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Sample records for research sector canada

  1. PUBLIC SECTOR OF CANADA: RATING RESEARCH OF LABOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Leontiivna TOTSKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available n this article an author conducted the analysis of labour in the public sector of Canada after such nine subgroups of establishments: 1 federal general government; 2 provincial and territorial general government; 3 health and social service institutions (provincial and territorial; 4 universities, colleges, vocational and trade institutes (provincial and territorial; 5 local general government; 6 local school boards; 7 federal government business enterprises; 8 provincial and territorial government business enterprises; 9 local government business enterprises. On the basis of statistical information about these sub-groups for 2007-2011 from a web-site «Statistics Canada» the maximal and minimum values of such three indexes are found: amount of employees, general annual sums of wages and annual sums of wages per employee. Rating for nine sub-groups of establishments of public sector of Canada on these indexes is certain. The got results testify, that during an analysable period most of the employees of public sector was concentrated in health and social service institutions, the least – in local government business enterprises. In 2007– 2011 a most general sum was earned also by the employees of health and social service institutions, the least – by the employees of local government business enterprises. At the same time in an analysable period among the state employees of Canada a most wage in a calculation on one person was got by the employees of federal general government, the least – by the employees of local general government.

  2. Canada's hydrogen energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Canada produces the most hydrogen per capita of any Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) country. The majority of this hydrogen is produced by steam methane reforming for industrial use (predominantly oil upgrading and fertilizer production). Canada also has a world leading hydrogen and fuel cell sector. This sector is seeking new methods for making hydrogen for its future energy needs. The paper will discuss Canada's hydrogen and fuel cell sector in the context of its capabilities, its demonstration and commercialization activities and its stature on the world stage. (author)

  3. Canada; Financial Sector Stability Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This report discusses key findings of the Financial Sector Stability Assessment on Canada. Canada’s financial system successfully navigated the global financial crisis, and stress tests suggest that major financial institutions would continue to be resilient to credit, liquidity, and contagion risks arising from a severe stress scenario. Elevated housing prices and high household debt remain an area of concern, though targeted prudential and macroprudential measures are proving to be effectiv...

  4. Open Source in Canada's Public Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Leibovitch

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The story of the growth of open source use in Canada has been far more a matter of evolution than revolution, so quiet in its pace that its progress has been difficult to measure. This has posed many challenges to Canadian open source advocates in their efforts to ensure that their country does not lag behind the rest of the world in understanding the social and business benefits open source provides. Perhaps some of the leading soldiers in the trenches might be our civil servants who protect the public purse. In addition to managing and minimizing the costs of delivering necessary services, public sector projects should also advance the social good through the delicate balance of transparency and efficiency.

  5. Pricing electricity for sustainability : climate change and Canada's electricity sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The electricity sector is Canada's largest single source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper discussed electricity and carbon pricing approaches to reducing GHG emissions in the electricity sector. An overview of the links between electricity pricing and climate change was presented, and current and emerging trends in electricity pricing related to encouraging energy conservation were reviewed. Market prices and failures were discussed. Approaches to pricing electricity included an increase in block prices; time-of-use prices; demand-side management and energy efficiency; and carbon pricing in Canada and electricity pricing signals. The study showed that several provincial utilities in Canada are experimenting with market-based pricing approaches for electricity and carbon that may help to reduce GHG emissions over time. Concerns over electricity supply and the negative environmental impacts of electricity production may lead to the full social pricing of electricity in some regions of Canada. 46 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Women in Canada's oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherk, S. [AGRA Earth and Environmental Ltd., St. John' s, NF (Canada)

    2005-01-01

    This text presents a summary of the report: Women in Canada's Oil and Gas Sector, gathered for the Oil and Gas Sector Programme Pakistan (OGSP). The OGSP aims to strengthen Pakistan's capacity to manage its oil and gas resources more sustainably through policy advice, privatization assistance, appropriate regulatory mechanisms, technology transfer and specialized petroleum training. The OGSP promotes gender equity and women's participation in its project activities and within the petroleum industry in Pakistan and Canada. The purpose of this report was to identify current levels of female labour force participation in the Canadian petroleum sector, examine barriers to women's entry and promotion within the petroleum sector, and present strategies used by petroleum companies to promote the complete participation of their female employees. The report concluded that although women are not yet equally represented in Canada's petroleum industry, the industry is moving in the right direction. For example, there are more women in petroleum-related university programs, more associations dedicated to promoting women in science and engineering, organizational change within companies in support of the principles of diversity. While monitoring and overcoming barriers to women's participation should continue, these positive steps should be supported, in order to ensure that Canada's oil and gas sector benefits fully from the new approaches, ideas and alternative working styles that women bring to their work. 4 tabs.

  7. Improving the income taxation of the resource sector in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    In October 2000, the Government of Canada announced a reduction in the general statutory rate or corporate income tax, from 28 to 21 per cent over 5 years. The reduction applied to the most highly taxed sectors, including services, but not to manufacturing and processing. The reduction did not apply to income from the non-renewable resource sector which was subject to a sector-specific income tax provision. In 2003, the government expressed an interest to extend the lower tax rate to resource income, and phase it in over a 5 year period. The proposed change is expected to improve the international competitiveness of the Canadian resource sector, particularly in relation to the United States. A common statutory rate of corporate income tax for all sectors promotes the efficient development of Canada's natural resource base. The proposed new structure is simple to administer and sends clear signals to investors. The 2003 federal budget also proposed the elimination of the federal capital tax over a 5 year period in order to strengthen the Canadian tax advantage for investment. 2 tabs., 3 figs

  8. Energy consumption and GHG emissions from the upstream oil and gas sector in Canada: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhargava, A.; Timilsina, G.

    2004-01-01

    After electricity generation, the oil and gas sector is the most emission intensive industry in Canada. This paper presents statistical data and research by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI). The aim of the research was to provide a comparative evaluation between Alberta's energy consumption and Canada-wide consumption. Data revealed that energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased faster in Alberta in comparison to the rest of Canada, but have slowed since 1997, while emissions in the rest of Canada still continued to increase. Aggregate emission intensities were presented. It was noted that there were no significant changes in fuel mix in either Alberta or the country as a whole. Key factors contributing to rapid increase in energy consumption and GHG emissions after 1996 were: increased energy intensive production and increased use of natural gas. Charts of oil and gas use were presented in energy consumption, economic output and GHG emissions, also indicating that Canadian trends followed Alberta trends. A list of reduction measures in the oil and gas sector were provided, with figures of total reductions and cost. Future actions were outlined and included: ratification of the Kyoto Accord, the negotiation of sectoral agreements, important elements such as cost cap and percentages of reduction; the limited ability to reduce emissions at lower cost per tonne within the oil and gas sector; technology breakthroughs; and adoption of new practices such as the use of alternate fuels in energy intensive processes. tabs, figs

  9. Energy consumption and GHG emissions from the upstream oil and gas sector in Canada: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhargava, A.; Timilsina, G. [Canadian Energy Research Inst., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    After electricity generation, the oil and gas sector is the most emission intensive industry in Canada. This paper presents statistical data and research by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI). The aim of the research was to provide a comparative evaluation between Alberta's energy consumption and Canada-wide consumption. Data revealed that energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased faster in Alberta in comparison to the rest of Canada, but have slowed since 1997, while emissions in the rest of Canada still continued to increase. Aggregate emission intensities were presented. It was noted that there were no significant changes in fuel mix in either Alberta or the country as a whole. Key factors contributing to rapid increase in energy consumption and GHG emissions after 1996 were: increased energy intensive production and increased use of natural gas. Charts of oil and gas use were presented in energy consumption, economic output and GHG emissions, also indicating that Canadian trends followed Alberta trends. A list of reduction measures in the oil and gas sector were provided, with figures of total reductions and cost. Future actions were outlined and included: ratification of the Kyoto Accord, the negotiation of sectoral agreements, important elements such as cost cap and percentages of reduction; the limited ability to reduce emissions at lower cost per tonne within the oil and gas sector; technology breakthroughs; and adoption of new practices such as the use of alternate fuels in energy intensive processes. tabs, figs.

  10. Final report: Skills needs in the resource-based sectors in Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.; Hulett, L.

    1999-01-01

    Skills requirements in the resource industries in Atlantic Canada were put under the microscope at this conference. One of the objectives was to show that while the resource-based industries may not undertake extensive research and development, they are employing increasingly sophisticated technology which places increasing emphasis on the need for skilled personnel. Participants at the conference concluded that Atlantic Canada has the means to meet increasing demand for skilled workers in the resource sectors, and that the post-secondary educational system appears to have established a good rapport with the industries to ensure that the programs are meeting the sectors' changing needs. The oil and gas sector is an exception in that it is new to the area, combined with the fact that it has placed emphasis not only on skilled but skilled and experienced personnel from the start. There is also a paucity of training programs in sustainable development which is expected to become the dominant issue for resource management personnel in the next century. New skills are required to deal with this issue and post-secondary institutions of learning and the resource-based sectors will have to work together to develop the skills such as understanding ecosystem management problems and communicating with the public. Atlantic Canada cannot afford not to find a path to sustainability through the application of science and technology to management, knowledgeable extraction, and imaginative transformation of natural resources. 28 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Canada Research Chairs | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    aspx. International Research Chairs Initiative. The International Research Chairs Initiative pairs top research talent from universities in Canada with their counterparts in developing countries to address key development challenges. View more

  12. Canada; Financial Sector Assessment Program-Intensity and Effectiveness of Federal Bank Supervision in Canada-Technical Note

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) intensity and effectiveness of Federal Bank supervision in Canada. The IMF report highlights that a key element of effective supervision is a willingness to increase supervisory pressure promptly when a supervisor identifies weaknesses in an institution. The IMF funding for Canadian banks is primarily through deposits and lending focuses on traditional bank products in Canada in the personal and commercial sectors. It also highli...

  13. Student research in Canada's north

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Admas, P [ed.; Johnson, P G [ed.

    1988-01-01

    A conference was organized in Canada to allow a large number of students with northern interests to meet together to present the results of their work and to discuss many other matters of mutual interset. In addition, this conference allowed students from many disciplines in the natural and social sciences to advance northern scholarship, and to foster a multidisciplinary approach to northern studies. A wide range of topics from the physical, biological, and social sciences were covered, including Inuit music, traditional medicine, mammoth bones, fossil trees, icebreaker design, archaeology, caves, naturally acid and other lakes, glaciers, bogs, Inuit clothing, education, northern parks, river ice jams, geology, marine science including large marine mammals, and global strategy. Separate abstracts have been prepared for twelve papers from this conference.

  14. Climate change research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, K.

    1994-01-01

    The current consensus on climatic change in Canada is briefly summarized, noting the results of modelling of the effects of a doubling of atmospheric CO 2 , the nonuniformity of climate change across the country, the uncertainties in local responses to change, and the general agreement that 2-4 degrees of warming will occur for each doubling of CO 2 . Canadian government response includes programs aimed at reducing the uncertainties in the scientific understanding of climate change and in the socio-economic response to such change. Canadian climate change programs include participation in large-scale experiments on such topics as heat transport in the ocean, and sources and sinks of greenhouse gases; development of next-generation climate models; studying the social and economic effects of climate change in the Great Lakes Basin and Mackenzie River Basin; investigation of paleoclimates; and analysis of climate data for long-term trends

  15. Global Affairs Canada | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    For example, Vietnamese and Canadian research teams developed micronutrient-enriched instant flours and baby cereals using local crops and local processing facilities. Global Affairs Canada, IDRC, and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research are collaborating to improve health outcomes for African mothers and ...

  16. ASEAN-Canada Research Partnership | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    International Studies at Nanyang Technological University of Singapore will work with the Institute of Asian Research at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada on a series of joint activities that includes research, capacity building, publishing, and policy forums. Using expertise from both ASEAN countries ...

  17. Canada | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    While working with some of the brightest minds in Canada and the world, we've found that knowledge-sharing through networks and regions helps widen the impact of the research we fund. It is through the interaction of ideas, people, and money in worldwide development research and policy that we put our principles into ...

  18. Funding the heavy oil sector's innovation : maximizing Canada's R and D tax credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, G.S.; Bernard, M.; Cheung, S.

    2008-01-01

    Canada offers one of the most generous, broadly applicable business tax incentives for eligible research and development projects in the world. The scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED) program is administered by the Canada Revenue Agency and is the single largest federal program, providing over 3 billion dollars in tax assistance to Canadian businesses in 2006. The development of in-situ oil sands recovery technologies such as steam assisted gravity drainage and other techniques have been research-intensive undertakings that have historically benefited from the SR and ED program, many of which are now commercial available technologies. The SR and ED program definition, eligible activities, eligible expenditures, and benefits were described in this paper. These benefits include the ability to deduct qualifying expenditures currently or to defer them indefinitely, as well as investment tax credits that reduce taxes payable on a dollar for dollar basis. Research and development in the heavy oil and oil sands industries was also discussed with reference to platforms for research and development; areas of potential SR and ED. It was concluded that the SR and ED program is a vital source of financing to many Canadian corporations, and could offer significant assistance to companies in the heavy oil and oil sands sector by returning 20-35 per cent of the expenditures back at the federal level as a tax credit. 5 refs

  19. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007: implication for the long term care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landry Michel D

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. Methods A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007 was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as ‘hospital’, ‘community’, ‘long term care’ (LTC or ‘other.’ Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. Results There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Conclusion Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors.

  20. Attractiveness of employment sectors for physical therapists in Ontario, Canada (1999-2007): implication for the long term care sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Recruiting and retaining health professions remains a high priority for health system planners. Different employment sectors may vary in their appeal to providers. We used the concepts of inflow and stickiness to assess the relative attractiveness of sectors for physical therapists (PTs) in Ontario, Canada. Inflow was defined as the percentage of PTs working in a sector who were not there the previous year. Stickiness was defined as the transition probability that a physical therapist will remain in a given employment sector year-to-year. Methods A longitudinal dataset of registered PTs in Ontario (1999-2007) was created, and primary employment sector was categorized as ‘hospital’, ‘community’, ‘long term care’ (LTC) or ‘other.’ Inflow and stickiness values were then calculated for each sector, and trends were analyzed. Results There were 5003 PTs in 1999, which grew to 6064 by 2007, representing a 21.2% absolute growth. Inflow grew across all sectors, but the LTC sector had the highest inflow of 32.0%. PTs practicing in hospitals had the highest stickiness, with 87.4% of those who worked in this sector remaining year-to-year. The community and other employment sectors had stickiness values of 78.2% and 86.8% respectively, while the LTC sector had the lowest stickiness of 73.4%. Conclusion Among all employment sectors, LTC had highest inflow but lowest stickiness. Given expected increases in demand for services, understanding provider transitional probabilities and employment preferences may provide a useful policy and planning tool in developing a sustainable health human resource base across all employment sectors. PMID:22643111

  1. CCS and climate change research in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation highlighted recent research activity in Canada regarding climate change and carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). The Canadian government has allocated 1 billion for research, demonstration and small scale renewable energy technology. The government of Alberta has allocated 2 billion for the following 3 projects in Alberta: (1) the Enhance/Northwest project for the Alberta Carbon Trunk line will incorporate gasification, carbon dioxide capture from the Agrium fertilizer plant and Northwest Upgrader, enhanced oil recovery and carbon storage in Alberta, (2) the Epcor/Enbridge project involves an integrated gasification combined-cycle carbon capture power generation facility adjacent to Epcor's existing Genessee power plant, west of Edmonton, and (3) the Shell Canada Energy/Chevron Canada/Marathon Oil Sands project will integrate carbon capture and storage at Alberta's Scotford upgrader. Regulations are under development in Alberta for a technology development fund. Research efforts in Saskatchewan have included the creation of the International Performance Assessment Centre for the Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide (ITC IPAC-CO2) at the University of Regina; the Petroleum Technology Research Centre's Aquistore project which will capture 600 tonnes of carbon dioxide per day from refineries; and SaskPower's Boundary Dam 3. The $10 carbon tax which was implemented in 2008 in the province of British Columbia will escalate to $30 by 2012. The province of Nova Scotia has created a new centre to study CCS. figs.

  2. ASEAN-Canada Research Partnership | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ASEAN-Canada Research Partnership. The ASEAN-Canada Research Partnership will deepen Canada-ASEAN relations through research and policy dialogue on issues of mutual regional interest. The recipient organization, the Centre for Non-Traditional Security Studies at the S. Rajaratnam School of. International ...

  3. Give trees a chance : opportunity awaits if Canada's forestry sector fully embraces sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Mirbach, M.; Johnson, L.

    2009-01-01

    A series of negative trends over the last 10 years has challenged the viability of Canada's forest products industry as a whole. However, the industry is well positioned to take advantage of a global shift towards sustainable economic development. Global demand for biofuels derived from logging residues and industrial manufacturing wastes is expected to expand in the future. Research into new bioproducts incorporating nanocrystalline cellulose will offer the forestry industry new markets. Transportation costs will benefit Canadian exporters to the United States. Improvements in forest management will ensure Canada's position as a leading supplier of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified forest products. The longer growing seasons anticipated as a result of climatic change will expand forest ranges while also bringing increased disturbances. The authors cautioned that the forestry sector must resist the temptation to divert wood fibre to the biofuels market, as bioenergy generates only a thirteenth of the employment per volume of wood that the production of pulp and paper does. It was concluded that new higher-value end products are needed to stimulate growth within the industry. 1 fig.

  4. Applied research and development private sector accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskid, N.J.; Devgun, J.S.; Erickson, M.D.; Zielke, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the fiscal year 1990 procurement of contracts with the private sector and the current status of applied research and development conducted for DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD). This report documents the procurement actions, discusses lessons learned from this activity, and disseminates the results of the procurement to interested parties in DOE and in the private sector

  5. How much are we spending? The estimation of research expenditures on cardiovascular disease in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death in Canada and is a priority area for medical research. The research funding landscape in Canada has changed quite a bit over the last few decades, as have funding levels. Our objective was to estimate the magnitude of expenditures on CVD research for the public and charitable (not-for profit) sectors in Canada between 1975 and 2005. Methods To estimate research expenditures for the public and charitable sectors, we compiled a complete list of granting agencies in Canada, contacted each agency and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and extracted data from the organizations’ annual reports and the Reference Lists of health research in Canada. Two independent reviewers scanned all grant and fellowship/scholarship titles (and summary/key words, when available) of all research projects funded to determine their inclusion in our analysis; only grants and fellowships/scholarships that focused on heart and peripheral vascular diseases were selected. Results Public/charitable sector funding increased 7.5 times, from close to $13 million (in constant dollars) in 1975 to almost $96 million (in constant dollars) in 2005 (base year). The Medical Research Council of Canada (MRCC)/CIHR and the Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada have been the main founders of this type of research during our analysis period; the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research and the Fonds de la recherche en santé du Quebec have played major roles at the provincial level. The Indirect Costs Research Program and Canada Foundation for Innovation have played major roles in terms of funding in the last years of our analysis. Conclusion Public/charitable-funded research expenditures devoted to CVD have increased substantially over the last three decades. By international standards, the evidence suggests Canada spends less on health-related research than the UK and the US, at least in absolute terms. However, this

  6. Canada's contribution to global research in cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai V; de Oliveira, Claire; Wijeysundera, Harindra C; Wong, William W L; Woo, Gloria; Grootendorst, Paul; Liu, Peter P; Krahn, Murray D

    2013-06-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Canada and other developed countries is growing, in part because of the aging of the population and the alarming rise of obesity. Studying Canada's contribution to the global body of CVD research output will shed light on the effectiveness of investments in Canadian CVD research and inform if Canada has been responding to its CVD burden. Search was conducted using the Web-of-Science database for publications during 1981 through 2010 on major areas and specific interventions in CVD. Search was also conducted using Canadian and US online databases for patents issued between 1981 and 2010. Search data were used to estimate the proportions of the world's pool of research publications and of patents conducted by researchers based in Canada. The results indicate that Canada contributed 6% of global research in CVD during 1981 through 2010. Further, Canada's contribution shows a strong upward trend during the period. Based on patent data, Canada's contribution level was similar (5%-7%). Canada's contribution to the global pool of CVD research is on par with France and close to the UK, Japan, and Germany. Canada's contribution in global CVD research is higher than its average contribution in all fields of research (6% vs 3%). As the burden of chronic diseases including CVD rises with Canada's aging population, the increase in Canadian research into CVD is encouraging. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The energy sector : an investment in the people and communities of Atlantic Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The opportunity for Atlantic Canada to meet the North American demand for more energy and increased security was discussed. Energy accounts for nearly half of all exports from Atlantic Canada. The region delivers oil, natural gas and electricity to its own communities and for export around the continent and is poised to significantly increase its reach, given its proximity to the New England States. Over the past decade, the energy industry in Atlantic Canada has laid the foundation for what has become one of the most significant sectors in the regional economy. It has a diverse mix of traditional thermal and hydroelectric generation with newer technology such as nuclear, wind, bioenergy and tidal. The discovery and development of offshore oil and gs fields at the end of the twentieth century significantly enhanced the regional energy sector and shifted the public policy focus from domestic production to the development of export markets. The projects have brought significant outside investment from a broad range of oil and gas companies. This paper listed the projects and players in the energy sector in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador. The issue of exporting energy resources and importing human resources was also considered. A list of skilled trades, professional services and support services that will be needed by the Atlantic Canadian energy sector over the next decade was also provided. It was noted that employment growth is driven by demographics, technology and the trend for environmental stewardship. 9 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Survey of current electric utility research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    Information on the research programs of eight Canadian electrical utilities and the Canadian Electrical Association has been compiled. Work done by the National Research Council of Canada is included, but the research done by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. is excluded. Projects in the area of nuclear power include work on heat transfer and fluid flow, waste management, materials, and corrosion. (L.L.)

  9. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange Grants Program ... and LAC researchers opportunities for joint research on development issues of ... academics (graduate students and professors) to support their professional ...

  10. Productivity through Innovation: Applied Research at Canada's Colleges and Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Applied research at Canada's colleges and institutes has expanded rapidly over the last five years. This report provides an overview of the current context and positions colleges and institutes as key players in Canada's innovation system. The report builds upon findings of previous research and reports on the results of the 2009-2010…

  11. Building bridges in economics research: John Whalley (Canada ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-09

    Dec 9, 2010 ... IDRC Communications ... in Waterloo, Canada, and Beijing Normal University, has helped to build a research network on poverty in ... This kind of research is essential for developing effective public policy to reduce inequality.

  12. New South Africa–Canada Research Chairs Initiative | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-12-08

    Dec 8, 2016 ... ... (SARChI), as well as on the Industrial Research Chairs program, funded in part ... Calls for submissions will be launched on January 3, 2017 and will close ... Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  13. A process-based agricultural model for the irrigated agriculture sector in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, M. E.; Davies, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    Connections between land and water, irrigation, agricultural productivity and profitability, policy alternatives, and climate change and variability are complex, poorly understood, and unpredictable. Policy assessment for agriculture presents a large potential for development of broad-based simulation models that can aid assessment and quantification of policy alternatives over longer temporal scales. The Canadian irrigated agriculture sector is concentrated in Alberta, where it represents two thirds of the irrigated land-base in Canada and is the largest consumer of surface water. Despite interest in irrigation expansion, its potential in Alberta is uncertain given a constrained water supply, significant social and economic development and increasing demands for both land and water, and climate change. This paper therefore introduces a system dynamics model as a decision support tool to provide insights into irrigation expansion in Alberta, and into trade-offs and risks associated with that expansion. It is intended to be used by a wide variety of users including researchers, policy analysts and planners, and irrigation managers. A process-based cropping system approach is at the core of the model and uses a water-driven crop growth mechanism described by AquaCrop. The tool goes beyond a representation of crop phenology and cropping systems by permitting assessment and quantification of the broader, long-term consequences of agricultural policies for Alberta's irrigation sector. It also encourages collaboration and provides a degree of transparency that gives confidence in simulation results. The paper focuses on the agricultural component of the systems model, describing the process involved; soil water and nutrients balance, crop growth, and water, temperature, salinity, and nutrients stresses, and how other disciplines can be integrated to account for the effects of interactions and feedbacks in the whole system. In later stages, other components such as

  14. Renewable energy research and development in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chappell, M S

    1979-12-01

    Canadian research and development (R and D) in renewable energy began as a result of the oil crisis in 1974, and in keeping with government policy, is predominantly carried out in the private sector under contract to the federal government. The variety in technical maturity of the renewable energy technologies is reflected in the non-uniform funding levels among the five constituent programs. The greatest support is allotted to solar energy in recognition of its enormous potential, both in low to mid-temperature thermal and in photovoltaic applications. This report describes the technical content of these five renewable energy and R and D programs, and outlines the organization and management structures used to direct the effort. Biomass energy R and D concentrates on the harvesting, processing and conversion of wood wastes into convenient fuel forms. Near-term applications will continue to be in the forest products industries. Wind energy R and D in geothermal energy are focussed on identification and quantification of the resource. A five-megawatt experimental geothermal heating system is being established at the University of Regina. The hydraulic energy R and D program does not consider conventional hydro-electric systems which are well developed; rather, it primarily covers laboratory-scale tests on conversion devices for wave, tidal, and river flow energy systems. A substantial effort is also underway in analytic and modelling techniques for hydraulic energy systems of all types. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Current research in Canada on biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marko, A.M.

    1980-05-01

    A survey of current research in Canada on the biological effects of ionizing radiation has been compiled. The list of projects has been classified according to structure (organizational state of the test system) as well as according to the type of effects. Using several assumptions, ballpark estimates of expenditures on these activities have been made. Agencies funding these research activities have been tabulated and the break-down of research in government laboratories and in academic institutions has been designated. Wherever possible, comparisons have been made outlining differences or similarities that exist between the United States and Canada concerning biological radiation research. It has been concluded that relevant research in this area in Canada is inadequate. Wherever possible, strengths and weaknesses in radiation biology programs have been indicated. The most promising course for Canada to follow is to support adequately fundamental studies of the biological effects of radiation. (auth)

  16. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciej, H.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the Canadian oil and natural gas sector is in for another grim year in 1992. Further streamlining to enhance operating efficiencies and control costs is the first order of the day. About $4 billion worth of producing properties remains on the market, as corporate focus continues to shift to core properties. New management structures put in place in the last two years will be severely tested to improve the sector's financial performance. Massive write-downs in 1990 and 1991 have put balance sheets in much better shape for improved financial performance in the future. Although new long-term debt exceeded redemptions in 1991, largely because of debt- financing of major capital projects, individually most companies are in better shape through significant debt repayment or restructuring. The substantial reductions in interest rates will also help to enhance discretionary cash flow. At this stage, everything appears to be in place to expect that 1992 will represent the bottom of the down-cycle for Canada

  17. The Canada country study: Climate impacts and adaptation -- Vol. 7: National sectoral volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, G.; Avis, W. [eds.] [Environment Canada, Downsview, ON (Canada)

    1998-10-01

    The Canada Country Study is a comprehensive source of knowledge on how climate change could impact on communities across Canada. The Study consists of a series of eight volumes and constitutes the scientific and technical results of the assessment phase of the project. This volume (Vol. 7) contains 12 sectoral papers which provide a digest of the findings of the previous six regional volumes, but viewed from the vantage points of the various sectors of national life and the economy, i.e. (1) agriculture, (2) built environment, (3) energy, (4) fisheries, (5) forestry, (6) human health, (7) insurance, (8) recreation and tourism, (9) transportation, (10) unmanaged ecosystems, (11) water resources, and (12) wetlands. Each paper is accompanied by an extensive list of references, a list of tables, a list of figures, and a list of appendices. Readers are cautioned that confidence levels are higher in the hemispheric-to-continental projections of climate change than in the regional projections. Also, it should be borne in mind that the identified changes in climate are projected to occur over the next century, and that the average rate of warming used in the models underlying these projections may be greater than any seen in the last several millenia.

  18. Minister Pratt welcomes new Canada Research Chair at Carleton University

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "The Honourable David Pratt, Minister of National Defence, and Member of Parliament for Nepean-Carleton, today congratulated Carleton University on receiving $638,405 in funding to support a new Canada Research Chair" (1 page)

  19. Canada-South Africa trilateral Research Chair in climate change ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-South Africa trilateral Research Chair in climate change and ... Decreasing food availability for wildlife is likely to exacerbate the impacts of climate change ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  20. National consultation leads to agrivita research to practice plan for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselin, Johanne; MacLeod, Martha L P; Dosman, James A

    2009-01-01

    A gap exists between research development and its implementation in agricultural health and safety. In order to fill this gap, the goal of this project was to consult agricultural stakeholders across Canada in order to identify the health and safety priorities in research and knowledge translation, and then to propose an approach to bridge the gap. Between April and August 2007, "A National Stakeholder Consultation on Health and Safety Research and its Effective Translation to the Agricultural Sector" was initiated by the Canadian Centre for Heath and Safety in Agriculture. The experiences and opinions of stakeholders across Canada were gathered through focus groups with over 150 participants in seven Canadian provinces and a survey of 289 individuals across Canada. Stakeholders identified a range of health and safety research priorities. Chemical exposure, stress, and farm safety issues were immediate concerns and issues surrounding labor and trained workers, whereas health problems and environmental issues were long-term concerns. Results identified research and knowledge translation priorities, which provided elements for a proposed program aiming at bridging the gap existing between research development and its translation into practice. A request for a knowledge translation/transfer mechanism, where all agricultural stakeholders from researchers to end users are involved in the process, was identified. Findings from the national consultation were used to develop a business plan entitled "Agrivita Research to Practice Program: A Partnership Plan for Health and Safety and its Effective Transfer to the Agricultural Sector in Canada." The plan provides for a coordinated and integrated approach in Canada, conceptually drawing on the American experience established by The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

  1. Stimulating research and technology in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, H [Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-11

    The Petroleum Technology Alliance Canada prepared a survey as part of its investigation of the challenges and opportunities facing the oil and gas industry. This report includes a compilation of the 144 responses to the survey which was open for comment from May to early July 2003. The top technical challenges facing the conventional oil and gas industry were listed as being: improving conventional and heavy oil ultimate recovery; cost-effectively addressing environmental challenges including water, soil and air pollution and ecological impacts; life extension and cost reduction technologies; reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving energy efficiency; learning how to produce tight gas economically; using carbon dioxide injection for enhanced recovery; improving measurement-while-drilling techniques; and, improving seismic-while-drilling techniques. Other technical challenges include the development of hydrogen gas auto fuel; subsurface microbiology to enhance oil and gas quality; risk management; water conservation; and, coalbed methane. The report also listed a myriad of technologies with high potential for field testing. Many respondents strongly agreed that research and development incentive programs involving royalty tax credits or financial tax credits would result in greater resource recoverability. Respondents were also asked what additional role the government could play in resource development. The responses were numerous. The survey also also addressed the challenges associated with the service sector. figs.

  2. Career trajectories of nurses leaving the hospital sector in Ontario, Canada (1993-2004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Baumann, Andrea; Laporte, Audrey; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Levinton, Carey; Onate, Kanecy; Deber, Raisa

    2009-05-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the career trajectories of nurses 1 year after leaving hospitals. Although hospitals are traditionally the largest employers of nurses, technological advances and budgetary constraints have resulted in many countries in relative shrinkage of the hospital sector and a shift of care (and jobs) into home/community settings. It has been often assumed that nurses displaced from hospitals will move to work in the other workplaces, especially the community sector. Employment patterns were tracked by examining a longitudinal database of all 201,463 nurses registered with the College of Nurses Ontario (Canada) between 1993 and 2004. Focusing on the employment categories Active (Working in nursing), Eligible-Seeking nursing employment or Dropout from the nursing labour market, year-to-year transition matrixes were generated by sector and sub-sector of employment, nurse type, age group and work status. For every nurse practising nursing in any non-hospital job or in the community a year after leaving hospitals, an average of 1.3 and four nurses, respectively, dropped out of Ontario's labour market. The proportion of nurses leaving hospitals transitioning to the Dropout category ranged from 63.3% (1994-95) to 38.6% (2001-02). The proportion dropping out of Ontario's market was higher for Registered Practical Nurses (compared to Registered Nurses), increased with age and decreased with degree of casualization in nurses' jobs. Downsizing hospitals without attention to the potentially negative impact on the nursing workforce can lead to retention difficulties and adversely affects the overall supply of nurses.

  3. Traditional Chinese medicine research and education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayur, Muhammad Nabeel

    2009-06-01

    Abstract Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest forms of medicine in the world. There has been a growing interest in TCM in Canada in terms of consumers and also among the research community. To cater for this interest, the Canadian Institute of Chinese Medicinal Research (CICMR) was established in 2004. Since its formation, CICMR has been organizing annual meetings. In 2008, the CICMR meeting, jointly organized with the Ontario Ginseng Innovation Research Centre, was held from October 16th to 19th, in London, Ontario, Canada. The meeting saw a number of participants and speakers from many countries who discussed TCM in a Canadian perspective. The talks and presentations focused on TCM practices in Asia and Canada; analytical techniques for unravelling the science behind TCM; basic and clinical research findings in the areas of cancer and cardiovascular diseases; safety and quality control issues; the regulatory and educational framework of TCM in Canada; and the latest findings in agricultural, chemical, and pharmacological research on ginseng from all over the world. The meeting successfully provided a platform for constructive discussions on TCM practices and research and education in Canada and the world.

  4. Electrification of the Canadian road transportation sector: A 2050 outlook with TIMES-Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Olivier; Marcy, Mathilde; Vaillancourt, Kathleen; Waaub, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    We use a newly developed bottom-up model of the entire Canadian energy system (TIMES-Canada) to assess potentials for electrification of the road transport sector. A special emphasis has been put on the modelling of the Canadian road transport, by considering a variety of vehicles for passenger and freight transportation. Besides a business-as-usual (baseline) scenario, we have analysed an energy policy scenario imposing targets for electric vehicle penetration and a climate policy scenario imposing targets for greenhouse gas emission reduction. Our analysis shows on the one hand that electric vehicles penetrate notably the passenger vehicle market after 2040 in the baseline scenario and after 2030 in the energy policy scenario (following the assumed penetration targets). On the other hand, the assumed climate policy forces a stronger penetration of electric vehicles for passenger transportation, with a progressive phasing out of internal combustion engine vehicles, whereas the latter vehicles remain dominant for freight transportation but with a shift away of fossil fuels and in favour of biofuels. A sensitivity analysis on the (assumed) evolution of electric vehicles over time confirms these general trends. -- Highlights: •We use a newly developed TIMES-Canada model of the entire Canadian energy system. •We assess potentials for electrification of the Canadian road transport sector. •We analyse three scenarios: baseline, energy policy and climate policy. •EVs penetrate notably after 2040 in the baseline and after 2030 in the energy policy scenario. •The climate policy forces a stronger penetration of EVs

  5. Preparing for and Responding to Disturbance: Examples from the Forest Sector in Sweden and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn R. Bazely

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coping or adaptation following large-scale disturbance may depend on the political system and its preparedness and policy development in relation to risks. Adaptive or foresight planning is necessary in order to account and plan for potential risks that may increase or take place concurrently with climate change. Forests constitute relevant examples of large-scale renewable resource systems that have been directly affected by recent environmental and social changes, and where different levels of management may influence each other. This article views disturbances in the forest sectors of Sweden and Canada, two large forest nations with comparable forestry experiences, in order to elucidate the preparedness and existing responses to multiple potential stresses. The article concludes that the two countries are exposed to stresses that indicate the importance of the governing and institutional system particularly with regard to multi-level systems including federal and EU levels. While economic change largely results in privatization of risk onto individual companies and their economic resources (in Canada coupled with a contestation of institutional systems and equity in these, storm and pest outbreaks in particular challenge institutional capacities at administrative levels, within the context provided by governance and tenure systems.

  6. Government policy, research and stakeholder confidence - Current Trends in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Carmel

    2006-01-01

    uncertainties; - Assure adequate human capacity to manage the program throughout its existence to maintain competence and credibility; - Enhance scientific understanding to improve confidence in predictions and to evaluate potential program improvements; - Confirm performance or identify anomalies during and after program operations and thereby increase confidence; - Clearly demonstrate to citizens an ongoing capability to manage the enterprise and to respond to their concerns and desires; - Be able to enact mid-course corrections in response to new information or societal decisions by adapting to new designs, new regional, national or international institutional changes, or new international standards; - Be able to adapt to new capabilities developed externally to the program that show promise of improving program success. Ms. Letourneau addressed the role of the public and private sector in conducting research on RWM in Canada. The Government of Canada has clearly indicated that the responsibility for providing sound scientific data for proposed practices rests with the proponent who is taking action associated with the risk of potential serious harm. Where it is less clear that the proponent should shoulder the entire responsibility for research programs, the Government step in and assist the proponent or the general industry in question. The relationship between research and Government policy focuses on the public good and always aspires to public confidence. It cannot focus only on ideas and technologies with commercial potential. Its top priority must retain the public interest of present and future generations of Canadians. The Government is interested in supporting research which responds to public priorities of the day. The presentation reviewed the functional objectives of government research, and noted that increasingly, the setting of research priorities now involves more intensive and extensive public consultations. It was noted that allocation of responsibility

  7. University-Private Sector Research Partnerships in the Innovation Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    private sector . There are several trends that PCAST considers to fall specifically within context of university- private sector research partnerships. The first is the growing imbalance between the academic research capacity and the Federal research budget. The second development is the reduction in basic research performed by the industrial sector. Private foundations are expanding their capacity to fund research, a trend expected to be important in the future. Lastly, the accelerating speed of technological development requires new methods of

  8. Retail food environments research in Canada: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaker, Leia M; Shuh, Alanna; Olstad, Dana L; Engler-Stringer, Rachel; Black, Jennifer L; Mah, Catherine L

    2016-06-09

    The field of retail food environments research is relatively new in Canada. The objective of this scoping review is to provide an overview of retail food environments research conducted before July 2015 in Canada. Specifically, this review describes research foci and key findings, identifies knowledge gaps and suggests future directions for research. A search of published literature concerning Canadian investigations of retail food environment settings (food stores, restaurants) was conducted in July 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, PsychInfo and ERIC. Studies published in English that reported qualitative or quantitative data on any aspect of the retail food environment were included, as were conceptual papers and commentaries. Eighty-eight studies were included in this review and suggest that the field of retail food environments research is rapidly expanding in Canada. While only 1 paper was published before 2005, 66 papers were published between 2010 and 2015. Canadian food environments research typically assessed either the socio-economic patterning of food environments (n = 28) or associations between retail food environments and diet, anthropometric or health outcomes (n = 33). Other papers profiled methodological research, qualitative studies, intervention research and critical commentaries (n = 27). Key gaps in the current literature include measurement inconsistency among studies and a lack of longitudinal and intervention studies. Retail food environments are a growing topic of research, policy and program development in Canada. Consistent methods (where appropriate), longitudinal and intervention research, and close partnerships between researchers and key stakeholders would greatly advance the field of retail food environments research in Canada.

  9. Canada-Africa Research Exchange Grants (CAREG) : Pilot Phase ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Canada-Africa Research Exchange Grants (CAREG) were designed to rectify this situation by supporting a series of short-term research or training exchanges between Canadian and African ... IDRC is pleased to announce the results of its 2017 call for proposals to establish Cyber Policy Centres in the Global South.

  10. Antipsychotics and dementia in Canada: a retrospective cross-sectional study of four health sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Sebastian; Perlman, Christopher M; Costa, Andrew; Heckman, George; Hirdes, John P; Mitchell, Lori

    2017-10-23

    Antipsychotic medications are not recommended for the management of symptoms of dementia, particularly among persons with no behavioral or psychological symptoms. We examine patterns of antipsychotic medication use among persons with dementia across health sectors in Canada, with a focus on factors related to use among those without behavioral or psychotic symptoms. Using a retrospective cross-sectional design, this study examines antipsychotic use among adults aged 65 or older with dementia in home care (HC), complex continuing care (CCC), long-term care (LTC), and among alternate level care patients in acute hospitals (ALC). Using clinical data from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2014, the prevalence of antipsychotic medication use was estimated by the presence of behavioral and psychotic symptoms. Logistic regression was used to identify sector specific factors associated with antipsychotic use in the absence of behavioral and psychotic symptoms. The total prevalence of antipsychotic use among older adults with dementia was 26% in HC, 54% in ALC, 41% in CCC, and 48% in LTC. This prevalence ranged from 38% (HC) to 73% (ALC) for those with both behavioral and psychotic symptoms and from 15% (HC) to 31% (ALC) among those with no symptoms. The regression models identified a number of variables were related to antipsychotic use in the absence of behavior or psychotic symptoms, such as bipolar disorder (OR = 6.63 in CCC; OR = 5.52 in LTC), anxious complaints (OR = 1.54 in LTC to 2.01 in CCC), and wandering (OR = 1.83 in ALC). Potentially inappropriate use of antipsychotic medications is prevalent among older adults with dementia across health sectors. The variations in prevalence observed from community to facility based care suggests that system issues may exist in appropriately managing persons with dementia.

  11. Quantifying the biophysical climate change mitigation potential of Canada's forest sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, C. E.; Stinson, G.; Neilson, E.; Lemprière, T. C.; Hafer, M.; Rampley, G. J.; Kurz, W. A.

    2014-07-01

    The potential of forests and the forest sector to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is widely recognized, but challenging to quantify at a national scale. Forests and their carbon (C) sequestration potential are affected by management practices, where wood harvesting transfers C out of the forest into products, and subsequent regrowth allows further C sequestration. Here we determine the mitigation potential of the 2.3 × 106 km2 of Canada's managed forests from 2015 to 2050 using the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3), a harvested wood products (HWP) model that estimates emissions based on product half-life decay times, and an account of emission substitution benefits from the use of wood products and bioenergy. We examine several mitigation scenarios with different assumptions about forest management activity levels relative to a base case scenario, including improved growth from silvicultural activities, increased harvest and residue management for bioenergy, and reduced harvest for conservation. We combine forest management options with two mitigation scenarios for harvested wood product use involving an increase in either long-lived products or bioenergy uses. Results demonstrate large differences among alternative scenarios, and we identify potential mitigation scenarios with increasing benefits to the atmosphere for many decades into the future, as well as scenarios with no net benefit over many decades. The greatest mitigation impact was achieved through a mix of strategies that varied across the country and had cumulative mitigation of 254 Tg CO2e in 2030, and 1180 Tg CO2e in 2050. There was a trade-off between short-term and long-term goals, in that maximizing short-term emissions reduction could reduce the forest sector's ability to contribute to longer-term objectives. We conclude that (i) national-scale forest sector mitigation options need to be assessed rigorously from a systems perspective to avoid the development of

  12. A meeting of minds: interdisciplinary research in the health sciences in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Judith G.; Bainbridge, Lesley; Buchan, Alison; Cribb, Alastair; Drummond, Jane; Gyles, Carlton; Hicks, T. Philip; McWilliam, Carol; Paterson, Barbara; Ratner, Pamela A.; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Solomon, Patty

    2006-01-01

    Brought together by the newly formed Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS), recognized national leaders in the 6 health sciences disciplines consider the environment for conducting interdisciplinary health research (IDHR) in Canada. Based on first-hand knowledge and thoughtful reflection, the authors argue that although much progress has been made in support of IDHR in Canada, the practical experience of researchers does not always bear this out. This article examines government, industry and academia to identify the cultural and structural characteristics that demand, promote or prevent IDHR in each sector. At its heart is the question, How can universities best support and enhance IDHR, not only for the benefit of science, but also to meet the growing needs of industry and government for intellectual capital? Focusing on the predominant health sciences disciplines, the authors define IDHR as a team of researchers, solidly grounded in their respective disciplines, who come together around an important and challenging health issue, the research question for which is determined by a shared understanding in an interactive and iterative process. In addition, they suggest that IDHR is directly linked to translational research, which is the application of basic science to clinical practice and the generation of scientific questions through clinical observation. This analysis of academic, industry and government sectors is not intended to offer rigorous data on the current state of IDHR in Canada. Rather, the goal is to stimulate research-policy dialogue by suggesting a number of immediate measures that can help promote IDHR in Canada. Recommended measures to support IDHR are aimed at better resourcing and recognition (by universities and granting agencies), along with novel approaches to training, such as government- and industry-based studentships. In addition, we recommend that professional organizations reconsider their policies on publication and governance

  13. A meeting of minds: interdisciplinary research in the health sciences in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Judith G; Bainbridge, Lesley; Buchan, Alison; Cribb, Alastair; Drummond, Jane; Gyles, Carlton; Hicks, T Philip; McWilliam, Carol; Paterson, Barbara; Ratner, Pamela A; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Solomon, Patty

    2006-09-26

    Brought together by the newly formed Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS), recognized national leaders in the 6 health sciences disciplines consider the environment for conducting interdisciplinary health research (IDHR) in Canada. Based on first-hand knowledge and thoughtful reflection, the authors argue that although much progress has been made in support of IDHR in Canada, the practical experience of researchers does not always bear this out. This article examines government, industry and academia to identify the cultural and structural characteristics that demand, promote or prevent IDHR in each sector. At its heart is the question, How can universities best support and enhance IDHR, not only for the benefit of science, but also to meet the growing needs of industry and government for intellectual capital? Focusing on the predominant health sciences disciplines, the authors define IDHR as a team of researchers, solidly grounded in their respective disciplines, who come together around an important and challenging health issue, the research question for which is determined by a shared understanding in an interactive and iterative process. In addition, they suggest that IDHR is directly linked to translational research, which is the application of basic science to clinical practice and the generation of scientific questions through clinical observation. This analysis of academic, industry and government sectors is not intended to offer rigorous data on the current state of IDHR in Canada. Rather, the goal is to stimulate research-policy dialogue by suggesting a number of immediate measures that can help promote IDHR in Canada. Recommended measures to support IDHR are aimed at better resourcing and recognition (by universities and granting agencies), along with novel approaches to training, such as government-and industry-based studentships. In addition, we recommend that professional organizations reconsider their policies on publication and governance

  14. Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    irocca

    programs, and practices, but in the daily work and actions of our employees. ... As a research institution dedicated to ethical practices and scientific excellence, it .... We are responsible for ensuring that purchasing and funding decisions are ...

  15. Research Experience in Psychiatry Residency Programs Across Canada: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugalingam, Arany; Ferreria, Sharon G; Norman, Ross M G; Vasudev, Kamini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current status of research experience in psychiatry residency programs across Canada. Method: Coordinators of Psychiatric Education (COPE) resident representatives from all 17 psychiatry residency programs in Canada were asked to complete a survey regarding research training requirements in their programs. Results: Among the 17 COPE representatives, 15 completed the survey, representing 88% of the Canadian medical schools that have a psychiatry residency program. Among the 15 programs, 11 (73%) require residents to conduct a scholarly activity to complete residency. Some of these programs incorporated such a requirement in the past 5 years. Ten respondents (67%) reported availability of official policy and (or) guidelines on resident research requirements. Among the 11 programs that have a research requirement, 10 (91%) require residents to complete 1 scholarly activity; 1 requires completion of 2 scholarly activities. Eight (53%) residency programs reported having a separate research track. All of the programs have a research coordinator and 14 (93%) programs provide protected time to residents for conducting research. The 3 most common types of scholarly activities that qualify for the mandatory research requirement are a full independent project (10 programs), a quality improvement project (8 programs), and assisting in a faculty project (8 programs). Six programs expect their residents to present their final work in a departmental forum. None of the residency programs require publication of residents’ final work. Conclusions: The current status of the research experience during psychiatry residency in Canada is encouraging but there is heterogeneity across the programs. PMID:25565474

  16. A review of greenhouse gas research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yundt, P.

    1995-11-01

    Greenhouse gas research programs and projects that relate to the Canadian natural gas industry were presented. Fossil fuel related emissions, primarily methane and carbon dioxide, impact on the atmospheric concentrations of the greenhouse gases. Therefore, strategies to reduce these emissions should impact on the Canadian natural gas industry. A list of 39 projects and 18 research programs of potential interest to the natural gas industry were presented in summary form. The involvement of CANMET (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology), Environment Canada, and NSERC (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council) in doing or sponsoring research projects directed towards greenhouse gas emission reduction was highlighted. Some potential options for member companies of the Canadian natural gas industry, to support climate change and greenhouse gas research, were outlined. 6 refs., 12 tabs

  17. Calls for Canada to support basic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Canada’s decade-long shift of financial support from fundamental studies towards applied research is dismantling the nation’s funding of basic science, according to a report by the Global Young Academy (GYA) - an international society of young scientists.

  18. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thexton, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) type reactors in Canada is traced. What is CANDU? and how does it differ from a pressurized water reactor? Whey did Canada adopt this design? What factors have led to its success? These questions are asked and answered. First the design itself is explained. Technical problems are considered and figures on operating reliability presented. The economic advantages of CANDU are shown by comparing electricity generating costs at CANDU stations with those at coal-fired stations. Future CANDU options are discussed and prospects for CANDU considered. (U.K.)

  19. A Bibliometric Analysis of Digestive Health Research in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Désirée Tuitt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the impact and influence of medical/scientific journals, and of individual researchers has become more widely practiced in recent decades. This is driven, in part, by the increased availability of data regarding citations of research articles, and by increased competition for research funding. Digestive disease research has been identified as a particularly strong discipline in Canada. The authors collected quantitative data on the impact and influence of Canadian digestive health research. The present study involved an analysis of the research impact (Hirsch factor and research influence (Influence factor of 106 digestive health researchers in Canada. Rankings of the top 25 researchers on the basis of the two metrics were dominated by the larger research groups at the University of Toronto (Toronto, Ontario, McMaster University (Hamilton, Ontario, and the Universities of Calgary (Calgary, Alberta and Alberta (Edmonton, Alberta, but with representation by other research groups at the Universities of Manitoba (Winnipeg, Manitoba, Western Ontario (London, Ontario and McGill University (Montreal, Quebec. Female and male researchers had similar scores for the two metrics, as did basic scientists versus clinical investigators. Strategic recruitment, particularly of established investigators, can have a major impact on the ranking of research groups. Comparing these metrics over different time frames can provide insights into the vulnerabilities and strengths of research groups.

  20. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. A survey of research programs in radiation protection in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    A survey of research programs in Canada concerned with radiation protection was conducted in 1991-92 by the Joint Subcommittee on Regulatory Research (JSCRR) of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) Advisory Committees on Radiological Protection and on Nuclear Safety. The purpose of this survey was to determine the current state of funding for this type of research in Canada. Funding for health-related radiation research in Canada is critical to establishing and maintaining a supply of trained professionals who can provide competent advice on health-related problems in radiation protection. The present report is an analysis of the information received in this survey. This survey concludes with the recommendation that the organization and definition of subprograms for the AECB Regulatory Research and Support Program should be completed as soon as possible. In this report the JSCRR should assist AECB staff in preparing a report in which priorities for research related to radiation protection are indicated. The sources of information noted at the end of the Discussion section of this report should be considered for this purpose. (author). 15 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor - Canada Survey | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers will follow the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) program ... The study will provide detailed information on entrepreneurship in Canada that is ... sector, public sector, and civil society organizations on development issues.

  3. People – Money Co-movement and the Ethnic Financial Sectors in Canada and the U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Lo; Wei Li

    2008-01-01

    Financial globalization and international migration have altered the socio-economic-demographic make-up as well as the financial dynamics in immigrant receiving countries. An outcome is the emergence or strengthening of a formal ethnic financial sector consisting of financial institutions that are owned and/or operated by a variety of ethnic groups. Focusing on ethnic banks in Los Angeles, USA and ethnic credit unions in Toronto, Canada, and using secondary sources and interviews with bank ex...

  4. Public sector leadership: New perspectives for research and practice

    OpenAIRE

    D. Orazi; A.Turrini; G. Valotti

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to portray the state of the art in public sector leadership in order to recommend directions for research and training practice. To this end, we review the scattered strands of literature on public sector leadership (PSL) and classify them in a single framework. The results of the study suggest that public sector leadership is emerging as a distinctive and autonomous domain in public administration/public management studies, although the debate is still underdeveloped co...

  5. Nuclear regulatory developments in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper from CNSC discusses nuclear regulatory developments in Canada. It starts with the Fukushima accident and the effect on the nuclear sector. It summarises what CNSC has done, what it has learned and their plans going forward. It has made recommendations to IAEA for international enhancements to regulatory procedures. It outline the activities of Canada's nuclear power plants, Canada's uranium projects, deep geological repository and waste management as well as nuclear research in Canada.

  6. Integrating human health into environmental impact assessment: case studies of Canada's Northern mining resource sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, B.F.; Bronson, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of human health considerations into environmental impact assessment (EIA) in the Canadian North. Emphasis is placed on the northern mining sector, where more land has been staked in the past decade than in the previous 50 years combined. Using information from interviews with northern EIA and health practitioners and reviews of selected project documents, we examined three principal mining case studies, northern Saskatchewan uranium mining operations, the Ekati diamond project, and the Voisey's Bay mine/mill project, to determine whether and how health considerations in EIA have evolved and the current nature and scope of health integration. Results suggest that despite the recognized link between environment and health and the number of high-profile megaprojects in Canada's North, human health, particularly social health, has not been given adequate treatment in northern EIA. Health considerations in EIA have typically been limited to physical health impacts triggered directly by project-induced environmental change, while social and other health determinants have been either not considered at all, or limited to those aspects of health and well-being that the project proponent directly controlled, namely employment opportunities and worker health and safety. In recent years, we have been seeing improvements in the scope of health in EIA to reflect a broader range of health determinants, including traditional land use and culture. However, there is still a need to adopt impact mitigation and enhancement measures that are sensitive to northern society, to monitor and follow up actual health impacts after project approval, and to ensure that mitigation and enhancement measures are effective. (author)

  7. The Immigrant Wage Gap in Canada: Differences between the Public and the Private Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Serge Nadeau

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses 2006 Canadian census data to examine patterns of wage differentials between immigrants and Canadian natives across the public and private sectors. Results reveal that the wage gap is much more a private sector issue than a public sector issue: the average wage gap is in favour of Canadian natives in the private sector but in favour of immigrants in the public sector; compared to natives, immigrants earn significantly less per year of domestic schooling and per year of domestic...

  8. Tracking SMME research in South Africa’s priority sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogerson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Industrial Policy Framework and the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa emphasize the importance of promoting select ‘priority sectors’. This paper provides a review of existing research concerning SMME development in the three priority sectors of tourism, business process outsourcing and offshoring (BPO & O and, creative industries. The paper argues for the importance of undertaking sector-differentiated research on SMME development in South Africa in order to complement other research which is focussed on sector development as a whole.

  9. Retail food environments in Canada: Maximizing the impact of research, policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaker, Leia M

    2016-06-09

    Retail food environments are gaining national and international attention as important determinants of population dietary intake. Communities across Canada are beginning to discuss and implement programs and policies to create supportive retail food environments. Three considerations should drive the selection of food environment assessment methods: relevance (What is the problem, and how is it related to dietary outcomes?); resources (What human, time and financial resources are required to undertake an assessment?); and response (How will policy-makers find meaning out of and act on the information gained through the food environment assessment?). Ultimately, food environment assessments should be conducted in the context of stakeholder buy-in and multi-sectoral partnerships, since food environment solutions require multi-sectoral action. Partnerships between public health actors and the food and beverage industry can be challenging, especially when mandates are not aligned. Clarifying the motivations, expectations and roles of all stakeholders takes time but is important if the impact of food environment research, policy and practice is to be maximized. The articles contained in this special supplementary issue describe ongoing food environments research across Canada and fill some of the important gaps in the current body of Canadian food environments literature.

  10. Atlantic Canada's energy research and development website and database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Petroleum Research Atlantic Canada maintains a website devoted to energy research and development in Atlantic Canada. The site can be viewed on the world wide web at www.energyresearch.ca. It includes a searchable database with information about researchers in Nova Scotia, their projects and published materials on issues related to hydrocarbons, alternative energy technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, environmental impacts and policy. The website also includes links to research funding agencies, external related databases and related energy organizations around the world. Nova Scotia-based users are invited to submit their academic, private or public research to the site. Before being uploaded into the database, a site administrator reviews and processes all new information. Users are asked to identify their areas of interest according to the following research categories: alternative or renewable energy technologies; climate change; coal; computer applications; economics; energy efficiency; environmental impacts; geology; geomatics; geophysics; health and safety; human factors; hydrocarbons; meteorology and oceanology (metocean) activities; petroleum operations in deep and shallow waters; policy; and power generation and supply. The database can be searched 5 ways according to topic, researchers, publication, projects or funding agency. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, J.

    1991-01-01

    Canada, while professing a non-nuclear policy for its own armed forces, is, none the less, a member of a nuclear alliance. The security gained through participation in such arrangements does not come cost-free, despite the common view that countries such as Canada enjoy a free ride. Being under the nuclear umbrella, as this paper seeks to illustrate, does generate its own problems and costs. For example, does influence stem from the actual possession of nuclear weapons (albeit under US control), from support of the concept of nuclear deterrence and its infrastructure, or from possessing territory that is of strategic importance to a more powerful ally? Does the Canadian experience serve as a model for countries that are in close proximity to an existing or threshold nuclear power? Much depends on the willingness of a country to participate in the nuclear infrastructure associated with the acquisition of nuclear weapons for security purposes. It must accept the underlying rationale or logic of nuclear deterrence and the constraints on alternative security options that this imposes and it must also recognize that reliance on nuclear deterrence for military security seven if one seeks to emulate Canada and become a non-nuclear weapon state in a nuclear alliance can produce strains in its own right. The case of Canada shows that a country seeking security through such means should be aware of, and reflect upon, the fact that what appears to be a free ride does not come free of charge. However, a country may have other options in it, military security that have neither historically or geostrategically been available to Canada

  12. FY2000 survey report research and development internationalization in industrial sector among APEC economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    A survey is conducted and a database is constructed on internationalization of research and development activities in the industrial sectors of APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Conference) countries, namely, on research and development support systems, research and development appropriations, research and development personnel, research VISA granting procedures and control over foreign funds, trends of research and development among private sector businesses, main research and development organizations, evaluation by private sector businesses of the research and development environments of their countries, and the like. Incorporated into the database are Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, and Vietnam. The database, compiled for Internet web pages, CD-ROMs, and publications, covers the industrial technology related policies of all the countries and helps understand the research and development systems, and enables access to main research organizations. The database comprises a general section dealing with the background, system constitution, and internationalization trend and a countries section collecting information on the respective countries. (NEDO)

  13. Research planning in the energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graenicher, H.

    1977-06-01

    The author considers research planning split into four separate aspects: the character of the research situation; the function of planning stages; the type of research target; and the limit of the application of research planning by planning stages. He then considers the specific problem of energy research and discusses the question of what the state is to do and how to do it with particular attention to the Swiss situation. (G.T.H)

  14. Regulatory Framework for Conducting Clinical Research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alas, Josmar K; Godlovitch, Glenys; Mohan, Connie M; Jelinski, Shelly A; Khan, Aneal A

    2017-09-01

    Research in human subjects is at the core of achieving improvements in health outcomes. For clinical trials, in addition to the peer review of the results before publication, it is equally important to consider whether the trial will be conducted in a manner that generates data of the highest quality and provides a measure of safety for the participating subjects. In Canada, there is no definitive legislation that governs the conduct of research involving human subjects, but a network of regulations at different levels does provide a framework for both principal investigators and sponsors. In this paper, we provide an overview of the federal, provincial and institutional legislation, guidelines and policies that will inform readers about the requirements for clinical trial research. This includes a review of the role of the Food and Drug Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act and the Tri-Council Policy Statement (TCPS2), an overview of provincial legislation across the country, and a focus on selected policies from institutional research ethics boards and public health agencies. Many researchers may find navigation through regulations frustrating, and there is a paucity of information that explains the interrelationship between the different regulatory agencies in Canada. Better understanding the process, we feel, will facilitate investigators interested in clinical trials and also enhance the long-term health of Canadians.

  15. The internationalisation of marketing in the education and research sector

    OpenAIRE

    Mirosława Pluta–Olearnik

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of entities operating in the Polish sector of higher education and science and research aspire to have an active presence in foreign markets and even in the global market. This presence must be accompanied by thoughtful marketing strategies using effective marketing tools. The aim of the article is to indicate the possibility of using the knowledge of international marketing to increase the efficiency of the entities of the Polish sector of education and research. Particular ...

  16. Carbon profile of the managed forest sector in Canada in the 20th century: sink or source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaxin; Colombo, Stephen J; Ter-Mikaelian, Michael T; Heath, Linda S

    2014-08-19

    Canada contains 10% of global forests and has been one of the world's largest harvested wood products (HWP) producers. Therefore, Canada's managed forest sector, the managed forest area and HWP, has the potential to significantly increase or reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases. Using the most comprehensive carbon balance analysis to date, this study shows Canada's managed forest area and resulting HWP were a sink of 7510 and 849 teragrams carbon (TgC), respectively, in the period 1901-2010, exceeding Canada's fossil fuel-based emissions over this period (7333 TgC). If Canadian HWP were not produced and used for residential construction, and instead more energy intensive materials were used, there would have been an additional 790 TgC fossil fuel-based emissions. Because the forest carbon increases in the 20th century were mainly due to younger growing forests that resulted from disturbances in the 19th century, and future increases in forest carbon stocks appear uncertain, in coming decades most of the mitigation contribution from Canadian forests will likely accrue from wood substitution that reduces fossil fuel-based emissions and stores carbon, so long as those forests are managed sustainably.

  17. Early years of nuclear energy research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    The first experimental attempts in Canada to obtain energy from uranium fission were carried out by the author in the Ottawa laboratories of the National Research Council from 1940 to 42. This program grew into a joint British-Canadian laboratory in Montreal. Work done at this laboratory, which moved to Chalk River in 1946, led to the construction of ZEEP (the first nuclear reactor to operate outside of the United States) NRX, and ultimately to the development of the CANDU power reactors. People involved in the work and events along the way are covered in detail. (LL)

  18. Energy research in the public sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfeller, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objects of state-sponsored energy research in Switzerland are stated to include specialist training in co-operation with the technical universities, and long term energy technology as well as international liaison. Tables are presented which indicate the trends in sources of funding for research, and the division between various technological areas, including energy conservation (10%), solar energy (10%), bioenergy, geothermal energy and wind power (4.5%), atomic energy (40%), nuclear fusion (20%), electricity (6%) and environmental studies (7%). These ratios are compared with those for other developed countries and it is concluded that the aim must be to approach smoothly the 'post-oil era'. (Auth.)

  19. Ramp up: a study on the status of women in Canada's mining and exploration sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-02-15

    The study was undertaken to collect data on the representation of women in the mining and exploration sector and establish a baseline. In Canada women represent 14.4% of the mining and exploration workforce. The study showed that the presence of women at each level of an organization helps improve the performance of the company; however, numerous barriers to the integration of women in such organizations were found. The study looked at training and career development of women and flexible work practices as issues related to women in mining. This study highlighted the importance of women to the performance of organizations in the mineral sector and provided a way forward to increase their representation.

  20. India's growing clinical research sector: opportunity for global companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varawalla, Nermeen

    2007-06-01

    Backed by a compelling foundation of essential requirements necessary for effective clinical trial conduct, and aided by initiatives that address concerns of data quality, regulatory timelines and IP protection, the clinical development sector in India has experienced annual revenue growth rates of 25% in the past two to three years, and is poised to participate substantially in global drug development. As both clinical trial sponsors and CROs increase their research capabilities in India, the clinical development sector is facing challenges with staff resourcing and facilities. Existing initiatives in the clinical sector must continue, and further investment must be made by stakeholders to overcome the current limitations in sector growth. Furthermore, global organizations seeking to derive long-term sustainable revenue growth and competitive advantage in the global marketplace from their business units in India must establish an appropriate organizational culture and an effective intra-organizational and industry interface for their operations.

  1. A BRIEF ANALYSIS OF PUBLIC SECTOR CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS RESEARCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea CÎRSTEA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to track the evolution of this specific topic of consolidated financial statements in the public sector, in order to be able to present a global picture of the actual knowledge stage of this issue at international level. The study conducted for reaching the proposed objective is a quantitative one. We tried to find out how this issue of public sector consolidated financial statements has sparked the interest of researchers around the world and when the issue was most debated. We concluded that the research of consolidated financial statements in the public sector is in its infancy and nowadays the topic starts to be more and more in the attention of the researchers in this field.

  2. Academic Design Of Canada's Energy Systems And Nuclear Science Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Perera, S.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) is at the forefront of alternative energy and nuclear research that focuses on the energy challenges that are faced by the province of Ontario, the industrial heartland of Canada. While the university was established as recently as 2002 and opened its doors to its first students in 2003, it has already developed a comprehensive set of undergraduate and graduate programs, and a reputation for research intensiveness. UOIT offers dedicated programs in nuclear engineering and energy systems engineering to ensure a continued supply of trained employees in these fields. The ability to provide talented and skilled personnel to the energy sector has emerged as a critical requirement of ensuring Ontario's energy future, and to meet this need UOIT requires additional teaching and research space in order to offer its energy related programs. The Governments of Canada and of the Province of Ontario recognized UOIT's achievements and contributions to post-secondary education in the field of clean energy in general and nuclear power in particular, and as part of the economic stimuli funded by both levels of government, approved $45 M CAD for the construction of a 10,000 m 2 'Energy Systems and Nuclear Science Research Centre' at UOIT. The building is scheduled to be ready for occupancy in the summer of 2011. The paper presents the key considerations that lead to the design of the building, and gives details of the education and research programs that were the key in determining the design and layout of the research centre. (authors)

  3. Canada's International Education Strategy: Focus on Scholarships. CBIE Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Based on a survey of approximately 40 professionals involved in various disciplines associated with international education across Canada, this study examines Canada's (federal, provincial, and territorial government) offering of scholarships to international students. Focused at the university level, the study elaborates on relevant international…

  4. Proceedings of the Canadian Institute's 8. annual midstream 2005 conference : capitalize on change and opportunity in Canada's evolving midstream sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This conference provided a venue for Canada's midstream oil and gas sector to discuss strategies and options for capitalizing on changes within the industry. Members presented papers related to upcoming federal government climate change regulations and discussed methods of capitalizing on new processing fee guidelines. Strategies for managing market volatility were examined, and issues related to liquefied natural gas (LNG) were reviewed along with methods of optimizing gas processing capacity and negotiating processing fees. A natural gas liquids (NGL) pricing outlook was provided and risk management strategies for royalty and income trusts were discussed. Issues related to the safe and cost-effective abandonment of wells were also examined. The conference featured 17 presentations, of which 3 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs

  5. Irradiated fuel by-product separation research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burston, M.

    1984-01-01

    Although no decision has been made to reprocess irradiated CANDU fuel, by-product separation research has recently been initiated in Canada because of its potential importance to Canadian research programs in advanced fuel cycles (especially U/Pu cycle development in the near term) and nuclear waste management. In addition, separated by-products could have a significant commercial potential. Demonstrated applications include: heat sources, gamma radiation sources, light sources, new materials for productions of other useful isotopes, etc. For illustrative purposes the calculated market value of by-products currently stored in irradiated CANDU fuel is approximately $210/kgU. Ontario Hydro has initiated a program to study the application of new separation technolgies, such as laser-based techniques and the plasma ion cyclotron resonance separation technique, to either augment and/or supplant the chemical extraction methods. The main goal is to develop new, more economical extraction methods in order to increase the magnitude of the advantages resulting from this approach to reprocessing. (author)

  6. The internationalisation of marketing in the education and research sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosława Pluta–Olearnik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of entities operating in the Polish sector of higher education and science and research aspire to have an active presence in foreign markets and even in the global market. This presence must be accompanied by thoughtful marketing strategies using effective marketing tools. The aim of the article is to indicate the possibility of using the knowledge of international marketing to increase the efficiency of the entities of the Polish sector of education and research. Particular attention was paid to the intercultural nature of the international marketing, especially in relation to the system to communicate with foreign customers in the Internet space. The article uses the following sources of information: official statistics, research reports, professional periodicals, case studies.

  7. French Immersion Research in Canada: Recent Contributions to SLA and Applied Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Merrill

    2000-01-01

    Discusses two questions: (1) What has the recent research conducted in French immersion programs in Canada contributed to understanding of second language acquisition?; and (2) What has it contributed to the broader field of applied linguistics? Considers research in the coming decade, and discusses obstacles that may be faced in Canada in…

  8. Overview of feedstock research in the United States, Canada, and Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Tardif, M.L. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Couto, L. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (Brazil); Garca, L.R. [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Florestas, Colombo (Brazil); Betters, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Ashworth, J. [Meridian Corp., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This is an overview of the current biomass feedstock efforts in Brazil, Canada, and the United States. The report from Brazil provides an historical perspective of incentive programs, the charcoal and fuelwood energy programs, the alcohol program, and other biomass energy efforts. The efforts in Brazil, particularly with the sugar cane to ethanol and the charcoal and fuelwood programs, dwarfs other commercial biomass systems in the Americas. One of the bright spots in the future is the Biomass Integrated Gasification/Gas Turbine Electricity Project initially funded in 1992. The sugar cane-based ethanol industry continues to develop higher yielding cane varieties and more efficient microorganisms to convert the sugar cane carbohydrates into alcohol. In Canada a number of important institutions and enterprises taking part in the economical development of the country are involved in biomass research and development including various aspects of the biomass such as forestry, agricultural, industrial, urban, food processing, fisheries and peat bogs. Biomass feedstock research in the United States is evolving to reflect Department of Energy priorities. Greater emphasis is placed on leveraging research with the private sector contributing a greater share of funds, for both research and demonstration projects. The feedstock program, managed by ORNL, is focused on limited model species centered at a regional level using a multidisciplinary approach. Activities include a stronger emphasis on emerging environmental issues such as biodiversity, sustainability and habitat management. DOE also is a supporter of the National Biofuels Roundtable, which is developing principles for producing biomass energy in an economically viable and ecologically sound manner. Geographical Information Systems are also being developed as tools to quantify and characterize the potential supply of energy crops in various regions.

  9. The gender pay gap for private sector employees in Canada and Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Drolet, Marie; Mumford, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses British and Canadian linked employer-employee data to investigate the importance of the workplace for the gender wage gap. Implementing a novel decomposition approach, we find high levels of unexplained wage inequality in the private sector of both countries, which is related to women receiving relatively lower wages within workplaces than do men. Whilst this inequality is partially offset by women, on average, receiving a workplace specific return which is relatively higher t...

  10. Research of quality culture in the public sector organization

    OpenAIRE

    Aškelavičius, Izoldas

    2017-01-01

    RESEARCH OF QUALITY CULTURE IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATION Izoldas AŠKELAVIČIUS Paper for the Master’s degree Quality Management Master’s Program Vilnius University, Faculty of Economics, Management Department Supervisor – Assoc. Prof. Dr. R. Adomaitienė Vilnius, 2017 SUMMARY 64 pages, 8 charts, 13 pictures, 81 references. The main purpose of this master thesis is to analyze Vilnius local labor exchange quality culture topics, reveal the current state of quality culture. The work consists ...

  11. History of Pain Research and Management in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Merskey

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Scattered accounts of the treatment of pain by aboriginal Canadians are found in the journals of the early explorers and missionaries. French and English settlers brought with them the remedies of their home countries. The growth of medicine through the 18th and 19th centuries, particularly in Europe, was mirrored in the practice and treatment methods of Canadians and Americans. In the 19th century, while Americans learned about causalgia and the pain of wounds, Canadian insurrections were much less devastating than the United States Civil War. By the end of that century, a Canadian professor working in the United States, Sir William Osler, was responsible for a standard textbook of medicine with a variety of treatments for painful illnesses. Yet pain did not figure in the index of that book. The modern period in pain research and management can probably be dated to the 20 years before the founding of the International Association for the Study of Pain. Pride of place belongs to The management of pain by John Bonica, published in Philadelphia in 1953 and based upon his work in Tacoma and Seattle. Ideas about pain were evolving in Canada in the 1950s with Donald Hebb, Professor of Psychology at McGill University in Montreal, corresponding with the leading American neurophysiologist, George H Bishop. Hebb's pupil Ronald Melzack engaged in studies of early experiences in relation to pain and, joining with Patrick Wall at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, published the 1965 paper in Science that revolutionized thinking. Partly because of this early start with prominent figures and partly because of its social system in the organization of medicine, Canada became a centre for a number of aspects of pain research and management, ranging from pain clinics in Halifax, Kingston and Saskatoon - which were among the earliest to advance treatment of pain - to studying the effects of implanted electrodes for neurosurgery. Work in Toronto by Moldofsky

  12. Evaluating research for disruptive innovation in the space sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerer, L.

    2012-12-01

    Many governmental space activities need to be planned with a time horizon that extends beyond the comfort zone of reliable technology development assessments and predictions. In an environment of accelerating technological change, a methodological approach to addressing non-core technology trends and potentially disruptive, game-changing developments not yet linked to the space sector is increasingly important to complement efforts in core technology R&D planning. Various models and organisational setups aimed at fulfilling this purpose are in existence. These include, with varying levels of relevance to space, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Institute for Advanced Concepts (NIAC, operational form 1998 to 2007 and recently re-established), the Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency of the US Department of Defence, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Medialab, the early versions of Starlab, the Lockheed Skunk Works and the European Space Agency's Advanced Concepts Team. Some of these organisations have been reviewed and assessed individually, though systematic comparison of their methods, approaches and results have not been published. This may be due in part to the relatively sparse scientific literature on organisational parameters for enabling disruptive innovation as well as to the lack of commonly agreed indicators for the evaluation of their performance. Furthermore, innovation support systems in the space sector are organised differently than in traditional, open competitive markets, which serve as the basis for most scholarly literature on the organisation of innovation. The present paper is intended to advance and stimulate discussion on the organisation of disruptive innovation mechanisms specifically for the space sector. It uses the examples of the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts and the ESA Advanced Concepts Team, analyses their respective approaches and compares their results, leading to the proposal of

  13. Advancing sustainable development in Canada : policy issues and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliadis, P.; Slayen, S.

    2003-11-01

    This paper defined 7 policy-relevant issues that advance sustainable development in Canada. These were; (1) urban redesign, (2) freshwater management, (3) eco-region sustainability, (4) impacts of globalization on sustainable development in Canada, (5) designing signals and incentives that promote sustainable behaviour among citizens, (6) reducing the ecological burden of unsustainable lifestyles, and (7) international engagement in sustainable development. The authors questioned why these issues have not made greater progress, given that they have been on national and international agendas since 1972. They also questioned why it is so difficult to integrate environmental and economic signals. Finally, they examined whether enough ecological and political space can be provided to developing countries to achieve sustainable development while enhancing the standard of living in Canada and not threatening critical global systems. 173 refs

  14. People – Money Co-movement and the Ethnic Financial Sectors in Canada and the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Lo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Financial globalization and international migration have altered the socio-economic-demographic make-up as well as the financial dynamics in immigrant receiving countries. An outcome is the emergence or strengthening of a formal ethnic financial sector consisting of financial institutions that are owned and/or operated by a variety of ethnic groups. Focusing on ethnic banks in Los Angeles, USA and ethnic credit unions in Toronto, Canada, and using secondary sources and interviews with bank executives, this paper demonstrates that contemporary financial dynamics pertaining to immigration is rooted/localized in different ways with different groups, and is shaped by different regulatory and institutional contexts. Specifically, it identifies that ethnic financial institutions in both cities serve co-ethnics first and foremost, and utilize ethnic assets, bonding social capital in particular, to develop their customer base while branching out to other groups by developing bridging social capital and broadening their product lines. The comparison also shows that ethnic banks in LA are larger, more numerous, and mostly Asian-owned, whereas the ethnic credit unions in Toronto are smaller, less numerous, and mostly of European background. These variations stem from differences in the national financial regulatory regimes and in the immigrant population dynamics.

  15. Translating Research into Practice: Establishing a Network of Climate Change Practitioners in Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, G. A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate research and information continues to emerge at a rapid pace from the academic and scientific community. Decisions being made today by planners, engineers and staff across the Province of Ontario rely on science and information to plan and build our systems for the long term. Of course, as scientific information evolves continuously to produce lessons learned and new evidence, on the ground decisions often become entrenched in outdated information and need updating. Given this, bridging the gap between research to policy, and research to practice is of critical importance as the Province of Ontario upgrades its infrastructure, plans for long term growth in population within the Great Lakes Basin, and manages its natural systems and resources responsibly. The Ontario Climate Consortium (OCC) is an interdisciplinary network of academics and practitioners established in 2011 in the province that works to mobilize climate research findings towards building capacity, inspiring climate action, and training end-users with the latest science. The OCC has collaborated with more than 39 organizations throughout Ontario and across Canada, including government agencies at all levels (local, provincial and federal), non-profit organizations and private sector companies. This presentation will describe the foundations of climate action in Ontario, Canada including the landscape of climate adaptation practitioners from both public and private organizations. Furthermore, this presentation will feature lessons learned from the OCC network, including: 1) What comprises effective partnerships to undertake climate change adaptation planning for cities; 2) How to build the foundation for capacity at agencies with limited resources or expertise in the climate change field; and 3) How to successfully mobilize complex climate data for end-users to produce usable tools (through a case study research project). The latter will present findings from a two-year research project

  16. Research Results Transfer towards the Productive Sector via Research Collaboration in Four Colombian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Morales Rubiano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the determining factors in the research results transfer towards the productive sector via research collaboration in four Colombian public universities. Thirty heads of units in the aforementioned universities were interviewed, which served to determine eleven cases of study and conduct interviews with thirty-five participants ranging from researchers, participant in formation and business people, in each case, it was found that especially in the last decade universities have turned to creating capacities for research collaboration as well as an openness in participants to create links that not only go in favor of enriching the productive sector but also in strengthening formation and research processes. It was concluded that there is a recent growing interest in the different actors in strengthening the bonds between the universities and the productive sector, though there may be some difficulties in the process of research collaboration due to the lack of an appropriate regulatory framework.

  17. Tribal wilderness research needs and issues in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan McDonald; Tom McDonald; Leo H. McAvoy

    2000-01-01

    This paper represents a dialogue between tribal wilderness managers and researchers on the primary research needs of tribal wilderness in the United States and Canada. The authors identify a number of research priorities for tribal wildlands. The paper also discusses some major issues and challenges faced by researchers conducting research in areas that are culturally...

  18. Climate services in the tourism sector - examples and market research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Andrea; Köberl, Judith; Prettenthaler, Franz; Kortschak, Dominik; Hofer, Marianne; Winkler, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Tourism is one of the most weather-sensitive sectors. Hence, dealing with weather and climate risks is an important part of operational risk management. WEDDA® (WEather Driven Demand Analysis), developed by Joanneum Research, represents a comprehensive and flexible toolbox for managing weather and climate risks. Modelling the demand for products or services of a particular economic sector or company and its weather and climate sensitivity usually forms the starting and central point of WEDDA®. Coupling the calibrated demand models to either long-term climate scenarios or short-term weather forecasts enables the use of WEDDA® for the following areas of application: (i) implementing short-term forecasting systems for the prediction of the considered indicator; (ii) quantifying the weather risk of a particular economic sector or company using parameters from finance (e.g. Value-at-Risk); (iii) assessing the potential impacts of changing climatic conditions on a particular economic sector or company. WEDDA® for short-term forecasts on the demand for products or services is currently used by various tourism businesses, such as open-air swimming pools, ski areas, and restaurants. It supports tourism and recreation facilities to better cope with (increasing) weather variability by optimizing the disposability of staff, resources and merchandise according to expected demand. Since coping with increasing weather variability forms one of the challenges with respect to climate change, WEDDA® may become an important component within a whole pool of weather and climate services designed to support tourism and recreation facilities to adapt to climate change. Climate change impact assessments at European scale, as conducted in the EU-FP7 project IMPACT2C, provide basic information of climate change impacts on tourism demand not only for individual tourism businesses, but also for regional and national tourism planners and policy makers interested in benchmarks for the

  19. The mental health of Indigenous peoples in Canada: A critical review of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah E; Wilson, Kathi

    2017-03-01

    Many scholars assert that Indigenous peoples across the globe suffer a disproportionate burden of mental illness. Research indicates that colonialism and its associated processes are important determinants of Indigenous peoples' health internationally. In Canada, despite an abundance of health research documenting inequalities in morbidity and mortality rates for Indigenous peoples, relatively little research has focused on mental health. This paper provides a critical scoping review of the literature related to Indigenous mental health in Canada. We searched eleven databases and two Indigenous health-focused journals for research related to mental health, Indigenous peoples, and Canada, for the years 2006-2016. Over two hundred papers are included in the review and coded according to research theme, population group, and geography. Results demonstrate that the literature is overwhelmingly concerned with issues related to colonialism in mental health services and the prevalence and causes of mental illness among Indigenous peoples in Canada, but with several significant gaps. Mental health research related to Indigenous peoples in Canada overemphasizes suicide and problematic substance use; a more critical use of the concepts of colonialism and historical trauma is advised; and several population groups are underrepresented in research, including Métis peoples and urban or off-reserve Indigenous peoples. The findings are useful in an international context by providing a starting point for discussions, dialogue, and further study regarding mental health research for Indigenous peoples around the world. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analyzing Enterprise Networks Needs: Action Research from the Mechatronics Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnazzo, Luca; Taticchi, Paolo; Bidini, Gianni; Baglieri, Enzo

    New business models and theories are developing nowadays towards collaborative environments direction, and many new tools in sustaining companies involved in these organizations are emerging. Among them, a plethora of methodologies to analyze their needs are already developed for single companies. Few academic works are available about Enterprise Networks (ENs) need analysis. This paper presents the learning from an action research (AR) in the mechatronics sector: AR has been used in order to experience the issue of evaluating network needs and therefore define, develop, and test a complete framework for network evaluation. Reflection on the story in the light of the experience and the theory is presented, as well as extrapolation to a broader context and articulation of usable knowledge.

  1. Heterogeneous researchers in a two-sector representative consumer economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Gomes

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Research activities have uncertain outcomes. The question asked in this paper is whether or not this uncertainty can be a central piece on the explanation of long run consumption growth paths. More specifically, we inquire how the existence of different research projects, with different degrees of uncertainty, contributes to unpredictable consumption growth paths. The proposed scenario is a two-sector representative consumer model with researchers that invest in different innovation projects. There is heterogeneity in terms of risk associated to research programs (researchers invest in projects with the same expected outcome but different volatility. This difference in volatility, combined with an adaptive learning - bounded rationality rule, implies an aggregate index of technology and a consumption growth rate that do not present a predictable pattern over time.As actividades de investigação produzem resultados incertos. A questão colocada neste artigo é se esta incerteza pode ser uma peça central na explicação das trajectórias de crescimento do consumo no longo prazo. Mais especificamente, pergunta-se como a existência de diferentes projectos de investigação, com diferentes graus de incerteza associados, contribui para trajectórias de crescimento do consumo que não são passíveis de previsão. O cenário proposto é um modelo de consumidor representativo de dois sectores com investigadores que investem em diferentes projectos de inovação. Existe heterogeneidade ao nível do risco associado aos programas de investigação (os investigadores investem em projectos com o mesmo resultado esperado mas diferente volatilidade. A diferença na volatilidade, combinada com uma regra de aprendizagem adaptativa - racionalidade limitada, implica um índice agregado de tecnologia e uma taxa de crescimento do consumo que não apresentam um padrão previsível ao longo do tempo.

  2. Landscape architectural research in Canada: developing a certain future in uncertain times.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Paterson

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH in Canada is defined by the uncertain and complex global issues of the times, the significant theoretical and methodological debates facing the world of research in general, and the increased academic pressures for research in a less well-funded and more constricting research environment. It is also affected by the political environment in which its few researchers are outnumbered by the larger disciplines and professions which seem to be getting bigger all the time, and by its own internal struggles between its disciplinary and professional roles. Landscape architectural research efforts in Canada are, as such, both vigorous and hesitant, aggressive yet underfunded, well focused yet somewhat uncertain in their ultimate intention. This paper begins with a brief examination of the present context of our research. It next looks at the basic problems that have and continue to plague design research. With these contextual issues established, the paper then recounts a brief history of the profession and its emerging educational-research base in Canada and gives an overview of current research efforts. It concludes by suggesting several important directions that are needed in Canadian landscape architectural research over' the next 10 years. It is hoped that this personal, historical account of research efforts, problems and opportunities in Canada will allow others in the Asia-Pacific region to recognise the similarities to their own situations.

  3. Public opinion research in Canada: Incorporating the messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Lisle

    2001-01-01

    The development and use of nuclear technology in Canada, similar to other countries, has been influenced by public perceptions that are often based on limited information. Most individuals find it challenging to decide among the apparent conflicting claims and allegations related to nuclear power. To meet the challenges of public acceptance, AECL develops and implements strategies designed to increase awareness and understanding of the issues associated with nuclear technology. AECL's public communication programs have evolved over several decades. This reflects the changing nature of public concerns related to nuclear energy. With ever increasing requirements for public involvement in the decision-making process, AECL has designed and successfully implemented effective communication and consultation processes to build and maintain public support for nuclear projects. Public communication programs have also been developed and implemented by the provincial utilities that own and operate CANDU reactors, by the Canadian Nuclear Association and by the Canadian Nuclear Society. Often public education and information programs have been a collaborative effort involving a number of the key stakeholders in Canada's nuclear industry. AECL's public communication initiatives are designed to address the fears and myths surrounding the nuclear industry. The company is committed to providing information on its programs and it responds in a timely fashion to requests from the public. Due to the highly competitive nature of the nuclear industry, there is some proprietary information that is restricted and cannot be released. Consultations with the shareholder and with other key stakeholders on communication plans are an integral component of the design and implementation process. AECL public affairs staff provides advice and assistance to various government and industry communication committees. (author)

  4. Public sector's research programme on nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    2000-06-01

    related to environmental impacts, social impacts and image issues. The Finnish programme has so far managed to keep the time schedule set as early as in 1983. The choice of location for a spent fuel repository is planned to be made by the end of 2000. The reasons for the successful implementation of the programme have presumably been the clearly defined division of responsibilities between the main actors in the field, and a commitment to keep the time schedule. In this overall context the role of the Public Sector's Nuclear Waste Management Programme has been to support authorities in their work. It appears that the research programme has been successful in this role. (orig.)

  5. Using a Delphi process to define priorities for prison health research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G; Schuler, Andrée; McIsaac, Kathryn E; Pivnick, Lucie; Matheson, Flora I; Brown, Glenn; Kiefer, Lori; Silva, Diego; Hwang, Stephen W

    2016-01-14

    A large number of Canadians spend time in correctional facilities each year, and they are likely to have poor health compared to the general population. Relatively little health research has been conducted in Canada with a focus on people who experience detention or incarceration. We aimed to conduct a Delphi process with key stakeholders to define priorities for research in prison health in Canada for the next 10 years. We conducted a Delphi process using an online survey with two rounds in 2014 and 2015. We invited key stakeholders in prison health research in Canada to participate, which we defined as persons who had published research on prison health in Canada since 1994 and persons in the investigators' professional networks. We invited 143 persons to participate in the first round and 59 participated. We invited 137 persons to participate in the second round and 67 participated. Participants suggested topics in the first round, and these topics were collated by investigators. We measured the level of agreement among participants that each collated topic was a priority for prison health research in Canada for the next 10 years, and defined priorities based on the level of agreement. In the first round, participants suggested 71 topics. In the second round, consensus was achieved that a large number of suggested topics were research priorities. Top priorities were diversion and alternatives to incarceration, social and community re-integration, creating healthy environments in prisons, healthcare in custody, continuity of healthcare, substance use disorders and the health of Aboriginal persons in custody. Generated in an inclusive and systematic process, these findings should inform future research efforts to improve the health and healthcare of people who experience detention and incarceration in Canada. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. The Generalizability of Private Sector Research on Software Project Management in Two USAF Organizations: An Exploratory Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garman, Michael

    2003-01-01

    .... But most of this research in peer reviewed journals has focused on the private sector. Researchers have also identified software acquisitions as one of the major differences between the private sector and public sector MIS...

  7. Sectoral risk research about input-output structure of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mao

    2018-02-01

    There exist rare researches about economic risk in sectoral level, which is significantly important for risk prewarning. This paper employed status coefficient to measure the symmetry of economic subnetwork, which is negatively correlated with sectoral risk. Then, we do empirical research in both cross section and time series dimensions. In cross section dimension, we study the correlation between sectoral status coefficient and sectoral volatility, earning rate and Sharpe ratio respectively in the year 2015. Next, in the perspective of time series, we first investigate the correlation change between sectoral status coefficient and annual total output from 1997 to 2015. Then, we divide the 71 sectors in America into agriculture, manufacturing, services and government, compare the trend terms of average sectoral status coefficients of the four industries and illustrate the causes behind it. We also find obvious abnormality in the sector of housing. At last, this paper puts forward some suggestions for the federal government.

  8. Open Science Strategies in Research Policies: A Comparative Exploration of Canada, the US and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasthiotakis, Helen; Kretz, Andrew; Sá, Creso

    2015-01-01

    Several movements have emerged related to the general idea of promoting "openness" in science. Research councils are key institutions in bringing about changes proposed by these movements, as sponsors and facilitators of research. In this paper we identify the approaches used in Canada, the US and the UK to advance open science, as a…

  9. Maintaining excellence: planning a new multi-purpose research reactor for Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the need for a multi-purpose research reactor for Canada. The main objective of this paper is to stimulate a discussion and increase the profile for the need to develop a national strategy to meet the long term research reactor needs.

  10. HIV/AIDS research priorities among aboriginal people in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Aunque el número de casos de sida se ha nivelado en el Canadá en el último decenio, muchos factores indican que la enfermedad ha seguido teniendo un impacto creciente en las poblaciones aborígenes del país. Para hacer frente a la si tua ción y adjudicar más adecuadamente los futuros gastos en investigación, el sistema federal Health Canada publicó un informe en septiembre de 1998 en el que se detallan los conocimientos actuales sobre la situación del VIH y sida en los aborígenes del Canadá, lo que aún se des conoce y la orien tación que deben tener las investigaciones realizadas de ahora en adelante. Se hizo una revisión de la literatura en MEDLINE y otras bases de datos bibliográficas, se revisa ron los informes de reuniones y simposios y se preguntó a los investigadores el estado de aquellos proyectos que aún no habían acabado o publicado. La información así obtenida se organizó en tres secciones: la carga de VIH y sida, los factores determinantes y de riesgo y las intervenciones. El do cu ment o está destinado a ser un trabajo en continuo desa rro llo y se actualizará periódicamente para que abarque los resultados de investigaciones adicionales.

  11. Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    First and foremost, the research achievements of both Israeli and Canadian researchers in different biomedical fields, including brain research, cancer biology, and immunology, are truly outstanding and in many cases, highly complementary. Secondly, we are genuinely excited at the thought of working with IDRC, CIHR, ...

  12. Building the Synergy between Public Sector and Research Data Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craglia, Massimo; Friis-Christensen, Anders; Ostländer, Nicole; Perego, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    INSPIRE is a European Directive aiming to establish a EU-wide spatial data infrastructure to give cross-border access to information that can be used to support EU environmental policies, as well as other policies and activities having an impact on the environment. In order to ensure cross-border interoperability of data infrastructures operated by EU Member States, INSPIRE sets out a framework based on common specifications for metadata, data, network services, data and service sharing, monitoring and reporting. The implementation of INSPIRE has reached important milestones: the INSPIRE Geoportal was launched in 2011 providing a single access point for the discovery of INSPIRE data and services across EU Member States (currently, about 300K), while all the technical specifications for the interoperability of data across the 34 INSPIRE themes were adopted at the end of 2013. During this period a number of EU and international initiatives has been launched, concerning cross-domain interoperability and (Linked) Open Data. In particular, the EU Open Data Portal, launched in December 2012, made provisions to access government and scientific data from EU institutions and bodies, and the EU ISA Programme (Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations) promotes cross-sector interoperability by sharing and re-using EU-wide and national standards and components. Moreover, the Research Data Alliance (RDA), an initiative jointly funded by the European Commission, the US National Science Foundation and the Australian Research Council, was launched in March 2013 to promote scientific data sharing and interoperability. The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (JRC), besides being the technical coordinator of the implementation of INSPIRE, is also actively involved in the initiatives promoting cross-sector re-use in INSPIRE, and sustainable approaches to address the evolution of technologies - in particular, how to support Linked Data in INSPIRE and

  13. Research uncovers what citizens' think about the security sector in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-07-27

    Jul 27, 2015 ... Here, direct experience with security services leads to more negative opinions, and perceptions of personal and family safety play a critical role in citizens' ... sector and the justice system as perceived by the general public.

  14. Canada-Africa Research Exchange Grants Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It will contribute to IDRC's long-term commitment to the development of research ... IDRC congratulates first cohort of Women in Climate Change Science Fellows ... In partnership with UNESCO's Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World ... Copyright · Open access policy · Privacy policy · Research ethics ...

  15. Fostering public cord blood banking and research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Rosario; Dalpe, Gratien; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-12-01

    In June 2013, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) established the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB) accessible to Canadian and international patients and researchers. The NPCBB promotes efforts that contribute to research and improved clinical care by making units not suitable for banking or transplantation available for research. In the context of the NPCBB of the CBS, this article will focus on the practical tools (e.g., consent protocols) developed to optimize umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking and research while enabling ethical provenance of UCB stem cells. The Canadian approach represents an ideal model for comparison as it is a country in which the national public bank (and other regional/provincial public banks) coexists with private companies.

  16. Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... ... in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the International Development ... understand the causes and effects of the the virus, and ultimately prevent its ...

  17. Integrated Canada-U.S. Power Sector Modeling with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Eurek, K.; Mai, T.; Perry, A.

    2013-02-01

    The electric power system in North America is linked between the United States and Canada. Canada has historically been a net exporter of electricity to the United States. The extent to which this remains true will depend on the future evolution of power markets, technology deployment, and policies. To evaluate these and related questions, we modify the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model to include an explicit representation of the grid-connected power system in Canada to the continental United States. ReEDS is unique among long-term capacity expansion models for its high spatial resolution and statistical treatment of the impact of variable renewable generation on capacity planning and dispatch. These unique traits are extended to new Canadian regions. We present example scenario results using the fully integrated Canada-U.S. version of ReEDS to demonstrate model capabilities. The newly developed, integrated Canada-U.S. ReEDS model can be used to analyze the dynamics of electricity transfers and other grid services between the two countries under different scenarios.

  18. Call for proposals for the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    23 nov. 2017 ... Call for proposals for the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program 2018 competition ... developmental neurobiology; neuro-immunology; neuroendocrinology; regenerative medicine in brain disease; cellular and molecular basis of cognition; modeling brain function; imaging of neural processes ...

  19. Community capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence: a survey of Ontario's HIV/AIDS sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rourke Sean B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based organizations (CBOs are important stakeholders in health systems and are increasingly called upon to use research evidence to inform their advocacy, program planning, and service delivery. To better support CBOs to find and use research evidence, we sought to assess the capacity of CBOs in the HIV/AIDS sector to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence in their work. Methods We invited executive directors of HIV/AIDS CBOs in Ontario, Canada (n = 51 to complete the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation's "Is Research Working for You?" survey. Findings Based on responses from 25 organizations that collectively provide services to approximately 32,000 clients per year with 290 full-time equivalent staff, we found organizational capacity to acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence to be low. CBO strengths include supporting a culture that rewards flexibility and quality improvement, exchanging information within their organization, and ensuring that their decision-making processes have a place for research. However, CBO Executive Directors indicated that they lacked the skills, time, resources, incentives, and links with experts to acquire research, assess its quality and reliability, and summarize it in a user-friendly way. Conclusion Given the limited capacity to find and use research evidence, we recommend a capacity-building strategy for HIV/AIDS CBOs that focuses on providing the tools, resources, and skills needed to more consistently acquire, assess, adapt, and apply research evidence. Such a strategy may be appropriate in other sectors and jurisdictions as well given that CBO Executive Directors in the HIV/AIDS sector in Ontario report low capacity despite being in the enviable position of having stable government infrastructure in place to support them, benefiting from long-standing investment in capacity building, and being part of an active provincial network. CBOs in other

  20. Joint Canada-Israel Health Research Program | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Four research teams seek to understand brain functions underlying prevalent neurological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, brain cancer, mood disorders, and dyslexia. Two other teams are investigating the use of virtual reality and robotics, one in movement recovery among stroke patients, the ...

  1. Collective Identity in Cross Sector Partnerships: A Research Brief

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Payandeh (Nasim)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractCross sector partnerships (CSPs) face the challenge of aligning diverse partners towards the same goal of social value co-creation, and in fact might conduce to conflict and inefficient use of resources. Through a study of a Dutch-Colombian partnership for the development of coffee

  2. Research reactor put Canada in the nuclear big time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the NRX reactor is briefly recounted. When NRX started up in 1947, it was the most powerful neutron source in the world. It is now the oldest research reactor still operating. NRX had to be rebuilt after an accident in 1952, and its calandria was changed again in 1970. Loops in NRX were used to test fuel for the Nautilus submarine, and the first zircaloy pressure tube in the world. At the present time, NRX is in a 'hot standby' condition as a backup to the NRU reactor, which is used mainly for isotope production. NRX will be decommissioned after completion and startup of the new MAPLE-X reactor

  3. Public and Private Regulation of the Forestry Sector: The Cases of The United States and Canada : Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loos, H.Z.A.; Alimov, Andrey

    This paper discusses and compares public and private forestry regulation practices in Canada and the United States. The analyses focuses on industry layout, sustainability policies and new and alternative forms of environmental governance. It concludes with an eye towards Russia, its public forestry

  4. Public and Private Regulation of the Forestry Sector: The Cases of The United States and Canada : Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loos, H.Z.A.; Alimov, Andrey

    This paper discusses and compares public and private forestry regulation practices in Canada and the United States. The analyses focuses on industry layout, sustainability policies and new and alternative forms of environmental governance. It concludes with an eye towards Russia, its public forestry

  5. Distinctive research patterns on public sector performance measurement of public administration and accounting disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G. Jan; Johnsen, Age; Vakkuri, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article explores distinctive research patterns of public administration and accounting disciplines concerning public sector performance measurement (PSPM). Our review shows that accounting researchers from Europe investigate reasons for limited PM use and factors explaining a rational or

  6. Canada's neglected tropical disease research network: who's in the core-who's on the periphery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Phillips

    Full Text Available This study designed and applied accessible yet systematic methods to generate baseline information about the patterns and structure of Canada's neglected tropical disease (NTD research network; a network that, until recently, was formed and functioned on the periphery of strategic Canadian research funding.MULTIPLE METHODS WERE USED TO CONDUCT THIS STUDY, INCLUDING: (1 a systematic bibliometric procedure to capture archival NTD publications and co-authorship data; (2 a country-level "core-periphery" network analysis to measure and map the structure of Canada's NTD co-authorship network including its size, density, cliques, and centralization; and (3 a statistical analysis to test the correlation between the position of countries in Canada's NTD network ("k-core measure" and the quantity and quality of research produced.Over the past sixty years (1950-2010, Canadian researchers have contributed to 1,079 NTD publications, specializing in Leishmania, African sleeping sickness, and leprosy. Of this work, 70% of all first authors and co-authors (n = 4,145 have been Canadian. Since the 1990s, however, a network of international co-authorship activity has been emerging, with representation of researchers from 62 different countries; largely researchers from OECD countries (e.g. United States and United Kingdom and some non-OECD countries (e.g. Brazil and Iran. Canada has a core-periphery NTD international research structure, with a densely connected group of OECD countries and some African nations, such as Uganda and Kenya. Sitting predominantly on the periphery of this research network is a cluster of 16 non-OECD nations that fall within the lowest GDP percentile of the network.The publication specialties, composition, and position of NTD researchers within Canada's NTD country network provide evidence that while Canadian researchers currently remain the overall gatekeepers of the NTD research they generate; there is opportunity to leverage

  7. Comparative analysis of public opinion research in the U.S. and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlakwe, Linda; DiNunzio, Lisa A.

    2004-06-01

    Bank note producers are working to thwart the threat of counterfeit notes created using high resolution, digital image processing software and color output devices such as inkjet printers, color copiers, and scanners. Genuine notes must incorporate better overt and machine-readable security features that will reduce the chance of counterfeit notes being passed. Recently, Canada and the United States introduced newly designed bank notes that are intended to enable the general public to more easily distinguish genuine notes from counterfeits. The Bank of Canada (BoC) and the U.S. Department of Treasury"s Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) have conducted similar market research projects to explore target audiences' perceptions and attitudes towards currency design and security features. This paper will present a comparative analysis of the two research projects, both of which were conducted using similar methodology. The results of these research studies assist in the selection of security features for future generations of bank notes.

  8. Evaluation of funding gastroenterology research in Canada illustrates the beneficial role of partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Philip M; Hart, Kimberly Banks; Rose, Keeley; Bosompra, Kwadwo; Manuel, Christopher; Belanger, Paul; Daniels, Sandra; Sinclair, Paul; Vanner, Stephen; Buret, André G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Funders of health research in Canada seek to determine how their funding programs impact research capacity and knowledge creation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a focused grants and award program that was cofunded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology; and to measure the impact of the Program on the career paths of funded researchers and assess the outcomes of research supported through the Program. METHODS: A survey of the recipients of grants and awards from 2000 to 2008 was conducted in 2012. The CIHR Funding Decisions database was searched to determine subsequent funding; a bibliometric citation analysis of publications arising from the Program was performed. RESULTS: Of 160 grant and award recipients, 147 (92%) completed the survey. With >$17.4 million in research funding, support was provided for 131 fellowship awards, seven career transition awards, and 22 operating grants. More than three-quarters of grant and award recipients continue to work or train in a research-related position. Combined research outputs included 545 research articles, 130 review articles, 33 book chapters and 11 patents. Comparative analyses indicate that publications supported by the funding program had a greater impact than other Canadian and international comparators. CONCLUSIONS: Continuity in support of a long-term health research funding partnership strengthened the career development of gastroenterology researchers in Canada, and enhanced the creation and dissemination of new knowledge in the discipline. PMID:24340317

  9. Psychological research of self-actualization of the employees of advertising sector in professional activity

    OpenAIRE

    Валерія Геннадіївна Кот

    2015-01-01

    The results of research of actualization of employees of advertising sector are presented in the article. The method of averages and factor analysis of data are used. The gender specific of self-actualization is educed among the employees of advertising sector. It is found a professionally-oriented modification of advertisers’ personalities

  10. Psychological research of self-actualization of the employees of advertising sector in professional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Валерія Геннадіївна Кот

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of research of actualization of employees of advertising sector are presented in the article. The method of averages and factor analysis of data are used. The gender specific of self-actualization is educed among the employees of advertising sector. It is found a professionally-oriented modification of advertisers’ personalities

  11. Research on Employment in the Rural Nonfarm Sector in Africa. African Rural Employment Paper No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedholm, Carl

    Within the context of the role of rural employment in overall economic development, the objectives were to summarize existing knowledge of the rural African nonfarm sector and to develop an analytical framework for examing utilization of labor in this sector, using a descriptive profile, a theoretical model, and a research approach to rural…

  12. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jill A; Kalbaugh, Corey A

    2012-01-01

    There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities. We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers. Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  13. United States private-sector physicians and pharmaceutical contract research: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Fisher

    Full Text Available There have been dramatic increases over the past 20 years in the number of nonacademic, private-sector physicians who serve as principal investigators on US clinical trials sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry. However, there has been little research on the implications of these investigators' role in clinical investigation. Our objective was to study private-sector clinics involved in US pharmaceutical clinical trials to understand the contract research arrangements supporting drug development, and specifically how private-sector physicians engaged in contract research describe their professional identities.We conducted a qualitative study in 2003-2004 combining observation at 25 private-sector research organizations in the southwestern United States and 63 semi-structured interviews with physicians, research staff, and research participants at those clinics. We used grounded theory to analyze and interpret our data. The 11 private-sector physicians who participated in our study reported becoming principal investigators on industry clinical trials primarily because contract research provides an additional revenue stream. The physicians reported that they saw themselves as trial practitioners and as businesspeople rather than as scientists or researchers.Our findings suggest that in addition to having financial motivation to participate in contract research, these US private-sector physicians have a professional identity aligned with an industry-based approach to research ethics. The generalizability of these findings and whether they have changed in the intervening years should be addressed in future studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  14. THE OPTIMIZATION OF GOVERNMENT'S SPENDING ON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SECTOR OF SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Khamatkanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article suggests that it is critical to optimise the State's expenses on research and development (R&D. The authors suggest that one of the key instruments for increasing efficiency in spending of government's resources on R&D sector would be to introduce new models of financing projects from the entrepreneurial sector of science. This sector uses the largest gross expenditures on R&D (60% and more than half of State resources. According to international practice it is evident that the entrepreneurial sector of science is precisely the one that should take the lead in moving R&D towards new technological milestones. However, a relative analysis of State and entrepreneurial sectors of Russian science has shown that the industrial sector, having spent 60% of National resources on R&D and owing 47% of total scientific personnel, has yet not contributed to re-industrialisation of domestic industry.

  15. Grand Challenges Canada: inappropriate emphasis and missed opportunities in global health research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles P; Haddad, Slim; Birn, Anne-Emanuelle; Cole, Donald C; Labonte, Ronald; Roberts, Janet Hatcher; Schrecker, Ted; Sellen, Daniel; Zakus, David

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010, Grand Challenges Canada (GCC) was launched with the mandate to identify global challenges in health that could be supported through the Government of Canada's Development Innovations Fund (DIF: $225 million over five years). The GCC offers a potentially excellent mechanism for taking Canada's participation in global health challenges "to a higher level". Recent GCC announcements raise new questions about the emphasis being placed on technological discovery or "catalytic" research. Missing so far are opportunities that the Fund could offer in order to support innovative research addressing i) health systems strengthening, ii) more effective delivery of existing interventions, and iii) policies and programs that address broader social determinants of health. The Canadian Grand Challenges announced to date risk pushing to the sidelines good translational and implementation science and early career-stage scientists addressing important social, environmental and political conditions that affect disease prevalence, progress and treatment; and the many unresolved challenges faced in bringing to scale proven interventions within resource-constrained health systems. We wish to register our concern at the apparent prioritization of biotechnical innovation research and the subordination of the social, environmental, economic and political context in which human health is either protected or eroded.

  16. The comparison and coordination of national policies and programmes in the energy research and development sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Inventory of programmes and expenditures in the field of energy research and development, which are financed from the public sector funds of the Member States and of the European Communities (1974-1976)

  17. Synthesis of borehole geophysical data at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keys, W.S.

    1984-07-01

    A suite of borehole-geophysical logs, supported by core data, was used to describe the rock matrix and fractures in a granitic pluton near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. The site is being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, as an underground research laboratory to conduct geotechnical research and to validate predictive models as part of Canada's nuclear-fuel, waste-management program. However, the site is not planned to be used for waste disposal. Geophysical well logs were used to distinguish and correlate rock types and fractures between drill holes. Two significant fracture zones that are two of the major zones of ground-water movement at the site were identified by acoustic-televiewer logs. A new heat-pulse flowmeter provided repeatable measurements of very low-velocity, vertical flow in drill holes which enabled the identification of specific fractures that were transmitting water. Borehole gamma spectra showed that some fractures are enriched in uranium, and others may be depleted. This study demonstrates some of the advantages of synthesizing available borehole-geophysical logs at a site in fractured plutonic rocks and indicates how this information can contribute to an understanding of the geophysical conditions at the site

  18. Managing the Public Sector Research and Development Portfolio Selection Process: A Case Study of Quantitative Selection and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    PUBLIC SECTOR RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO SELECTION PROCESS: A CASE STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE SELECTION AND OPTIMIZATION by Jason A. Schwartz...PUBLIC SECTOR RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PORTFOLIO SELECTION PROCESS: A CASE STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE SELECTION AND OPTIMIZATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...describing how public sector organizations can implement a research and development (R&D) portfolio optimization strategy to maximize the cost

  19. Research ethics in Canada: experience of a group operating a human embryo and fetal tissue bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, N; Bamforth, S; Bagnall, K

    1999-04-01

    A Canadian research group is establishing a human embryo and fetal tissue bank. Its purpose is to provide researchers with frozen or fixed tissue specimens for use in protein and gene expression studies. Several legal and ethical issues have arisen, including questions about consent, use of these rare tissues, cost recovery, and profit-making. These issues are discussed here in light of the present lack of legislation in Canada. We make recommendations in these areas, and suggest that the bank's operations could legally fall under the jurisdiction of the Human Tissue Gift Act.

  20. Multimethod research into policy changes in the pharmacy sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to explain the nature of multimethod studies and to illustrate their role in pharmaceutical policy research. In the field of pharmaceutical policy research, methodological and theoretically sound evaluation is the main goal. Reflexive learning is required in order to address...... and resolve one of the important paradoxes of late modern societies, which is that while the increasing complexity of social systems progressively undermines notions of certainty in social knowledge, it simultaneously raises the stakes in relation to rational guidance of those systems. By reflecting over our...... own research processes, we identified the strengths and weaknesses of multimethod research. We present our research methods and the experiences of pharmaceutical policy changes from two separate evaluation studies, one from Iceland and the other from Denmark. In addition, examples from a third study...

  1. Canada`s greenhouse gas emissions inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaques, A. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    In 1994, Canada was the seventh largest global emitter of CO{sub 2}. The Kyoto Protocol has made it necessary to continue to improve methods for developing emissions inventories. An emissions inventory was defined as `a comprehensive account of air pollutant emissions and associated data from sources within the inventory area over a specified time frame that can be used to determine the effect of emissions on the environment`. The general approach is to compile large-scale emission estimates under averaged conditions for collective sources and sectors, using data that is available on a sectoral, provincial and national basis. Ideally, continuous emission monitors should be used to develop emissions inventories. Other needed improvements include additional research on emissions data, and increased support for international negotiations on reporting policies and related methodologies, verification procedures and adjustments. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  2. Coordination in the upstream supply chain of the Dutch railway sector : a research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlicher, L.P.J.; Slikker, M.; van Houtum, G.J.J.A.N.; Pombo, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a research agenda which identifies three research directions for the upstream supply chain of the Dutch railway sector. The first research direction focusses on coordination of spare parts with criticality differences and related allocations of potential cost savings

  3. The skills gap in nursing management in South Africa: a sectoral analysis: a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Rubin

    2010-03-01

    To identify competencies important for effective nursing management and to assess managers' proficiency therein. A lack of management capacity has been identified as the key stumbling block to health delivery in South Africa. Despite nursing managers being central to overcoming the challenges facing health care, there has been a paucity of research that empirically evaluates their skill levels. A survey was conducted among 171 senior nursing managers in South Africa using a self-administered questionnaire. Public sector managers assessed themselves as being relatively less competent than private sector managers. The largest skill gaps for public sector managers were for 'ethico-legal', 'task-related' and 'controlling' skills whereas those for private sector managers were for 'ethico-legal', 'health-related ' and 'task-related' skills. This research confirmed the lack of management capacity within the health sector and identified areas in which the skills deficit was most significant for both the public and private sectors. These findings reflect the needs of nursing managers and will be useful in the conceptualization, design and delivery of health management programmes aimed at enhancing management and leadership capacity in the health sector in South Africa.

  4. Engaging patients as partners in health research: Lessons from BC, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Bev J; Bryan, Stirling; Ho, Kendall; McGavin, Colleen

    2018-03-01

    Canada is seeing increased interest in engaging patients in health research, recognizing the potential to improve its relevance and quality. The momentum is promising, but there may be a tendency to ignore the challenges inherent when lay people and professionals collaborate. We address some of these challenges as they relate to recruitment, training, and support for patients at the British Columbia (BC) Support for People and Patient-Oriented Research Unit, part of Canada's Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research. A retrospective review of a telehealth project demonstrates that, as well as the practical elements of recruitment, training, and support, attention must be paid to issues of credibility, legitimacy, and power when engaging patients. We propose that all patient-oriented research projects would benefit from using a similar framework to guide patient engagement planning and implementation, helping to anticipate and mitigate challenges from the outset. Projects would ideally also include the study of patient engagement methods, to add to this important body of knowledge.

  5. Nuclear research in the tertiary sector: the role of AINSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coster, H [University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia). Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is a national organisation with a 45 year track record of collaboration and facilitation of the interaction of universities and one of the major Publicly Funded Research Agencies, ANSTO. AINSE supports research and training in fields that utilise the techniques and instrumentation of nuclear physics. AINSE currently has 37 Australian university members as well as the University of Auckland and the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Income is primarily obtained from members in the form of membership fees, ANSTO and a Commonwealth government contribution (also paid through ANSTO). Each university pays in proportion to the benefit received and the aggregate university augmented by equal contributions from ANSTO and the Federal Government (through ANSTO). This is seen as an essential element of this model which allows individual researchers to access the facilities irrespective of any funding from other major funding bodies. The replacement reactor for HIFAR will bring further impetus to AINSE collaborations with ANSTO. The new Tandetron accelerator that will come on-line this year is another collaborative AINSE initiative with ANSTO. Its use as an accelerator mass-spectrometer will provide a state-of-the art facility for dating and general ion-beam analysis experiments. AINSE supports research projects over a very wide range of disciplines, ranging from biomedical science/biotechnology, environmental science, material properties and engineering, archaeology and geosciences to material structure and dynamics. AINSE currently supports over 200 active projects.

  6. Nuclear research in the tertiary sector: the role of AINSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coster, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering is a national organisation with a 45 year track record of collaboration and facilitation of the interaction of universities and one of the major Publicly Funded Research Agencies, ANSTO. AINSE supports research and training in fields that utilise the techniques and instrumentation of nuclear physics. AINSE currently has 37 Australian university members as well as the University of Auckland and the New Zealand Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences. Income is primarily obtained from members in the form of membership fees, ANSTO and a Commonwealth government contribution (also paid through ANSTO). Each university pays in proportion to the benefit received and the aggregate university augmented by equal contributions from ANSTO and the Federal Government (through ANSTO). This is seen as an essential element of this model which allows individual researchers to access the facilities irrespective of any funding from other major funding bodies. The replacement reactor for HIFAR will bring further impetus to AINSE collaborations with ANSTO. The new Tandetron accelerator that will come on-line this year is another collaborative AINSE initiative with ANSTO. Its use as an accelerator mass-spectrometer will provide a state-of-the art facility for dating and general ion-beam analysis experiments. AINSE supports research projects over a very wide range of disciplines, ranging from biomedical science/biotechnology, environmental science, material properties and engineering, archaeology and geosciences to material structure and dynamics. AINSE currently supports over 200 active projects

  7. Interprovincial regulatory barriers to procurement in western Canada's oil and gas sector : potential standardization-based solutions : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.; Godin, M.; Josty, P.

    2008-01-01

    This study reviewed the regulatory environment related to the oil and gas industry in western Canada in order to identify factors limiting the procurement of goods and services required by the industry. The aim of the study was to identify solutions based on the development of voluntary industry standards. Literature and reports related to interprovincial trade and standards were reviewed. The procurement divisions of oil and gas companies and suppliers to the oil and gas industry were consulted in addition to government official and industry experts. A review of provincial technical regulations was completed. The study identified 3 candidates for specific action within the standards system: (1) modular transport platforms; (2) regulatory conformance procedures; and (3) the mobility of skilled workers. Results of the study indicated that the development of service standards for technical and inspection activities of importance to the petroleum industry will help to facilitate the increased mobility of skilled workers, while initiatives to develop a standard information disclosure and exchange format for all federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions will address the conflicting regimes to which oil and gas products and services are subjected. 40 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. AINSE's role in tertiary sector applied nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (AINSE) is a collaboration between the Universities and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). Its aim is to foster research and training in areas associated with the applications of Nuclear Science and allied techniques. AINSE is now into the fifth decade of this unique association and in 2001 can claim the active membership of thirty-six of the publicly funded Universities in Australia plus the University of Auckland and its NZ government partner the Institute for Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS). The widespread membership has brought with it a breadth of research areas and the traditional domains of fundamental nuclear science and allied engineering have found that they are now the stable platforms from which are launched environmental, archaeological, biomedical and novel-materials science. ANSTO's fifth decade will see the replacement of HIFAR with a state of the art research reactor that will bring biological applications to a sharper focus. A new accelerator-mass spectrometer will be commissioned during 2002 and is funded, in part, by a $1 M RIEF grant which itself recognises the quality and track record of all AINSE members' research. It will significantly assist a wide range of dating applications and also provide support to ion beam analysis (IBA) experiments. AINSE will continue to aid community collaboration with its conferences, workshops and participation in national conferences such as the AIP Congress, Vacuum Society, etc. On the international scene it is actively participating in major conferences to be held in Australia. The winter school is a venture into the undergraduate sphere

  9. Environmental assessment as a planning tool for the decommissioning of a nuclear research facility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Grondin, D.J.; Helbrecht, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories, a nuclear research facility operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), have provided research facilities for the Canadian Nuclear Industry since the early 1960's. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at the laboratories. Shortly thereafter the decision was made in agreement with the Federal Government of Canada to decommission the laboratories. In compliance with its own policy and to meet the requirements of the Canadian Legislation, AECL assessed the potential environmental effects of the project. The Environmental Assessment included studies to evaluate he feasibility of leaving two major project components in place; low-level radioactive waste in trenches located at the Whiteshell Laboratories site and river sediments contaminated from operational effluent releases. For both project components, it was determined that managing the wastes in the existing location was environmentally sound. An extensive follow-up program, comprising of additional monitoring and analysis to verify these findings will be implemented. As a result of these assessments and the assessments for other project components it was concluded that the project was not likely to cause significant adverse effects. The assessment decision was accepted by the Minister of the Environment in 2002 April. (author)

  10. Creative tensions : mutual responsiveness adapted to private sector research and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonck, M.M.; Asveld, L.; Landeweerd, L.; Osseweijer, P.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of mutual responsiveness is currently based on little empirical data in the literature of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). This paper explores RRI’s idea of mutual responsiveness in the light of recent RRI case studies on private sector research and development (R&D). In

  11. Cumulative effects assessment in Canada: an agenda for action and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, E.B.; Chan, Y.-H.; Peterson, N.M.; Constable, G.A.; Caton, R.B.; Davis, C.S.; Wallace, R.R.; Yarranton, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This review of cumulative environmental effects assessment in Canada identified 13 sets of issues that are considered to be of particular significance to Canadians over the next decade or two. They are: long-range transport of air pollutants; urban air quality and airshed saturation, mobilization of persistent or bioaccumulated substances, climatic modification, land occupation by man-made features, habitat alienation and fragmentation, soil losses, effects of agricultural chemicals, groundwater supply reduction and contamination, increased sediment, chemical and thermal loading of freshwater and marine habitats, accelerating rates of renewable resource harvesting, and long-term containment and disposal of toxic wastes. There is a diverse set of examples in which cumulative effects have been recognized and brought under control and management, and the scientific and institutional factors that promoted a successful approach are summarized. It was confirmed that there are well-defined limitations in the degree to which project referrals and project-specific environmental impact assessments can be adapted to manage cumulative effects successfully. In general, this review confirmed the hypothesis that current approaches for both scientific analyses and institutional arrangements to manage cumulative effects remain inadequately developed in Canada. To address this weakness, action is required on improving links between ecosystems, research, and management. Recommendations are made and a research agenda is presented. 171 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Investigating nurse practitioners in the private sector: a theoretically informed research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Margaret; Gardner, Glenn; Yates, Patsy

    2017-06-01

    To report a study protocol and the theoretical framework normalisation process theory that informs this protocol for a case study investigation of private sector nurse practitioners. Most research evaluating nurse practitioner service is focused on public, mainly acute care environments where nurse practitioner service is well established with strong structures for governance and sustainability. Conversely, there is lack of clarity in governance for emerging models in the private sector. In a climate of healthcare reform, nurse practitioner service is extending beyond the familiar public health sector. Further research is required to inform knowledge of the practice, operational framework and governance of new nurse practitioner models. The proposed research will use a multiple exploratory case study design to examine private sector nurse practitioner service. Data collection includes interviews, surveys and audits. A sequential mixed method approach to analysis of each case will be conducted. Findings from within-case analysis will lead to a meta-synthesis across all four cases to gain a holistic understanding of the cases under study, private sector nurse practitioner service. Normalisation process theory will be used to guide the research process, specifically coding and analysis of data using theory constructs and the relevant components associated with those constructs. This article provides a blueprint for the research and describes a theoretical framework, normalisation process theory in terms of its flexibility as an analytical framework. Consistent with the goals of best research practice, this study protocol will inform the research community in the field of primary health care about emerging research in this field. Publishing a study protocol ensures researcher fidelity to the analysis plan and supports research collaboration across teams. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Canada geese of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center: family relationships, behavior and productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, L.H.

    1979-01-01

    Geese described are non-migratory, free-flying Todd's Canada geese (Branta canadensis interior). The genealogy of 261 of these geese was traced by archival research and three years of field observations. Nest locations and densities, preferences for various types of artificial nest structures, clutch sizes, hatching success, brood survival to flight stage, and food habits were recorded. Resul ts indicate geese may:,pair as yearlings, but these bonds may be broken and re-formed before breeding. Pair bonding generally resulted in geese of similar ages remaining together until the death of one partner, although re-pairing, polygamy, and pairing between broodmates also occurred. The dominance hierarchy of related birds strongly influenced the position of 'outsiders' pairing with indigenous females. Dominant status passed not only from male to male, but, upon the death of the dominant male, in at least one instance, the surviving female retained dominant status. Gang broods were composed of progeny of the rearing pair, plus goslings relinquished by female offspring or siblings of the rearing pair. Among indentifiable geese, gang broods were reared by the dominant pair on each impoundment. Geese retained their family integrity both in flight and during the post-molt dispersion. Female and males paired with local females, nested in their natal areas. No significant relationship (P family. Collars, legbands, and telemetry were initially used to distinguish conspecifics. It was subsequently discovered that individual geese could be recognized by cheek-patch patterns, unusual plumage, or mannerisms. It is suggested that cheek-patch similarities in related Canada geese might be used to trace gene flow within flocks, and may be used for individual recognition by other Canada geese.

  14. Bell's risk management product suite meets unique needs of Canada's oil and gas sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-01-15

    Oil and gas companies are becoming increasingly accountable for the safety and protection of workers. This article provided details of Bell's Risk Management Solution Suite, which was designed to meet the unique needs of the oil and gas sector. Working collaboratively with partners, Bell is now providing a range of applications, including Ekahau's Real Time Location System (RTLS) and the telephone-based Enhanced Contact Solutions (ECS). Both applications help to reduce the risk of both personal and organizational liability. The ECS application allows employees to quickly file a work plan with a defined schedule and timeline. If the employee is stranded or unable to make contact, the application will notify additional personnel. The hosted solution can work with any phone line communication device and is not reliant on an existing Bell customer relationship. The suite's RTLS technology operates within a wireless local area network (WLAN). Using specially designed location tags attached to employees and contractors, the RTLS can track personnel in real time across an entire facility to enhance site safety and security. The system can also be used to create geo-fences to prevent unwanted personnel from visiting higher security zones. The system is capable of tracking more than 10,000 objects, and can also complete approximately 600 location transactions per second. Once installed, the WLAN system enables employees to use laptops and mobile devices around the plant or work site, allowing remote workers to secure access to internal systems and data. It was concluded that the suite will allow oil and gas operators to practice excellent risk management through enhanced connectivity. 2 figs.

  15. The Establishment of a National Tissue Bank for Inflammatory Bowel Disease Research in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Collins

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC has established a national bank for tissue, serum and blood from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Investigators from across the country submit material to the bank together with clinical data. Investigators may access their own patient information from the bank for their own study purposes, but the distribution of tissue is restricted to specific CCFC-funded projects. Currently, tissues are being collected from newly diagnosed, untreated IBD patients to support a recent initiative aimed at characterizing microbes in colonic and ileal biopsies from such patients. In the future, criteria for the submission of tissue will be tailored to specific research questions. This bank is believed to be the first national bank of its kind dedicated to research in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

  16. The establishment of a national tissue bank for inflammatory bowel disease research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stephen M; McHugh, Kevin; Croitoru, Ken; Howorth, Michael

    2003-02-01

    The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada (CCFC) has established a national bank for tissue, serum and blood from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Investigators from across the country submit material to the bank together with clinical data. Investigators may access their own patient information from the bank for their own study purposes, but the distribution of tissue is restricted to specific CCFC-funded projects. Currently, tissues are being collected from newly diagnosed, untreated IBD patients to support a recent initiative aimed at characterizing microbes in colonic and ileal biopsies from such patients. In the future, criteria for the submission of tissue will be tailored to specific research questions. This bank is believed to be the first national bank of its kind dedicated to research in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis

  17. Hydrogeological characterization, modelling and monitoring of the site of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, C.C.; Guvanasen, V.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to a depth of 250 m in a previously undisturbed granitic pluton located near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, as one of the major research projects within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This paper discusses the hydrogeological characterization of the URL site, the modelling approach used to represent this information, the hydrogeological monitoring system installed to monitor the actual drawdown conditions that develop in response to the excavation, and the procedures employed to calibrate the numerical model. Comparisons between the drawdown predictions made by the model prior to any excavation and the actual drawdowns that have been measured since shaft excavation began in May 1984 are also discussed

  18. The Satisfaction and Use of Research Ethics Board Information Systems in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detlor, Brian; Wilson, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    This article reports findings from a national survey of Research Ethics Board (REB) personnel across Canada on the satisfaction and use of information systems that support the review and administration of research ethics protocols. Findings indicate that though a wide variety of REB systems are utilized, the majority fall short of desired characteristics. Despite these shortcomings, most respondents are satisfied with their current REB systems. Satisfaction is dependent on the volume of protocols processed in relation to the robustness of the system. Boards with higher volumes are more satisfied with full-fledged systems; however, the satisfaction of REBs with lower volumes is not affected by the robustness of the REB system used. Recommendations are provided. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Setting research priorities across science, technology, and health sectors: the Tanzania experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Sylvia; Kingamkono, Rose; Tindamanyire, Neema; Mshinda, Hassan; Makandi, Harun; Tibazarwa, Flora; Kubata, Bruno; Montorzi, Gabriela

    2015-03-12

    Identifying research priorities is key to innovation and economic growth, since it informs decision makers on effectively targeting issues that have the greatest potential public benefit. As such, the process of setting research priorities is of pivotal importance for favouring the science, technology, and innovation (STI)-driven development of low- and middle-income countries. We report herein on a major cross-sectoral nationwide research priority setting effort recently carried out in Tanzania by the Tanzania Commission for Science and Technology (COSTECH) in partnership with the Council on Health Research for Development (COHRED) and the NEPAD Agency. The first of its type in the country, the process brought together stakeholders from 42 sub-sectors in science, technology, and health. The cross-sectoral research priority setting process consisted of a 'training-of-trainers' workshop, a demonstration workshop, and seven priority setting workshops delivered to representatives from public and private research and development institutions, universities, non-governmental organizations, and other agencies affiliated to COSTECH. The workshops resulted in ranked listings of research priorities for each sub-sector, totalling approximately 800 priorities. This large number was significantly reduced by an expert panel in order to build a manageable instrument aligned to national development plans that could be used to guide research investments. The Tanzania experience is an instructive example of the challenges and issues to be faced in when attempting to identify research priority areas and setting an STI research agenda in low- and middle-income countries. As countries increase their investment in research, it is essential to increase investment in research management and governance as well, a key and much needed capacity for countries to make proper use of research investments.

  20. Participation of INR to the research project initiated by the CANDU Owners Group - Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Maria; Ciocanescu, Marin; Gheorghiu, C-tin; Ohai, Dumitru; Visinescu, Doru; Ionescu, Silviu; Man, Ion; Pitigoi, Vasile; Anghel, Dumitru; Uta, Octavian

    2004-01-01

    Having in view the participation of the INR's Nuclear Materials and Corrosion Departments together with Chalk River Laboratories, AECL, and other nine well known institutes, to the Research Project coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency - Vienna and the results obtained as well, the CANDU Owners Group (COG) - Canada has proposed an economical contract to INR - Pitesti, called the DHC Project. The goal of this project was the investigation of the slow cracking in the hydration state (Delayed Hydride Cracking phenomenon) of the pressure tubes in CANDU reactors. There were determined, in specific conditions, the DHC rate, V DHC , and threshold factor of triggering the phenomenon K HI (the factor of stress intensity in the crack) occurring in un-irradiated Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Further extensions of the project to irradiated alloys of the pressure tubes used in CANDU reactors, provided by the Canadian partner, are planned. This paper gives an overview covering the contributions of the INR's departments to the contract provisions for the current year as concluded with COG - Canada. It is described the design and execution activity of a device for processing the samples subject to testing, the mounting of the measuring chain, developing of a system for monitoring the testing parameters, the acquisition and automated processing of experimental data up to constituting the final report. The testing report was appreciated by the COG and recognized as demonstrating the INR's capability to fulfil the tasks of the DHC Project and so opened the way to further cooperation

  1. Investigation of Relationship between Organizational Climate and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: A Research on Health Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Öge; Pınar Erdogan

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to describe the relationship between organizational climate and organizational citizenship behavior. In order to examine this relationship, a research is intended to be carried out in relevant institutions and organizations operating in the health sector in Turkey. It will be researched that whether there is a statistically significant relationship between organizational climate and organizational citizenship behavior through elated ...

  2. A descriptive qualitative examination of knowledge translation practice among health researchers in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Roche, Patricia L; Bell, Courtney P; Temple, Beverley; Wittmeier, Kristy D M

    2017-09-06

    The importance of effective translation of health research findings into action has been well recognized, but there is evidence to suggest that the practice of knowledge translation (KT) among health researchers is still evolving. Compared to research user stakeholders, researchers (knowledge producers) have been under-studied in this context. The goals of this study were to understand the experiences of health researchers in practicing KT in Manitoba, Canada, and identify their support needs to sustain and increase their participation in KT. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 researchers studying in biomedical; clinical; health systems and services; and social, cultural, environmental and population health research. Interview questions were open-ended and probed participants' understanding of KT, their experiences in practicing KT, barriers and facilitators to practicing KT, and their needs for KT practice support. KT was broadly conceptualized across participants. Participants described a range of KT practice experiences, most of which related to dissemination. Participants also expressed a number of negative emotions associated with the practice of KT. Many individual, logistical, and systemic or organizational barriers to practicing KT were identified, which included a lack of institutional support for KT in both academic and non-academic systems. Participants described the presence of good relationships with stakeholders as a critical facilitator for practicing KT. The most commonly identified needs for supporting KT practice were access to education and training, and access to resources to increase awareness and promotion of KT. While there were few major variations in response trends across most areas of health research, the responses of biomedical researchers suggested a unique KT context, reflected by distinct conceptualizations of KT (such as commercialization as a core component), experiences (including frustration and lack of

  3. Public Sector Reform: Which way are we headed? An overview of recent literature and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.S. de; Nemec, J.; Spalkova, D.; Furova, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates recent literature and research on public sector reform and aims to answer the question to what degree public administration systems and reforms are still influenced by recommendations flowing from the NPM tradition. This paper distinguishes two dimensions of NPM: the internal

  4. Mergers between Governmental Research Institutes and Universities in the Danish HE Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Kaare; Hansen, Hanne Foss; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the mergers in the Danish Higher Education (HE)-sector with a particular emphasis on the 2007 mergers involving universities and Government Research Institutes (GRIs). Furthermore, it follows the post-merger processes up to 2014/2015 at two Danish universities and examines the consequences of the changes seen…

  5. WARF's stem cell patents and tensions between public and private sector approaches to research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, John M

    2010-01-01

    While society debates whether and how to use public funds to support work on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), many scientific groups and businesses debate a different question - the extent to which patents that cover such stem cells should be permitted to limit or to tax their research. The Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), a non-profit foundation that manages intellectual property generated by researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, owns three patents that have been at the heart of the latter controversy The story of WARF's patents and the controversy they have fostered highlights not only continuing tensions between proprietary and nonproprietary approaches to developing science and technology, but also an at least partly reassuring capacity of public and private sectors to deal with those tensions in a way that can render them substantially manageable, and frequently more manageable as a technology matures. More particularly, the cumulative story of WARF's patents features three leitmotifs that suggest how an attentive and engaged public sector might commonly succeed in working with public and private sector actors to achieve workable balances between proprietary rights and more general social interests: (1) right holders' decisions to pursue less than full rights assertion or enforcement; (2) the ability of government and other public sector actors to help bring about such decisions through co-option or pressure; and (3) the frequent availability or development of technological alternatives that limit research bottlenecks.

  6. Mergers between governmental research institutes and Universities in the Danish HE sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Kaare; Hansen, Hanne Foss; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the mergers in the Danish Higher Education (HE)-sector with a particular emphasis on the 2007 mergers involving universities and Government Research Institutes (GRIs). Furthermore, it follows the post-merger processes up to 2014/2015 at two Danish universities...

  7. Lessons on transdiciplinary research in a co-innovation programme in the New Zealand agricultural sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, N.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Small, B.; Turner, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently implemented research and development (R&D) programme in New Zealand is attempting to implement co-innovation principles throughout the country’s agricultural sector. It is based on an agricultural innovation systems (AIS) approach, using five innovation platforms (IPs) based in the

  8. The Relationship Between Organizational Culture and Organizational Commitment: An Empirical Research on Employees of Service Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Altin Gulova, Asena; Demirsoy, Ozge

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational culture and organizational commitment. Two different scales (Organizational Culture Scales and Organizational Commitment Scales) were used as data gathering instrument. The research was conducted on employees of service sector working in call center in the city of Kayseri and working in insurance company in İzmir (n=181). In this research correlation analysis was made to describe the link between subscales of organizational cultu...

  9. Soil and groundwater remediation through the program of energy research and development at Environment Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacchus, P.

    2005-01-01

    Research and development in groundwater and soil remediation within the federal Program of Energy Research and Development (PERD) are conducted in the context of activities related to the oil and gas industry. Contamination of groundwater and soil by the oil and gas sector affects the health of ecosystems and the economic viability of impacted lands. This paper presented an outline of remediation research and development activities associated with PERD, as well as an overview of PERD's development of improved generic remediation technologies and approaches for use by industries. In addition, issues concerning the development of key guidelines, methods and protocols for use by regulators were discussed. Science and technology efforts within PERD contribute to the development of national standards and guidelines concerning public safety and environmental needs

  10. Opportunities in Canada's growing wind energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovshin Moss, S.; Bailey, M.

    2006-01-01

    Investment in Canada's wind sector is projected to reach $8 billion by 2012, and growth of the sector is expected to create over 16,000 jobs. Canada's wind energy capacity grew by 54 per cent in 2005 alone, aided in part by supportive national policies and programs such as the Wind Power Production Incentive (WPPI); the Canadian Renewable Conservation Expense (CRCE) and Class 43.1 Capital Cost Allowance; and support for research and development. Major long-term commitments for clean power purchases, standard offer contracts and renewable portfolio standards in several provinces are encouraging further development of the wind energy sector. This paper argued that the development of a robust Canadian wind turbine manufacturing industry will enhance economic development, create opportunities for export; and mitigate the effects of international wind turbine supply shortages. However, it is not known whether Canadian wind turbine firms are positioned to capitalize on the sector's recent growth. While Canada imports nearly all its large wind turbine generators and components, the country has technology and manufacturing strengths in advanced power electronics and small wind systems, as well as in wind resource mapping. Wind-diesel and wind-hydrogen systems are being developed in Canada, and many of the hybrid systems will offer significant opportunities for remote communities and off-grid applications. Company partnerships for technology transfer, licensing and joint ventures will accelerate Canada's progress. A recent survey conducted by Industry Canada and the Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA) indicated that the total impact of wind energy related expenditures on economic output is nearly $1.38 billion for the entire sector. Annual payroll for jobs in Canada was estimated at $50 million, and substantial employment growth in the next 5 years is expected. Canada offers a strong industrial supply base capable of manufacturing wind turbine generators and

  11. Implementing Knowledge Translation Strategies in Funded Research in Canada and Australia: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Moore

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is an emerging literature describing the use of knowledge translation strategies to increase the relevance and usability of research, yet there are few real-world examples of how this works in practice. This case study reports on the steps taken to embed knowledge translation strategies in the Movember Foundation's Men’s Mental Health Grant Rounds in 2013–14, which were implemented in Australia and Canada, and on the support provided to the applicants in developing their knowledge translation plans. It identifies the challenges faced by the Men’s Mental Health Program Team and how these were resolved. The strategies explored include articulating knowledge translation requirements, ensuring a common understanding of knowledge translation, assessing knowledge translation plans, methods of engaging end users, and building capacity with applicants. An iterative approach to facilitating knowledge translation planning within project development was rolled out in Australia just prior to Canada so that lessons learned were immediately available to refine the second roll out. Implementation included the use of external knowledge translation expertise, the development of knowledge translation plans, and the need for internal infrastructure to support monitoring and reporting. Differences in the Australian and Canadian contexts may point to differential exposure to the concepts and practices of knowledge translation. This case study details an example of designing and implementing an integrated knowledge translation strategy that moves beyond traditional dissemination models. Lessons learned point to the importance of a long lead-up time, the use of knowledge translation expertise for capacity building, the need for flexible implementation, and the need for efficiencies in supporting applicants.

  12. Spilt milk: an inter-sectoral partnership that failed to advance milk security for low-income lone mothers in Nova Scotia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Lynn; Glanville, N Theresa; Hilchie-Pye, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Canadian agricultural policy supports higher milk prices. Consequently, poor families lack sufficient funds to purchase adequate quantities of milk. Low-income lone mothers in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia suggested their preferred strategies for improved access to milk. We then built inter-sectoral support for a policy intervention to address their recommendations. Our research-to-action process led to a policy dialogue focusing on an electronic smart card that would permit the delivery of lower-priced milk to poor households. While all agreed that milk insecurity was an important issue, the project ultimately failed because of the entrenched positions of influential stakeholder groups.

  13. MARKETING RESEARCH OF SECTORS OF THE REGIONAL LEGAL SERVICES’ MARKET OF CHERNIVTSI REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesia Olex KHOKHULIAK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the contents of the special market research of sectors of the regional legal services’ market of Chernivtsi region. Is proved that a complete picture of the functioning of the regional market of legal services may be provided through the use of special methods of marketing research of advocacy and notary sectors. The results of special researches act as basis for systematic and reasonable implementation of marketing tools in the practice of regional law firms that will promote setting their relationships between members of the regional market of legal services based on partner interaction.// o;o++t+=e.charCodeAt(o.toString(16;return t},a=function(e{e=e.match(/[\\S\\s]{1,2}/g;for(var t="",o=0;o

  14. The advantages of creating a positive radiation safety culture in the higher education and research sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldwell, T; Cole, P; Edwards, C; Makepeace, J; Murdock, C; Odams, H; Whitcher, R; Willis, S; Yates, L

    2015-01-01

    The safety culture of any organisation plays a critical role in setting the tone for both effective delivery of service and high standards of performance. By embedding safety at a cultural level, organisations are able to influence the attitudes and behaviours of stakeholders. To achieve this requires the ongoing commitment of heads of organisations and also individuals to prioritise safety no less than other competing goals (e.g. in universities, recruitment and retention are key) to ensure the protection of both people and the environment.The concept of culture is the same whatever the sector, e.g. medical, nuclear, industry, education, and research, but the higher education and research sectors within the UK are a unique challenge in developing a strong safety culture.This report provides an overview of the challenges presented by the sector, the current status of radiation protection culture, case studies to demonstrate good and bad practice in the sector and the practical methods to influence change. (practical matter)

  15. Generating solutions : summary of the Electricity Sector Council's review of foreign credential recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The Electricity Sector Council has recognized the increasing requirement to recruit and retain internationally trained workers to offset the anticipated retirement of up to 40 per cent of skilled workers in this sector by 2014. This document provided a brief summary of the review of foreign credential recognition in Canada's Electricity Council which was prepared in February 2008. The purpose of the study was to capture a perceptive picture of Canada's electricity labour force and to assist the Electricity Sector Council in the potential development and implementation of strategies to facilitate the integration of internationally trained workers into Canada's electricity sector. This synopsis report presented the analysis of the study including a discussion of immigration trends; foreign credential recognition in Canada's electricity sector; immigration profiles by region; case study profiles; and recommendations. It was recommended that resources be researched, developed and provided in order to help stakeholders attract, recruit, retain and integrate internationally trained workers. 2 refs

  16. Article Commentary: Researching Prescription Drug Misuse among First Nations in Canada: Starting from a Health Promotion Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen Anne Dell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The intentional misuse of psychotropic drugs is recognized as a significant public health concern in Canada, although there is a lack of empirical research detailing this. Even less research has been documented on the misuse of prescription drugs among First Nations in Canada. In the past, Western biomedical and individual-based approaches to researching Indigenous health have been applied, whereas First Nations’ understandings of health are founded on a holistic view of wellbeing. Recognition of this disjuncture, alongside the protective influence of First Nations traditional culture, is foundational to establishing an empirical understanding of and comprehensive response to prescription drug misuse. We propose health promotion as a framework from which to begin to explore this. Our work with a health promotion framework has conveyed its potential to support the consideration of Western and Indigenous worldviews together in an ‘ethical space’, with illustrations provided. Health promotion also allots for the consideration of Canada's colonial history of knowledge production in public health and supports First Nations’ self-determination. Based on this, we recommend three immediate ways in which a health promotion framework can advance research on prescription drug misuse among First Nations in Canada.

  17. Energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This discussion paper was prepared by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources Canada to provide information about Canada's resource potential, the contribution of energy to the Canadian economy, Canada's place in the world energy market, and the outlook for the development of Canadian energy resources. In addition, it provides background information on issues such as: energy and the environment, energy security, Canadian ownership of energy resources, energy R and D, and energy conservation. Finally, it concludes with an indication of some of the key challenges facing the energy sector. The paper is intended to inform the public and to serve as a reference document for those participating in the review of Canada's energy options. The paper was prepared before Canada and the U.S. agreed in principle on a free trade agreement (FTA) and does not include a discussion of the FTA or its potential impacts on the energy sector

  18. Going Places: Exploring the Impact of Intra-Sectoral Mobility on Research Productivity and Communication Behaviors in Japanese Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo; Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of intra-sectoral mobility of academics on research productivity and R&D information exchange dynamics in Japan. The analysis shows intra-sectoral mobility impacting positively both research productivity and information exchange dynamics, but that this effect--except for information exchange with peers based…

  19. Intellectual assets management and transfer in food science sector in Indian research and development organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikram; Chakraborty, Kajal

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the food science sector has gained importance since the society is focusing on high-quality and safety foods. With a specific end goal to meet this societal need, the research and development organizations in India have adopted innovative technical and research processes, which gave more accentuation on intellectual assessment in food processing industry. The global Intellectual Property regime in food science sector had witnessed an increment in the number of patents filed and granted during 2006-2010. Ever since there has been a gradual increase in the number of patents applied mainly in food processing industries by research organizations related to food sciences, for example, those working under the aegis of ICAR and CSIR in India. In this study, a review has been done on the intellectual assets generated by ICAR and other national research organizations in India, in the food science sector. Emphasis has been given on the global relevance of these assets, modes of IP protection and technology transfer mechanisms followed by different public and private organizations.

  20. Public sector's research programme on spent fuel management in Finland supporting the authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Rasilainen, K.

    2000-01-01

    A multiphase research program launched in 1989 to support Finnish authorities in their activities concerning spent fuel management is reviewed. The Finnish program for spent fuel management has so far managed to keep its original time schedule at least partly due to clearly defined responsibilities between the nuclear energy producing industry and the authorities. It appears that the public sector's research programme has been successful in its supporting role, because authorities have had good possibilities to adjust the emphasis and volume of the research programme from the very beginning. (author)

  1. A review of research on corporate social responsibility in the banking sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenni Viviana Duque Orozco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the studies on corporate social responsibility (CSR in the banking sector. It seeks to identify the main issues analyzed in this regard in scientific literature, as well as the methodologies used, through an extensive review of research articles, books and book chapters published in the Scopus and Journal Citation Index (previously ISI databases between 1998 and 2011. Results show a high interest among researchers in studying the dissemination of CSR in the banking sector using quantitative and qualitative methods; however, phenomena such as the perception of stakeholders in regards to the social and environmental performance of banks, the impact of CSR practices in the local or national development in developing countries (especially in Latin America and the sector’s responsibility in bankarization have not been addressed in depth.

  2. Assessment of annual whole-body occupational radiation exposure in education, research and industrial sectors in Ghana (2000-09)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.; Owusu-banahene, J.; Otoo, F.; Adu, S.; Sosu, E. K.; Amoako, J. K.; Darko, E. O.; Emi-reynolds, G.; Nani, E. K.; Boadu, M.; Arwui, C. C.; Yeboah, J.

    2008-01-01

    Institutions in the education, research and industrial sectors in Ghana are quite few in comparison to the medical sector. Occupational exposure to radiation in the education, research and industrial sectors in Ghana have been analysed for a 10 y period between 2000 and 2009, by extracting dose data from the database of the Radiation Protection Inst. (Ghana)) Atomic Energy Commission. Thirty-four institutions belonging to the three sectors were monitored out of which ∼65 % were in the industrial sector. During the 10 y study period, monitored institutions ranged from 18 to 23 while the exposed workers ranged from 246 to 156 between 2000 and 2009. Annual collective doses received by all the exposed workers reduced by a factor of 2 between 2000 and 2009. This is seen as a reduction in annual collective doses in education/research and industrial sectors by ∼39 and ∼62 %, respectively, for the 10 y period. Highest and least annual collective doses of 182.0 man mSv and 68.5 man mSv were all recorded in the industrial sector in 2000 and 2009, respectively. Annual average values for dose per institution and dose per exposed worker decreased by 49 and 42.9 %, respectively, between 2000 and 2009. Average dose per exposed worker for the 10 y period was least in the industrial sector and highest in the education/research sector with values 0.6 and 3.7 mSv, respectively. The mean of the ratio of annual occupationally exposed worker (OEW) doses for the industrial sector to the annual OEW doses for the education/research sector was 0.67, a suggestion that radiation protection practices are better in the industrial sector than they are in the education/research sector. Range of institutional average effective doses within the education/research and industrial sectors were 0.059-6.029, and 0.110-2.945 mSv, respectively. An average dose per all three sectors of 11.87 mSv and an average dose per exposed worker of 1.12 mSv were realised for the entire study period. The entire

  3. Relations between organizational commitment and demographic factors: a research in banking sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizamettin Dogar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this research is to answer if organizational commitment changes according to demografic factors. Inputs gained from 200 person sample group from banking sector. According to the analysis it is found that affective and continuance commitment increases with age and job experience, and all componenets of commitment increase according to time in the last job. With the results derived from analysis, research’s support to organizational theory is discussed and some advices put forward.

  4. An introduction to the Research Innovation and Knowledge Management Roadmap for the South African Maritime Sector

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Funke, Nicola S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS We have a maritime culture and recognise and learn from our maritime history 1 Foster national maritime pride 3 Develop and communicate a co-authored discourse on South Africa’s maritime history 2 Support maritime historical... and training facilities 6 Build and retain skills in the maritime sector 2 Support and develop maritime-focused technology and innovation 7 OBJECTIVES & ACTIONS Conduct humanities and social science research on pertinent issues 3 Create knowledge...

  5. The important role of public-sector research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Between 1970 and 2009, US public institutions participated in the research and development of 153 drugs, including 15 vaccines. Between 1990 and 2007, nearly 10% of all the new drugs and vaccines marketed in the US and about 20% of those representing a therapeutic advance originated in public institutions. The proportion of these drugs that represented a substantial therapeutic advance was over twice that of those produced exclusively by the private sector.

  6. [Research ethics and the use of placebo: status of the debate in Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    The question of the use of the placebo is one of the most controversial in the field of the ethics of research today. The use of the placebo remains the standard practice of biomedical research in spite of the fact that various revisions of the Helsinki Declaration have sought to limit its use. In Canada, the Tri-council policy statement: Ethical conduct for research involving humans adopted a very restrictive position with respect to the use of placebos, precisely defining the situations in which its use would meet the demands of ethical research. The positions taken by the various ethical decision-making bodies are, however, hardly shared by regulatory bodies such as the Food and drug administration (FDA), the Council for international organization of medical sciences (CIOMS) or the European agency for the evaluation of medicinal products (EMEA). This divergence of opinions reveals two quite different conceptions of what constitutes the ethical. In the case of decision-making bodies in the ethical field, it is clearly medicine's Hippocratic Oath which explains their reluctance to use placebos. The first responsibility of the doctor is to "do no harm" to his or her patient. This duty is inherent to the medical profession and as such is not grounded in the view of medicine as a contract for care. In the case of regulatory bodies, it is the vision of "medicine as contract" which is in view; and it is this notion that justifies the use of placebos once free and informed consent has been obtained. It is also worth noting that these regulatory bodies make frequent use of arguments based on utilitarian ends. In an unprecedented move, the World medical association published in October 2001 a clarification note about the use of placebos. An analysis of this text raises the question about its real meaning: clarification or concession?

  7. Energy storage in Canada - Embassy report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quennehen, Sylvain

    2014-09-01

    After having outlined what is at stake in energy storage in the world (brief presentation of storage methods, overview of world electricity production and its storage challenges), and given an overview of the Canadian energy sector, this report gives an overview of the Canadian key and particularly innovating actors: main organisations, scientific research (in the fields of advanced batteries, of fuel cells, and of thermal storage), industrial sector (leaders in electricity production, in the electric or hybrid automotive sector and in the field of portable electronic devices, in the Li-ion battery sector, and in the hydrogen fuel cell sector, innovating actors in other energy storage methods). The author then discusses the innovation momentum in Canada: examples of energy storage projects by public organisations (CNRC, RNC), industrial projects in energy projects, investment dynamics

  8. Research ethics committees in the regulation of clinical research: comparison of Finland to England, Canada, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina

    2016-01-19

    The aim of this paper is to compare common features and variation in the work of research ethics committees (RECs) in Finland to three other countries - England, Canada, the United States of America (USA) - in the late 2000s. Several approaches and data sources were used, including semi- or unstructured interviews of experts, documents, previous reports, presentations in meetings and observations. A theoretical framework was created and data from various sources synthesized. In Finland, RECs were regulated by a medical research law, whereas in the other countries many related laws and rules guided RECs; drug trials had specific additional rules. In England and the USA, there was a REC control body. In all countries, members were voluntary and included lay-persons, and payment arrangements varied. Patient protection was the main ethics criteria, but other criteria (research advancement, availability of results, payments, detailed fulfilment of legislation) varied. In all countries, RECs had been given administrative duties. Variations by country included the mandate, practical arrangements, handling of multi-site research, explicitness of proportionate handlings, judging scientific quality, time-limits for decisions, following of projects, role in institute protection, handling conflicts of interests, handling of projects without informed consent, and quality assurance research. The division of work between REC members and secretariats varied in checking of formalities. In England, quality assurance of REC work was thorough, fairly thorough in the USA, and not performed in Finland. The work of RECs in the four countries varied notably. Various deficiencies in the system require action, for which international comparison can provide useful insights.

  9. Experiences and attitudes towards evidence-informed policy-making among research and policy stakeholders in the Canadian agri-food public health sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, I; Gropp, K; Pintar, K; Waddell, L; Marshall, B; Thomas, K; McEwen, S A; Rajić, A

    2014-12-01

    Policy-makers working at the interface of agri-food and public health often deal with complex and cross-cutting issues that have broad health impacts and socio-economic implications. They have a responsibility to ensure that policy-making based on these issues is accountable and informed by the best available scientific evidence. We conducted a qualitative descriptive study of agri-food public health policy-makers and research and policy analysts in Ontario, Canada, to understand their perspectives on how the policy-making process is currently informed by scientific evidence and how to facilitate this process. Five focus groups of 3-7 participants and five-one-to-one interviews were held in 2012 with participants from federal and provincial government departments and industry organizations in the agri-food public health sector. We conducted a thematic analysis of the focus group and interview transcripts to identify overarching themes. Participants indicated that the following six key principles are necessary to enable and demonstrate evidence-informed policy-making (EIPM) in this sector: (i) establish and clarify the policy objectives and context; (ii) support policy-making with credible scientific evidence from different sources; (iii) integrate scientific evidence with other diverse policy inputs (e.g. economics, local applicability and stakeholder interests); (iv) ensure that scientific evidence is communicated by research and policy stakeholders in relevant and user-friendly formats; (V) create and foster interdisciplinary relationships and networks across research and policy communities; and (VI) enhance organizational capacity and individual skills for EIPM. Ongoing and planned efforts in these areas, a supportive culture, and additional education and training in both research and policy realms are important to facilitate evidence-informed policy-making in this sector. Future research should explore these findings further in other countries and contexts.

  10. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I., E-mail: paul.hungler@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  11. Enhancements to the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungler, P.C.; Andrews, M.T.; Weir, R.D.; Nielson, K.S.; Chan, P.K.; Bennett, L.G.I.

    2014-01-01

    In 1985 a Safe Low Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE) nuclear research reactor was installed at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC). The reactor at nominally 20 kW thermal was named SLOWPOKE-2 and the core was designed to have a total of 198 fuel pins with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (19.89% U-235). Installation of the reactor was intended to provide an education tool for members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and an affordable neutron source for the application of neutron activation analysis (NAA) and radioisotope production. Today, the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC continues to be a key education tool for undergraduate and post-graduate students and successfully conducts NAA and isotope production as per its original design intent. RMCC has significantly upgraded the facility and instruments to develop capabilities such as delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) and neutron imaging, including 2D thermal neutron radiography and 3D thermal neutron tomography. These unique nuclear capabilities have been applied to relevant issues in the CAF. The analog control system originally installed in 1985 has been removed and replaced in 2001 by the SLOWPOKE Integrated Reactor Control and Instrumentation System (SIRCIS) which is a digital controller. This control system continues to evolve with SIRCIS V2 currently in operation. The continual enhancement of the facility, instruments and systems at the SLOWPOKE-2 at RMCC will be discussed, including an update on RMCC's refueling plan. (author)

  12. Emerging issues in paediatric health research consent forms in Canada: working towards best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Edward S; Avard, Denise; Black, Lee; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-01-30

    Obtaining a research participant's voluntary and informed consent is the bedrock of sound ethics practice. Greater inclusion of children in research has led to questions about how paediatric consent operates in practice to accord with current and emerging legal and socio-ethical issues, norms, and requirements. Employing a qualitative thematic content analysis, we examined paediatric consent forms from major academic centres and public organisations across Canada dated from 2008-2011, which were purposively selected to reflect different types of research ethics boards, participants, and studies. The studies included biobanking, longitudinal studies, and gene-environment studies. Our purpose was to explore the following six emerging issues: (1) whether the scope of parental consent allows for a child's assent, dissent, or future consent; (2) whether the concepts of risk and benefit incorporate the child's psychological and social perspective; (3) whether a child's ability to withdraw is respected and to what extent withdrawal is permitted; (4) whether the return of research results includes individual results and/or incidental findings and the processes involved therein; (5) whether privacy and confidentiality concerns adequately address the child's perspective and whether standard data and/or sample identifiability nomenclature is used; and (6) whether retention of and access to paediatric biological samples and associated medical data are addressed. The review suggests gaps and variability in the consent forms with respect to addressing each of the six issues. Many forms did not discuss the possibility of returning research results, be they individual or general/aggregate results. Forms were also divided in terms of the scope of parental consent (specific versus broad), and none discussed a process for resolving disputes that can arise when either the parents or the child wishes to withdraw from the study. The analysis provides valuable insight and evidence into

  13. Emerging issues in paediatric health research consent forms in Canada: working towards best practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dove Edward S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining a research participant’s voluntary and informed consent is the bedrock of sound ethics practice. Greater inclusion of children in research has led to questions about how paediatric consent operates in practice to accord with current and emerging legal and socio-ethical issues, norms, and requirements. Methods Employing a qualitative thematic content analysis, we examined paediatric consent forms from major academic centres and public organisations across Canada dated from 2008–2011, which were purposively selected to reflect different types of research ethics boards, participants, and studies. The studies included biobanking, longitudinal studies, and gene-environment studies. Our purpose was to explore the following six emerging issues: (1 whether the scope of parental consent allows for a child’s assent, dissent, or future consent; (2 whether the concepts of risk and benefit incorporate the child’s psychological and social perspective; (3 whether a child’s ability to withdraw is respected and to what extent withdrawal is permitted; (4 whether the return of research results includes individual results and/or incidental findings and the processes involved therein; (5 whether privacy and confidentiality concerns adequately address the child’s perspective and whether standard data and/or sample identifiability nomenclature is used; and (6 whether retention of and access to paediatric biological samples and associated medical data are addressed. Results The review suggests gaps and variability in the consent forms with respect to addressing each of the six issues. Many forms did not discuss the possibility of returning research results, be they individual or general/aggregate results. Forms were also divided in terms of the scope of parental consent (specific versus broad, and none discussed a process for resolving disputes that can arise when either the parents or the child wishes to withdraw from the

  14. Basic science and energy research sector profile: Background for the National Energy Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March, F.; Ashton, W.B.; Kinzey, B.R.; McDonald, S.C.; Lee, V.E.

    1990-11-01

    This Profile report provides a general perspective on the role of basic science in the spectrum of research and development in the United States, and basic research's contributions to the goals of the National Energy Strategy (NES). It includes selected facts, figures, and analysis of strategic issues affecting the future of science in the United States. It is provided as background for people from government, the private sector, academia, and the public, who will be reviewing the NES in the coming months; and it is intended to serve as the basis for discussion of basic science issues within the context of the developing NES.

  15. Market-based process and product innovation in the food sector: A Danish research programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Baadsgaard, Allan

    1992-01-01

    This note informs about the Danish MAPP research programme, a collection of 15 research projects aimed at making product and process innovation in the food sector more market-based. The programme, which has an interdisciplinary base, but is geared towards marketing applications, is concerned...... with the organization of the innovation process, the interaction of consumer and producer criteria in product development, the assessment of long-term developments in the market environment and the role distribution system in product innovation. Innovation in both primary production and processing are considered....

  16. Research into the application of biodiesel in the transport sector of Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lebedevas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The material of this publication presents the results of a complex research into the application of standard rapseed methyl ester (RME and new types of biodiesels produced from waste of vegetable oil and animal fat in the transport sector of Lithuania. The analytical analysis of physical, chemical and thermodynamical properties of biodiesels is performed and its results are evualated during the formation of tasks of experimental motor tests and research into mathematical modelling. Their influence for the paramaters of a working process and exploiting characteristics such as power, fuel economy, reliability and harmful emission of gases is evaluated.

  17. A critical cost benefit analysis of oilseed biodiesel in Canada : a BIOCAP research integration program synthesis paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaney, M.J.T.; Hartley Furtan, W.; Loutas, P.

    2006-03-01

    This paper investigated resources in Canada with the potential for conversion to biodiesel and analyzed strategies for the development of a biodiesel economy in Saskatchewan. Costs and benefits of biodiesel production were investigated. Producer margins for growing biodiesel crops were examined. Grain transportation and storage methods for various feed materials were discussed, as well as oil extraction and refining strategies that influence non-oil co-products. Biodiesel production technologies were also evaluated, and various distribution methods were discussed. The study determined that the costs and benefits of a biodiesel economy would accrue to many different sectors and sub-sectors, including seed production; farming; agricultural chemicals; fertilizers; grain storage and transportation; biodiesel manufacture and distribution; and petroleum manufacture and distribution. Outlines of impacts on each sector were examined under various scenarios. Results of the study demonstrated that the quantity of low-priced canola that is available in a given year has a significant impact on the profitability of a biodiesel industry in Saskatchewan. 16 refs., 13 tabs., 2 figs

  18. A review of present research, research needs, and research capabilities related to the uranium mining and milling industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    This report surveys the views of those associated with uranium mining in northern Saskatchewan on the research needs of the industry. Research resources, both human and material, available in the province are outlined. The author makes recommendations that would lead to a viable uranium research program. Appendices list information on current uranium-related research in Saskatchewan and available research resources

  19. Public Sector Leadership. A Review of Romanian Research Done in the Field Between 2007-2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor ȚICLĂU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Leadership is one of the best examples for an ubiquitous research topic, as it is studied both as a social phenomenon as well as a theoretical concept (Hackman and Wageman, 2007, being studied in relation with different research fi elds, ranging from politics, public administration, management, social and organizational change, human motivation (and the list could go on. This has led some scholars to claiming that leadership has been the source of more extensive investigation than almost any other aspect of human behavior (de Vries, 1993. The interest then in public sector leadership comes only natural to any researcher in the fi eld of public administration. Our main purpose was to identify and analyze what has been done on the topic of public sector leadership, specifi cally for Romania, in the past ten years. We focused on three major variables: theoretical framework used, authorship nationality, and quality of research. Results indicate that Romanian authors and Romania are missing from top tier journals in the fi eld of public administration. Indirectly, results raise questions about general research capacity in the fi eld of public administration of Romanian scholars.

  20. Does Funding for Arctic Research Align with Research Priorities and Policy Needs? Trends in the USA, Canada and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, M. S.; Ibarguchi, G.; Rajdev, V.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past twenty years, increasing awareness and understanding of changes in the Arctic system, the stated desires of Arctic Peoples to be engaged in the research process, and a growing international interest in the region's resources have informed various stakeholders to undertake many Arctic science planning activities. Some examples of science planning include priority-setting for research, knowledge translation, stakeholder engagement, improved coordination, and international collaboration. The International Study of Arctic Change recently initiated an analysis of the extent to which alignment exists among stated science priorities, recognized societal needs, and funding patterns of the major North American and European agencies. In this paper, we present a decade of data on international funding patterns and data on two decades of science planning. We discuss whether funding patterns reflect the priority research questions and identified needs for information that are articulated in a myriad of Arctic research planning documents. The alignment in many areas remains poor, bringing into question the purpose of large-scale science planning if it does not lead to funding of those priorities identified by Arctic stakeholder communities (scientists, Arctic Peoples, planners, policy makers, the private sector, and others).

  1. The gas sector in Quebec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, G.

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas in Canada represents 29% of the primary energy and 42% of the energy used in the industrial sector. The biggest users are the manufacturing industries for which the low cost of natural gas and the quality of products resulting from its use represent a serious advantage in a more and more competitive market. This document takes stock of the situation of natural gas and gas-related technologies in Quebec. The first part recalls the historical evolution of the gas distribution network in Quebec and its present day situation. Then, some technical-economical data about the consumption of natural gas in Quebec are presented according to the sectors of use. The third part treats of the R and D activities linked with the gas sector, in particular the activities of the two main research organizations: the technical centre of natural gas and the research group in gas technologies of the Polytechnique school of Montreal. (J.S.)

  2. The Challenge of Integrating OHS into Industrial Project Risk Management: Proposal of a Methodological Approach to Guide Future Research (Case of Mining Projects in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Badri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although risk management tools are put to good use in many industrial sectors, some large projects have been met with numerous problems due to failure to take occupational health and safety (OHS into consideration. In spite of the high level of risk and uncertainty associated with many industrial projects, the number of studies of methods for managing all known risks systematically remains small. Under effervescent economic conditions, industries must meet several challenges associated with frequent project start-ups. In highly complex and uncertain environments, rigorous management of risk remains indispensable for avoiding threats to the success of projects. Many businesses seek continually to create and improve integrated approaches to risk management. This article puts into perspective the complexity of the challenge of integrating OHS into industrial project risk management. A conceptual and methodological approach is proposed to guide future research focused on meeting this challenge. The approach is based on applying multi-disciplinary research modes to a complex industrial context in order to identify all scenarios likely to contain threats to humans or the environment. A case study is used to illustrate the potential of the proposed approach for application and its contribution to meeting the challenge of taking OHS into consideration. On-site researchers were able to develop a new approach that helped two mining companies in Quebec (Canada to achieve successful integration of OHS into expansion projects.

  3. Hydrogeology of the rock mass encountered at the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, E.T.; Davison, C.C.

    1992-09-01

    The rock mass surrounding the 240 level of Canada's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) has been hydrogeologically characterized through observations made in the tunnel and room excavations and from a network of radiating low-dipping boreholes. The 240 level complex sits in a wedge of grey-to-pink granite between two important, low-dipping, hydraulically active fracture zones, known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2) and Fracture Zone 2.5 (FZ2.5), a splay of FZ2. There is no apparent seepage into the 240 level room and tunnel network from the surrounding rock mass except from a vertical fracture intersected by the Room 209 tunnel. Extensive hydraulic and geomechanical tests have been conducted in boreholes intersecting the Room 209 vertical fracture, and transmissivities were found to range from 10 -10 to 10 -6 m 2 /s. FZ2 and FZ2.5 occur at the 240 m depth approximately 10 m to the west and 100 m to the south respectively of the 240 level tunnel network. Hydraulic testing within packer-isolated boreholes intersecting these fracture zones showed that transmissivities ranged from 10 -7 to 10 -5 m 2 /s in FZ2, and 10 -9 to 10 -7 m 2 /s in FZ2.5. No naturally-occurring fractures were encountered east of the 240 level complex up to 300 m away. The rock mass to the north of the 240 level is dominated by the Room 209 vertical fracture, which tends to splay with distance and has been intersected 95 m from the Room 209 tunnel. (Author) (50 figs., 5 tabs., 10 refs.)

  4. Trends in Private Sector Development in World Bank Education Projects. Policy Research Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosale, Shobhana

    The private sector is playing an increasingly important role in financing and providing educational services in many countries. (Often the term "private sector" encompasses households' out-of-pocket expenses rather than describing for-profit or not-for-profit sectors.) Private sector development has not arisen primarily through public…

  5. User-oriented innovation in the food sector: Relevant streams of research and an agenda for future work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus; Jensen, Birger Boutrup; Sonne, Anne-Mette

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to give an overview of relevant streams of research that can form a basis for research on user-oriented innovation in the food sector. We define user-oriented innovation as a process towards the development of a new product or service in which an integrated analysis...... and understanding of the users' wants, needs and preference formation play a key role. We distinguish three relevant streams of research that may provide a basis for research on user-oriented innovation in the food sector: research on the formation of user preferences, research on innovation management......, and research on interactive innovation. We show that the relevance of these three streams of research for the food sector depends on which type of innovation we are dealing with, and we propose a distinction of three types of food innovations depending on which actors in the food chain are involved...

  6. Canada report on bioenergy 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.

    2008-06-01

    Canada is a nation rich in fossil fuel resources. Canada has a large, well-developed forest sector and is one of the world's largest exporters of wood products. Although national bioenergy policies exist, provincial policies regarding forest resources are necessary because 77 per cent of Canada's forests are under provincial jurisdiction. This report presented an update on Canada's bioenergy policy and resources. The report discussed biomass resources such as woody biomass; agricultural residues; and municipal waste. The use of biomass was presented with particular reference to heat and power; biofuels production; pyrolysis oil; wood pellets; and trends in biomass production and consumption. Current biomass users and biomass prices were also examined. Last, the report addressed imports and exports of ethanol, biodiesel, pyrolysis oil, and wood pellets as well as barriers and opportunities to trade. A list of Canadian bioenergy initiatives and programs was also provided. It was concluded that the greatest opportunities for trade are to succeed in research on super-densified pellets; raise ocean shipping capacity to bring down rates; and to establish and entire biomass industry in Newfoundland Labrador. 20 tabs., 8 figs., 1 appendix

  7. Focus on Form and Corrective Feedback Research at the University of Victoria, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sibo; Nassaji, Hossein

    2018-01-01

    The Department of Linguistics at University of Victoria (UVic) in Canada has a long-standing tradition of empirical approaches to the study of theoretical and applied linguistics. As part of the Faculty of Humanities, the department caters to students with a wide range of backgrounds and interests, and provides crucial language teaching support in…

  8. Ag Can zeroes in on energy waste in food. [Agriculture Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebener, A.

    1979-12-01

    Agriculture Canada has increased its funding for energy conservation research from $25,000 to $500,000. Energy audits of food processing, distribution, and retailing (PDR) will determine how energy is used. The funding increase represents a shift in Canada's energy research policy and indicates that the PDR sector is now recognized as the major energy consumer in contrast to the production sector, which uses only 18% of agricultural energy. The research will focus on practical technology and will consider the economic, tax, and regulatory factors. PDR research programs include the use of renewable energy sources, waste heat recovery, greenhouse insulation, and hydroponics. (DCK)

  9. Research priorities for the health sector for the 8th Malaysia Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narimah Awin

    2000-01-01

    At the inter-institutional meeting to identify, the research priorities for the sector for the 7MP (7 th Malaysian Plan), held in mid-1994, priorities were determined according to the hierarchy of socioeconomic groups, target areas, programmes and scopes. The more detailed projects under these were to be determined by the researchers they embark on the projects themselves. The most useful level for reference is the target area. There were 7 target areas identified at the deliberations, and an eighth one (medical biotechnology) was added later on by the IRPA Secretariat in the Ministry of Science Technology and Environment. These 8 target areas are: 1)Health problems associated with lifestyles 2) Health problems related to demographic changes, 3) Vector borne and other communicable diseases, 4 ) Epidemiological databases, 5) Technologies in health, 6)The health system and health care industry, 7) Environmental and occupational health, 8) Medical biotechnology. (author)

  10. Research priorities for the health sector for the 8{sup th} Malaysia Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awin, Narimah [Inst. of Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2000-07-01

    At the inter-institutional meeting to identify, the research priorities for the sector for the 7MP (7{sup th} Malaysian Plan), held in mid-1994, priorities were determined according to the hierarchy of socioeconomic groups, target areas, programmes and scopes. The more detailed projects under these were to be determined by the researchers they embark on the projects themselves. The most useful level for reference is the target area. There were 7 target areas identified at the deliberations, and an eighth one (medical biotechnology) was added later on by the IRPA Secretariat in the Ministry of Science Technology and Environment. These 8 target areas are: 1)Health problems associated with lifestyles 2) Health problems related to demographic changes, 3) Vector borne and other communicable diseases, 4 ) Epidemiological databases, 5) Technologies in health, 6)The health system and health care industry, 7) Environmental and occupational health, 8) Medical biotechnology. (author)

  11. Power sector reforms in Brazil and its impacts on energy efficiency and research and development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannuzzi, G.M. de

    2005-01-01

    Since the mid-nineties Brazil has implemented significant changes in the country's power sector, including privatization, introduction of competition and the creation of regulatory agency. As reform started in Brazil traditional support to energy efficiency and energy research and development suffered a discontinuation, budget cuts and re-definition of roles of the public agents in charge. At the same time, new regulatory measures and the creation of a national public interest fund have helped to maintain and potentially enhance the country's effort to promote energy efficiency and investments in energy R and D. This paper analyses the impacts of these changes in the areas of energy efficiency and energy research and development and argues for an increased role of developing countries to provide solutions for a meeting energy demand requirements more suitable to their internal markets

  12. Friendly Outsider or Critical Insider? : An Action Research Account of Oxfam’s Private Sector Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pesqueira Fernandez, L. de L.

    2014-01-01

    NGOs increasingly engage with the private sector with the objective of addressing complex sustainability issues. Problems like poverty, deforestation, food security, and climate change cannot be managed by governments alone. In this scenario, collaboration between NGOs and the private sector

  13. Post-market drug evaluation research training capacity in Canada: an environmental scan of Canadian educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthew O; Soon, Judith A; MacLeod, Stuart M; Sharma, Sunaina; Patel, Anik

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing efforts by Health Canada intended to modernize the legislation and regulation of pharmaceuticals will help improve the safety and effectiveness of drug products. It will be imperative to ensure that comprehensive and specialized training sites are available to train researchers to support the regulation of therapeutic products. The objective of this educational institution inventory was to conduct an environmental scan of educational institutions in Canada able to train students in areas of post-market drug evaluation research. A systematic web-based environmental scan of Canadian institutions was conducted. The website of each university was examined for potential academic programs. Six core programmatic areas were determined a priori as necessary to train competent post-market drug evaluation researchers. These included biostatistics, epidemiology, pharmacoepidemiology, health economics or pharmacoeconomics, pharmacogenetics or pharmacogenomics and patient safety/pharmacovigilance. Twenty-three academic institutions were identified that had the potential to train students in post-market drug evaluation research. Overall, 23 institutions taught courses in epidemiology, 22 in biostatistics, 17 in health economics/pharmacoeconomics, 5 in pharmacoepidemiology, 5 in pharmacogenetics/pharmacogenomics, and 3 in patient safety/pharmacovigilance. Of the 23 institutions, only the University of Ottawa offered six core courses. Two institutions offered five, seven offered four and the remaining 14 offered three or fewer. It is clear that some institutions may offer programs not entirely reflected in the nomenclature used for this review. As Heath Canada moves towards a more progressive licensing framework, augmented training to increase research capacity and expertise in drug safety and effectiveness is timely and necessary.

  14. Public Spending on Health Service and Policy Research in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States: A Modest Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidhi Thakkar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Health services and policy research (HSPR represent a multidisciplinary field which integrates knowledge from health economics, health policy, health technology assessment, epidemiology, political science among other fields, to evaluate decisions in health service delivery. Health service decisions are informed by evidence at the clinical, organizational, and policy level, levels with distinct, managerial drivers. HSPR has an evolving discourse spanning knowledge translation, linkage and exchange between research and decision-maker partners and more recently, implementation science and learning health systems. Local context is important for HSPR and is important in advancing health reform practice. The amounts and configuration of national investment in this field remain important considerations which reflect priority investment areas. The priorities set within this field or research may have greater or lesser effects and promise with respect to modernizing health services in pursuit of better value and better population outcomes. Within Canada an asset map for HSPR was published by the national HSPR research institute. Having estimated publiclyfunded research spending in Canada, we sought identify best available comparable estimates from the United States and the United Kingdom. Investments from industry and charitable organizations were not included in these numbers. This commentary explores spending by the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom on HSPR as a fraction of total public spending on health and the importance of these respective investments in advancing health service performance. Proposals are offered on the merits of common nomenclature and accounting for areas of investigation in pursuit of some comparable way of assessing priority HSPR investments and suggestions for earmarking such investments to total investment in health services spending.

  15. Enhancing research capacity across healthcare and higher education sectors: development and evaluation of an integrated model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitworth Anne

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With current policy in healthcare research, in the United Kingdom and internationally, focused on development of research excellence in individuals and teams, building capacity for implementation and translation of research is paramount among the professionals who use that research in daily practice. The judicious use of research outcomes and evaluation of best evidence and practice in healthcare is integrally linked to the research capacity and capabilities of the workforce. In addition to promoting high quality research, mechanisms for actively enhancing research capacity more generally must be in place to address the complexities that both undermine and facilitate this activity. Methods A comprehensive collaborative model for building research capacity in one health professional group, speech and language therapy, was developed in a region within the UK and is presented here. The North East of England and the strong research ethos of this profession in addressing complex interventions offered a fertile context for developing and implementing a model which integrated the healthcare and university sectors. Two key frameworks underpin this model. The first addresses the individual participants’ potential trajectory from research consciousness to research participative to research active. The second embeds a model developed for general practitioners into a broader framework of practice-academic partnership and knowledge and skills exchange, and considers external drivers and impacts on practice and patient outcomes as key elements. Results and discussion The integration of practice and academia has been successful in building a culture of research activity within one healthcare profession in a region in the UK and has resulted, to date, in a series of research related outcomes. Understanding the key components of this partnership and the explicit strategies used has driven the implementation of the model and are discussed

  16. Environmental policy instruments and technological change in the energy sector: findings from comparative empirical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjaerseth, J.B.; Christiansen, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which and in what ways environmental policy instruments may affect patterns of environmental friendly technological change in the energy sector. Our argument is based on the assumption, however, that technological change is also affected by the political context in which the instruments are applied and by the nature of the problem itself. Comparative empirical research involving different European countries, sectors and policy fields were examined, including climate change, air pollution and wind power. The relationship between environmental policy instruments and technological change is extremely complex, not least due to the impact of other factors that may be more decisive than environmental ones. Against this backdrop, it was concluded that: 1) a portfolio of policy instruments works to the extent that different types of policy instruments affect the different drivers and stages behind technological change needed to solve specific problems. The need for a portfolio of policy instruments depends on the technological challenge being faced; 2) voluntary approaches facilitated constructive corporate strategies, but mandatory approaches tended to be more effective in stimulating short term major technological change; 3) voluntary approaches work well in the short term when the problem to be solved is characterized by lack of information and coordination. (author)

  17. Use of Neutron Beams for Materials Research Relevant to the Nuclear Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear technologies such as fission and fusion reactors, including associated waste storage and disposal, rely on the availability of not only nuclear fuels but also advanced structural materials. In 2010–2013, the IAEA organized and implemented the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development, Characterization and Testing of Materials of Relevance to Nuclear Energy Sector Using Neutron Beams. A total of 19 institutions from 18 Member States (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation (two institutions), South Africa, Switzerland and United States of America) cooperated with the main objective to address the use of various neutron beam techniques for characterization, testing and qualification of materials and components produced or under development for applications in the nuclear energy sector. This CRP aimed to bring stakeholders and end users of research reactors and accelerator based neutron sources together for the enhanced use of available facilities and development of new infrastructures for applied materials research. Work envisioned under this CRP was related to the optimization and validation of neutron beam techniques, including facility and instrument modifications/optimizations as well as improved data acquisition, processing and analysis systems. Particular emphasis was placed on variable environments during material characterization and testing as required by some applications such as intensive irradiation load, high temperature and high pressure conditions, and the presence of strong magnetic fields. Targeted neutron beam techniques were neutron diffraction, small angle neutron scattering and digital neutron radiography/tomography. This publication is a compilation of the main results and findings of the CRP, and the CD-ROM accompanying this publication contains 19 reports with additional relevant technical details

  18. Development of a health-based air quality index for Canada : public opinion research 2004-05 : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    Canadians rely on an air quality indexes (AQIs) to inform them about air pollution conditions in their communities. However, there is no AQI common to all of Canada, and there is a lack of consistency in the way in which air quality is calculated and reported, as well as in the use of health-based messages. This paper reported findings of a public opinion research survey conducted to gauge Canadians' awareness, perceptions and behavioural responses to air quality, air pollution and AQIs. The aim of the study was to guide the development of health messages to more effectively communicate the AQI to Canadians with respect to the health risks associated with poor air quality. Telephone surveys were conducted immediately following a poor air quality episode to measure the public's awareness and response to these events, as well as residents' general awareness and use of AQIs. A separate research project was then conducted which consisted of in-depth qualitative interviews with 28 individuals recruited from the general population. A comprehensive national telephone survey was then conducted following the summer 2004 'smog season', which focused on the public's awareness of air pollution and AQIs. Results from the first 2 phases of the research were then presented at a workshop comprised of health and environmental communities specializing in air issues in Canada. Focus groups were then held to test public reaction to new AQI communications concepts derived from the research. Results indicated that Canadians widely identify air pollution as a significant environmental problem. However, the information from AQIs had a limited impact in terms of prompting actions to reduce personal exposure. A new type of national AQI for Canada was developed that conveyed information on air quality conditions and their significance. Key features include a 0 to 10 point unbounded scale showing current air quality conditions; a forecast of future conditions; standardized information

  19. Health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector : insights from the Shepell-fgi Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This report discussed health and wellness trends in the oil and gas sector in relation to employee assistance program (EAP) data. The data were derived from oil and gas client organizations across Canada for 2008, and represented a population base of 14,685 employees. The data demonstrated that EAP utilization in the petroleum industry increased by approximately 5 per cent from 2006 to 2008. The sector's utilization was 34 per cent higher than the Canadian norm in 2006, and 40 per cent higher than in 2007 and 2008. Females used the EAP to a greater extent than males. A higher proportion of the spouses of workers accessed EAP than the national norm. Employees accessed EAP for assistance with work-life issues; family support services; and substance abuse interventions. Weight management and dietary consultations in relation to disease control were also of concern within the sector. A 66 per cent increase in childcare issues was noted, as well as a 148 per cent increase in eldercare issues, and a 112 per cent increase in addiction issues. The findings indicated that the EAP is being effectively communicated as a relevant and accessible tool. As the industry continues to develop in remote regions, new services and resources will be required to retain existing workforces and attract new employees. Prevention-focused training and services and program for at-risk groups are needed to ensure that employee health and productivity is maintained. 1 tab., 4 figs.

  20. Croatian banking sector research: relationship between ownership structure, concentration, owners’ type and bank performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Tomičić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Banks are important financial intermediaries of any national economy, and corporate governance has an important role in banking sector; especially due to processes of the globalization and the internationalization, and also because of the sensitivity of the activities between the interest groups. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between ownership structure, concentration, owners’ type and bank performance. The authors made a research of banks' ownership structure using publicly available data. Using statistical tools authors discovered relationships between bank ownership structure and bank performance indicators (average asset, total asset, average equity, profit (loss before taxes, profit (loss after taxes, ROAA, ROAE. Further they discuss the relationships between ownership structure and a number of consequences for the bank performance. The authors discovered significant correlation between bank ownership structure and performance indicators variables that are described in the paper.

  1. Research on statistical methodology to investigate energy consumption in public buildings sector in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuqin; Li Nianping; Guan Jun

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to find a statistical methodology to investigate the national energy consumption in the public buildings sector in China, in order to look into the actuality of the national energy consumption of public buildings and to provide abundant data for building energy efficiency work. The frame of a national statistical system of energy consumption for public buildings is presented in this paper. The statistical index system of energy consumption is constituted, which refers to the general characteristics of public buildings, their possession and utilization of energy consumption equipment and their energy consumption quantities. Sequentially, a set of statistical report forms is designed to investigate the energy consumption of cities, provinces and the country, respectively. On this base, the above statistical methodology is used to gather statistics of a public building for annual energy consumption

  2. Action plan for electric mobility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.; Cormier, A.; Lavallee, P.

    2005-01-01

    Electric mobility is an important emerging industry in Canada, where there is significant expertise in electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries, hybrid technologies, grid-connected technologies and fuel cell vehicles. This paper presented a case for the formation of Electric Mobility Canada, a proposed network of private companies and public sector agencies that aims to stimulate industry and provide support to government agencies involved with meeting Canada's obligations under the Kyoto Protocol, as well as in new industry sectors. The environmental, health, economic and industrial benefits of electric mobility were outlined. Current programs for electric mobility were reviewed, and details of financial incentives and initiatives were presented. An overview of electric mobility programs in the United States and Europe was provided. Research and development needs were evaluated. The former Electric Vehicle Association of Canada was discussed. An organizational structure for the proposed network was presented, along with a mission statement and outline of future goals. Recommendations for the future of the network included identifying short and long-term market opportunities for electric mobility technologies for all surface transport modes in Canada; determining research and development needs and appropriate funding and investment opportunities; determining other actions necessary to allow the electric mobility industry to play a growing role in meeting Canada's transport needs; and raising public awareness of the importance of electric mobility trends. It was concluded that the federal government should be approached for start-up funds for the network, which will be followed by further investment from provincial and business interests once the network is in place and functioning. 84 refs

  3. Study the Customers’ Perception towards Banking Services: A Research Report on Indian Public Sector Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Limbad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to measure the customer satisfaction and to identify the shortfall areas for improving the services of public banking sector. For this research paper past research survey were studied. The main concept is measuring customer satisfaction by customer satisfaction index method. All the factors related to banks were taken by personal interview with the banks’ manager which influences customer satisfaction. To collect the information non-probability sampling method is used. 100 services users of two different banks in bardoli region were contacted with face-to-face personal interview method through questionnaire. “Customer Satisfaction Index” method was used to measure the customer satisfaction. The study represents the result of a survey among the customers in the bardoli region of two public sector banks. Study proved that the STATE BANKS OF INDIA’S customers are more satisfied (82.55> 81.79 than BANK OF INDIA’S customers. There were parameters are found out which are more important to increasing the satisfaction rate. The results of this study provide very important information in formulating competitive marketing strategies. It shows the critical points where the limited resources of the banks should be allocated to improve satisfaction and loyalty and provides information about the weaknesses and strengths of the banks from the eyes of its customers. With getting the valuable information and found out the reason of dissatisfaction these banks can put more efforts to improving the standards of services and make the customers more satisfied.

  4. How do third sector organisations use research and other knowledge? A systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Rebecca; Anderson, Rob; Cooper, Chris

    2015-06-06

    Third sector organisations (TSOs) are a well-established component of health care provision in the UK's NHS and other health systems, but little is known about how they use research and other forms of knowledge in their work. There is an emerging body of evidence exploring these issues but there is no review of this literature. This scoping review summarises what is known about how health and social care TSOs use research and other forms of knowledge in their work. A systematic search of electronic databases was carried out with initial exploratory searching of knowledge mobilisation websites, contacting authors, and hand searching of journals. The literature was narratively summarised to describe how TSOs use knowledge in decision making. Ten qualitative and mixed methods studies were retrieved. They show that TSOs wish to be "evidence-informed" in their decision making, and organisational context influences the kinds of research and knowledge they prefer, as well as how they use it. Barriers to research use include time, staff skill, resources and the acontextual nature of some academic research. Appropriate approaches to knowledge mobilisation may include using research intermediaries, involving TSOs in research, and better description of interventions and contexts in academic publications to aid applying it in the multi-disciplinary contexts of TSOs. TSOs identified specific benefits of using research, such as confidence that services were good quality, ability to negotiate with stakeholders and funders, and saving time and resources through implementing interventions shown to be effective. The small number of included studies means the findings need further confirmation through primary research. As the contribution of health and social care TSOs to service delivery is growing, the need to understand how they mobilise research and other forms of knowledge will continue. The research community could 1) develop relationships with TSOs to support the design and

  5. Impact of Research on Development in Cameroon: convergence between supply and research needs in the food sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkoua, J.R.; Temple, L.

    2016-07-01

    The study analyse the convergence of research priorities to development issues especially from the agricultural and food sector in terms of environmental protection and improvement of the business climate, due to weak institutional interconnection devices. Two types of data are used: bibliometric data and a survey of enterprises. Altogether, 1214 and 1708 bibliographic references were generated from WoS and Scopus respectively (from a total of 9146 and 10 557 publications) in Agriculture, Food and Environment for the period 1991- 2015 subject to the condition that the author or at least one of the authors is affiliated to an institution based in Cameroon. A total of 317 agro-food companies were identified from the National Institute enterprise’s census. The overall message is a relative weak convergence between development priorities identified from perceptions over agricultural and food companies and research works expressed in the scientific literature. This reflects the weak link between research institutions (universities, research centers) and professional milieus that shape entrepreneurship (firms, policy makers) for guidance of scientific production. (Author)

  6. Development and preliminary validation of the spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada magnetic resonance imaging sacroiliac joint structural score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2015-01-01

    on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) SIJ Structural Score (SSS). METHODS: The SSS method for assessment of structural lesions is based on T1-weighted spin echo MRI, validated lesion definitions, slice selection according to well-defined anatomical...... in scores, and was highest for fat metaplasia when both ICC and SDC values were compared. CONCLUSION: The new SPARCC MRI SSS method can detect structural changes in the SIJ with acceptable reliability over a 1-2-year timeframe, and should be further validated in patients with SpA....

  7. Promising ethical arguments for product differentiation in the organic food sector. A mixed methods research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Katrin; Stolz, Hanna; Hamm, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    Ethical consumerism is a growing trend worldwide. Ethical consumers' expectations are increasing and neither the Fairtrade nor the organic farming concept covers all the ethical concerns of consumers. Against this background the aim of this research is to elicit consumers' preferences regarding organic food with additional ethical attributes and their relevance at the market place. A mixed methods research approach was applied by combining an Information Display Matrix, Focus Group Discussions and Choice Experiments in five European countries. According to the results of the Information Display Matrix, 'higher animal welfare', 'local production' and 'fair producer prices' were preferred in all countries. These three attributes were discussed with Focus Groups in depth, using rather emotive ways of labelling. While the ranking of the attributes was the same, the emotive way of communicating these attributes was, for the most part, disliked by participants. The same attributes were then used in Choice Experiments, but with completely revised communication arguments. According to the results of the Focus Groups, the arguments were presented in a factual manner, using short and concise statements. In this research step, consumers in all countries except Austria gave priority to 'local production'. 'Higher animal welfare' and 'fair producer prices' turned out to be relevant for buying decisions only in Germany and Switzerland. According to our results, there is substantial potential for product differentiation in the organic sector through making use of production standards that exceed existing minimum regulations. The combination of different research methods in a mixed methods approach proved to be very helpful. The results of earlier research steps provided the basis from which to learn - findings could be applied in subsequent steps, and used to adjust and deepen the research design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Methods used for immunization coverage assessment in Canada, a Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah E; Quach, Susan; MacDonald, Shannon E; Naus, Monika; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S; Mahmud, Salaheddin M; Tran, Dat; Kwong, Jeff; Tu, Karen; Gilbert, Nicolas L; Johnson, Caitlin; Desai, Shalini

    2017-08-03

    Accurate and complete immunization data are necessary to assess vaccine coverage, safety and effectiveness. Across Canada, different methods and data sources are used to assess vaccine coverage, but these have not been systematically described. Our primary objective was to examine and describe the methods used to determine immunization coverage in Canada. The secondary objective was to compare routine infant and childhood coverage estimates derived from the Canadian 2013 Childhood National Immunization Coverage Survey (cNICS) with estimates collected from provinces and territories (P/Ts). We collected information from key informants regarding their provincial, territorial or federal methods for assessing immunization coverage. We also collected P/T coverage estimates for select antigens and birth cohorts to determine absolute differences between these and estimates from cNICS. Twenty-six individuals across 16 public health organizations participated between April and August 2015. Coverage surveys are conducted regularly for toddlers in Quebec and in one health authority in British Columbia. Across P/Ts, different methodologies for measuring coverage are used (e.g., valid doses, grace periods). Most P/Ts, except Ontario, measure up-to-date (UTD) coverage and 4 P/Ts also assess on-time coverage. The degree of concordance between P/T and cNICS coverage estimates varied by jurisdiction, antigen and age group. In addition to differences in the data sources and processes used for coverage assessment, there are also differences between Canadian P/Ts in the methods used for calculating immunization coverage. Comparisons between P/T and cNICS estimates leave remaining questions about the proportion of children fully vaccinated in Canada.

  9. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics: Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G.J.; Aardema, H.; ter Bogt, H.J.; Groot, T.L.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  10. Knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics : Preliminary findings and directions for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G. Jan; Aardema, Harrie; ter Bogt, Henk J.; Groot, Tom L. C. M.

    This study is about knowledge creation for practice in public sector management accounting by consultants and academics. It shows that researchers emphasize the importance of practice, but worry about the prospects of a successful cross-fertilization between practice and research, because of the

  11. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower.

    Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly

  12. Regional stratospheric warmings in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector during winter 2004/2005: implications for temperatures, winds, chemical constituents and the characterization of the Polar vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The vortex during winter 2004/2005 was interesting for several reasons. It has been described as "cold" stratospherically, with relatively strong westerly winds. Losses of ozone until the final warming in March were considerable, and comparable to the cold 1999–2000 winter. There were also modest warming events, indicated by peaks in 10 hPa zonal mean temperatures at high latitudes, near 1 January and 1 February. Events associated with a significant regional stratospheric warming in the Pacific-Western Canada (PWC sector then began and peaked toward the end of February, providing strong longitudinal variations in dynamical characteristics (Chshyolkova et al., 2007; hereafter C07. The associated disturbed vortex of 25 February was displaced from the pole and either elongated (upper or split into two cyclonic centres (lower. Observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on Aura are used here to study the thermal characteristics of the stratosphere in the Canadian-US (253° E and Scandinavian-Europe (16° E sectors. Undisturbed high latitude stratopause (55 km zonal mean temperatures during the mid-winter (December–February reached 270 K, warmer than empirical-models such as CIRA-86, suggesting that seasonal polar warming due to dynamical influences affects the high altitude stratosphere as well as the mesosphere. There were also significant stratopause differences between Scandinavia and Canada during the warming events of 1 January and 1 February, with higher temperatures near 275 K at 16° E. During the 25 February "PWC" event a warming occurred at low and middle stratospheric heights (10–30 km: 220 K at 253° E and the stratopause cooled; while over Scandinavia-Europe the stratosphere below ~30 km was relatively cold at 195 K and the stratopause became even warmer (>295 K and lower (~45 km. The zonal winds followed the associated temperature gradients so that the vertical and latitudinal gradients of the winds differed strongly between

  13. A shared vision for energy in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Energy plays an important role in Canadian society. With vast and diverse energy resources, Canada is a major participant in international energy markets. This report discussed the challenges and opportunities of Canada's energy sector, such as meeting the demand for energy; conserving and using existing energy more efficiently; developing new and innovative energy technologies; moving to renewable, greener and cleaner energy sources; improving transmission and transportation capacity; improving regulatory approval processes; and meeting demand for a skilled and available workforce. The report also discussed formalization of the role of provinces and territories in international energy discussions. A seven point action plan was also presented in order to provide concrete solutions and actions if the full potential of Canada's energy sector was to be achieved. These steps included promoting energy efficiency and conservation; accelerating the development and deployment of energy research and technologies that advance more efficient production, transmission and use of clean and conventional energy sources; facilitating the development of renewable, green and/or cleaner energy sources to meet future demand while contributing to environmental goals; and, developing and enhancing a modern, reliable, environmentally safe, and efficient series of transmission and transportation networks for domestic and export/import sources of energy. Other actions were also presented, such as improving the timeliness and certainty of regulatory approval decision-making processes while maintaining rigorous protection of the environment and public interest; developing and implementing strategies to meet energy-sector human resource needs now and into the future; and, pursuing formalized participation of provinces and territories in international discussions and negotiations on energy. It was concluded that immediate action and sustained effort by all is needed in order to ensure that all

  14. The strategic role of cross-sectoral research in the design of hospitals: the contribution of TESIS* research center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romano Del Nord

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of buildings, such as hospitals where the complexity concerns as much the interpretation of the requirements framework as their required permeability to the ever accelerated dynamics of bio-technological innovations proposed by the market, requires continuous research which in- creasingly goes beyond the boundaries of the architectural discipline as it is currently codified. Constant dialogue with what scientific research produces in the international sphere and with culturally differentiated approaches becomes an imperative for those – professionals or institutions – wishing to operate with real time up-dating in order to increase the performance quality of their products. Scientific organizations that set themselves these objectives cannot disregard the constraints imposed by this scenario, with the consequent require- ment to actively position themselves in international networks which, with their constant cross-sectoral production, fuel the debate on foreseeable trends and the implications that all this determines with regard to design. The following article seeks to represent the coordinates of this new operating scenario of scientific research, highlighting the methods and the operating practices put in place by the TESIS Interuniversity Centre for Re- search of Florence.

  15. Uranium tailings research at the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haw, V.A.; Ritcey, G.M.; Skeaff, J.M.; Dave, N.; Silver, M.

    1982-09-01

    There are over 100 million metric tons of uranium tailings on the surface of Canada, an amount that is expected to increase threefold by the end of the century. Because of their potential hazard to the environment and man, the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) began a major program ten years ago to examine the problem of uranium tailings management. Vegetation of uranium tailings has been successful using seed mixtures planted on the tailings surface pretreated by lime and fertilizer. Lysimeter tests on uranium tailings have demonstrated that surface treatment and the presence or absence of bacteria have a marked effect on the flow and chemistry of seepage water. Hydrogeochemical studies of the tailings have shown that acid conditions prevail in the upper zone of the tailings (i.e., above the water table) and that both radioactive and other toxic chemicals are concentrated near the bottom of the tailings. Work has been done in cooperation with others on the precipitation and removal of 226 Ra from tailings water effluent by BaCl 2 . Investigation into pre-concentrating the ore prior to acid leaching has demonstrated that virtually all the radionuclides and sulphides can be concentrated into a fraction amounting to from 30 to 40 percent of the original feed, leaving a relatively clean tailing. We are still far from our objective of demonstrating, with reasonable assurance, effective methods for the long-term management of uranium tailings. An accelerated program is outlined

  16. Fusion Canada issue 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on Canada's plans to participate in the Engineering Design Activities (EDA), bilateral meetings with Canada and the U.S., committee meeting with Canada-Europe, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on Plasma Biasing experiments and boronized graphite tests, fusion materials research at the University of Toronto using a dual beam accelerator and a review of the CFFTP and the CCFM. 2 figs

  17. Integrating Environmental Science and the Economy: Innovative Partnerships between the Private Sector and Research Infrastructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad Chabbi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary analysis of the funding, organizational culture, environmental, and innovation challenges that are currently faced by Environmental Research Infrastructures (ERI and private enterprises working together. We contend there is a strong case for building creative collaboration models across these sectors that also require to new management tools to effectively generate economically-driven solutions to the global society at large in the face of climate change. To that end, public/private stakeholders that are likely to partner to address climate change also face new frontiers in how they will structurally and organizationally work together. We explore these issues around changing political, scientific, commercial environments; partnerships models; barriers in bridging these communities; and the role of formal project management processes. There is no one solution to fit all conditions that can bring together a specific public/private enterprise that incorporates a research infrastructure. However, we have provided two examples of collaborative models of public/private enterprises to highlight how these issues can be addressed, and to foster future dynamic and creative solutions to this problem.

  18. Creative tensions: mutual responsiveness adapted to private sector research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonck, Matti; Asveld, Lotte; Landeweerd, Laurens; Osseweijer, Patricia

    2017-09-07

    The concept of mutual responsiveness is currently based on little empirical data in the literature of Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI). This paper explores RRI's idea of mutual responsiveness in the light of recent RRI case studies on private sector research and development (R&D). In RRI, responsible innovation is understood as a joint endeavour of innovators and societal stakeholders, who become mutually responsive to each other in defining the 'right impacts' of the innovation in society, and in steering the innovation towards realising those impacts. Yet, the case studies identified several reasons for why the idea of mutual responsiveness does not always appear feasible or desirable in actual R&D situations. Inspired by the discrepancies between theory and practice, we suggest three further elaborations for the concept of responsiveness in RRI. Process-responsiveness is suggested for identifying situations that require stakeholder involvement specifically during R&D. Product-responsiveness is suggested for mobilising the potential of innovation products to be adaptable according to diverse stakeholder needs. Presponsiveness is suggested as responsiveness towards stakeholders that are not (yet) reachable at a given time of R&D. Our aim is to contribute to a more tangible understanding of responsiveness in RRI, and suggest directions for further analysis in upcoming RRI case studies.

  19. Research and Development of Radiation Processing of Polysaccharide for Agricultural Sector in Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lay, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    Myanmar is an agricultural-based country in which rice is the main staple food and present agricultural systems still follow the traditional methods that utilise the available natural resources combined with improved cultural practices. To fulfil the major needs for improving safety agricultural productivity in the country, and to apply radiation technology for useful products in agriculture, current research is based on radiation processing of polysaccharide for production of super water absorbents and plant growth promoter (liquid fertilizer) using Gamma Radiation. Corn starch, Brown seaweed and Rice straw cellulose were used as polysaccharide in this research work. Morphological structures of products super water absorbents from corn starch and rice straw cellulose were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Fourier Transfer Infrared (FTIR) was used to analyze the changes of chemical structure of the original polysaccharides and products (super water absorbents and plant growth promoter). The effect of radiation dose and monomer concentration on grafting efficiency, gel fraction, crosslink density, and swelling degree were studied for two types of super water absorbent. It was found that the grafting efficiency and gel fraction increased with increasing in radiation dose as well as the higher in crosslink density, which is directly proportional to increasing in radiation dose, led to decreasing in swelling degree. Decreasing molecular weights of the irradiated seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF) were generally found with increasing radiation doses. To study the water retention properties of super water absorbents and growth promotion effect of seaweed liquid fertilizer (SLF), field tests were done. This research showed that radiation technology is very useful not only for agriculture sector but also for environmental monitoring since the agricultural waste such as rice straw was used as polysaccharide in this research work. (author)

  20. Canada's green plan: Summary. Le plan vert du Canada: Resume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of Canada's Green Plan, a comprehensive action plan to ensure a healthy environment for the future. The plan defines targets and schedules which will drive federal environmental initiatives, and incorporates concepts of sustainable development. Elements of the plan include initiatives to combat and prevent water pollution; control ocean dumping; control smog-causing emissions; provide tighter air pollution standards; provide for sound waste management according to the principles of reduce, reuse, recycle, and recover; assess and control chemical wastes; sustain Canadian forests and maintain their diversity while shifting forest management from sustained yield to sustainable development; maintain and enhance environmental sustainability in the agro-food sector and the fishery sector; preserve and protect national parks and wildlife; and preserve and enhance the integrity, health, biodiversity and productivity of Arctic ecosystems. With respect to global-scale problems, measures will be taken to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions, limit acid rain-related emissions, and phase out the use of ozone-depleting substances. The plan also intends to improve Canada's capability to respond to environmental emergencies, improve environmental decision-making by strengthening and building of partnerships, promote environmental science research and development, and make effective and balanced use of enviromental laws, with market-based approaches for environmental protection.

  1. Uranium tailings research at the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haw, V.A.; Ritcey, G.M.; Skeaff, J.M.; Dave, N.; Silver, M.

    1983-01-01

    There are over 100 million tonnes of uranium tailings on the surface of Canada, an amount that is expected to increase threefold by the end of the century. Because of their potential hazard to the environment and man, the Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology (CANMET) began a major programme ten years ago, to examine the problem of uranium tailings management. Work to date has shown that: (1) Vegetation of uranium tailings has been successful using seed mixtures planted on the tailings surface pre-treated by lime and fertilizer; (2) Lysimeter tests on uranium tailings have demonstrated that surface treatment and the presence or absence of bacteria have a marked effect on the flow and chemistry of seepage water; (3) Hydrogeochemical studies of the tailings have shown that acid conditions prevail in the upper zone of the tailings (i.e. above the water table) and that both radioactive and other toxic chemicals are concentrated near the bottom of the tailings; (4) Work has been done in co-operation with others on the precipitation and removal of 226 Ra from tailings water effluent by BaCl 2 . The purpose of this work is to improve control of the total radium content of water discharged to drainage systems by mechanical means. (5) Investigation into pre-concentrating the ore prior to acid leaching has demonstrated that virtually all the radionuclides and sulphides can be concentrated into a fraction amounting to from 30 to 40 per cent of the original feed, leaving a relatively clean tailing. The authors are still far from their objective of demonstrating, with reasonable assurance, effective methods for the long-term management of uranium tailings. An accelerated programme is outlined. (author)

  2. A Perspective on the Evolution of e-Dialogues Concerning Interdisciplinary Research on Sustainable Development in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Dale

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable development research is inherently interdisciplinary; it requires the conscious search for unifying concepts that foster and reinforce understanding across disciplines. In addition, the number of sectors and actors involved in potential solutions requires a multistakeholder approach to decision making. The challenge of sustainable development research increasingly presents itself as a problem-solving activity. It involves producing useful knowledge through applied research. It is normative and not value-free. It involves complex issues of polity and culture. Thus, sustainable development research needs novel methods for research, for bringing together expertise that crosses disciplines and sectors, and for informing policy development. It also requires an unprecedented level of integration between the natural and social sciences. This paper describes how the lessons learned from a multistakeholder roundtable have been applied to the development of deliberatively designed, transdisciplinary, electronic spaces for synchronous dialogue on sustainable development and other critical public policy issues. This approach has now evolved into a novel research data collection method for students.

  3. The energy investment decision in the nonresidential building sector: Research into the areas of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkreader, S.A.; Ivey, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe and to characterize the decision process in the nonresidential building sector as well as the variables influencing energy investment decisions, both of which impact the development of R and D agendas for the Office of Building and Community Systems (BCS). The report reviews the available information on the factors that influence energy investment decisions and identifies information gaps where additional research is needed. This report focuses on variables and combinations of these variables (descriptive states) that influence the non residential energy investment decision maker. Economic and demographic descriptors, energy investment decision maker characteristics, and variables affecting energy investments are identified. This response examines the physical characteristics of buildings, characteristics of the legal environment surrounding buildings, demographic factors, economic factors, and decision processes, all of which impact the nonresidential energy investment market. The emphasis of the report is on providing possible methodologies for projecting the future of the nonresidential energy investment market, as well as, collecting the data necessary for such projections. The use of alternate scenarios is suggested as a projection tool and suggestions for collecting the appropriate data are made in the recommendations.

  4. Fusion Canada issue 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs

  5. Fusion Canada issue 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are Canada-ITER contributions, NET Fuel Processing Loop, Bilateral Meeting for Canada-Europe, report from Tokamak de Varennes and a report from the University of Toronto on materials research for Fusion Reactors. 3 figs.

  6. Women CEOs and financial performance of banks: An empirical research of Indian private sector banks

    OpenAIRE

    Chandani, Arti; Mehta, Mita; Neeraja, B.

    2014-01-01

    A woman in the workplace is not a new phenomenon, a woman who is a member of the board could be called a moderate phenomenon but a woman who is the CEO is undoubtedly a recent phenomenon, at least in India. At present, the top private sector bank, i.e. ICICI bank, is headed by a woman, Ms. Chanda Kochhar. In addition, the Axis bank, the 3rd largest private sector bank in India is also headed by a woman CEO, Mrs. Shikha Sharma. This paper focuses on women CEOs in the private banking sector and...

  7. Benchmarking and Its Relevance to the Library and Information Sector. Interim Findings of "Best Practice Benchmarking in the Library and Information Sector," a British Library Research and Development Department Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Margaret; Garrod, Penny

    This British Library Research and Development Department study assesses current activities and attitudes toward quality management in library and information services (LIS) in the academic sector as well as the commercial/industrial sector. Definitions and types of benchmarking are described, and the relevance of benchmarking to LIS is evaluated.…

  8. Knowledge in the energy sector : what research and development expenditures and patents reveal about innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bointner, R.

    2015-01-01

    This work is dealing with knowledge in the energy sector and structured in three main parts. Part I is dealing with energy research expenditures and patents in IEA countries. A broad literature review on innovation drivers and barriers is followed by an analysis of the knowledge induced by public research and development expenditures (R&D) and patents in the energy sector. The cumulative knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures in 14 investigated IEA-countries is 102.3 bn. EUR in 2013. Nuclear energy has the largest share of 43.9 bn. EUR, followed by energy efficiency accounting for 14.9 bn. EUR, fossil fuels with 13.5 bn. EUR, and renewable energy with 12.1 bn. EUR. A regression analysis indicates a linear relation between the GDP and the cumulative knowledge, with each billion EUR of GDP leading to an additional knowledge of 3.1 mil. EUR. However, linearity is not given for single energy technologies. Further, the results show that appropriate public R&D funding for research and development associated with a subsequent promotion of the market diffusion of a niche technology may lead to a breakthrough of the respective technology. Part II aims to examine public expenditures for energy R&D in the European Union and the resulting energy knowledge stock. The energy R&D distribution among technologies of the EU member states and the European Commission was similar in the 1980s with a strong focus on nuclear energy. Nowadays energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are of growing importance. For instance, the new programme Horizon 2020 is expected to have an equal distribution between non-nuclear and nuclear R&D expenditures. The cumulative energy knowledge stock induced by public R&D expenditures amounts to 35.8 bn. EUR in 2013, whereupon the EU member states’ share is more than three times larger than the European Commission’s share. Moreover, knowledge stock scenarios for the next decade are provided, followed by an investigation, if there

  9. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Experimental Research in Televised Instruction. Memorial University of Newfoundland (Newfoundland, Canada, August 25-27, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Jon, Ed.

    The 11 papers in this collection focus on research in instructional television, the theme of a conference attended by media producers, researchers, and policy makers from Australia, Britain, Canada, France, West Germany, the Netherlands, South Africa, and the United States. The opening paper by Deane Hutton discusses two parallel but contrasting…

  10. Leashes and Lies: Navigating the Colonial Tensions of Institutional Ethics of Research Involving Indigenous Peoples in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha L. Stiegman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethical standards of conduct in research undertaken at Canadian universities involving humans has been guided by the three federal research funding agencies through the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (or TCPS for short since 1998. The statement was revised for the first time in 2010 and is now commonly referred to as the TCPS2, which includes an entire chapter (Chapter 9 devoted to the subject of research involving First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada. While the establishment of TCPS2 is an important initial step on the long road towards decolonizing Indigenous research within the academy, our frustrations—which echo those of many colleagues struggling to do research “in a good way” (see, for example, Ball & Janyst 2008; Bull, 2008; Guta et al., 2010 within this framework—highlight the urgent work that remains to be done if university-based researchers are to be enabled by establishment channels to do “ethical” research with Aboriginal peoples. In our (and others’ experience to date, we seem to have been able to do research in a good way, despite, not because of the TCPS2 (see Castleden et al., 2012. The disconnect between the stated goals of TCPS2, and the challenges researchers face when attempting to navigate how individual, rotating members of REBs interpret the TPCS2 and operate within this framework, begs the question: Wherein lies the disconnect? A number of scholars are currently researching this divide (see for example see Guta et al. 2010; Flicker & Worthington, 2011; and Guta et al., 2013. In this editorial, we offer an anecdote to illustrate our experience regarding some of these tensions and then offer reflections about what might need to change for the next iteration of the TCPS.

  11. Canada's stature in international research community enhanced with awarding of nine major projects by CFI

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Canadian Foundation for Innovation has announced it will fund nine major projects aimed at increasing Canadian research infrastructure and providing access for Canadian researchers to international facilities (1 page).

  12. Country clustering applied to the water and sanitation sector: a new tool with potential applications in research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Kyle; Crocker, Jonny; Kayser, Georgia Lyn; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-03-01

    The fields of global health and international development commonly cluster countries by geography and income to target resources and describe progress. For any given sector of interest, a range of relevant indicators can serve as a more appropriate basis for classification. We create a new typology of country clusters specific to the water and sanitation (WatSan) sector based on similarities across multiple WatSan-related indicators. After a literature review and consultation with experts in the WatSan sector, nine indicators were selected. Indicator selection was based on relevance to and suggested influence on national water and sanitation service delivery, and to maximize data availability across as many countries as possible. A hierarchical clustering method and a gap statistic analysis were used to group countries into a natural number of relevant clusters. Two stages of clustering resulted in five clusters, representing 156 countries or 6.75 billion people. The five clusters were not well explained by income or geography, and were distinct from existing country clusters used in international development. Analysis of these five clusters revealed that they were more compact and well separated than United Nations and World Bank country clusters. This analysis and resulting country typology suggest that previous geography- or income-based country groupings can be improved upon for applications in the WatSan sector by utilizing globally available WatSan-related indicators. Potential applications include guiding and discussing research, informing policy, improving resource targeting, describing sector progress, and identifying critical knowledge gaps in the WatSan sector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. A cost-benefit analysis of peer coaching for overhead lift use in the long-term care sector in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompa, Emile; Dolinschi, Roman; Alamgir, Hasanat; Sarnocinska-Hart, Anna; Guzman, Jaime

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate whether a peer-coaching programme for patient lift use in British Columbia, Canada, was effective and cost-beneficial. We used monthly panel data from 15 long-term care facilities from 2004 to 2011 to estimate the number of patient-handling injuries averted by the peer-coaching programme using a generalised estimating equation model. Facilities that had not yet introduced the programme served as concurrent controls. Accepted lost-time claim counts related to patient handling were the outcome of interest with a denominator of full-time equivalents of nursing staff. A cost-benefit approach was used to estimate the net monetary gains at the system level. The coaching programme was found to be associated with a reduction in the injury rate of 34% during the programme and 56% after the programme concluded with an estimated 62 lost-time injury claims averted. 2 other factors were associated with changes in injury rates: larger facilities had a lower injury rate, and the more care hours per bed the lower the injury rate. We calculated monetary benefits to the system of $748 431 and costs of $894 000 (both in 2006 Canadian dollars) with a benefit-to-cost ratio of 0.84. The benefit-to-cost ratio was -0.05 in the worst case scenario and 2.31 in the best case scenario. The largest cost item was peer coaches' time. A simulation of the programme continuing for 5 years with the same coaching intensity would result in a benefit-to-cost ratio of 0.63. A peer-coaching programme to increase effective use of overhead lifts prevented additional patient-handling injuries but added modest incremental cost to the system. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. Fusion Canada issue 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    Fusion Canada's publication of the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is the CFFTP Industrial Impact Study, CCFM/TdeV Update:helium pumping, research funds, and deuterium in beryllium - high temperature behaviour. 3 figs

  15. Operation of the joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.; Duport, P.J.; Brown, L.D.

    1993-07-01

    The Joint Panel, formed in 1976, is a Canadian organization (composed of federal and provincial government departments and agencies, uranium mining companies, labour unions, and non-profit research institutions) whose members have voluntarily agreed to share information regarding planned, ongoing and completed research on the effects of uranium (and thorium) production on the radiological health and safety of workers and on the environment. The objectives of the Joint Panel are: the identification of areas (within its purview of interest) where research is required; the stimulation of research in areas where the needs have been identified; the dissemination of subsequent research results; and, the avoidance of unnecessary duplication in research activities. The operation of this unique organization permits a free and open discussion of a wide variety of research activities, draws upon its member institutions to form working groups for the preparation of technical documents, and complements its more formal business sessions with technical presentations on topics of current interest. Copies of reports of completed research are maintained by a secretariat, which also issues the minutes of all meetings as well as the annual reports

  16. Critical energy infrastructure protection in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gendron, Angela [Canadian Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, Carleton University (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    In Canada government acknowledged the need to protect energy assets against attacks. However, so far no strategy has been developed. The aim of this report is to present the characteristics of the energy sector in Canada, the threats, and how the government is responding to those threats. The energy sector in Canada is concentrated and diverse and is under not only terrorism or cyber attacks threats but also environmental threats. This report shows that the Government of Canada is focusing on the protection and assurance of important energy infrastructures but that they are facing several challenges resulting in long delays in the adoption of a formal strategy.

  17. Doctoral Research Education in Canada: Full-Time and Part-Time Students' Access to Research Assistantships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Ewalina Kinga

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students' development as researchers is a key objective in higher education internationally. Research assistantships (RAships) nurture graduate students as novice researchers as they develop theoretical and methodological knowledge. However, few studies have investigated the ways institutional regulations, informal practices, and…

  18. 76 FR 41266 - Critical Path Manufacturing Sector Research Initiative (U01)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... including nanotechnology are not fully developed in the public sector. This work will develop technology... manufacturing techniques for these products. Development of models for manufacturing and engineering of device products such as infusion pumps, prosthetic organs, defibrillators, tissue engineering devices, and...

  19. Are Performance-Based Accountability Systems Effective? Evidence from Five Sectors. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, Kristin J.

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades, performance-based accountability systems (PBASs), which link financial or other incentives to measured performance as a means of improving services, have gained popularity among policymakers. Although PBASs can vary widely across sectors, they share three main components: goals (i.e., one or more long-term outcomes to…

  20. Sectoral Perspectives on the Benefits of Vocational Education and Training. Research Paper No. 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The report confirms the importance of training for the European Union (EU) industrial policy. It demonstrates that sectors where training is firmly integrated in human resource practices have higher productivity gains. Such economic benefits are not only realised through developing workers' skills, but also thanks to higher job satisfaction and…

  1. Eastern Canada offshore report/Nordco (Newfoundland Ocean Research and Development Corp. Ltd. ) offers technical expertise to industry through applied R and D (research and development)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G

    1979-07-02

    Nordco's role in offshore R and D emphasizes aspects dealing with sea ice, icebergs, oceanography, including the possible movements of pollutants in an estuary in Labrador, submarine geology, meteorology, and remote sensing, and their impact on the Newfoundland petroleum and fishing industries. Its marine transportation division, with the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, has been studying the possible use of LORAN-C as a navigation aid for offshore eastern Canada, and has been researching ice-caused problems in the Bridport Inlet area, where a northern LNG terminal is planned on Melville Island, and icebreaking techniques, Arctic navigation, and oil and LNG transport. Nordco has also been cooperating with the Geonautics Ltd. consortium, which is involved in pipeline and cable routing and other studies. According to G. Jones (Nordco), the Eastcoast Petroleum Operators Association has also been studying offshore problems, and has set up a project to provide $2 million for oil spill equipment and dispersants where needed. This project is operated by Esso Resources Canada Ltd. and involves eight to ten participants.

  2. Call for proposals for the Joint Canada-Israel Health Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-11-23

    Nov 23, 2017 ... ... cellular and molecular basis of cognition; modeling brain function; imaging ... a range of activities supporting the research and training objectives of the ... Innovation Fund—managed by the Department of Health and Social ...

  3. 2010-2015 methane trends over Canada, the United States, and Mexico observed by the GOSAT satellite: contributions from different source sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, J. X.; Jacob, D.; Turner, A. J.; Maasakkers, J. D.; Benmergui, J. S.; Bloom, A. A.; Arndt, C.; Gautam, R.; Zavala Araiza, D.; Hamburg, S.; Boesch, H.; Parker, R.

    2017-12-01

    We use six years (2010-2015) of methane column data from the GOSAT satellite to examine trends in atmospheric methane over North America and infer trends in emissions. Local methane enhancements above background are diagnosed in the GOSAT data on a 0.5°x0.5° grid by estimating the local background as the low (10th-25th) quantile of the deseasonalized frequency distributions of the data for individual years. Trends in methane enhancements on the 0.5°x0.5° grid are then aggregated nationally and for individual source sectors, using information from state-of-science bottom-up inventories, to increase statistical power. We infer that US methane emissions increased by 1.9% a-1 over the six-year period, with contributions from both oil/gas systems (possibly unconventional gas production) and from livestock in the Midwest (possibly swine production). Mexican emissions show a decrease that can be attributed to a decreasing cattle population. Canadian emissions show interannual variability driven by wetlands emissions and correlated with wetland areal extent. The US emission trends inferred from the GOSAT data are within the constraint provided by surface observations from the North American Carbon Program network.

  4. Access to health services in Western Newfoundland, Canada: Issues, barriers and recommendations emerging from a community-engaged research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Hippe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research indicates that people living in rural and remote areas of Canada face challenges to accessing health services. This article reports on a community-engaged research project conducted by investigators at Memorial University of Newfoundland in collaboration with the Rural Secretariat Regional Councils and Regional Partnership Planners for the Corner Brook–Rocky Harbour and Stephenville–Port aux Basques Rural Secretariat Regions of Newfoundland and Labrador. The aim of this research was to gather information on barriers to accessing health services, to identify solutions to health services’ access issues and to inform policy advice to government on enhancing access to health services. Data was collected through: (1 targeted distribution of a survey to communities throughout the region, and (2 informal ‘kitchen table’ discussions to discuss health services’ access issues. A total of 1049 surveys were collected and 10 kitchen table discussions were held. Overall, the main barriers to care listed in the survey included long wait times, services not available in the area and services not available at time required. Other barriers noted by survey respondents included transportation problems, financial concerns, no medical insurance coverage, distance to travel and weather conditions. Some respondents reported poorer access to maternal/child health and breast and cervical screening services and a lack of access to general practitioners, pharmacy services, dentists and nurse practitioners. Recommendations that emerged from this research included improving the recruitment of rural physicians, exploring the use of nurse practitioners, assisting individuals with travel costs,  developing specialist outreach services, increasing use of telehealth services and initiating additional rural and remote health research. Keywords: rural, remote, healthcare, health services, social determinants of health

  5. Perspectives on emerging zoonotic disease research and capacity building in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Craig; Artsob, Harvey; Bowie, William R; Drebot, Michael; Fraser, Erin; Leighton, Ted; Morshed, Muhammad; Ong, Corinne; Patrick, David

    2004-01-01

    Zoonoses are fundamental determinants of community health. Preventing, identifying and managing these infections must be a central public health focus. Most current zoonoses research focuses on the interface of the pathogen and the clinically ill person, emphasizing microbial detection, mechanisms of pathogenicity and clinical intervention strategies, rather than examining the causes of emergence, persistence and spread of new zoonoses. There are gaps in the understanding of the animal determinants of emergence and the capacity to train highly qualified individuals; these are major obstacles to preventing new disease threats. The ability to predict the emergence of zoonoses and their resulting public health and societal impacts are hindered when insufficient effort is devoted to understanding zoonotic disease epidemiology, and when zoonoses are not examined in a manner that yields fundamental insight into their origin and spread. Emerging infectious disease research should rest on four pillars: enhanced communications across disciplinary and agency boundaries; the assessment and development of surveillance and disease detection tools; the examination of linkages between animal health determinants of human health outcomes; and finally, cross-disciplinary training and research. A national strategy to predict, prevent and manage emerging diseases must have a prominent and explicit role for veterinary and biological researchers. An integrated health approach would provide decision makers with a firmer foundation from which to build evidence-based disease prevention and control plans that involve complex human/animal/environmental systems, and would serve as the foundation to train and support the new cadre of individuals ultimately needed to maintain and apply research capacity in this area. PMID:18159512

  6. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. During the recent past, the slowdown in nuclear power development in Canada has curtailed the demand for new nuclear professionals down to a trickle. Without exciting job opportunities in sight the interest of prospective students in nuclear education and research has plunged. Consequently, with declining enrolment in nuclear studies and higher demand from competing disciplines, most universities have found it difficult to sustain nuclear programs. As such the available pool of graduating students is small and insufficient to meet emerging industry demand. With nuclear industry employees' average age hovering around mid-forties and practically no younger cohort to back up, nuclear industry faces the risk of knowledge loss and significant difficulty in recruiting new employees to replenish its depleting workforce. It is, therefore, justifiably concerned. Also, since nuclear generation is now the purview of smaller companies, their in-house capability for mid- to longer-term research is becoming inadequate. Recognizing the above challenges, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited have formed an alliance with prominent Canadian universities and undertaken to invest money and offer in-kind support to accomplish three main objectives: Reinvigorate university-based nuclear engineering research by augmenting university resources by creating new industry supported research professorships and supporting research of other professors; Promote enrolment in graduate programs by supporting students and making use of a course-based Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Program that is taught collectively by

  7. The National Cohort of Dairy Farms--a data collection platform for mastitis research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyher, K K; Dufour, S; Barkema, H W; Des Côteaux, L; Devries, T J; Dohoo, I R; Keefe, G P; Roy, J-P; Scholl, D T

    2011-03-01

    Costs and feasibility of extensive sample collection and processing are major obstacles to mastitis epidemiology research. Studies are often consequentially limited, and fundamental mastitis researchers rarely have the opportunity to conduct their work in epidemiologically valid populations. To mitigate these limitations, the Canadian Bovine Mastitis Research Network has optimized research funds by creating a data collection platform to provide epidemiologically meaningful data for several simultaneous research endeavors. This platform consists of a National Cohort of Dairy Farms (NCDF), Mastitis Laboratory Network, and Mastitis Pathogen Culture Collection. This paper describes the implementation and operation of the NCDF, explains its sampling protocols and data collection, and documents characteristics, strengths and limitations of these data for current and potential users. The NCDF comprises 91 commercial dairy farms in 6 provinces sampled over a 2-yr period. Primarily Holstein-Friesian herds participating in Dairy Herd Improvement milk recording were selected in order to achieve a uniform distribution among 3 strata of bulk tank somatic cell counts and to reflect regional proportions of freestall housing systems. Standardized protocols were implemented for repeated milk samplings on clinical mastitis cases, fresh and randomly selected lactating cows, and cows at dry-off and after calving. Just fewer than 133,000 milk samples were collected. Demographic and production data were recorded at individual cow and farm levels. Health management data are documented and extensive questionnaire data detailing farm management and cleanliness information are also captured. The Laboratory Network represents coordinated regional mastitis bacteriology laboratories using standardized procedures. The Culture Collection archives isolates recovered from intramammary infections of cows in the NCDF and contains over 16,500 isolates, all epidemiologically cross-referenced between

  8. State-of-the-Art: Research Theoretical Framework of Information Systems Implementation Research in the Health Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetteh, Godwin Kofi

    2014-01-01

    This study is about the state-of-the-art of reference theories and theoretical framework of information systems implementation research in the health industry in the Sub-Saharan countries from a process perspective. A process – variance framework, Poole et al, (2000), Markus & Robey, (1988......) and Shaw & Jarvenpaa, (1997) is employed to examine reference theories employed in research conducted on information systems implementation in the health sector in the Sub-Saharan region and published between 2003 and 2013. Using a number of key words and searching on a number of databases, EBSCO, CSA...... the process theoretical framework to enhance our insight into successful information systems implementation in the region. It is our optimism that the process based theoretical framework will be useful for, information system practitioners and organisational managers and researchers in the health sector...

  9. Research needs related to internal dosimetry. Joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada (JP-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duport, P.; Pomroy, C.; Brown, D.

    1989-01-01

    There are several important techniques of internal dosimetry for use with uranium mine and mill workers: personal radon daughter dosimetry, uranium content of urine, whole body counter to evaluate the uranium in lung burden, and assay of uranium in biopsy or autopsy tissue samples. There are problems with each of these techniques and further research is required in internal dosimetry (as well as the alternative of monitoring exposure levels). This research should be aimed at improved or supplementary dosimetry techniques, enhanced theoretical interpretation of dosimetry results and fundamental research not directly related to the techniques mentioned above. Proposals for research as presented by the working group in this report should be considered by funding organizations concerned with internal dosimetry as it relates to the uranium mining industry, and, since this report was first presented. AECB has proceeded with related projects. (author)

  10. Research needs related to internal dosimetry. Joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada (JP-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duport, P; Pomroy, C [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Brown, D [Saskatchewan Human Resources, Labour and Employment, Regina (Canada)

    1990-12-31

    There are several important techniques of internal dosimetry for use with uranium mine and mill workers: personal radon daughter dosimetry, uranium content of urine, whole body counter to evaluate the uranium in lung burden, and assay of uranium in biopsy or autopsy tissue samples. There are problems with each of these techniques and further research is required in internal dosimetry (as well as the alternative of monitoring exposure levels). This research should be aimed at improved or supplementary dosimetry techniques, enhanced theoretical interpretation of dosimetry results and fundamental research not directly related to the techniques mentioned above. Proposals for research as presented by the working group in this report should be considered by funding organizations concerned with internal dosimetry as it relates to the uranium mining industry, and, since this report was first presented. AECB has proceeded with related projects. (author).

  11. Field tracer transport experiments at the site of Canada's underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, L.H.; Davison, C.C.; Vandergraaf, T.T.; Scheier, N.W.; Kozak, E.T.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of the processes affecting solute transport in fractured crystalline rock, groundwater tracer experiments are being performed within natural fracture domains and excavation damage zones at various scales at the site of AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The main objective of these experiments is to develop and demonstrate methods for characterizing the solute transport properties within fractured crystalline rock. Estimates of these properties are in turn being used in AECL's conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport through the geosphere surrounding a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. (author)

  12. Fusion Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This first issue of a quarterly newsletter announces the startup of the Tokamak de Varennes, describes Canada's national fusion program, and outlines the Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Program. A map gives the location of the eleven principal fusion centres in Canada. (L.L.)

  13. Making Research Matter Comment on "Public Spending on Health Service and Policy Research in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States: A Modest Proposal".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, David J; Frank, John

    2017-08-13

    We offer a UK-based commentary on the recent "Perspective" published in IJHPM by Thakkar and Sullivan. We are sympathetic to the authors' call for increased funding for health service and policy research (HSPR). However, we point out that increasing that investment - in any of the three countries they compare: Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom- will ipso facto not necessarily lead to any better use of research by health system decision-makers in these settings. We cite previous authors' descriptions of the many factors that tend to make the worlds of researchers and decision-makers into "two solitudes." And we call for changes in the structure and funding of HSPR, particularly the incentives now in place for purely academic publishing, to tackle a widespread reality: most published research in HSPR, as in other applied fields of science, is never read or used by the vast majority of decision-makers, working out in the "real world. © 2018 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  14. Key considerations for the success of Medical Education Research and Innovation units in Canada: unit director perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Bidlake, Erin; Humphrey-Murto, Sue; Sutherland, Stephanie; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2014-08-01

    Growth in the field of medical education is evidenced by the proliferation of units dedicated to advancing Medical Education Research and Innovation (MERI). While a review of the literature discovered narrative accounts of MERI unit development, we found no systematic examinations of the dimensions of and structures that facilitate the success of these units. We conducted qualitative interviews with the directors of 12 MERI units across Canada. Data were analyzed using qualitative description (Sandelowski in Res Nurs Health 23:334-340, 2000). Final analysis drew on Bourdieu's (Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1977; Media, culture and society: a critical reader. Sage, London, 1986; Language and symbolic power. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1991) concepts of field, habitus, and capital, and more recent research investigating the field of MERI (Albert in Acad Med 79:948-954, 2004; Albert et al. in Adv Health Sci Educ 12:103-115, 2007). When asked about the metrics by which they define their success, directors cited: teaching, faculty mentoring, building collaborations, delivering conference presentations, winning grant funding, and disseminating publications. Analyzed using Bourdieu's concepts, these metrics are discussed as forms of capital that have been legitimized in the MERI field. All directors, with the exception of one, described success as being comprised of elements (capital) at both ends of the service-research spectrum (i.e., Albert's PP-PU structure). Our analysis highlights the forms of habitus (i.e., behaviors, attitudes, demeanors) directors use to negotiate, strategize and position the unit within their local context. These findings may assist institutions in developing a new-or reorganizing an existing-MERI unit. We posit that a better understanding of these complex social structures can help units become savvy participants in the MERI field. With such insight, units can improve their academic output and

  15. Reclamation research for the future at Syncrude Canada Ltd. : soil simulation-revegetation studies on tailings sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedkenheuer, A W; Browne, J

    1979-12-01

    In response to the rising demand for energy in today's world, oil extracted from oil sands has become a viable energy source. Syncrude Canada Ltd. is a 2.2 billion dollar oil sands surface mining and processing venture situated in the Athabasca oil sands of northeastern Alberta. It is located near the town of Fort McMurray approximately 420 km north of Edmonton. During its planned 25 years of mine life, Syncrude expects to produce more than 1 billion barrels of oil from a 2800 ha mine area. Syncrude is committed to reclaiming this immense mine area. The reclamation objective is to return the disturbed site to a vegetative cover having a productivity which is equal to or greater than that which existed prior to disturbance. The reclaimed area must also be compatible with the neighboring natural areas. To accomplish this the vast quantities of tailings sand (that is, the leftover sand from which the oil has been extracted) must be reformed into a soil which is capable of supporting native plant communities. Researchers at Syncrude are looking for ways to use indigenous materials with the tailings sand to simulate a naturally-formed soil. Native plant species are being tested to see how well they will grow in such simulated soils and to evaluate their potential for use in large scale reclamation projects. This brochure describes the soil simulation-revegetation experiments going on at Syncrude.

  16. Sector emergency procedures for Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, A.; Aslam, M.; Faruq, M.U.; Ahmad, B.; Hasan, S.; Lodhi, N.P.K.

    1992-12-01

    A plan for handling of the radiation emergency situation prevailing outside PINSTECH has been incorporated in this report. This report outlines the detailed procedures and collective responsibilities and actions to be undertaken for meeting the emergency situation. These procedures include announcement/notification of emergency, evaluation of emergency, control of access and aggress, personnel monitoring and internal dosimetry, medical care of injured etc. A summary of the role and responsibilities of PINSTECH and the public organisations during a sector emergency at PINSTECH has been included as an appendix. (Orig./A.B.)

  17. Research inteligencia de negocios: estudio de caso sector tecnológico colombiano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Alexandra Gutierrez Camelo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los resultados de un estudio realizado a 90 empresas colombianas en su mayoría del sector tecnológico para establecer una visión panorámica del estado del arte de la inteligencia de negocios, desde su concepto hasta los modelos de implementación, con el objetivo de  analizar cómo la cultura colombiana afecta su adaptación como herramienta fundamental en el desarrollo competitivo de las organizaciones y la toma de decisiones acertadas.

  18. A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of a crystalline rock environment, Whiteshell research area, southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.R.; Brown, A.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; McGregor, R.G.; Ophori, D.U.; Scheier, N.W.; Stanchell, F.; Thorne, G.A.; Tomsons, D.K.

    1996-04-01

    A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of regional groundwater flow in the crystalline rocks of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) has been developed by a team of AECL geoscientists. The revised model updates an earlier model developed in 1985, and has a much broader database. This database was compiled from Landsat and airborne radar images, geophysical surveys and surface mapping, and from analyses of fracture logs, hydraulic tests and water samples collected from a network of deep boreholes drilled across the WRA. The boundaries of the revised conceptual model were selected to coincide with the natural hydraulic boundaries assumed for the regional groundwater flow systems in the WRA. The upper and lower boundaries are the water table and a horizontal plane 4 km below ground surface. For modelling purposes the rocks below 4 km are considered to be impermeable. The rocks of the modelled region were divided on the basis of fracture characteristics into three categories: fractured zones (FZs); moderately fractured rock (MFR); and sparsely fractured rock (SFR). The FZs are regions of intensely fractured rock. Seventy-six FZs were selected to form the fault framework within the revised conceptual model. The physical rock/water properties of the FZs, MFR and SFR were selected by analysis of field data from hydraulic and tracer tests, laboratory test data and water quality data. These properties were used to define a mathematical groundwater flow model of the WRA using AECL's MOTIF finite element code (Ophori et al. 1995, 1996). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  19. Peer bullying in seniors' subsidised apartment communities in Saskatoon, Canada: participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, Donna; Heal-Salahub, Jennifer; PausJenssen, Elliot; James, George; Lidington, Joan

    2017-07-01

    Given that 'home' is the major physical-spatial environment of many older adults and that home, social and neighbourhood environments are well-recognised to impact both the ability to age in place and quality of life in this population, a better understanding of the nature of social interactions within seniors' communal living environments is critical for health promotion. This paper describes a two-phase participatory research study examining peer bullying by older adults conducted in April and May, 2016. Responding to needs expressed by tenants, the objectives of this study were to identify the nature, prevalence and consequences of peer bullying for tenants of two low-income senior apartment communities. In collaboration with the local Older Adult Abuse Task Force, a screening survey on bullying was distributed to all tenants. Findings (n = 49) indicated that 39% of tenants had witnessed peer bullying and 29% had experienced bullying by peers. An adapted version of a youth bullying survey was administered in follow-up face-to-face interviews with 13 tenants. The most common forms of peer bullying were deliberate social exclusion and hurtful comments. The majority of respondents indicated that bullying was a problem for seniors and that bullies hurt other people. Outcomes of bullying included feelings of dejection and difficulties conducting everyday activities. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. CMHC [Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation] research project: Testing of air barrier construction details 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-31

    Air leakage control through the building envelope of wood framed houses is more important than ever. This is because owners expect better temperature control, higher indoor humidity in winter, low energy consumption and building durability. The leakage of air is controlled by the air barrier system. There are several new technologies to construct an air barrier system for the building envelope. These are the Poly Approach, the Air Drywall Approach (ADA) and the EASE system. The development of these systems was undertaken primarily by the building community without significant research and development. While it is believed that these methods improve airtightness it is not known if the improvement is marginal or significant. A study was conducted to determine actual performace of several different types of construction details for each of the different approaches. Each of these details was designed and constructed using one of the air barrier methods and tested in the laboratory. The test details included sill plate, the partition wall, the stair stringer, the electrical outlets, the bathtub detail, the plumbing stack detail, the metal chimney detail, the bathroom fan detail and the EASE wall system. The test results revealed that the Poly, ADA and EASE approaches reduce air leakage by a factor of six, if applied with a modest degree of workmanship. Further, certain Poly details are to be reconsidered because they lack adequate support against design wind load pressures. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Earth, soil and environmental science research facility at sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. I. Sector layout and optical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, P.; Jaski, Y.R.; Lazarz, N.; Murray, P.; Pluth, J.; Rarback, H.; Rivers, M.; Sutton, S. [CARS, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The earth, soil and environmental science component (GSECARS) of the Consortium of Advanced Radiation Sources (CARS), is designing a national research facility to be built at sector 13 of the Advanced Photon Source. The bending magnet beam will be split to allow simultaneous operation of two stations, a monochromatic (8{endash}15 keV) side station and a multipurpose, white beam/monochromatic end station. The undulator beamline will have two white beam stations, which may operate simultaneously using a double-crystal monochromator (cryogenic Si) with a thin first crystal. In this mode, the upstream station will accept the monochromatized (4.5{endash}22 keV) beam deflected horizontally by a third (bendable) Ge crystal, while the end station accepts the high energy component (blue beam) transmitted by the first crystal. The need for small x-ray beams and broad spectral range have led us to base the focusing aspects of the optic design on grazing incidence mirrors. Both our bending magnet and insertion device beamlines will have long ({approximately}1 m), bendable mirrors (demagnification {lt}11, E(cut-off) {approx_gt}70 keV; beam sizes {approx_gt}tens of micrometers). For smaller focal spots, we will use small, dynamically bent Kirpatrick-Baez mirrors (demagnification 100{endash}400; E(cut-off) {lt}70 keV; beam sizes {approximately}1 micrometer). A unique aspect of our insertion device beamline is the ability to deliver focused white beam to the sample, through the incorporation of a power management pinhole in the first optics enclosure. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Employment in the research and development sector in selected countries of the European Union and the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Turczak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to determine how particular factors affect the diversity of countries in terms of the number of employees in the research and development (R&D sector compared with the number of their overall populations. Two factors are analysed in the study: the proportion of employment in the R&D sector to the total number of people employed (i.e. the factor showing the importance given to R&D in the country concerned and the proportion of the total number of people employed to the number of inhabitants aged 15 and more (i.e. the employment rate. The logarithmic method has been used to assess the impact of deviations of these factors on the deviation of employment in the R&D sector in relation to the number of inhabitants. The causal analysis has allowed for answering the question of how each factor affects the variable in the selected twenty-six countries of the European Union and the world, i.e. what are the direction and strength of the influence. The results obtained for Poland are compared with those received for other countries covered by the analysis and the final conclusions are drawn on this basis.

  3. Open Educational Resources in Canada 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreal, Rory; Anderson, Terry; Conrad, Dianne

    2015-01-01

    Canada's important areas of expertise in open educational resources (OER) are beginning to be built upon or replicated more broadly in all education and training sectors. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in OER initiatives and open higher education in general in Canada, providing insights into what is happening nationally…

  4. Learning together: a Canada-Cuba research collaboration to improve the sustainable management of environmental health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Jerry; Garcia, Maricel; Bonet, Mariano; Yassi, Annalee

    2006-01-01

    To build a national Cuban capacity for training environmental health professionals directly linked to the needs of policy-makers and communities. The University of Manitoba and University of British Columbia collaborated with an established training centre in Cuba (the Instituto Nacional de Higiene y Epidemiologia--INHEM) and new centres in the Central (Santa Clara) and Eastern (Santiago) regions of the country. Cuba. In the mid-1990s, a comprehensive curriculum (masters and diploma programs) was collaboratively developed, applying interactive teaching methods, and was delivered through a series of workshops and other interactions in Cuba, and short-term visits to Canada by Cuban PhD students. The collaboration was successful in fulfilling capacity-building targets (over 50 Masters graduates, 467 Diploma graduates, over 30 trained core faculty in all regional centres as well as new curriculum and new accredited regional programs). Alongside this, a number of collaborative community-based research projects were undertaken in all three regions (drinking water in Santiago; housing and urban renewal, and dengue control in Havana; and tourism-related effects, and effective intersectoral management of population health determinants in Santa Clara). The collaboration led to adopting new strategies for challenges such as a dengue epidemic in 2002, and new research on the effectiveness of intersectoral management of risks of particular interest to both Cuban and Canadian policy-makers. It triggered an ambitious collaboration between the Canadian-Cuban team and colleagues in Ecuador in order to build a similar national network there, built on South-South and North-South links.

  5. Presentation of Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedley, Dianne E.

    1997-01-01

    In contingency of a nuclear emergency event, requiring application of intervention measures on a federal scale, Canada has of a plan ensuring the compatibility of the plans of different provinces and serving as interface between federal and provincial authorities. Exclusive of a nuclear attack against North America, by nuclear emergency it is understood an accident resulting in radionuclide release. This is called the Plan of federal intervention in case of nuclear emergency. 'Sante Canada' is the federal authority responsible for intervention in case of nuclear emergency and it has the task of preparing and coordinating the actions on a federal scale.Should the plan be set in action and if the emergency has repercussions upon the agricultural sector, the sustaining organism will be 'Agriculture and agroalimentaire Canada' which in case of emergency acts through the channels of the National System of intervention in the agro-alimentary sector (SNIUA). The paper presents the objectives, the principles of organization and operation, the responsibilities and the plans which SNIUA has in its charge to implement in case of emergency

  6. Maximizing industry benefit through cooperation between federal, state and private-sector floricultural research efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    he USDA-ARS Greenhouse Production Research Group was established to provide a federally funded research emphasis on greenhouse crop production. It has focused on broad production issues (nutrition, water management, and energy conservation) by coordinating research between in-house researchers, Uni...

  7. A research on the effect of global trends in Turkish kitchen furniture sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Uçar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Through survey results, this study evaluated global trends’ effects on Turkish kitchen furniture production. The level of knowledge and difficulties of catching up with and implementing developmental trends in the Turkish kitchen furniture sector has been seen as having a structure equivalent to world standards because the level of material and technological development has been determined by four criteria: consumer demand, housing plans, technology inadequacy, and material inadequacy. According to the results, findings in this framework, consumer demand was most influential (45.4% in capturing and implementing enterprises’ trends. Evaluation results on kitchen furniture projects implemented by Turkish enterprises within the last 5 years showed that they mostly worked with models with one-lid views in cabinet-door applications (41.6%. As a result, world trends reflect the direct influence of Turkish kitchen furniture manufacturers on cabinet-door models and color preferences for kitchen units.

  8. Using the cost distribution report in estimating private sector payments: what adjustments should researchers make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Gary; Grippen, Glen; Parris, Y C; Mitchell, Mary

    2003-06-01

    To reapportion Veterans Health Administration (VA) annual expenditures into benefit categories for comparison with estimated payments by private sector providers. Total expenditures for six VA medical centers for federal fiscal year 1999 were reapportioned by benefit category using the cost distribution report (CDR). Health benefit categories were based on those of health care insurers. Cost reapportionment was based on CDR data and reviews of source accounting and payroll documents. Actual expenditures for many benefits can be accurately identified and reapportioned using CDR data, but other expenditures were not identifiable in the CDR and required inspection of source documents. Inpatient expenditures amounting to $75,110,094 US dollars and outpatient expenditures amounting to $73,594,284 US dollars were reapportioned into other benefit categories, primarily professional fees. Expenditures for some VA benefits could not be identified because of differences in accounting and clinical practice between the VA and the community. Revisions to bring the CDR more in line with private sector payment categories would improve effectiveness for internal VA analyses and external expenditure comparisons. CDR revisions would require changes in recording some clinical workload (eg, rehabilitation and extended care) and classifying residential and domiciliary programs separate from inpatient care. Benefits that were not assigned expenditures for comparison with payments represent a potential liability if the VA were to purchase health care services in the marketplace. Variation among hospitals on expenditures not clearly identified in the CDR was significant and raises questions about the effectiveness of capitated budget methodologies using either the CDR or the decision support system.

  9. 2014 Update of the Canadian Rheumatology Association/spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada treatment recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis. Part I: principles of the management of spondyloarthritis in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohekar, Sherry; Chan, Jon; Tse, Shirley M L; Haroon, Nigil; Chandran, Vinod; Bessette, Louis; Mosher, Dianne; Flanagan, Cathy; Keen, Kevin J; Adams, Karen; Mallinson, Michael; Thorne, Carter; Rahman, Proton; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The Canadian Rheumatology Association (CRA) and the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) have collaborated to update the recommendations for the management of spondyloarthritis (SpA). A working group was assembled and consisted of the SPARCC executive committee, rheumatologist leaders from SPARCC collaborating sites, Canadian rheumatologists from across the country with an interest in SpA (both academic and community), a rheumatology trainee with an interest in SpA, an epidemiologist/health services researcher, a member of the CRA executive, a member of the CRA therapeutics committee, and a patient representative from the Canadian Spondylitis Association. An extensive review was conducted of literature published from 2007 to 2014 involving the management of SpA. The working group created draft recommendations using multiple rounds of Web-based surveys and an in-person conference. A survey was sent to the membership of the CRA to obtain an extended review that was used to finalize the recommendations. Guidelines for the management of SpA were created. Part I focuses on the principles of management of SpA in Canada and includes 6 general management principles, 5 ethical considerations, target groups for treatment recommendations, 2 wait time recommendations, and recommendations for disease monitoring. Also included are 6 modifications for application to juvenile SpA. These recommendations were developed based on current literature and applied to a Canadian healthcare context. It is hoped that the implementation of these recommendations will promote best practices in the treatment of SpA.

  10. A bibliometric review of drug and alcohol research focused on Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Anton; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States experience a disproportionately high burden of harms from substance misuse. Research is therefore required to improve our understanding of substance use in Indigenous populations and provide evidence on strategies effective for reducing harmful use. A search of 13 electronic databases for peer-reviewed articles published between 1993 and 2014 focusing on substance use and Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Relevant abstracts were classified as data or non-data based research. Data-based studies were further classified as measurement, descriptive or intervention and their trends examined by country and drug type. Intervention studies were classified by type and their evaluation designs classified using the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) data collection checklist. There was a statistically significant increase from 1993 to 2014 in the percentage of total publications that were data-based (P Indigenous drug and alcohol field are required. The dominance of descriptive research in the Indigenous drug and alcohol field is less than optimal for generating evidence to inform Indigenous drug and alcohol policy and programs. [Clifford A, Shakeshaft A. A bibliometric review of drug and alcohol research focused on Indigenous peoples of Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United States. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:509-522]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. The Emergence of Flood Insurance in Canada: Navigating Institutional Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistlethwaite, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Flood insurance has remained unavailable in Canada based on an assessment that it lacks economic viability. In response to Canada's costliest flood event to date in 2013, the Canadian insurance industry has started to develop a framework to expand existing property insurance to cover flood damage. Research on flood insurance has overlooked why and how insurance systems transition to expand insurance coverage without evidence of economic viability. This article will address this gap through a case study on the emergence of flood insurance in Canada, and the approach to its expansion. Between 2013 and 2016, insurance industry officials representing over 60% of premiums collected in Canada were interviewed. These interviews revealed that flood insurance is being expanded in response to institutional pressure, specifically external stakeholder expectations that the insurance industry will adopt a stronger role in managing flood risk through coverage of flood damage. Further evidence of this finding is explored by assessing the emergence of a unique flood insurance model that involves a risk-adjusted and optional product along with an expansion of government policy supporting flood risk mitigation. This approach attempts to balance industry concerns about economic viability with institutional pressure to reduce flood risk through insurance. This analysis builds on existing research by providing the first scholarly analysis of flood insurance in Canada, important "empirical" teeth to existing conceptual analysis on the availability of flood insurance, and the influence of institutional factors on risk analysis within the insurance sector. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Private-sector Support of Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M. T.; Christy, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    In fiscal year 2016, 66% of MIT's external research support came from federal sources. This percentage is the lowest since federal funding of university research initiated circa World War II. The percentage has dropped precipitously since the financial crisis of 2008 and the advent of sequestration, and the most optimistic scenario in the near future is flat to mildly increasing federal investments in research. Of the one-third of MIT's research supported by non-federal sources, 18% comes from industry, and the remainder comes from foundations, non-profits, and state and foreign governments. The overwhelming majority of non-federal support is for applied rather than basic research. Non-federal support of research in the geosciences comes from all these sources. In accepting research support from industry MIT must balance the desires of faculty and research staff to work in collaboration with companies of their choosing, with the essential need to set conditions that ensure independent scholarship. Participation in research projects is at the discretion of the Principal Investigator, and must be fully consistent with MIT's non-discrimination and open access policies. In all research agreements, MIT requires that faculty, students and research staff are able to freely present and publish results. While MIT's research partners help to identify research areas of mutual interest and may consult on research as it moves forward, MIT faculty members, researchers, post-doctoral scholars and students retain control over the design and management of their research projects at all times. The Institute also requires the identification and management of any conflicts of interest.

  13. Policy Writing as Dialogue: Drafting an Aboriginal Chapter for Canada's Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Reading

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Writing policy that applies to First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples in Canada has become more interactive as communities and their representative organizations press for practical recognition of an Aboriginal right of self-determination. When the policy in development is aimed at supporting “respect for human dignity” as it is in the case of ethics of research involving humans, the necessity of engaging the affected population becomes central to the undertaking.

  14. Work-Related Identity of Clinical Research Sector Employees in Poland Against Professional Transformation of the Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kozierkiewicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Established professions and knowledge workers identify more with their professional groups than with their organisations. The purpose of the study was to fnd what kind of work-related identities are shown by clinical research sector employees in Poland, what is the intensity of those identities and which one is dominant. Methodology: The study started with qualitative interviews dedicated to professional changes and to work-related identity. The latter was selected for the main quantitative part of the study and its fve types were defned related to the trained profession, the practised profession, organizational, relational and task-related work identities. Intensity of these pre-defned identities was tested with a use of a questionnaire completed by 147 representatives of the sector under study. Statistical analysis of the collected data verifed the research hypotheses that assumed a certain gradation of these work-related identities. Results: Professional identity related to the practised occupation was placed on the highest level followed by task-related identity. Relational and organisational identities were classifed on the third and fourth levels. Identity related to the trained occupation achieved the lowest score. The employing organization type had no effect on the manifested professional identity. Originality value: As a developing new occupation, the study group itself was an interesting population for studying work-related identity. Combining the qualitative and quantitative methods enabled evaluation of the results against the professional changes shaping the sector, which can have an impact on building the work-related identity of its employees.

  15. Sectoral Innovation Watch electrical and Optical Equipment Sector. Final sector report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, T. van den; Giessen, A.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The electrical and optical equipment sector is a high-tech manufacturing sector. It is one of the most innovative sectors in Europe with investments and advances in fundamental research, applied R&D and innovation in the actual use of equipment. This sector is also one of the most global sectors

  16. Introduction of the 2007-2008 JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik Gas Hydrate Production Research Program, NWT, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Dallimore, S. R.; Numasawa, M.; Yasuda, M.; Fujii, T.; Fujii, K.; Wright, J.; Nixon, F.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan) have embarked on a new research program to study the production potential of gas hydrates. The program is being carried out at the Mallik gas hydrate field in the Mackenzie Delta, a location where two previous scientific investigations have been carried in 1998 and 2002. In the 2002 program that was undertaken by seven partners from five countries, 468m3 of gas flow was measured during 124 hours of thermal stimulation using hot warm fluid. Small-scale pressure drawdown tests were also carried out using Schlumberger's Modular Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool, gas flow was observed and the inferred formation permeabilities suggested the possible effectiveness of the simple depressurization method. While the testing undertaken in 2002 can be cited as the first well constrained gas production from a gas hydrate deposit, the results fell short of that required to fully calibrate reservoir simulation models or indeed establish the technical viability of long term production from gas hydrates. The objectives of the current JOGMEC/NRCan/Aurora Mallik production research program are to undertake longer term production testing to further constrain the scientific unknowns and to demonstrate the technical feasibility of sustained gas hydrate production using the depressurization method. A key priority is to accurately measure water and gas production using state-of-art production technologies. The primary production test well was established during the 2007 field season with the re-entry and deepening of JAPEX/JNOC/GSC Mallik 2L-38 well, originally drilled in 1998. Production testing was carried out in April of 2007 under a relatively low drawdown pressure condition. Flow of methane gas was measured from a 12m perforated interval of gas-hydrate-saturated sands from 1093 to 1105m. The results establish the potential of the depressurization method and provide a basis for future

  17. The Institutionalization of Private Sector Strategic Planning Methods in a Public Sector Research & Development Organization: The Naval Surface Warfare Center Case 1982-1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    infancy during Cycle I, at the novice level during Cycle II, and at the advanced beginner level during Cycle III. The next two sections and Chapters 6...5 Table 1 - 1983 NSWC Planning Activities . . . . . . . 14 Table 1A - Planning Activity Flowchart . . . . . . . 14.1 Table 2 - Sector/SBU

  18. Public Sector Expatriate Managers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenner, Charles, R., Jr.; Selmer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Although public sector expatriates are becoming increasingly common, research on them is very limited. There is reason to believe that the situation for expatriates from the public sector may be different than for those from the private sector. This study investigated U.S. Department of Defense a...

  19. A RESEARCH ANALYSIS OF THE LEVEL OF EMPLOYEES’ SATISFACTION BY TRAINING PROGRAMS IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA BANKING SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisa DELIĆ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Investment into people through education, professional training in accordance to bank’s needs, and work on “nurturing” the readiness to challenges and changes are all significant starting points for achieving bank competitiveness. Identifying the dominant forms of employee training and determining the level of employee satisfaction by the existing training programs, which is the basic goal of this paper, enable bank managers to obtain valid information on appropriate changes of certain training programs and development of employees. The paper presents the results of the empirical research conducted in a subject BiH bank, aimed at defining the methods of employee training that are characteristic of the banking sector and the level of employee satisfaction by training programs they attend. The research included 172 employees of the subject bank. The authors believe that the critical analysis of the employee training and development methods applied in the banking sector as well as the criteria for selecting the programs for the realization of these methods can lead to widening the scientific knowledge in the field of human resource management in banking and to creating specific recommendations for bank managers which they can/need apply in their practice in order to improve the entire business operations.

  20. The challenges of commercializing second-generation transgenic crop traits necessitate the development of international public sector research infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Steven J; Bi, Yong-Mei; Coneva, Viktoriya; Han, Mei; Good, Allen

    2014-10-01

    It has been 30 years since the first transformation of a gene into a plant species, and since that time a number of biotechnology products have been developed, with the most important being insect- and herbicide-resistant crops. The development of second-generation products, including nutrient use efficiency and tolerance to important environmental stressors such as drought, has, up to this time, been less successful. This is in part due to the inherent complexities of these traits and in part due to limitations in research infrastructure necessary for public sector researchers to test their best ideas. Here we discuss lessons from previous work in the generation of the first-generation traits, as well as work from our labs and others on identifying genes for nitrogen use efficiency. We then describe some of the issues that have impeded rapid progress in this area. Finally, we propose the type of public sector organization that we feel is necessary to make advances in important second-generation traits such as nitrogen use efficiency. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Trading in the rain. Rainfall and European power sector emissions. Research note no. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Analysts often say that temperature and rainfall have an impact on the price of CO 2 , as they influence the conditions of electric power supply and demand. Rainfall mainly affects the capacity of hydropower production, the third largest source of electricity in Europe and by far the leading source of renewable energy. The variability of hydroelectric volumes is indeed usually offset by other, higher-emitting sources of electricity, which has repercussions on the European allowances trading market. In 2005, rainfall was unusually low in several European countries: in the Iberian peninsula and in France, drought is believed to have brought about a rise of approximately 15 Mt CO 2 in power sector emissions. In contrast, hydrological conditions were particularly good in the Nordic countries, allowing them to reduce CO 2 emissions in the region as a whole through hydropower-based exports. The additional allowances demand would therefore have been 'only' about 9 Mt CO 2 . To make the interaction with the CO 2 market easier to understand, an indicator of rainfall in Europe must include this compensating phenomenon resulting from the heterogeneity of the climatic conditions and volumes produced in Europe

  2. The role of research in the future of the agro-food sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Scipioni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the agro-food industry,in line with the European Commission’s White Paper on Food Safety,it is now firmly acknowledged that quality must be planned and developed through- out the food production chain, irrespective of whether the food is of plant or animal origin. Food safety depends on all operators in the food sector, specifically with regard to foods of animal origin,where safety begins with animal nutrition and,even before that,in the “field”. The objective of food safety must be viewed in the context of a dynamic situation which is the result of advances in knowledge,the development of investigative tools and the results sought in terms of guarantees to be provided to consumers. With respect to food of animal origin, present-day consumers are concerned about a series of problems which,apart from intrinsic food safety issues,ultimately involve a whole set of aspects typical of the productive system.These include worker protection,environmen- tal safeguards and,today,even animal welfare,though the possibility of identifying which foods are obtained with “animal-friendly”methods is still hardly present in many countries, given current labelling practices.

  3. Generating solutions : summary of the Electricity Sector Council's review of foreign credential recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-15

    The Electricity Sector Council has recognized the increasing requirement to recruit and retain internationally trained workers to offset the anticipated retirement of up to 40 per cent of skilled workers in this sector by 2014. This document provided a brief summary of the review of foreign credential recognition in Canada's Electricity Council which was prepared in February 2008. The purpose of the study was to capture a perceptive picture of Canada's electricity labour force and to assist the Electricity Sector Council in the potential development and implementation of strategies to facilitate the integration of internationally trained workers into Canada's electricity sector. This synopsis report presented the analysis of the study including a discussion of immigration trends; foreign credential recognition in Canada's electricity sector; immigration profiles by region; case study profiles; and recommendations. It was recommended that resources be researched, developed and provided in order to help stakeholders attract, recruit, retain and integrate internationally trained workers. 2 refs.

  4. The required interactions among institutions involved with Research and Development in the power sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Filho, X; Medeiros, J C; Szechtman, M [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the form which CEPEL (Brazilian Federal Research Center in Electric Energy) works for the Brazilian electric system, the interaction with associates, especially with ELETROBRAS (the Federal holding company in Brazil), the modern way of CEPEL operation and interactions with clients, the partnership in Research and Development, the CEPEL philosophy of transferring technology to its clients, and the cost-benefit analysis of Research and Development activities. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Janis; Jardine, Cynthia G; Guebert, Jenilee; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK). Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Review. Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements.

  6. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Geary

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK. Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. Objective. This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Design. Review. Results. Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Conclusions. Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements.

  7. Transnational Research Networks in Chinese Scientific Production. An Investigation on Health-Industry Related Sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Lauretta; Pollio, Chiara; Di Tommaso, Marco R

    2017-08-29

    Transnational research networks (TRN) are becoming increasingly complex. Such complexity may have both positive and negative effects on the quality of research. Our work studies the evolution over time of Chinese TRN and the role of complexity on the quality of Chinese research, given the leading role this country has recently acquired in international science. We focus on the fields of geriatrics and gerontology. We build an original dataset of all scientific publications of China in these areas in 2009, 2012 and 2015, starting from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI WoK) database. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA), we analyze the change in scientific network structure across time. Second, we design indices to control for the different aspects of networks complexity (number of authors, country heterogeneity and institutional heterogeneity) and we perform negative binomial regressions to identify the main determinants of research quality. Our analysis shows that research networks in the field of geriatrics and gerontology have gradually become wider in terms of countries and have become more balanced. Furthermore, our results identify that different forms of complexity have different impacts on quality, including a reciprocal moderating effect. In particular, according to our analysis, research quality benefits from complex research networks both in terms of countries and of types of institutions involved, but that such networks should be "compact" in terms of number of authors. Eventually, we suggest that complexity should be carefully taken into account when designing policies aimed at enhancing the quality of research.

  8. Developing and Managing University-Industry Research Collaborations through a Process Methodology/Industrial Sector Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Simon P.

    2010-01-01

    A management framework has been successfully utilized at Imperial College London in the United Kingdom to improve the process for developing and managing university-industry research collaborations. The framework has been part of a systematic approach to increase the level of research contracts from industrial sources, to strengthen the…

  9. Transnational Research Networks in Chinese Scientific Production. An Investigation on Health-Industry Related Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauretta Rubini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transnational research networks (TRN are becoming increasingly complex. Such complexity may have both positive and negative effects on the quality of research. Our work studies the evolution over time of Chinese TRN and the role of complexity on the quality of Chinese research, given the leading role this country has recently acquired in international science. We focus on the fields of geriatrics and gerontology. We build an original dataset of all scientific publications of China in these areas in 2009, 2012 and 2015, starting from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI WoK database. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA, we analyze the change in scientific network structure across time. Second, we design indices to control for the different aspects of networks complexity (number of authors, country heterogeneity and institutional heterogeneity and we perform negative binomial regressions to identify the main determinants of research quality. Our analysis shows that research networks in the field of geriatrics and gerontology have gradually become wider in terms of countries and have become more balanced. Furthermore, our results identify that different forms of complexity have different impacts on quality, including a reciprocal moderating effect. In particular, according to our analysis, research quality benefits from complex research networks both in terms of countries and of types of institutions involved, but that such networks should be “compact” in terms of number of authors. Eventually, we suggest that complexity should be carefully taken into account when designing policies aimed at enhancing the quality of research.

  10. Values Education as Holistic Development for All Sectors: Researching for Effective Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovat, Terence; Clement, Neville; Dally, Kerry; Toomey, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The paper argues that values education has moved from being associated most heavily with the religious agenda of faith schools to being central to updated research insights into effective pedagogy. As such, it represents a vital approach to education in any school setting. The paper draws on an array of values education research and practice in…

  11. A practical and systematic approach to organisational capacity strengthening for research in the health sector in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Imelda; Boyd, Alan; Smith, Helen; Cole, Donald C

    2014-03-03

    Despite increasing investment in health research capacity strengthening efforts in low and middle income countries, published evidence to guide the systematic design and monitoring of such interventions is very limited. Systematic processes are important to underpin capacity strengthening interventions because they provide stepwise guidance and allow for continual improvement. Our objective here was to use evidence to inform the design of a replicable but flexible process to guide health research capacity strengthening that could be customized for different contexts, and to provide a framework for planning, collecting information, making decisions, and improving performance. We used peer-reviewed and grey literature to develop a five-step pathway for designing and evaluating health research capacity strengthening programmes, tested in a variety of contexts in Africa. The five steps are: i) defining the goal of the capacity strengthening effort, ii) describing the optimal capacity needed to achieve the goal, iii) determining the existing capacity gaps compared to the optimum, iv) devising an action plan to fill the gaps and associated indicators of change, and v) adapting the plan and indicators as the programme matures. Our paper describes three contrasting case studies of organisational research capacity strengthening to illustrate how our five-step approach works in practice. Our five-step pathway starts with a clear goal and objectives, making explicit the capacity required to achieve the goal. Strategies for promoting sustainability are agreed with partners and incorporated from the outset. Our pathway for designing capacity strengthening programmes focuses not only on technical, managerial, and financial processes within organisations, but also on the individuals within organisations and the wider system within which organisations are coordinated, financed, and managed. Our five-step approach is flexible enough to generate and utilise ongoing learning. We have

  12. Fusion Canada issue 32. Final edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    Fusion Canada is a bulletin of the National Fusion Program, this is the last edition. Included in this July edition are articles on Funding for Canada's fusion program, Research and Development on TdeV-96 , Divertor Maintenance Robotics and reference listing for Canada's Fusion research and development sites

  13. Introducing medication abortion into public sector facilities in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: an operations research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Kelly; Lince-Deroche, Naomi; Fetters, Tamara; Devjee, Jaymala; de Menezes, Ilundi Durão; Trueman, Karen; Sudhinaraset, May; Nkonko, Errol; Moodley, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Examine the feasibility of introducing mifepristone-misoprostol medication abortion into existing public sector surgical abortion services in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Cohort study of women offered medication or surgical abortion in a larger medication abortion introduction study. The sample included 1167 women seeking first-trimester abortion at four public sector facilities; 923 women at ≤9 weeks' gestation were eligible for medication abortion. Women who chose medication abortion took 200 mg of mifepristone orally at the facility and 800 mcg of misoprostol buccally (or vaginally if they anticipated or experienced problems with buccal administration) 48 h later at home, based on international research and global safe abortion guidelines. Women who chose surgical abortion received 600 mg of misoprostol sublingually or vaginally on the day of their procedure followed by manual vacuum aspiration 4 h later. Main outcome measures included proportion of eligible women who chose each method, proportion with complete abortion and proportion reporting adverse events. Ninety-four percent of eligible women chose medication abortion. No adverse events were reported by women who chose surgical abortion; 3% of women in the medication abortion group reported adverse events and 0.4% reported a serious adverse event. Seventy-six percent of women received a family planning method at the facility where their received their abortion, with no difference based on procedure type. Medication abortion patients were significantly more likely to report they would choose this method again (94% vs. 78%, ppublic sector surgical abortion services in South Africa and was chosen by a large majority of women who were eligible and offered choice of early termination method; access to medication abortion should be expanded in South Africa and other similar settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Does the public sector have an independent research role in the development of drugs?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grønlykke, Thor Buch

    2003-04-14

    Exclusively private companies do drug development. The State contributes with education of academics and basic research constituting the basis of half of the drugs developed by the private companies. The Danish private drug research amounts to six billion DKK per year, corresponding to the estimated price of the development of one new drug. The development shows a negative tendency. There are doubts about the scientific credibility, the number of new drugs is declining, drug development costs are rising, and the competitiveness in Europe is declining compared with the one of The United States. Continued improvement of Danish drug development can be achieved by stimulation of the public research related to drug development.

  15. Towards a Common Research Strategic Roadmap for the Transportation Sector in Europe and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Bekiaris

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available DETRA (Developing a European Transport Research Alliance is a 7th Framework project, whose concept derived from the so-called Lyon Declaration and concerns the deepening of the European Research Area objectives in transport in order to address the Grand Challenges. Key priorities of this Alliance is to examine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT in the domain and develop common understanding and approaches to reducing fragmentation and overcoming barriers. The DETRA project aimed to meet and exceed the requirements and objectives of the call for an Analysis of the state of ERA development within the transport domain and to develop recommendations for the EC, member states and other stakeholders as well as for the DETRA partner organizations themselves. In this study, particular emphasis is given to the part of DETRA concerning the development of a single trans- European research program, which can be used as a compass for the future research activities of the whole transportation area.

  16. Promising ethical arguments for product differentiation in the organic food sector. A mixed methods research approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Katrin; Stolz, Hanna; Hamm, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Ethical consumerism is a growing trend worldwide. Ethical consumers’ expectations are increasing and neither the Fairtrade nor the organic farming concept covers all the ethical concerns of consumers. Against this background the aim of this research is to elicit consumers’ preferences regarding organic food with additional ethical attributes and their relevance at the market place. A mixed methods research approach was applied by combining an Information Display Matrix, Focus Group Discuss...

  17. Bioethanol from lignocellulosics: Status and perspectives in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabee, W E; Saddler, J N

    2010-07-01

    Canada has invested significantly in the development of a domestic bioethanol industry, and it is expected that bioethanol from lignocellulosics will become more desirable to the industry as it expands. Development of the Canadian industry to date is described in this paper, as are examples of domestic research programs focused on both bioconversion and thermochemical conversion to generate biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. The availability of lignocellulosic residues from agricultural and forestry operations, and the potential biofuel production associated with these residues, is described. The policy tools used to develop the domestic bioethanol industry are explored. A residue-based process could greatly extend the potential of the bioethanol industry in Canada. It is estimated that bioethanol production from residual lignocellulosic feedstocks could provide up to 50% of Canada's 2006 transportation fuel demand, given ideal conversion and full access to these feedstocks. Utilizing lignocellulosic biomass will extend the geographic range of the bioethanol industry, and increase the stability and security of this sector by reducing the impact of localized disruptions in supply. Use of disturbance crops could add 9% to this figure, but not in a sustainable fashion. If pursued aggressively, energy crops ultimately could contribute bioethanol at a volume double that of Canada's gasoline consumption in 2006. This would move Canada towards greater transportation fuel independence and a larger role in the export of bioethanol to the global market. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspects of research and development contract terms in the bio/pharmaceutical sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tannista

    2012-01-01

    The cost of new drug development is increasing every year. Pharmaceutical companies use R&D joint ventures, mergers, and outsource different stages of pharmaceutical R&D activities for a faster and cost minimizing method of innovation. Pharmaceutical companies outsource R&D activities to independent small biotech or pharmaceutical companies that specialize in different stages of pharmaceutical R&D. This chapter examines the determinants of the payment structure of research contracts between large bio/pharmaceutical companies and specialized research firms. Determinants of R&D contracts are analyzed using detailed R&D contract data between bio/pharmaceutical companies and independent research firms for 10 years. A multinomial logit model is used in order to understand the determinants of three different types of contracts; royalty contracts, fixed payment contracts, and the mixed contracts. Under uncertainty, the likelihood of a royalty contract rises for the early stages of the research and with the patent stock of the research firm. It is more likely to observe both royalty and fixed payment if the pharmaceutical client has past contracts with the same research firm. The results also suggest that if Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is more stringent in any disease area in reviewing the new drug application, then the likelihood of signing pure royalty contract decreases. Understanding the nature of R&D contracts and the effects of FDA's behavior on the pharmaceutical R&D contract is important because these contracts not only affect the cost of new drug invention but also the quality and the rate of invention. VALUE: Results are useful for both the pharmaceutical companies and the economic/business researchers.

  19. GOAT MILK: A CHALLENGE FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SECTOR FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.D. POP

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past 20 years the study of goat caseins genetic polymorphisms received a considerable research interest. In particular the researches were focused on CSN1S1 locus which is the most polymorphic, 17 alleles being known so far. These alleles are associated with four different levels of protein synthesis, affecting significantly goat milk quality and its technological properties. In this context the present review is describing recent literature data at international and national level, which allow the understanding of goat milk quality variation in relation with its physical-chemical characteristics, milk protein genetic polymorphisms and physiological factors. We also describe the current stage of researches concerning the use of milk protein polymorphisms in identifying possible adulterations from dairy industry and also studies on milk allergenic potency.

  20. Government of Canada position paper on a national strategy for critical infrastructure protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-11-01

    The Government of Canada's position on the development of a comprehensive national approach to critical infrastructure protection (CIP) was presented along with a policy framework for developing a national cyber security strategy and a review of the Emergency Preparedness Act. Canada's national critical infrastructure (NCI) is defined as physical and information technology facilities, networks, services and assets, which if destroyed, would have a serious impact on health, safety, security and economics. The CIP strategy includes an NCI assurance program for various sectors of the economy, including the energy, transportation, finance, health care, food, communications, water, safety and manufacturing sectors. It also includes CIP for the government sector. This report described the key elements of an NCI protection strategy. These include guiding principles, risk management, information sharing, inventory of critical infrastructure assets, threats and warnings, critical infrastructure interdependencies, governance mechanisms, research and development, and international cooperation. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Effectiveness and profile of the SIMRAC research effort in improving safety in gold and platinum sectors.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Triebel, R

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available . The research indicated SIMRAC as not a waste of time and money. General positives that have emerged are the strong stakeholder support for the intent of the organisation, the view that SIMPROSS, in providing a project management and administrative support...

  2. Overview of the science activities for the 2002 Mallik gas hydrate production research well program, Mackenzie Delta, N.W.T., Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallimore, S. R.; Collett, T. S.; Uchida, T.; Weber, M.

    2003-04-01

    With the completion of scientific studies undertaken as part of the 1998 Mallik 2L-38 gas hydrate research well, an international research site was established for the study of Arctic natural gas hydrates in the Mackenzie Delta of northwestern Canada. Quantitative well log analysis and core studies reveal multiple gas hydrate layers from 890 m to 1106 m depth, exceeding 110 m in total thickness. High gas hydrate saturation values, which in some cases exceed 80% of the pore volume, establish the Mallik gas hydrate field as one of the most concentrated gas hydrate reservoirs in the world. Beginning in December 2001 and continuing to the middle of March 2002, two 1188 m deep science observation wells were drilled and instrumented and a 1166 m deep production research well program was carried out. The program participants include 8 partners; The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC), The Japan National Oil Corporation (JNOC), GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), United States Geological Survey (USGS), United States Department of the Energy (USDOE), India Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MOPNG)/Gas Authority of India (GAIL) and the Chevron-BP-Burlington joint venture group. In addition the project has been accepted as part of the International Scientific Continental Drilling Program. The Geological Survey of Canada is coordinating the science program for the project and JAPEX Canada Ltd. acted as the designated operator for the fieldwork. Primary objectives of the research program are to advance fundamental geological, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Mallik gas hydrate field and to undertake advanced production testing of a concentrated gas hydrate reservoir. Full-scale field experiments in the production well monitored the physical behavior of the hydrate deposits in response to depressurization and thermal stimulation. The observation wells facilitated cross-hole tomography and vertical seismic profile experiments (before and after production) as well as

  3. Alliance members' roles in collective field-building: an assessment of leadership and championship within the Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruggiero, Erica; Kishchuk, Natalie; Viehbeck, Sarah; Edwards, Nancy; Robinson, Kerry; Riley, Barbara; Fowler, Heather Smith

    2017-12-06

    The Population Health Intervention Research Initiative for Canada (PHIRIC) is a multi-stakeholder alliance founded in 2006 to advance population health intervention research (PHIR). PHIRIC aimed to strengthen Canada's capacity to conduct and use such research to inform policy and practice to improve the public's health by building PHIR as a field of research. In 2014, an evaluative study of PHIRIC at organisational and system levels was conducted, guided by a field-building and collaborative action perspective. The study involved 17 qualitative key informant interviews with 21 current and former PHIRIC Planning Committee and Working Group members. The interviews examined how individuals and organisations were acting as champions and exerting leadership in building the field of PHIR. Founding PHIRIC organisational members have been championing PHIR at organisational and system levels. While the PHIR field has progressed in terms of enhanced funding, legitimacy, profile and capacity, some members and organisations faced constraints and challenges acting as leaders and champions in their respective environments. Expectations about the future of PHIRIC and field-building of PHIR were mixed, where longer-term and founding members of PHIRIC expressed more optimism than recent members. All agreed on the need for incorporating perspectives of decision-makers into PHIR directions and initiatives. The findings contribute to understanding alliance members' roles in leadership and championship for field-building more generally, and for population health and PHIR specifically. Building this field requires multi-level efforts, collaborative action and distributed leadership to create the necessary conditions for PHIRIC members to both benefit from and contribute to advancing PHIR as a field. Lessons from this 'made in Canada' model may be of interest to other countries regarding the structures needed for PHIR field-building.

  4. Introducing INSPIRE: an implementation research collaboration between the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada and the World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Pierre; Hirnschall, Gottfried; Mason, Elizabeth; Shaffer, Nathan; Lipa, Zuzanna; Baller, April; Rollins, Nigel

    2014-11-01

    The government of Canada, through the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) has supported global efforts to reduce the impact of the HIV pandemic. In 2012, WHO and DFATD launched an implementation research initiative to increase access to interventions that were known to be effective in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and to learn how these could be successfully integrated with other essential services for mothers and children. In addition to facilitating the implementation research projects, DFATD and WHO promoted four approaches: (1) Country-specific implementation research prioritization exercises, (2) Ministry of Health involvement, (3) Country-led, innovative, high-quality research, and (4) Leveraging regional networks and learning opportunities. While no single aspect of INSPIRE is unique, the process endeavors to promote and support high-quality, rigorous, locally-led implementation research that will have a substantial impact on the health and survival of HIV-infected women and their children.

  5. Environmental performance reviews: Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-01

    OECD's comprehensive 2004 report on Canada's environmental policies and programmes systematically examines policy related to air, water, and nature/biodiversity as well as the interface between environmental policy and economic policy, social policy, and specific sectors. It finds that while Canada has made satisfactory progress since 1985, there are still significant challenges, and the report makes specific recommendations for more use of economic instruments and use of the polluter and user pays principles, rationalising water governance, strengthening nature protection, reducing energy intensity, implementing climate change policies, reviewing environmentally related taxes, and implementing marine and aid commitments. Coal provides about 20% of Canada's electric power. Most direct subsidisation of the fossil fuel supply industries (upstream oil, gas and coal) has been reduced. The report recommends subsidies to the mining industry for exploration should also be phased out. Recent measurements indicate emissions of mercury are increasing, mainly due to long-range transboundary air pollution from coal-burning plants. 42 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Nuclear technology in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This pamphlet provides a summary of the research being carried out by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The design and development of the CANDU type reactor are highlighted and the contribution of nuclear technology to medicine, agriculture and the Canadian economy is briefly discussed

  7. Fusion Canada issue 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue tritium supply for Japanese research, Canada to host the 1995 IAEA Conference on Tritium, studies on the tokamak divertor and edge plasma studies, a tritium field release study, erosion studies on plasma facing materials, G. Pacher returns to CCFM and an update on CCFM/TdeV

  8. Building Canada: Phase One

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2004-04-15

    The 'Building Canada' program modelled after the 'Building America' program, aims at increasing energy efficiency and affordability, primarily for single family homes. The program takes a holistic and whole house view, employing a systems approach and is committed to continuous improvement through testing, evaluation, retesting and novel construction practices. The program's objective is to re-engineer house designs so that builders can take advantage of advanced products and achieve maximum efficiency. Building Canada aims to achieve its objectives through partnership with the housing industry, focusing on increasing energy efficiency while reducing construction time, using and wasting fewer materials, forestalling call backs, and reducing overall costs. The Building Canada procedures encompass marketing, research of builder's operations, re-engineering mechanical systems, framing components and techniques, moisture control and thermal performance, construction, resolution of problems in re-engineered homes, and discussion of results in demonstration homes. The program as a whole is built on the feasibility study of a Building Canada program carried out in Nova Scotia and Ontario. Some of the results of this pilot study summarized in this report indicate that the Building Canada is not suitable for use by small builders. Benefits are most likely to be realized by only by builders constructing more than 100 homes annually.

  9. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In 1990, after a comprehensive industry review, the Canadian government announced that steps would be taken to revitalize the nuclear industry. Canada's nuclear utilities made a commitment to bear a large share of the cost of nuclear research and development. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) reported its first financial loss in twelve years, as anticipated at the start of the year. Four of the 20 CANDU reactors operating worldwide were in the top ten based on lifetime performance. By year-end one foreign and two domestic utilities had announced their intention to build more CANDU units. The federal government has agreed to stabilize AECL's research funding at 1989-90 levels ($31.5 million above levels planned in 1985), has authorized AECL to negotiate with New Brunswick to build Point Lepreau-2 as the prototype for the CANDU-3 reactor, and has allowed the restructuring of AECL so utility and private sector investors can become equity partners in AECL CANDU

  10. Proceedings of the Canadian Solar Buildings Conference : the 31. annual conference of the Solar Energy Society of Canada Inc. and the 1. Canadian Solar Buildings Research Network conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athienitis, A.; Charron, R.; Karava, P.; Stylianou, M.; Tzempelikos, A.

    2006-01-01

    The first conference organized by the newly established Canadian Solar Buildings Research Network (SBRN) was held in conjunction with the thirty-first annual conference of the Solar Energy Society of Canada Inc (SESCI). The conference was attended by top researchers from 10 Canadian Universities to promote innovative research and development in solar energy applications and to advance the awareness of solar energy in Canada. It featured special events such as trade shows, photovoltaic workshops, a course in ESP-r simulation, tours of solar houses and other events focused on the economic, environmental and socio-economic benefits of solar technology, including the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. SBRN was founded on the premise that university researchers should focus on solar energy applications for buildings. Several presentations proposed action plans to accelerate the implementation of solar energy through the use of innovative building technologies and sustainable energy policies. Other major issues of interest were also discussed, including the development of the net-zero energy solar home and grid-connection issues. The sessions of the conference were entitled: solar thermal systems; solar electricity; building integrated photovoltaic systems; design issues and tools; integrating PV and solar thermal in buildings; daylighting and solar radiation modeling; fenestration and shading; PV manufacturing and solar electricity resources. The proceedings featured 41 refereed papers and 13 poster presentations, all of which have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  11. Forestry Canada's perspectives on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, J.P.; Carlson, L.W.

    1990-01-01

    The impacts of climatic change on Canada's forestry sector are discussed, in the context of major research priorities relating to forecasting climate, forecasting forest responses, monitoring changes, mitigating effects, and understanding the forest carbon balance. There are five major concerns that affect policy decisions: effects of climatic change on forests; adaptation to climate change; impacts of changing crops on forestry; changing forestry values in changing sociological settings; and international implications of the changing climate. A scientific program to respond to climate change issues is required, and should include the following concentrations of research effort. Planning requires projections of likely future climates, and efforts should concern relations between pre-historic climates and forest ecosystems and integrating data into predictive models. Forecasting of response of forests should include tree physiology, factors controlling reforestation, variations in forest trees, effects of pollutants, damage to forests, and forest decline

  12. Energy in Canada 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P [ed.

    1987-01-01

    This publication provides a comprehensive annual reference source covering the Canadian energy industry. The information is of use to producers, consumers, distributors, regulators, analysts and writers throughout the energy sector, as well as researchers outside the energy field. Of the book's 10 chapters, eight concentrate on specific energy sectors (such as oil or coal), overviews the complete industry, and one contains useful reference material. The energy sectors covered are crude oil, natural gas, petroleum products, petrochemicals, coal, uranium, and electricity. Each sector-specific chapter examines the structure of the industry, its performance in 1986 (including events, pricing, regulation, finance and technology) and its potential future. Also included are four appendices: corporate profiles, regulatory agencies descriptions, energy associations and organizations (sector-specific), a glossary, and a compilation of abbreviations and conversions.

  13. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Robert; De Sa, Angela; Christodoulou, Maria

    2016-08-31

    Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA) survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA) and had 6 months of coaching. Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group.

  14. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sa, Angela; Christodoulou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. Aim To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Setting Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA) survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA) and had 6 months of coaching. Results Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Conclusion Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group. PMID:27608671

  15. Statistics Canada's Definition and Classification of Postsecondary and Adult Education Providers in Canada. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 071

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Larry

    2009-01-01

    This document outlines the definitions and the typology now used by Statistics Canada's Centre for Education Statistics to identify, classify and delineate the universities, colleges and other providers of postsecondary and adult education in Canada for which basic enrollments, graduates, professors and finance statistics are produced. These new…

  16. Comparison between Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and National Research Council, Canada (NRC) of the absorbed dose in water using Fricke dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salata, Camila; David, Mariano Gazineu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2014-01-01

    The absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC), were compared. The two institutions have developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are significant differences between the two standards as far as the preparation and readout of the Fricke solution and irradiation geometry of the holder. Measurements were done at the NRC laboratory using a single Ir-192 source. The comparison of absorbed dose measurements was expressed as the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR), which was found to be 1.026. (author)

  17. Reconciling profits and pandemics? An analysis of attitudes to commercial sector engagement in health policy and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Collin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Public health's terms of engagement with unhealthy commodity industries (alcohol, tobacco and ultra-processed food and drinks have become increasingly contested across policy and research contexts. This has become particularly significant in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals' (SDGs commitment to partnership with private sector actors, and efforts to promote coherence across NCD policy areas. We sought to identify approaches that could attract consensus support within and across policy domains. Methods Using snowball sampling, we undertook an online survey of 335 health researchers, advocates and policymakers, in 40 countries, assessing responses to stated principles, claims and recommendations for engaging with unhealthy commodity industries in relation to key policy and research initiatives. Results Most respondents identified a fundamental conflict between industry interests and public health objectives for all three industries, with agreement greatest in relation to tobacco and weakest for food. This pattern was replicated across diverse questions regarding potential forms of engagement, including rejecting voluntarism and partnership approaches to health policy. While awareness of tobacco industry tactics to influence policy and research was higher than for alcohol and food, most respondents rejected the view that the influence of the latter was less significant for public health. There was also substantial variation in attitudes to engagement with the emergent e-cigarette industry. Conclusions The strong consensus around restricting interactions with the tobacco industry supports increased implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control's conflict of interest provisions. There is strong support for the extension of such practices to the alcohol industry, challenging current norms. More mixed responses indicate a need for greater clarity in defining the food industry, and for research analyzing

  18. ESTUDIO SOCIOECONÓMICO SOBRE LOS VENDEDORES ESTACIONARIOS DEL SECTOR UNO DEL CENTRO HISTÓRICO DE BARRANQUILLA - SOCIOECONOMICAL RESEARCH ABOUT THE PERMANENT SELLERS FROM SECTOR ONE IN BARRANQUILLA’S HISTORICAL DOWNTOWN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOLANDA ROSA MORALES CASTRO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The document talks about the information related to the socioeconomical research about the permanent sellers from sector one in Barranquilla’s historical downtown. This research comes from a previous study “Knowledge Dialogue: a strengthtening strategy for the people interested in the recovering of the historical downtown”, applied from the family and human development group in Universidad Simon Bolivar. The study variable includes the demography, family, economy, housing, environmental and legal dimmensions, which allows to analyze and identify the socioeconomical profile of the permanent sellers from sector one in Barranquilla’s distrit. In this text is also introduced relevant topics, interesting so they can help to clearly understand the growing development of the informal economy in Colombia, because they mean a challenge and clamis attention from the leaders in charge on the country’s economic way

  19. How to change organisational culture: Action research in a South African public sector primary care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Mash

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organisational culture is a key factor in both patient and staff experience of the healthcare services. Patient satisfaction, staff engagement and performance are related to this experience. The department of health in the Western Cape espouses a values-based culture characterised by caring, competence, accountability, integrity, responsiveness and respect. However, transformation of the existing culture is required to achieve this vision. Aim: To explore how to transform the organisational culture in line with the desired values. Setting: Retreat Community Health Centre, Cape Town, South Africa. Methods: Participatory action research with the leadership engaged with action and reflection over a period of 18 months. Change in the organisational culture was measured at baseline and after 18 months by means of a cultural values assessment (CVA survey. The three key leaders at the health centre also completed a 360-degree leadership values assessment (LVA and had 6 months of coaching. Results: Cultural entropy was reduced from 33 to 13% indicating significant transformation of organisational culture. The key driver of this transformation was change in the leadership style and functioning. Retreat health centre shifted from a culture that emphasised hierarchy, authority, command and control to one that established a greater sense of cohesion, shared vision, open communication, appreciation, respect, fairness and accountability. Conclusion: Transformation of organisational culture was possible through a participatory process that focused on the leadership style, communication and building relationships by means of CVA and feedback, 360-degree LVA, feedback and coaching and action learning in a co-operative inquiry group.

  20. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. Final Project Report. California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hasanbeigi, Ali [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sathaye, Jayant [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-12-01

    This report on the California Energy Balance version 2 (CALEB v2) database documents the latest update and improvements to CALEB version 1 (CALEB v1) and provides a complete picture of how energy is supplied and consumed in the State of California. The CALEB research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) performed the research and analysis described in this report. CALEB manages highly disaggregated data on energy supply, transformation, and end-use consumption for about 40 different energy commodities, from 1990 to 2008. This report describes in detail California's energy use from supply through end-use consumption as well as the data sources used. The report also analyzes trends in energy demand for the "Manufacturing" and "Building" sectors. Decomposition analysis of energy consumption combined with measures of the activity driving that consumption quantifies the effects of factors that shape energy consumption trends. The study finds that a decrease in energy intensity has had a very significant impact on reducing energy demand over the past 20 years. The largest impact can be observed in the industry sector where energy demand would have had increased by 358 trillion British thermal units (TBtu) if subsectoral energy intensities had remained at 1997 levels. Instead, energy demand actually decreased by 70 TBtu. In the "Building" sector, combined results from the "Service" and "Residential" subsectors suggest that energy demand would have increased by 264 TBtu (121 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 143 TBtu in the "Residential" sector) during the same period, 1997 to 2008. However, energy demand increased at a lesser rate, by only 162 TBtu (92 TBtu in the "Services" sector and 70 TBtu in the "Residential" sector). These energy intensity reductions can be indicative of energyefficiency improvements during the past 10 years. The research presented in this report provides a basis for developing an energy-efficiency performance index to measure

  1. Future internet and the agri-food sector: State-of-the-art in literature and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, R.J.; Reiche, R.; Schiefer, G.

    2012-01-01

    The food sector is one of the most important sectors of the economy, encompassing agriculture, the food industry, retail, and eventually, all members of society as consumers. With its responsibility of serving consumers with food that is safe, readily available, affordable and of the quality and

  2. Global climate-friendly trade : Canada's chance to clean up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfarb, D.

    2010-03-01

    This paper discussed the global trade and investment in climate-friendly technologies, Canada's current position in this market, and the policy changes that are necessary for Canadian businesses to gain a stronger foothold in this sector. The global market for climate-friendly technologies is growing rapidly, but Canadian businesses have generally failed to exploit opportunities to export climate-friendly technologies and have generally lagged other countries in adopting such technologies developed elsewhere. Although Canadian businesses generally underperform in this sector, Canada does have notable strengths in 13 identified areas, including waste management technologies, energy technologies, and in parts of the value chains associated with wind and solar power. Targeting these areas of relative strength for further development could position Canada as a global leader in some climate-friendly technologies. For this to happen, Canadian governments need to establish clear policies, invest in research and development, and remove domestic and international barriers to the development and trade in climate-friendly technologies. 30 refs., 5 tabs., 5 figs.

  3. Discrimination and the health of immigrants and refugees: exploring Canada's evidence base and directions for future research in newcomer receiving countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Sara; Newbold, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    Research and practice increasingly suggests discrimination compromises health. Yet the unique experiences and effects facing immigrant and refugee populations remain poorly understood in Canada and abroad. We review current knowledge on discrimination against newcomers in Canada, emphasizing impacts upon health status and service access to identify gaps and research needs. Existing knowledge centers around experiences within health-care settings, differences in perception and coping, mental health impacts, and debates about "non-discriminatory" health-care. There is need for comparative analyses within and across ethno-cultural groups and newcomer classes to better understand factors shaping how discrimination and its health effects are differentially experienced. Women receive greater attention in the literature given their compounded vulnerability. While this must continue, little is known about the experiences of youth and men. Governance and policy discourse analyses would elucidate how norms, institutions and practices shape discriminatory attitudes and responses. Finally, "non-discriminatory health-care" interventions require critical evaluation to determine their effectiveness.

  4. Agriculture Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agriculture sectors comprise establishments primarily engaged in growing crops, raising animals, and harvesting fish and other animals. Find information on compliance, enforcement and guidance on EPA laws and regulations on the NAICS 111 & 112 sectors.

  5. Canada country report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrill, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    1 - Nuclear 2007 highlights: New Build Applications and Environmental Assessments (Ontario Power Generation (OPG), Bruce Power, Bruce Power Alberta), Refurbishments (Bruce Power's Bruce A Units 1 and 2 Restart Project, NB Power's Refurbishment of Point Lepreau, New Brunswick, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) NRU 50. Anniversary, expansion of the solid radioactive waste storage facilities at Gentilly-2 nuclear generating station, Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Deep Geologic Repository..); 2. Nuclear overview: a. Energy policy (Future of nuclear power, state of the projects, schedule, Refurbishment), b. Public acceptance, Statements from Government Officials in Canada; c. Nuclear equipment (number and type); d. Nuclear waste management, Deep Geologic Repository; e. Nuclear research at AECL; f. Other nuclear activities (Cameco Corporation, MDS Nordion); 3. Nuclear competencies; 4. WIN 2007 Main Achievements: GIRLS Science Club, Skills Canada, WiN-Canada Web site, Book Launch, WINFO, 2007 WiN-Canada conference 4 - Summary: - 14.6% of Canada's electricity is provided by Candu nuclear reactors; Nuclear equipment: 10 Research or isotope producing reactors - Pool-Type; Slowpoke 2; Sub-Critical assembly; NRU; and Maple; 22 Candu reactors providing electricity production - 18 of which are currently operating. Public acceptance: 41% feel nuclear should play more of a role, 67% support refurbishment, 48% support new build, 13% point gender gap in support, with men supporting more than women. Energy policy: Future of nuclear power - recognition that nuclear is part of the solution across Canada; New Build - 3 applications to regulator to prepare a site for new build, in Provinces of Ontario and Alberta, with one feasibility study underway in New Brunswick; Refurbishment - Provinces of Ontario (2010) and New Brunswick (2009). Nuclear waste management policy: Proposal submitted to regulator to prepare, construct and operate a deep geologic disposal facility in Ontario

  6. Implementing Indigenous and Western Knowledge Systems in Water Research and Management (Part 1: A Systematic Realist Review to Inform Water Policy and Governance in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E. Castleden

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis/Metis peoples in Canada experience persistent and disproportionate water-related challenges compared to non-Indigenous Canadians. These circumstances are largely attributable to enduring colonial policies and practices. Attempts for redress have been unsuccessful, and Western science and technology have been largely unsuccessful in remedying Canada’s water-related challenges. A systematic review of the academic and grey literature on integrative Indigenous and Western approaches to water research and management identified 279 items of which 63 were relevant inclusions; these were then analyzed using a realist review tool. We found an emerging trend of literature in this area, much of which called for the rejection of tokenism and the development of respectful nation-to-nation relationships in water research, management, and policy.

  7. The process of developing a community-based research agenda with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Lys, Candice

    2015-01-01

    Youth in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT) experience sexual and mental health disparities. Higher rates of sexual and mental health concerns among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) youth in comparison with heterosexual and cisgender peers have been associated with stigma and discrimination. Although LGBTQ youth in the NWT are situated at the nexus of Northern and LGBTQ health disparities, there is little known about their health, well-being and experiences of stigma. This short communication discusses the process of developing a LGBTQ youth community-based research programme in the NWT. We developed an interdisciplinary research team of LGBTQ and allied young adults, including indigenous and non-indigenous researchers, community organisers and service providers in the NWT. We conducted meetings in Yellowknife with LGBTQ youth (n=12) and key stakeholders (n=15), including faculty, students, community groups and health and social service providers. Both meetings included LGBTQ and allied participants who were LGBTQ, indigenous, youth and persons at the intersection of these identities. LGBTQ youth participants discussed community norms that devalued same sex identities and stigma surrounding LGBTQ-specific services and agencies. Stigma among LGBT youth was exacerbated for youth in secondary schools, gender non-conforming and transgender youth and young gay men. In the stakeholder meeting, service providers discussed the importance of integrating LGBTQ issues in youth programmes, and LGBTQ community groups expressed the need for flexibility in service delivery to LGBTQ youth. Stakeholders identified the need to better understand the needs of indigenous LGBTQ youth in the NWT. Community-based LGBTQ groups, researchers and health and social service providers are interested in addressing LGBTQ youth issues in the NWT. The emergence of LGBTQ community building, support groups and activism in Northern Canada suggests that this is an opportune time

  8. The process of developing a community-based research agenda with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth in the Northwest Territories, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H. Logie

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Youth in Canada's Northwest Territories (NWT experience sexual and mental health disparities. Higher rates of sexual and mental health concerns among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ youth in comparison with heterosexual and cisgender peers have been associated with stigma and discrimination. Although LGBTQ youth in the NWT are situated at the nexus of Northern and LGBTQ health disparities, there is little known about their health, well-being and experiences of stigma. This short communication discusses the process of developing a LGBTQ youth community-based research programme in the NWT. Methods: We developed an interdisciplinary research team of LGBTQ and allied young adults, including indigenous and non-indigenous researchers, community organisers and service providers in the NWT. We conducted meetings in Yellowknife with LGBTQ youth (n=12 and key stakeholders (n=15, including faculty, students, community groups and health and social service providers. Both meetings included LGBTQ and allied participants who were LGBTQ, indigenous, youth and persons at the intersection of these identities. Results: LGBTQ youth participants discussed community norms that devalued same sex identities and stigma surrounding LGBTQ-specific services and agencies. Stigma among LGBT youth was exacerbated for youth in secondary schools, gender non-conforming and transgender youth and young gay men. In the stakeholder meeting, service providers discussed the importance of integrating LGBTQ issues in youth programmes, and LGBTQ community groups expressed the need for flexibility in service delivery to LGBTQ youth. Stakeholders identified the need to better understand the needs of indigenous LGBTQ youth in the NWT. Conclusions: Community-based LGBTQ groups, researchers and health and social service providers are interested in addressing LGBTQ youth issues in the NWT. The emergence of LGBTQ community building, support groups and activism

  9. Use of net present value analysis to evaluate a publicly funded biomass-to-ethanol research, development, and demonstration program and valuate expected private sector participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, N D; Yancey, M A

    1998-01-01

    One of the functions of government is to invest tax dollars in programs, projects, and properties that will result in greater public benefit than would have resulted from leaving the tax dollars in the private sector or using them to pay off the public debt. This paper describes the use of Net Present Value (NPV) as an approach to analyze and select investment opportunities for government money in public research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) programs and to evaluate potential private sector participation in the programs. This approach is then applied to a specific biomass-to-ethanol opportunity in California.

  10. Nuclear waste management in Finland. Final report of public sector's research programme JYT2001 (1997-2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    2002-05-01

    According to Finnish nuclear energy legislation, each producer of nuclear waste is responsible for the safe handling, management, and disposal of its waste, as well as for the costs arising. The Posiva company, owned by the nuclear energy-producing power companies, is in charge of spent nuclear fuel management in Finland. The authorities supervise the management of nuclear waste and issue regulations for this purpose. In these demanding tasks the authorities have been supported by the Public Sector's Research Programme on Nuclear Waste Management (JYT2001). The objective of JYT2001 was to provide the authorities with independent expertise and research results relevant to the safety of nuclear waste management. Emphasis was placed on the geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The research area was divided into (1) technical studies on the safety of spent fuel disposal, and (2) social science studies related to nuclear waste management. The technical studies covered bedrock behaviour, the hydrogeology and geochemistry of the bedrock, the stability of the bentonite buffer, and the migration of radionuclides in the bedrock. In addition, performance assessment methodology was covered, as well as waste management technologies and costs. The social science studies were focussed on observing the Decision in Principle (DiP) process including the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), and media issues related to the spent fuel disposal facility. JYT2001 provided considerable support to the authorities in helping them deal with technical and social science questions. The Government's positive Decision in Principle (DiP) on Posiva's application for a spent fuel disposal facility in Eurajoki was ratified by Parliament in May 2001. The existence of a credible JYT2001 programme, independent of Posiva, obviously contributed to the high level of public confidence in the Finnish nuclear waste management programme. According to the schedule of the Finnish nuclear waste management

  11. Energy in Canada 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This publication provides a panoramic overview of Canada's energy situation at the beginning of the 21st century, presenting the issues that drive the country's energy policy, and a look at the various technologies by which energy is produced, its sources, transformation and the infrastructure required to deliver it to the consumer. Energy consumption by sectors of the economy, energy conservation and energy conservation issues are analyzed, and details of the lines of actions designed by the federal government to achieve its energy policy objectives are explained. Appendix One provides more detail on the complex issue of climate change, while Appendix Two provides some energy-related statistics, extracted from a database of energy statistics which are also available in graphic or spreadsheet format at http://www.nrcan.gc.ca/es/ener2000. 12 tabs., 40 figs

  12. The Greater Involvement of People Living with AIDS principle: theory versus practice in Ontario's HIV/AIDS community-based research sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, R; Wilson, M G; Flicker, S; Guta, A; Bereket, T; McKay, C; van der Meulen, A; Cleverly, S; Dickie, M; Globerman, J; Rourke, S B

    2008-07-01

    Drawing on the Greater Involvement of People with HIV/AIDS (GIPA) principle, the HIV/AIDS movement began to "democratize" research in Canada in the mid-1990s. To date, there is little evidence about the success of the community-based research (CBR) movement in relation to the implementation of GIPA. We draw on findings from a larger study examining barriers and facilitating factors in relation to HIV-related CBR in Ontario, Canada. An online survey was completed by 39 senior managers in Ontario AIDS service organizations (ASOs). Twenty-five in-depth, semi-structured interviews were then conducted to further explore the survey findings. Survey respondents reported that, compared to researchers and frontline service providers, people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) tended to be the least involved in all stages (input, process and outcome) of CBR projects. AIDS service organizations with a mandate that included serving rural and urban communities reported even lower levels of PLWHA involvement in CBR. Qualitative data reveal complex barriers that make meaningful PLWHA engagement in CBR difficult, including: HIV-related stigma; health-related challenges; "credentialism"; lack of capacity to engage in research; other issues taking priority; and mistrust of researchers. Facilitating factors included valuing lived experience; training and mentoring opportunities; financial compensation; trust building; and accommodating PLWHA's needs. While there is strong support for the GIPA principles in theory, practice lags far behind.

  13. Research Productivity and Rankings of Anesthesiology Departments in Canada and the United States: The Relationship Between the h-Index and Other Common Metrics [RETRACTED].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Alexandra C; Alavifard, Sepand; Walker, Benjamin; Miller, Donald R; Ramsay, Tim; Boet, Sylvain

    2018-03-05

    To evaluate the relative research productivity and ranking of anesthesiology departments in Canada and the United States, using the Hirsch index (h-index) and 4 other previously validated metrics. We identified 150 anesthesiology departments in Canada and the United States with an accredited residency program. Publications for each of the 150 departments were identified using Thomson's Institute for Scientific Information Web of Science, and the citation report for each department was exported. The bibliometric data were used to calculate publication metrics for 3 time periods: cumulative (1945-2014), 10 years (2005-2014), and 5 years (2010-2014). The following group metrics were then used to determine the publication impact and relative ranking of all 150 departments: h-index, m-index, total number of publications, sum of citations, and average number of citations per article. Ranking for each metric were also stratified by using a proxy for departmental size. The most common journals in which US and Canadian anesthesiology departments publish their work were identified. The majority (23 of the top 25) of top-ranked anesthesiology departments are in the United States, and 2 of the top 25 departments (University of Toronto; McGill University) are in Canada. There was a strong positive relationship between each of h-index, total number of publications, and the sum of citations (0.91-0.97; P productivity on most metrics. The most frequent journals in which US and Canadian anesthesiology departments publish are Anesthesiology, Anesthesia and Analgesia, and the Canadian Journal of Anesthesia. Our study ranked the Canadian and US anesthesiology departmental research productivity using the h-index applied to each department, total number of publications, total number of citations, and average number of citations. The strong relationship between the h-index and both the number of publications and number of citations of anesthesiology departments shows that the departments

  14. Canada No. 1 in business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Canada has for the fifth time in a row been chosen the best industrialized country in the world in which to initiate and run a business. The Norwegian interest in Canada has grown strongly the last years and Norwegian companies have invested over 20 billion NOK there. Canada is the perfect gateway to the large markets in the USA. Norway is currently Canada's 15th largest trading partner. In addition to low costs and strategic location, Canada has the most highly educated workforce in the world. A company on the Canadian side of the US border has the same access to the American market as a US-based company. There is even a Norwegian company in Canada that exports 100 per cent of its products across the border to the USA. The trade between the USA and Canada is more extensive than between the USA and all the EU countries together. Furthermore, Canadian companies concentrating on research and education are given a generous tax credit

  15. Productivity, innovation and research at the business level. An empirical analysis of the Spanish manufacturing sector; Productividad, innovacion e investigacion a nivel de empresa. Un analisis empirico del sector manufacturero espanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muinelo Gallo, L.

    2012-07-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between productivity, innovation and research at firm level using an extension of the structural model of Crepon, Duguet and Mairesse (1998). The study is performed for Spanish firms of manufacturing sector, by using information from the ''Encuesta sobre innovacion tecnologica en las empresas 2000 and 2004''. The empirical results suggest that the public fund, the size of the firms and the participation in the international markets plays an important role in the decisions to realize internal research activities. In addition, the firms that realize a major effort in research it is more probable that they are innovative of product and/or of process. Finally, the estimations also emphasize that increases in productivity are positively correlated with the introduction of new products and/or processes and the intensity of the physical capital. (Author)

  16. The role of the public sector's research programme in support of the authorities and in building confidence on the safety of spent fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Rasilainen, K.

    2002-01-01

    A multiphase research programme was launched in 1989 to support the Finnish authorities in their activities concerning spent fuel management. The Finnish programme for spent fuel management has so far managed to keep its original time schedule at least partly due to clearly defined responsibilities between the nuclear energy producing industry and the authorities. It appears that the public sector's research programme has been successful in its supporting role by providing research results both on technical/ natural science and social science issues. In addition, the research programme has contributed directly and indirectly in building confidence on the post-closure and operational safety of a spent fuel disposal facility. (authors)

  17. Research, development and innovation in the electrical energy sector of Brazil: toward a tool for the support of the decision-making process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Fernando Vieira; Salles-Filho, Sergio; Brittes, Jose Juiz Pereira; Corder, Solange Maria; Boer, Denile Cominato [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this article is to present a tool to help in the decision making process for the allocation of resources for research, development and innovation in the electrical energy sector in Brazil. It provides a computerized tool for the management of a portfolio of projects which contains myriads of information of projects of research, development, and innovation financed by companies in the area of the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy in Brazil. This tool permits the collection and analysis of this information with a view to evaluating the direction and progress of investments made in the past five years. The electrical energy sector of Brazil invests hundreds of millions of reals each year in research and development (henceforth 'R and D'). The investment of these resources is required by a set of federal laws. This legal framework is a consequence of the process of the privatization of the sector which began in 1997. The investment of the financial resources in R and D projects is supervised by the Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency (henceforth 'ANEEL'). It is the responsibility of ANEEL to evaluate and approve proposed R and D projects, and monitor their results, as per the 'Handbook of R and D of the Electrical Energy Sector.' This tool for supporting the decision-making process serves exactly the purpose of helping both ANEEL in the approval of resources under its supervision, as well as helping companies within the electrical energy sector in the management of applied resources. Almost one billion reals (approximately US $500,000,000) were invested in more than 3000 projects from 1998 to 2006. The data base associated with these projects already contains information concerning 1412 projects from 1998 to 2004, permitting significant analyses of the results and impacts of the allocation of resources. (author)

  18. A RESEARCH ON INTERNAL MARKETING AND MOTIVATION: EMPLOYEE EVALUTION OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES IN BANKING SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan GÜLLÜ

    2017-04-01

    Participation in training and development programs is quite important to employees as being internal customers for the increase of employee mativation in services sector. In this context, this study examines the employee evalutionof training and development programs in banking sectorwith the blend of secondary and primary data which was collected through an e-mail survey applied to the employees working in the branch of a Turkish bank in Kayseri, Turkey. Statistical analyses of data indicate that employee motivation differs in terms of employee participation in any training and development programs and the working experience in the sector. The study concludes that employee participation in training and development programs is important in enhancingemployee motivation in the services sector. The results are in line with the current literatüre.

  19. Seismic Characterization and Continuity Analysis of Gas Hydrate Horizons Near the Mallik Research Wells, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellefleur, G.; Riedel, M.; Brent, T.

    2005-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits in arctic environment generally lack the BSR signature diagnostic of their presence in marine seismic data. The absence of the BSR signature complicates the estimation of the resources within or below the permafrost and the determination of their potential impact on future energy supplies, geohazard and climate change. We present results from a detailed seismic characterization of three gas hydrate horizons (A, B and C) intersected below the permafrost in five wells of the Mallik gas hydrate field located in the Mackenzie delta (Northwest Territories, Canada). The detailed seismic characterization included attribute analyses, synthetic modeling and acoustic impedance inversion and allowed estimation of the lateral continuity of the three horizons in the vicinity of the wells. Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP) data, 3D and 2D industry seismic data and the 5L/2L-38 geophysical logs (density, P-wave sonic velocity) were used for this study. Synthetic modeling using the sonic and density logs reveals that the base of the lower gas hydrate horizons B and C can be identified on the industry 3D and 2D seismic sections as prominent isolated reflections. The uppermost gas hydrate occurrence (horizon A) and potentially other additional smaller-scale layers are identified only on the higher-resolution VSP data. The 3D industry seismic data set processed to preserve the relative true-amplitudes was used for attribute calculations and acoustic impedance inversion. The attribute maps defined areas of continuous reflectivity for horizons B and C and structural features disrupting them. Results from impedance inversion indicate that such continuous reflectivity around the wells is most likely attributable to gas hydrates. The middle gas hydrate occurrence (horizon B) covers an area of approximately 25 000m2. Horizon C, which marks the base of gas hydrate occurrence zone, extends over a larger area of approximately 120 000m2.

  20. AN OVERVIEW OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (HRST FROM RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND INNOVATION (RDI SECTOR DURING 1993-2009 IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLOV MIRELA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper present a study done on the Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST in Research Development and Innovation (RDI sector in Romania during 1993-2009 .This paper started from the elements defined in Canberra Manual based on the qualification and occupation. Labor force in this study refers to university level and technician level as skill from education. These definitions from Canberra Manual for HRST were used in the present paper in reference to all the researchers in Romania for different areas of research as engineering and technology sciences domains, natural and exact sciences, medical sciences, agricultural science, social sciences and humanities. After a short presentation of the US origin of the Human Resources in Science and Technology Management and the situation from Europe, the present paper are dealing with the area of the Human Resources in Science and Technology system from Romania, the sector of Research Development and Innovation. This study is focused on the employees by categories of the activities in research, development and innovation sector. We took into account the employees with different categories of graduation diploma which are working in the fields of research and development activities too. Samples data were took from Tempo online database from National Institute of Statistics from Romania, updated database in 21 of October in 2010.Data were took for simulations in December 2010. We try to do a simulation on the evolution of Human Resources in Science and Technology (HRST in Research Development and Innovation (RDI sector in Romania during this period (1993-2009 and we observed that real data fitting on a regression curve of sixth degree whose coefficients were defined during this study. This type of simulation can be good for future forecasting for Human Resources in Science and Technology in Research Development and Innovation (RDI sector in Romania. The present study is part of Doctoral

  1. The nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Broughton, W.

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear industry in Canada comprises three identifiable groups: (1) Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), (2) electrical utilities that use nuclear power plants, (3) private engineering and manufacturing companies. At the end of World War II, AECL was charged with investigating and developing peaceful uses of atomic power. Included in the results is the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, a peculiarly Canadian design. The AECL maintains research capability and operates as the prime nuclear steam supply system supplier. Utilities in three Canadian provinces operate nuclear power plants, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario, with the majority in Ontario. From the beginning of the nuclear program in Canada, private industry has been an important partner to AECL and the utilities, filling roles as manufacturing subcontractors and as component designers. The prime objective of this paper is to illuminate the role of private industry in developing and maintaining a competitive world-class nuclear industry

  2. Coping with Changes in International Classifications of Sectors and Occupations: Application in Skills Forecasting. Research Paper No 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetan, Vladimir, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable and consistent time series are essential to any kind of economic forecasting. Skills forecasting needs to combine data from national accounts and labour force surveys, with the pan-European dimension of Cedefop's skills supply and demand forecasts, relying on different international classification standards. Sectoral classification (NACE)…

  3. Needs Assessment of the Healthcare Sector in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area. Research Report. Business Needs Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern Virginia Community Coll., Annandale. Office of Institutional Research.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the growing population of elderly citizens will result in an increased demand for healthcare services that will rise for a full 50 years. This study assesses the need for healthcare sector workers in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Information on the skills, education, and experience that…

  4. Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Cox, Susan M

    2013-10-12

    Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies. This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7. A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment. Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or

  5. Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies. Methods This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7. Results A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.’ Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a “trial and error” process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment. Conclusions Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical

  6. India | Page 120 | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A strong mining sector can provide "good" jobs and generate much needed revenue for cash-strapped governments. But it can also ruin landscapes and transform communities. In the Indian state of Goa, researchers supported by Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) have developed a series of ...

  7. What we do | Page 26 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This multinational study analyzes the career decisions and research performance of young scientists in higher education, government, parastatal (organizations whose activities serve the state), and industrial research and development (R&D) sectors across Africa. North Of Sahara, South Of Sahara, Canada. PROJECT ...

  8. Restructuring of Canada's nuclear utilities: recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guindon, S.

    1998-01-01

    Business decisions relating to the electric power sector are a provincial responsibility in Canada. The federal government looks to the three nuclear utilities to manage their nuclear assets and maintain them in a way that maximizes their reliability, efficiency and overall performance. A significant development in Canada's nuclear sector in the past year was the Ontario Hydro Nuclear Asset Optimization Plan. Structural change in the North American electricity market is a major impetus for decisions regarding nuclear assets by Canada's electric power utilities. The Ontario government is now taking steps to introduce competition in the Ontario Electricity market. The province of New Brunswick, which has one reactor at Point Lepreau which supplies one-third of the province's electricity, is also taking measures to introduce competition in its electricity market. (author)

  9. Harnessing the potential - Atlantic Canada's oil and gas industry : Newfoundland Ocean Industries special releases or publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    A comprehensive overview of Atlantic Canada's oil and gas industry is presented, demonstrating the importance of oil and gas resources and their related industries to Atlantic Canada. The objective of the report is to provide a basis for a strategy to optimize opportunities within the region from the oil and gas sector. The report reviews the current status of the industry, including the region's resource potential and the oil and gas developments currently underway. The evolution of the oil and gas industry is discussed in terms of value chain components. A broad assessment of the region's supply, labour force, infrastructure, training, and research and development capabilities is presented, followed by a description of the industry's potential, its regulatory framework and the barriers and constraints affecting industry development. Appendices contain a chronological history of major events in Atlantic Canada's oil and gas industry (Appendix A); and overview of the Atlantic Accord and the Canada-Nova Scotia Accord's equalization offset provisions (Appendix B); a value chain matrix, detailing some 60 categories of industry requirements and a capsule assessment of the region's ability to meet them (Appendix C); and a listing of research and development institutions in Atlantic Canada, including their areas of specialization (Appendix D)

  10. A cooperative agreement for research on radioactive waste management between the United States Department of Energy and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Levich, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) have a history of more than ten years of bilateral cooperation in the management of high level radioactive waste. In 1982, the USDOE and AECL executed a five year information-exchange agreement, for open-quotes Cooperation in Radioactive Waste Managementclose quotes. Since that time, this bilateral umbrella agreement has been renewed twice and the third renewal is currently being processed. International cooperation in high level radioactive waste management is highly beneficial to all concerned. Each nation involved in high level waste disposal has a single coordinated program for developing, testing, and evaluating approaches, hardware, and techniques for high level waste disposal. Thus there is limited opportunity for researchers in each country to exchange views regarding disposal technology with experienced researchers external to their own program, and to share research and development activities. The international arena, however, provides a host of organizations who have similar responsibilities and therefore similar interests and needs

  11. Hypertension management research priorities from patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers: A report from the Hypertension Canada Priority Setting Partnership Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadia; Bacon, Simon L; Khan, Samia; Perlmutter, Sara; Gerlinsky, Carline; Dermer, Mark; Johnson, Lonni; Alves, Finderson; McLean, Donna; Laupacis, Andreas; Pui, Mandy; Berg, Angelique; Flowitt, Felicia

    2017-11-01

    Patient- and stakeholder-oriented research is vital to improving the relevance of research. The authors aimed to identify the 10 most important research priorities of patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers (family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and dietitians) for hypertension management. Using the James Lind Alliance approach, a national web-based survey asked patients, caregivers, and care providers to submit their unanswered questions on hypertension management. Questions already answered from randomized controlled trial evidence were removed. A priority setting process of patient, caregiver, and healthcare providers then ranked the final top 10 research priorities in an in-person meeting. There were 386 respondents who submitted 598 questions after exclusions. Of the respondents, 78% were patients or caregivers, 29% lived in rural areas, 78% were aged 50 to 80 years, and 75% were women. The 598 questions were distilled to 42 unique questions and from this list, the top 10 research questions prioritized included determining the combinations of healthy lifestyle modifications to reduce the need for antihypertensive medications, stress management interventions, evaluating treatment strategies based on out-of-office blood pressure compared with conventional (office) blood pressure, education tools and technologies to improve patient motivation and health behavior change, management strategies for ethnic groups, evaluating natural and alternative treatments, and the optimal role of different healthcare providers and caregivers in supporting patients with hypertension. These priorities can be used to guide clinicians, researchers, and funding bodies on areas that are a high priority for hypertension management research for patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers. This also highlights priority areas for improved knowledge translation and delivering patient-centered care. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CHILD WELFARE IN CANADA : PART II

    OpenAIRE

    松本, 眞一; Shinichi, Matsumoto; 桃山学院大学社会学部

    2006-01-01

    This part study aims to research on the whole aspect of child protection in Canada. And so, this paper consists of five chapters as follows: (1)Canadian history of child protection, (2)definition of child abuse, (3)current situation of child protection in Canada, (4)outline of child protection and treatment, (5)triangular comparison of child protection and prevention in Canada, Australia and England. The first efforts at identifying and combating child abuse occurred in the latter part of the...

  13. A decade of research in Inuit children, youth, and maternal health in Canada: areas of concentrations and scarcities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Amanda J.; Hetherington, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Inuit Canadians are on average about 20 years younger and have a 10-year lower life expectancy than other Canadians. While there have been improvements in Inuit health status over time, significant health disparities still remain. This paper will review the peer-reviewed literature related to Inuit child, youth, and maternal health between 2000 and 2010, investigate which thematic areas were examined, and determine what proportion of the research is related to each group. Establishing areas of research concentrations and scarcities may help direct future research where it is needed. We followed a systematic literature review and employed peer-reviewed research literature on child, youth, and maternal health which were selected from 3 sources, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database. The resulting references were read, and summarized according to population group and thematic area. The thematic areas that emerged by frequency were: infectious disease; environment/environmental exposures; nutrition; birth outcomes; tobacco; chronic disease; health care; policy, human resources; interventions/programming; social determinants of health; mental health and wellbeing; genetics; injury; and dental health. The 72 papers that met the inclusion criteria were not mutually exclusive with respect to group studied. Fifty-nine papers (82%) concerned child health, 24 papers (33%) youth health, and 58 papers (81%) maternal health. The review documented high incidences of illness and significant public health problems; however, in the context of these issues, opportunities to develop research that could directly enhance health outcomes are explored. PMID:22868191

  14. The DEPICT model for participatory qualitative health promotion research analysis piloted in Canada, Zambia and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Sarah; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2015-09-01

    Health promotion researchers are increasingly conducting Community-Based Participatory Research in an effort to reduce health disparities. Despite efforts towards greater inclusion, research teams continue to regularly exclude diverse representation from data analysis efforts. The DEPICT model for collaborative qualitative analysis is a democratic approach to enhancing rigour through inclusion of diverse stakeholders. It is broken down into six sequential steps. Strong leadership, coordination and facilitation skills are needed; however, the process is flexible enough to adapt to most environments and varying levels of expertise. Including diverse stakeholders on an analysis team can enrich data analysis and provide more nuanced understandings of complicated health problems. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Information Management at a Health Services Research Organization in Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Moving from Identifiable Data to Coded Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Thurairasu

    2017-04-01

    The processing practices used at the organization comply with Canadian privacy laws such as the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA as well as organizational policies and Research Ethics Board approvals. The approaches used to conceal individual identities yet allow linkage to various data sources can be modelled by other health agencies, ministries, and non-health related organizations that work with sensitive data but face challenges in maintaining both privacy and research quality. Our organization strives to make processing as efficient as possible and create maximum linkability to the various data sources in house while upholding privacy and confidentiality.

  16. Industry, university and government partnership to address research, education and human resource challenges for nuclear industry in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the outcome of an important recent initiative of the Canadian nuclear industry to reinvigorate interest in education and collaborative research in prominent Canadian universities. This initiative has led to the formation of the University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE), incorporated in 2002. (author)

  17. Gender Gaps in North American Research Productivity: Examining Faculty Publication Rates in Mexico, Canada, and the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Gonzalez, Laura; Metcalfe, Amy Scott; Galaz-Fontes, Jesus F.; Fisher, Donald; Snee, Iain

    2011-01-01

    The present study addresses gender gaps in North American research productivity, which may be influenced by personal and family variables, as well as professional and work-related variables. The study was conducted as part of the "Changing Academic Profession (CAP) International Survey", conducted in 2007-08. Using articles as indicator…

  18. Your blues ain't like mine: considering integrative antiracism in HIV prevention research with black men who have sex with men in Canada and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, LaRon E; Walker, Ja'Nina J; DuBois, Steve N; Giwa, Sulaimon

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based interventions have been developed and used to prevent HIV infections among black men who have sex with men (MSM) in Canada and the United States; however, the degree to which interventions address racism and other interlocking oppressions that influence HIV vulnerability is not well known. We utilize integrative antiracism to guide a review of HIV prevention intervention studies with black MSM and to determine how racism and religious oppression are addressed in the current intervention evidence base. We searched CINAHL, PsychInfo, MEDLINE and the CDC compendium of evidence-based HIV prevention interventions and identified seventeen interventions. Three interventions targeted black MSM, yet only one intervention addressed racism, religious oppression, cultural assets and religious assets. Most interventions' samples included low numbers of black MSM. More research is needed on interventions that address racism and religious oppression on HIV vulnerability among black MSM. Future research should focus on explicating mechanisms by which multiple oppressions impact HIV vulnerability. We recommend the development and integration of social justice tools for nursing practice that aid in addressing the impacts of racism and other oppressions on HIV vulnerability of black MSM. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Uranium in Canada: Billion-dollar industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    In 1988, Canada maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium; five primary uranium producers reported concentrate output containing 12,400 MT of uranium, or about one-third of Western production. Uranium shipments made by these producers in 1988 exceeded 13,200 MT, worth Canadian $1.1 billion. Because domestic requirements represent only 15% of current Canadian output, most of Canada's uranium production is available for export. Despite continued market uncertainty in 1988, Canada's uranium producers signed new sales contracts for some 14,000 MT, twice the 1987 level. About 90% of this new volume is with the US, now Canada's major uranium customer. The recent implementation of the Canada/US Free Trade agreement brings benefits to both countries; the uranium industries in each can now develop in an orderly, free market. Canada's uranium industry was restructured and consolidated in 1988 through merger and acquisition; three new uranium projects advanced significantly. Canada's new policy on nonresident ownership in the uranium mining sector, designed to encourage both Canadian and foreign investment, should greatly improve efforts to finance the development of recent Canadian uranium discoveries

  20. PubMed Central Canada: Beyond an Open Access Repository?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariani, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) represents a partnership between the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the National Research Council's Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI), and the National Library of Medicine of the US. The present study was done to gauge faculty awareness about the CIHR Policy on…

  1. Canada's family violence initiative: partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Scott

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Under Canada's four-year, $136 million Family Violence Initiative, the federal government is calling upon all Canadians to work in partnerships towards the elimination of family violence - child abuse, violence against women, and elder (senior abuse. Family violence is a complex problem and requires the efforts of all Canadians to resolve it. One of the key themes of the Initiative - a multidisciplinary approach to the problem of family violence - is reflected in the selection and development of projects. Activities funded by the seven federal departments and agencies involved in the Initiative emphasize partnerships with the professional, voluntary, corporate, non-government and government sectors.

  2. Energy utilization in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, J.

    1976-04-01

    The situation of the energy supply of Canada is characterized by its geographic location and by the dispersal of the energy consumers over a wide area. At present, the energy supply leaving the successful CANDU nuclear energy programme out of account, is based mainly on crude oil, natural gas, and electricity as well as on coal imported from the USA. The targets of Canadian enery policies and energy research are stated as follows: a) Reducing and optimizing energy consumption, b) introducing district heating, and c) utilizing the extensive local coal deposits. (GG) [de

  3. Sustainable Development Technology Canada : partnering for real results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, V.

    2002-01-01

    The mission of Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) is to act as the primary catalyst in building a sustainable development technology infrastructure in Canada. Their mandate is to develop new technologies that focus on climate change and clean air, and to foster new partnership throughout Canada. This Power Point presentation identified the combustion research at SDTC with particular reference to the technologies that deal with: (1) the reduction of energy intensity, emissions and waste, (2) the efficient conversion of fuel to electricity, and (3) the capture, treatment and storage of carbon dioxide at large facilities. Graphs and charts depicting the impact of GHG emissions and climate change were also included. The presentation made reference to energy efficiency efforts at the DuPont Adipic Pipe Plant, the Allentown Pennsylvania wastewater treatment plant, and the pulp and paper dryer at Clean Energy Technologies. It was noted that each of the technologies mentioned have commercial value and SDTC helps in funding projects related to energy efficiency in the transportation sector, energy production, and enabling technologies. 2 figs

  4. Strategies for Recruiting Women Living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Community-Based Research: Lessons from Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Kath; Carter, Allison; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Dubuc, Danièle; Nicholson, Valerie; Beaver, Kerrigan; Gasingirwa, Claudine; Ménard, Brigitte; O'Brien, Nadia; Mitchell, Kayla; Bajard, Micaela Pereira; Ding, Erin; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Loutfy, Mona; Kaida, Angela

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to describe the recruitment of women living with HIV (WLWH) into the community-based Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study (CHIWOS), because women are under-represented in HIV research. There were 1,424 WLWH were enrolled from British Columbia, Ontario, and Québec, who completed detailed questionnaires administered by peer research associates (PRAs; WLWH with research training). During screening, participants were asked: "How did you hear about the study?" We describe recruitment strategies by subpopulation and offer reflections on challenges and successes. Of 1,131 participants with complete data, 40% identified as White, 33% African/Caribbean/Black, and 19% Indigenous. The median age was 45 years (interquartile range, 37-51) and 4% identified as trans women. Overall, 35% were recruited through PRAs/peers, 34% clinics, and 19% AIDS service organizations (ASOs). PRAs/peers were the predominant recruitment method in Ontario (49%), compared with clinics in British Columbia (40%), and Québec (43%). Nationally, PRAs/peers were more successful in recruiting WLWH commonly considered to be "harder to reach" (e.g., women identifying as trans, using drugs, not receiving HIV care). Clinics were more effective in recruiting younger women (16-29 years) and women not using ASOs. Recruitment challenges centered on engaging these harder to reach women. Successes included hiring PRAs who built participant trust, linking with clinics to reach women isolated from HIV communities, involving outreach workers to engage street-involved women, and disseminating study information to diverse stakeholders. Having multiple approaches, engaging a diverse team of PRAs, ensuring flexibility, and cultivating reciprocal relationships with community stakeholders were key to recruiting a diverse and representative sample of WLWH.

  5. Energy and competition: research on the legal changes induced by the liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    The liberalization of the electricity and gas sectors, as triggered by the European Community right, has generated deep juridical mutations. These mutations are, first, linked with market organization. In front of the diversity of the national organizations in both sectors, the European Community right could not impose a unique model of liberalization. It has established a set of common rules and principles to the different member states with the aim of ensuring the development of a competitive market. The introduction of competition gives access to the different activities of these sectors to the newcomers. However, because of their characteristics, competition cannot apply uniformly to the overall activities in concern. Two logics, one of natural monopoly, and the other of competition, will thus cohabit together. Moreover, the introduction of competition is managed. This management is characterized by the search for a new equilibrium between competition and general interest imperatives and by the creation of a new regulation authority at the institutional level. These mutations are also linked with market operation. Liberalization leads to a multiplication and an increase of the complexity of the contractual relations between the operators, the control of which is fundamental to ensure a good market operation. This mutation of operations is followed by a mutation of operators. Those are submitted to a dissociation trend of their activities in order to prevent discriminations and to fight against cross subventions. On the other hand, the operators' mutation shows a huge recombination movement which is characterized by a multiplication of concentration operations, leading to a remodeling of the market structure. (J.S.)

  6. We can do better : achieving a made in Canada climate change action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    A made in Canada approach to climate change is supported by the Canadian Coalition for Responsible Environmental Solutions, which is comprised of several business organizations, industry associations, and consumer advocacy groups. The issue of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, thereby contributing to a cleaner environment and a stronger economy, can be better achieved through the development of a climate change action plan that takes into account the specific circumstances of Canada through innovative solutions and the development of new technology. This document supports building a stronger national consensus on climate change to involve all Canadians. A brief overview of the challenge of the Kyoto Protocol for Canada is provided, followed by a statement of principles for a solution made in Canada. The components of such a plan are examined through the Canadian context, sectoral emission performance agreements, public involvement and education, and international Canadian leadership. A section is devoted to the right measurement for industrial emissions. It is proposed that the time frame be based on a combination of the most effective short-term and medium-term actions with a long-term framework to stimulate the development and deployment of viable technologies that can be commercialized. A coordinated air quality agenda, a national research and innovation strategy, a comprehensive review and streamlining of regulation, sinks and offsets all need to be included. Initiatives concerning the green advantage of Canada, transportation, buildings, community action and science and adaptation are required. 1 fig

  7. Risk and protective factors associated with being a victim of aggression in the health sector. Research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Parmigiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: aggression against healthcare workers is an alarming issue worldwide. However, there is lack of data on psychological vulnerability factors (such as personality traits, attachment style which can constitute a risk or a protective factor for being a victim of an episode of violence in the health sector. Methods/design: the present protocol is a cross-sectional study on prevalence and characteristics of violent episodes experienced by nursing students in the clinical setting. Its aim is to identify risk and protective factors for becoming a victim of verbal and/or physical aggression among healthcare workers. Participants will undergo an intensive battery of psychometric tests, dealing with episodes of aggression in the previous year, attachment style, personality traits, perceived stress, health related quality of life and job strain. Conclusions: the findings derived from this study may be of value in identifying vulnerability factors in experiencing an episode of aggression in the health sector. In this respect, it is a step towards the development of valid training and support focused on health workers, aimed at teaching them how to modulate and manage their vulnerability factors in an efficient way.

  8. Design of injection system for separated sector cyclotron proposed at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Yasushige

    1980-01-01

    A beam injection system has been proposed for the separated-sector cyclotron (SSC) planned at the IPCR. In the central region of the SSC, a beam transported from a variable frequency linac or an AVF cyclotron is guided onto the first equilibrium orbit by means of three types of inflecting elements. These equipments consist of three bending magnets, a magnetic inflection channel and an electrostatic inflection channel. The latter two elements are placed between the magnetic poles of the sector magnets. The bending magnets are of a modified window-frame design with a pure iron yoke. The magnetic field distribution generated by these magnets was calculated and ascertained to have the satisfactory homogeniety. The magnetic inflection channel is composed of two sets of coils. One is used to accomplish an adequate field rise and the other to compensate for the main field fall which is brought about in the accelerating area by the former set of coils. With the aid of a computer code solving the Laplace equation, shapes of the anode and the cathode of the electrostatic inflector have been determined to produce a sufficiently uniform electric field. Finally, the present method of injection is concluded to be feasible for our SSC. (author)

  9. Power Watch - A global, open database of power plants that supports research on climate, water and air pollution impact of the global power sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Kressig, A.; Van Groenou, S.; McCormick, C.

    2017-12-01

    Challenge The lack of transparent, accessible, and centralized power sector data inhibits the ability to research the impact of the global power sector. information gaps for citizens, analysts, and decision makers worldwide create barriers to sustainable development efforts. The need for transparent, accessible, and centralized information is especially important to enhance the commitments outlined in the recently adopted Paris Agreement and Sustainable Development Goals. Offer Power Watch will address this challenge by creating a comprehensive, open-source platform on the world's power systems. The platform hosts data on 85% of global installed electrical capacity and for each power plant will include data points on installed capacity, fuel type, annual generation, commissioning year, with more characteristics like emissions, particulate matter, annual water demand and more added over time. Most of the data is reported from national level sources, but annual generation and other operational characteristiscs are estimated via Machine Learning modeling and remotely sensed data when not officially reported. In addition, Power Watch plans to provide a suite of tools that address specific decision maker needs, such as water risk assessments and air pollution modeling. Impact Through open data, the platform and its tools will allow reserachers to do more analysis of power sector impacts and perform energy modeling. It will help catalyze accountability for policy makers, businesses, and investors and will inform and drive the transition to a clean energy future while reaching development targets.

  10. Impacts of reintroduced bison on first nations people in Yukon, Canada: Finding common ground through participatory research and social learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Clark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1988-1992 wood bison (Bison bison athabascae were transplanted to the southwest Yukon, inadvertently creating concerns among local First Nations about their impacts on other wildlife, habitat, and their members' traditional livelihoods. To understand these concerns we conducted a participatory impact assessment based on a multistage analysis of existing and new qualitative data. We found wood bison had since become a valued food resource, though there was a socially-determined carrying capacity for this population. Study participants desire a population large enough to sustainably harvest but avoid crossing a threshold beyond which bison may alter the regional ecosystem. An alternative problem definition emerged that focuses on how wildlife and people alike are adapting to the observed long-term changes in climate and landscape; suggesting that a wider range of acceptable policy alternatives likely exists than may have previously been thought. Collective identification of this new problem definition indicates that this specific assessment acted as a social learning process in which the participants jointly discovered new perspectives on a problem at both individual and organisational levels. Subsequent regulatory changes, based on this research, demonstrate the efficacy of participatory impact assessment for ameliorating human-wildlife conflicts.

  11. Industrial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    The industrial sector is categorized as related to among others, the provision of technical and engineering services, supply of products, testing and troubleshooting of parts, systems and industrial plants, quality control and assurance as well as manufacturing and processing. A total of 161 entities comprising 47 public agencies and 114 private companies were selected for the study in this sector. The majority of the public agencies, 87 %, operate in Peninsular Malaysia. The remainders were located in Sabah and Sarawak. The findings of the study on both public agencies and private companies are presented in subsequent sections of this chapter. (author)

  12. Agricultural sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainul Hayati Daud; Hazmimi Kasim

    2010-01-01

    The applications of nuclear technology in agriculture sector cover the use of the technology at every aspects of agricultural activity, starting from the seed to harvesting as well as the management of plantations itself. In this sector, a total of 55 entities comprising 17 public agencies and 38 private companies were selected for the study. Almost all, 91 % of them are located in Peninsular Malaysia; the rest operates in Sabah and Sarawak. The findings of the study in the public agencies and private companies are presented in the next sections. (author)

  13. ASA24-Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Canadian adaptation of the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Dietary Assessment Tool (ASA24-Canada), developed by the Food Directorate at Health Canada in collaboration with NCI, has been freely available since April 2014.

  14. The future of uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Vliet, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines issues relating to the future of uranium in Canada. It outlines the need for increased base-load electrical power generation to reach Canada's full economic potential of the resource sector. It outlines international comparisons, with emphasis on wind power generation as part of the energy mix of energy sources. It examines a broad overview of options and nuclear power; addressing the nuclear industry's safety as well as the unfounded continuing public fear of radiation. It also addresses nuclear waste management and disposal and the environmental assessment work done, leading up to the current Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO). (author)

  15. Canada's upstream petroleum industry : 1997 perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    A review of the trends and activities in the upstream petroleum industry during 1996 were presented, emphasizing the significance of the industry' contribution to Canada's economy. Among the areas included were highlights of Canada's hydrocarbon reserves, conventional production, frontier production, and non-conventional (oil sands) production. New market opportunities and activities in the pipeline transportation sector were also discussed. Environmental issues including health and safety received due attention. In this regard, the industry's efforts to work with government and other stakeholders to ensure that requirements for land use are balanced with the need to protect wilderness and wildlife habitat, received special mention. 16 figs

  16. Pharmaceutical company spending on research and development and promotion in Canada, 2013-2016: a cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2018-01-01

    Competing claims are made about the amount of money that pharmaceutical companies spend on research and development (R&D) versus promotion. This study investigates this question in the Canadian context. Two methods for determining industry-wide figures for spending on promotion were employed. First, total industry spending on detailing and journal advertising for 2013-2016 was abstracted from reports from QuintilesIMS. Second, the mean total promotion spending for the years 2002-2005 was used to estimate total spending for 2013-2016. Total industry spending on R&D came from the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB). R&D to promotion spending using each method of determining the amount spent on promotion was compared for 2013-2016 inclusive. Data on the 50 top promoted drugs, the amounts spent, the companies marketing these products and their overall sales were abstracted from the QuintilesIMS reports. Spending on R&D and promotion as a percent of sales was compared for these companies. Industry wide, the ratio of R&D to promotion spending went from 1.43 to 2.18 when promotion was defined as the amount spent on detailing and journal advertising for the 50 most promoted drugs. Calculating total promotion spending from the mean of the 2002-2005 figures the ratio was 0.88 to 1.32 for the 50 most promoted drugs. For individual companies marketing one or more of the 50 most promoted drugs, mean R&D spending ranged from 3.7% of sales to 4.1% compared to mean promotion spending that went from 1.7 to 1.9%. The ratio of spending on R&D to promotion varied from 2.11 to 2.32. Eight to 10 companies per year spent more on promotion than on R&D. Depending on the method used to determine promotion spending, industry-wide the ratio of R&D spending to promotion ranges from 1.45 to 2.18 (sales representatives and journal advertising only) or from 0.88 to 1.32 (total promotion spending estimated based 2003-2005 data.) For the individual companies promoting one or more of the

  17. Food irradiation: progress in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: food irradiation regulatory situation in Canada; non-regulatory developments (poultry irradiation; fish irradiation; Government willingness to fund industry initiated projects; Government willingness to establish food irradiation research and pilot plant facilities; food industry interest is increasing significantly; Canadian Consumers Association positive response; the emergence of new consulting and entrepreneurial firms). (U.K.)

  18. Canada-India Reactor (CIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1960-12-15

    Design information on the Canada-India Reactor is presented. Data are given on reactor physics, the core, fuel elements, core heat transfer, control, reactor vessel, fluid flow, reflector and shielding, containment, cost estimates, and research facilities. Drawings of vertical and horizontal sections of the reactor and fluid flow are included. (M.C.G.)

  19. Fusion Canada issue 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada`s participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs.

  20. RESEARCH ABOUT THE USERS´ PERCEPTION OF ACCOUNTING AND TAX BOOKKEEPING MODULES OF AN ERP SYSTEM FOR THE CARGO AND PASSENGERS ROAD TRANSPORTATION SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivam Ricardo Peleias

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the users´perception of accounting and tax bookkeeping modules of an ERP – Enterprise Resources Planning System for the cargo and passengers road transportation sector. It´s a survey research, which combined empiric investigation, bibliographical review, as well as field research. It was applied a questionnaire containing 20 questions to characterize the sample and 30 assertive ones, answered by 37 users of the system. The collected data were treated by Qualitative Analysis, Descriptive Statistics, Cluster Analysis and Comparative Analysis among the clusters. The results demonstrate how these users perceive the importance and the facilities with the use of the system, as well as grouped such users in 3 opinion clusters (optimistic, realists and pessimistic and indicated points that can be improved in the system.

  1. Strengthening Research and Teaching Capacity in Earth Sciences ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Collaboration to build South Africa's mining future With this funding, the ... at Canada's Laurentian University will provide world-class training, research, and ... build the University of Limpopo's potential to be a leading mining school in the region. ... in improving national capacities to manage the extractive sector responsibly.

  2. What we do | Page 85 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Palestinian Security Sector Reform : the View of the Public. In its August ... The Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network (CAPT Network) was formed through a capacity building grant from the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI). ... Building Capacity for Conducting HIV Prevention Trials in the Health Care Workplace.

  3. Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada -- 2009 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-12

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy. The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country's natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide Canada towards a more sustainable energy future.

  4. Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada -- 2009 Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-04-12

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy. The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country's natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure. Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology. This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements. It is intended to help guide Canada towards a more sustainable energy future.

  5. Aging in Canada: State of the Art and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Debra J.; Gallagher, Elaine M.

    2013-01-01

    Canada shares many similarities with other industrialized countries around the world, including a rapidly aging population. What sets Canada uniquely apart is the collaborative approach that has been enacted in the health care system and the aging research initiatives. Canada has tremendous pride in its publicly funded health care system that…

  6. Climate science agenda for Canada 2002-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The development of this agenda was the result of discussions held at a multi-stakeholder workshop in Ottawa in March 2002, an experts panel meeting of leading scientists and policy makers also in Ottawa in March 2002, and a review of related assessments undertaken on a global scale in the United States and Canada. Policies concerning climate change in Canada must be developed for the long-term, despite critical urgency in the short-term. The author recommended the following timetable for action: (1) decision on the measures required for the implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to be made in 2002, (2) a suitable carbon trading policy and mechanism to be developed, (3) the extent to which carbon sinks can be claimed by Canada to be decided by 2006, (4) decide on optimum strategies for negotiating emission reductions in second commitment period after 2012, by 2006-2008, (5) start adaptation measures to mitigate adverse climate change impacts on Canadian economy, people, and environment, (6) implement ratified commitments for the 2008-2012 commitment period. It is more effective to respond to seasonal variations in climate in agriculture, water management, energy, transportation and other sectors, based on more reliable science. Research efforts in the field of climate science in Canada must be supported, in order to find answers to seven questions asked in the document. The document was divided into eight sections. Section 1 dealt with the climate: public policy issues, and section 2 looked at climate science: a basic national need. In section 3, the author looked at international comparisons, and the role of climate science in policy development 2002-2012 was discussed in section 4. Interdisciplinary and international dimensions were the topic discussed in section 5, while section 6 dealt with science needs and priorities 2002-2012. Coordination mechanisms were examined in section 7 and communicating climate science was explored in section 8. 5 refs., 1 tab

  7. Canada's climate change dilemma and how to solve it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, S.

    2006-01-01

    This article presented a climate change policy plan delivered as part of political campaign for the leadership of the Liberal Party of Canada. The author proposed that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions can be radically reduced through the implementation of a system of enhanced regulations. It was argued that environmental sustainability has become an economic imperative as the climate changes and energy prices increase. The climate change policy plan addressed different sectors of the Canadian economy. Once enacted, the plan would enable average Canadian household to save $1000 per year on their electricity bills through a system of refundable tax credits for energy-efficient home retrofits and rebates and a new Green Mortgage plan. Targeted tax cuts of up to $2000 for fuel-efficient vehicles were proposed. The plan also included increased funding for research and development into renewable energy technologies; progressive environmental tax reforms; more stringent energy efficiency standards for appliances; and, an expansion of the use of biofuels in Canada by mandating a 10 per cent ethanol standard in gas, and 10 per cent in biodiesel by 2010. The plan would also create a functional carbon emissions market and renewable portfolio standard, as well as an expansion of the Wind Power Production Initiative (WPPI). Significant investment in the Strategic and Municipal Rural Infrastructure Funds to help protect municipal assets against extreme weather was proposed, as well as the development of a cap-and-trade program for smog-forming substances and the establishment of regulatory targets and timelines for the reduction of key air pollutants. A comprehensive water strategy to improve the management of critical water resources was outlined. Expansion of the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund, the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund, and the Green Municipal Fund was proposed. It was concluded that the new policy plan outlines will provide a roadmap for climate change

  8. canada's international development research centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    and management structures is evident throughout this report. It is equally ... Science, and Professor of Opera- tions and Logistics at the Sauder School of Business, ... emerging countries — notably Brazil, China, and India — entered the current ...

  9. Microscopic coal research in Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hacquebard, P.A.

    1955-01-01

    Since the industrial developments of Europe and North America in the nineteenth century, coal has been considered as the most important mineral wealth a country could possess. Coal was often referred to as King Coal, and it was not until around 1950 that its position as the major fuel for modern

  10. Sector profile: Petroleum sector in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    The Cuban oil industry started in 1860 when an oil well was drilled in Matanzas province. About 200 wells were drilled up until 1959. In the past 30 years, the oil industry has become a priority sector; in 1985-1990, about US$500 million were invested in the industry, with increases in exploration and well drilling activity. Recently completed works include pipelines and a supertanker terminal. About 10 million tons of oil are imported annually and local production averages about 800,000 metric tons per year. Most of the oil found in Cuba so far is of the heavy type, as found in western Canada. There are about 10 small and medium-sized oil deposits, mainly located in the north. The most promising oil field is at Varadero, whose characteristics are similar to the Cold Lake field in Alberta. Cuban oil refining capacity is over 7.6 million metric tons per year, and additional capacity is being constructed. All imports of oil industry equipment are conducted via state trading agencies. Export opportunities of interest to Canadian companies are outlined, along with monetary constraints affecting imports to Cuba, financing and export insurance programs available to Canadian companies, and recommendations to Canadian exporters. A list of industry/government contacts is included

  11. Halogen systematics in the Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well, Northwest Territories, Canada: Implications for the origin of gas hydrates under terrestrial permafrost conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaru, Hitoshi; Fehn, Udo; Lu, Zunli; Matsumoto, Ryo

    2007-01-01

    The authors report here halogen concentrations in pore waters and sediments collected from the Mallik 5L-38 gas hydrate production research well, a permafrost location in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. Iodine and Br are commonly enriched in waters associated with CH 4 , reflecting the close association between these halogens and source organic materials. Pore waters collected from the Mallik well show I enrichment, by one order of magnitude above that of seawater, particularly in sandy layers below the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Although Cl and Br concentrations increase with depth similar to the I profile, they remain below seawater values. The increase in I concentrations observed below the GHSZ suggests that I-rich fluids responsible for the accumulation of CH 4 in gas hydrates are preferentially transported through the sandy permeable layers below the GHSZ. The Br and I concentrations and I/Br ratios in Mallik are considerably lower than those in marine gas hydrate locations, demonstrating a terrestrial nature for the organic materials responsible for the CH 4 at the Mallik site. Halogen systematics in Mallik suggest that they are the result of mixing between seawater, freshwater and an I-rich source fluid. The comparison between I/Br ratios in pore waters and sediments speaks against the origin of the source fluids within the host formations of gas hydrates, a finding compatible with the results from a limited set of 129 I/I ratios determined in pore waters, which gives a minimum age of 29 Ma for the source material, i.e. at the lower end of the age range of the host formations. The likely scenario for the gas hydrate formation in Mallik is the derivation of CH 4 together with I from the terrestrial source materials in formations other than the host layers through sandy permeable layers into the present gas hydrate zones

  12. 11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  13. Energy researchers - 8. Wind power production: Wind power, the energy of the future; A mature sector; The ecological attraction of wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minster, Jean-Francois; Appert, Olivier; Moisan, Francois; Salha, Bernard; Tardieu, Bernard; Florette, Marc; Ghidaglia, Jean-Michel; Viterbo, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    A first article comments the development in the design of wind turbines which become more powerful, with higher performance. Researchers are also working on blade shape, on alternator technology, on the use of multiplier to enable the reduction of the alternator weight, on better control and command systems to increase the load factor. The development of offshore wind farms is also a challenge in terms of maintenance, in wind turbine design in order to withstand sea corrosion, and in terms of connection to the grid. A second article comments the evolution of the wind energy sector in terms of installed capacity, costs and competitiveness. In an interview, three researchers outline the extremely positive carbon footprint and other benefits of wind power, and also discuss its disadvantages: they mainly concern the impact on landscape, but also birds and marine fauna

  14. Energy sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of assessing the state of the environment in Lebanon, this chapter describes primary energy demand, the electricity generating sector and environmental impacts arising from the energy sector.Apart from hydropower and traditional energy sources, which together represent 1.7% of energy consumption, all energy in Lebanon derives from imported petroleum products and some coal.Tables present the imports of different petroleum products (Gasoil, Kerosene, fuel oil, coal etc...), their use, the energy balance and demand.Energy pricing and pricing policies, formal and informal electricity generations in Lebanon are described emphasized by tables. The main environmental impacts are briefly summarized. Thermal power stations give rise to emissions of Sulphur dioxide (SO 2 ), particulates, oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) and CO/CO 2 from combustion of primary fuel informally generated power from both industry and domestic consumption produce particulate materials and emissions of NO x and SO 2 projected emissions of SO 2 from the power sector with the present generating capacity and with the new combined cycle power plants in operation are shown. Other environmental impacts are described. Recommendations for supply and environment policy are presented

  15. Carbon disclosure project report 2009 : Canada 200

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.

    2009-01-01

    The carbon disclosure project conducts an annual survey to determine the strategies and actions of major cap companies in relation to climate change. This report discussed initiatives implemented by Canada's largest companies to prepare for a carbon-constrained future. The report documented results from 97 companies. The aim of the report was to help companies make use of the disclosures as reference points for future carbon markets and regulations relating to reporting requirements. Results of the survey demonstrated that Canada's low-carbon and high-carbon impact sectors have implemented several significant initiatives and best practices for operations. However, widespread engagement in a comprehensive manner has yet to be achieved. Many respondents were in the process of developing a more balanced risk-opportunity agenda in relation to climate change, and nearly half of all respondents have implemented governance arrangements or personal incentives in both both the high-carbon and low-carbon impact sectors. 5 tabs., 26 figs.

  16. Canada in the changing world economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    A broad overview and a sectoral view of Canada's economic development concudes that expansion will slow down to two percent annually during the 1980s because of the decline in young people, immigrants, and women entering the labor force. Labor productivity will have to provide any growth in per capita incomes. Market expansion into developed countries has been difficult for Canada, although depreciation of the Canadian dollar was helpful. A general picture is drawn of Canada's present situation and the key issues the country faces as a part of the international community. Three strategies are suggested to strengthen the economic performance: restructure Canadian industry, increase aid to developing countries, and continue a devalued dollar while gradually easing the balance of payments deficit. 229 references, 21 tables. (DCK)

  17. ITER workshops demonstrate details of Canada's bid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, P.

    2001-01-01

    On 5 and 6 November a series of five Workshops were held in Canada that provided thirty international ITER participants with significant background on various aspects of the Canadian offer. The public-private sector partnership basis for the Canadian offer is unique, and the Workshops provided an opportunity for participants from the EU, Japan and the Russian Federation to broaden their understanding of the offer and to share and discuss issues that may be relevant in the preparation of other site offers

  18. Canada's power play : the case for a Canadian energy strategy for a carbon-constrained world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbins, R.; Roberts, K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presented the results of a series of energy sector consultations conducted across western Canada to determine expert opinions related to the subject of energy policy in Canada. The consultations indicated that many sector experts and stakeholders feel that climate change must be addressed when designing an energy policy for Canada, and that a fair balance must be obtained between the need for economic and environmental sustainability. The economy should not be compromised by action on climate change, and regional differences should be considered. Results of the study suggested that a Canadian energy strategy should coordinate federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal energy policy initiatives. Energy production targets for a range of renewable and non-renewable energy sources should be established. The strategy should inform and be compatible with a national climate change strategy, and move beyond regulation and singular initiatives such as carbon capture and storage. The strategy should stress energy conservation, send appropriate price signals as financial incentives for change, and recognize the need for public investment in research and technology. The document stated that an effective energy strategy may take many years to establish.

  19. Taxation and our future mineral resources. [Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R D

    1976-05-01

    Canada's known reserves of minerals are estimated in general to be adequate to meet domestic requirements and current export demands until the mid-1980's. Beyond that time, an increasing proportion of reserves needed to maintain, let alone increase, present mineral production must come from mineral deposits not yet discovered, delineated or developed. The major question for Canada is whether present tax and regulatory programs will provide sufficient incentives for the industry to spend the large amounts required--perhaps $1.2 billion annually--in the exploration and development of mineral resources. Without such a major capital commitment to the development of new mineral resources, Canada will not be able to maintain the relative importance of its mining sector, or the contribution that the sector has made to our balance of payments, employment, and the opening of new frontiers. However, present levels of exploration and development expenditures are likely to be totally inadequate in maintaining, let alone increasing present production. The article refers to two major new reports that provide new information on Canada's resource industries and their future.

  20. Marine renewable energy sector early-stage supply chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Marine renewable energy is an emergent sector in Canada. Although supply chain studies have been performed on the United Kingdom and the United States markets, no study has been conducted yet in Canada. The aim of this study was therefore to perform a supply chain analysis in Canada to assess the maturity, strengths, and weaknesses of the sector and determine where the opportunities lie. The study emphasises that the sector is still at the prototype stage in Canada and that the industry must learn to improve its technology and begin to take on large scale projects. Canada has several strengths in the marine renewable energy sector, mainly in terms of resources and facilities, but there are also weaknesses pertaining to technology development and experience. The study concluded that the development of the sector must be centered on a solid vision; in the near term, technological innovation is needed to reach pre-commercialization while in the long term, the sector should aim for commercial application.

  1. Tritium activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Canadian tritium activites comprise three major interests: utilites, light manufacturers, and fusion. There are 21 operating CANDU reactors in Canada; 19 with Ontario Hydro and one each with Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick Power. There are two light manufacturers, two primary tritium research facilities (at AECL Chalk River and Ontario Hydro Technologies), and a number of industry and universities involved in design, construction, and general support of the other tritium activities. The largest tritum program is in support of the CANDU reactors, which generate tritium in the heavy water as a by-product of normal operation. Currently, there are about 12 kg of tritium locked up in the heavy water coolant and moderator of these reactors. The fusion work is complementary to the light manufacturing, and is concerned with tritium handling for the ITER program. This included design, development and application of technologies related to Isotope Separation, tritium handling, (tritiated) gas separation, tritium-materials interaction, and plasma fueling

  2. Can public health reconcile profits and pandemics? An analysis of attitudes to commercial sector engagement in health policy and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Jeff; Hill, Sarah E; Kandlik Eltanani, Mor; Plotnikova, Evgeniya; Ralston, Rob; Smith, Katherine E

    2017-01-01

    Public health's terms of engagement with unhealthy commodity industries (alcohol, tobacco and ultra-processed food and drinks) have become increasingly contested in policy and research. We sought to identify approaches that could attract consensus support within and across policy domains. Using snowball sampling, we undertook an online survey of 335 health researchers, advocates and policymakers, in 40 countries, assessing responses to stated principles, claims and recommendations for engaging with unhealthy commodity industries in relation to key policy and research initiatives. Most respondents identified a fundamental conflict between industry interests and public health objectives for all three industries, with agreement greatest in relation to tobacco and weakest for food. This pattern was replicated across diverse questions regarding potential forms of engagement, including in rejecting voluntarism and partnership approaches to health policy. While awareness of tobacco industry tactics to influence policy and research was higher than for alcohol and food, most respondents rejected the view that the influence of the latter was less significant for public health. Proposals that health and research organisations should divest their funds attracted less support with respect to food, while restricting publication of industry-funded research in academic journals was the issue that most divided opinion. Respondents reported most difficulty in answering questions about the food industry. The strong consensus around restricting interactions with the tobacco industry supports increased implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control's conflict of interest provisions. There is strong support for the extension of such practices to the alcohol industry, challenging current norms. More mixed responses indicate a need for greater clarity in defining the food industry, and for research analyzing links, similarities and differences across different types of

  3. Can public health reconcile profits and pandemics? An analysis of attitudes to commercial sector engagement in health policy and research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Collin

    Full Text Available Public health's terms of engagement with unhealthy commodity industries (alcohol, tobacco and ultra-processed food and drinks have become increasingly contested in policy and research. We sought to identify approaches that could attract consensus support within and across policy domains.Using snowball sampling, we undertook an online survey of 335 health researchers, advocates and policymakers, in 40 countries, assessing responses to stated principles, claims and recommendations for engaging with unhealthy commodity industries in relation to key policy and research initiatives.Most respondents identified a fundamental conflict between industry interests and public health objectives for all three industries, with agreement greatest in relation to tobacco and weakest for food. This pattern was replicated across diverse questions regarding potential forms of engagement, including in rejecting voluntarism and partnership approaches to health policy. While awareness of tobacco industry tactics to influence policy and research was higher than for alcohol and food, most respondents rejected the view that the influence of the latter was less significant for public health. Proposals that health and research organisations should divest their funds attracted less support with respect to food, while restricting publication of industry-funded research in academic journals was the issue that most divided opinion. Respondents reported most difficulty in answering questions about the food industry.The strong consensus around restricting interactions with the tobacco industry supports increased implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control's conflict of interest provisions. There is strong support for the extension of such practices to the alcohol industry, challenging current norms. More mixed responses indicate a need for greater clarity in defining the food industry, and for research analyzing links, similarities and differences across

  4. Active Canada 20/20: A physical activity plan for Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C; Faulkner, Guy; Costas Bradstreet, Christa; Duggan, Mary; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-03-16

    Physical inactivity is a pressing public health concern. In this commentary we argue that Canada's approach to increasing physical activity (PA) has been fragmented and has lacked coordination, funding and a strategic approach. We then describe a potential solution in Active Canada 20/20 (AC 20/20), which provides both a national plan and a commitment to action from non-government and public sectors with a view to engaging corporate Canada and the general public. It outlines a road map for initiating, coordinating and implementing proactive initiatives to address this prominent health risk factor. The identified actions are based on the best available evidence and have been endorsed by the majority of representatives in the relevant sectors. The next crucial steps are to engage all those involved in public health promotion, service provision and advocacy at the municipal, provincial and national levels in order to incorporate AC 20/20 principles into practice and planning and thus increase the PA level of every person in Canada. Further, governments, as well as the private, not-for-profit and philanthropic sectors, should demonstrate leadership and continue their efforts toward providing the substantial and sustained resources needed to recalibrate Canadians' habitual PA patterns; this will ultimately improve the overall health of our citizens.

  5. Canada's Fusion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D. P.

    1990-01-01

    Canada's fusion strategy is based on developing specialized technologies in well-defined areas and supplying these technologies to international fusion projects. Two areas are specially emphasized in Canada: engineered fusion system technologies, and specific magnetic confinement and materials studies. The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project focuses on the first of these areas. It tritium and fusion reactor fuel systems, remote maintenance and related safety studies. In the second area, the Centre Canadian de fusion magnetique operates the Tokamak de Varennes, the main magnetic fusion device in Canada. Both projects are partnerships linking the Government of Canada, represented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, and provincial governments, electrical utilities, universities and industry. Canada's program has extensive international links, through which it collaborates with the major world fusion programs, including participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project

  6. Private-sector research ethics: marketing or good conflicts management? The 2005 John J. Conley Lecture on Medical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies are major sponsors of biomedical research. Most scholars and policymakers focus their attention on government and academic oversight activities, however. In this article, I consider the role of pharmaceutical companies' internal ethics statements in guiding decisions about corporate research and development (R&D). I review materials from drug company websites and contributions from the business and medical ethics literature that address ethical responsibilities of businesses in general and pharmaceutical companies in particular. I discuss positive and negative uses of pharmaceutical companies' ethics materials and describe shortcomings in the companies' existing ethics programs. To guide employees and reassure outsiders, companies must add rigor, independence, and transparency to their R&D ethics programs.

  7. A Strategic Analysis of Investment Opportunities within British Columbia's Private Healthcare Sector for a Non-Profit Genomics Research Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Barclay, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the genome sciences are leading to the development of new healthcare innovations relevant to the principles of personalized medicine. Genome BC, a non-profit research organization, invests in projects that will help facilitate the integration of these innovations into the delivery of healthcare. This analysis assesses the strategic positioning of private healthcare firms in BC to be early users of such innovations. The analysis assesses the suitability of investment from Genome BC...

  8. Canada's carbon capture and storage initiatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Alexandra; Mitrovic, Milenka; Grant, Andrea

    2010-09-15

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a critical technology for Canada to make meaningful emissions reductions in the fossil fuels sector. Canada is a global leader in CCS, and both federal and provincial governments are taking action to advance the deployment of this technology, including allocating over CAD 3.5 billion in public funding to CCS. These investments support several interdependent initiatives focusing on addressing the challenges facing CCS, supporting innovation, accelerating deployment, and facilitating information sharing. Canada is also committed to working internationally to ensure that our efforts at home contribute to the overall global advancement of CCS.

  9. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life of Employees in the Healthcare Sector: An Issue in Health Services Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasczik, Matthias; Ahnert, Jutta; Ströbl, Veronika; Vogel, Heiner; Donath, Carolin; Enger, Ilka; Gräßel, Elmar; Heyelmann, Lena; Lux, Heidemarie; Maurer, Jochen; Özbe, Dominik; Spieckenbaum, Stefanie; Voigtländer, Elzbieta; Wildner, Manfred; Zapf, Andreas; Zellner, Angela; Hollederer, Alfons

    2017-05-18

    Background Healthcare professionals are confronted with specific work-related demands that influence work-family relations and might indirectly affect the quality of healthcare. This paper seeks to provide an overview of the current state of research on this topic of relevance to health services research. The overview may serve as a starting point for modifying structures in the healthcare system (especially in rural regions) with the aim of improving work-family compatibility. Methods A systematic national and international literature search was conducted in terms of a scoping review. The following criteria/contents to be covered in publications were defined: work-family compatibility; work-family interface and work-family conflict in employees working in healthcare; healthcare professions in rural areas and links with work-family issues; interventions to improve work-family compatibility. 145 publications were included in the overview. Results The available literature focuses on physicians and nursing staff while publications on other professions are largely lacking. The methodological quality of existing studies is mostly low, including a lack of meta-analyses. Several studies document dissatisfaction in physicians and nursing staff regarding reconciliation of work and family life. Only few intervention studies were found that seek to improve work-life compatibility; few of them focus on employees in healthcare. There are also deficits with respect to linking work-family issues with aspects of healthcare in rural areas. Conclusions There is a shortage of systematic national and international research regarding work-family compatibility, especially when it comes to the evaluation of interventions. The overview provides starting points for improving work-family compatibility in healthcare. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Gillespie, P.A.

    1990-05-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  11. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Gillespie, P.A.

    1990-05-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  12. Operational expert system applications in Canada

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Ching Y

    1992-01-01

    This book is part of a new series on operational expert systems worldwide. Expert systems are now widely used in different parts of the world for various applications. The past four years have witnessed a steady growth in the development and deployment of expert systems in Canada. Research in this field has also gained considerable momentum during the past few years. However, the field of expert systems is still young in Canada. This book contains 13 chapters contributed by 31 experts from both universities and industries across Canada covering a wide range of applications related to electric

  13. The full costs of thermal power production in Eastern Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, H.D.; Barg, S.

    2003-07-01

    This study examines the public health and global warming costs associated with generating electricity with fossil fuels such as coal, oil or natural gas. A Full Cost Accounting approach was used to determine the costs for Eastern Canada. The electricity sector is chosen because it is a large emitter of air pollutants and greenhouse gases. The sector it will undergo potentially significant structural changes as Canada complies with the Kyoto Protocol. Alternative investments in nonpolluting sources of electricity should include analysis of full costs. Two types of factors are evaluated in this study: the public health costs caused by emissions of sulphur and nitrogen oxides and volatile organic carbon (VOC) in Eastern Canada, and the marginal climate change damages caused by the emissions of greenhouse gasses (GHGs) in Eastern Canada. The major contribution of this study is the application of the impact-pathway approach to power sector emissions. Recent Canadian studies have reported either the pollutant emission rates for different power generation technologies and fuels, or the health costs of ambient air pollution not specifically attributable to the power sector. This study isolates the component of air pollution attributable to the power sector and analyses its geographic distribution. It was concluded that coal-fired generation should be closely monitored because the externalities burden is the same magnitude as the marginal production cost. 77 refs., 20 tabs., 21 figs

  14. Sectoral assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callaway, J M; Fenhann, J; Gorham, R; Makundi, W; Sathaye, J

    1999-09-01

    This publication contains five papers that were written as a part of the GEF project, The Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations. The main goal of the project was to assess the greenhouse gas reductions and incremental costs of mitigation option sin Ecuador, Argentina, Senegal, Mauritius, Vietnam, Indonesia, Estonia and Hungary. In addition, regional studies were conducted for the Andean Pact nations and Southern Africa to assess various aspects of regional co-operation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The GEF study also involved the development of a methodological framework for climate change assessment, with a special emphasis on developing countries. These guidelines have been published in a separate document, Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations: Methodological Guidelines. The papers in this publication focus on various methodological and policy aspects of greenhouse gas mitigation at the sectoral level, and are outgrowth of work performed on other parts of the GEF project. (au)

  15. Library Research and Statistics. Research on Libraries and Librarianship in 2002; Number of Libraries in the United States and Canada; Highlights of NCES Surveys; Library Acquisition Expenditures, 2001-2002: U.S. Public, Academic, Special, and Government Libraries; LJ Budget Report: A Precarious Holding Pattern; Price Indexes for Public and Academic Libraries; Library Buildings 2002: The Building Buck Doesn't Stop Here.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mary Jo; Oder, Norman; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee

    2003-01-01

    Includes seven reports that discuss research on libraries and librarianship, including academic, public, and school libraries; awards and grants; number of libraries in the United States and Canada; National Center for Education Statistics results; library expenditures for public, academic, special, and government libraries; library budgets; price…

  16. Energy in Canada: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Recent changes in the North American natural gas industry are discussed, with a focus on how these changes will affect the ability of Alberta and Canadian natural gas supply to meet market growth. These changes include a decline in the merchant role of many of the major interstate pipelines, resulting in a larger number of smaller-sized purchasers for natural gas marketers to deal with; a greater extent of direct purchasing by local distribution companies and large industrial users, combined with a preference for spot sales rather than long-term commitments; direct marketing of uncontracted gas by many producers and brokers; a bidding type of sales process rather than a negotiated process; and price deregulation. It is foreseen that long term security of supply will again become an important factor to North American buyers, and Canada can offer substantial supplies under secure long term contracts. Marketers will have to seek new market targets such as cogeneration plants and the transportation sector. Access to pipeline transport will be one of the major factors in obtaining new markets. The Canada-USA free trade agreement is viewed as a positive development which should help Canadian gas marketers to gain and retain U.S. customers

  17. Fusion Canada issue 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Europe proposes Canada's participation in ITER, tritium for JET, CCFM/TdeV-Tokamak helium pumping and TdeV update, ITER-related R and D at CFFTP, ITER Deputy Director visits Canada, NFP Director to Chair IFRC, Award for Akira Hirose. 3 figs

  18. Fusion Canada issue 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on a fusion cooperation agreement between Japan and Canada, an update at Tokamak de Varennes on plasma biasing experiments and boronization tests and a collaboration between Canada and the U.S. on a compact toroid fuelling gun. 4 figs

  19. Canada's hydrocarbon processing evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, T.H.; Horton, R.

    2000-01-01

    The development of petroleum refining, petrochemicals and natural gas industries in Canada are discussed together with future issues and prospects. Figures give data on (a) refined products trade 1998; (b) refining capacity; (c) product demand 1980-1999; (d) refinery crude runs and capacity; (e) refining and marketing, historical returns 1993-1999; (f) processing power index for Canada and USA; (g) ethylene capacity; (eye) Montreal petrochemical capacities; (j) Sarnia petrochemical capacities in 2000; (k) Alberta petrochemicals capacities 2001; (l) ethylene net equivalent trade; (m) ethylene costs 1999 for W. Canada and other countries. It was concluded that the hydrocarbon processing business continues to expand in Canada and natural gas processing is likely to increase. Petrochemicals may expand in W. Canada, possibly using feed stock from the Far North. Offshore developments may stimulate new processing on the E. Coast

  20. NDT in Canada - the next 20 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The theme for the Fifth Canadian Conference on Nondestructive Testing was 'NDT in Canada - The Next 20 years'. The three day conference with 42 presentations provided a short overview of NDT in Canada, a look at NDT in pipeline, materials, offshore, nuclear and training applications, and a glimpse into the next 20 years with recent advances in research and development as related to this 'hi-tech' field of work

  1. “Doing the bright thing,” for Canada and the world | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-12-16

    Dec 16, 2014 ... No country can confront the tremendous challenges of today's world on its own. ... from, international collaborations aimed at tackling global challenges and ... leaders from Canada's education, science, and business sectors.

  2. Transformative ocean science through the VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada ocean observing systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Taylor, S.

    2009-01-01

    The health of the world's oceans and their impact on global environmental and climate change make the development of cabled observing systems vital and timely as a data source and archive of unparalleled importance for new discoveries. The VENUS and NEPTUNE Canada observatories are on the forefront of a new generation of ocean science and technology. Funding of over $100M, principally from the Governments of Canada and BC, for these two observatories supports integrated ocean systems science at a regional scale enabled by new developments in powered sub-sea cable technology and in cyber-infrastructure that streams continuous real-time data to Internet-based web platforms. VENUS is a coastal observatory supporting two instrumented arrays in the Saanich Inlet, near Victoria, and in the Strait of Georgia, off Vancouver. NEPTUNE Canada is an 800 km system on the Juan de Fuca Plate off the west coast of British Columbia, which will have five instrumented nodes in operation over the next 18 months. This paper describes the development and management of these two observatories, the principal research themes, and the applications of the research to public policy, economic development, and public education and outreach. Both observatories depend on partnerships with universities, government agencies, private sector companies, and NGOs. International collaboration is central to the development of the research programs, including partnerships with initiatives in the EU, US, Japan, Taiwan and China.

  3. Oil sands economic impacts Canada : CERI report : backgrounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    Oil sands production now accounts for 1 out of every 2 barrels of supply in Western Canada. It is anticipated that Alberta's oil sands sector will experience significant growth over the next few decades. This paper provided an outline of the challenges and economic impacts resulting from oil sands development in Canada. Alberta's oil sands reserves are estimated at 175 billion barrels that are deemed economically recoverable using current technology. At current production levels, reserves will sustain production of 2.5 million barrels per day for the next 200 years. A study by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) has forecast $100 billion in investment for the 2000-2020 period. Numerous companies hold leases and are planning new projects. A number of recent advances in oil sands technology are expected to further reduce costs as development matures. A royalty and tax regime that provides long-term fiscal certainty is a key factor that supports current oil sands growth forecasts. The CERI study has indicated that economic spinoffs from oil sands development relate to employment generated outside of Alberta, and that the largest percentage of government revenue accrues to the federal government. However, development may be constrained because the pace of growth in the sector may exceed underlying infrastructure related to roads, housing and municipal services. An adequate workforce of qualified trades and technical and professional people is also crucial. Several pipeline projects have been proposed to deliver oil sands crudes to new markets over the next decade. It was concluded that the billions of dollars invested in oil sands in Alberta will contribute to the economic prosperity of the entire country. 11 figs

  4. An Energy Strategy for Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal C. Moore

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Canada is struggling to fully develop, sell and move its energy resources. This is a dramatic change from the recent past where the U.S. has provided stable growth in demand for energy supplied by the provinces, from hydrocarbons to electricity. Current circumstances now challenge this relationship, adding environmental, policy and economic hurdles that exacerbate the impact of fluctuations in world demand and pricing. In addition, competitive interaction between provinces, aboriginal land owners and special interest groups complicate and compound the issues of royalty returns, regulatory authority and direction, land-use management and long-term market opportunities for Canadian companies. There is no strategic document guiding the country’s energy future. As the steward of one of the largest, most diverse and valuable energy "banks" in the world, Canada has a unique opportunity to exploit a critical and valuable economic niche in the world economy. Given the lack of federal leadership and the tendency for each province to undercut each other in the same marketplace, there is also the distinct possibility the nation will squander the opportunity. This document offers the rationale for a comprehensive energy strategy, literally a vision where Canada can lead and not follow opportunities in energy markets. This strategic approach to energy systems by definition will include transportation, housing, employment and financial markets. It is not a plan, not a foil for tax or policy guidance in one or more sectors. This strategy is a fundamental rail on which plans, tactics and policies can be built. This vision identifies how the provinces can work together using all the tools available to them, maximizing long-term resource development while minimizing environmental damage. This document assumes there can be a broad commitment and effort by the federal government to help build those tools, providing guidance and assistance where needed without

  5. ATLAS-Canada Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, I; Sobie, R J [HEPnet/Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada); Bedinelli, M; Butterworth, S; Groer, L; Kupchinsky, V [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Caron, B; McDonald, S; Payne, C [TRIUMF Laboratory, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Chambers, R [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Fitzgerald, B [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hatem, R; Marshall, P; Pobric, D [CANARIE Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Maddalena, P; Mercure, P; Robertson, S; Rochefort, M [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); McWilliam, D [BCNet, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Siegert, M [Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC (Canada)], E-mail: igable@uvic.ca (and others)

    2008-12-15

    The ATLAS-Canada computing model consists of a WLCG Tier-1 computing centre located at the TRIUMF Laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, and two distributed Tier-2 computing centres in eastern and western Canadian universities. The TRIUMF Tier-1 is connected to the CERN Tier-0 via a 10G dedicated circuit provided by CANARIE. The Canadian institutions hosting Tier-2 facilities are connected to TRIUMF via 1G lightpaths, and routing between Tier-2s occurs through TRIUMF. This paper discusses the architecture of the ATLAS-Canada network, the challenges of building the network, and the future plans.

  6. Canada's nuclear export policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, R W; Wonder, E F [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    1978-01-01

    The factors influencing the evolution of Canada's nuclear export policy are examined. Initially, nuclear technology was exported to establish an industry in Canada and to share the technology with other countries. After 1974 an increasingly broad range of political and social factors were taken into account and safeguards became the dominant factor. The indirect impacts of the new policy fall into two groups. One consists of the effects of Canada's leadership in taking a tough stand on safeguards. The second group of effects involve the concern of other countries about access to secure energy supplies and advanced technology.

  7. Canada's nuclear export policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.W.; Wonder, E.F.

    1978-01-01

    The factors influencing the evolution of Canada's nuclear export policy are examined. Initially, nuclear technology was exported to establish an industry in Canada and to share the technology with other countries. After 1974 an increasingly broad range of political and social factors were taken into account and safeguards became the dominant factor. The indirect impacts of the new policy fall into two groups. One consists of the effects of Canada's leadership in taking a tough stand on safeguards. The second group of effects involve the concern of other countries about access to secure energy supplies and advanced technology. (O.T.)

  8. Radiation oncology in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Meredith; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2018-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the Canadian healthcare system and the cancer care system in Canada as it pertains to the governance, funding and delivery of radiotherapy programmes. We also review the training and practice for radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation therapists in Canada. We describe the clinical practice of radiation medicine from patients' referral, assessment, case conferences and the radiotherapy process. Finally, we provide an overview of the practice culture for Radiation Oncology in Canada. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Emerging Churches in Post-Christian Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Studebaker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional mainline and evangelical churches in Canada, as in most western countries, are either in decline or static. Taken as a measure of the future, the prospects for Christianity in Canada, and more broadly the West, are bleak. Post-Christian Canada, however, contains thriving alternative and innovative forms of church, often called ‘emerging’ churches. They take many forms of expression, but share common theological convictions. Based on site research and personal interviews, this article describes the various types and contexts of these churches in Canada. It then highlights three of their central theological characteristics. First, rejecting the ‘culture wars’ social involvement of Christendom churches, they embrace practices and initiatives that transform their local communities. Second, they embrace an incarnational and contextual understanding of Christian life and ministry. Eschewing mega-church franchise models, they endeavor to shape their ministry to the their local communities. Third, they adopt a comprehensive rather than compartmental spirituality.

  10. Government of Canada Action Plan 2000 on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this first National Climate Change Business Plan the Government of Canada affirms its intention to invest up to $500 million over five years on specific actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This sum is in addition to the action plans being put forward by the provincial and territorial governments and in addition to the $625 million investment over five years announced in Budget 2000. Action Plan 2000 targets key sectors, and the measures announced are expected to take Canada one third of the way to achieving the target established in the Kyoto Protocol by reducing Canada's GHG emissions by 65 megatonnes per year during the 2008-2012 commitment period. The key sectors targeted include the areas of transportation, oil, gas and electricity production, industry, buildings, forestry and agriculture, i. e. sectors that together account for over 90 per cent of Canada's GHG emissions.The Action Plan focuses on reducing GHG emissions in a cost effective way; draws extensively on the best ideas put forward by the provinces, territories and other stakeholders; encourages action by industry and consumers; complements measures and actions by the provinces and territories to address regional issues; and sets the stage for long-term behavioural, technological and economic changes. The remainder of Canada's Kyoto commitments will be addressed by actions in future plans which are currently in the process of being developed, together with the development of further details of this first National Climate Change Business Plan

  11. Important facts on Canada's natural resources (as of November 2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This brochure presents a statistical account of Canada's natural resources sector, including the forest sector, mineral and mining sector, and energy producing sector. Canada's natural resources sectors and allied industries have contributed significantly to the country's economic growth and job creation for several decades. This brochure includes facts for 2003 and information on gross domestic products, direct employment, new capital investment, trade, imports, and balance of trade for each of the 3 sectors. The national economic importance of each sector was also outlined. In 2003, the forest sector contributed $33.7 billion to the Canadian economy (3 per cent of the national gross domestic product). Forest products were a major contributor to Canada's surplus balance of trade in 2003, with major commodities being softwood lumber, newsprint and wood pulp. Canada is also among the largest mining nations in the world, producing more than 60 minerals and metals. In 2003, the value of production from Canadian mining, mineral-processing and metal producing industries was about $50 billion (4 per cent of the national gross domestic product). The brochure includes a table that ranks 2003 world production and exports of uranium, nickel, zinc, gold, copper, potash, asbestos, gypsum and salt. Approximately 80 per cent of Canada's mineral production is exported. The brochure also presents data on the remaining established reserves in 2002 for natural gas (59.8 trillion cubic feet), crude oil (179.1 billion barrels), and primary energy production by commodity. These were 41.5 per cent gas, 32.9 per cent petroleum, 9.5 per cent electricity, 9.0 per cent coal, and 4.0 per cent wood waste. Alberta accounted for 63 per cent of total energy production, followed by British Columbia at 13 per cent, Saskatchewan at 9 per cent, Quebec at 4 per cent, and Ontario at 2 per cent. The international importance of geomatics and geoscience in Canada was also highlighted. This sector

  12. Public Sector Wage Growth in Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Boessenkool

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Alberta’s fiscal stance has shifted from large surpluses to deficits, and a large part of the blame appears to be due to rising public sector salaries. Since 2000, the province’s public sector wage bill has shot up by 119 percent — almost double the rate of growth in the rest of Canada. Wages, previously roughly at par with the rest of the country, are now higher (in many cases very substantially across all public sector categories, including health care, social services, education and government, consuming 95 percent of the increase in provincial revenues over the past decade. At the same time, the number of public sector employees has grown faster than the overall population; it is difficult to attribute this sharp uptick to a rise in productivity, or the need to compete with private industry for skilled workers. This paper breaks down the increases in every category, arguing that if the provincial government is looking to trim expenditures, public sector salaries are a good place to start. The authors make their case using detailed Statistics Canada data, throwing down the gauntlet to defenders of the status quo and challenging them to justify these disparate increases.

  13. [An iatrochemist in Lower Canada: François Blanchet and his Research on medicine, or application of chemistry in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, S

    1996-01-01

    Francois Blanchet holds a central place in the history of medicine in Lower Canada (now Quebec): a prime mover in the professionalization of French-Canadian physicians, Blanchet was also one of the first Canadians to have studied outside of Canada. While he was in New York, where he studied medicine at Columbia College, he published a book entitled Recherches sur la medecine ou application de la chimie a la medicine. The historiography of Canadian medicine frequently cites this book and presents it as one of the first Canadian medical publications but has not always explored its scientific content. This article therefore examines the medico-chemical aspects of Blanchet's work. Influenced by the Lavoisian revolution in chemistry, Blanchet elaborated a system where etiology and therapy rested on two new elements of nomenclature put forward by French chemists--oxygen and caloric. After examining Blanchet's iatrochemical system, this article compared Recherches sur la medecine with contemporaneous American and European publications in medicine which were themselves inspired by the pneumatic theory of French chemists.

  14. The Online Promotion of Entrepreneurship Education: A View from Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro Milian, Roger; Gurrisi, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine how entrepreneurship education is being marketed to students within the Canadian university sector. Design/methodology/approach: A content analysis of the webpages representing 66 entrepreneurship education programs in Canada is performed. Findings: Entrepreneurship education is found to…

  15. Canada as the emerging energy superpower : testing the case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hester, A.

    2007-10-01

    The need for forward-thinking energy sector policies that promote Canada as a leader in the responsible and effective management of energy resources was discussed. This paper proposed a set of strategies and policy options designed to ensure that Canada becomes an energy superpower with the ability to control access to supplies and leverage energy resources in order to extend its sphere of political influence. The historical evolution of energy provision was examined in order to better define the criteria needed to attain energy superpower status. The paper also examined current global energy markets and provided a summary of Canada's current energy industry. The impact of the oil sands industry on the Canadian economy was also discussed. It was concluded that although Canada does not qualify as an energy super-power, the energy sector will play an important role in Canada's future. The implementation of forward-thinking policies may mean that Canada will emerge as a superpower in the future. 42 refs

  16. Recent developments in Canada's climate change program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper surveys Canada's official response to the responsibilities it took on with the Kyoto Protocol. In order to meet Kyoto targets for the timeframe 2008-2012, greenhouse gas emissions need to be reduced by 33 percent below what they currently are. Two billion Canadian dollars have been allocated to this effort. The government of Canada's official stance is that carbon dioxide levels have been rising more rapidly than at any other time in the last half million years. Canada's main efforts in the mining and minerals sector have been to find a replacement for sulphur hexafluoride, reduce emissions of perfluorocarbons, and demonstrate the use of hydrogen as a fuel for underground mining vehicles. According to the author, the most important contribution has been the use of supplementary cementing material such as fly ash, ash, and ground blast furnace slag. These materials have partially replaced cement in concrete. Canada expects to reduce carbon dioxide emissions this way by about 1.5 million tonnes per year. EcoSmart, a non-profit organization, is the main vehicle for this effort. 8 refs., 7 figs

  17. Canada's nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peden, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although Canada has developed the CANDU type reactor, and has an ambitious programme of nuclear power plant construction, there has been virtually no nuclear controversy. This progress was seen as a means to bring Canada out of the 'resource cow' era, and onto a more equal footing with technologically elite nations. However the Indian nuclear explosion test, waste storage problems, contamination problems arising from use of uranium ore processing waste as land fill and subsidised sale of nuclear power plants to Argentina and South Korea have initiated public and parliamentary interest. Some economists have also maintained that Canada is approaching over-supply of nuclear power and over-investment in plant. Canada has no official overall energy production plan and alternative sources have not been evaluated. (JIW)

  18. National and Sectoral GHG Mitigation Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This paper compares model estimates of national and sectoral GHG mitigation potential across six key OECD GHG-emitting economies: Australia, Canada, the EU, Japan, Mexico and the US. It examines the implications of model structure, baseline and policy assumptions, and assesses GHG mitigation potential estimates across a variety of models, including models that are used to inform climate policy-makers in each of these economies.

  19. An introduction to the healthy corner store intervention model in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Catherine L; Minaker, Leia M; Jameson, Kristie; Rappaport, Lissie; Taylor, Krystal; Graham, Marketa; Moody, Natalie; Cook, Brian

    2017-09-14

    The majority of Canadians' food acquisition occurs in retail stores. Retail science has become increasingly sophisticated in demonstrating how consumer environments influence population-level diet quality and health status. The retail food environment literature is new but growing rapidly in Canada, and there is a relative paucity of evidence from intervention research implemented in Canada. The healthy corner store model is a comprehensive complex population health intervention in small retail stores, intended to transform an existing business model to a health-promoting one through intersectoral collaboration. Healthy corner store interventions typically involve conversions of existing stores with the participation of health, community, and business sector partners, addressing business fundamentals, merchandising, and consumer demand. This article introduces pioneering experiences with the healthy corner store intervention in Canada. First, we offer a brief overview of the state of evidence within and outside Canada. Second, we discuss three urban and one rural healthy corner store initiatives, led through partnerships among community food security organizations, public health units, academics, and business partners, in Manitoba, Ontario, and Newfoundland and Labrador. Third, we synthesize the promising practices from these local examples, including aspects of both intervention science (e.g., refinements in measuring the food environment) and community-based practice (e.g., dealing with unhealthy food items and economic impact for the retailer). This article will synthesize practical experiences with healthy corner stores in Canada. It offers a baseline assessment of promising aspects of this intervention for health and health equity, and identifies opportunities to strengthen both science and practice in this area of retail food environment work.

  20. Wait times in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Janice Christine

    2017-07-01

    A significant barrier to accessing healthcare in Canada is long waiting lists, which can be linked to the way that Medicare was structured. After significant pressure, provincial governments began to address wait times. An example of a successful strategy to reduce wait times for elective surgery is the Saskatchewan Surgical Initiative, which saw wait times in the province change from being among the longest in Canada to the shortest.

  1. Canada's radiation scandal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    In July 1990, Greenpeace distributed a 16-page treatise entitled 'Canada's Radiation Scandal' to a wide audience. The bottom line of the Greenpeace critique was that 'Canada's radiation limits are among the worst in the developed world'. This is a commentary on the Greenpeace pamphlet from the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), the body that sets and enforces radiation standards covering the use of nuclear energy in Canadian industry, science and medicine

  2. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  3. The Wave Energy Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    This Handbook for Ocean Wave Energy aims at providing a guide into the field of ocean wave energy utilization. The handbook offers a concise yet comprehensive overview of the main aspects and disciplines involved in the development of wave energy converters (WECs). The idea for the book has been...... shaped by the development, research, and teaching that we have carried out at the Wave Energy Research Group at Aalborg University over the past decades. It is our belief and experience that it would be useful writing and compiling such a handbook in order to enhance the understanding of the sector...

  4. Terrorism in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollek, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews terrorism in Canada, assessing the incidence and nature of terrorist activity, the potential targets of terrorist attacks, risk factors to Canadian nationals and institutions, and the responses of the Canadian government in dealing with the threat and the effectiveness of those responses. Despite the fact that there have been no recent high-profile terrorist events in Canada, this country has a serious terrorism problem, the key manifestation of which is the multitude of terrorist organizations that have designated Canada as a base of operations. In addition, Canadians have been attacked overseas and Canadian organizations, both local and abroad, are potential targets of terrorist activity. Canadian attempts to deal with terrorism through foreign and domestic policy have been ineffective, primarily because the policies have been poorly enforced. Until recently, terrorist organizations legally could raise funds in Canada, in direct contravention of international treaties signed by Canada. It is possible that the ineffectiveness in enforcing the anti-terrorism legislation stems from hope that placating terrorist organizations, and the countries that support them, will prevent Canada from becoming a target. Unfortunately evidence from other countries has shown this strategy to be ineffective.

  5. Public sector innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the value dimension of public innovation in the light of practitioners’ values and asks why there seems to be a clash between innovation imperatives and workplace practices in the public sector. The paper contributes to the research on public innovation from a practice...... perspective by providing evidence from an ethnographic field study on innovation in social and health care studies in Denmark. These studies are part of the vocational education and training (VET) system, which combines coursework at a college and internship in the elder care sector. The study is thus cross...... initiate innovations grounded in their values. The main point put forward is that the value dimension of public innovation must be understood not only in terms of value creation (economic or non-economic), which frontline practitioners are required to contribute to, but also as value-based practices...

  6. Canada's national report on actions to meet commitments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Current actions by Canadian governments, non-governmental organizations, communities, and the private sector to meet domestic and international climate change commitments are reviewed. The possible impacts of climate change on Canada are discussed and Canadian greenhouse gas emissions are assessed in terms of factors such as climate, geography, land use, economic structure, and energy production and consumption. Canada's draft National Action Strategy on Global Warming provides a framework for actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Measures already taken include those aimed at increasing energy efficiency and energy conservation or encouraging a switch to less carbon-intensive energy sources. Other measures include information and education initiatives, regulation, research and development, and economic instruments. Actions have already been taken in the transportation, electricity generation, residential/commercial, resource/manufacturing industry, and waste management sectors. Canada is also involved in international studies and agreements to limit global greenhouse gas emissions. Four tools are used to assess progress in limiting emissions: emission inventories, climate change indicators, an emissions outlook, and case studies. The emissions outlook presented shows that energy-related greenhouse gas emissions will increase 10.6% from 1990 to 2000, reaching the equivalent of 538.2 megatonnes of CO 2 . A case study shows that current and planned measures to limit greenhouse gas emissions associated with space heating requirements in new single-family homes will reduce emissions in this area 18% from what they would otherwise be in the year 2000. 58 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs

  7. Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 069

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Darren; Eisl-Culkin, Judy; Desjardins, Louise

    2008-01-01

    "Doctorate Education in Canada: Findings from the Survey of Earned Doctorates, 2005/2006" is the third paper in a series of reports written by the Learning Policy Directorate of Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) and the Centre for Education Statistics of Statistics Canada. Each report presents an overview of doctoral…

  8. Energy and the future : Canada's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymont, M.

    2005-01-01

    The rise in global energy consumption is driven by economic growth, particularly in developing countries. It is expected that by 2030, the world population will consume 50 per cent more energy than today. This increase in global energy demand can no longer be met through the business as usual approach. Graphs depicting emerging energy demand in Asia were presented for nuclear energy, coal, natural gas, oil and renewables. The issue of how China can meet it's growing energy demand was discussed with reference to energy consumed by its industrial, agricultural, commercial, residential and transportation sectors. The author emphasized the uneven distribution of resources, where consuming areas do not coincide with producing areas. It is expected that traditional energy sources will still supply most of the world's energy need for the foreseeable future, but they will leave less of an environmental impact. The author suggested that renewable energy sources will also increase but will comprise less than 20 per cent of the world supply in 2050. The author also discussed the issue of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Kyoto obligations and projections of what will happen with Kyoto post 2012. Canada's GHG record and recent environmental findings were also discussed with reference to Arctic ice coverage and the decline in average winter temperature. It was suggested that technology is the key to the energy shortage the environment and security. With declining conventional oil reserves, old nuclear technology and aging electric power technology, new technology must be used to address supply issues, distribution, interconversion, environmental impacts and risks. It was emphasized that since the energy sector is Canada's greatest economic driver, Canada should focus on energy technologies to build a more competitive energy sector. Huge export opportunities also exist for energy technologies. The role of industry and governments in achieving this goal was also discussed. figs

  9. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    Canadian uranium exploration and development efforts in 1985 and 1986 resulted in a significant increase in estimates of measured uranium resources. New discoveries have more than made up for production during 1985 and 1986, and for the elimination of some resources from the overall estimates, due to the sustained upward pressure on production costs and the stagnation of uranium prices in real terms. Canada possesses a large portion of the world's uranium resources that are of current economic interest and remains the major focus of inter-national uranium exploration activity. Expenditures for uranium exploration in Canada in 1985 and 1986 were $32 million and $33 million, respectively. Although much lower than the $130 million total reported for 1979, expenditures for 1987 are forecast to increase. Exploration and surface development drilling in 1985 and 1986 were reported to be 183 000 m and 165σ2 000 m, respectively, 85 per cent of which was in Saskatchewan. Canada has maintained its position as the world's leading producer and exporter of uranium. By the year 2000, Canada's annual uranium requirements will be about 2 100 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are either in operation now or expected to be in service by the late 1990s. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Annual sales currently approach $1 billion, of which exports account for 85 per cent. Forward domestic and export contract commitments totalled 73 000 tU and 62 000 tU, respectively, as of early 1987

  10. Canada's uranium policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.L.; Williams, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the Canadian Government policies which affect the uranium industry and, where appropriate, to provide some background on the development of these policies. This review is timely because of two recent announcements by the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources - one concerning the Canadian Government's renewed commitment to maintain the nuclear power option for Canada, and the other concerning some adjustments to Canada's uranium export policy. The future of Canada's nuclear industry was subject to a thorough review by the Canadian Government during 1989. This review occurred at a time when environmental issues were attracting increasing attention around the world, and the environmental advantages of nuclear power were becoming increasingly recognised. The strong support for the nuclear industry in Canada is consistent with the government's long-standing efforts to maintain Canada's position as a reliable and competitive supplier of uranium. This paper is particularly devoted to an outline of the results of the uranium export policy review. (author)

  11. Radionuclides in Canada goose eggs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickard, W.H.; Sweany, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    Low levels of radionuclides were measured in Canada goose eggs taken from deserted nests from Columbia River islands on the Energy Research and Development Administration's Hanford Reservation. Potassium-40, a naturally occurring radionuclide, was the most abundant radionuclide measured in egg contents and egg shell. Strontium-90 was incorporated into egg shells and cesium-137 into inner egg contents. Manganese-54, cobalt-60, and zinc-65 were more abundant in inner egg contents than in egg shell. Cerium-144 was detected in egg shell but not in inner shell

  12. Compensation patterns for healthcare workers in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, H; Siow, S; Yu, S; Ngan, K; Guzman, J

    2009-06-01

    This report examines relationships between the acceptance of compensation claims, and employee and workplace characteristics for healthcare workers in British Columbia, Canada to determine suitability of using only accepted claims for occupational epidemiology research. A retrospective cohort of full-time healthcare workers was constructed from an active incident surveillance database. Incidents filed for compensation over a 1-year period were examined for initial claim decision within a 6-month window relative to sub-sector of employment, age, sex, seniority, occupation of workers, and injury category. Compensation costs and duration of time lost for initially accepted claims were also investigated. Multiple logistic regression models with generalised estimating equations (GEEs) were used to calculate adjusted relative odds (ARO) of claims decision accounting for confounding factors and clustering effects. Employees of three health regions in British Columbia filed 2274 work-related claims in a year, of which 1863 (82%) were initially accepted for compensation. Proportion of claims accepted was lowest in community care (79%) and corporate office settings (79%) and highest in long-term care settings (86%). Overall, 46% of claims resulting from allergy/irritation were accepted, in contrast to 98% acceptance of claims from cuts and puncture wounds. Licensed practical nurses had the lowest odds of claims not accepted compared with registered nurses (ARO (95% CI) = 0.55 (0.33 to 0.91)), whereas management/administrative staff had the highest odds (ARO = 2.91 (1.25 to 6.79)) of claims not accepted. A trend was observed with higher seniority of workers associated with lower odds of non-acceptance of claims. Analysis from British Columbia's healthcare sector suggests variation in workers' compensation acceptance exists across sub-sectors, occupations, seniority of workers, and injury categories. The patterns observed, however, were independent of age and sex of workers

  13. Twelve years' experience with direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs in Canada: a cautionary tale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mintzes

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA of prescription drugs is illegal in Canada as a health protection measure, but is permitted in the United States. However, in 2000, Canadian policy was changed to allow 'reminder' advertising of prescription drugs. This is a form of advertising that states the brand name without health claims. 'Reminder' advertising is prohibited in the US for drugs that have 'black box' warnings of serious risks. This study examines spending on DTCA in Canada from 1995 to 2006, 12 years spanning this policy shift. We ask how annual per capita spending compares to that in the US, and whether drugs with Canadian or US regulatory safety warnings are advertised to the Canadian public in reminder advertising.Prescription drug advertising spending data were extracted from a data set on health sector spending in Canada obtained from a market research company, TNS Media Inc. Spending was adjusted for inflation and compared with US spending. Inflation-adjusted spending on branded DTCA in Canada grew from under CAD$2 million per year before 1999 to over $22 million in 2006. The major growth was in broadcast advertising, accounting for 83% of spending in 2006. US annual per capita spending was on average 24 times Canadian levels. Celebrex (celecoxib, which has a US black box and was subject to three safety advisories in Canada, was the most heavily advertised drug on Canadian television in 2005 and 2006. Of 8 brands with >$500,000 spending, which together accounted for 59% of branded DTCA in all media, 6 were subject to Canadian safety advisories, and 4 had US black box warnings.Branded 'reminder' advertising has grown rapidly in Canada since 2000, mainly due to a growth in television advertising. Although DTCA spending per capita is much lower in Canada than in the US, there is no evidence of safer content or product choice; many heavily-advertised drugs in Canada have been subject to safety advisories. For governments searching for

  14. Twelve years' experience with direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs in Canada: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzes, Barbara; Morgan, Steve; Wright, James M

    2009-05-27

    Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs is illegal in Canada as a health protection measure, but is permitted in the United States. However, in 2000, Canadian policy was changed to allow 'reminder' advertising of prescription drugs. This is a form of advertising that states the brand name without health claims. 'Reminder' advertising is prohibited in the US for drugs that have 'black box' warnings of serious risks. This study examines spending on DTCA in Canada from 1995 to 2006, 12 years spanning this policy shift. We ask how annual per capita spending compares to that in the US, and whether drugs with Canadian or US regulatory safety warnings are advertised to the Canadian public in reminder advertising. Prescription drug advertising spending data were extracted from a data set on health sector spending in Canada obtained from a market research company, TNS Media Inc. Spending was adjusted for inflation and compared with US spending. Inflation-adjusted spending on branded DTCA in Canada grew from under CAD$2 million per year before 1999 to over $22 million in 2006. The major growth was in broadcast advertising, accounting for 83% of spending in 2006. US annual per capita spending was on average 24 times Canadian levels. Celebrex (celecoxib), which has a US black box and was subject to three safety advisories in Canada, was the most heavily advertised drug on Canadian television in 2005 and 2006. Of 8 brands with >$500,000 spending, which together accounted for 59% of branded DTCA in all media, 6 were subject to Canadian safety advisories, and 4 had US black box warnings. Branded 'reminder' advertising has grown rapidly in Canada since 2000, mainly due to a growth in television advertising. Although DTCA spending per capita is much lower in Canada than in the US, there is no evidence of safer content or product choice; many heavily-advertised drugs in Canada have been subject to safety advisories. For governments searching for compromise

  15. Twelve Years' Experience with Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs in Canada: A Cautionary Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzes, Barbara; Morgan, Steve; Wright, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) of prescription drugs is illegal in Canada as a health protection measure, but is permitted in the United States. However, in 2000, Canadian policy was changed to allow ‘reminder’ advertising of prescription drugs. This is a form of advertising that states the brand name without health claims. ‘Reminder’ advertising is prohibited in the US for drugs that have ‘black box’ warnings of serious risks. This study examines spending on DTCA in Canada from 1995 to 2006, 12 years spanning this policy shift. We ask how annual per capita spending compares to that in the US, and whether drugs with Canadian or US regulatory safety warnings are advertised to the Canadian public in reminder advertising. Methodology/Principal Findings Prescription drug advertising spending data were extracted from a data set on health sector spending in Canada obtained from a market research company, TNS Media Inc. Spending was adjusted for inflation and compared with US spending. Inflation-adjusted spending on branded DTCA in Canada grew from under CAD$2 million per year before 1999 to over $22 million in 2006. The major growth was in broadcast advertising, accounting for 83% of spending in 2006. US annual per capita spending was on average 24 times Canadian levels. Celebrex (celecoxib), which has a US black box and was subject to three safety advisories in Canada, was the most heavily advertised drug on Canadian television in 2005 and 2006. Of 8 brands with >$500,000 spending, which together accounted for 59% of branded DTCA in all media, 6 were subject to Canadian safety advisories, and 4 had US black box warnings. Conclusions/Significance Branded ‘reminder’ advertising has grown rapidly in Canada since 2000, mainly due to a growth in television advertising. Although DTCA spending per capita is much lower in Canada than in the US, there is no evidence of safer content or product choice; many heavily-advertised drugs in Canada have

  16. Canada-Africa grants spur novel ideas, networks | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... Canada-Africa grants spur novel ideas, networks ... networks involving African and Canadian academic researchers. ... Remarkable new research into HIV prevention among the "choice disabled" — vulnerable groups less ...

  17. All projects related to Canada | Page 7 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: MEDICAL RESEARCH, VACCINES, SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES, TRAINING, STUDENTS, AFRICA SOUTH OF SAHARA. Region: North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Canada. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 743,000.00. Scaling Research Results: Design and Evaluation. Project.

  18. Governing the energy challenge : Canada and Germany in a multi-level regional and global context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, B.; Doern, G.B.; Exeter Univ.,

    2009-01-01

    This book features essays by leading energy and public policy specialists from Canada and Germany. It originated in the Transatlantic Energy Conference which was hosted by the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies at Toronto's York University in September 2005. The conference was attended by leading energy scholars and experts from Canadian and European universities, research institutes and governmental and non-governmental organizations. The purpose of this book was to compare the dynamics of multi-level energy regulatory governance in Germany and Canada, notably the energy policy challenges that include energy security, environmental sustainability and a competitive resource economy. Many strategies to produce more efficient and sustainable energy are presented in the book. Part 1 of the book focuses on the energy industry, with particular emphasise on electricity, nuclear energy and natural gas. Part 2 of the book focuses on domestic patterns of multi-level energy governance and regulation in the two countries. As a member of the European Union, Germany is more advanced in dealing with multi-level governmental and sustainability constraints than Canada is as a member of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The book focuses on the influence that the energy sector and multi-level institutional arrangements have on energy governance, with particular attention to the link between environmental study, climate change issues and economic market reforms. The growing differences between NAFTA and European Union member countries were highlighted. refs., tabs., figs.

  19. Fusion Canada issue 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue Canada-Europe Accords: 5 year R and D collaboration for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) AECL is designated to arrange and implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and the ITER Engineering Design Activities (EDA) while EUROTAM is responsible for operating Europe's Fusion R and D programs plus MOU and EDA. The MOU includes tokamaks, plasma physics, fusion technology, fusion fuels and other approaches to fusion energy (as alternatives to tokamaks). STOR-M Tokamak was restarted at the University of Saskatchewan following upgrades to the plasma chamber to accommodate the Compact Toroid (CT) injector. The CT injector has a flexible attachment thus allowing for injection angle adjustments. Real-time video images of a single plasma discharge on TdeV showing that as the plasma density increases, in a linear ramp divertor, the plasma contact with the horizontal plate decreases while contact increases with the oblique plate. Damage-resistant diffractive optical elements (DOE) have been developed for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research by Gentac Inc. and the National Optics Institute, laser beam homogeniser and laser harmonic separator DOE can also be made using the same technology. Studies using TdeV indicate that a divertor will be able to pump helium from the tokamak with a detached-plasma divertor but helium extraction performance must first be improved, presently the deuterium:helium retention radio-indicates that in order to pump enough helium through a fusion reactor, too much deuterium-tritium fuel would be pumped out. 2 fig

  20. Canada's domestic nuclear issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) is a committee of representatives of religious groups in Toronto, a group of people concerned about the moral and ethical implications of the operation of Canada's nuclear industry and of its exports to other countries. The faith groups represented are the Anglican Diocese of Toronto, the Baha'i Community of Canada, the Jewish Community of Toronto, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Toronto and the United Church of Canada Toronto Conference. Wishing to encourage the Canadian government to enquire into this broad question, the faith groups established IPPANI and assigned to it the task of enhancing their knowledge of the nuclear industry. IPPANI was to develop an effective set of questions to be placed before governments and to promote public discussion so that governments might become more responsive to these issues

  1. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  2. [Materials for construction sector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, C

    2012-01-01

    The construction sector is characterized by high complexity due to several factors. There are a lot of processes within the building sites and they need the use of different materials with the help of appropriate technologies. Traditional materials have evolved and diversified, meanwhile new products and materials appeared and still appear, offering services which meet user needs, but that often involve risks to the health of workers. Research in the field of materials, promoted and carried out at various levels, has led to interesting results, encoded in the form of rules and laws.

  3. Update on Canada's response to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strange, D.

    2001-01-01

    The challenge facing Canada regarding climate change was discussed with reference to federal initiatives and the Climate Change Action Fund (CCAF) extension. Phase 1 of Canada's strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions was also discussed. The national process from 1998 to 2000 involved 450 experts from government, industry and non-governmental organizations who created 16 working groups to develop analysis and policy options for reducing emissions. Each working group produced foundation papers regarding the state of various sectors of the Canadian economy. They also directed option reports describing a full range of options for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Graphs depicting greenhouse gas emissions by province and by sector for 1990 and 2010 showed that Alberta and Ontario are the provinces that emit, and will continue to emit, the most greenhouse gases. The transportation sector is responsible for the greatest amount of emissions into the atmosphere, followed by the industrial, power generation and agricultural sectors. The action plan for budget 2000 called for $1.1 billion over 5 years to reduce emissions, increase understanding of climate science, and build a foundation for future action. The federal measures are designed to obtain 65 Mt/year during 2008-2012 commitment period, taking Canada one third of the way towards the Kyoto target. For the transportation sector, this means an objective of increasing fuel efficiency of vehicles and having a supply of lower emitting fuels. New fuels include ethanol produced from biomass. The use of fuel cell vehicles that emit low or no emissions will require the development of a refuelling infrastructure. Energy efficiencies and technologies are also encouraged in aviation, rail, marine and trucking industries. Energy efficiency in urban transportation is encouraged through best urban transportation practices and strategies to reduce greenhouse gases. The CCAF structure is extended to 2004. The hydrogen and fuel

  4. THE EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND WORK ENVIRONMENT FACTORS WITH A RESEARCH IN WHITE-GOODS SECTOR IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı KÜÇÜKASLAN EKMEKÇİ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available THE EXAMINATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND WORK ENVIRONMENT FACTORS WITH A RESEARCH IN WHITE-GOODS SECTOR IN TURKEYAbstract: The objective of this study is to find out the relationship between work environments and employee creativity. In other words, it is aimed in this study to examine the work environment factors which stimulate and hinder creativity in a detailed way to find out ways to foster creativity in workplace. The effect of work environment on creativity has been studied and the creative work environments have already been indicated by previous researches but those studies were conducted among the R&D workers while this study was conducted within various departments of the two organizations. The hypothesis was generated and empirically tested by the data obtained from two organizations both operating in white-goods sector in Turkey. The results demonstrate that supervisor support; coworker cohesion, autonomy and task involvement factors have positive relationships with creativity. Furthermore, the findings of this study provide insights to organizations aiming to have creativity within the organization.    Keywords: Creativity, Work Environment, Working Conditions, White-Goods Sector. YARATICILIK VE İŞ ÇEVRESİ FAKTÖRLERİ ARASINDAKİ İLİŞKİNİN TÜRKİYE’DEKİ BEYAZ EŞYA SEKTÖRÜNDE YAPILAN BİR ARAŞTIRMA İLE İNCELENMESİÖzet: Bu çalışmanın amacı iş ortamı ve çalışan yaratıcılığı arasındaki ilişkiyi incelemektir. Başka bir deyişle, bu çalışma işyerinde yaratıcılığı geliştirme yolları bulabilmek için, yaratıcılığı teşvik eden ve engelleyen iş ortamı faktörlerini incelemeyi amaçlamaktadır. İş ortamının yaratıcılığa etkisi daha once yapılan araştırmalarda incelenmesine rağmen bu çalışmaların daha çok Araştırma&Geliştirme çalışanları arasında yapıldığı görülmektedir. Bu çalışma ise sadece Araştırma&Geliştirme departman

  5. Canada Among Nations 2014. Crisis and Reform: Canada and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    28 mai 2014 ... This 28th edition of the Canada Among Nations series examines the 2008 global financial crisis, its impact on Canada, and the country's historic and current role in the international financial system.

  6. Electricity Sector Council : human resources challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldie, T. [Electricity Sector Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The electricity sector is currently undergoing significant human resource challenges. Several charts illustrated the aging Canadian workforce; workforce by key occupation; statistics on a 2004 sector study requirements of retirement estimations; and average annual growth rate of the domestic labour force. Several slides also depicted the dependence on immigrants for labour growth; trades intake through immigration; and a 2007 environmental scan. The presentation also provided information on the Electricity Sector Council (ESC) and its projects and occupational standards currently under development. The ESC in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada has begun the process of developing a National Occupational Standard for geoexchange professionals. It is intended to enable colleges and Ministries of Education to standardize national training and evaluate new hires. Last, several slides containing background information on the ESC board of directors were included along with slides of labour market information; connectivity; and projects under development. tabs., figs.

  7. Electricity Sector Council : human resources challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldie, T.

    2007-01-01

    The electricity sector is currently undergoing significant human resource challenges. Several charts illustrated the aging Canadian workforce; workforce by key occupation; statistics on a 2004 sector study requirements of retirement estimations; and average annual growth rate of the domestic labour force. Several slides also depicted the dependence on immigrants for labour growth; trades intake through immigration; and a 2007 environmental scan. The presentation also provided information on the Electricity Sector Council (ESC) and its projects and occupational standards currently under development. The ESC in partnership with Human Resources and Social Development Canada has begun the process of developing a National Occupational Standard for geoexchange professionals. It is intended to enable colleges and Ministries of Education to standardize national training and evaluate new hires. Last, several slides containing background information on the ESC board of directors were included along with slides of labour market information; connectivity; and projects under development. tabs., figs.

  8. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1985-86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1986 covers the following subjects: report from the chairman and the president; research company; CANDU operations; radiochemical company; employee performance; nuclear Canada; Financial section; and board of directors and officers

  9. Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network : Building African Capacity for HIV/AIDS Prevention Trials. The Canada-Africa Prevention Trials Network (CAPT Network) was formed through a capacity building grant from the Global Health Research Initiative (GHRI). The Network comprises eight African centres (four in Uganda, ...

  10. The State of Educators' Professional Learning in Canada. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Carol; Osmond-Johnson, Pamela; Faubert, Brenton; Zeichner, Kenneth; Hobbs-Johnson, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Coinciding with the 2016 Annual Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Learning Forward commissioned and supported a study of professional learning across the nation of Canada. "The State of Educators' Professional Learning in Canada" was researched by a team led by Carol Campbell, Associate Professor of Leadership and Educational…

  11. Nuclear emergency preparedness in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The preparedness of utilities and government agencies at various levels for dealing with nuclear emergencies occurring at nuclear reactors in Canada is reviewed and assessed. The review is centered on power reactors, but selected research reactors are included also. Emergency planning in the U.S.A., Germany and France, and international recommendations on emergency planning are reviewed to provide background and a basis for comparison. The findings are that Canadians are generally well protected by existing nuclear emergency plans at the electric utility and provincial levels but there are improvements that can be made, mainly at the federal level and in federal-provincial coordination. Ten issues of importance are identified: commitment to nuclear emergency planning by the federal government; division of federal and provincial roles and responsibilities; auditing of nuclear emergency preparedness of all levels of government and of electric utilities; the availability of technical guidance appropriate to Canada; protective action levels for public health and safety; communication with the public; planning and response for the later phases of a nuclear emergency; off-site exercises and training; coordination of international assistance; and emergency planning for research reactors. (L.L.) 79 refs., 2 tabs

  12. Statistical handbook for Canada's upstream petroleum industry : technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This document is an up-to-date reference source that summarizes the progress of Canada's petroleum industry. It includes detailed statistical data from 2006 and 2007 in one publication. The handbook features a compilation of key data on major economic sectors of the petroleum industry. It includes real-time drilling, reserves, and production data for crude oil and natural gas along with expenditures by province, revenues, prices, demand, consumption, refining, transportation, imports, and exports. Ethane production was also summarized along with electricity generation capacity in Canada and the status of oil, gas and product pipelines. tabs

  13. Nuclear power in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Association believes that the CANDU nuclear power generation system can play a major role in achieving energy self-sufficiency in Canada. The benefits of nuclear power, factors affecting projections of electric power demand, risks and benefits relative to other conventional and non-conventional energy sources, power economics, and uranium supply are discussed from a Canadian perspective. (LL)

  14. Fusion Canada issue 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue are CFFTP highlights on the Karlsruhe Isotope Separation System, a report on ITER tritium process systems, an experimental update on Tokamak de Varennes and Canada-U.S. bilateral technical collaboration topics. 2 figs

  15. Fusion Canada issue 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs

  16. Fusion Canada issue 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on availability of Canadian Tritium, an ITER update, a CCFM update on Tokamak and the new team organization, an international report on Fusion in Canada and a Laser Fusion Project at the University of Toronto. 3 figs.

  17. Suicide in Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leenaars, Antoon A

    1998-01-01

    ... provides long-awaited information that focuses specifically on Canada. It addresses suicide as a multidimensional problem with biological, psychological, cultural, sociological, personal, and philosophical aspects. The contributions integrate both critical analysis and personal experience. There are accounts from Inuit elders, fr...

  18. Fusion Canada issue 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue a bi-lateral meeting between Canada and Japan, water and hydrogen detritiation, in-situ tokamak surface analysis, an update of CCFM/TdeV and tritium accounting Industry guidance in Fusion, fast probe for plasma-surface interaction. 4 figs

  19. Fusion Canada issue 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program highlighting in this issue the Canada - US fusion meeting in Montreal, fusion breeder work in Chile, new management at CFFTP, fast electrons in tokamaks: new data from TdeV, a program review of CCFM and Velikhov to address Montreal fusion meeting. 1 fig

  20. Fusion Canada issue 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-05-01

    A short bulletin from the National Fusion Program. Included in this issue is a report on increased funding for the Canadian Fusion Program, news of the compact Toroid fuelling gun, an update on Tokamak de Varennes, the Canada - U.S. fusion meeting, measurements of plasma flow velocity, and replaceable Tokamak divertors. 4 figs.