby, Linda; Doyle, Eva; Muenzen, Patricia M.; Caro, Carla M.; Kusorgbor-Narh, Cynthia S.

    2016-01-01

    The Health Education Specialist Practice Analysis 2015 (HESPA 2015) was conducted to update and validate the Areas of Responsibilities, Competencies, and Sub-competencies for Entry- and Advanced-Level Health Education Specialists. Two data collection instruments were developed--one was focused on Sub-competencies and the other on knowledge items…

  13. PERSUASION, INTERACTION AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE: REPRESENTING SELF AND OTHERS IN RESEARCH WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Hyland

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available It is now increasingly accepted that academic knowledge is closely related to the social practices of academic communities, and particularly to their discourses. Texts are persuasive only when they employ rhetorical conventions that colleagues find convincing, and in recent years corpus analyses have helped to underpin this social constructivist position and to reveal some of the ways this is achieved. In this paper I discuss the role of interaction in this process. Based on an analysis of 240 published research papers from eight disciplines and insider informant interviews, I explore the nature of interactive persuasion in this genre. I show here the importance of interaction in academic argument, suggest some of the ways this is achieved, and indicate how these choices reflect and construct disciplinary communities.

  14. Pangolins (Manis crassicaudata in Sri Lanka: A Review of Current Knowledge, Threats and Research Priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K.P. Perera

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata is arguably the least studied species of all Asiatic pangolin species and, is the solitary pangolin species recorded in Sri Lanka. Growing concerns over their population decline due to poaching and trading has triggered a move to uplift Indian Pangolin to Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES. However, lack of reliable scientific information on the behavior, ecology and threats for the survival of Indian Pangolin remains a major limitation in conservation of the species. This narrative review discusses the current knowledge on Indian Pangolin with special reference to Sri Lanka, and identifies key research priorities for better conservation planning of the species.

  15. Hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation and agricultural crops: knowledge gain and knowledge gap after 40 years of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Lyon, John G.; Huete, Alfredo; Edited by Thenkabail, Prasad S.; Lyon, John G.; Huete, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this chapter was to summarize the advances made over last 40+ years, as reported in various chapters of this book, in understanding, modeling, and mapping terrestrial vegetation using hyperspectral remote sensing (or imaging spectroscopy) using sensors that are ground-based, truck-mounted, airborne, and spaceborne. As we have seen in various chapters of this book and synthesized in this chapter, the advances made include: (a) significantly improved characterization and modeling of a wide array of biophysical and biochemical properties of vegetation, (b) ability to discriminate plant species and vegetation types with high degree of accuracies (c) reducing uncertainties in determining net primary productivity or carbon assessments from terrestrial vegetation, (d) improved crop productivity and water productivity models, (b), (e) ability to access stress resulting from causes such as management practices, pests and disease, water deficit or excess; , and (f) establishing more sensitive wavebands and indices to detect plant water\\moisture content. The advent of spaceborne hyperspectral sensors (e.g., NASA’s Hyperion, ESA’s PROBA, and upcoming NASA’s HyspIRI) and numerous methods and techniques espoused in this book to overcome Hughes phenomenon or data redundancy when handling large volumes of hyperspectral data have generated tremendous interest in advancing our hyperspectral applications knowledge base over larger spatial extent such as region, nation, continent, and globe.

  16. Food Safety at Farmers' Markets: A Knowledge Synthesis of Published Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian; Thaivalappil, Abhinand; Reimer, Danielle; Greig, Judy

    2017-12-01

    Farmers' markets are increasingly popular venues in North America for the sale of fresh produce and other foods. However, the nature of their operation can present possible food safety issues, challenges, and risks to consumers. A knowledge synthesis was conducted to identify, characterize, and summarize published research on the microbial food safety issues and implications associated with farmers' markets. A scoping review was conducted using the following steps: comprehensive search strategy, relevance screening of abstracts, and characterization of relevant articles. Two subsets of data were prioritized for more detailed systematic review (data extraction and risk-of-bias assessment) and meta-analysis: (i) studies comparing the microbial safety of foods from farmers' markets versus other sources and (ii) studies evaluating the use of food safety practices at farmers' markets. Overall, 83 relevant studies were identified. The majority of studies were published as journal articles (64%), used a cross-sectional design (81%), and were conducted in the United States (78%). Most studies (39%; n = 32) investigated stakeholder, mostly consumer (n = 22), attitudes toward food safety at farmers' markets. Limited but heterogeneous evidence indicated a higher prevalence of Campylobacter and Salmonella in chicken meat from farmers' markets versus other retail sources, but there was no difference in the microbial contamination of fresh produce. Studies evaluating the use of food safety practices at farmers' markets identified some gaps; for example, the average prevalence of vendor hand washing was 4% (95% confidence interval: 0 to 11%; I 2 = 27%; n = 5 studies). Twelve foodborne outbreaks and case reports were identified, resulting in a total of 411 illnesses, 38 hospitalizations, and two deaths from 1994 to 2016. Only five intervention studies were identified. Key knowledge gaps and areas warranting future research, training, and education are highlighted and discussed.

  17. Education in health research methodology: use of a wiki for knowledge translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele P Hamm

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A research-practice gap exists between what is known about conducting methodologically rigorous randomized controlled trials (RCTs and what is done. Evidence consistently shows that pediatric RCTs are susceptible to high risk of bias; therefore novel methods of influencing the design and conduct of trials are required. The objective of this study was to develop and pilot test a wiki designed to educate pediatric trialists and trainees in the principles involved in minimizing risk of bias in RCTs. The focus was on preliminary usability testing of the wiki. METHODS: The wiki was developed through adaptation of existing knowledge translation strategies and through tailoring the site to the identified needs of the end-users. The wiki was evaluated for usability and user preferences regarding the content and formatting. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 trialists and systematic reviewers, representing varying levels of experience with risk of bias or the conduct of trials. Data were analyzed using content analysis. RESULTS: Participants found the wiki to be well organized, easy to use, and straightforward to navigate. Suggestions for improvement tended to focus on clarification of the text or on esthetics, rather than on the content or format. Participants liked the additional features of the site that were supplementary to the text, such as the interactive examples, and the components that focused on practical applications, adding relevance to the theory presented. While the site could be used by both trialists and systematic reviewers, the lack of a clearly defined target audience caused some confusion among participants. CONCLUSIONS: Participants were supportive of using a wiki as a novel educational tool. The results of this pilot test will be used to refine the risk of bias wiki, which holds promise as a knowledge translation intervention for education in medical research methodology.

  18. The redesigned Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base, FROG-kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Kenneth K; Soundararajan, Usha; Rajeevan, Haseena; Pakstis, Andrew J; Moore, Katherine N; Ropero-Miller, Jeri D

    2018-03-01

    The Forensic Resource/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base (FROG-kb) web site was introduced in 2011 and in the five years since the previous publication ongoing research into how the database can better serve forensics has resulted in extensive redesign of the database interface and functionality. Originally designed as a prototype to support forensic use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), FROG-kb provides a freely accessible web interface that facilitates forensic practice and can be useful for teaching and research. Based on knowledge gained through its use, the web interface has been redesigned for easier navigation through the multiple components. The site also has functional enhancements, extensive new documentation, and new reference panels of SNPs with new curated data. FROG-kb focuses on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and provides reference population data for several published panels of individual identification SNPs (IISNPs) and several published panels of ancestry inference SNPs (AISNPs). For each of the various marker panels with reference population data, FROG-kb calculates random match probabilities (RMP) and relative likelihoods of ancestry for a user-entered genotype profile (either completely or partially specified). Example genotype profiles are available and the User's Manual presents interpretation guidelines for the calculations. The extensive documentation along with ongoing updates makes FROG-kb a comprehensive tool in facilitating use of SNPs in forensic practice and education. An overview of the new FROG-kb with examples and material explaining the results of its use are presented here. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Research Coordination in Enhancing Integrative Research: the Co-production of Knowledge Agenda of the Global Land Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpa, F. M.; Boillat, S. P.; Grove, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The search for sustainability and resilience requires the integration of natural science with social science, as well as the joint production of knowledge and solutions by science and society. In this context, international science coordination initiatives, like Future Earth, have increasingly stressed the need to perform more integrated and more socially relevant research. This contribution has the objective to highlight the potential role of a research coordination initiative, the Global Land Programme (GLP), to provide guidance for more integrative research. The need to perform integrative research is particularly true for land systems, which include dynamic interactions among social and natural drivers that are often multifunctional. Thus, their governance and management is particularity complex and involve highly diverse stakeholders. A key aspect of integrative research is co-production of knowledge, understood as the interactive production of knowledge by both academics and non-academics, that leads to new forms of solutions-oriented knowledge. We relied on experiences of co-production of knowledge on land systems from the GLP network, and drove seven lessons learnt: 1) the importance of including several learning loops in the process, 2) the importance of long-term relationships, 3) the need to overcome the distinction between basic and applied science, 4) the opportunities offered by new communication technologies, 5) the need to train professionals in both breadth and depth, 6) the access to knowledge, and 7) the need to understand better the roles of scientists and decision-makers. These lessons were used to define action-research priorities for enhancing co-production of knowledge on land systems in GLP projects and working groups. As a conclusion, we argue that research coordination initiatives have the potential to provide analysis and guidance for more integrative research. This can be done by performing synthesis and self-reflection activities that

  20. American specialists and SAP project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrlova, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Within the past days of November the project teams of SAP Nuclear in Slovenske elektrarne, a. s. incorporated the specialists from PSEG from New Jersey, U.S.A. The goal of their stay here was to pass on the professional experience and good practice from the implementation of quite demanding project in the nuclear power plants. We have learned more about the company and the objectives from an interview with Clay Warren, SAP Nuclear Project Manager in SE. (author)

  1. 'On the doctor's orders': A pilot study of the effects of website marketing for medical specialist providers under gatekeeping arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, S.

    2017-01-01

    Websites from medical specialist providers are becoming increasingly marketing oriented, but there exists a paucity of empirical research on the effects. This experimental study explored effects of exposure to real websites from medical specialist providers among Dutch adults under physician

  2. Specialist training in pediatric anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom G

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society of Anaesth......There has been a great deal of focus on specialist training in pediatric anesthesia in the last decade or so. Internationally, however, there is still no uniform agreement as to how such a training program should be arranged and organized. Since September 2003, the Scandinavian Society...... of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine has coordinated an advanced Inter-Nordic educational program in pediatric anesthesia and intensive care. The training program is managed by a Steering Committee. This program is intended for physicians who recently have received their specialist degree in anesthesiology...... and intensive care. The training period is 12 months of which 9 months are dedicated to pediatric anesthesia and 3 months to pediatric intensive care. During the 1-year training period, the candidates are designated a Scandinavian host clinic (at a tertiary pediatric center in Scandinavia approved...

  3. Research on Knowledge-Oriented Supply ChainRisk Management System Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yingchun Guo

    2011-01-01

    Based on analyzing the characteristics of supply chain risk management under the influences of knowledge, in this paper integrates basic theories and methods of knowledge management into the process of risk management, builds a knowledge-oriented supply chain risk management system model, and proposes relevant strategies, presenting references for practical application of knowledge-oriented supply chain risk management. By means of acquiring, storing, sharing, and transferring supply chain ri...

  4. The Present of Architectural Psychology Researches in China- Based on the Bibliometric Analysis and Knowledge Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, LeiYe; Wang, Qi; Xu, JunHua; Wu, Qing; Jin, MeiDong; Liao, RongJun; Wang, HaiBin

    2018-03-01

    Architectural Psychology is an interdisciplinary subject of psychology and architecture that focuses on architectural design by using Gestalt psychology, cognitive psychology and other related psychology principles. Researchers from China have achieved fruitful achievements in the field of architectural psychology during past thirty-three years. To reveal the current situation of the field in China, 129 related papers from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) were analyzed by CiteSpace II software. The results show that: (1) the studies of the field in China have been started since 1984 and the annual number of the papers increased dramatically from 2008 and reached a historical peak in 2016. Shanxi Architecture tops the list of contributing publishing journals; Wuhan University, Southwest Jiaotong University and Chongqing University are the best performer among the contributing organizations. (2) “Environmental Psychology”, “Architectural Design” and “Architectural Psychology” are the most frequency keywords. The frontiers of the field in China are “architectural creation” and “environmental psychology” while the popular research topics were“residential environment”, “spatial environment”, “environmental psychology”, “architectural theory” and “architectural psychology”.

  5. The Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB): a curated neurogenetics knowledge base with clinical and research applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Millen, Kathleen J; Barkovich, A James; Dobyns, William B; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    The number of single genes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders has increased dramatically over the past decade. The identification of causative genes for these disorders is important to clinical outcome as it allows for accurate assessment of prognosis, genetic counseling, delineation of natural history, inclusion in clinical trials, and in some cases determines therapy. Clinicians face the challenge of correctly identifying neurodevelopmental phenotypes, recognizing syndromes, and prioritizing the best candidate genes for testing. However, there is no central repository of definitions for many phenotypes, leading to errors of diagnosis. Additionally, there is no system of levels of evidence linking genes to phenotypes, making it difficult for clinicians to know which genes are most strongly associated with a given condition. We have developed the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB: https://www.dbdb.urmc.rochester.edu/home), a publicly available, online-curated repository of genes, phenotypes, and syndromes associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. DBDB contains the first referenced ontology of developmental brain phenotypes, and uses a novel system of levels of evidence for gene-phenotype associations. It is intended to assist clinicians in arriving at the correct diagnosis, select the most appropriate genetic test for that phenotype, and improve the care of patients with developmental brain disorders. For researchers interested in the discovery of novel genes for developmental brain disorders, DBDB provides a well-curated source of important genes against which research sequencing results can be compared. Finally, DBDB allows novel observations about the landscape of the neurogenetics knowledge base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Knowledge Transfer and Dissemination of Advanced Practice Nursing Information and Research to Acute-Care Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Nancy; Dobbins, Maureen; Peachey, Gladys; Hoxby, Heather; Ireland, Sandra; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; DiCenso, Alba

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the information needs and knowledge-dissemination preferences of acute-care administrators with respect to advanced practice nursing (APN). Supportive leadership is imperative for the success of APN roles and administrators need up-to-date research evidence and information, but it is unclear what the information needs of administrators are and how they prefer to receive the information. A survey tool was developed from the literature and from the findings of a qualitative study with acute-care leaders. Of 107 surveys distributed to nursing administrators in 2 teaching hospitals, 79 (73.8%) were returned. Just over half of respondents reported wanting APN information related to model of care and patient and systems outcomes of APN care; the majority expressed a preference for electronic transmission of the information. Researchers need multiple strategies for distributing context-specific APN evidence and information to nursing administrators. Copyright© by Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University.

  7. Pre-Service Science Teachers in Xinjiang "Scientific Inquiry" - Pedagogical Content Knowledge Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yufeng; Xiong, Jianwen

    2012-01-01

    Scientific inquiry is one of the science curriculum content, "Scientific inquiry" - Pedagogical Content Knowledge is the face of scientific inquiry and teachers - of course pedagogical content knowledge and scientific inquiry a teaching practice with more direct expertise. Pre-service teacher training phase of acquisition of knowledge is…

  8. A Game of Thrones: Organising and Legitimising Knowledge through PISA Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mølstad, Christina E.; Pettersson, Daniel; Forsberg, Eva

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates knowledge structures and scientific communication using bibliometric methods to explore scientific knowledge production and dissemination. The aim is to develop knowledge about this growing field by investigating studies using international large-scale assessment (ILSA) data, with a specific focus on those using Programme…

  9. Improving the utilization of research knowledge in agri-food public health: a mixed-method review of knowledge translation and transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajić, Andrijana; Young, Ian; McEwen, Scott A

    2013-05-01

    Knowledge translation and transfer (KTT) aims to increase research utilization and ensure that the best available knowledge is used to inform policy and practice. Many frameworks, methods, and terms are used to describe KTT, and the field has largely developed in the health sector over the past decade. There is a need to review key KTT principles and methods in different sectors and evaluate their potential application in agri-food public health. We conducted a structured mixed-method review of the KTT literature. From 827 citations identified in a comprehensive search, we characterized 160 relevant review articles, case studies, and reports. A thematic analysis was conducted on a prioritized and representative subset of 33 articles to identify key principles and characteristics for ensuring effective KTT. The review steps were conducted by two or more independent reviewers using structured and pretested forms. We identified five key principles for effective KTT that were described within two contexts: to improve research utilization in general and to inform policy-making. To ensure general research uptake, there is a need for the following: (1) relevant and credible research; (2) ongoing interactions between researchers and end-users; (3) organizational support and culture; and (4) monitoring and evaluation. To inform policy-making, (5) researchers must also address the multiple and competing contextual factors of the policy-making process. We also describe 23 recommended and promising KTT methods, including six synthesis (e.g., systematic reviews, mixed-method reviews, and rapid reviews); nine dissemination (e.g., evidence summaries, social media, and policy briefs); and eight exchange methods (e.g., communities of practice, knowledge brokering, and policy dialogues). A brief description, contextual example, and key references are provided for each method. We recommend a wider endorsement of KTT principles and methods in agri-food public health, but there are

  10. Motivational Profiles and Motivation for Lifelong Learning of Medical Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burgt, Stéphanie M E; Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Wilschut, Janneke A; Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; Croiset, Gerda; Peerdeman, Saskia M

    2018-05-22

    Medical specialists face the challenge of maintaining their knowledge and skills and continuing professional development, that is, lifelong learning. Motivation may play an integral role in many of the challenges facing the physician workforce today including maintenance of a high performance. The aim of this study was to determine whether medical specialists show different motivational profiles and if these profiles predict differences in motivation for lifelong learning. An online questionnaire was sent to every medical specialist working in five hospitals in the Netherlands. The questionnaire included the validated Multidimensional Work Motivation Scale and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning together with background questions like age, gender, and type of hospital. Respondents were grouped into different motivational profiles by using a two-step clustering approach. Four motivational profiles were identified: (1) HAMC profile (for High Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (2) MAMC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Moderate Controlled motivation), (3) MALC profile (for Moderate Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation), and (4) HALC profile (for High Autonomous and Low Controlled motivation). Most of the female specialists that work in an academic hospital and specialists with a surgical specialty were represented in the HALC profile. Four motivational profiles were found among medical specialists, differing in gender, experience and type of specialization. The profiles are based on the combination of autonomous motivation (AM) and controlled motivation (CM) in the specialists. The profiles that have a high score on autonomous motivation have a positive association with lifelong learning.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 62: The Influence of Knowledge Diffusion on Aeronautics Innovation: The Research, Development, and Production of Large Commercial Aircraft in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golich, Vicki L.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on how European public policies-individually and collectively - influence the diffusion of knowledge and technology. It begins with an overview of the roles played historically and currently by European governments in the Research, Development and Production (RD&P) of Large Commercial Aircraft (LCA). The analytical framework brings together literature from global political economy, comparative politics, business management, and science and technology policy studies. It distinguishes between the production of knowledge, on the one hand, and the dissemination of knowledge, on the other. France, Germany, and the United Kingdom serve as the analytical cases. The paper concludes with a call for additional research in this area, some tentative lessons learned, and a discussion of the consequences of national strategies and policies for the diffusion of knowledge and technology in an era of globalizaton.

  12. Talk, trust and time: a longitudinal study evaluating knowledge translation and exchange processes for research on violence against women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Violence against women (VAW) is a major public health problem. Translation of VAW research to policy and practice is an area that remains understudied, but provides the opportunity to examine knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) processes in a complex, multi-stakeholder context. In a series of studies including two randomized trials, the McMaster University VAW Research Program studied one key research gap: evidence about the effectiveness of screening women for exposure to intimate partner violence. This project developed and evaluated KTE strategies to share research findings with policymakers, health and community service providers, and women's advocates. Methods A longitudinal cross-sectional design, applying concurrent mixed data collection methods (surveys, interviews, and focus groups), was used to evaluate the utility of specific KTE strategies, including a series of workshops and a day-long Family Violence Knowledge Exchange Forum, on research sharing, uptake, and use. Results Participants valued the opportunity to meet with researchers, provide feedback on key messages, and make personal connections with other stakeholders. A number of factors specific to the knowledge itself, stakeholders' contexts, and the nature of the knowledge gap being addressed influenced the uptake, sharing, and use of the research. The types of knowledge use changed across time, and were specifically related to both the types of decisions being made, and to stage of decision making; most reported use was conceptual or symbolic, with few examples of instrumental use. Participants did report actively sharing the research findings with their own networks. Further examination of these second-order knowledge-sharing processes is required, including development of appropriate methods and measures for its assessment. Some participants reported that they would not use the research evidence in their decision making when it contradicted professional experiences, while others

  13. Talk, trust and time: a longitudinal study evaluating knowledge translation and exchange processes for research on violence against women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Susan M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence against women (VAW is a major public health problem. Translation of VAW research to policy and practice is an area that remains understudied, but provides the opportunity to examine knowledge translation and exchange (KTE processes in a complex, multi-stakeholder context. In a series of studies including two randomized trials, the McMaster University VAW Research Program studied one key research gap: evidence about the effectiveness of screening women for exposure to intimate partner violence. This project developed and evaluated KTE strategies to share research findings with policymakers, health and community service providers, and women's advocates. Methods A longitudinal cross-sectional design, applying concurrent mixed data collection methods (surveys, interviews, and focus groups, was used to evaluate the utility of specific KTE strategies, including a series of workshops and a day-long Family Violence Knowledge Exchange Forum, on research sharing, uptake, and use. Results Participants valued the opportunity to meet with researchers, provide feedback on key messages, and make personal connections with other stakeholders. A number of factors specific to the knowledge itself, stakeholders' contexts, and the nature of the knowledge gap being addressed influenced the uptake, sharing, and use of the research. The types of knowledge use changed across time, and were specifically related to both the types of decisions being made, and to stage of decision making; most reported use was conceptual or symbolic, with few examples of instrumental use. Participants did report actively sharing the research findings with their own networks. Further examination of these second-order knowledge-sharing processes is required, including development of appropriate methods and measures for its assessment. Some participants reported that they would not use the research evidence in their decision making when it contradicted professional

  14. Hydrogeology and management of freshwater lenses on atoll islands: Review of current knowledge and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Adrian D.; Sharp, Hannah K.; Galvis, Sandra C.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Sinclair, Peter

    2017-08-01

    On atoll islands, fresh groundwater occurs as a buoyant lens-shaped body surrounded by saltwater derived from the sea, forming the main freshwater source for many island communities. A review of the state of knowledge of atoll island groundwater is overdue given their susceptibility to adverse impacts, and the task to address water access and sanitation issues within the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals framework before the year 2030. In this article, we review available literature to summarise the key processes, investigation techniques and management approaches of atoll island groundwater systems. Over fifty years of investigation has led to important advancements in the understanding of atoll hydrogeology, but a paucity of hydrogeological data persists on all but a small number of atoll islands. We find that the combined effects of buoyancy forces, complex geology, tides, episodic ocean events, strong climatic variability and human impacts create highly dynamic fresh groundwater lenses. Methods used to quantify freshwater availability range from simple empirical relationships to three-dimensional density-dependent models. Generic atoll island numerical models have proven popular in trying to unravel the individual factors controlling fresh groundwater lens behaviour. Major challenges face the inhabitants and custodians of atoll island aquifers, with rising anthropogenic stresses compounded by the threats of climate variability and change, sea-level rise, and some atolls already extracting freshwater at or above sustainability limits. We find that the study of atoll groundwater systems remains a critical area for further research effort to address persistent knowledge gaps, which lead to high uncertainties in water security issues for both island residents and surrounding environs.

  15. Knowledge management as a tool for improving business processes: an action research approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora Martínez-Martínez

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the importance of Knowledge Management as a tool for improving business processes in a different context from the industrial organizations, as an archaeological museum. Design/methodology/approach: Using data collected from the National Museum of the Sultanate of Oman in Muscat, a methodology for analysis and improvement of processes (the Business Cycle Management Process, CMP is designed and validated. This application is described as an eight phases process based on Six Sigma DMAIC. The model has a characteristic "P" shape. Findings: As the results obtained by the process improvement initiative show, we highlight the relevance of the improvement in all aspects regarding the security in showcases in that context. Research limitations/implications: The complexity of implementing indicators and the partial vision of the project as data were only obtained from a part of one of the companies involved in the construction of the museum. An important implication of this paper is in order to present a methodology to improve the museum processes focusing on the reduction of errors and also adding value for the visitors. Practical implications: The relevance to intervene on certain relevant variables at different levels of management performance is verified. Social implications: Improving the quality of leisure services in order to the identification of certain challenges regarding the nature and competitiveness of cultural services. Originality/value: The current work has served as a repository of knowledge applicable to new similar projects, in which to take into account the peculiarities of each case and in particular the level of quality demanded by the client in a cultural context. It is important to take into account the degree of avoidable dissatisfaction (number of solvable problems that would lead to dissatisfaction, the opportunity for improvement, the reduction of operational waste and the need

  16. Towards a common knowledge base for nuclear research: A challenge for the stakeholders community and for the EC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van

    2004-01-01

    At the Lisbon 2000 Summit, a strategic goal was proposed for the European Union: 'to become the most competitive knowledge-based economy with more and better employment and social cohesion by 2010'. Overall, in particular in the nuclear fission community, this EC initiative was well accepted by the main stakeholders. In Europe, the main stakeholders (i.e. suppliers and/or demanders) of nuclear knowledge are actually: the research organisations with mixed public/private funding), the manufacturing industry (or vendors), the utilities and waste management organisations, the regulatory bodies (or technical safety organisations/TSOs) and the academia. In the nuclear fission research area, under Euratom FP-5 (1998-2002), criticism was raised by a number of 'high level experts' that too many Community efforts were devoted to production (e.g. through execution of shared cost actions) and not enough to dissemination and transfer (e.g. through education and training) and exploitation (e.g. through innovation) of nuclear knowledge. They were also complaining about the wasted resources due to the 'fragmentation' of EU research. As far as production of nuclear fission knowledge is concerned, a variety of poles (or fragments) of scientific research and operational feedback does exist in many countries but there is no clear common strategy on how to integrate these fragments at European level with a long term prospect. As far as dissemination and transfer of nuclear knowledge is concerned, the situation in some EU-25 countries is dramatic: mostly due to a bad public perception of nuclear energy, the lack of teachers and students becomes a serious concern. As far as exploitation of nuclear knowledge is concerned, all stakeholders are concerned about the unfair balance between supply and demand of knowledge, and about the relatively poor impact of research on technological and societal changes. In conclusion, from a EU research point of view, the solutions to the above 'nuclear

  17. Bridging the care continuum: patient information needs for specialist referrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steltenkamp Carol L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer is critical in the primary care to specialist referral process and has been examined extensively in the US and other countries, yet there has been little attention to the patient's perspective of the information transfer process. This cross-sectional study examined the quality of the information received by patients with a chronic condition from the referring and specialist physician in the specialist referral process and the relationship of the quality of information received to trust in the physicians. Methods Structured telephone interviews were conducted with a random sample of 250 patients who had experienced a referral to a specialist for the first visit for a chronic condition within the prior six months. The sample was selected from the patients who visited specialist physicians at any of the 500 hospitals from the National Research Corporation client base. Results Most patients (85% received a good explanation about the reason for the specialist visit from the referring physician yet 26% felt unprepared about what to expect. Trust in the referring physician was highly associated with the preparatory information patients received. Specialists gave good explanations about diagnosis and treatment, but 26% of patients got no information about follow-up. Trust in the specialist correlated highly with good explanations of diagnosis, treatment, and self-management. Conclusion Preparatory information from referring physicians influences the quality of the referral process, the subsequent coordination of care, and trust in the physician. Changes in the health care system can improve the information transfer process and improve coordination of care for patients.

  18. An analysis of specialist and non-specialist user requirements for geographic climate change information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Martin C

    2013-11-01

    The EU EuroClim project developed a system to monitor and record climate change indicator data based on satellite observations of snow cover, sea ice and glaciers in Northern Europe and the Arctic. It also contained projection data for temperature, rainfall and average wind speed for Europe. These were all stored as data sets in a GIS database for users to download. The process of gathering requirements for a user population including scientists, researchers, policy makers, educationalists and the general public is described. Using an iterative design methodology, a user survey was administered to obtain initial feedback on the system concept followed by panel sessions where users were presented with the system concept and a demonstrator to interact with it. The requirements of both specialist and non-specialist users is summarised together with strategies for the effective communication of geographic climate change information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Research brief: sexual communication and knowledge among Mexican parents and their adolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Esther C; Villarruel, Antonia M; Gómez, Marco Vinicio; Onofre, Dora Julia; Zhou, Yan

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the sexual knowledge and communication of Mexican parents and adolescents. Preintervention data were analyzed from 829 high school students (ages 14-17) and one of the parents of each. Differences were found between parents and adolescents in sexual knowledge (M = 16.16 vs. M = 14.92; t = 7.20, p knowledge related to sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, and condom use. Parents perceived more general communication (t [787] = 6.33, p education levels scored higher in HIV knowledge and general communication. Fathers had higher total sexual knowledge, whereas mothers perceived higher sexual communication than fathers. There were no differences in knowledge and communication by parental socioeconomic level. Results suggest health care providers need to assist parents in developing specific knowledge and skills to support their adolescents' sexual decision-making.

  20. Researchers Supporting Schools to Improve Health: Influential Factors and Outcomes of Knowledge Brokering in the COMPASS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kristin M.; Elliott, Susan J.; Leatherdale, Scott T.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Although schools are considered opportune settings for youth health interventions, a gap between school health research and practice exists. COMPASS, a longitudinal study of Ontario and Alberta secondary students and schools (2012-2021), used integrated knowledge translation to enhance schools' uptake of research findings. Schools…

  1. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics: Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G.J.; Aardema, H.; ter Bogt, H.J.; Groot, T.L.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  2. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics : Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G. Jan; Aardema, Harrie; ter Bogt, Henk J.; Groot, Tom L. C. M.

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  3. An Indigenous Knowledges Perspective on Valid Meaning Making: A Commentary on Research with the EDI and Aboriginal Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Michele A.

    2011-01-01

    Offering an Indigenous perspective, this commentary discusses collaborative research, shared meaning making, and knowledge building specific to child development, and reflects on social, cultural, and historical aspects that influence these processes. Drawing upon experiences of developing a collaborative research approach with which to engage…

  4. Diabetes Knowledge Translation Status in Developing Countries: A Mixed Method Study Among Diabetes Researchers in Case of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinejadi, Ali; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Despite considerable investment in research, the existing research evidence is frequently not implemented and/or leads to useless or detrimental care in healthcare. The knowledge-practice gap proposed as one of the main causes of not achieving the treatment goals in diabetes. Iran also is facing a difference between the production and utilization of the knowledge of diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the status of diabetes knowledge translation (KT) in Iran. This was a survey that executed in 2015 by concurrent mixed methods approach in a descriptive, cross-sectional method. The research population was 65 diabetes researchers from 14 diabetes research centers throughout Iran. The research was carried out via the self-assessment tool for research institutes (SATORI), a valid and reliable tool. Focus group discussions were used to complete this tool. The data were analyzed using quantitative (descriptive method by Excel software) and qualitative approaches (thematic analysis) based on SATORI-extracted seven themes. The mean of scores "the question of research," "knowledge production," "knowledge transfer," "promoting the use of evidence," and all aspects altogether were 2.48, 2.80, 2.18, 2.06, and 2.39, respectively. The themes "research quality and timeliness" and "promoting and evaluating the use of evidence" received the lowest (1.91) and highest mean scores (2.94), respectively. Except for the theme "interaction with research users" with a relatively mediocre scores (2.63), the other areas had scores below the mean. The overall status of diabetes KT in Iran was lower than the ideal situation. There are many challenges that require great interventions at the organizational or macro level. To reinforce diabetes KT in Iran, it should hold a more leading and centralized function in the strategies of the country's diabetes research system.

  5. Introducing the Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics knowledge base, FROG-kb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Haseena; Soundararajan, Usha; Pakstis, Andrew J; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2012-09-01

    Online tools and databases based on multi-allelic short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs) are actively used in forensic teaching, research, and investigations. The Fst value of each CODIS marker tends to be low across the populations of the world and most populations typically have all the common STRP alleles present diminishing the ability of these systems to discriminate ethnicity. Recently, considerable research is being conducted on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be considered for human identification and description. However, online tools and databases that can be used for forensic research and investigation are limited. The back end DBMS (Database Management System) for FROG-kb is Oracle version 10. The front end is implemented with specific code using technologies such as Java, Java Servlet, JSP, JQuery, and GoogleCharts. We present an open access web application, FROG-kb (Forensic Research/Reference on Genetics-knowledge base, http://frog.med.yale.edu), that is useful for teaching and research relevant to forensics and can serve as a tool facilitating forensic practice. The underlying data for FROG-kb are provided by the already extensively used and referenced ALlele FREquency Database, ALFRED (http://alfred.med.yale.edu). In addition to displaying data in an organized manner, computational tools that use the underlying allele frequencies with user-provided data are implemented in FROG-kb. These tools are organized by the different published SNP/marker panels available. This web tool currently has implemented general functions possible for two types of SNP panels, individual identification and ancestry inference, and a prediction function specific to a phenotype informative panel for eye color. The current online version of FROG-kb already provides new and useful functionality. We expect FROG-kb to grow and expand in capabilities and welcome input from the forensic community in identifying datasets and functionalities that will be most helpful

  6. Classification schemes for knowledge translation interventions: a practical resource for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Susan E; Zimmermann, Gabrielle L; Nuspl, Megan; Hanson, Heather M; Albrecht, Lauren; Esmail, Rosmin; Sauro, Khara; Newton, Amanda S; Donald, Maoliosa; Dyson, Michele P; Thomson, Denise; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-12-06

    As implementation science advances, the number of interventions to promote the translation of evidence into healthcare, health systems, or health policy is growing. Accordingly, classification schemes for these knowledge translation (KT) interventions have emerged. A recent scoping review identified 51 classification schemes of KT interventions to integrate evidence into healthcare practice; however, the review did not evaluate the quality of the classification schemes or provide detailed information to assist researchers in selecting a scheme for their context and purpose. This study aimed to further examine and assess the quality of these classification schemes of KT interventions, and provide information to aid researchers when selecting a classification scheme. We abstracted the following information from each of the original 51 classification scheme articles: authors' objectives; purpose of the scheme and field of application; socioecologic level (individual, organizational, community, system); adaptability (broad versus specific); target group (patients, providers, policy-makers), intent (policy, education, practice), and purpose (dissemination versus implementation). Two reviewers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the development of each classification scheme using an adapted version of the AGREE II tool. Based on these assessments, two independent reviewers reached consensus about whether to recommend each scheme for researcher use, or not. Of the 51 original classification schemes, we excluded seven that were not specific classification schemes, not accessible or duplicates. Of the remaining 44 classification schemes, nine were not recommended. Of the 35 recommended classification schemes, ten focused on behaviour change and six focused on population health. Many schemes (n = 29) addressed practice considerations. Fewer schemes addressed educational or policy objectives. Twenty-five classification schemes had broad applicability

  7. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 67: Maximizing the Results of Federally-Funded Research and Development Through Knowledge Management: A Strategic Imperative for Improving US Competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.

    1998-01-01

    Federally-funded research and development (R&D) represents a significant annual investment (approximately $79 billion in fiscal year 1996) on the part of U.S. taxpayers. Based on the results of a 10-year study of knowledge diffusion in U.S. aerospace industry, the authors take the position that U.S. competitiveness will be enhanced if knowledge management strategies, employed within a capability-enhancing U.S. technology policy framework, are applied to diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D. In making their case, the authors stress the importance of knowledge as the source of competitive advantage in today's global economy. Next, they offer a practice-based definition of knowledge management and discuss three current approaches to knowledge management implementation-mechanistic, "the learning organization," and systemic. The authors then examine three weaknesses in existing U.S. public policy and policy implementation-the dominance of knowledge creation, the need for diffusion-oriented technology policy, and the prevalence of a dissemination model- that affect diffusion of the results of federally-funded R&D. To address these shortcomings, they propose the development of a knowledge management framework for diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D. The article closes with a discussion of some issues and challenges associated with implementing a knowledge management framework for diffusing the results of federally-funded R&D.

  8. 48 CFR 536.570-3 - Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Specialist. 536.570-3... CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 536.570-3 Specialist. Insert 552.236-72, Specialist, in solicitations and contracts for construction if the technical sections...

  9. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires and prevention. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The purpose of the specialists' meeting was to summarize the IWGFR member countries' knowledge of sodium combustion and extinguishment technology, including prevention and detection of sodium fires and protective clothes and to review and discuss critical features of sodium fires contaminated with fission products and fuel, evolution and filtration of aerosols and to determine the critical gaps in our knowledge and what should be done to develop knowledge in this area. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into three major sections, as follows: sodium fires; prevention and extinguishing of sodium fires, and aerosols

  10. Specialists' meeting on sodium fires and prevention. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1979-03-15

    The purpose of the specialists' meeting was to summarize the IWGFR member countries' knowledge of sodium combustion and extinguishment technology, including prevention and detection of sodium fires and protective clothes and to review and discuss critical features of sodium fires contaminated with fission products and fuel, evolution and filtration of aerosols and to determine the critical gaps in our knowledge and what should be done to develop knowledge in this area. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into three major sections, as follows: sodium fires; prevention and extinguishing of sodium fires, and aerosols.

  11. Exploring Knowledge Processes Based on Teacher Research in a School-University Research Network of a Master's Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; van Swet, Jacqueline; Beijaard, Douwe; Bergen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    School-university research networks aim at closer integration of research and practice by means of teacher research. Such practice-oriented research can benefit both schools and universities. This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. The research question…

  12. Research report of fiscal 1997. Invitation project of specialists on petroleum substituting energy between Japan and the EU; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho. Nichi EU sekiyu daitai energy kanren senmonka shohei jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Specialists were invited from EU countries for information exchange to promote R and D of petroleum substituting energy in Japan. In the seminar on the present and future trend of R and D of fuel cells in EU countries, the present R and D state of fuel cells in Italy, the present state and future R and D plan of fuel cells in ANSALDO group, the state of SOFC R and D in Germany and by international cooperation, and R and D of polymer electrolyte fuel cell in Fraunhofer institute for Solar Energy Systems were reported contributing to mutual understanding between Japan and the EU. Exchange of opinions and information was also made between 4 fuel cell specialists of EU countries and Japanese specialists. The report on such an exchange includes the outline of Japanese fuel cell technologies, and the present R and D states of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), and polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). The specialists visited some government organizations, semi-government organizations, institutes and private enterprises related to promotion, support and verification of R and D of fuel cells. 2 tabs.

  13. Study regarding the relevance of the accounting subjects in the economic vocational training of non-accountant specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Bădicu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The responsibility for the skills of specialists in the economic field belongs to universities, which, by modernizing the curriculum, must take into account the requirements of the professional environment (employers, where the role of the economic specialist extends beyond narrow knowledge, flexibility and high capacity to address various problems. From this perspective, in order to enhance the role of the academic environment and to develop the professional skills of the graduating economists, it is necessary to correlate the competencies and the requirements about educational outcomes. With regard to the relevance of the accounting subjects in the professional training of non-accountant economic specialists, given the competing interests of universities, students and employers in the field of education, we proposed a debate with the view to design strategies of accounting education in the higher economic education of the Republic of Moldova. The article represents a study based on the documentation of the university curriculum in undergraduate programs. With the view to test and validate the necessity of studying accounting subjects in the professional training of non-accounting economic specialists, a questionnaire was developed and implemented. The general research idea refers to the need to study accounting in economic education and practice, which could have an impact over the competitiveness of the Economics graduate.

  14. Knowledge Sharing Through Virtual Mode: The Influenced Factors for KM Development Among the Researchers in Nuclear Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnan, H.; Sulaiman, M.S.; Yusof, M.H.; Ali, I.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • The primary contribution of this study is to assess the influence of virtual mode as a KM medium in Nuclear Malaysia. • Direct relationship between the researchers and the used of virtual mode in the knowledge sharing process. • Finding reveals that virtual mode contributes significant factors in influencing researchers’ knowledge sharing behaviour. • The findings from the study may be used by the management of Nuclear Malaysia to improve or enhance the capacity of virtual mode provided by the organisation

  15. Emerging Trends in the Globalization of Knowledge: The Role of the Technical Report in Aerospace Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Golich, Vicki L.

    1997-01-01

    Economists, management theorists, business strategists, and governments alike recognize knowledge as the single most important resource in today's global economy. Because of its relationship to technological progress and economic growth, many governments have taken a keen interest in knowledge, specifically its production, transfer, and use. This paper focuses on the technical report as a product for disseminating the results of aerospace research and development (R&D) and its use and importance to aerospace engineers and scientists. The emergence of knowledge as an intellectual asset, its relationship to innovation, and its importance in a global economy provides the context for the paper. The relationships between government and knowledge and between government and innovation are used to placed knowledge within the context of publicly-funded R&D. Data, including the reader preferences of NASA technical reports, are derived from the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, a ten-year study of knowledge diffusion in the U.S. aerospace industry.

  16. BUSINESS GAMES IN PROFESSIONAL TRAINING OF FUTURE FIRE SAFETY SPECIALISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Лариса Маладика

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Special features of professional training of future specialists in extraordinary (emergency situations, increasing its quality with the use of interactive technologies have been considered in this article. The paper presents a research of modern interactive educational technologies, most widely used at higher educational institutions, promoting modernization of education as well as training of competitive future specialists. The article grounds possibility of formation and development of the culture of professional communication by interactive methods of learning, and business games, in particular. The research deals with kinds of business games as active methods of learning, their structural levels and features of use.

  17. Evaluation of knowledge loss risk in nuclear industry and research organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantin, Marin; Apostol, Minodora; Balaceanu, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Institutional knowledge is defined as a collective knowledge of all employees in an organization or institution. The necessity to maintain organizational competency for nuclear power has been widely recognized given the nature of the business and the life cycle of 100 years or more. Our paper is intended to perform the first step in the knowledge loss risk assessment in nuclear organizations in Romania. Generally a three step procedure is needed for the evaluation process: - conducting the knowledge loss risk assessment; - determination of the approach needed to capture critical knowledge; - monitoring and evaluation. Taking into account the specificity of problems at organizational/institutional level, the difficulty of finding of a common approach, and the necessity to harmonize different interests at national level, a National Nuclear Knowledge Strategy is compulsory needed. (authors)

  18. Directory of guidance documents relating to biodiversity and cultural knowledge research and prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churcher, T. [comp.] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Geography]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Biodiversity in both developing and developed countries has been accessed for a long time by local communities as well as by outside researchers and corporate prospectors. Such activities are carried out for various purposes. Sometimes plants, animals and habitats are merely described, other times the goal is to extract for profit. These activities have helped to advance knowledge and create awareness of how precious biodiversity is. These activities have also generated many products that contribute to the health and well-being of global consumers, but may not necessarily provide benefits to their original stewards. Research has also focused attention on particular features of biodiversity. Biodiversity has been conserved, both by local community traditions, and by more formal means, with varying degree of effectiveness. One recently proposed means is the Convention on Biological Diversity. That convention has been ratified by large number of countries and has stimulated global concern over this issue. It has provided a framework for conserving biodiversity. At the same time many local communities, NGOs and people`s organizations are advancing alternative ways to conserve biodiversity and cultural diversity. In many places, the conservation of biodiversity and the protection of cultural diversity are inescapably intertwined. Despite strong links between biodiversity and the land and the water management traditions of the 6000 linguistically distinct cultures, the Convention on Biological Diversity focuses on nation-state sovereignty over biodiversity. We believe that local communities should have greater say in whether and how biodiversity is studied, extracted and commercialized. We consider prior informed consent to be a necessary requirement of such explorations, as is equitable sharing of any benefits arising from them.

  19. Q Fever: Current State of Knowledge and Perspectives of Research of a Neglected Zoonosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rebecca Porter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is an ubiquitous zoonosis caused by an resistant intracellular bacterium, Coxiella burnetii. In certain areas, Q fever can be a severe public health problem, and awareness of the disease must be promoted worldwide. Nevertheless, knowledge of Coxiella burnetii remains limited to this day. Its resistant (intracellular and environmental and infectious properties have been poorly investigated. Further understanding of the interactions between the infected host and the bacteria is necessary. Domestic ruminants are considered as the main reservoir of bacteria. Infected animals shed highly infectious organisms in milk, feces, urine, vaginal mucus, and, very importantly, birth products. Inhalation is the main route of infection. Frequently asymptomatic in humans and animals, Q fever can cause acute or chronic infections. Financial consequences of infection can be dramatic at herd level. Vaccination with inactive whole-cell bacteria has been performed and proved effective in humans and animals. However, inactive whole-cell vaccines present several defects. Recombinant vaccines have been developed in experimental conditions and have great potential for the future. Q fever is a challenging disease for scientists as significant further investigations are necessary. Great research opportunities are available to reach a better understanding and thus a better prevention and control of the infection.

  20. Knowledge management awareness in a research and development facility: Investigating employee perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Potgieter

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to understand Sasol R&D employees’ perceptions of knowledge management (KM. The study also assessed the attitude of Sasol R&D management towards KM. Method: The target population for this research included different levels of seniority and education in Sasol R&D. A questionnaire was distributed to a sample of 150 employees in R&D and 50 more who work closely with R&D in support functions. Results: It was found that the importance of KM is understood by Sasol R&D employees and management. It was established that Sasol R&D management regard KM as important, but that their commitment to KM initiatives is not necessarily evident for employees. A concern highlighted by the study was that employees were not aware of the duties of the identified KM champions within their facility. Conclusion: It was suggested that Sasol R&D employees should be made aware of the duties of KM champions. It was also established that Sasol R&D management needs to be more visible in their support of KM initiatives. Recommendations based on the findings of the study can assist Sasol R&D, and other facilities attempting to implement a KM strategy, to gain insight into the perceptions of employees and the role management needs to play in the facilitation of this process.