WorldWideScience

Sample records for research review committee

  1. Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee has had a fundamental difficulty because of the atmosphere that has existed since it was created. It came into existence at a time of decreasing budgets. For any Committee the easiest thing is to tell the Director what additional to do. That does not really help him a lot in this atmosphere of reduced budgets which he reviewed for you on Monday. Concurrently the research arm of Nuclear Regulatory Commission has recognized that the scope of its activity needed to be increased rather than decreased. In the last two-and-a-half-year period, human factors work was reinstated, radiation and health effects investigations were reinvigorated, research in the waste area was given significant acceleration. Further, accident management came into being, and the NRC finally got back into the TMI-2 area. So with all of those activities being added to the program at the same time that the research budget was going down, the situation has become very strained. What that leads to regarding Committee membership is a need for technically competent generalists who will be able to sit as the Division Directors come in, as the contractors come in, and sort the wheat from the chaff. The Committee needs people who are interested in and have a broad perspective on what regulatory needs are and specifically how safety research activities can contribute to them. The author summarizes the history of the Committee, the current status, and plans for the future

  2. Measuring inconsistency in research ethics committee review

    OpenAIRE

    Trace, Samantha; Kolstoe, Simon Erik

    2017-01-01

    Background The review of human participant research by Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) is a complex multi-faceted process that cannot be reduced to an algorithm. However, this does not give RECs/ IRBs permission to be inconsistent in their specific requirements to researchers or in their final opinions. In England the Health Research Authority (HRA) coordinates 67 committees, and has adopted a consistency improvement plan including a process called “Sha...

  3. Measuring inconsistency in research ethics committee review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trace, Samantha; Kolstoe, Simon Erik

    2017-11-28

    The review of human participant research by Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) is a complex multi-faceted process that cannot be reduced to an algorithm. However, this does not give RECs/ IRBs permission to be inconsistent in their specific requirements to researchers or in their final opinions. In England the Health Research Authority (HRA) coordinates 67 committees, and has adopted a consistency improvement plan including a process called "Shared Ethical Debate" (ShED) where multiple committees review the same project. Committee reviews are compared for consistency by analysing the resulting minutes. We present a description of the ShED process. We report an analysis of minutes created by research ethics committees participating in two ShED exercises, and compare them to minutes produced in a published "mystery shopper" exercise. We propose a consistency score by defining top themes for each exercise, and calculating the ratio between top themes and total themes identified by each committee for each ShED exercise. Our analysis highlights qualitative differences between the ShED 19, ShED 20 and "mystery shopper" exercises. The quantitative measure of consistency showed only one committee across the three exercises with more than half its total themes as top themes (ratio of 0.6). The average consistency scores for the three exercises were 0.23 (ShED19), 0.35 (ShED20) and 0.32 (mystery shopper). There is a statistically significant difference between the ShED 19 exercise, and the ShED 20 and mystery shopper exercises. ShED exercises are effective in identifying inconsistency between ethics committees and we describe a scoring method that could be used to quantify this. However, whilst a level of inconsistency is probably inevitable in research ethics committee reviews, studies must move beyond the ShED methodology to understand why inconsistency occurs, and what an acceptable level of inconsistency might be.

  4. Report of the Review Committee on valuation of the research subjects in the fields of advanced science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods, etc. the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of eight experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the research theme completed in FY1998 and those planned for five years starting in FY2000 in the Advanced Science Research Center. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on September 17, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research results/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Research Group Leaders. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on March 14, 2000. As a result, the Research Evaluation Committee acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  5. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the research subjects in the field of advanced science research (FY2000)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of eight experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the research themes completed in FY1999, those to be ended through FY2000, and those planned for five years starting in FY2001 in the Advanced Science Research Center. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on July 17, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research result/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Research Group Leaders. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  6. Ethical review from the inside: repertoires of evaluation in Research Ethics Committee meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jean Philippe; van Zwieten, Myra C. B.; Willems, Dick L.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the practice of ethical review by Research Ethics Committees (REC) could help protect the interests of human participants and promote scientific progress. To facilitate such evaluations, we conducted an ethnographic study of how an REC reviews research proposals during its meetings. We

  7. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee and Research Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research composed of twelve experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY2000 in the Nuclear Safety Research Center (Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support). The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on January 20, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  8. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Department of Environmental Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support in Tokai Research Establishment at JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of 11 specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 11, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. (author)

  9. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Reactor Safety Research, Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Department of Environmental Safety Research and Department of Safety Research Technical Support in Tokai Research Establishment at JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of 11 specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 11, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Nuclear Safety Research. (author)

  10. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of 12 experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the whole R and D subjects in fusion research, including post-review for those completed in FY1998, intermediate-review for those started in FY1999, and pre-review for those to be implemented in FY2001. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on March 9, 2000. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research result/plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  11. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  12. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, Volume 91, RBRC Scientific Review Committee Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samios,N.P.

    2008-11-17

    The ninth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on Nov. 17-18, 2008, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Dr. Wit Busza (Chair), Dr. Miklos Gyulassy, Dr. Akira Masaike, Dr. Richard Milner, Dr. Alfred Mueller, and Dr. Akira Ukawa. We are pleased that Dr. Yasushige Yano, the Director of the Nishina Institute of RIKEN, Japan participated in this meeting both in informing the committee of the activities of the Nishina Institute and the role of RBRC and as an observer of this review. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on his/her research efforts. This encompassed three major areas of investigation, theoretical, experimental and computational physics. In addition the committee met privately with the fellows and postdocs to ascertain their opinions and concerns. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  13. The Challenge of Timely, Responsive and Rigorous Ethics Review of Disaster Research: Views of Research Ethics Committee Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Hunt

    Full Text Available Research conducted following natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods or hurricanes is crucial for improving relief interventions. Such research, however, poses ethical, methodological and logistical challenges for researchers. Oversight of disaster research also poses challenges for research ethics committees (RECs, in part due to the rapid turnaround needed to initiate research after a disaster. Currently, there is limited knowledge available about how RECs respond to and appraise disaster research. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the experiences of REC members who had reviewed disaster research conducted in low- or middle-income countries.We used interpretive description methodology and conducted in-depth interviews with 15 respondents. Respondents were chairs, members, advisors, or coordinators from 13 RECs, including RECs affiliated with universities, governments, international organizations, a for-profit REC, and an ad hoc committee established during a disaster. Interviews were analyzed inductively using constant comparative techniques.Through this process, three elements were identified as characterizing effective and high-quality review: timeliness, responsiveness and rigorousness. To ensure timeliness, many RECs rely on adaptations of review procedures for urgent protocols. Respondents emphasized that responsive review requires awareness of and sensitivity to the particularities of disaster settings and disaster research. Rigorous review was linked with providing careful assessment of ethical considerations related to the research, as well as ensuring independence of the review process.Both the frequency of disasters and the conduct of disaster research are on the rise. Ensuring effective and high quality review of disaster research is crucial, yet challenges, including time pressures for urgent protocols, exist for achieving this goal. Adapting standard REC procedures may be necessary. However, steps should be

  14. How do we know that research ethics committees are really working? The neglected role of outcomes assessment in research ethics review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouësseau Marie-Charlotte

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Countries are increasingly devoting significant resources to creating or strengthening research ethics committees, but there has been insufficient attention to assessing whether these committees are actually improving the protection of human research participants. Discussion Research ethics committees face numerous obstacles to achieving their goal of improving research participant protection. These include the inherently amorphous nature of ethics review, the tendency of regulatory systems to encourage a focus on form over substance, financial and resource constraints, and conflicts of interest. Auditing and accreditation programs can improve the quality of ethics review by encouraging the development of standardized policies and procedures, promoting a common base of knowledge, and enhancing the status of research ethics committees within their own institutions. However, these mechanisms focus largely on questions of structure and process and are therefore incapable of answering many critical questions about ethics committees' actual impact on research practices. The first step in determining whether research ethics committees are achieving their intended function is to identify what prospective research participants and their communities hope to get out of the ethics review process. Answers to this question can help guide the development of effective outcomes assessment measures. It is also important to determine whether research ethics committees' guidance to investigators is actually being followed. Finally, the information developed through outcomes assessment must be disseminated to key decision-makers and incorporated into practice. This article offers concrete suggestions for achieving these goals. Conclusion Outcomes assessment of research ethics committees should address the following questions: First, does research ethics committee review improve participants' understanding of the risks and potential benefits of

  15. South African Research Ethics Committee Review of Standards of Prevention in HIV Vaccine Trial Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essack, Zaynab; Wassenaar, Douglas R

    2018-04-01

    HIV prevention trials provide a prevention package to participants to help prevent HIV acquisition. As new prevention methods are proven effective, this raises ethical and scientific design complexities regarding the prevention package or standard of prevention. Given its high HIV incidence and prevalence, South Africa has become a hub for HIV prevention research. For this reason, it is critical to study the implementation of relevant ethical-legal frameworks for such research in South Africa. This qualitative study used in-depth interviews to explore the practices and perspectives of eight members of South African research ethics committees (RECs) who have reviewed protocols for HIV vaccine trials. Their practices and perspectives are compared with ethics guideline requirements for standards of prevention.

  16. Report of the review committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the field of high-temperature engineering and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-09-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods and the Practices Manuals of the Institution Evaluation Committee and Research Evaluation Committee, the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research composed of nine experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY 2000 in the Departments of HTTR Project and Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on December 27, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on August 31, 2000. The Research Evaluation Committee recognized the review results as appropriate. This report describes the review results. (author)

  17. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on advance science research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2002, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2001, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2004 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2003. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 24, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 4, 2003. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  18. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advance Science Research. Result evaluation, interim evaluation, in-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the accomplishments of the research completed in Fiscal Year 2001, the accomplishments of the research started in Fiscal Year 2000, and the adequacy of the programs of the research to be started in Fiscal Year 2003 at Advanced Science Research Center of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 4, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Science Research. (author)

  19. Regulatory Review Committee update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, T. [Polishuk, Camman and Steele, London ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The Committee's objectives, current membership and current issues are reviewed. Each current issue, notably the consultation process with the Ministry of Natural Resources, appeal of Ministry actions, orphan wells/security deposits, oilfield fluid disposal and labour code practices review are discussed in some detail. Dissatisfaction with the current appeals process to the Ministry is highlighted, along with a search for an all encompassing solution. The orphan well problem also received considerable attention, with similar demands for a comprehensive solution.

  20. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on advanced photon and synchrotron radiation research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Advanced Photon Research Center and at Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Kansai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 21, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Advanced Photon and Synchrotron Radiation Research. (author)

  1. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. Ex-post evaluation in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D results achieved for five years until Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from October 2003 to February 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on November 14, 2003, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 8, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  2. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of HTTR Project and Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology in Oarai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to February 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 8, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on High-Temperature Engineering and Research. (author)

  3. Report of the evaluation by the ad hoc review committee on radiation application research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2002 at Department of Material Development, at Department of Ion-Beam-Applied Biology and at Advanced Radiation Technology Center in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of ten specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from May to July 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 25, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on July 12, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Radiation Application Research. (author)

  4. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  5. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 13 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2003 at Department of Materials Science in Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from April 2002 to August 2002. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on June 5th, 2002, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on August 5th, 2002. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Materials Science Research. (author)

  6. Clinical research ethics review process in Lebanon: efficiency and functions of research ethics committees – results from a descriptive questionnaire-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Atallah, David; Moubarak, Malak; El Kassis, Nadine; Abboud, Sara

    2018-01-01

    Background Clinical trials conducted in Lebanon are increasing. However, little is known about the performance of research ethics committees (RECs) in charge of reviewing the research protocols. This study aimed to assess the level of adherence to the ethics surrounding the conduct of clinical trials and perceptions of team members regarding roles of the RECs during the conduct of clinical trials in Lebanon. The research question was: Are RECs adherent to the ethics surrounding the conduct of...

  7. Ethical considerations in malaria research proposal review: empirical evidence from 114 proposals submitted to an Ethics Committee in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Pornpimon; Prakobtham, Sukanya; Limphattharacharoen, Chanthima; Vutikes, Pitchapa; Khusmith, Srisin; Pengsaa, Krisana; Wilairatana, Polrat; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2015-09-14

    Malaria research is typically conducted in developing countries in areas of endemic disease. This raises specific ethical issues, including those related to local cultural concepts of health and disease, the educational background of study subjects, and principles of justice at the community and country level. Research Ethics Committees (RECs) are responsible for regulating the ethical conduct of research, but questions have been raised whether RECs facilitate or impede research, and about the quality of REC review itself. This study examines the review process for malaria research proposals submitted to the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine at Mahidol University, Thailand. Proposals for all studies submitted for review from January 2010 to December 2014 were included. Individual REC members' reviewing forms were evaluated. Ethical issues (e.g., scientific merit, risk-benefit, sample size, or informed-consent) raised in the forms were counted and analysed according to characteristics, including study classification/design, use of specimens, study site, and study population. All 114 proposals submitted during the study period were analysed, comprising biomedical studies (17 %), drug trials (13 %), laboratory studies (24 %) and epidemiological studies (46 %). They included multi-site (13 %) and international studies (4 %), and those involving minority populations (28 %), children (17 %) and pregnant women (7 %). Drug trials had the highest proportion of questions raised for most ethical issues, while issues concerning privacy and confidentiality tended to be highest for laboratory and epidemiology studies. Clarifications on ethical issues were requested by the ethics committee more for proposals involving new specimen collection. Studies involving stored data and specimens tended to attract more issues around privacy and confidentiality. Proposals involving minority populations were more likely to raise issues than those that did not

  8. Report of the DOE Office of Energy Research review committee on the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration of the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    At the request of Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Director of DOE's Office of Energy Research, a technical review committee was assembled to perform a peer review of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) from October 26 to October 30, 1992, at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL). The Energy Research Review Committee (ERC) evaluated the technical feasibility, the estimated cost, the proposed construction schedule, and the management arrangements for the SDC detector as documented in the SDC Technical Design Report, SDC Project Cost/Schedule Summary Book, SDC draft Project Management Plan, and other materials prepared for and presented to the Committee by the SDC management. The SDC detector is one of two major detector facilities anticipated at the SSC. The SDC project will be carried out by a worldwide collaboration of almost 1000 scientists, engineers, and managers from over 100 universities, national laboratories, and industries. The SDC will construct a state-of-the-art, general-purpose detector weighing over 26,000 tons and the size of an eight-story building, to perform a broad class of high energy physics experiments at the SSC beginning in the fall of 1999. The design of the SSC detector emphasizes tracking in a strong solenoidal magnetic field to measure charged-particle momenta and to assist in providing good electron and muon identification; identification of neutrinos and other penetrating particles using a hermetic calorimeter; studies of jets of hadrons using both calorimeter and tracking systems; and studies of short-lived particles, such as B mesons, and pattern recognition within complex events using a silicon-based vertex tracking system. These capabilities are the result of the intensive research, development, and design activities undertaken since 1989 by this very large and capable collaboration

  9. Human research ethics committees in technical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top 50 technical universities in the world shows that, where not specifically mandated by law, most technical universities do not employ ethics committees to review human studies. As the domains of basic and applied sciences expand, ethics committees are increasingly needed to guide and oversee all such research regardless of legal requirements. We offer as examples, from our experience as an ethics committee in a major European technical university, ways in which such a committee provides needed services and can help ensure more ethical studies involving humans outside the standard medical context. We provide some arguments for creating such committees, and in our supplemental article, we provide specific examples of cases and concerns that may confront technical, engineering, and design research, as well as outline the general framework we have used in creating our committee. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Sex-Divergent Clinical Outcomes and Precision Medicine: An Important New Role for Institutional Review Boards and Research Ethics Committees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Segarra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The efforts toward individualized medicine have constantly increased in an attempt to improve treatment options. These efforts have led to the development of small molecules which target specific molecular pathways involved in cancer progression. We have reviewed preclinical studies of sunitinib that incorporate sex as a covariate to explore possible sex-based differences in pharmacokinetics and drug–drug interactions (DDI to attempt a relationship with published clinical outputs. We observed that covariate sex is lacking in most clinical outcome reports and suggest a series of ethic-based proposals to improve research activities and identify relevant different sex outcomes. We propose a deeper integration of preclinical, clinical, and translational research addressing statistical and clinical significance jointly; to embed specific sex-divergent endpoints to evaluate possible gender differences objectively during all stages of research; to pay greater attention to sex-divergent outcomes in polypharmacy scenarios, DDI and bioequivalence studies; the clear reporting of preclinical and clinical findings regarding sex-divergent outcomes; as well as to encourage the active role of scientists and the pharmaceutical industry to foster a new scientific culture through their research programs, practice, and participation in editorial boards and Institutional Ethics Review Boards (IRBs and Research Ethics Committees (RECs. We establish the IRB/REC as the centerpiece for the implementation of these proposals. We suggest the expansion of its competence to follow up clinical trials to ensure that sex differences are addressed and recognized; to engage in data monitoring committees to improve clinical research cooperation and ethically address those potential clinical outcome differences between male and female patients to analyze their social and clinical implications in research and healthcare policies.

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-10-10

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment.

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 77, RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING, OCTOBER 10-12, 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The eighth evaluation of the RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) took place on October 10-12, 2005, at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The members of the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) were Dr. Jean-Paul Blaizot, Professor Makoto Kobayashi, Dr. Akira Masaike, Professor Charles Young Prescott (Chair), Professor Stephen Sharpe (absent), and Professor Jack Sandweiss. We are grateful to Professor Akira Ukawa who was appointed to the SRC to cover Professor Sharpe's area of expertise. In addition to reviewing this year's program, the committee, augmented by Professor Kozi Nakai, evaluated the RBRC proposal for a five-year extension of the RIKEN BNL Collaboration MOU beyond 2007. Dr. Koji Kaya, Director of the Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, Japan, presided over the session on the extension proposal. In order to illustrate the breadth and scope of the RBRC program, each member of the Center made a presentation on higher research efforts. In addition, a special session was held in connection with the RBRC QCDSP and QCDOC supercomputers. Professor Norman H. Christ, a collaborator from Columbia University, gave a presentation on the progress and status of the project, and Professor Frithjof Karsch of BNL presented the first physics results from QCDOC. Although the main purpose of this review is a report to RIKEN Management (Dr. Ryoji Noyori, RIKEN President) on the health, scientific value, management and future prospects of the Center, the RBRC management felt that a compendium of the scientific presentations are of sufficient quality and interest that they warrant a wider distribution. Therefore we have made this compilation and present it to the community for its information and enlightenment

  13. Knowledge about the research and ethics committee at Makerere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: All research involving human participants should be reviewed by a competent and independent institutional research and ethics committee. Research conducted at Makerere University College of Health Sciences should be subjected to a rigorous review process by the ethics committee in order to protect ...

  14. Human research ethics committees: examining their roles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Marilys; Gillam, Lynn; Rosenthal, Doreen; Bolitho, Annie

    2012-07-01

    Considerable time and resources are invested in the ethics review process. We present qualitative data on how human research ethics committee members and health researchers perceive the role and function of the committee. The findings are based on interviews with 34 Australian ethics committee members and 54 health researchers. Although all participants agreed that the primary role of the ethics committee was to protect participants, there was disagreement regarding the additional roles undertaken by committees. Of particular concern were the perceptions from some ethics committee members and researchers that ethics committees were working to protect the institution's interests, as well as being overprotective toward research participants. This has the potential to lead to poor relations and mistrust between ethics committees and researchers.

  15. Genetic screening: programs, principles, and research--thirty years later. Reviewing the recommendations of the Committee for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism (SIEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simopoulos, A P

    2009-01-01

    Screening programs for genetic diseases and characteristics have multiplied in the last 50 years. 'Genetic Screening: Programs, Principles, and Research' is the report of the Committee for the Study of Inborn Errors of Metabolism (SIEM Committee) commissioned by the Division of Medical Sciences of the National Research Council at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, published in 1975. The report is considered a classic in the field worldwide, therefore it was thought appropriate 30 years later to present the Committee's modus operandi and bring the Committee's recommendations to the attention of those involved in genetics, including organizational, educational, legal, and research aspects of genetic screening. The Committee's report anticipated many of the legal, ethical, economic, social, medical, and policy aspects of genetic screening. The recommendations are current, and future committees should be familiar with them. In 1975 the Committee stated: 'As new screening tests are devised, they should be carefully reviewed. If the experimental rate of discovery of new genetic characteristics means an accelerating rate of appearance of new screening tests, now is the time to develop the medical and social apparatus to accommodate what later on may otherwise turn out to be unmanageable growth.' What a prophetic statement that was. If the Committee's recommendations had been implemented on time, there would be today a federal agency in existence, responsive and responsible to carry out the programs and support research on various aspects of genetic screening, including implementation of a federal law that protects consumers from discrimination by their employers and the insurance industry on the basis of genetic information. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Inter-Society Research Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mamoru; Higuchi, Masahisa.

    1996-01-01

    World-wide tendencies and circumstances for nuclear power cannot be said to be moving full of sail with a favorable wind, due to nuclear power plant accidents and comparatively little economical benefit. The present Nuclear Power Plant situation is that some personnel understand a need for the development from the viewpoint of efficient energy usage in the world and environmental problems like global warming. At the same time others oppose future nuclear development from the viewpoint of safety problems and economic cost. These issues may end nuclear development worldwide. Nuclear development must be considered from an international viewpoint and other various aspects. Therefore, all countries concerned should cooperative in the adjustment of research carried out by each country. Nuclear power's future must be efficient in the utilization of limited resources (money, manpower and facilities). It is concluded that the ISRC should only discuss technical matters on nuclear engineering, independent from political influence. Societies agreeing to this idea, provide the ISRC with money and/or manpower and/or facilities. The ISRC will consist of a research program committee and research task forces. Members of the Research Program Committee are the chairmen of the research task forces who are also society representatives. The Committee will discuss research programs and resources. The research task forces will consist of one society representative chairman and specialists on the program

  17. Factors influencing the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppli, C A; Fraser, D

    2007-05-01

    Research ethics committees - animal ethics committees (AECs) for animal-based research and institutional research boards (IRBs) for human subjects - have a key role in research governance, but there has been little study of the factors influencing their effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to examine how the effectiveness of a research ethics committee is influenced by committee composition and dynamics, recruitment of members, workload, participation level and member turnover. As a model, 28 members of AECs at four universities in western Canada were interviewed. Committees were selected to represent variation in the number and type of protocols reviewed, and participants were selected to include different types of committee members. We found that a bias towards institutional or scientific interests may result from (1) a preponderance of institutional and scientist members, (2) an intimidating atmosphere for community members and other minority members, (3) recruitment of community members who are affiliated with the institution and (4) members joining for reasons other than to fulfil the committee mandate. Thoroughness of protocol review may be influenced by heavy workloads, type of review process and lack of full committee participation. These results, together with results from the literature on research ethics committees, suggested potential ways to improve the effectiveness of research ethics committees.

  18. Review by a local medical research ethics committee of the conduct of approved research projects, by examination of patients' case notes, consent forms, and research records and by interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T; Moore, E J; Tunstall-Pedoe, H

    1997-05-31

    To monitor the conduct of medical research projects that have already been approved by the local medical research ethics committee. Follow up study of ethically approved studies (randomly selected from all the studies approved in the previous year) by examination of patients' case notes, consent forms, and research records and by interview of the researchers at their workplace. Tayside, Scotland (mixed rural and urban population). 30 research projects approved by Tayside local medical research ethics committee. Adherence to the agreed protocol, particularly for recruitment (obtaining and recording informed consent) and for specific requirements of the ethics committee, including notification of changes to the protocol and of adverse events. In one project only oral consent had been obtained, and in a quarter of the studies one or more consent forms were incorrectly completed. Inadequate filing of case notes in five studies and of consent forms in six made them unavailable for scrutiny. Adverse events were reported, but there was a general failure to report the abandoning or non-starting of projects in two studies the investigators failed to notify a change in the responsible researcher. Monitoring of medical research by local medical research ethics committees promotes and preserves ethical standards, protects subjects and researchers, discourages fraud, and has the support of investigators. We recommend that 10% of projects should undergo on-site review, with all others monitored by questionnaire. This would require about six person hours of time and a salary bill of 120 pounds per study monitored.

  19. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.

    2002-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: VOLUME 69 RBRC SCIENTIFIC REVIEW COMMITTEE MEETING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMIOS, N.P.

    2005-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RSRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the 'Rikagaku Kenkyusho' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD, and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. The RBRC has both a theory and experimental component. At present the theoretical group has 4 Fellows and 3 Research Associates as well as 11 RHIC Physics/University Fellows (academic year 2003-2004). To date there are approximately 30 graduates from the program of which 13 have attained tenure positions at major institutions worldwide. The experimental group is smaller and has 2 Fellows and 3 RHIC Physics/University Fellows and 3 Research Associates, and historically 6 individuals have attained permanent positions. Beginning in 2001 a new RIKEN Spin Program (RSP) category was implemented at RBRC. These appointments are joint positions of RBRC and RIKEN and include the following positions in theory and experiment: RSP Researchers, RSP Research Associates, and Young Researchers, who are mentored by senior RBRC Scientists, A number of RIKEN Jr. Research Associates and Visiting Scientists also contribute to the physics program at the Center. RBRC has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select a few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. To date there are sixty nine proceedings volumes available. The construction of a 0.6 teraflops parallel processor, dedicated to lattice QCD, begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998 and is still

  1. 77 FR 16894 - Financial Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... reported and collected; --Performing applied research and essential long-term research; --Developing tools... economics, financial institutions and markets, statistical analysis, financial markets analysis... is essential to the effective operation of the Committee. Application for Advisory Committee...

  2. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, Douglas D.

    2000-01-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings

  3. Evaluation of clinical trials by Ethics Committees in Germany: Experience of applicants with the review of requests for opinion of the Ethics Committees - results of a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russ, Hagen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The review of requests for a positive opinion of the ethics committees (application procedure as a requirement to start a clinical trial in Germany has been completely redesigned with the transposition of EU Directive 2001/20/EC in the 12th Amendment of the German Medicines Act in August 2004. The experience of applicants (sponsors, legal representatives of sponsors in the EU and persons or organizations authorized by the sponsors to make the application, respectively in terms of interactions with the ethics committees in Germany has been positive overall, especially with respect to ethics committee adherence to the statutory timelines applicable for review of requests. However, inconsistencies between ethics committees exist in terms of the form and content of the requirements for application documents and their evaluation.With the objective of further improving both the quality of applications and the evaluation of those applications by ethics committees, a survey among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (VFA was conducted from January to April 2008. Based on reasoned opinions issued by the respective ethics committee in charge of the coordinating principal investigator (coordinating ethics committee, the type and frequency of formal and content-related objections to applications according to § 7 of the German Good Clinical Practice (GCP Regulation were systematically documented, and qualitative and quantitative analyses performed. 21 out of 44 members of the VFA participated in the survey. 288 applications for Phase I–IV studies submitted between January and December 2007 to 40 ethics committees were evaluated.This survey shows that about one in six applications is incomplete and has formal and/or content objections, respectively, especially those that pertain to documents demonstrating the qualification of the investigator and/or suitability of the facilities. These objections are attributable to

  4. Clinical research ethics review process in Lebanon: efficiency and functions of research ethics committees - results from a descriptive questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, David; Moubarak, Malak; El Kassis, Nadine; Abboud, Sara

    2018-01-11

    Clinical trials conducted in Lebanon are increasing. However, little is known about the performance of research ethics committees (RECs) in charge of reviewing the research protocols. This study aimed to assess the level of adherence to the ethics surrounding the conduct of clinical trials and perceptions of team members regarding roles of the RECs during the conduct of clinical trials in Lebanon. The research question was: Are RECs adherent to the ethics surrounding the conduct of clinical trials (chapters II and IV in 'Standards and Operational Guidance for Ethics Review of Health-related Research with Human Participants' in Lebanon?' This was a quantitative and descriptive questionnaire-based study conducted among RECs of university hospitals in Lebanon. The questionnaire had to be completed online and included general questions in addition to items reflecting the different aspects of a REC performance and effectiveness. All the questionnaire was assigned a total score of 175 points. General information and questions assigned point values/scores were analysed using descriptive statistics: frequency and percentage, mean score ± standard deviation. Ten RECs participated in the study (52 persons: four chairs, one vice-president, 47 ordinary members). Forty-seven (90.4%) had previous experience with clinical research and 30 (57.7%) had a diploma or had done a training in research ethics. Forty-one percent confirmed that they were required to have a training in research ethics. All RECs had a policy for disclosing and managing potential conflicts of interest for its members, but 71.8% of participants reported the existence of such a policy for researchers. Thirty-three point three percent reported that the RECs had an anti-bribery policy. The questionnaire mean score was 129.6 ± 22.3/175 points reflecting thus an excellent adherence to international standards. Inadequate training of REC members and the lack of anti-bribery policies should be resolved to

  5. Committee on Military Nutrition Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poos, Mary

    2000-01-01

    .... Its purpose is to provide reviews and recommendations to the Commander, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, on research projects, programs, and products as they relate to the nutrition and performance of military personnel...

  6. Rebuilding a Research Ethics Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, John S. G.; Marchesi, August

    2013-01-01

    The principal ethics committee in Australia's Capital, Canberra, underwent a major revision in the last three years based on changes debated in the literature. Committee or Board structure varies widely; regulations determining minimum size and membership differ between countries. Issues such as the effectiveness of committee management,…

  7. 77 FR 31071 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  8. 75 FR 8789 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related to Gulf...

  9. 75 FR 28686 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  10. 76 FR 9407 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities...

  11. 78 FR 77205 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... service in the Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA...

  12. 75 FR 65405 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee will review VA program activities related...

  13. Joint Integration Office Independent Review Committee annual report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    Comprised of seven persons with extensive experience in the issues of nuclear waste, the Independent Review Committee (IRC) provides independent and objective review of Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) activities managed by the Joint Integration Office (JIO), formerly the Defense Transuranic Waste Lead Organization (TLO). The Committee is ensured a broad, interdisciplinary perspective since its membership includes representatives from the fields of nuclear engineering, nuclear waste transportation, industrial quality control, systems and environmental engineering and state and local government. The scope of IRC activities includes overall review of specific TLO plans, projects and activities, and technical review of particular research and development projects. The Committee makes specific suggestions and recommendations based upon expertise in the field of TRU Waste Management. The IRC operates as a consulting group, under an independent charter providing objective review of program activities. This report summarizes the 12 major topics reviewed by the committee during 1985

  14. Report of the Review Committee of the R and D subjects on Computational Science and Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of seven experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in a 2000 fiscal year at the Center for promotion of Computational Science and Engineering. The review meeting took place on April 26, 1999. According to the review methods consisting of review items, points of review and review criteria given by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the materials submitted in advance and presentations of CCSE. The Research Evaluation Committee received the review report and its explanations from the Review Committee on July 5. The Research Evaluation Committee has acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  15. Anchoring contextual analysis in health policy and systems research: A narrative review of contextual factors influencing health committees in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Asha; Scott, Kerry; Garimella, Surekha; Mondal, Shinjini; Ved, Rajani; Sheikh, Kabir

    2015-05-01

    Health committees, councils or boards (HCs) mediate between communities and health services in many health systems. Despite their widespread prevalence, HC functions vary due to their diversity and complexity, not least because of their context specific nature. We undertook a narrative review to better understand the contextual features relevant to HCs, drawing from Scopus and the internet. We found 390 English language articles from journals and grey literature since 1996 on health committees, councils and boards. After screening with inclusion and exclusion criteria, we focused on 44 articles. Through an iterative process of exploring previous attempts at understanding context in health policy and systems research (HPSR) and the HC literature, we developed a conceptual framework that delineates these contextual factors into four overlapping spheres (community, health facilities, health administration, society) with cross-cutting issues (awareness, trust, benefits, resources, legal mandates, capacity-building, the role of political parties, non-governmental organizations, markets, media, social movements and inequalities). While many attempts at describing context in HPSR result in empty arenas, generic lists or amorphous detail, we suggest anchoring an understanding of context to a conceptual framework specific to the phenomena of interest. By doing so, our review distinguishes between contextual elements that are relatively well understood and those that are not. In addition, our review found that contextual elements are dynamic and porous in nature, influencing HCs but also being influenced by them due to the permeability of HCs. While reforms focus on tangible HC inputs and outputs (training, guidelines, number of meetings held), our review of contextual factors highlights the dynamic relationships and broader structural elements that facilitate and/or hinder the role of health committees in health systems. Such an understanding of context points to its

  16. HIV/AIDS research conducted in the developing world and sponsored by the developed world: reporting of research ethics committee review in two countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lisa Judy; Rifai-Bashjawish, Hoda; Kleinert, Kelly; Saltman, Alexandra; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Klitzman, Robert

    2011-09-01

    We explored how often journal articles reporting HIV research sponsored by a developed country, but conducted in a developing country, mention research ethics committee (REC) approval from both countries, and what factors are involved. Of all such 2007 articles on Medline conducted in one of four developing countries (N = 154), only 52% mentioned such dual approval. Mention of dual vs. single approval was more likely among articles with ≥ 50% sponsor country authors, and the United States as the sponsor country. Also, dual approval was more likely among articles that mentioned informed consent and funding, had ≥ 50% sponsor country authors, were biomedical (vs. psychosocial), and appeared in journals adopting International Committee Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) guidelines. Dual approval was thus obtained in only half of the articles and was associated with ethical and logistic issues, indicating the need for clearer and more universally accepted guidelines.

  17. Research governance: new hope for ethics committees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Deborah; Martlew, Ainsley

    2007-01-01

    For many years there has been discussion regarding the problems confronting our current ethics review system. Commentators have identified numerous issues that threaten the sustainability of Australia's voluntary HREC system. Various ad hoc solutions to these problems have been posed, but have not resulted in any significant advances. However, in recent years, discourse regarding research governance has become prominent in the Australian research environment. The application of research governance principles is gaining momentum amongst the regulators of research, including research institutions and their governing bureaucracies. We argue that this is potentially the most significant development in several years towards creating a sustainable HREC system in Australia. The recognition by research institutions and their governing bureaucracies that the responsibility for overall research governance lies with them, rather than solely with their HRECs, is leading to a range of initiatives which should significantly lessen the burden on Australian ethics committees, and improve their ability to undertake their core task of reviewing the ethical aspects of research proposals.

  18. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1983-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "The Adjustment of Nominal Interest Rates to Inflation: A Review of Recent Literature"; "Role of Government in a Market Economy"; "Economic Analysis and Agricultural Policy"; "Agricultural Research Policy"

  19. Committee on Military Nutrition Research Proposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poos, Mary

    1999-01-01

    This publication, Military Sfrategies for Sustainment of Nufrition and Immune Function in the Field, is the latest in a series of reports based on workshops sponsored by the Committee on Military Nutrition Research (CMNR...

  20. Research Award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... Research Award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics. Deadline: ... The Research Awardee will spend one year at IDRC and work approximately 50% of the time on her/his own research and 50% on ACRE-related tasks.

  1. Human Research Ethics Committees in Technical Universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koepsell, D.R.; Brinkman, W.P.; Pont, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although

  2. Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    1981-01-01

    Research Reviewed: "Global Modeling After Its First Decade"; "Monthly Food Price Forecasts"; "Costs of Marketing Slaughter Cattle: Computerized versus Conventional Auction Systems"; "Survival Strategies for Agricultural Cooperatives"

  3. 78 FR 6087 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of... the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC). The Federal Advisory Committee... Federal Officer, BERAC, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and...

  4. Research ethics review at University Eduardo Mondlane (UEM)/Maputo Central Hospital, Mozambique (2013-2016): a descriptive analysis of the start-up of a new research ethics committee (REC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacarlal, Jahit; Muchanga, Vasco; Mabutana, Carlos; Mabui, Matilde; Mariamo, Arlete; Cuamba, Assa Júlio; Fumo, Leida Artur; Silveira, Jacinta; Heitman, Elizabeth; Moon, Troy D

    2018-05-23

    Mozambique has seen remarkable growth in biomedical research over the last decade. To meet a growing need, the National Committee for Bioethics in Health of Mozambique (CNBS) encouraged the development of ethical review processes at institutions that regularly conduct medical and social science research. In 2012, the Faculty of Medicine (FM) of University Eduardo Mondlane (UEM) and the Maputo Central Hospital (MCH) established a joint Institutional Committee on Bioethics for Health (CIBS FM & MCH). This study examines the experience of the first 4 years of the CIBS FM & MCH. This study provides a descriptive, retrospective analysis of research protocols submitted to and approved by the CIBS FM & MCH between March 1, 2013 and December 31, 2016, together with an analysis of the Committee's respective reviews and actions. A total of 356 protocols were submitted for review during the period under analysis, with 309 protocols approved. Sixty-four percent were submitted by students, faculty, and researchers from UEM, mainly related to Master's degree research (42%). Descriptive cross-sectional studies were the most frequently reviewed research (61%). The majority were prospective (71%) and used quantitative methodologies (51%). The Departments of Internal Medicine at MCH and Community Health at the FM submitted the most protocols from their respective institutions, with 38 and 53% respectively. The CIBS's average time to final approval for all protocols was 56 days, rising to 161 for the 40 protocols that required subsequent national-level review by the CNBS. Our results show that over its first 4 years, the CIBS FM & MCH has been successful in managing a constant demand for protocol review and that several broad quality improvement initiatives, such as investigator mentoring and an electronic protocol submission platform have improved efficiency in the review process and the overall quality of the protocols submitted. Beyond Maputo, long-term investments in training

  5. 77 FR 42298 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee (Technical Advisory Committee). DATES: The... 9008(d) established the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee and lays forth... nomination. Appointments to the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee will be made by...

  6. Report of the marketing science editorial review committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fader, Peter S.; Bronnenberg, B.J.J.A.M.; Lyer, Ganesh; Neslin, Scott A.; Netzer, Oded; Srinivasan, Kannan

    2014-01-01

    This is an abridged version of an evaluation report for Marketing Science, which was commissioned by the INFORMS Publications Committee as part of its periodic review of every INFORMS journal. The coauthors listed here comprised the task force that conducted the research project and strategic

  7. Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This research review is dedicated to the memory of William Safire (1929-2009). A visionary leader, Safire brought other visionaries, researchers, educators, artists, and policymakers together to explore the confluence of arts education and neuroscience. He fostered the new field of neuroeducation in his work as chair of The Dana Foundation in…

  8. Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the author explores an often-used process in research--the mind map. He uses this method in his own research and artwork. He also uses this extensively with students, particularly master students when they are trying to surround issues in their thesis projects. Mind maps are closely associated with brainstorming, as brainstorming…

  9. 49 CFR 8.9 - Information Security Review Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information Security Review Committee. 8.9 Section.../DECLASSIFICATION/ACCESS Classification/Declassification of Information § 8.9 Information Security Review Committee. (a) There is hereby established a Department of Transportation Information Security Review Committee...

  10. Ethical issues in research involving minority populations: the process and outcomes of protocol review by the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recruiting minorities into research studies requires special attention, particularly when studies involve “extra-vulnerable” participants with multiple vulnerabilities, e.g., pregnant women, the fetuses/neonates of ethnic minorities, children in refugee camps, or cross-border migrants. This study retrospectively analyzed submissions to the Ethics Committee of the Faculty of Tropical Medicine (FTM-EC) in Thailand. Issues related to the process and outcomes of proposal review, and the main issues for which clarification/revision were requested on studies, are discussed extensively. Methods The study data were extracted from proposals and amendments submitted to the FTM-EC during the period October 2009 – September 2012, and then analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. The main issues for clarification/revision were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results 373 proposals were submitted; 44 studies involved minority groups with 21 extra-vulnerable minorities. All clinical and 2/3 of non-clinical studies submitted for initial review underwent full-board review. For combined clinical and non-clinical study submissions, 92.1% were referred back to the investigators and approved after clarification/revision, while 2.7% were deferred due to major/critical changes, and 2.1% not approved due to substantial violations of ethical principles. The main issues needing clarification/revision differed between all studies and those involving minorities: participant information sheet (62.2% vs. 86.4%), informed consent/assent form (51.2% vs. 86.4%), and research methodology (80.7% vs. 84.1%), respectively. The main ethical issues arising during the meetings, regarding studies involving minorities, included ensuring no exploitation, coercion, or pressure on the minority to participate; methodology not affecting their legal status; considering ethnicity and cultural structure; and providing appropriate compensation. Conclusion Delays in the approval or non

  11. Review by a local medical research ethics committee of the conduct of approved research projects, by examination of patients' case notes, consent forms, and research records and by interview.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, T.; Moore, E. J.; Tunstall-Pedoe, H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To monitor the conduct of medical research projects that have already been approved by the local medical research ethics committee. DESIGN: Follow up study of ethically approved studies (randomly selected from all the studies approved in the previous year) by examination of patients' case notes, consent forms, and research records and by interview of the researchers at their workplace. SETTING: Tayside, Scotland (mixed rural and urban population). SUBJECTS: 30 research projects app...

  12. 78 FR 40098 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including...

  13. 75 FR 6651 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department... meeting of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC). Federal Advisory.... Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, SC-23/Germantown...

  14. 77 FR 4028 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department... meeting of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC). The Federal Advisory.... Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, SC-23/Germantown...

  15. Research Award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    ACRE seeks a Research Awardee to study research ethics in an ... The following topics are examples of issues that could be ... advance their career goals, and recognize the dual nature of the position—applied research activity and general ...

  16. Review of the Strategic Plan for International Collaboration on Fusion Science and Technology Research. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The United States Government has employed international collaborations in magnetic fusion energy research since the program was declassified in 1958. These collaborations have been successful not only in producing high quality scientific results that have contributed to the advancement of fusion science and technology, they have also allowed us to highly leverage our funding. Thus, in the 1980s, when the funding situation made it necessary to reduce the technical breadth of the U.S. domestic program, these highly leveraged collaborations became key strategic elements of the U.S. program, allowing us to maintain some degree of technical breadth. With the recent, nearly complete declassification of inertial confinement fusion, the use of some international collaboration is expected to be introduced in the related inertial fusion energy research activities as well. The United States has been a leader in establishing and fostering collaborations that have involved scientific and technological exchanges, joint planning, and joint work at fusion facilities in the U.S. and worldwide. These collaborative efforts have proven mutually beneficial to the United States and our partners. International collaborations are a tool that allows us to meet fusion program goals in the most effective way possible. Working with highly qualified people from other countries and other cultures provides the collaborators with an opportunity to see problems from new and different perspectives, allows solutions to arise from the diversity of the participants, and promotes both collaboration and friendly competition. In short, it provides an exciting and stimulating environment resulting in a synergistic effect that is good for science and good for the people of the world.

  17. 77 FR 20377 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee under Section 9008(d) of the Food... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department...

  18. Why to audit to research ethics committees?

    OpenAIRE

    Quiroz, Estela; Médica oftalmóloga, docente de ética y metodología de la investigación, Coordinadora de la Red Peruana de Comités de Ética de la Investigación. Hospital Nacional Hipólito Unanue. Lima, Perú.

    2010-01-01

    Ethics committees in biomedical research have the responsibility to ensure the protection of human participants in the studies. In order to improve the quality of their work they must undergo audit procedures commissioned by the sponsors and inspections done by the regulatory authorities. Through these procedures, improvement of their functions should be guaranteed, so they can optimize their tasks and accomplish in the best way the purpose for which they were created. Los comités de ét...

  19. 78 FR 64932 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy... announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee under Section... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the meeting and/or to make oral...

  20. 76 FR 36102 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... vacancies on the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee (Technical Advisory Committee..., 2008, H.R. 6124]. FCEA section 9008(d) establishes the Biomass Research and Development Technical... committee are ineligible for nomination. Appointments to the Biomass Research and Development Technical...

  1. 77 FR 64970 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L... observe the business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and...

  2. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 5. Summary - Piping Review Committee conclusions and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This document summarizes a comprehensive review of NRC requirements for Nuclear Piping by the US NRC Piping Review Committee. Four topical areas, addressed in greater detail in Volumes 1 through 4 of this report, are included: (1) Stress Corrosion Cracking in Piping of Boiling Water Reactor Plants; (2) Evaluation of Seismic Design; (3) Evaluation of Potential for Pipe Breaks; and (4) Evaluation of Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations. This volume summarizes the major issues, reviews the interfaces, and presents the Committee's conclusions and recommendations for updating NRC requirements on these issues. This report also suggests research or other work that may be required to respond to issues not amenable to resolution at this time

  3. 7 CFR 929.125 - Committee review procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MASSACHUSETTS, RHODE ISLAND, CONNECTICUT, NEW JERSEY, WISCONSIN, MICHIGAN, MINNESOTA, OREGON, WASHINGTON, AND LONG ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Rules and Regulations § 929.125 Committee review procedures... Committee within 30 days after receipt of the Committee's determination of sales history, a request for a...

  4. Safety Committees for Argentinean Research Reactor - Regulatory Issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, Carlos D.

    2009-01-01

    In the field of radiological and nuclear safety, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina controls three research reactors and three critical assemblies, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to ensure the fulfillment of the requirements established in the Licenses, in the Regulatory Standards and in the Mandatory Documentation in general. From the Nuclear Regulatory Authority's point of view, within the general process of research reactors safety management, the Operational Organization self verification of radiological and nuclear safety plays an outstanding role. In this aspect the ARN has established specific requirements in the Regulatory Standards, in the Operation Licenses and in the Operational Limits and Conditions. These requirements include the figure of different safety committees, which act as reviewers or advisers in diverse situations. This paper describes the main characteristics of the committees, their function, scope and the regulatory documents where the requirements are included. (author)

  5. Lapse in Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Continuing Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Fu Tsan

    Full Text Available The United States federal animal welfare regulations and the Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals require that institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs conduct continuing reviews of all animal research activities. However, little is known about the lapse rate of IACUC continuing reviews, and how frequently investigators continue research activities during the lapse. It is also not clear what factors may contribute to an institution's lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. As part of the quality assurance program, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has collected performance metric data for animal care and use programs since 2011. We analyzed IACUC continuing review performance data at 74-75 VA research facilities from 2011 through 2015. The IACUC continuing review lapse rates improved from 5.6% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2015. The rate of investigators continuing research activities during the lapse also decreased from 47.2% in 2012 to 7.4% in 2015. The type of IACUCs used and the size of animal research programs appeared to have no effect in facility's rates of lapse in IACUC continuing reviews. While approximately 80% of facilities reported no lapse in IACUC continuing reviews, approximately 14% of facilities had lapse rates of >10% each year. Some facilities appeared to be repeat offenders. Four facilities had IACUC lapse rates of >10% in at least 3 out of 5 years, suggesting a system problem in these facilities requiring remedial actions to improve their IACUC continuing review processes.

  6. Scientific committee 83 on indentification of research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Scientific committee 83 was appointed to identify research needs for radiation protection in response to the Nuclear Regulatory Commissions requires that follows on a Presidential inquiry to the Council asking it to identify critical questions in research including laboratory and epidemiologic research related to radiation protection and requiring resolution at this time. The answers overwhelmingly identified low dose, low dose rate, LET, and radiation risk being the most important. Aspects of the problems that were singled out had to do with fractionation and protraction, shape of the dose response curve, molecular mechanism, decrement in risk with time as revealed by epidemiologic study, and the reality of hormesis. Against this background, the Committee formulated its scope and an outline of this report, as well as the time table and the mechanism to react with its consultant s who will also be asked to serve as its critical reviewers. The scope of the Committee was taken to be the identification of areas for additional research to improve the bases for making recommendations for protection against ionizing radiation. This paper has five parts, one dealing with sources and environmental transport, one with dosimetry and measurement, one with biologic consequences, epidemiology and risk estimates and one with public perception and policy

  7. Research ethics committees in Japan: A perspective from thirty years of experience at Tokushima University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Hiroaki; Katashima, Rumi; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    The first Japanese ethics committee for biomedical research involving human subjects was established at Tokushima University in 1982. Although this committee was not formed as a response to national directives, the government eventually developed ethical guidelines, such as the Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Studies that were established in 2003. The practical impact of such guidelines was a rapid increase in the number of protocols seeking ethics committee approval and, accordingly, an increase in the workload of ethics committees. This review describes the activity of the ethics committee at Tokushima University during the last thirty years and discusses the infrastructure that best supports the activities of this committee. In addition, we address the issues that ethics committees now face and discuss future directions. J. Med. Invest. 62: 114-118, August, 2015.

  8. [Bioethical Approach for Nursing Research -Focused on the Use of Research Ethics Committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ihn Sook

    2015-06-01

    This paper was written to introduce methods of using the research ethics committee (RES) from requesting the initial review to reporting the close-out for nursing researchers. General ethical principles were described by reviewing the 'Bioethics and Safety Act' and other related guidelines, and constructing some questions and answers. The results were composed of three parts; definition of RES, steps in using RES, and archiving. The 7 steps for using RES were; identifying whether the study needed to be reviewed, by the RES identifying whether the study could be exempted, requesting the initial review after preparing documents, requesting the re-review, requesting an amendment review, requesting a continuing review and reporting the close-out. Nursing researchers need to receive RES approval before starting nursing research involving human subjects. Nursing researchers are urged to use the steps reported in this paper to receive RES approval easily and quickly.

  9. Report of the Review Committee on evaluation of the R and D subjects in the fields of Environmental Science and Health Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    On the basis of the JAERI's Basic Guidelines for the Research Evaluation Methods, etc., the Ad Hoc Review Committee composed of nine experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of the JAERI in order to review the R and D subjects to be implemented for five years starting in FY2000 in the Department of Environmental Science and Department of Health Physics. The Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting was held on August 30, 1999. According to the review methods including review items, points of review and review criteria, determined by the Research Evaluation Committee, the review was conducted based on the research plan documents submitted in advance and presentations by the Department Directors. The review report was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee for further review and discussions in its meeting held on March 14, 2000. As a result, the Research Evaluation Committee acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  10. Communicating Qualitative Research Study Designs to Research Ethics Review Boards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Researchers using qualitative methodologies appear to be particularly prone to having their study designs called into question by research ethics or funding agency review committees. In this paper, the author considers the issue of communicating qualitative research study designs in the context of institutional research ethics review and offers…

  11. 78 FR 16357 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development... hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: April 24--8:30 a.m. to 4...

  12. 78 FR 46331 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy.... Appointments to the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee will be made by the Secretary... Energy is soliciting nominations for candidates to fill vacancies on the Biomass Research and Development...

  13. 75 FR 56525 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY.... SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the meeting and/or...

  14. 78 FR 29125 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L... public are welcome to observe the business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and...

  15. 75 FR 74026 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY.... SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... participation. This notice announces the meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory...

  16. 77 FR 6791 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy... announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal... leading to the production of biobased fuels and biobased products. Tentative Agenda Update on USDA Biomass...

  17. 78 FR 8500 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L... fuels and biobased products. Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include the following: Update on USDA Biomass...

  18. 77 FR 26276 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the meeting and/or... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION...

  19. 78 FR 44105 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the meeting and/or to make oral statements... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION...

  20. 76 FR 63614 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To attend the meeting and/or to make oral... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION...

  1. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Department of Health Physics in Tokai Research Establishment and at related departments in other Establishments of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of six specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from October 2000 to January 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on October 10, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Health Physics. (author)

  2. Ethical assessment of research protocols: the experience of the Research Ethics Committee of the Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Oliveira de Barros

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This is a review article on the origin of the ethical analysis ofresearch protocols, the Brazilian and International legislation,including the Research Ethics Committee of Hospital IsraelitaAlbert Einstein. Since 1997, when the Committee was validatedits role has been recognized as that of a consultant and educator,participating on local and national scientific events andcollaborating with researchers in order to improve their projectsand learn to recognize ethical dilemmas in their protocols.

  3. Ethics, Ethical Human Research and Human Research Ethics Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Non-medical research involves the same issues of justice, beneficence, and respect for persons that apply to non-medical research. It also may involve risk of harm to participants, and conflicts of interest for researchers. It is therefore not possible to argue that such research should be exempt from ethical review. This paper argues that…

  4. Committees for Ethics in Research involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossne, William Saad; Vieira, Sonia; De Freitas, Corina Bontempo Duca

    2008-01-01

    In Brazil since October 1996 there have been guidelines for research involving human subjects. Now human subjects know when their treatment is part of research. Deceit is no longer tolerated. But is not enough to say we offer an explanation to the potential subject and we offer a choice before he or she is confronted with an informed consent form. As in all professional activity, scientific investigation needs social controls. In Brazil, the ultimate responsibility of an investigation lies on the investigator, but in every institution where research is carried out there is a Committee for Ethics in Research. All Committees are subordinated to the National Commission of Ethics in Research, which is submitted to the Brazilian Institute of Health. During 2005 around 17,000 protocols involving 700,000 human subjects were revised by 475 Committees distributed all over the country. Approximately 7,000 people are now working in these Committees.

  5. Research Review: Doing Artistic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serig, Dan

    2012-01-01

    In this review, the author focuses on the pragmatic consideration: How do artists do artistic research? Artistic research in the context of this review is about the connections and relationships among three primary domains: (1) the arts; (2) higher education; and (3) arts education. Broadly stated, all artists do research when they do art--whether…

  6. Committees review activities at December meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Education and Human Resources Committee reported having approved participation in the Association for Women Geoscientist's (AWG) national survey. During the summer of 1983 the AWG designed a 75-question survey targeted to women but also applicable to men. The survey consisted of five sections (in addition to such demographics as age, salary, education, job area, and society membership): feelings and attitude toward job, career/family balance, sexual harassment and discrimination, opinions on national energy and conservation policy, and attitude toward AWG. The questionnaire was mailed to AWG members (just over 1000) and to AGU female members (about 1300). Survey participants were asked to give copies to their male colleagues to create a comparison group. About 25% of the 800 responses were from men. The responses were split about 50/50 between AWG and AGU members. The Education and Human Resources Committee will have the results from the survey presented at their next meeting in Cincinnati, May 15.

  7. 75 FR 45130 - Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, rm. 2201, Silver... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2009-D-0125] Guidance for Industry and Researchers on the Radioactive Drug Research Committee: Human Research Without an...

  8. 77 FR 14462 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development....S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development.... Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: April 18, 2012--9:30 a.m...

  9. 78 FR 47049 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development...; 5 U.S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and.... Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: September 18--8:30 a.m. to...

  10. 77 FR 54648 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development....S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development...: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. TIME AND DATE: September 26, 2012--9 a.m. to 4 p.m...

  11. 76 FR 12404 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development....S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development...: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: April 20, 2011--9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m...

  12. 75 FR 14243 - Research, Engineering And Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering And Development....S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development...: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: April 21, 2010--9 a.m. to 5 p.m...

  13. 76 FR 44648 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development....S.C. App. 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development.... Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: September 21, 2011--9 a.m...

  14. 75 FR 30804 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY.... SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... public are welcome to observe the business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory...

  15. 75 FR 11526 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY.... SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory... public are welcome to observe the business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory...

  16. Ethics approval: responsibilities of journal editors, authors and research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Luchuo Engelbert

    2017-01-01

    Meaningful progress of medicine depends on research that must ultimately involve human subjects. Obtaining ethical approval therefore, especially in medical sciences, should be a moral reflex for researchers. This unfortunately is not the case, with numerous researchers bypassing the ethics approval procedure, or simply unaware of its importance. Good research involves risks taken by research participants and uses tax payers' money in the process. These mandates the research endeavor to aim at attaining the highest degree of respect for the sacrifices made by others for science. Most researchers mistake scientific clearance or approval, for ethics approval. For a study to be ethical sound, it must be scientifically sound. This is only one of the activities carried out during protocol review. It is not uncommon for sensitive ethical concerns, especially in the social sciences to be overlooked and considered not to be accompanied by any serious risks for the research participants.The researcher has the responsibility of systematically consulting the competent ethics committee for advice and consequent approvals or ethical waivers. Journal editors and reviewers have the duty to systematically evaluate the ethical soundness of manuscripts submitted for review. Capacity building in research ethics and institutional support for Research Ethics Committees to speed up protocol review could reduce the incentive of carrying out research in human subjects without ethics approvals. It is hypocritical and idle to continue to expect optimal reviews on time and of good quality, from ethics committees functioning purely on altruistic grounds. Capacity building for researchers in research ethics, and institutional reforms and support for Research Ethics Committees appear not to have received the attention they truly deserve.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel Canister Storage Building CDR Review Committee report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dana, W.P.

    1995-12-01

    The Canister Storage Building (CSB) is a subproject under the Spent Nuclear Fuels Major System Acquisition. This subproject is necessary to design and construct a facility capable of providing dry storage of repackaged spent fuels received from K Basins. The CSB project completed a Conceptual Design Report (CDR) implementing current project requirements. A Design Review Committee was established to review the CDR. This document is the final report summarizing that review

  18. Human Participants in Engineering Research: Notes from a Fledgling Ethics Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, David; Brinkman, Willem-Paul; Pont, Sylvia

    2015-08-01

    For the past half-century, issues relating to the ethical conduct of human research have focused largely on the domain of medical, and more recently social-psychological research. The modern regime of applied ethics, emerging as it has from the Nuremberg trials and certain other historical antecedents, applies the key principles of: autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice to human beings who enter trials of experimental drugs and devices (Martensen in J Hist Med Allied Sci 56(2):168-175, 2001). Institutions such as Institutional Review Boards (in the U.S.) and Ethics Committees (in Europe and elsewhere) oversee most governmentally-funded medical research around the world, in more than a hundred nations that are signers of the Declaration of Helsinki (World Medical Association 2008). Increasingly, research outside of medicine has been recognized to pose potential risks to human subjects of experiments. Ethics committees now operate in the US, Canada, the U.K. and Australia to oversee all governmental-funded research, and in other jurisdictions, the range of research covered by such committees is expanding. Social science, anthropology, and other fields are falling under more clear directives to conduct a formal ethical review for basic research involving human participants (Federman et al. in Responsible research: a systems approach to protecting research participants. National Academies Press, Washington, 2003, p. 36). The legal and institutional response for protecting human subjects in the course of developing non-medical technologies, engineering, and design is currently vague, but some universities are establishing ethics committees to oversee their human subjects research even where the experiments involved are non-medical and not technically covered by the Declaration of Helsinki. In The Netherlands, as in most of Europe, Asia, Latin America, or Africa, no laws mandate an ethical review of non-medical research. Yet, nearly 2

  19. Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee--2011 final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ann L; Sideras, James

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 annual report of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee (RICMRC) is presented. Since 1997, the committee has reviewed 224 deaths to achieve its mission to "review infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives." In 2011, the committee reviewed 21 deaths (22 met the committee's criteria) of infants and children who were residents of Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Hanson and Brookings counties in South Dakota. The manner of 12 of the reviewed deaths was natural with eight of these the result of progressive neurological diseases or conditions. In 2011 there were no deaths attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), though there were two deaths of infants during sleep. One of these infants was ruled accidental as the baby died of aspiration and the other death occurred in an unsafe environment with its manner determined to be undecided. Six deaths were accidental, one of which occurred as a result of a fire in a home without functional smoke alarms. One motor vehicle death occurred, through no fault of the teen age driver. Another death resulted from tubing over a low head dam on the Big Sioux River. One youth suicide occurred to a resident of the region.

  20. Report of the International Review Committee of the joint proposal of the Japan Hadron Facility (KEK) and the Neutron Science Project (JAERI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The International Review Committee composed of twelve Japanese and foreign experts was set up under the Research Evaluation Committee of JAERI, and has reviewed the proposed joint project combining JAERI's Neutron Science Project and KEK's Japan Hadron Facility into one major facility. The review meeting took place on April 26-27, 1999, at JAERI Head quarters, Tokyo. According to the points of review given in advance, the review was implemented based on the joint project report submitted and presentations of both institutions. The Research Evaluation Committee received the review report and its explanations from the Review Committee on July 5. The Research Evaluation Committee has acknowledged appropriateness of the review results. This report describes the review results. (author)

  1. 76 FR 9339 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and... Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee under Section 9008(d) of the Food.... Tentative Agenda: Agenda will include the following: Update on USDA Biomass R&D Activities. Update on DOE...

  2. 76 FR 22091 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee AGENCY: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces an open meeting of the Biomass Research and...

  3. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  4. 15 CFR 2008.19 - Classification Review Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Classification Review Committee. 2008.19 Section 2008.19 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE OF THE UNITED...

  5. IDRC's Advisory Committee on Research Ethics | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ACRE observes IDRC's Corporate Principles on Research Ethics. ... various published statements on the management of environmental research. ... equity while remaining sensitive to the cultural norms and practices of the localities where the ...

  6. 77 FR 6826 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... environmental research and education. Agenda: Wednesday, March 14, 2012 Update on NSF environmental research and... Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Environmental Research...

  7. Boards of directors, audit committees and financial reporting quality. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Skorulska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of financial reporting quality is a problematic task because financial reporting is difficult to observe and measure. The aim of the article is to present the methods of financial reporting quality meas-urement and a systematic review of literature on the effects of corporate governance reforms on the qualityof financial reporting. The main research questions are: (1 what are the possibilities of measuring financial reporting for research purposes, (2 which of the methods of measuring the quality of financial reporting are used in research on corporate governance, and (3 which variables used in measuring corporate gov-ernance factors affect financial reporting quality? To answer these questions, a critical analysis of literature and a systematic review of research results using meta-analysis was made. For selecting the best articles a three-step collection strategy was used, which resulted in a database of 38 publications. The review has shown that for measuring the quality of financial reporting researchers most frequently use models based on measurement of risk management, and the most common independent variables describing corporate governance are: the size of the audit committee, presence of independent directors on the supervisory board, dual role of CEO, proportion of independent directors in the audit committee, size of the supervisory board, proportion of accounting experts in the audit committee, and frequency of audit committee meetings

  8. Payment of research participants: current practice and policies of Irish research ethics committees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Payment of research participants helps to increase recruitment for research studies, but can pose ethical dilemmas. Research ethics committees (RECs) have a centrally important role in guiding this practice, but standardisation of the ethical approval process in Ireland is lacking.

  9. Heterogeneity of Human Research Ethics Committees and Research Governance Offices across Australia: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smit, Elisabeth; Kearns, Lisa S; Clarke, Linda; Dick, Jonathan; Hill, Catherine L; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Conducting ethically grounded research is a fundamental facet of all investigations. Nevertheless, the administrative burdens of current ethics review are substantial, and calls have been made for a reduction in research waste. To describe the heterogeneity in administration and documentation required by Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) and Research Governance Offices (RGOs) across Australia. In establishing a nationwide study to investigate the molecular aetiology of Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA), for which archived pathological specimens from around Australia are being recruited, we identified variation across separate HREC and RGO requirements. Submission paperwork and correspondence from each collaborating site and its representative office for research were reviewed. This data was interrogated to evaluate differences in current guidelines. Twenty-five pathology departments across seven Australian States collaborated in this study. All states, except Victoria, employed a single ethics review model. There was discrepancy amongst HRECs as to which application process applied to our study: seven requested completion of a "National Ethics Application Form" and three a "Low Negligible Risk" form. Noticeable differences in guidelines included whether electronic submission was sufficient. There was variability in the total number of documents submitted (range five to 22) and panel review turnaround time (range nine to 136 days). We demonstrate the challenges and illustrate the heavy workload involved in receiving widespread ethics and governance approval across Australia. We highlight the need to simplify, homogenise, and nationalise human ethics for non-clinical trial studies. Reducing unnecessary administration will enable investigators to achieve research aims more efficiently.

  10. Report From the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loew, Gregory A.

    2003-01-01

    The International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC), formed in 1994, was reconvened in February 2001 by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) to assess the current technical status of all electron-positron linear collider designs at hand in the world: TESLA, JLC-C, JLC-X/NLC and CLIC. The ILC-TRC worked for exactly two years and submitted its report to ICFA in February 2003. This paper presents the motivation behind the study, the charge to the committee and its organization, a table of machine parameters for 500 GeV c.m. energy and later upgrades to higher energies, the methodology used to assess the designs, and a ranked list of R and D tasks still deemed necessary between now and the time any one of the projects is selected by the HEP community and begins construction. Possible future developments are briefly discussed

  11. The Evolution of American Hospital Ethics Committees: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Andrew; Jurchak, Martha

    2016-01-01

    During the 1970s and 1980s, legal precedent, governmental recommendations, and professional society guidelines drove the formation of hospital ethics committees (HECs). The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organization's requirements in the early 1990s solidified the role of HECs as the primary mechanism to address ethical issues in patient care. Because external factors drove the rapid growth of HECs on an institution-by-institution basis, however, no initial consensus formed around the structure and function of these committees. There are now almost 40 years of empirical studies on the composition, administration, and activities of HECs in the United States. We conducted a systematic review of the available empirical literature on HECs to describe their evolution. As HECs changed over time, they increased their total number of members and percentage of members from nursing and the community. Although physicians increasingly chaired these committees, their presence as a percentage of overall members declined. The percentage of administrative members remained steady, although committees became increasingly likely to have at least one administrative member. HECs were also increasingly likely to report to an administrative body or to the board of trustees or directors rather than to the medical staff. Finally, consultation volume increased steadily over time. There has not, however, been a national survey of the composition of ethics committees, their administration, or volume of consultation in more than 10 years, despite increasing calls for professional standards and quality improvement assessments among HECs. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  12. 76 FR 31018 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... consequences of military service in the Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee...

  13. 77 FR 2353 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses; Notice... Advisory Committee Act) that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... consequences of military service in the Southwest Asia theater of operations during the Gulf War. The Committee...

  14. 75 FR 50009 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... support for environmental research and education. Agenda September 8, 2010 Update on recent NSF... Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Environmental Research...

  15. 76 FR 7881 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... support for environmental research and education. Agenda March 16 Update on recent NSF environmental... Science Foundation announces the following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee for Environmental Research...

  16. 76 FR 10004 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  17. 76 FR 54734 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  18. 76 FR 30647 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  19. 75 FR 72792 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  20. 77 FR 70140 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related to deemed...

  1. 75 FR 41439 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  2. 75 FR 5952 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  3. 76 FR 72902 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  4. 75 FR 62508 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  5. 78 FR 21346 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  6. Whether Audit Committee Financial Expertise Is the Only Relevant Expertise: A Review of Audit Committee Expertise and Timeliness of Financial Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Rabea Baatwah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature on audit committee expertise and financial reporting timeliness. Financial reporting timeliness and audit committee expertise are two areas of research gaining the attention of a large number of stakeholders because they contribute to the reliability and the  relevancy of financial reporting. Indeed, the focus of this review is primarily on the recent developments in the pertinent literature in order to show the limitations of such research and encourage future research to overcome these limitations. By also looking at the development of the audit committee expertise literature, this study concludes that (1 like most audit committee literature, financial reporting timeliness literature continues to assume the absence of the contribution of expertise other than financial expertise, and ignore the role of audit committee chair; (2 most of this literature fails to find a significant effect because it ignores the interaction among corporate governance mechanisms. Accordingly, this study posits that ignoring the issues raised in such research by future research would lead to major mistakes in reforms relating to how the quality of financial reporting can be enhanced.

  7. Review of the Fusion Theory and Computing Program. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonsen, Thomas M.; Berry, Lee A.; Brown, Michael R.; Dahlburg, Jill P.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Greenwald, Martin; Hegna, Chris C.; McCurdy, William; Newman, David E.; Pellegrini, Claudio; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Post, Douglass E.; Rosenbluth, Marshall N.; Sheffield, John; Simonen, Thomas C.; Van Dam, James

    2001-01-01

    At the November 14-15, 2000, meeting of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, a Panel was set up to address questions about the Theory and Computing program, posed in a charge from the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (see Appendix A). This area was of theory and computing/simulations had been considered in the FESAC Knoxville meeting of 1999 and in the deliberations of the Integrated Program Planning Activity (IPPA) in 2000. A National Research Council committee provided a detailed review of the scientific quality of the fusion energy sciences program, including theory and computing, in 2000.

  8. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. In-advance evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology in accordance with the Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the adequacy of the R and D programs pertaining to the establishment and utilization of the Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) to be implemented for five years starting in Fiscal Year 2001 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering and Department of Environmental Sciences of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from February to March 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on February 9, 2001, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Information Technology. (author)

  9. Report of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering. Result evaluation in fiscal year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee, which consisted of 14 members from outside of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), set up an Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations in order to evaluate the R and D accomplishments achieved for five years from Fiscal Year 1995 to Fiscal Year 1999 at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee consisted of seven specialists from outside of JAERI. The Ad Hoc Review Committee conducted its activities from December 2000 to March 2001. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Ad Hoc Review Committee meeting which was held on December 27, 2000, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on March 16, 2001. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Ad Hoc Review Committee on Computational Science and Engineering. (author)

  10. Safety Review Committee - Annual Report 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    During the year under review. The Safety Review Committee (SRC) assessed the safety of ANSTO's operations. This was done by site visits, examination of documentation and briefing by ANSTO officers responsible for particular operations, and includes HIFAR and Moata reactors, radioisotope production, packing and dispatch, radioactive waste management practices, occupational health and safety activities and ANSTO's arrangements for public health and safety beyond the site. This report describes the activities and findings of the SRC during the year ending 30 June 1992. 8 figs., ills

  11. 78 FR 36309 - Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses, Notice... Act, 5 U.S.C. App., that the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses will meet on... operations during the Gulf War. [[Page 36310

  12. 76 FR 46781 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., 2011: 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; August 24, 2011: 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: I Hotel, 1900 S. First Street... welcome to observe the business of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee. To... ext. 220; E- mail: hq.com ">[email protected] hq.com at least 7 business days prior to the meeting. Members...

  13. PROFESSIONAL CODES OF CONDUCT IN PSYCHOLOGY: DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF COMPLAINTS REVIEWED BY THE COPC ETHICS COMMITTEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mila Arch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades a significant increase has been observed in the number of complaints filed with ethical committees. The possibility of being the subject of a complaint is therefore a growing concern for professionals. However, research on ethics and codes of conduct in psychology is still very limited and real data on the complaints filed with Ethics Committees against psychologists are practically nonexistent. This article describes the results of a descriptive analysis of the complaints reviewed by the COPC Ethics Committee from 1998 to 2011. A total of 324 complaints were filed, but only 20% led to opening disciplinary proceedings, the judicial context being the professional area in which the highest percentage of complaints were filed (85%. Among the most prevalent reasons for complaints were making assessments without prior examination and partiality.

  14. 76 FR 54730 - Committees on Administration and Management, Collaborative Governance, Judicial Review, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... accommodations for persons with disabilities), and how to submit comments to the committee can be found in the ``Research'' section of the ACUS Web site. Go to www.acus.gov and click on Research - > Committee Meetings...

  15. 76 FR 61072 - Committees on Administration and Management, Collaborative Governance, Judicial Review, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... accommodations for persons with disabilities), and how to submit comments to the committee can be found in the ``Research'' section of the ACUS Web site. Go to http://www.acus.gov and click on Research -> Committee...

  16. Heterogeneity of Human Research Ethics Committees and Research Governance Offices across Australia: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth De Smit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Conducting ethically grounded research is a fundamental facet of all investigations. Nevertheless, the administrative burdens of current ethics review are substantial, and calls have been made for a reduction in research waste. Aims To describe the heterogeneity in administration and documentation required by Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs and Research Governance Offices (RGOs across Australia. Methods In establishing a nationwide study to investigate the molecular aetiology of Giant Cell Arteritis (GCA, for which archived pathological specimens from around Australia are being recruited, we identified variation across separate HREC and RGO requirements. Submission paperwork and correspondence from each collaborating site and its representative office for research were reviewed. This data was interrogated to evaluate differences in current guidelines. Results Twenty-five pathology departments across seven Australian States collaborated in this study. All states, except Victoria, employed a single ethics review model. There was discrepancy amongst HRECs as to which application process applied to our study: seven requested completion of a “National Ethics Application Form” and three a “Low Negligible Risk” form. Noticeable differences in guidelines included whether electronic submission was sufficient. There was variability in the total number of documents submitted (range five to 22 and panel review turnaround time (range nine to 136 days. Conclusion We demonstrate the challenges and illustrate the heavy workload involved in receiving widespread ethics and governance approval across Australia. We highlight the need to simplify, homogenise, and nationalise human ethics for non-clinical trial studies. Reducing unnecessary administration will enable investigators to achieve research aims more efficiently

  17. Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Leadership Team of the IAHR Committee for Hydraulic Machinery and Systems Eduard EGUSQUIZA, UPC Barcelona, Spain, Chair François AVELLAN, EPFL-LMH, Switzerland, Past Chair Richard K FISHER, Voith Hydro Inc., USA, Past Chair Fidel ARZOLA, Edelca, Venezuela Michel COUSTON, Alstom Hydro, France Niklas DAHLBÄCKCK, Vatenfall, Sweden Normand DESY, Andritz VA TECH Hydro Ltd., Canada Chisachi KATO, University of Tokyo, Japan Andrei LIPEJ, Turboinstitut, Slovenija Torbjørn NIELSEN, NTNU, Norway Romeo SUSAN-RESIGA, 'Politehnica' University Timisoara, Romania Stefan RIEDELBAUCH, Stuggart University, Germany Albert RUPRECHT, Stuttgart University, Germany Qing-Hua SHI, Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co., China Geraldo TIAGO, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Brazil International Advisory Committee Shouqi YUAN (principal) Jiangsu University China QingHua SHI (principal) Dong Fang Electrical Machinery Co. China Fidel ARZOLA EDELCA Venezuela Thomas ASCHENBRENNER Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Anton BERGANT Litostroj Power doo Slovenia B C BHAOYAL Research & Technology Centre India Hermod BREKKE NTNU Norway Stuart COULSON Voith Hydro Inc. USA Paul COOPER Fluid Machinery Research Inc USA V A DEMIANOV Power Machines OJSC Russia Bart van ESCH Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Netherland Arno GEHRER Andritz Hydro Graz Austria Akira GOTO Ebara Corporation Japan Adiel GUINZBURG The Boeing Company USA D-H HELLMANN KSB AG Germany Ashvin HOSANGADI Combustion Research and Flow Technology USA Byung-Sun HWANG Korea Institute of Material Science Korea Toshiaki KANEMOTO Kyushu Institute of Technology Japan Mann-Eung KIM Korean Register of Shipping Korea Jiri KOUTNIK Voith Hydro GmbH & Co. KG Germany Jinkook LEE Eaton Corporation USA Young-Ho LEE Korea Maritime University Korea Woo-Seop LIM Hyosung Goodsprings Inc Korea Jun MATSUI Yokohama National University Japan Kazuyoshi Mitsubishi H I Ltd, Japan MIYAGAWA Christophe NICOLET Power Vision Engineering Srl Switzerland Maryse PAGE Hydro

  18. Enhancing capacity of research ethics review committees

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In particular, pharmaceutical companies have been shifting trials from ... cited by participants during the needs assessments were excess workload, and a lack of coordination .... universities and from public and private hospitals, potential.

  19. Research award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... ... Maternal and Child Health, in its program management and the planning ... For the remaining 50% of his/her time at IDRC, the research awardee ... of research for development;; Strong research and analytical skills;; Strong ...

  20. Research Award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... For the remaining 50% of his/her time at IDRC, the Research ... of authorship, management of conflicts of interest, and negotiation of power imbalances. ... of research for development;; Strong research and analytical skills; ...

  1. Research award: Advisory Committee on Research Ethics 2019 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... in its program management and the planning of events and activities around research ... For the remaining 50% of his/her time at IDRC, the research awardee will ... research and analytical skills;; Strong verbal and written communication ...

  2. Research using small tokamaks. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The technical reports in these proceedings were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on research Using Small Tokamaks, held in Ahmedabad, India, 6-7 December 1995. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide a forum for the exchange of information on various small and medium sized plasma experiments, not only for tokamaks. The potential benefits of these research programmes are to: test theories, such as effects of the plasma rotation; check empirical scalings, such as density limits; develop fusion technology hardware; develop plasma diagnostics; such as tomography; and to train scientists, engineers, technicians, and students, particularly in developing IAEA Member States

  3. Ethical aspects in tissue research: thematic analysis of ethical statements to the research ethics committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have been published about ethics committees and the clarifications requested about the submitted applications. In Finland, ethics committees require a separate statement on ethical aspects of the research in applications to the ethics committee. However, little is known about how researchers consider the ethical aspects of their own studies. Methods The data were collected from all the applications received by the official regional ethics committee in the Hospital District of Northern Savo during 2004–2009 (n = 688). These included a total of 56 studies involving research on tissue other than blood. The statements by the researchers about the ethics about their own research in these applications were analyzed by thematic content analysis under the following themes: recruitment, informed consent, risks and benefits, confidentiality and societal meaning. Results The researchers tended to describe recruitment and informed consent process very briefly. Usually these descriptions simply stated who the recruiter was and that written consent would be required. There was little information provided on the recruitment situation and on how the study recruiters would be informed. Although most of the studies were clinical, the possibility was hardly ever discussed that patients could fail to distinguish between care and research. Conclusion The written guidelines, available on the webpages of the ethics committee, do not seem to be enough to help researchers achieve this goal. In addition to detailed guidelines for researchers, investigators need to be taught to appreciate the ethical aspects in their own studies. PMID:22873761

  4. Stating the Case for Nursing Research Ethics Committees: A Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Theresa; Fletcher, Ian

    1998-01-01

    Nurse-led research ethics committees are generally more tolerant of diversity in research proposals than are medical committees steeped in empirical traditions. However, national trends in nursing in Britain may influence a preference for multidisciplinary over nurse-led committees. (SK)

  5. African Research Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Research Review publishes original research output in the areas of Arts, Education, Social Sciences, Pure and applied Sciences, Engineering and ... Final selection of papers for publication in the Journal will be based on paper originality, technical quality, use of language and overall contribution to knowledge.

  6. Ethics committees and the changed clinical research environment in India in 2016: A perspective!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanish; Sule, Poonam; Bughediwala, Murtuza; Pandya, Vrunda; Sinha, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Institutional and Independent Ethics Committees (ECs) have as their primary mission the protection of human research subjects. The Central Drugs Standard Control Organization has in the period 2013-2016 introduced several new regulations and amendments to existing regulations overseeing the conduct of Research in India. Several of these have direct effect on the functioning of the EC from a review, approval, and oversight mechanism. The Ethics Council of Indian Society for Clinical Research conducted a questionnaire survey among EC members to understand the impact of these changes in their functioning. The domains surveyed included awareness about recent changes/amendments and impacts, serious adverse events (SAEs) and compensation, informed consent and audio-video recording, monitoring and auditing of research, and future working of ECs. Seventy-nine percent of ECs are of the opinion that the new regulations/guidelines will add to their existing burden in the process of review and approval, providing subject protection and research oversight. Even though 68% of ECs stated that they are comfortable with SAE assessment and compensation determination, they state that there is variability in calculation of compensation amount using the formulae. An overwhelming majority (80%) of ECs stated that they were not in favor of centralized EC for providing review, approval, and oversight of clinical studies. Ethics Committees act as local regulator for clinical trials at sites providing Human Subject protection. The survey captures the contemporary issues faced by the ECs and also raises important questions on the ease of doing research, oversight of approved research, and administrative burden on the EC. Recent changes in regulations have on the one hand empowered Ethics committees but brought in challenges in the way that they provide oversight and monitor research carried out at the site.

  7. 75 FR 17953 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee Findings Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Repatriation Review Committee Findings Related to the Identity of Cultural Items in the Possession of the.... 3006(c)(3)), reviewed the record and made findings of fact related to the identity of 45 cultural items... Review Committee found that each of the 45 cultural items was both a ``sacred object'' (25 U.S.C. 3001(3...

  8. Assessment by human research ethics committees of potential conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship of clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, J P; Kerridge, I H

    2007-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical research have the potential to bias research outcomes and ultimately prejudice patient care. It is unknown how Australian Human Research Ethics Committees (HREC) assess and manage such conflicts of interest. We aimed to gain an understanding of how HREC approach the problem of potential conflicts of interest arising from pharmaceutical sponsorship of clinical research. We conducted a survey of HREC chairpersons in New South Wales. HREC vary widely in their approaches to conflicts of interest, including in their use of National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines, which were often misinterpreted or overlooked. Many committees rely primarily on researchers disclosing potential conflicts of interest, whereas a majority of HREC use disclosure to research participants as the primary tool for preventing and managing conflicts of interest. Almost no HREC place limitations on researcher relationships with pharmaceutical companies. These findings suggest reluctance on the part of HREC to regulate many potential conflicts of interest between researchers and pharmaceutical sponsors, which may arise from uncertainty regarding the meaning or significance of conflicts of interest in research, from ambiguity surrounding the role of HREC in assessing and managing conflicts of interest in research or from misinterpretation or ignorance of current National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines. Further review of policies and practices in this important area may prove beneficial in safeguarding clinical research and patient care while promoting continuing constructive engagement with the pharmaceutical industry.

  9. 42 CFR 61.15 - Moral character or loyalty; reference to Special Review Committee; review and recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Moral character or loyalty; reference to Special... § 61.15 Moral character or loyalty; reference to Special Review Committee; review and recommendation. (a) Moral character or loyalty; reference to Special Review Committee. Whenever the Surgeon General...

  10. Perspectives of Egyptian research ethics committees regarding their effective functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matar, Amal; Silverman, Henry

    2013-02-01

    The recent increase in research in the Middle East has been associated with the establishment of research ethics committees (RECs). Our aim was to obtain perspectives of RECs regarding the challenges that impede their effective functioning. We conducted in-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. We transcribed and analyzed the interviews to uncover major themes and subthemes. We identified the following themes: membership composition; training needs of members; availability of human and capital resources; role of the national government; concerns with the informed consent process; government scrutiny of research; investigator-related issues; and concerns with transfer of biological samples to other countries. Our interview study revealed several barriers that need to be considered by appropriate stakeholders to enhance adequate functioning of RECs.

  11. Ethical Evaluation of Mental Health Social Research: Agreement Between Researchers and Ethics Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón Barrios, Liliana; Guarneros García, Tonatiuh; Jiménez Tapia, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this article is to compare various ethical issues considered by social scientists and research ethics committees in the evaluation of mental health social research protocols. We contacted 47 social scientists and 10 members of ethics committees in Mexico with two electronic national surveys that requested information from both groups related to the application of ethical principles in mental health social research. The results showed no significant difference between these groups in the value placed on the ethical issues explored. Based on this finding, we make proposals to strengthen the collaboration between the two groups.

  12. Committee for International Conference on Mechanical Engineering Research (ICMER 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Ahmad Razlan Bin

    2012-09-01

    Scientific Advisory Committee: 1) Prof. Dr. Ahmad Kamal Ariffin (UKM) 2) Prof. Dr. Hj. Rosli Abu Bakar (UMP) 3) Prof. Dr. Hanafi Ismail (USM) 4) Prof. Ir. Dr. Mohd Jailani Mohd Nor (MoHE) 5) Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha (UMP) 6) Prof. Dr. Masjuki Haji Hassan 7) Prof. Ir. Dr. Ramesh Singh (UNITEN) 8) Prof. Dr. Razali Ayob (UTEM) 9) Prof. Dr. Wan Khairuddin (UTM) 10) Prof. Dr. Sulaiman Hj. Hasan (UTHM) 11) Prof. Dr. Zuraidah Mohd. Zain (UniMAP) 12) Prof. Dr. Horizon Gitano (USM) 13) Prof. Dr. K.V Sharma (UMP) 14) Prof. Dr. Shahrani Anuar (UMP) 15) Assoc. Prof. Dr. Abd Rashid Abd. Aziz (UTP) 16) Assoc. Prof. Dr. Aidy Ali (UPM) 17) Assoc. Prof. Dr. Saidur Rahman (UM) 18) Assoc. Prof. Dr. Md Abdul Maleque (UIA) Organizing Committee Chairman: Prof. Dr. Hj. Rosli Abu Bakar Co-Chair: Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha Co-Chair: Prof. Ir. Dr. Jailani Salihon Secretary: Dr. Rizalman Mamat Committee on Keynote Speaker 1) Kumaran Kadirgama (Chair) 2) Prof. Dr. K.V. Sharma 3) Haji Amirruddin Abdul Kadir 4) Miminorazeansuhaila Loman 5) Mohd Akramin Mohd Romlay Technical Committee (Peer Review & Proceedings) 1) Dr. Abdul Adam Abdullah (Chair) 2) Dr. Ahmad Razlan Yusoff 3) Mohd Yusof Taib 4) Dr. Md. Mustafizur Rahman 5) Dr. Hjh. Yusnita Rahayu 6) Dr. Gigih Priyandoko 7) Dr. Agung Sudrajad 8) Muhammad Hatifi Mansor 9) Mohd Fadzil Abdul Rahim Technical Committee (Panels & Session Chairs) 1) Dr. Mahadzir Ishak (Chair) 2) Prof. Dr. Shahrani Anuar 3) Dr. Maisara Mohyeldin Gasim Mohamed 4) Muhammad Ammar Nik Mu'tasim 5) Ahmad Basirul Subha bin Alias Technical Committee (Journal Publication) 1) Dr. Ahmad Razlan bin Yusoff (Chair) 2) Mohd Yusof Taib 3) Dr. Mahadzir Ishak 4) Dr. Abdul Adam Abdullah 5) Hj. Amirruddin Abdul Kadir 6) Hadi Abdul Salaam Bureau of Publicity & Website 1) Dr. Muhamad Arifpin Mansor (Chair) 2) Amir Abdul Razak 3) Idris Mat Sahat 4) Prof. Dr. Hj. Rosli Abu Bakar 5) Muhamad Zuhairi Sulaiman 6) Dr. Sugeng Ariyono 7) Asnul Hadi Ahmad 8) Mohd Tarmizy Che Kar 9) Mohd Padzly Radzi Bureau of

  13. Incorporating ethical principles into clinical research protocols: a tool for protocol writers and ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rebecca H; Wacholtz, Mary C; Barnes, Mark; Boggs, Liam; Callery-D'Amico, Susan; Davis, Amy; Digilova, Alla; Forster, David; Heffernan, Kate; Luthin, Maeve; Lynch, Holly Fernandez; McNair, Lindsay; Miller, Jennifer E; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Van Campen, Luann; Wilenzick, Mark; Wolf, Delia; Woolston, Cris; Aldinger, Carmen; Bierer, Barbara E

    2016-04-01

    A novel Protocol Ethics Tool Kit ('Ethics Tool Kit') has been developed by a multi-stakeholder group of the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard. The purpose of the Ethics Tool Kit is to facilitate effective recognition, consideration and deliberation of critical ethical issues in clinical trial protocols. The Ethics Tool Kit may be used by investigators and sponsors to develop a dedicated Ethics Section within a protocol to improve the consistency and transparency between clinical trial protocols and research ethics committee reviews. It may also streamline ethics review and may facilitate and expedite the review process by anticipating the concerns of ethics committee reviewers. Specific attention was given to issues arising in multinational settings. With the use of this Tool Kit, researchers have the opportunity to address critical research ethics issues proactively, potentially speeding the time and easing the process to final protocol approval. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  14. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee: Second Report, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loew, Gregory

    2003-02-21

    As this report is being published, the international high energy physics (HEP) community finds itself confronting a set of fascinating discoveries and new questions regarding the nature of matter and its fundamental particles and forces. The observation of neutrino oscillations that indicates that neutrinos have mass, measurements of the accelerating expansion of the universe that may be due to dark energy, and evidence for a period of rapid inflation at the beginning of the Big Bang are stimulating the entire field. Looming on the horizon are the potential discoveries of a Higgs particle that may reveal the origin of mass and of a whole family of supersymmetric particles that may be part of the cosmic dark matter. For the HEP community to elucidate these mysteries, new accelerators are indispensable. At this time, after careful deliberations, all three regional organizations of the HEP community (ACFA in Asia, HEPAP in North America, and ECFA in Europe) have reached the common conclusion that the next accelerator should be an electron-positron linear collider with an initial center-of-mass energy of 500 Giga-electronvolts (GeV), later upgradable to higher energies, and that it should be built and operated in parallel with the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN. Hence, this second report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC) comes at a very timely moment. The report was requested by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) in February 2001 to assess the current technical status of electron-positron linear collider designs in the various regions. Note that the ILC-TRC was not asked to concern itself with either cost studies or the ultimate selection process of a machine. This Executive Summary gives a short outline of the genesis of the report, the charge given to the committee, and its organization. It then presents a brief description of four electron-positron linear collider designs at hand. The

  15. Special committee review of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's severe accident risks report (NUREG--1150)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.J.C.; Apostolakis, G.; Kastenberg, W.E.; Birkhofer, E.H.A.; Hoegberg, L.G.; LeSage, L.G.; Rasmussen, N.C.; Teague, H.J.; Taylor, J.J.

    1990-08-01

    In April 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) published a draft report ''Severe Accident Risks: An Assessment for Five US Nuclear Power Plants,'' NUREG-1150. This report updated, extended and improved upon the information presented in the 1974 ''Reactor Safety Study,'' WASH-1400. Because the information in NUREG-1150 will play a significant role in implementing the NRC's Severe Accident Policy, its quality and credibility are of critical importance. Accordingly, the Commission requested that the RES conduct a peer review of NUREG-1150 to ensure that the methods, safety insights and conclusions presented are appropriate and adequately reflect the current state of knowledge with respect to reactor safety. To this end, RES formed a special committee in June of 1989 under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Committee, composed of a group of recognized national and international experts in nuclear reactor safety, was charged with preparing a report reflecting their review of NUREG-1150 with respect to the adequacy of the methods, data, analysis and conclusions it set forth. The report which precedes reflects the results of this peer review

  16. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  17. 15 CFR 2002.1 - Trade Policy Committee Review Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE OPERATION OF COMMITTEES § 2002.1 Trade Policy Committee..., December 11, 1971 (15 CFR 2002.1), is abolished and there is hereby established as a subordinate body of...

  18. Tai Chi research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2011-08-01

    This review briefly summarizes recent Tai Chi research on physical benefits including balance and muscle strength and psychological benefits including attentiveness, sleep and anxiety. Cardiovascular changes following Tai Chi include decreased heart rate and blood pressure, increased vagal activity and decreased cholesterol. Pain syndromes that have been affected include fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Autoimmune and immune conditions recently researched and reviewed here include osteoporosis, diabetes and HIV. Methodological problems with this research include the variability in forms (series of postures) used across studies as well as the intensity of the Tai Chi schedule. Further, most of the studies are based on within group changes rather than attention control group comparisons. Nonetheless, significant clinical improvements have been noted. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A 'good' ethical review: audit and professionalism in research ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglas-Jones, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    How does one conduct, measure and record a ‘good’ ethical review of biomedical research? To what extent do ethics committees invoke professionalism in researchers and in themselves, and to what extent do they see competence as adherence to a set of standard operating procedures for ethical review......? Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork with the Forum of Ethics Review Committees of Asia and the Pacific (FERCAP), a capacity-building NGO that runs ethics committee trainings and reviews in the Asia Pacific region, I develop an analysis of ethical review and its effects. I focus on a ‘second-order audit’ run...... readings of ‘ethics’. I begin and end with a reflection on the ethical effects of a measurement practice that takes ethics itself as its object....

  20. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on fusion research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Fusion Research and Development in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Fusion Research and Development evaluated the adequacy of the plans of fusion research and development to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 23, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Fusion Research and Development. (author)

  1. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety Research in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety Research evaluated the adequacy of the plans of nuclear safety research to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of eight specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 27, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Safety Research. (author)

  2. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research support and collaborative activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities evaluated the adequacy of the plans of research support and collaborative activities to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 21, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research Support and Collaborative Activities. (author)

  3. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research for radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications evaluated the adequacy of the plans of research for radiation applications to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from June 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advanced and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on July 29, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research for Radiation Applications. (author)

  4. Ethics creep or governance creep? Challenges for Australian Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Susanna M

    2011-09-01

    Australian Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) have to contend with ever-increasing workloads and responsibilities which go well beyond questions of mere ethics. In this article, I shall examine how the roles of HRECs have changed, and show how this is reflected in the iterations of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (NS). In particular I suggest that the focus of the National Statement has shifted to concentrate on matters of research governance at the expense of research ethics, compounded by its linkage to the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research (2007) in its most recent iteration. I shall explore some of the challenges this poses for HRECs and institutions and the risks it poses to ensuring that Australian researchers receive clear ethical guidance and review.

  5. 75 FR 3542 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit... Board is to review rehabilitation research and development applications for scientific and technical...

  6. 75 FR 40036 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit... (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit... is to review rehabilitation research and development applications for scientific and technical merit...

  7. Research and regulatory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macleod, J.S.; Fryer, D.R.H.

    1979-01-01

    To enable the regulatory review to be effectively undertaken by the regulatory body, there is a need for it to have ready access to information generated by research activities. Certain advantages have been seen to be gained by the regulatory body itself directly allocating and controlling some portion of these activities. The princial reasons for reaching this conclusion are summarised and a brief description of the Inspectorates directly sponsored programme outlined. (author)

  8. 78 FR 20696 - NASA Advisory Council; Human Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... topics: --Overview of Research in Space Life and Physical Sciences --Space Station and Future Exploration... Exploration and Operations Committee; Research Subcommittee; Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space... of the Research Subcommittee of the Human Exploration and Operations Committee (HEOC) of the NASA...

  9. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research... responsibility for appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  10. 78 FR 70917 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  11. 77 FR 39209 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  12. 77 FR 59374 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  13. 75 FR 48411 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development.... 2), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R, E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering & Development Advisory Committee. Time and Date: September...

  14. Yoga research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    This paper is a review of empirical studies, review and meta-analysis publications on yoga from the last few years. The review includes demographics/prevalence of yoga as a practice, bibliometric analyses of the yoga publications and the use of yoga for physical fitness and cognitive function. Most of the studies reviewed here involve yoga effects on psychiatric and medical conditions. These include pregnancy, prenatal and postpartum depression; stress, PTSD, anxiety, and obesity; cardiovascular conditions including hypertension; pain syndromes including arthritis, headaches and low back pain; autoimmune conditions including asthma, type II diabetes and multiple sclerosis; immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer; and aging problems including balance, osteoporosis and Parkinson's. The methods and results of those studies are briefly summarized along with their limitations and suggestions for future research. Basically yoga has been more effective than control and waitlist control conditions, although not always more effective than treatment comparison groups such as other forms of exercise. More randomized controlled studies are needed in which yoga is compared to active exercise groups. Having established the physical and mental health benefits of yoga makes it ethically questionable to assign participants to inactive control groups. Shorter sessions should be investigated for cost-effectiveness and for daily practice. Multiple physical and physiological measures need to be added to the self-report research protocols and potential underlying mechanisms need to be further explored. In the interim, the studies reviewed here highlight the therapeutic effects of yoga, a practice that could come to be called yoga therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 76 FR 47611 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research And Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-05

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research And Education; Notice of... support for environmental research and education. Agenda September 8, 2011 Update on NSF environmental research and education activities; Update on national and international collaborations; Meeting with the...

  16. 78 FR 9743 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... concerning support for environmental research and education. Agenda March 13, 2013 Update on NSF environmental research and education activities Update on national and international collaborations Update on...

  17. [Independent ethics committees for clinical research in Argentina. An evaluation and a system to guarantee their independence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Sergio E

    2008-01-01

    The Administración Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnología Médica de la República Argentina (ANMAT) requires that an independent ethics committee of sponsors and/or researchers must previously evaluate and approve all the new pharmacological research protocols carried out on human beings. However, due to the lucrative nature of the evaluation, and because the selection of the Independent Ethics Committee is carried out by the sponsors and/or researchers, the assumed autonomy of the former can be reduced to merely a relationship of "service provider-customer". The Institutional Review Board of the Mar del Plata s Community Hospital has evaluated, between 2005 and 2006, thirty three research protocols (with their corresponding information sheets for patients and informed consent forms) previously approved by a non-institutional Independent Ethics Committee. The median number of objections made by the Institutional Review Board, which prompted the previously mentioned protocols to be modified in order to be approved, was of three per protocol. In other words, the accreditation of an Independent Ethics Committee requires a system that guarantees actual independence from the sponsors and/or researchers, as well as management control mechanisms that may lead them into an eventual loss of accreditation. Several measures are proposed in order to correct the deficiencies of the present system.

  18. 75 FR 18484 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... Emerging Technologies Analysis. 2. ETRAC Panel on Emerging Technologies. 3. History of the Laser. 4... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) [[Page...

  19. International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee Report, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This 1995 report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee is the first attempt to gather in one document the current status of all major e + e - linear collider projects in the world. The report is the result of a collaborative effort of scientists from many laboratories working together over a period of about one year. A short description of the organization, origins and history of the report is given below. To get an idea of the organization, the reader should first refer to the Table of Contents. Chapter 1 is an introduction and general overview of the respective 500 GeV c.m. energy machines. In contrast, Chapter 2, cutting across individual machine boundaries, gives a comparative description and discussion of all the major machine sub-systems as well as particle physics experimentation, showing where these subjects stand today and what additional work needs to be done in the next few years to reach the point where complete design reports can be prepared. Chapter 3 describes the various paths to energy upgrades, and other experimental options (γγ, e - e - , etc.). Chapter 4 gives a short status report of the machine experiments and test facilities being built in the world. Chapter 5 outlines current and other possible areas of collaboration and finally., Chapter 6 summarizes our principal conclusions

  20. CIRRPC (Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination) sixteenth quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The document is a summary of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination activities for the period April 1 through June 30, 1988. During the reporting period, the Executive Committee met with the staff concerned with the radiation matters of the Department of the Interior on May 20 and with the Department of Defense on May 23 to review current CIRRPC activities and issues of particular interest to those agencies. The meetings were a part of CIRRPC's program of visits to member agencies on a two-year cycle

  1. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. What scientists want from their research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith-Spiegel, Patricia; Tabachnick, Barbara

    2006-03-01

    Whereas investigators have directed considerable criticism against Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), the desirable characteristics of IRBs have not previously been empirically determined. A sample of 886 experienced biomedical and social and behavioral scientists rated 45 descriptors of IRB actions and functions as to their importance. Predictions derived from organizational justice research findings in other work settings were generally borne out. Investigators place high value on the fairness and respectful consideration of their IRBs. Expected differences between biomedical and social behavioral researchers and other variables were unfounded. Recommendations are offered for educating IRBs to accord researchers greater respect and fair treatment.

  3. Integer Linear Programming for Constrained Multi-Aspect Committee Review Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadehgan, Maryam; Zhai, ChengXiang

    2011-01-01

    Automatic review assignment can significantly improve the productivity of many people such as conference organizers, journal editors and grant administrators. A general setup of the review assignment problem involves assigning a set of reviewers on a committee to a set of documents to be reviewed under the constraint of review quota so that the reviewers assigned to a document can collectively cover multiple topic aspects of the document. No previous work has addressed such a setup of committee review assignments while also considering matching multiple aspects of topics and expertise. In this paper, we tackle the problem of committee review assignment with multi-aspect expertise matching by casting it as an integer linear programming problem. The proposed algorithm can naturally accommodate any probabilistic or deterministic method for modeling multiple aspects to automate committee review assignments. Evaluation using a multi-aspect review assignment test set constructed using ACM SIGIR publications shows that the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient for committee review assignments based on multi-aspect expertise matching. PMID:22711970

  4. Payment of research participants: current practice and policies of Irish research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Eric; King, Romaine; Mohan, Helen M; Gavin, Blanaid; McNicholas, Fiona

    2013-09-01

    Payment of research participants helps to increase recruitment for research studies, but can pose ethical dilemmas. Research ethics committees (RECs) have a centrally important role in guiding this practice, but standardisation of the ethical approval process in Ireland is lacking. Our aim was to examine REC policies, experiences and concerns with respect to the payment of participants in research projects in Ireland. Postal survey of all RECs in Ireland. Response rate was 62.5% (n=50). 80% of RECs reported not to have any established policy on the payment of research subjects while 20% had refused ethics approval to studies because the investigators proposed to pay research participants. The most commonly cited concerns were the potential for inducement and undermining of voluntary consent. There is considerable variability among RECs on the payment of research participants and a lack of clear consensus guidelines on the subject. The development of standardised guidelines on the payment of research subjects may enhance recruitment of research participants.

  5. Ethics review of studies during public health emergencies - the experience of the WHO ethics review committee during the Ebola virus disease epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirol, Emilie; Kuesel, Annette C; Guraiib, Maria Magdalena; de la Fuente-Núñez, Vânia; Saxena, Abha; Gomes, Melba F

    2017-06-26

    Between 2013 and 2016, West Africa experienced the largest ever outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease. In the absence of registered treatments or vaccines to control this lethal disease, the World Health Organization coordinated and supported research to expedite identification of interventions that could control the outbreak and improve future control efforts. Consequently, the World Health Organization Research Ethics Review Committee (WHO-ERC) was heavily involved in reviews and ethics discussions. It reviewed 24 new and 22 amended protocols for research studies including interventional (drug, vaccine) and observational studies. WHO-ERC provided the reviews within on average 6 working days. The WHO-ERC often could not provide immediate approval of protocols for reasons which were not Ebola Virus Disease specific but related to protocol inconsistencies, missing information and complex informed consents. WHO-ERC considerations on Ebola Virus Disease specific issues (benefit-risk assessment, study design, exclusion of pregnant women and children from interventional studies, data and sample sharing, collaborative partnerships including international and local researchers and communities, community engagement and participant information) are presented. To accelerate study approval in future public health emergencies, we recommend: (1) internally consistent and complete submissions with information documents in language participants are likely to understand, (2) close collaboration between local and international researchers from research inception, (3) generation of template agreements for data and sample sharing and use during the ongoing global consultations on bio-banks, (4) formation of Joint Scientific Advisory and Data Safety Review Committees for all studies linked to a particular intervention or group of interventions, (5) formation of a Joint Ethics Review Committee with representatives of the Ethics Committees of all institutions and countries involved to

  6. [Responsibilities of ethics committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bergmann, K

    2000-05-01

    Increasing numbers of clinical research projects are submitted to ethical committees (institutional review boards) for approval. New therapeutic developments have to be evaluated by these committees to protect patients/volunteers. Thus, the responsibility of ethical committees is increasing. The "Nürnberger Kodex" and the "Declaration of Helsinki" are the background for these evaluations. According to the German drug law the physician is obligated by law to submit the protocol to such a committee. In addition, local state physician authorities require such a procedure. Important considerations during the review process besides ethical aspects are the informed consent, which should be written in an understandable form, and the obligations of the insurance.

  7. The Efforts of the American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee to Use NASA Research in Education and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Dusenbery, P.; Gross, N. A.; Johnson, R.; Lopez, R. E.; Lysak, R. L.; Moldwin, M.; Morrow, C. A.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Reiff, P. H.; Scherrer, D. K.; Thieman, J.; Wawro, M.; Wood, E. L.

    2017-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union Space Physics and Aeronomy Section Education and Public Outreach Committee (AGU SPA-EPO Committee) was established in 1990 to foster the growth of a culture of outreach and community engagement within the SPA Section of the AGU. The SPA was the first AGU Section to establish an EPO Committee. The Committee has initiated several key Section EPO programs that have grown to become Union programs. NASA sponsored research is central to the mission of the SPE-EPO. Programs highlighting NASA research include the Student Paper Competition, Exploration Station, a precursor to the GIFT workshops, the Student mixer, and more. The Committee played a key role in coordinating the AGU's outreach activities relating to the International Heliophysical Year in 2007-2008. This paper will review the triumphs, the failures, and the lessons learned about recruiting colleagues to join with us from the last quarter century of effort.

  8. Decisions by Finnish Medical Research Ethics Committees: A Nationwide Study of Process and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina; Virtanen, Jorma I; Regushevskaya, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Review by research ethics committees (RECs) is the key in medical research regulation. Data from meeting notes and project summaries were abstracted from all projects submitted in 2002 (n = 1,004) and 2007 (n = 1,045) to the official medical RECs in Finland. Data from consecutive submissions were combined per project. When comparing RECs, logistic regression was used to adjust for application characteristics. The number of projects handled varied notably by REC. In the first handling, 85% of applications in 2002 and 77% in 2007 were approved, while 13% and 20% were tabled. For 61% of the projects, the review time was 89 days, and 6% had 6 months or longer. The variation by REC in approval rates, number of handlings, or long review times was not explained by project characteristics. In the last handling, 94% of the projects in both years were approved or concluded not to need a statement from that REC. The most common reason for tabling or not approving an application was patient autonomy, usually centered on the patient leaflet. The next most common reasons were requests for further information and dissatisfaction with the scientific aspects of the project. The reasons classified as "ethics" in the narrow sense were rare. The REC focus was to assure that researchers follow the various rules on medical research and to improve the quality of research and project documents. REC considerations could be divided into decisions based on ethics and recommendations covering other aspects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. A cross-sectional survey to investigate community understanding of medical research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschi, Lin; Kelsall, Helen L; Loff, Bebe; Slegers, Claudia; Zion, Deborah; Glass, Deborah C

    2015-07-01

    Study explanatory forms often state that an ethics committee has approved a research project. To determine whether the lay community understand the roles of ethics committees in research, we took a cross-sectional national sample from three sampling frames: the general population (n=1532); cohort study participants (n=397); and case-control study participants (n=151). About half (51.3%) of the participants had heard of ethics committees. Those who had were more likely to be those who had participated in previous surveys, older participants, those born in Australia and those with higher education. Almost all participants agreed that the roles of an ethics committee were to protect participants' privacy and ensure no harm came to study participants and most agreed that the committee's role was to ensure that the research was capable of providing answers. Case-control and cohort participants were more likely than the general population to consider that the role of an ethics committee was to design the research and obtain research funding. Overall, we found that about half of the population are aware of ethics committees and that most could correctly identify that ethics committees are there to protect the welfare and rights of research participants, although a substantial minority had some incorrect beliefs about the committees' roles. Increased education, particularly for migrants and older people, might improve understanding of the role of ethics committees in research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. 75 FR 9616 - Committee Management Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee Management Renewals The NSF management officials having... follows consultation with the Committee Management Secretariat, General Services Administration... Industrial Innovations and Partnerships, 28164. Proposal Review Panel for Emerging Frontiers in Research and...

  11. 77 FR 12086 - Committee Management Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee Management Renewals The NSF management officials having... follows consultation with the Committee Management Secretariat, General Services Administration... Industrial Innovations and Partnerships, 28164 Proposal Review Panel for Emerging Frontiers in Research and...

  12. Review of spheromak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarboe, T.R.

    1994-01-01

    Spheromak research from 1979 to the present is reviewed including over 160 references. Emphasis is on understanding and interpretation of results. In addition to summarizing results some new interpretations are presented. An introduction and brief history is followed by a discussion of generalized helicity and its time derivative. Formation and sustainment are discussed including five different methods, flux core, θ-pinch z-pinch, coaxial source, conical θ-pinch, and kinked z-pinch. All methods are helicity injections. Steady-state methods and rules for designing spheromak experiments are covered, followed by equilibrium and stability. Methods of stabilizing the tilt and shift modes are discussed as well as their impact on the reactor designs. Current-driven and pressure-driven instabilities as well as relaxation in general are covered. Energy confinement is discussed in terms of helicity decay time and βs limits. The confinement in high and low open-flux geometries are compared and the reactor implications discussed. (author)

  13. "The Project Cannot Be Approved in Its Current Form": Feminist Visual Research Meets the Human Research Ethics Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    This article reflects on a university human research ethics committee's unease regarding a feminist visual pilot study within the field of education. The small exploratory study proposed to explore a migrant mother's production of her son's identity through her family photograph collection. The committee requested substantial…

  14. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and policy coordination - first annual report, June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the first annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, by Dr. George A. Keyworth, II, Science Advisor to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). CIRRPC replaced the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET). Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy

  15. Research Ethics Committees and Participatory Action Research With Young People: The Politics of Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanar, Zeynep M; Fazli, Mehria; Rahman, Jahanara; Farthing, Rys

    2016-04-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) is a methodological approach that seeks to maximize the participation of people whose lives it researches. It is underpinned by an ethical concern to research "with" people, rather than "on" people. However, this ethical approach to research is often, paradoxically, problematized by universities' research ethics committees (RECs). This article explores one site of tension between PAR and RECs-the requirement for anonymity for below 18-year-olds. It explores this tension by exploring a case study of a peer-to-peer research project undertaken by young women in East London, and using our own experiences and perspectives, it argues that anonymity can be unjust, disempowering, and unnecessary, and can reduce "pride." Without wanting to develop specific recommendations, given the limited scope of our case study, this article uses firsthand experiences to add weight to the broader discussions calling for a critical rethink of REC guidelines. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. 77 FR 47047 - Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Committee Act (Public Law No. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires that agencies publish these notices in the.... ADDRESSES: Renaissance DuPont Hotel, 1143 New Hampshire Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20037. FOR FURTHER...: In keeping with procedures, members of the public are welcome to observe the business of the Biomass...

  17. Ethics Review Committee approval and informed consent: an analysis of biomedical publications originating from Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwardhana Chesmal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International guidelines on research have focused on protecting research participants. Ethical Research Committee (ERC approval and informed consent are the cornerstones. Externally sponsored research requires approval through ethical review in both the host and the sponsoring country. This study aimed to determine to what extent ERC approval and informed consent procedures are documented in locally and internationally published human subject research carried out in Sri Lanka. Methods We obtained ERC approval in Sri Lanka and the United Kingdom. Theses from 1985 to 2005 available at the Postgraduate Institute of Medicine (PGIM library affiliated to the University of Colombo were scrutinised using checklists agreed in consultation with senior research collaborators. A Medline search was carried out with MeSH major and minor heading 'Sri Lanka' as the search term for international publications originating in Sri Lanka during 1999 to 2004. All research publications from CMJ during 1999 to 2005 were also scrutinized. Results Of 291 theses, 34% documented ERC approvals and 61% documented obtaining consent. From the international journal survey, 250 publications originated from Sri Lanka of which only 79 full text original research publications could be accessed electronically. Of these 38% documented ERC approval and 39% documented obtaining consent. In the Ceylon Medical Journal 36% documented ERC approval and 37% documented obtaining consent. Conclusion Only one third of the publications scrutinized recorded ERC approval and procurement of informed consent. However, there is a positive trend in documenting these ethical requirements in local postgraduate research and in the local medical journal.

  18. External evaluation on Monju Core Confirmation Test in FY 2010 (the Technical Committee on Monju Research Utilization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    This report describes the review made by the 'Technical Committee on Monju Research Utilization' on the results of Core Confirmation Test conducted from May to July in 2010. The committee consists of technical specialists in the relevant engineering domains from various Japanese industries and universities. The Committee was convened twice in 2010, in August and December, where the each item of the Core Confirmation Test was explained by individual personnel in charge, and the outline and the detailed analysis were discussed, respectively. Evaluations were made by the Committee after the questions and answers. Main points of the evaluations are listed below: After the 14 year stand-by, the Core Confirmation Test has been successfully completed within a brief duration of 3 months, with provision of precious technical data for future development and commercialization of FBRs. Safety has been confirmed and valuable data for analysis code validation have been acquired on an FBR core containing 1.5%wt of Am-241. It is significant that the newly released nuclear data library, JENDL-4.0 has been validated based on studies of capture cross section of Am-241 and of fission cross section of Pu-239. Finally, the chief examiner of the Committee stated his expectation for advancement of Japanese FBR technologies with the JAEA's leadership based of achievements on Monju, to be reflected on subsequent FBR developments. (author)

  19. Overall Assessment of Human Research and Ethics Committees in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrahman, Mahera; Nair, Satish Chandrasekhar

    2017-04-01

    Growing demand for human health research in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has prompted the need to develop a robust research ethics oversight. Examination of the structure, function, and practices of the human research ethics committees (HRECs), followed by evaluation of standards for measuring research output, was conducted. Results indicate that among the HRECs, 90% followed International Council for Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice guidelines, 66.6% have been in operation for more than 5 years, 95% reviewed proposals within 8 weeks, and 56% reviewed for scientific merit apart from ethics. However, systems to recognize accomplishments of researchers, funding transparency, and adverse event reporting were deployed in less than 30% of all HRECs. Research was incorporated into the vision and mission statements of many (65%) organizations. Research publications, collaborations, and recognitions were used to measure research output and report key performance indicators. In spite, resources to generate research output such as dedicated budget (20%), support staff (20%), and continuous training and mentoring program for medical residents (15%) and HREC members (25%) were somehow lacking. HREC structure and operations in the UAE are similar to other regions of the world. Systems to conduct research and report outcomes are defined in the UAE. Regulatory legislation and allocation of resources to support the clinical research enterprise will not only help to meet growing demand for clinical trials but also transform the quality of patient care in the UAE. It is anticipated that the results of this study will benefit investigators, regulators, pharmaceutical sponsors, and the policy makers in the region.

  20. 34 CFR 350.34 - Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must... Engineering Research Centers Does the Secretary Assist? § 350.34 Which Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers must have an advisory committee? A Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center conducting research...

  1. 77 FR 40622 - Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (MSHRAC, NIOSH..., oxygen supply partnership, safety culture, occupational health and safety management systems, preventing...

  2. From "a Fair Game" to "a Form of Covert Research": Research Ethics Committee Members' Differing Notions of Consent and Potential Risk to Participants Within Social Media Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbin, R A; Samuel, G; Derrick, G E

    2018-04-01

    Social media (SM) research presents new challenges for research ethics committees (RECs) who must balance familiar ethical principles with new notions of public availability. This article qualitatively examines how U.K. REC members view this balance in terms of risk and consent. While it found significant variance overall, there were discernible experience-based trends. REC members with less experience of reviewing SM held inflexible notions of consent and risk that could be categorized as either relying on traditional notions of requiring direct consent, or viewing publicly available data as "fair game." More experienced REC members took a more nuanced approach to data use and consent. We conclude that the more nuanced approach should be best practice during ethical review of SM research.

  3. [Institutional ethics committees in Mexico: the ambiguous boundary between health care ethics and research ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Martínez, Edith; Lifshitz-Guinzberg, Alberto; Medesigo-Micete, José; Bedolla, Miguel

    2008-08-01

    To identify ethics committees in medical practice in Mexico and possible implications stemming from their composition and functions. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from January-December 2005. A survey was sent by e-mail to the hospitals and family medicine centers with at 10 practices within the Mexican Institute for Social Security (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social) (n=437) and the Institute for Security and Social Services for State Employees (Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado) (n=167) and to the Mexican Ministry of Health's most important health care centers (n=15). The following items were analyzed: name of the committee, date of formation, current status, composition, functions, and level of authority. In all, 116 committees were identified, with various names. Of these, 101 (87.1%) were active. The committees were formed from 1985-2006, with a spike occurring in 2004-2005. Of the active committees, 59 (58.4%) were charged with ethical problems/dilemmas related to clinical practice as well as those related to research projects. Of the committee members, 357 (59.0%) held managing positions in the establishment to which the committee pertained; most were medical professionals (71.5%), followed by nursing staff (11.9%). Among the members of the active committees, 77.9% had not received training in ethics. Legal conflicts can be expected, mainly within the organizations whose committees have the authority to determine a course of action. An integrated plan is needed that will set standards for the composition and proceedings of Mexico's ethics committees and the improved training of committee members.

  4. Massage Therapy Research Review

    OpenAIRE

    Field, Tiffany

    2014-01-01

    Moderate pressure massage has contributed to many positive effects including increased weight gain in preterm infants, reduced pain in different syndromes including fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis, enhanced attentiveness, reduced depression and enhanced immune function (increased natural killer cells and natural killer cell activity). Surprisingly, these recent studies have not been reviewed, highlighting the need for the current review. When moderate and light pressure massage have bee...

  5. Activities of the research committee on thorium cycle in atomic energy society of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohki, Shiro

    1985-01-01

    In 1978 the Research Committee on Thorium Cycle was established as one of committees of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and the Committee published a report titled 'The Thorium Cycle - Present Status and Future Prospect' in October 1980 as a result of investigations on the status of the thoirum cycle in Japan as well as that in overseas. Based on this investigation, the Committee is intending to evaluate synthetically the thorium utilization in Japan under the prospect for the middle and long term by intensifying the activities of the Committee. Furthermore, from this viewpoint, the author supplements comments on following three points: (1) Reasons why the thorium utilization has not received positive evaluation in Japan; (2) Reasons why Japan has to pay attention to thorium; (3) How the technology on thorium should be developed in Japan. (author)

  6. 76 FR 12315 - Committees on Collaborative Governance, Regulation, Rulemaking, Judicial Review, and Adjudication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... (including information about remote access and obtaining special accommodations for persons with disabilities), and how to submit comments to the committee can be found in the ``Research'' section of the ACUS Web...

  7. 76 FR 18144 - Committees on Administration & Management, Collaborative Governance, and Judicial Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... accommodations for persons with disabilities), and how to submit comments to the committee can be found in the ``Research'' section of the ACUS Web site, at http://www.acus.gov . Comments may be submitted by e-mail to...

  8. Protecting vulnerable research participants: a Foucault-inspired analysis of ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juritzen, Truls I; Grimen, Harald; Heggen, Kristin

    2011-09-01

    History has demonstrated the necessity of protecting research participants. Research ethics are based on a concept of asymmetry of power, viewing the researcher as powerful and potentially dangerous and establishing ethics committees as external agencies in the field of research. We argue in favour of expanding this perspective on relationships of power to encompass the ethics committees as one among several actors that exert power and that act in a relational interplay with researchers and participants. We employ Michel Foucault's ideas of power as an omnipresent force which is dynamic and unstable, as well as the notion that knowledge and power are inextricably intertwined. The article discusses how research ethics committees may affect academic freedom. In addition it is pointed out that research participants could be harmed - not only by unfortunate research practices, but also by being subjected to the protective efforts of ethics monitoring bodies.

  9. Health Research Ethics Committees in South Africa 12 years into democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myer Landon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the growth of biomedical research in South Africa, there are few insights into the operation of Research Ethics Committees (RECs in this setting. We investigated the composition, operations and training needs of health RECs in South Africa against the backdrop of national and international guidelines. Methods The 12 major health RECs in South Africa were surveyed using semi-structured questionnaires that investigated the composition and functions of each REC as well as the operational issues facing committees. Results Health RECs in SA have an average of 16 members and REC members are predominantly male and white. Overall, there was a large discrepancy in findings between under-resourced RECs and well resourced RECs. The majority of members (56% are scientists or clinicians who are typically affiliated to the same institution as the health REC. Community representatives account for only 8% of membership. Training needs for health REC members varied widely. Conclusion Most major health RECs in South Africa are well organized given the resource constraints that exist in relation to research ethics in developing countries. However, the gender, racial and occupational diversity of most of these RECs is suboptimal, and most RECs are not constituted in accordance with South African guidelines. Variability in the operations and training needs of RECs is a reflection of apartheid-entrenched influences in tertiary education in SA. While legislation now exists to enforce standardization of research ethics review systems, no provision has been made for resources or capacity development, especially to support historically-disadvantaged institutions. Perpetuation of this legacy of apartheid represents a violation of the principles of justice and equity.

  10. 78 FR 48200 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... Research and Education, 9487. Dates: September 11, 2013, 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., and September 12, 2013, 9:00... research and education. Agenda September 11, 2013 Update on NSF environmental research and education...

  11. Archives: African Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 48 of 48 ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News. OTHER RESOURCES... for Researchers · for Journals · for Authors · for Policy Makers · about Open Access ...

  12. An evaluation of a data linkage training workshop for research ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kate M; Flack, Felicity S; Bear, Natasha L; Allen, Judy A

    2015-03-04

    In Australia research projects proposing the use of linked data require approval by a Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC). A sound evaluation of the ethical issues involved requires understanding of the basic mechanics of data linkage, the associated benefits and risks, and the legal context in which it occurs. The rapidly increasing number of research projects utilising linked data in Australia has led to an urgent need for enhanced capacity of HRECs to review research applications involving this emerging research methodology. The training described in this article was designed to respond to an identified need among the data linkage units in the Australian Population Health Research Network (PHRN) and HREC members in Australia. Five one-day face to face workshops were delivered in the study period to a total of 98 participants. Participants in the workshops represented all six categories of HREC membership composition listed in the National Health and Medical Research Centres' (NHMRC) National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research. Participants were assessed at three time points, prior to the training (T1), immediately after the training (T2) and 8 to 17 months after the training (T3). Ninety participants completed the pre and post questionnaires; 58 of them completed the deferred questionnaire. Participants reported significant improvements in levels of knowledge, understanding and skills in each of the eight areas evaluated. The training was beneficial for those with prior experience in the area of ethics and data linkage as well as those with no prior exposure. Our preliminary work in this area demonstrates that the provision of intensive face to face ethics training in data linkage is feasible and has a significant impact on participant's confidence in reviewing HREC applications.

  13. African Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    Department of Management and Accounting, .... structure, risk management and financial performance of banks still provide no agreement on ... Kern (2004) researched on UK banks and reported that principal-agents problem, which is a.

  14. Reuse of samples: ethical issues encountered by two institutional ethics review committees in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langat, Simon K

    2005-10-01

    There is growing concern about the reuse and exploitation of biological materials (human tissues) for use in research worldwide. Most discussions about samples have taken place in developed countries, where genetic manipulation techniques have greatly advanced in recent years. There is very little discussion in developing countries, although collaborative research with institutions from developed countries is on the increase. The study sought to identify and describe ethical issues arising in the storage, reuse and exportation of samples in a developing country. Research protocols presented to two Ethics Review Committees in Kenya during a period of two years were reviewed. A record was made of the protocol title, sample collected, request for storage, reuse or exportation and whether or not subject consent was sought. The findings indicated that about 25% out of the 388 protocols sought permission for reuse and only half of those actually informed subjects of the contemplated re-use. Less than 20% requested storage and again, about half of them sought consent from subjects. There is an indication that investigators do not see the need to seek consent for storage, reuse and exportation of samples. It is proposed that these issues should be addressed through policy interventions at both the national and global levels.

  15. Report of the Committee to review safeguards requirements at power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    In October 1982, NRC's Executive Director for Operations appointed a five-member Committee to review NRC security requirements at nuclear power plants with a view toward evaluating the impact of these requirements on operational safety. During visits to five power reactor sites and more than a dozen days of meetings over a period of four months, the Committee observed plant operating conditions and obtained views from abut 100 persons representing 16 nuclear utilities and industry organizations. They also interviewed about 40 NRC employees, including Resident Inspectors, and members of the Regional and Headquarters staffs. Overall, the Committee did not identify any clear operational safety problems associated with implementation of the NRC's security requirements. However, they did find that the potential existed, to varying degrees, at licensed facilities. The Committee's report, dated February 28, 1983, contains five basic findings and a number of associated recommendations intended to minimize the potential impact of security on safety

  16. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC's history structure, and operations; CIRRPC's most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies

  17. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC`s history structure, and operations; CIRRPC`s most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies.

  18. 75 FR 9001 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... Research and Education (9487). Dates: March 18, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. March 19, 2010, 8:30 a.m.-1 p.m... support for environmental research and education. Agenda March 18, 2010 Update on recent NSF environmental...

  19. 77 FR 50532 - Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education; Notice of... Environmental Research and Education, 9487. Dates: September 12, 2012, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. September 13, 2012, 9 a.m... concerning support for environmental research and education. Agenda September 12, 2012 Update on NSF...

  20. Whose Ethics, Whose Accountability? A Debate about University Research Ethics Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoecht, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Research ethics approval procedures and research ethics committees (RECs) are now well-established in most Western Universities. RECs base their judgements on an ethics code that has been developed by the health and biomedical sciences research community and that is widely considered to be universally valid regardless of discipline. On the other…

  1. 75 FR 12554 - Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (MSHRAC, NIOSH... priorities in mine safety and health research, including grants and contracts for such research, 30 U.S.C...

  2. Familiar ethical issues amplified: how members of research ethics committees describe ethical distinctions between disaster and non-disaster research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Catherine M; Anderson, James; Boulanger, Renaud F; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Schwartz, Lisa; Hunt, Matthew

    2017-06-28

    The conduct of research in settings affected by disasters such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes is challenging, particularly when infrastructures and resources were already limited pre-disaster. However, since post-disaster research is essential to the improvement of the humanitarian response, it is important that adequate research ethics oversight be available. We aim to answer the following questions: 1) what do research ethics committee (REC) members who have reviewed research protocols to be conducted following disasters in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) perceive as the key ethical concerns associated with disaster research?, and 2) in what ways do REC members understand these concerns to be distinct from those arising in research conducted in non-crisis situations? This qualitative study was developed using interpretative description methodology; 15 interviews were conducted with REC members. Four key ethical issues were identified as presenting distinctive considerations for disaster research to be implemented in LMICs, and were described by participants as familiar research ethics issues that were amplified in these contexts. First, REC members viewed disaster research as having strong social value due to its potential for improving disaster response, but also as requiring a higher level of justification compared to other research settings. Second, they identified vulnerability as an overarching concern for disaster research ethics, and a feature that required careful and critical appraisal when assessing protocols. They noted that research participants' vulnerabilities frequently change in the aftermath of a disaster and often in unpredictable ways. Third, they identified concerns related to promoting and maintaining safety, confidentiality and data security in insecure or austere environments. Lastly, though REC members endorsed the need and usefulness of community engagement, they noted that there are significant challenges in a disaster

  3. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination 10th anniversary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    Ten years ago, on April 9, 1984, the Science Advisor to the President, and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, established the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) to meet the need for an interagency committee to address Congressionally mandated and agency-identified issues related to radiation research and policy. CIRRPC replaced the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy, a committee of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology, and assumed the responsibilities of the Interagency Radiation Research Committee and the Radiation Policy Council, whose charters had expired. Since then, CIRRPC has been recognized as an effective and respected mechanism for coordinating radiation policy among Federal agencies and as an efficient coordinator and evaluator of Federal efforts on designated radiation research projects. In the last 10 years, CIRRPC has established various Policy and Science Subpanels to undertake the oftentimes difficult task of resolving and coordinating agency policies and responses to issues dealing with radiation. These subpanels addressed such issues as the metrication of radiation units, the policy impact of the radioepidemiological tables, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials, radon protection and health effects, predisaster planning for human health effects research, and ionizing radiation risk assessment. These subpanels and their work represent CIRRPC's continuing effort to seek a common position on issues of national significance and interest

  4. Can UK NHS research ethics committees effectively monitor publication and outcome reporting bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rasheda; Kolstoe, Simon

    2015-07-25

    Publication and outcome reporting bias is often caused by researchers selectively choosing which scientific results and outcomes to publish. This behaviour is ethically significant as it distorts the literature used for future scientific or clinical decision-making. This study investigates the practicalities of using ethics applications submitted to a UK National Health Service (NHS) research ethics committee to monitor both types of reporting bias. As part of an internal audit we accessed research ethics database records for studies submitting an end of study declaration to the Hampshire A research ethics committee (formerly Southampton A) between 1st January 2010 and 31st December 2011. A literature search was used to establish the publication status of studies. Primary and secondary outcomes stated in application forms were compared with outcomes reported in publications. Out of 116 studies the literature search identified 57 publications for 37 studies giving a publication rate of 32%. Original Research Ethics Committee (REC) applications could be obtained for 28 of the published studies. Outcome inconsistencies were found in 16 (57%) of the published studies. This study showed that the problem of publication and outcome reporting bias is still significant in the UK. The method described here demonstrates that UK NHS research ethics committees are in a good position to detect such bias due to their unique access to original research protocols. Data gathered in this way could be used by the Health Research Authority to encourage higher levels of transparency in UK research.

  5. Specialist committee's review reports for experimental fast reactor JOYO' MK-III performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kiyonobu; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    Performance tests (startup-physics tests and power elevation tests) were planed for experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' MK-III where irradiation performances were upgraded by power increase from 100 to 140 MW. The reactor safety committee of O-arai Engineering Center has established a specialist committee for 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests at the first meeting of 2003 on 23th. April 2003, to accomplish the tests successfully. Subjects of the specialist committee were reviews of following items covering a wide range. 1) Contents of modification works. 2) Reflections of functional test results to the plant and facilities. 3) Reflections of safety rule modification to instruction and manual for operation. 4) Quality assurances and pre-calculation for performance test. 5) Inspection plan and its results. 6) Adequacy of performance test plan. 7) Confirmation of performance test results. Before test-starts, the specialist committee has confirmed by reviewing the items from 1) to 6) based on explanations and documents of the Division of Experimental Reactor, that the test plan and pre-inspections are adequate. After the tests, the specialist committee had confirmed by reviewing the item 7) in the same way, that the each test result satisfies the corresponding criterion. The specialist committee has concluded from these review's results before and after the tests that the 'JOYO' MK-III Performance Tests were carried out appropriately. Besides, the first criticality of the JOYO MK-III was achieved on 2nd. July 2003, and the continuous full power operation was carried on 20th. Nov. 2003. Finally, all performance tests were completed by the pass of the last governmental pre-serviced inspection (dose rate measurement during the shut down condition). (author)

  6. 78 FR 37242 - Draft Report and Recommendations Prepared by the Research Committee of the Scientific Working...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    ... Recommendations Prepared by the Research Committee of the Scientific Working Group on Medicolegal Death... Justice Programs, National Institute of Justice, Scientific Working Group for Medicolegal Death Investigation will make available to the general public a document entitled, ``Research in Forensic Pathology...

  7. 78 FR 40743 - Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mine Safety and Health Research Advisory Committee, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (MSHRAC, NIOSH... Director, NIOSH, on priorities in mine safety and health research, including grants and contracts for such...

  8. 77 FR 74875 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee Findings Related to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... to convene the parties to a dispute relating to the identity and return of cultural items, and to... American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee Findings Related to the Identity and Return of Cultural Items in the Possession of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology...

  9. 42 CFR 50.405 - What is the structure of review committees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the structure of review committees? 50.405 Section 50.405 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Public Health Service Grant Appeals Procedure § 50.405 What is the...

  10. Extra-Judicial Complaints Review: First Experiences of the Dutch Public Procurement Experts Committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, C.E.C.; Janssen, J.G.J.; Muntz-Beekhuis, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Article 4.27 of the Dutch Public Procurement Act 2012 (‘Aanbestedingswet’) provides for a statutory basis for extra-judicial public procurement complaints review by an independent body: The Public Procurement Experts Committee (‘Commissie van Aanbestedingsexperts’), hereinafter referred to as: ‘the

  11. Co-design and implementation research: challenges and solutions for ethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Jackson, Claire; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2015-11-16

    Implementation science research, especially when using participatory and co-design approaches, raises unique challenges for research ethics committees. Such challenges may be poorly addressed by approval and governance mechanisms that were developed for more traditional research approaches such as randomised controlled trials. Implementation science commonly involves the partnership of researchers and stakeholders, attempting to understand and encourage uptake of completed or piloted research. A co-creation approach involves collaboration between researchers and end users from the onset, in question framing, research design and delivery, and influencing strategy, with implementation and broader dissemination strategies part of its design from gestation. A defining feature of co-creation is its emergent and adaptive nature, making detailed pre-specification of interventions and outcome measures impossible. This methodology sits oddly with ethics committee protocols that require precise pre-definition of interventions, mode of delivery, outcome measurements, and the role of study participants. But the strict (and, some would say, inflexible) requirements of ethics committees were developed for a purpose - to protect participants from harm and help ensure the rigour and transparency of studies. We propose some guiding principles to help square this circle. First, ethics committees should acknowledge and celebrate the diversity of research approaches, both formally (through training) and informally (by promoting debate and discussion); without active support, their members may not understand or value participatory designs. Second, ground rules should be established for co-design applications (e.g. how to judge when 'consultation' or 'engagement' becomes research) and communicated to committee members and stakeholders. Third, the benefits of power-sharing should be recognised and credit given to measures likely to support this important goal, especially in research with

  12. Report of the summative evaluation by the advisory committee on research and development of nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Research Evaluation Committee of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) set up an advisory Committee on Research and Development of Nuclear Energy Technology in accordance with the 'Fundamental Guideline for the Evaluation of Research and Development (R and D) at JAERI' and its subsidiary regulations. The Advisory Committee on Research and Development of Nuclear Energy Technology evaluated the adequacy of the plans of safety research to be succeeded from JAERI to a new research institute which will be established by integration of JAERI and the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The Advisory Committee consisted of nine specialists from outside the JAERI conducted its activities from July 2004 to August 2004. The evaluation was performed on the basis of the materials submitted in advance and of the oral presentations made at the Advisory Committee meeting which was held on August 10, 2004, in line with the items, viewpoints, and criteria for the evaluation specified by the Research Evaluation Committee. The result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee was submitted to the Research Evaluation Committee, and was judged to be appropriate at its meeting held on December 1, 2004. This report describes the result of the evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Research and Development on Nuclear Energy Technology. (author)

  13. 76 FR 8357 - Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ..., 2011, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. ADDRESSES: Omni Shoreham Hotel, 2500 Calvert Street, NW., Washington, DC 20008... Response Joint Genome Institute Update and ARM review outbrief 2012 Budget briefing New Business Public...

  14. Phronesis: Beyond the Research Ethics Committee-A Crucial Decision-Making Skill for Health Researchers During Community Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeff, Minrie; Rennie, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Health researchers conducting research in the community are often faced with unanticipated ethical issues that arise in the course of their research and that go beyond the scope of ethical approval by the research ethics committee. Eight expert researchers were selected through extreme intensity purposive sampling, because they are representative of unusual manifestations of the phenomenon related to their research in the community. They were selected to take part in a semi-structured focus group discussion on whether practical wisdom (phronesis) is used as a decision-making skill to solve unanticipated ethical issues during research in the community. Although the researchers were not familiar with the concept phronesis, it became obvious that it formed an integral part of their everyday existence and decision making during intervention research. They could balance research ethics with practical considerations. The capacity of practical wisdom as a crucial decision-making skill should be assimilated into a researcher's everyday reality, and also into the process of mentoring young researchers to become phronimos. Researchers should be taught this skill to handle unanticipated ethical issues. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Evaluation of the work of hospital districts' research ethics committees in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halila, Ritva

    2014-12-01

    The main task of research ethics committees (RECs) is to assess research studies before their start. In this study, 24 RECs that evaluate medical research were sent questionnaires about their structure and functions. The RECs were divided into two separate groups: those working in university hospital districts (uRECs) and those in central hospital districts (non-uRECs). The two groups were different in many respects: the uRECs were bigger in size, covered a wider range of disciplines (both medical and non-medical), had better resources and more frequent and regular meetings. After the survey was performed and analysed, the Medical Research Act was amended so that only hospital districts with a medical faculty in their region had a duty to establish ethics committees. After the amendment, the number of RECs evaluating medical research in Finland decreased from 25 to 9. The ethics committees that remained had wider expertise and were better equipped already by the time of this survey. Only one non-uREC was continuing its work, and this was being done under the governance of a university hospital district. Simple measures were used for qualitative analysis of the work of RECs that evaluate medical research. These showed differences between RECs. This may be helpful in establishing an ethics committee network in a research field or administrational area. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. A National Research Agenda for Virtual Reality: Report by the National Research Council Committee on VR R&D

    OpenAIRE

    Pausch, Randy; Aviles, Walter; Durlach, Nathaniel; Robinett, Warren; Zyda, Michael

    1995-01-01

    In 1992, at the request of a consortium of federal agencies, the National Research Council established a committee to "recommand a national research and development agenda in the area of virtual reality" to set U.S. government R&D funding priorities for virtual reality (VR) for the next decade....

  17. [The role of bioethics committees in the systems protecting scientific biomedical research participants in France and in Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarkowski, Marek; Sieczych, Alicja

    2013-08-01

    Bioethics committees are along with ethic regulations and rules of law one of three main pillars in the system of protection of scientific biomedical research participants. Although principal directives for bioethics committees are established by international guidelines, detailed regulations may differ in particular states. The aim of this article was to compare two bioethic committees systems: French and Polish one. Historical beginnings of the bioethics committees system in France and in Poland are briefly mentioned, Subsequently, the networks of bioethics committees in both countries are compared. Although the number of bioethics committees (Research Ethic Committees) in both countries is comparable, the procedure of their establishment varies. French committees are based on administrative division of the country and divide on regional and interregional committees. In Poland, bioethics committees are established by medical universities, medical research and development units or regional chambers of physicians and dentists. In France there is no equivalent of Appeal Bioethics Committee, however one could appeal from the negative bioethics committee's opinion. The composition of French bioethics committees is more diverse and half of the members are not related to medical professions. Members of French committees are named on indefinite term by headmaster of Regional Health Agency after having been chosen in competition for the post. In Poland members are called on three-year-term but the rotation of members is not overwhelming since there is no limit of terms for one member. French legal solutions seems more secure for scientific bioethics research participants. For this reason, a detailed research on legislation in other countries is necessary before introducing any new regulations in Polish law.

  18. Institutional ethical review and ethnographic research involving injection drug users: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Will; Maher, Lisa; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ethnographic research among people who inject drugs (PWID) involves complex ethical issues. While ethical review frameworks have been critiqued by social scientists, there is a lack of social science research examining institutional ethical review processes, particularly in relation to ethnographic work. This case study describes the institutional ethical review of an ethnographic research project using observational fieldwork and in-depth interviews to examine injection drug use. The review process and the salient concerns of the review committee are recounted, and the investigators' responses to the committee's concerns and requests are described to illustrate how key issues were resolved. The review committee expressed concerns regarding researcher safety when conducting fieldwork, and the investigators were asked to liaise with the police regarding the proposed research. An ongoing dialogue with the institutional review committee regarding researcher safety and autonomy from police involvement, as well as formal consultation with a local drug user group and solicitation of opinions from external experts, helped to resolve these issues. This case study suggests that ethical review processes can be particularly challenging for ethnographic projects focused on illegal behaviours, and that while some challenges could be mediated by modifying existing ethical review procedures, there is a need for legislation that provides legal protection of research data and participant confidentiality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation in health promotion: thoughts from inside a human research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Judy; Flack, Felicity

    2015-12-01

    Health promotion research, quality improvement and evaluation are all activities that raise ethical issues. In this paper, the Chair and a member of human resear ch ethics committees provide an insiders' point of view on how to demonstrate ethical conduct in health promotion research and quality improvement. Several common issues raised by health promotion research and evaluation are discussed including researcher integrity, conflicts of interest, use of information, consent and privacy.

  20. A Swedish perspective on research ethics review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius, M.D., G.P., Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available I have participated in writing ethical approval applications for research projects in Sweden a dozen times. I am also since some years a member of the local ethics advisory board in a mostly rural area serving 180.000 people. From that position I advise on what types of local project applications will have to be sent further to the regional ethics committee, REPN in Sweden. With that background I will try to give a brief Swedish perspective on research ethics reviews in general and regarding CGT (classic grounded theory studies using qualitative data in particular.The most famous Swedish example of unethical research is the 1947-1951 Vipeholm sugar trial (Krasse, 2001. Several hundred intellectually and mentally challenged persons at the Vipeholm institution were for years given an excess amount of sugar, mostly in the shape of candy. This resulted in caries that totally ruined the teeth of 50 persons. Of course participants did not give informed consent. Yet, at the time the research was not considered unethical. At least there was no debate about it.

  1. History of the research ad hoc committee on 'dissemination of information' and the special ad hoc committee on 'dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itabashi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Intellectual Resources Department, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    The Research ad hoc committee on 'Dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan was held 15 times from Oct. 1970 to Mar 1973. After that, The Special ad hoc committee on 'Dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan was held 115 times from Apr. 1973 to Mar 2009. The history of these two committees is described. Activity report is arranged including the information on change of the member and topics of the meeting, and the minutes. Furthermore, the document list on International Nuclear Information System (INIS) from Japan is included. (author)

  2. History of the research ad hoc committee on 'dissemination of information' and the special ad hoc committee on 'dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itabashi, Keizo

    2010-06-01

    The Research ad hoc committee on 'Dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan was held 15 times from Oct. 1970 to Mar 1973. After that, The Special ad hoc committee on 'Dissemination of information' of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan was held 115 times from Apr. 1973 to Mar 2009. The history of these two committees is described. Activity report is arranged including the information on change of the member and topics of the meeting, and the minutes. Furthermore, the document list on International Nuclear Information System (INIS) from Japan is included. (author)

  3. Reporting ethics committee approval in public administration research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Sara R; Gray, Phillip W

    2014-03-01

    While public administration research is thriving because of increased attention to social scientific rigor, lingering problems of methods and ethics remain. This article investigates the reporting of ethics approval within public administration publications. Beginning with an overview of ethics requirements regarding research with human participants, I turn to an examination of human participants protections for public administration research. Next, I present the findings of my analysis of articles published in the top five public administration journals over the period from 2000 to 2012, noting the incidences of ethics approval reporting as well as funding reporting. In explicating the importance of ethics reporting for public administration research, as it relates to replication, reputation, and vulnerable populations, I conclude with recommendations for increasing ethics approval reporting in public administration research.

  4. [Perception and satisfaction of main researchers on the management of a Clinical Research Ethics Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardell Navarro, N; Redondo-Capafons, S; Giménez, N; Quintana, S

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the main researchers (MR) perception and satisfaction associated to face-to-face project presentation as well as Clinical Research Ethics Committee (CREC) functions related to administrative and advisement aspects. Descriptive study performed during nine months (January to September 2011) through voluntary participation questionnaire given to MR who assisted to CREC meetings. The questionnaire contained a numeric range (1-10) and open issues to evaluate the presentation process, the satisfaction of CREC functions considering bureaucratic aspects, ethics, scientific-methodological, legal recommendations and its global function. Descriptive statistics and Student test were performed. The questionnaire was answered by 36 (95%) of total MR. Average score obtained in the evaluation of face-to-face study presentation was 9.2 (SD 0.9). In reference to legal issues an average punctuation of 7.1 (DE 0.4) was obtained, whereas ethics and scientific-methodological aspects scored 8.2 (DE 0.2 and 0.4). Global average evaluation about CREC tasks was 8.6 (SD 1.0). A positive assessment related to attend to the project presentation was made for 22 (61%) of the MR. The study showed a high satisfaction of CREC operation and a high evaluation of face-to-face project presentation. There were detected further improvement aspects to optimize CREC meetings, taking into account the effort developed by MR and CREC members. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices (abstracts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    The thirteenth IAEA technical committee meeting on research using small fusion devices are held in Chengdu, P. R. China on 18-20 Oct. , 1999. 41 articles are received and the content includes toroidal systems, helical systems, plasma focus, diagnostic systems, theory and modeling, improving confinement, numerical simulation, innovative concepts and others

  6. Members of research ethics committees accepted a modification of the randomized consent design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, Ron; Kessels, Alfons G.; ter Riet, Gerben; Kleijnen, Jos; Leffers, Pieter; Knottnerus, J. André; Sturmans, Ferd

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objective: The use of randomized consent designs has been subject of methodologic and ethical controversy. In most Western countries, research ethics committees make the decision as to whether a randomized consent design can be applied. The purpose of the study is to assess to what

  7. Report to NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems Relative to Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    The following report highlights some of the work accomplished by the Aviation Safety Engineering and Research Division of the Flight Safety Foundations since the last report to the NASA Committee on Aircraft Operating Problems on 22 May 1963. The information presented is in summary form. Additional details may be provided upon request of the reports themselves may be obtained from AvSER.

  8. Low-frequency electrical dosimetry: research agenda of the IEEE International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J Patrick; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-06-21

    This article treats unsettled issues in the use of numerical models of electrical dosimetry as applied to international limits on human exposure to low-frequency (typically  IEEE-ICES (International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety) Technical Committee 95. The paper discusses 25 issues needing attention, fitting into three general categories: induction models; electrostimulation models; and human exposure limits. Of these, 9 were voted as 'high priority' by members of Subcommittee 6. The list is presented as a research agenda for refinements in numerical modeling with applications to human exposure limits. It is likely that such issues are also important in medical and electrical product safety design applications.

  9. Minutes of 'Technical Committee for Geological Isolation Research and Development (1st time)'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yasuo; Torata, Shinichiro

    2007-03-01

    In order to plan and conduct a program of research and development (R and D) for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in JAEA-Tokai, JAEA decided to receive technical comments and advices from the Technical Committee for geological isolation R and D. This committee, which is constituted of specialists who do not belong to JAEA, has evaluated the program, taking into account of the status of geological disposal technology in Japan as well as foreign countries. This report compiles the minutes of the first meeting held in July 2006. (author)

  10. Historical review of radiation research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, B. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation reviews the history of radiation research beginning with the first findings and attempts for modelling of harmful effects of radiation, followed by the contamination of the environment, use of radiation epidemiology and concluding with the question of cancer generation. (26 refs.).

  11. AAC Modeling Intervention Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennott, Samuel C.; Light, Janice C.; McNaughton, David

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of research on the effects of interventions that include communication partner modeling of aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) on the language acquisition of individuals with complex communication needs was conducted. Included studies incorporated AAC modeling as a primary component of the intervention,…

  12. The clinical research office of the endourological society audit committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preminger, G.M.; Alken, P.; Habuchi, T.; Wijkstra, H.; Skolarikos, A.; Yin, C.-J.

    2011-01-01

    The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) conducts large-scale, international, multicenter clinical trials in the field of endourology. One of the major challenges that these trials pose is to ensure that data collected remotely and online within a very short time frame are

  13. 75 FR 37813 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... SACHRP about the application of subpart A of 45 CFR part 46 in the current research environment. This... will be a panel of speakers discussing the emergence of ethics consultations services, and whether such ethical discussions should occur more appropriately within the domain of the IRB. July 20 will conclude...

  14. 77 FR 58383 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ... the public who wish to have printed materials distributed to SACHRP members for this scheduled meeting should submit materials to the Executive Director, SACHRP, prior to the close of business October 1, 2012... human subjects research adopted by various agencies or offices within HHS would benefit from...

  15. Impact of the economic crisis on the activity of a clinical research ethics committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Arcenillas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Analyze the impact of economic and social crisis in volume and funding of clinical trials (CT and observational studies (ES from the activity of an Research Ethics Committee (REC. Method: REC memories 2003-2012 were reviewed. Financing of evaluated projects, CT and OS were analyzed classifying them into four groups: 1 promoted by pharmaceutical industry, 2 by scientific societies with industry support, 3 by scientific societies with government support and 4 unfunding.Two periods were compared: pre-crisis (2003-2007 and crisis (2008-2012. Results: During 10 studied years, 744 protocols were evaluated: a 71% of group 1, a 9% of group 2, a 3% of group 3 and a 17% was no funding. Regarding OS, 40%, 5,4%, 8,6% and 46% were the groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. Analyzing crisis versus pre-crisis period, statistically significant differences were observed in the decreasing of number of CT phase 2 and 3 and in the rising EO. Comparing crisis related to the pre-crisis period, the Group 4 increased statistically significantly. Conclusions: Evolution of total number of studies evaluated by REC tends to be maintained and even increased over time. REC maintains its activity and even increased at the expense of financing and unfunded OS.

  16. [Impact of the economic crisis on the activity of a clinical research ethics committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Capafons, S; Arcenillas, Paula; Giménez, Nuria; March López, Pablo; Soriano, Laura; Pla, Ramon; Quintana, Salvador

    2014-11-03

    Analyze the impact of economic and social crisis in volume and funding of clinical trials (CT) and observational studies (ES) from the activity of an Research Ethics Committee (REC). REC memories 2003-2012 were reviewed. Financing of evaluated projects, CT and OS were analyzed classifying them into four groups: 1) promoted by pharmaceutical industry, 2) by scientific societies with industry support, 3) by scientific societies with government support and 4) unfunding.Two periods were compared: pre-crisis (2003-2007) and crisis (2008-2012). During 10 studied years, 744 protocols were evaluated: a 71% of group 1, a 9% of group 2, a 3% of group 3 and a 17% was no funding. Regarding OS, 40%, 5,4%, 8,6% and 46% were the groups 1, 2, 3 and 4 respectively. Analyzing crisis versus pre-crisis period, statistically significant differences were observed in the decreasing of number of CT phase 2 and 3 and in the rising EO. Comparing crisis related to the pre-crisis period, the Group 4 increased statistically significantly. Evolution of total number of studies evaluated by REC tends to be maintained and even increased over time. REC maintains its activity and even increased at the expense of financing and unfunded OS. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. Report from the Committee of Visitors on its Review of the Processes and Procedures used to Manage the Theory and Computations Program, Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    A Committee of Visitors (COV) was formed to review the procedures used by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences to manage its Theory and Computations program. The COV was pleased to conclude that the research portfolio supported by the OFES Theory and Computations Program was of very high quality. The Program supports research programs at universities, research industries, and national laboratories that are well regarded internationally and address questions of high relevance to the DOE. A major change in the management of the Theory and Computations program over the past few years has been the introduction of a system of comparative peer review to guide the OFES Theory Team in selecting proposals for funding. The COV was impressed with the success of OFES in its implementation of comparative peer review and with the quality of the reviewers chosen by the OFES Theory Team. The COV concluded that the competitive peer review process has improved steadily over the three years that it has been in effect and that it has improved both the fairness and accountability of the proposal review process. While the COV commends OFES in its implementation of comparative review, the COV offers the following recommendations in the hope that they will further improve the comparative peer review process: The OFES should improve the consistency of peer reviews. We recommend adoption of a results-oriented scoring system in their guidelines to referees (see Appendix II), a greater use of review panels, and a standard format for proposals; The OFES should further improve the procedures and documentation for proposal handling. We recommend that the folders documenting funding decisions contain all the input from all of the reviewers, that OFES document their rationale for funding decisions which are at variance with the recommendation of the peer reviewers, and that OFES provide a Summary Sheet within each folder; The OFES should better communicate the procedures used to determine funding

  18. Report of Research Cooperation Sub-Committee 46 on research and development of methods for inelastic (EPICC: Elastic-PlastIC-Creep) structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yoshiaki

    1977-05-01

    This report succeeds the preceding one on ''Verification and Qualification of Nonlinear Structural Analysis Computer Program''. PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation) decided to sponsor an extended research project on inelastic structural analysis for a period spanning September, 1976 to May, 1978. Responding to PNC proposal, RC Sub-Committee 46 was formed in Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and plunged into the cooperative work from October, 1976. Besides the verification and/or qualification of available general purpose computer programs which were the major objectives of previous contract, the Committee executed the research on the topics categorized into the following three fields of interests: 1. Material data for use in elastic analysis, 2. Inelastic analysis procedure and computer program verification, 3. Design code and processing of computer solutions. This report summarizes the efforts during the first year of the Sub-Committee and consists of three parts each corresponding to the research topics stated above. Part I. Inelastic constitutive equations for materials under high temperature service conditions Part II. EPICC standard benchmark test problem and solutions Part III. Examination of postprocessors and development Although the research is still in the intermediate stage, the features of research being actively under way are 1. Evaluative review and nationwide collection of material data, recommendation of tentative constitutive equations for elastic-plastic and creep analyses of benchmark test problem, 2. Revision and augmentation of EPICC standard benchmark test problem and competitive and/or cooperative execution of solutions, 3. Review of existing prototypical post processors, and development of a processor for piping design. (author)

  19. [Intradiverticular bladder tumours: review of the Cancer Committee of the French Association of Urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Y; Comperat, E; Rouprêt, M; Larre, S; Roy, C; Quintens, H; Houede, N; Pignot, G; Wallerand, H; Soulie, M; Pfister, C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer Committee of the French Association of Urology (CCAFU) conducted a review of the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of intradiverticular bladder tumours (TVID) and proposed therapeutic management. A bibliographic research in French and English using Medline(®) with the keywords "tumor", "bladder" and "diverticulum" was performed. TVID are more frequently of stage T ≥ 3a and with non urothelial histology than classical bladder tumors. At diagnosis, the risk of underestimation of the extent and multifocality of the tumor was described. Their prognosis, that was more pejorative than conventional tumors, should impelled to limit the indications of conservative treatment. The evidence levels of analyzed publications were low, with C level according to Sackett score. the specificities of the TVID have lead the CCAFU to propose specific therapeutic guidelines, based on poor evidence level. Ta-T1 low grade TVID can be treated by transurethral resection alone or followed by BCG therapy in cases of associated carcinoma in situ. High-grade TVID, unifocal and without associated carcinoma in situ, can be treated by diverticulectomy associated with pelvic lymphadenectomy. High grade TVID, multiple or associated with carcinoma in situ, warranted total cystectomy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. 76 FR 34703 - Human Studies Review Board Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... subjects of research. The HSRB reports to the EPA Administrator through EPA's Science Advisor. General... address, e-mail address, and daytime telephone number. Interested candidates may self-nominate. To help..., Designated Federal Official, Office of the Science Advisor, Mail Code 8105R, U.S. Environmental Protection...

  1. 78 FR 50144 - Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service, Scientific Merit... management, and nursing research. Applications are reviewed for scientific and technical merit, mission... Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that the Health Services Research and Development Service (HSR&D...

  2. 78 FR 18680 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Scientific Merit Review... Service, and the Chief Research and Development Officer on the scientific and technical merit, the mission... Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. 2, that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service...

  3. Review of Nutrition Research and Education Activities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Department Operations and Nutrition of the Committee on Agriculture. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Agriculture.

    This document records the oral and written testimony given at a Congressional hearing on nutrition research and education as carried out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Witnesses included officials from the Department, professors and administrators from various university nutrition programs, and medical doctors. Testimony stressed the…

  4. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Enclosed are proceedings of the workshop on Internal Dosimetry held on Atlanta, Georgia in April 1992. The recommendations from the Workshop were considered by the CIRRPC Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research in identifying those areas to be undertaken by individual Federal Agencies or in cooperative efforts. This document presents summaries of the following sessions: A.1 Applications and limitations of ICRP and other metabolic models, A.2 Applications and implementation of proposed ICRP lung model, A.3 Estimates of intake from repetitive bioassay data, A.4 Chelation models for plutonium urinalysis data, B.1 Transuranium/uranium registry data, B.2 Autopsy tissue analysis, B.3 Bioassay / Whole body counting, B.4 Data base formatting and availability, C.1 An overview of calculational techniques in use today, C.2 The perfect code, C.3 Dose calculations based on individuals instead of averages, C.4 From macro dosimetry to micro dosimetry

  5. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  6. Photographic Tourism Research: Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Virdee, Inderpal

    2017-01-01

    This study reviews the current photographic tourism literature to identify what fields within tourism have been studied by researchers, the contexts, the samples used, the sampling methods employed, the photographic methods and supporting methods used, the data analysis techniques applied and the countries studied. A set of 115 relevant academic articles were selected and assessed using content analysis. The findings showed that overall publications in the field of photographic tourism increa...

  7. Review of DREV uranium research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drolet, J.P.; Erickson, W.H.; Tardif, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a brief review of the DREV uranium research carried out on various aspects of the physical metallurgy of depleted uranium alloys. It includes (1) a survey of the early work on polynary alloys, (2) recent metallurgical investigations on various alloy systems and (3) miscellaneous studies on grain size refinement, grain growth, powder metallurgy, pyrophoricity and directional casting of uranium alloys. A general summary of most of the studies carried out during the last ten years is also presented

  8. Towards beneficence for young children in research: challenges for bioethics committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Ann

    2010-09-01

    Bioethics committees are the focus of international scrutiny, particularly in relation to their application of the principle of beneficence, ensuring that risks incurred in research are outweighed by benefits to those involved directly and to the broader society. Beneficence, in turn, has become an international focus in research with young children, who hitherto had been rarely seen or heard in their own right in research. Twenty years ago, The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 raised global awareness of children's human rights to both participation and protection, and articulation of children's rights came to inform understandings of young children's rights in research. In the intervening period, countries such as Australia came to favour child protection and risk minimisation in research over the notion of children's bone fide participation in research. A key element of the protection regime was the theoretical understanding of young children as developmentally unable and, therefore, unfit to understand, consent to and fully participate as research participants. This understanding has been challenged in recent decades by new theoretical understandings of children's competence, where children can be seen to demonstrate competence, even at an early age, in consenting to, participating in and withdrawing from research. The paper draws on these understandings to provide insights for human research gatekeepers, such as bioethics committees, to deal with the challenges of research with young children and to realize the benefits that may accrue to children in research.

  9. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Report: Exascale Computing Initiative Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Daniel [University of Iowa; Berzins, Martin [University of Utah; Pennington, Robert; Sarkar, Vivek [Rice University; Taylor, Valerie [Texas A& M University

    2015-08-01

    On November 19, 2014, the Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged with reviewing the Department of Energy’s conceptual design for the Exascale Computing Initiative (ECI). In particular, this included assessing whether there are significant gaps in the ECI plan or areas that need to be given priority or extra management attention. Given the breadth and depth of previous reviews of the technical challenges inherent in exascale system design and deployment, the subcommittee focused its assessment on organizational and management issues, considering technical issues only as they informed organizational or management priorities and structures. This report presents the observations and recommendations of the subcommittee.

  10. A Review of NASA Human Research Program's Scientific Merit Processes: Letter Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelczyk, James A. (Editor); Strawbridge, Larisa M. (Editor); Schultz, Andrea M. (Editor); Liverman, Catharyn T. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    At the request of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened the Committee on the Review of NASA Human Research Program's (HRP's) Scientific Merit Assessment Processes in December 2011. The committee was asked to evaluate the scientific merit assessment processes that are applied to directed research tasks2 funded through the HRP and to determine best practices from similar assessment processes that are used in other federal agencies. This letter report and its recommendations are the product of a 10-member ad hoc committee, which included individuals who had previously conducted research under the HRP, were familiar with the HRP s research portfolio and operations, had specific knowledge of peer review processes, or were familiar with scientific merit assessment processes used in other organizations and federal agencies, such as the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF); and U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA), Defense (DOD), and Transportation.

  11. Ethics review of health research on human participants in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Christa

    2010-06-01

    In terms of South African legislation, all health research on human participants must be submitted to an accredited research ethics committee for independent ethics review. Health research covers a broad spectrum of research, including clinical trials. This article sets out the ethical-legal framework for the functioning and composition of such committees. It also deals with the newly created National Health Research Ethics Council, which registers and audits health research ethics committees. Special attention is given to the conduct of clinical trials. In conclusion, it is submitted that the National Health Act, the Draft Regulations Relating to Research on Human Subjects, and two sets of ethical guidelines adopted by the Department of Health provide a much needed and coherent ethical-legal framework for research in South Africa.

  12. The 2008 annual report of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Brad; Wilson, Ann

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 annual report of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee (RICMRC) is presented. This committee has as its mission the review of infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives. The 2008 review area includes South Dakota's Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Moody, Lake, McCook, Union, Hansen, Miner and Brookings counties. Within our region in 2008, there were six infant deaths labeled as Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID), of which two met the criteria for the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The four non-SIDS SUID deaths all represented deaths where asphyxia from unsafe sleeping environments could not be excluded. In addition, there were two accidental deaths from asphyxia in unsafe sleeping enviroments. We need to continue to promote the "Back to Sleep" campaign message of not only placing infants to sleep on their backs, but also making sure infants are put down to sleep on safe, firm, sleeping surfaces and are appropriately dressed for the ambient temperature. Parents need to be aware of the potential hazards of bed-sharing with their infants. In both 2007 and 2008, four children died in motor vehicle crashes, none of which were alcohol-related. Three fire-related childhood deaths were associated with one house fire involving a nonfunctional smoke alarm and a sleeping arrangement without an easy egress from a fire. Since 1997, the RICMRC has sought to achieve its mission to "review infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives". For 2008, the committee reviewed 21 deaths from Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Moody, Lake, McCook, Union, Hansen, Miner and Brookings counties that met the following criteria: Children under the age of 18 dying subsequent to hospital discharge following delivery. Children who either died in these counties from causes sustained in them, or residents who died elsewhere from causes sustained in the ten-county region.

  13. Report from the research committee of digital imaging standardization in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yutaka; Ise, Toshihide; Isetani, Osamu; Ichihara, Takashi; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Kanaya, Shinichi; Fukuda, Toshio; Horii, Hitoshi.

    1994-01-01

    Since digital scintillation camera systems were developed in 1982, digital imaging is rapidly replacing analog imaging. During the first year, the research committee of digital imaging standardization has collected and analyzed basic data concerning digital examination equipment systems, display equipments, films, and hardware and software techniques to determine items required for the standardization of digital imaging. During the second year, it has done basic phantom studies to assess digital images and analyzed the results from both physical and visual viewpoints. On the basis of the outcome of the research committee's activities and the nationwide survey, the draft of digital imaging standardization in nuclear medicine has been presented. In this paper. the analytical data of the two-year survey, made by the research committee of digital imaging standardization, are presented. The descriptions are given under the following four items: (1) standardization digital examination techniques, (2) standardization of display techniques, (3) the count and pixel of digital images, and (4) standardization of digital imaging techniques. (N.K.)

  14. A new research reactor? Report by the Select Committee for an inquiry into the contract for a new reactor at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    On 15 August 2000, the Senate resolved to establish the Select Committee for an Inquiry into the Contract for a New Reactor at Lucas Heights and report to the Parliament. The Select committee majority report is divided into three parts: the need for a new reactor; the tendering process and the nature of the contract; and Australia's nuclear waste management strategy and public health and safety. There is a final chapter which brings together the major issues examined in the report. Based on the evidence presented to it, the Committee notes that some Australian scientists and engineers present a strong case for the new reactor. While the Committee is of the view that nuclear science and technology is not backward looking and does offer opportunities for researchers to keep at the forefront of important areas in scientific research and development it does not automatically follow that the best way to promote scientific and medical research in this country is by spending substantial amounts of public funds for the next forty years on a single research reactor. Nevertheless, the Committee recommends that before the Government proceeds any further with the proposed reactor, it undertake a thorough and comprehensive public review of funding for medical and scientific research in Australia with a view to assessing priorities including the role, if any, a research reactor would have in contributing to Australia's scientific, medical and industrial interests. The Committee also requested that the Australian National Audit Office consider examining the tender and contract documents for the new reactor at Lucas Heights with a view to determining: whether further investigation of the tendering process and the contract is warranted; whether, during the tendering process, ANSTO ensured that there was adequate and appropriate independent verification and validation of the tenderers claims. Two supplementary report are included: one from the Liberal and National members (minority

  15. 77 FR 21622 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit...-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will be held on April 20, 2012, 131 M Street NE., Washington, DC...

  16. 77 FR 42365 - Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit...-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that various subcommittees of the Health Services Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will meet on August 28-30, 2012, at the Boston Omni Parker...

  17. 75 FR 72872 - Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit...-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that a meeting of the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service Scientific Merit Review Board will be held on December 13-14, 2010, at the Hilton Alexandria Old...

  18. The Service Review Committee: Royal College of Radiologists. Philosophy, role, and lessons to be learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thind, R.; Barter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Service Review Committee (SRC) was established by the Board of the Faculty of Clinical Radiology in 2000. At the time, the RCR identified a clear need to respond appropriately and swiftly to requests for review of service provision in clinical radiology departments where trusts were concerned about standards or performance issues. It was recognized by the College that the poorly performing radiologist is often part of a department that is itself dysfunctional, and that sub-optimal performance may often reflect inadequate management, lack of support, overwhelming workload, or inadequate facilities. Following the completion of a range of service reviews during its first 6 years, the SRC recognized that among the reviews there were recurring themes and causes for poorly functioning departments. The committee felt it appropriate to share these with the wider radiological community. In doing so, it is hoped that other departments may recognize their own problems at an early stage and take appropriate steps to prevent any escalation of difficulties

  19. Research on prisoners - a comparison between the IOM Committee recommendations (2006) and European regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Bernice S; Spaulding, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) Committee on Ethical Considerations for Revisions to DHHS Regulations for Protection of Prisoners Involved in Research published its report in 2006. It was charged with developing an ethical framework for the conduct of research with prisoners and identifying the safeguards and conditions necessary to ensure that research with prisoners is conducted ethically. The recommendations contained in the IOM report differ from current European regulations in several ways, some being more restrictive and some less so. For example, the IOM report suggests limiting the percentage of prisoners that should be involved in a biomedical study to 50%, a limit that does not exist in Europe. However, the report does not specifically advise against research without a direct benefit to an individual prisoner: the European regulations are more restrictive than the IOM committee recommendations in this respect. The definition of minimal risk varies, as well as the proposed role of the minimal risk requirement and of the principle of subsidiarity (research that can only be done effectively in prisons). The IOM report proposes a number of thoughtful suggestions, which it would be beneficial to implement everywhere, such as registers of research on prisoners. The European regulations offer pragmatic solutions to several thorny issues. In summary, the IOM committee report represents an admirable effort to tackle the present inconsistencies and deficiencies of federal regulations in the US on research on prisoners (45 CFR 46 Subpart C). Nonetheless, before acting on the recommendations, US regulators might consider revisiting international guidelines such as those published by the Council for International Organizations of Medical Science (CIOMS) and the Declaration of Helsinki.

  20. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. Questionnaires from Research Committee of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    The Research Committee of Nuclear Safety carried out a research on criticality accident at the JCO plant according to statement of president of the Japan Atomic Energy Society on October 8, 1999, of which results are planned to be summarized by the constitutions shown as follows, for a report on the 'Questionnaires of criticality accident in the Uranium Fuel Processing Plant of the JCO, Inc.': general criticality safety, fuel cycle and the JCO, Inc.; elucidation on progress and fact of accident; cause analysis and problem picking-up; proposals on improvement; and duty of the Society. Among them, on last two items, because of a conclusion to be required for members of the Society at discussions of the Committee, some questionnaires were send to more than 1800 of them on April 5, 2000 with name of chairman of the Committee. As results of the questionnaires contained proposals and opinions on a great numbers of fields, some key-words like words were found on a shape of repeating in most questionnaires. As they were thought to be very important nuclei in these two items, they were further largely classified to use for summarizing proposals and opinions on the questionnaires. This questionnaire had a big characteristic on the duty of the Society in comparison with those in the other organizations. (G.K.)

  1. Report of the review committee on the Fermilab HGQ R and D program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.; Anerella, M.; Leroy, D.; Ostojic, R.; Schermer, R.; Vedrine, P.

    1999-04-01

    This document is the report of the committee which met at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on 18 and 19 March 1999 to review the Fermilab R and D program on High Gradient Quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider Insertion Regions. The promising results of model magnet HGQ05 constitute a significant step forward and provide a solid basis upon which to base the magnet program. Although, the quench performance of magnet HGQ05 shows good progress, it is not yet fully satisfactory and can still be improved. The committee recommends that particular attention be paid to the first training quenches at 1.9 K and that more analyses be carried out to find possible correlations between quench start localization and specific mechanical features. In particular, the committee recommends analyzing in detail collar deflection data that seem to indicate that the first training quenches at 1.9 K may have originated in a region of low azimuthal coil pre-compression. The relative success of magnet HGQ05 and a detailed understanding of the reason behind it should help focus the magnet program on a limited number of clearly identified issues. The magnet program should be revised immediately to incorporate the lessons learned from magnet HGQ05 and to address the most outstanding issues. (authors)

  2. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact. Journal Home > About the Journal > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Reviewing Reviews of Research in Educational Leadership: An Empirical Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinger, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reviews of research play a critical but underappreciated role in knowledge production and accumulation. Yet, until relatively recently, limited attention has been given to the "methodology" of conducting reviews of research. This observation also applies in educational leadership and management where reviews of research have…

  4. Collaborative international research: ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to human biological materials at a South African institutional research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathar, Aslam; Dhai, Amaboo; van der Linde, Stephan

    2014-12-01

    Human Biological Materials (HBMs) are an invaluable resource in biomedical research. To determine if researchers and a Research Ethics Committee (REC) at a South African institution addressed ethical issues pertaining to HBMs in collaborative research with developed countries. Ethically approved retrospective cross-sectional descriptive audit. Of the 1305 protocols audited, 151 (11.57%) fulfilled the study's inclusion criteria. Compared to other developed countries, a majority of sponsors (90) were from the USA (p = 0.0001). The principle investigators (PIs) in all 151 protocols informed the REC of their intent to store HBMs. Only 132 protocols informed research participants (P ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to HBMs. There was a lack of congruence between the ethical guidelines of developed countries and their actions which are central to the access to HBMs in collaborative research. HBMs may be leaving South Africa without EPs and MTAs during the process of international collaborative research. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Clinical studies of the Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Hirofumi; Sada, Ken-Ei

    2013-10-01

    In Japan, the Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides, supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, has been promoting basic and clinical research on vasculitis since 1972. The present Research Committee on Intractable Vasculitides comprises 4 subcommittees under the direction of a Principal Investigator: Basic and Pathological Research Subcommittee, Clinical Research Subcommittee of Small and Medium-sized Vessel Vasculitis, Clinical Research Subcommittee of Large-sized Vessel Vasculitis, and International Cooperation Research Subcommittee. Since 2008, 9 nationwide clinical studies for vasculitis have been conducted and 8 clinical and basic studies are in progress.

  6. Report: EPA Has Adequate Controls to Manage Advice From Science and Research Federal Advisory Committees, but Transparency Could Be Improved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #17-P-0124, March 13, 2017. Science plays an integral role in the EPA's mission. The EPA has an adequate system of controls to manage recommendations from its science and research federal advisory committees.

  7. Summary of the progress of reactor physics in Japan reviewing the activities related to NEA Committee on Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Jitsuya

    1984-09-01

    The progress of fast and thermal reactor physics, fusion neutronics and shielding researches in these twenty years can be clearly recognized in the reviews of reactor physics activities in Japan which had been perpared by the Special Committee on Reactor Physics: the joint committee under Atomic Energy Society of Japan and JAERI. Many topics of those discussed at the NEACRP meetings concerned fast reactor physics. Information exchange on the topics such as adjustment of group cross sections by integral data, central worth discrepancy, sodium void effect and heterogeneous core stimulated the researches in Japan. And achievements in Japan including those in the JAERI Fast Critical Facility FCA were reported and contributed largely to the international co-operation. In addition, the contribution from Japan was also made concerning a study of fusion blanket. Among various specialists' meetings recommended by NEACRP, those on nuclear data and benchmarks for reactor shielding were often held since 1973 and helpful to the progress of shielding researches in Japan. The Third Specialists' Meeting on Reactor Noise (SMORN-III) was held in Tokyo in 1981, indicating the recent progress in safety-related applications of reactor noise analysis. The NEACRP benchmark tests were quite useful to the progress of reactor physics in Japan, which included the benchmark calculations of BWR lattice cell, key parameters and burn-up characteristics of a large LMFBR, FBR and PWR shielding, and so on. It may be noted that the benchmark test on reactor noise analysis methods was successfully conducted by Japan in connection with SMORN-III. In addition, the co-operation was positively made to the compilation of light water lattice data, and the preparation of reviews on actinide production and burn-up, and blanket physics. (J.P.N.)

  8. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hansoti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Open access (OA medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods: We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM. Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results: We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based. Of these 55, 25 (45% were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion: OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

  9. Apa-Tappi Whole-Tree Utilization Committee: review of achievements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, G M

    1978-03-01

    The Apa-Tappi Whole-Tree Utilization Committee started its activities in mid-1974 with people who pioneered the concept of whole-tree chipping. The major problem retarding expansion of use of these chips was determined to be grit and dirt, which is primarily associated with bark and foliage. Utilization of research and tests by member companies and communication with manufacturers resulted in commercial applications that improved chip quality. Other achievements have been the establishment of a nationwide project to develop tree-weight tables, documentation of associated problems, harvesting equipment improvements, screening and separation advances, and needed research work.

  10. The 2007 annual report of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Brad; Wilson, Ann L

    2008-08-01

    The mission of the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee (RICMRC) is to review infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives. The 2007 review area includes South Dakota's Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Moody, Lake, McCook, Union, Hansen, Miner and Brookings counties. Although there were no deaths in 2007 that met the criteria of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in our region, there were three infant deaths associated with unsafe sleeping environments (including adult co-sleeping) that either caused or potentially may have caused these infants' deaths. We need to continue to promote the "Back to Sleep" campaign message of not only placing infants to sleep on their backs, but also making sure infants are put down to sleep on safe, firm sleeping surfaces and that they are appropriately dressed for the ambient temperature. Parents need to be aware of the potential hazards of co-sleeping with their infants. Compared to nine such deaths in 2006, only four deaths in 2007 involved motor-vehicle crashes, none of which were alcohol related. Two drowning deaths illustrated the rapidity in which even momentary caregiver distractions can lead to deaths in children in and around water. Since 1997 the Regional Infant and Child Mortality Review Committee (RICMRC) has sought to achieve its mission to "review infant and child deaths so that information can be transformed into action to protect young lives." For 2007, the committee reviewed 25 deaths from Minnehaha, Turner, Lincoln, Moody, Lake, McCook, Union, Hansen, Miner and Brookings counties that met the following criteria: Children under the age of 18 dying subsequent to hospital discharge following delivery. Children who either died in these counties from causes sustained in them, or residents who died elsewhere from causes sustained in the 10-county region. The report that follows reviews the committee's activities for 2007. No deaths meeting the criteria

  11. (No) Limits to Anglo-American Accounting? Reconstructing the History of the International Accounting Standards Committee ; A Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Botzem, S.; Quack, S.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the current International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) from the earlier International Accounting Standards Committee (IASC) provides insight into many issues of international financial reporting, among them the characteristics of international accounting standards themselves. This article reviews Camfferman and Zeff’s [Camfferman, K., & Zeff, S. A. (2007). Financial reporting and global capital markets. A history of the international accounting standards committee 1973...

  12. Report of the second joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials. July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-05-01

    Joint research committees in purpose of the discussion on DEMO blanket in view point of the both of reactor technology and materials were held by the Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Fusion Materials. The joint research committee was held in Tokyo on July 12, 2002. In the committee, the present status of development of solid and liquid breeding blanket, the present status of development of reduced activation structure materials, and IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) program were discussed based on the discussions of the development programs of the blanket and materials at the first joint research committee. As a result, it was confirmed that high electric efficiency with 41% would be obtained in the solid breeding blanket system, that neutron radiation data of reduced activation ferritic steel was obtained by HFIR collaboration, and that KEP (key element technology phase) of IFMIF would be finished at the end of 2002 and the data base for the next step, i.e. EVEDA (engineering validation/engineering design activity) was obtained. In addition, the present status of ITER CTA, which was a transient phase for the construction, and the outline of ITER Fast Track, which was an accelerated plan for the performance of the power plants, were reported. This report consists of the summary of the discussion and the viewgraphs which were used at the second joint research committee, and these are very useful for the researchers of the fusion area in Japan. (author)

  13. Review of the research proposal for the steam generator retired from Kori unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Han, Joung Ho; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lim, Yun Soo; Lee, Deok Hyun; Hwang, Seong Sik; Hur, Do Haeng [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The tubes of the steam generator retired form Kori unit 1 have many different kinds of failures, such as denting pitting, wastage, ODSCC, PWSCC.Korea Electric Power Research Institute (KEPRI) submitted a research proposal for the steam generator to the Korea Institute S and T Evaluation and Planning (KSITEP). The KISTEP requested Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute to review the proposal by organizing a committee which should be composed of the specialists of the related domestic research institutes. Opinions of the committee on the objectives, research fields, economic benefit and validity in the research proposal were reviewed and suggested optimal research fields to be fulfilled successfully for the retired steam generator. Also, the rolls for the participants in the research works were allocated, which is critical in order to do the project effectively. 6 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  14. A New Ethical Challenge for Institutional Review Boards (IRBs/Ethics Committees (ECs in the Assessment of Pediatric Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Rose

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both the US and EU have introduced pediatric pharmaceutical legislation to facilitate clinical trials in children and development of better medicines for children. The first concerns were published in 2014 that the European Medicines Agency (EMA’s Pediatric Committee (PDCO may be over-enthusiastic and has compelled questionable pediatric clinical trials from pharmaceutical companies. Numerous clinical trials are mandated in rare conditions for which not enough patients exist for even one trial. Furthermore, where these trials are mandated in adolescent patients, the legal age limit of the 18th birthday is confused with a medical age limit and can result in separate clinical trials in adolescent patients that neither make medical nor scientific sense nor will ever recruit enough patients for a meaningful outcome. To confirm our concerns we searched the registry clinicaltrials.gov and found examples for PDCO-triggered unethical trials. We conclude that such trials should not be accepted by institutional review boards (IRBs/ethics committees (ECs and that clinical trials resulting from negotiations with EMA’s PDCO need extra careful scrutiny by IRBs/ECs in order to prevent unethical studies and damage to pediatric research and unnecessary risks to pediatric patients.

  15. Nuclear powerplant safety systems. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Energy Research and Production of the Committee on Science and Technology, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The main objective of holding these hearings is to help the committee, and the Congress, and members of the public to understand the questions associated with nuclear powerplant safety. Also, to help the committee and the Congress to take what steps it feels necessary in assuring that our nuclear powerplants will be even safer in the future than they are today. Learning the lessons from Three Mile Island, asking the tough questions, and providing responsible answers to them will be part of the functioning of this committee. This committee has the responsibility for energy research, development, and demonstration associated with our nuclear powerplant research, development, and demonstration programs which ultimately will lead to commercialization. In conducting these hearings, the subcommittee intends to explore every aspect of safety technology and to conduct a thorough review of the status of the technology. The subcommittee wants to develop a detailed understanding of nuclear safety and operating philosophy as well as the implications of the Three Mile Island accident and any other accident

  16. A role for research ethics committees in exchanges of human biospecimens through material transfer agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Donald; Nicol, Dianne; Nicolás, Pilar; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2014-09-01

    International transfers of human biological material (biospecimens) and data are increasing, and commentators are starting to raise concerns about how donor wishes are protected in such circumstances. These exchanges are generally made under contractual material transfer agreements (MTAs). This paper asks what role, if any, should research ethics committees (RECs) play in ensuring legal and ethical conduct in such exchanges. It is recommended that RECs should play a more active role in the future development of best practice MTAs involving exchange of biospecimens and data and in monitoring compliance.

  17. CERN scientists take part in the Tevatron Run II performance review committee

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Tevatron Run II is under way at Fermilab, exploring the high-energy frontier with upgraded detectors that will address some of the biggest questions in particle physics.Until CERN's LHC switches on, the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider is the world's only source of top quarks. It is the only place where we can search for supersymmetry, for the Higgs boson, and for signatures of additional dimensions of space-time. The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently convened a high-level international review committee to examine Fermilab experts' first-phase plans for the accelerator complex. Pictured here with a dipole magnet in CERN's LHC magnet test facility are the four CERN scientists who took part in the DOE's Tevatron review. Left to right: Francesco Ruggiero, Massimo Placidi, Flemming Pedersen, and Karlheinz Schindl. Further information: CERN Courier 43 (1)

  18. Is mandatory research ethics reviewing ethical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Murray; Allen, Gary

    2013-08-01

    Review boards responsible for vetting the ethical conduct of research have been criticised for their costliness, unreliability and inappropriate standards when evaluating some non-medical research, but the basic value of mandatory ethical review has not been questioned. When the standards that review boards use to evaluate research proposals are applied to review board practices, it is clear that review boards do not respect researchers or each other, lack merit and integrity, are not just and are not beneficent. The few benefits of mandatory ethical review come at a much greater, but mainly hidden, social cost. It is time that responsibility for the ethical conduct of research is clearly transferred to researchers, except possibly in that small proportion of cases where prospective research participants may be so intrinsically vulnerable that their well-being may need to be overseen.

  19. 76 FR 76937 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting-Room Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting--Room Change The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory... emerging technology and research activities, including those related to deemed exports. Agenda Wednesday...

  20. Attitude Research in Physical Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of attitude research in physical education. The first section reviews theoretical models that are prevalent in attitude research. Then, the next section describes the methods that were used to locate the research used in the remainder of the paper. The third section discusses measurement issues in…

  1. Using the Emanuel et al. framework to assess ethical issues raised by a biomedical research ethics committee in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoka-Gwegweni, Joyce M; Wassenaar, Douglas R

    2014-12-01

    The Emanuel, Wendler, and Grady framework was designed as a universal tool for use in many settings including developing countries. However, it is not known whether the work of African health research ethics committees (RECs) is compatible with this framework. The absence of any normative or empirical weighting of the eight principles within this framework suggests that different health RECs may raise some ethical issues more frequently than others when reviewing protocols. We used the Emanuel et al. framework to assess, code, and rank the most frequent ethical issues considered by a biomedical REC during review of research protocols for the years 2008 to 2012. We extracted data from the recorded minutes of a South African biomedical REC for the years 2008 to 2012, designed the data collection sheet according to the Emanuel et al. framework, and removed all identifiers during data processing and analysis. From the 98 protocols that we assessed, the most frequent issues that emerged were the informed consent, scientific validity, fair participant selection, and ongoing respect for participants. This study represents the first known attempt to analyze REC responses/minutes using the Emanuel et al. framework, and suggests that this framework may be useful in describing and categorizing the core activities of an REC. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. 77 FR 19179 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ...: 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 1. ETRAC Committee Business. 2. Nanotechnology--Nanocoated Materials. 3. Science and Engineering Indicators. 4. ETRAC Committee Discussion. 5. Planning for Next Meeting. The open...

  3. Partnership with the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes: Establishing an Advisory Committee for Pharmacogenetic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Chelsea T; Muzquiz, LeeAnna I; Howlett, Kevin; Azure, Bernie; Bodnar, Brenda; Finley, Vernon; Incashola, Tony; Mathias, Cheryl; Laukes, Cindi; Beatty, Patrick; Burke, Wylie; Pershouse, Mark A; Putnam, Elizabeth A; Trinidad, Susan Brown; James, Rosalina; Woodahl, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations in pharmacogenetic research is key if the benefits of pharmacogenetic testing are to reach these communities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage these communities in pharmacogenetics. An academic-community partnership between the University of Montana (UM) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) was established to engage the community as partners and advisors in pharmacogenetic research. A community advisory committee, the Community Pharmacogenetics Advisory Council (CPAC), was established to ensure community involvement in the research process. To promote bidirectional learning, researchers gave workshops and presentations about pharmacogenetic research to increase research capacity and CPAC members trained researchers in cultural competencies. As part of our commitment to a sustainable relationship, we conducted a self-assessment of the partnership, which included surveys and interviews with CPAC members and researchers. Academic and community participants agree that the partnership has promoted a bidirectional exchange of knowledge. Interviews showed positive feedback from the perspectives of both the CPAC and researchers. CPAC members discussed their trust in and support of the partnership, as well as having learned more about research processes and pharmacogenetics. Researchers discussed their appreciation of CPAC involvement in the project and guidance the group provided in understanding the CSKT community and culture. We have created an academic-community partnership to ensure CSKT community input and to share decision making about pharmacogenetic research. Our CBPR approach may be a model for engaging AI/AN people, and other underserved populations, in genetic research.

  4. [Experience of a research Ethics Committee and the challenges of the new Chilean legislation on research in human beings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún G, Manuel; Pinto C, María Eugenia; Raineri B, Gina G; Amigo, Hugo; Cifuentes O, Lucía; González, María Julieta; Horwitz, Nina; Marshall F, Claudia; Orellana V, Gricel

    2014-07-01

    The welfare of research participants must be guaranteed by international ethical standards. This article communicates the procedures of the Research Ethics Committee of the School of Medicine, University of Chile (CEISH). The new Chilean legislation on research in human beings is also discussed. Law 20.120: "On scientific research in human beings, its genome and forbidding human cloning" establishes the ethical principles that must be accomplished in every research involving human beings. Article 28 of the Law 20.584 "Regulation of the rights and duties of health care users", forbids the participation of handicapped people who cannot express their will in scientific research. Article 13 states that people not related directly with patient care cannot have access to his clinical records (with the exception of people with notarial authorization by the patient). CEISH proposes that, in case of people with intellectual deficiency, the decision to approve a scientific research should be analyzed on an individual basis. If the person is capable of expressing his or her will or has stated his or her consent beforehand, the research can be authorized. If the person cannot express his or her will, the scientific research cannot take place. In prospective studies, a consent from the patient and an authorization of the health authority should be required to access clinical records. In retrospective studies, consent should be obtained from the patient when personal information is going to be used. If the information is nameless, the consent can be disregarded.

  5. The Ethics of Traditional Chinese and Western Herbal Medicine Research: Views of Researchers and Human Ethics Committees in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline A. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growth of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and western herbal medicine (WHM research in Australia, little is known about how ethics committees (HRECs assess the ethics of TCM or WHM research. The objectives of this study were to examine the experiences of TCM and WHM researchers and HRECs with the evaluation of ethics applications. Two cross-sectional surveys were undertaken of HRECs and TCM and WHM researchers in Australia. Anonymous self-completion questionnaires were administered to 224 HRECs and 117 researchers. A response confirming involvement in TCM or WHM research applications was received from 20 HRECs and 42 researchers. The most frequent ethical issues identified by HRECs related to herbal products including information gaps relating to mode of action of herbal medicines and safety when combining herbal ingredients. Researchers concurred that they were frequently requested to provide additional information on multiple aspects including safety relating to the side effects of herbs and herb-drug interactions. Overall adherence with the principles of ethical conduct was high among TCM and WHM researchers although our study did identify the need for additional information regarding assessment of risk and risk management.

  6. [Review of WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy 8th report, --comparison to 7th report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Shinichi; En, Junichiro; Kitajima, Shiori; Barua, Sumana; Goto, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    In 2012 the WHO Expert Committee on Leprosy published its 8th report, 14 years after the publication of its 7th report in 1998. This report, the first since the leprosy reduction goal was met in 2000, highlights key points such as improvements in the quality of various services available to patients and the efforts of individuals and societies, in addition to medical progress in diagnosis and treatment. This review will mainly describe the changes made since the 7th report. Some of the main modifications are the deletion of single lesion paucibacillary type, elongated treatment of patients with high bacterial indices, the introduction of promising new drugs, and a shift from reducing the statistical number of patients to a new target for disability prevention.

  7. Review of design approaches of advanced pressurized LWRs. Report of a technical committee meeting and workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop was devoted to review and discuss differences and commonalties in the various design approaches with the aim of increasing the understanding of the design decisions taken, and a number of general conclusions were drawn. Though many differences in design approaches were found in the presentations, a number of common features could also be identified. These included design approaches to achieve further improvements with respect to safety, design simplification, reduction in cost, incorporation of feedback from operating experience, and control room improvements regarding human factors and digitization. Design approaches to achieve further improvements in safety included consideration of severe accidents in the design process, increased thermal margins and water inventories, longer grace periods and double containments. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Report of the Review Committee on the BNL colliding beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) proposal by BNL for a pp collider of 400 GeV /times/ 400 GeV with a maximum luminosity /Brit pounds/ = 2 /times/ 10 33 was reviewed by a DOE team, including consultants, on April 11--15, 1983. No major flaws were found that would prevent, in principle, the proposed collider from reaching its design goals. BNL has made sufficient progress in their superconducting magnet RandD program that, although there is not yet a magnet of the CBA baseline design, the Committee believes the design can be achieved. However, to ensure prompt completion of the project, substantial RandD needs to be carried out in short order, particularly on the timely and cost-effective production of magnets, reliability of quench protection, and determination of cryogenic heat loads

  9. Review of design approaches of advanced pressurized LWRs. Report of a technical committee meeting and workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop was devoted to review and discuss differences and commonalties in the various design approaches with the aim of increasing the understanding of the design decisions taken, and a number of general conclusions were drawn. Though many differences in design approaches were found in the presentations, a number of common features could also be identified. These included design approaches to achieve further improvements with respect to safety, design simplification, reduction in cost, incorporation of feedback from operating experience, and control room improvements regarding human factors and digitization. Design approaches to achieve further improvements in safety included consideration of severe accidents in the design process, increased thermal margins and water inventories, longer grace periods and double containments. Refs, figs and tabs.

  10. E-survey with researchers, members of ethics committees and sponsors of clinical research in Brazil: an emerging methodology for scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainesi, Sonia Mansoldo; Goldbaum, Moisés

    2012-12-01

    The growth of Internet users enables epidemiological studies to be conducted electronically, representing a promising methodology for data collection. Members of Ethics Committees, Clinical Researchers and Sponsors were interviewed using questionnaires sent over the Internet. Along with the questionnaire, participants received a message explaining the survey and also the informed consent. Returning the questionnaire meant the consent of the participant was given. No incentive was offered; two reminders were sent. The response rate was 21% (124/599), 20% (58/290) and 45% (24/53) respectively for Ethics Committees, Researchers and Sponsors. The percentage of return before the two reminders was about 62%. Reasons for non-response: participant not found, refusal to participate, lack of experience in clinical research or in the therapeutic field. Characteristics of participants: 45% of Ethics Committee participants, 64% of Researchers and 63% of Sponsors were male; mean age (range), respectively: 47 (28-74), 53 (24-72) and 40 (29-65) years. Among Researchers and Sponsors, all respondents had at least a university degree and, in the Ethics Committees group, only two (1.7%) did not have one. Most of the questionnaires in all groups came from the Southeast Region of Brazil, probably reflecting the highest number of clinical trials and research professionals in this region. Despite the potential limitations of a survey done through the Internet, this study led to a response rate similar to what has been observed with other models, efficiency in obtaining responses (speed and quality), convenience for respondents and low cost.

  11. Networking 2.0: Expanding your collaboration circles through the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, J. A.; Bowden, S.; Stephenson, S. N.; Starkweather, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) envisions a prosperous, sustainable, and healthy Arctic understood through innovative and collaborative research coordinated among Federal agencies and domestic and international partners. IARPC's approach is to harnesses the talent of the scientific and stakeholder community through Federally-run but broadly open collaboration teams, and an innovative website that expands the frontiers of collaborative research. The Obama Administration released the five-year Arctic Research Plan: FY2013-2017 in February 2013. The Plan focuses on advancing knowledge and sustainability of the Arctic by improving collaboration in seven priority research areas: sea ice and marine ecosystems, terrestrial ice and ecosystems, atmospheric studies, observing systems, regional climate models, human health studies, and adaptation tools for communities. From these seven research areas, 12 collaboration teams were formed to respond to the 145 milestones laid out in the Plan. The collaboration teams are charged with enhancing inter-institutional and interdisciplinary implementation of scientific research on local, regional, and circumpolar environmental and societal issues in the Arctic. The collaboration teams are co-chaired by Federal program managers, and, in some cases, external partners and are open to research and stakeholder communities. They meet on a regular basis by web- or teleconference to inform one another about ongoing and planned programs and new research results, as well as to inventory existing programs, identify gaps in knowledge and research, and address and implement the Plan's milestones. In-between meetings, team members communicate via our innovative, user-driven, collaboration website. Members share information about their research activities by posting updates, uploading documents, and including events on our calendar, and entering into dialogue about their research activities. Conversations taking place on the

  12. Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2011-01-01

    By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

  13. Building Research Capacity for Systematic Reviews | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... is addressing this gap, summarizing the best available primary research on digital ... Systematic reviews are used to appraise relevant research and synthesize ... The health sciences field uses them widely to inform studies and evaluate ...

  14. Sandia Combustion Research: Technical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report contains reports from research programs conducted at the Sandia Combustion Research Facility. Research is presented under the following topics: laser based diagnostics; combustion chemistry; reacting flow; combustion in engines and commercial burners; coal combustion; and industrial processing. Individual projects were processed separately for entry onto the DOE databases.

  15. Congressional hearing reviews NSF major research and facilities projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    An 8 March congressional hearing about the U.S. National Science Foundation's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (NSF MREFC) account focused on fiscal management and accountability of projects in that account and reviewed concerns raised by NSF's Office of Inspector General (OIG). NSF established the MREFC account in 1995 to better plan and manage investments in major equipment and facilities projects, which can cost from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars, and the foundation has funded 17 MREFC projects since then. The Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget includes funding for four MREFC projects: Advanced Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory (AdvLIGO), Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), National Ecological Observatory (NEON), and Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The hearing, held by a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, reviewed management oversight throughout the life cycles of MREFC projects and concerns raised in recent OIG reports about the use of budget contingency funds. NSF's February 2012 manual called "Risk management guide for large facilities" states that cost contingency is "that portion of the project budget required to cover `known unknowns,'" such as planning and estimating errors and omissions, minor labor or material price fluctuations, and design developments and changes within the project scope. Committee members acknowledged measures that NSF has made to improve the MREFC oversight process, but they also urged the agency to continue to take steps to ensure better project management.

  16. Strategically Reviewing the Research Literature in Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.; Cooper, Robin; Desir, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Reviewing literature in qualitative research can be challenging in terms of why, when, where, and how we should access third-party sources in our work, especially for novice qualitative researchers. As a pragmatic solution, we suggest qualitative researchers utilize research literature in four functional ways: (a) define the phenomenon in…

  17. Evaluation and review of planning for greater-confinement disposal by the Independent Peer Review Committee, July 9-10, 1985. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    This evaluation and review was performed under contract by Argonne National Laboratory in support of their role for developing the ''Planning for Greater Confinement Disposal'' Document for the Low-Level Waste Management Program Office for the Department of Energy, Office of Defense Waste and Byproducts Management. The Independent Peer Review Committee was composed of 13 well-qualified and recognized experts in their fields and pertinent disciplines, collectively representing considerable expertise and experience in waste disposal operations, waste management, environmental assessment and impact analysis, and other aspects of radioactive waste disposal. The members of the Peer Review Committee, their organizations, and thier area of expertise are given in Appendix 1. The general consensus of the Independent Review Committee was that the ''Planning for Greater-Confinement Disposal'' document was reasonably comprehensive, covering nearly all topics necessary to provide a good planning guide. There is, however, a definite need to reorganize the document into two volumes with appendices and the relationship of the GCD document to other LLWMP documents needs to be clarified in the introductory volume. Specific recommendations made by the committee on the DCD document are given in Section 3.2. Recommendations by the committee that have a somewhat broader scope than just the GCD document are given in Section 3.3

  18. Research reactor instrumentation and control technology. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The majority of research reactors operating today were put into operation 20 years ago, and some of them underwent modifications, upgrading and refurbishing since their construction to meet the requirements for higher neutron fluxes. However, a few of these ageing research reactors are still operating with their original instrumentation and control systems (I and C) which are important for reactor safety to guard against abnormal occurrences and reactor control involving startup, shutdown and power regulation. Worn and obsolete I and C systems cause operational problems as well as difficulties in obtaining replacement parts. In addition, satisfying the stringent safety conditions laid out by the nuclear regulatory bodies requires the modernization of research reactors I and C systems and integration of additional instrumentation units to the reactor. In order to clarify these issues and to provide some guidance to reactor operators on state-of-art technology and future trends for the I and C systems for research reactors, a Technical Committee Meeting on Technology and Trends for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Controls was held in Ljubljana, Slovenia, from 4 to 8 December 1995. This publication summarizes the discussions and recommendations resulting from that meeting. This is expected to benefit the research reactor operators planning I and C improvements. Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination second annual report, July 1, 1985--June 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, A.L.

    1996-06-30

    This is the second annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, to replace the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET) and reports to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Executive Office of the President. Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy. During CIRRPC`s second year, the member agencies have called upon this interagency resource to assist in coordinating science and policy issues and to provide a vehicle to accomplish multiagency tasks.

  20. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination second annual report, July 1, 1985--June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    This is the second annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, to replace the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET) and reports to the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), Executive Office of the President. Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy. During CIRRPC's second year, the member agencies have called upon this interagency resource to assist in coordinating science and policy issues and to provide a vehicle to accomplish multiagency tasks

  1. 10 CFR 1.19 - Other committees, boards, and panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... philosophy of nuclear regulatory research. The committee conducts specialized studies when requested by the... Mile Island, Unit 2. (c) The Nuclear Safety Research Review Committee (NSRRC) was established by the... of Nuclear Regulatory Research on important management matters in the direction of the Commission's...

  2. Young people's views about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees: findings from the PEARL qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, Suzanne; Brown, Lindsey; Campbell, Rona; Boyd, Andy; Macleod, John

    2016-09-02

    Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a birth cohort study within which the Project to Enhance ALSPAC through Record Linkage (PEARL) was established to enrich the ALSPAC resource through linkage between ALSPAC participants and routine sources of health and social data. PEARL incorporated qualitative research to seek the views of young people about data linkage, including their opinions about appropriate safeguards and research governance. In this paper we focus on views expressed about the purpose and composition of research ethics committees. Digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 48 participants aged 17-19 years. Participants were asked about whether medical research should be monitored and controlled, their knowledge of research ethics committees, who should sit on these committees and what their role should be. Interview recordings were fully transcribed and anonymised. Thematic analysis was undertaken, assisted by the Framework approach to data management. The majority of interviewees had little or no specific knowledge of ethics committees. Once given basic information about research ethics committees, only three respondents suggested there was no need for such bodies to scrutinise research. The key tasks of ethics committees were identified as monitoring the research process and protecting research participants. The difficulty of balancing the potential to inhibit research against the need to protect research participants was acknowledged. The importance of relevant research and professional expertise was identified but it was also considered important to represent wider public opinion, and to counter the bias potentially associated with self-selection possibly through a selection process similar to 'jury duty'. There is a need for more education and public awareness about the role and composition of research ethics committees. Despite an initial lack of knowledge, interviewees were able to contribute their ideas and balance

  3. Uterine transplantation: Review in human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Inhofer, A; Rafii, A; Carbonnel, M; Revaux, A; Ayoubi, J M

    2018-06-01

    Uterine transplantation is the solution to treat absolute uterine fertility. In this review, we present the historical, medical, technical, psychological and ethical perspectives in human uterine transplantation research. We reviewed the PubMed database following PRISMA guidelines and added data presented by several research teams during the first international congress on uterine transplantation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Employability: Review and Research Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Laure; Bernaud, Jean-Luc; Gouvernet, Brice; Rossier, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Professional transition, employment, and reemployment are major concerns for nations facing adverse economic situations. The employability construct represents a scientific challenge in order to better understand the relationship between the job seekers' issues and the expectations of the world of work. This paper presents a review of the concept…

  5. Impact of three years training on operations capacities of research ethics committees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folayan, Morenike Oluwatoyin; Adaranijo, Aisha; Durueke, Florita; Ajuwon, Ademola; Adejumo, Adebayo; Ezechi, Oliver; Oyedeji, Kola; Akanni, Olayide

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes a three-year project designed to build the capacity of members of research ethics committes to perform their roles and responsibilities efficiently and effectively. The project participants were made up of a cross-section of the membership of 13 Research Ethics Committees (RECs) functioning in Nigeria. They received training to develop their capacity to evaluate research protocols, monitor trial implementation, provide constructive input to trial staff, and assess the trial's success in promoting community engagement in the research. Following the training, technical assistance was provided to participants on an ongoing basis and the project's impacts were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively. Results indicate that sustained investment in capacity building efforts (including training, ongoing technical assistance, and the provision of multiple tools) improved the participants' knowledge of both the ethical principles relevant to biomedical research and how effective REC should function. Such investment was also shown to have a positive impact on the knowledge levels of other RECs members (those who did not receive training) and the overall operations of the RECs to which the participants belonged. Building the capacity of REC members to fulfill their roles effectively requires sustained effort and investment and pays off by enabling RECs to fulfill their essential mission of ensuring that trials are conducted safely and ethically. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. 77 FR 3780 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. The...

  7. 78 FR 20663 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function..., Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA. FDA intends to...

  8. 76 FR 44016 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research...

  9. Unintended consequences of human research ethics committees: au revoir workplace studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, Greg J; Sappey, Jennifer

    2007-07-01

    To protect the welfare and rights of participants in research and to facilitate research that will be of benefit, as well as protect them against litigation, universities and research-funding agencies in Australia adopted the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Humans (NHMRC 1999). In many other countries there are similar statements. However, the ways in which such statements are often implemented by Human Research Ethics Committees (HRECs) are in conflict with an important stream of industrial sociological research. This stream seeks to deconstruct workplaces and de-layer management rhetoric to understand the realities and complexities of the social relations of production. There is a pluralist basis for much industrial sociology that challenges the unitarist view of the workplace as essentially harmonious. While views of workplaces as being conflictual and exploitative have to be tempered with an understanding of the accommodative and cooperative nature of workplace relations, there is nevertheless a general recognition of acts of resistance, as well as those of cooperation. The way in which the National Statement is typically implemented in Australia means that many HRECs require written, informed consent, which in the first instance will usually be that of management. An unintended consequence is a research focus on consensus, which is at best one-sided and at worst seriously misleading. It is unlikely that managerial consent will be granted unless there is a 'good news story' guaranteed. This article explores the ways in which HRECs may influence workplace research. The publication of the revised National Statement provides a valuable opportunity not to be missed by HRECs to implement more effective and efficient practices which would not have the unintended consequences of the earlier version. This would deserve the support of researchers in industrial sociology and other branches of the social sciences.

  10. Organizing Committee Advisory Committee 187

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organizing Committee. V M Datar (Chairman). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. D C Biswas (Convener). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. K Mahata (Secretary). Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Z Ahmed. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. P V Bhagwat.

  11. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Seventh semi-annual status report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    This seventh semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1991 through September 1991. It includes a summary and minutes of the General Committee meeting, progress summaries of ongoing POC contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months. The meeting included test plan with Western coal, seed regeneration economics, power management for the integrated topping cycle and status of the Clean Coal Technology Proposal activities. Appendices cover CDIF operations HRSR development, CFFF operations etc.

  12. [Accreditation of Independent Ethics Committees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiro Avilés, Miguel A

    According to Law 14/2007 and Royal Decree 1090/2015, biomedical research must be assessed by an Research Ethics Committee (REC), which must be accredited as an Research ethics committee for clinical trials involving medicinal products (RECm) if the opinion is issued for a clinical trial involving medicinal products or clinical research with medical devices. The aim of this study is to ascertain how IEC and IECm accreditation is regulated. National and regional legislation governing biomedical research was analysed. No clearly-defined IEC or IECm accreditation procedures exist in the national or regional legislation. Independent Ethics Committees are vital for the development of basic or clinical biomedical research, and they must be accredited by an external body in order to safeguard their independence, multidisciplinary composition and review procedures. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Radioactive Operations Committee Review of the Intermediate-Level Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 2531 February 17, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, B.; Brooksbank, R.E.

    1972-01-01

    A subcommittee of the Radioactive Operations Committee met with the Operators of the Intermediate Level Waste Evaporator Facility on February 17, 1972, to discuss the status of the facility and its operations since the review of October 7, 1970, and reported in ORNL-CF-70-11-12. This review was made to determine the status of the ILWEF since the last review, to discuss compliance with previously recommended changes, and to review any new items of safety significance. Several recommendations were made.

  14. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Pre-review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research program of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  15. Naval Research Laboratory 1986 Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    probabil- infinitesimal impedance elements cannot be dep- ity density, icted .) If PR (r. 1 is the joint probability den- sity function for r and 1, a...Dynamics. 1-5 Sept. 1986, finse Research. Medellin , Colombia. % Rosenblum, L.J., Chairperson, IEEE Computer Saks, N.S., Coorganizer and lecturer, IEEE

  16. African Research Review: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  17. Participatory action research: considerations for ethical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanlou, N; Peter, E

    2005-05-01

    This paper addresses the distinctive nature of participatory action research (PAR) in relation to ethical review requirements. As a framework for conducting research and reducing health disparities, PAR is gaining increased attention in community and public health research. As a result, PAR researchers and members of Research Ethics Boards could benefit from an increased understanding of the array of ethical concerns that can arise. We discuss these concerns in light of commonly held ethical requirements for clinical research (social or scientific value, scientific validity, fair subject/participant selection, favourable risk-benefit ratio, independent review, informed consent, and respect for potential and enrolled participants) and refer to guidelines specifically developed for participatory research in health promotion. We draw from our community-based experiences in mental health promotion research with immigrant and culturally diverse youth to illustrate the ethical advantages and challenges of applying a PAR approach. We conclude with process suggestions for Research Ethics Boards.

  18. Review and evaluation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety research program for Fiscal Year 1983. Report to the Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    Public Law 95-209 includes a requirement that the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards submit an annual report to Congress on the safety research program of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report presents the results of the ACRS review and evaluation of the NRC safety research program for Fiscal Year 1983. The report contains a number of comments and recommendations

  19. Developmental process and early phases of implementation for the United States Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research National Nutrition Research Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Congress first called for improved coordination of human nutrition research within and among federal departments and agencies in the 1977 Farm Bill. Today, the Interagency Committee on Human Nutrition Research (ICHNR) is charged with improving the planning, coordination, and commu...

  20. Review of domestic radiation biology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Chun; Song Lingli; Ai Zihui

    2011-01-01

    Radiation biology research in China during the past ten years are reviewed. It should be noticed that radiation-biology should focus on microdosimetry, microbeam application, and radiation biological mechanism. (authors)

  1. Systematic reviews in pain research: methodology refined

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McQuay, H. J; Kalso, Eija; Moore, R. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    "Presents invited papers from the 6th IASP Research Symposium, Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses in Pain, held in Spain in September 2006, organized by the International Collaboration on Evidence...

  2. A deviation from standard design? Clinical trials, research ethics committees, and the regulatory co-construction of organizational deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoe, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Focusing on the high-profile drug disaster at London's Northwick Park Hospital in 2006, this article explores how such an event can be seen as an example of organizational deviance co-constructed between the company running the research and the research ethics committee which approved the trial. This deviance was the result of the normalization of a specific dosing practice in the broader regulatory field, allowing the researchers and regulators to take a risky dosing strategy for granted as best practice. Drawing on the work of Diane Vaughan, this article uses interview data with researchers and members of the research ethics committee concerned as well as documentary material, to show how work group cultures between regulators and those they are intended to oversee are maintained, and how the culturally embedded assumptions of such work groups can result in organizational and regulatory deviance.

  3. Stellarator Research Opportunities: A report of the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, David A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Anderson, David [University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2017-06-01

    This document is the product of a stellarator community workshop, organized by the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee and referred to as Stellcon, that was held in Cambridge, Massachusetts in February 2016, hosted by MIT. The workshop was widely advertised, and was attended by 40 scientists from 12 different institutions including national labs, universities and private industry, as well as a representative from the Department of Energy. The final section of this document describes areas of community wide consensus that were developed as a result of the discussions held at that workshop. Areas where further study would be helpful to generate a consensus path forward for the US stellarator program are also discussed. The program outlined in this document is directly responsive to many of the strategic priorities of FES as articulated in “Fusion Energy Sciences: A Ten-Year Perspective (2015-2025)” [2]. The natural disruption immunity of the stellarator directly addresses “Elimination of transient events that can be deleterious to toroidal fusion plasma confinement devices” an area of critical importance for the U.S. fusion energy sciences enterprise over the next decade. Another critical area of research “Strengthening our partnerships with international research facilities,” is being significantly advanced on the W7-X stellarator in Germany and serves as a test-bed for development of successful international collaboration on ITER. This report also outlines how materials science as it relates to plasma and fusion sciences, another critical research area, can be carried out effectively in a stellarator. Additionally, significant advances along two of the Research Directions outlined in the report; “Burning Plasma Science: Foundations - Next-generation research capabilities”, and “Burning Plasma Science: Long pulse - Sustainment of Long-Pulse Plasma Equilibria” are proposed.

  4. Stellarator Research Opportunities: A Report of the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, D. A.; Anderson, D.; Anderson, S.; Zarnstorff, M.; Spong, D. A.; Weitzner, H.; Neilson, G. H.; Ruzic, D.; Andruczyk, D.; Harris, J. H.; Mynick, H.; Hegna, C. C.; Schmitz, O.; Talmadge, J. N.; Curreli, D.; Maurer, D.; Boozer, A. H.; Knowlton, S.; Allain, J. P.; Ennis, D.; Wurden, G.; Reiman, A.; Lore, J. D.; Landreman, M.; Freidberg, J. P.; Hudson, S. R.; Porkolab, M.; Demers, D.; Terry, J.; Edlund, E.; Lazerson, S. A.; Pablant, N.; Fonck, R.; Volpe, F.; Canik, J.; Granetz, R.; Ware, A.; Hanson, J. D.; Kumar, S.; Deng, C.; Likin, K.; Cerfon, A.; Ram, A.; Hassam, A.; Prager, S.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Pueschel, M. J.; Joseph, I.; Glasser, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    This document is the product of a stellarator community workshop, organized by the National Stellarator Coordinating Committee and referred to as Stellcon, that was held in Cambridge, Massachusetts in February 2016, hosted by MIT. The workshop was widely advertised, and was attended by 40 scientists from 12 different institutions including national labs, universities and private industry, as well as a representative from the Department of Energy. The final section of this document describes areas of community wide consensus that were developed as a result of the discussions held at that workshop. Areas where further study would be helpful to generate a consensus path forward for the US stellarator program are also discussed. The program outlined in this document is directly responsive to many of the strategic priorities of FES as articulated in "Fusion Energy Sciences: A Ten-Year Perspective (2015-2025)" [1]. The natural disruption immunity of the stellarator directly addresses "Elimination of transient events that can be deleterious to toroidal fusion plasma confinement devices" an area of critical importance for the US fusion energy sciences enterprise over the next decade. Another critical area of research "Strengthening our partnerships with international research facilities," is being significantly advanced on the W7-X stellarator in Germany and serves as a test-bed for development of successful international collaboration on ITER. This report also outlines how materials science as it relates to plasma and fusion sciences, another critical research area, can be carried out effectively in a stellarator. Additionally, significant advances along two of the Research Directions outlined in the report; "Burning Plasma Science: Foundations - Next-generation research capabilities", and "Burning Plasma Science: Long pulse - Sustainment of Long-Pulse Plasma Equilibria" are proposed.

  5. Advancing research collaborations among agencies through the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee: A necessary step for linking science to policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaValley, M.; Starkweather, S.; Bowden, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Arctic is changing rapidly as average temperatures rise. As an Arctic nation, the United States is directly affected by these changes. It is imperative that these changes be understood to make effective policy decisions. Since the research needs of the Arctic are large and wide-ranging, most Federal agencies fund some aspect of Arctic research. As a result, the U.S. government regularly works to coordinate Federal Arctic research in order to reduce duplication of effort and costs, and to enhance the research's system perspective. The government's Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee (IARPC) accomplishes this coordination through its policy-driven five-year Arctic Research Plans and collaboration teams (CTs), which are research topic-oriented teams tasked with implementing the plans. The policies put forth by IARPC thus inform science, however IARPC has been less successful of making these science outcomes part of an iterative decision making process. IARPC's mandate to facilitate coordinated research through information sharing communities can be viewed a prerequisite step in the science-to- decision making process. Research collaborations and the communities of practice facilitated by IARPC allow scientists to connect with a wider community of scientists and stakeholders and, in turn, the larger issues in need of policy solutions. These connections help to create a pathway through which research may increasingly reflect policy goals and inform decisions. IARPC has been growing into a more useful model for the science-to-decision making interface since the publication of its Arctic Research Plan FY2017-2021, and it is useful to evaluate how and why IARPC is progressing in this realm. To understand the challenges facing interagency research collaboration and the progress IARPC has made, the Chukchi Beaufort and Communities CTs, were evaluated as case studies. From the case studies, several recommendations for enhancing collaborations across Federal

  6. Review on Ruminant Nutrition Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Haryanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research works in ruminant nutrition have been widely published, especially those related to the energy and protein utilization. The energy and protein requirements for maintenance and production in tropical regions may be different from those in the subtropical areas. Responses of different species of ruminants to energy and protein supplements were also observed. The synchronization of energy and protein availability has been considered as an important strategy in affecting the microbial fermentative process in the rumen and in affecting the animal performance. The inclusion of long-chained unsaturated fatty acids in the diets has been successfully affecting milk production with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. Feedstuffs characteristics in terms of their degradability and fermentation by rumen microbial enzymes have been intensively studied; however, further experimentations are still needed to elucidate the specific fate of its nutritive components in the rumen and tissue levels.

  7. Historical review of radiation research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, F.

    1979-01-01

    The outline of the history of radiation research in Japan is written in connection with the names of researchers. Yoshio Nishina was a pioneer, who derived the Klein-Nishina formula for the scattering of hard X-ray by free electrons. In 1935, the first nuclear experiment laboratory was constructed in the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research. Two cyclotrons, 26 in and 60 in pole face diameter, and a high voltage Cockcroft-Walton type ion accelerator were installed. Irradiation of insects and plants with fast neutrons was attempted to examine the biological effect. In August, 1945, atomic bombs exploded in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In 1950, radioisotopes were available. In early March, 1954, Bikini accident occurred. One fishing vessel was contaminated by radioactive fallout, and to investigate the effect of radioactivity, a committee consisted of investigators of physics, chemistry, medicine, biology, fisheries and geophysics was organized. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute was established in June, 1956. Several institutions for the peaceful use of atomic energy were established. The hybrid spark chamber to image the distribution of β-emitting isotopes on a plane surface was constructed in Nagoya University. As for the national project on food irradiation, one laboratory has played the role in irradiation techniques. Researches on radiation chemistry in universities, governmental and commercial organizations have been progressing steadily, and the machines for nanosecond to picosecond pulse radiolysis are working. (Yamashita, S.)

  8. Research ethics committees in the regulation of clinical research: comparison of Finland to England, Canada, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina

    2016-01-19

    The aim of this paper is to compare common features and variation in the work of research ethics committees (RECs) in Finland to three other countries - England, Canada, the United States of America (USA) - in the late 2000s. Several approaches and data sources were used, including semi- or unstructured interviews of experts, documents, previous reports, presentations in meetings and observations. A theoretical framework was created and data from various sources synthesized. In Finland, RECs were regulated by a medical research law, whereas in the other countries many related laws and rules guided RECs; drug trials had specific additional rules. In England and the USA, there was a REC control body. In all countries, members were voluntary and included lay-persons, and payment arrangements varied. Patient protection was the main ethics criteria, but other criteria (research advancement, availability of results, payments, detailed fulfilment of legislation) varied. In all countries, RECs had been given administrative duties. Variations by country included the mandate, practical arrangements, handling of multi-site research, explicitness of proportionate handlings, judging scientific quality, time-limits for decisions, following of projects, role in institute protection, handling conflicts of interests, handling of projects without informed consent, and quality assurance research. The division of work between REC members and secretariats varied in checking of formalities. In England, quality assurance of REC work was thorough, fairly thorough in the USA, and not performed in Finland. The work of RECs in the four countries varied notably. Various deficiencies in the system require action, for which international comparison can provide useful insights.

  9. National Kitchen Research Survey. A Report to the Curricula Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Craft Curricula and Certification Board for the Hotel, Catering and Tourism Industry, Dublin (Ireland).

    In 1983, as part of its overall review of craft catering education and training in Ireland, the National Craft Curricula and Certification Board commissioned a nationwide research study of the trends and developments in professional kitchen practice in all sectors of the hotel and catering industry. The study was conducted through interviews with…

  10. Introductory materials for committee members: 1) instructions for the Los Alamos National Laboratory fiscal year 2010 capability reviews 2) NPAC strategic capability planning 3) Summary self-assessment for the nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics an

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Antonio [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors.

  11. Understanding Peer Review of Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    An important factor in the success of America's national research system is that federal funds for university-based research are awarded primarily through peer review, which uses panels of scientific experts, or "peers," to evaluate the quality of grant proposals. In this competitive process, proposals compete for resources based on their…

  12. Research in Review. Malnutrition and Children's Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joseph H., Jr.; Baxter, Delia H.

    1981-01-01

    Indicates how various degrees of malnutrition affect children's development. Reviews research conducted in several developing countries and the United States, and describes the nutritional status of children in the United States. Implications for nutrition programs, research and policy formation are pointed out. (Author/RH)

  13. Waiting Online: A Review and Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gerard; Valverde, Mireia

    2003-01-01

    Reviews 21 papers based on 13 separate empirical studies on waiting on the Internet, drawn from the areas of marketing, system response time, and quality of service studies. The article proposes an agenda for future research, including extending the range of research methodologies, broadening the definition of waiting on the Internet, and…

  14. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review (EASSRR) is a bi-annual journal published by the Organization for Social Science Research in Eastern Africa (OSSREA). Since the publication of its maiden ... Emerging regions in Ethiopia: are they catching up with the rest of Ethiopia? EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ...

  15. Urban metabolism: A review of research methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Urban metabolism analysis has become an important tool for the study of urban ecosystems. The problems of large metabolic throughput, low metabolic efficiency, and disordered metabolic processes are a major cause of unhealthy urban systems. In this paper, I summarize the international research on urban metabolism, and describe the progress that has been made in terms of research methodologies. I also review the methods used in accounting for and evaluating material and energy flows in urban metabolic processes, simulation of these flows using a network model, and practical applications of these methods. Based on this review of the literature, I propose directions for future research, and particularly the need to study the urban carbon metabolism because of the modern context of global climate change. Moreover, I recommend more research on the optimal regulation of urban metabolic systems. Highlights: •Urban metabolic processes can be analyzed by regarding cities as superorganisms. •Urban metabolism methods include accounting, assessment, modeling, and regulation. •Research methodologies have improved greatly since this field began in 1965. •Future research should focus on carbon metabolism and optimal regulation. -- The author reviews research progress in the field of urban metabolism, and based on her literature review, proposes directions for future research

  16. Review of current status of LWR safety research in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tasaburo; Mishima, Yoshitsugu; Ando, Yoshio; Miyazono, Shohachiro; Takashima, Yoichi.

    1977-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Commission has exerted efforts on the research of the safety of nuclear plants in Japan, and ''Nuclear plant safety research committees'' was established in August 1974, which is composed of the government and the people. The philosophy of safety research, research and development plan, the forwarding procedure of the plan, international cooperation, for example LOFT program, and the effective feed back of the experimental results concerning nuclear safety are reviewed in this paper at first. As for the safety of nuclear reactors the basic philosophy that radio active fission products are contained in fuel or reactors with multiple barriers, (defence in depth) and almost no fission product is released outside reactor plants even at the time of hypothetical accident, is kept, and the research and development history and the future plan are described in this paper with the related technical problems. The structural safety is also explained, for example, on the philosophy ''leak before break'', pipe rupture, pipe restraint and stress analysis. The release of radioactive gas and liquid is decreased as the philosophy ''ALAP''. And probability safety evaluation method, LOCA, reactivity, accident and aseismatic design in nuclear plants in Japan are described. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Review of Research: Neuroscience and Reading--A Review for Reading Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, George G.; Goswami, Usha

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we lay the groundwork for an interdisciplinary conversation between literacy education research and relevant neuroscience research. We review recent neuroscience research on correlates of proposed cognitive subprocesses in text decoding and reading comprehension and analyze some of the methodological and conceptual challenges of…

  18. Compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, 1957-1984. Volume 2. Project Reviews G-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This six-volume compilation contains over 1000 reports prepared by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards from September 1957 through December 1984. The reports are divided into two groups: Part 1: ACRS Reports on Project Reviews, and Part 2: ACRS Reports on Generic Subjects. Part 1 contains ACRS reports alphabetized by project name and within project name by chronological order. Part 2 categorizes the reports by the most appropriate generic subject area and within subject area by chronological order

  19. A review of the role and remit of the committee on climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, Peter G.; Kim Swales, J.; Winning, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic action on climate change requires a combination of solutions, in terms of institutions and policy instruments. One way of achieving government carbon policy goals may be the creation of an independent body to advise on, or set, monitor policy. This paper critically assesses the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), which was created in 2008 as an independent body to help move the UK towards a low-carbon economy. We look at the motivation for its creation. In particular we consider its ability to overcome a time-inconsistency problem by comparing it to another independent body, the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of England. In practice the CCC appears to be the “inverse” of the Monetary Policy Committee, in that it advises on what the policy goal should be rather than being held responsible for achieving it. The CCC incorporates both advisory and monitoring functions to inform government and achieve a credible carbon policy over a long time frame. This is a similar framework to that adopted by , but the CCC operates on a continuing basis and also incorporates a unique climate change monitoring function. - Highlights: ► Compares Committee on Climate Change with Monetary Policy Committee to solve time-inconsistency. ► No delegation of independent instrument to Committee on Climate Change. ► Committee on Climate Change best viewed as a continuous version of the Stern Report. ► Also additional monitoring function to check government progress on climate change.

  20. Research ethics committee decision-making in relation to an efficient neonatal trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, C; Hyde, M J; Modi, N

    2017-07-01

    Randomised controlled trials, a gold-standard approach to reduce uncertainties in clinical practice, are growing in cost and are often slow to recruit. We determined whether methodological approaches to facilitate large, efficient clinical trials were acceptable to UK research ethics committees (RECs). We developed a protocol in collaboration with parents, for a comparative-effectiveness, randomised controlled trial comparing two widely used blood transfusion practices in preterm infants. We incorporated four approaches to improve recruitment and efficiency: (i) point-of-care design using electronic patient records for patient identification, randomisation and data acquisition, (ii) short two-page information sheet; (iii) explicit mention of possible inclusion benefit; (iv) opt-out consent with enrolment as the default. With the support of the UK Health Research Authority, we submitted an identical protocol to 12 UK REC. RECs in the UK. Number of REC granting favourable opinions. The use of electronic patient records was acceptable to all RECs; one REC raised concerns about the short parent information sheet, 10 about inclusion benefit and 9 about opt-out consent. Following responses to queries, nine RECs granted a favourable final opinion and three rejected the application because they considered the opt-out consent process invalid. A majority of RECs in this study consider the use of electronic patient record data, short information sheets, opt-out consent and mention of possible inclusion benefit to be acceptable in neonatal comparative-effectiveness research. We identified a need for guidance for RECs in relation to opt-out consent processes. These methods provide opportunity to facilitate large randomised controlled trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Fuel cycle industrialization program prepared by N-Fuel Research Committee, ANRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    To meet the new situation resulting from the scaling down of nuclear power development plan in Japan, and the changes due to the new U.S. nuclear non-proliferation policy, the Nuclear Fuel Research Committee of the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy of MITI has prepared the ''Interim Report on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle''. It sets out in precise terms the methods that should be followed for establishing the nuclear fuel cycle in Japan. Major items treated in this report are; uranium ore development, promotion of uranium stockpiling, construction of domestic uranium enrichment plant, promotion of the construction of a nuclear fuel park, Pu utilization and cooperation in international movement for nuclear non-proliferation, and the establishment of measures for radioactive waste management. Discussions are made from technological, economical, and political view points. Also attached are a table of the comprehensive industrialization plan up to the year 2000 and a table of estimated nuclear fuel demand and supply in Japan.

  2. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  3. Institutional Ethics Committee Regulations and Current Updates in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahuli, Amit V; Mahuli, Simpy A; Patil, Shankargouda; Bhandi, Shilpa

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the review is to provide current updates on regulations for ethics committees and researchers in India. Ethical dilemmas in research since time immemorial have been a major concern for researchers worldwide. The question "what makes clinical research ethical" is significant and difficult to answer as multiple factors are involved. The research involving human participants in clinical trials should follow the required rules, regulations, and guidelines in one's own country. It is a dynamic process, and updates have to be learned by researcher and committee members. The review highlights the ethical regulation from the Drug Controller General of India, Clinical Trial Registry of India, and Indian Council of Medical Research guidelines. In this article, the updates on Indian scenario of the Ethical Committee and guidelines are compiled. The review comes handy for clinical researchers and ethics committee members in academic institutions to check on the current updates and keep abreast with the knowledge on regulations of ethics in India.

  4. 78 FR 60884 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-02

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Immunoregulation, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center for Biologics...

  5. 76 FR 13646 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Polysaccharides, Division of Bacterial, Parasitic, and Allergenic Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review...

  6. 76 FR 55397 - Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ...] Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug... public. Name of Committee: Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee. General Function... Laboratory of Method Development, Division of Viral Products, Office of Vaccines Research and Review, Center...

  7. A review of schizophrenia research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K Y; Salina, A A

    2014-08-01

    Research in schizophrenia has advanced tremendously. One hundred and seventy five articles related to Schizophrenia were found from a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. This project aims to examine published research articles, in local and international journals in order to provide a glimpse of the research interest in Malaysia with regards to schizophrenia. Single case study, case series report, reviews and registry reports were not included in this review. Medication trial, unless it concerned a wider scope of psychopharmacology was also excluded from this review. A total of 105 articles were included in this review. Despite numerous genetics studies conducted and published, a definitive conclusion on the aetiology or mechanism underlying schizophrenia remains elusive. The National Mental Health - Schizophrenia Registry (NMHR) proved to be an important platform for many studies and publications. Studies stemmed from NMHR have provided significant insight into the baseline characteristic of patients with schizophrenia, pathway to care, and outcomes of the illness. International and regional collaborations have also encouraged important work involving stigma and discrimination in schizophrenia. Ministry of Health's hospitals (MOH) are the main research sites in the country with regards to schizophrenia research. Numbers of schizophrenia research are still low in relation to the number of universities and hospitals in the country. Some of the weaknesses include duplication of studies, over-emphasising clinical trials and ignoring basic clinical research, and the lack of publications in international and regional journals.

  8. Tourism and environmental research: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, D G

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the nature and scope of research into the environmental impact of tourism, the role such research may play in tourist development and conservation and the constraints which may be encountered. Research in this field is characterized by a wide spectrum of generally complex interrelationships and impacts. In recent years there has been a growing call from policy-makers for environmental guidelines, indicators and other research but as yet a few immediate solutions to their problems and answers to their request are to hand. The complexity of the issues involved and other difficulties have also limited the extent to which research has been fed into the decision-making process.

  9. Quantitative Communication Research: Review, Trends, and Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. Levine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trends in quantitative communication research are reviewed. A content analysis of 48 articles reporting original communication research published in 1988-1991 and 2008-2011 is reported. Survey research and self-report measurement remain common approaches to research. Null hypothesis significance testing remains the dominant approach to statistical analysis. Reporting the shapes of distributions, estimates of statistical power, and confidence intervals remain uncommon. Trends over time include the increased popularity of health communication and computer mediated communication as topics of research, and increased attention to mediator and moderator variables. The implications of these practices for scientific progress are critically discussed, and suggestions for the future are provided.

  10. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the result of the evaluation by the committee on the research on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2007. (author)

  11. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on 'the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the result of the evaluation by the committee on the research on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2008. (author)

  12. Description and Evaluation of the Research Ethics Review Process in Japan: Proposed Measures for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mika; Sato, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) are designed to protect human subjects in research. It is essential to recognize whether the RECs are achieving this goal. Several studies have reported on RECs; however, detailed data regarding the quality of research protocols and the review process of RECs have not been reported in Japan. We examine research protocols reviewed by RECs and the review processes at three institutions using a novel checklist we developed. The data show that approximately half of all examined protocols lacked a clearly written "Background" section that defines the study rationale and design. These results reiterate suggestions made in previous research regarding educational programs and support departments that could enhance responsible conduct in clinical research to protect human subjects in Japan. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Computational physics and applied mathematics capability review June 8-10, 2010 (Advance materials to committee members)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Stephen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will review its Computational Physics and Applied Mathematics (CPAM) capabilities in 2010. The goals of capability reviews are to assess the quality of science, technology, and engineering (STE) performed by the capability, evaluate the integration of this capability across the Laboratory and within the scientific community, examine the relevance of this capability to the Laboratory's programs, and provide advice on the current and future directions of this capability. This is the first such review for CPAM, which has a long and unique history at the laboratory, starting from the inception of the Laboratory in 1943. The CPAM capability covers an extremely broad technical area at Los Alamos, encompassing a wide array of disciplines, research topics, and organizations. A vast array of technical disciplines and activities are included in this capability, from general numerical modeling, to coupled mUlti-physics simulations, to detailed domain science activities in mathematics, methods, and algorithms. The CPAM capability involves over 12 different technical divisions and a majority of our programmatic and scientific activities. To make this large scope tractable, the CPAM capability is broken into the following six technical 'themes.' These themes represent technical slices through the CP AM capability and collect critical core competencies of the Laboratory, each of which contributes to the capability (and each of which is divided into multiple additional elements in the detailed descriptions of the themes in subsequent sections): (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics - This theme speaks to the vast array of scientific capabilities for the simulation of fluids under shocks, low-speed flow, and turbulent conditions - which are key, historical, and fundamental strengths of the laboratory; (2) Partial Differential Equations - The technical scope of this theme is the applied mathematics and numerical solution of partial

  14. Transgender Parenting: A Review of Existing Research

    OpenAIRE

    Stotzer, Rebecca L; Herman, Jody L; Hasenbush, Amira

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this report reviewed 51 studies that analyze data about transgender parents. This report reviews the existing research on the prevalence and characteristics of transgender people who are parents, the quality of relationships between transgender parents and their children, outcomes for children with a transgender parent, and the reported needs of transgender parents. Overall, the authors found that substantial numbers of transgender people are parents, though at rates below the ...

  15. Governance and oversight of researcher access to electronic health data: the role of the Independent Scientific Advisory Committee for MHRA database research, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, P; Cassell, J A; Saunders, M H; Stevens, R

    2017-03-01

    In order to promote understanding of UK governance and assurance relating to electronic health records research, we present and discuss the role of the Independent Scientific Advisory Committee (ISAC) for MHRA database research in evaluating protocols proposing the use of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink. We describe the development of the Committee's activities between 2006 and 2015, alongside growth in data linkage and wider national electronic health records programmes, including the application and assessment processes, and our approach to undertaking this work. Our model can provide independence, challenge and support to data providers such as the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database which has been used for well over 1,000 medical research projects. ISAC's role in scientific oversight ensures feasible and scientifically acceptable plans are in place, while having both lay and professional membership addresses governance issues in order to protect the integrity of the database and ensure that public confidence is maintained.

  16. How to do human-subjects research if you do not have an institutional review board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Todd W

    2008-10-01

    Biomedical research with human subjects has expanded outside of traditional medical centers and hospitals into other health care entities, such as rehabilitation facilities, free-standing out-patient treatment centers, and even home-health agencies. Regardless of the location, federal regulations mandate that all human-subjects research must be overseen by an institutional review board (IRB) or ethics committee to ensure the research abide by the Code of Federal Regulations. Consequently, all human-subjects research must be reviewed and approved by an IRB prior to initiation of any research procedures. Unfortunately, many of these nontraditional research facilities do not have easy access to an IRB. This does not render such research exempt from federal oversight. Clinicians at these facilities have viable options for obtaining IRB approval and legally conducting such research. This paper outlines the available options and their pros and cons.

  17. Re-Viewing Literature in Hermeneutic Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Smythe PhD, RN, RM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In academia there seems to be a taken for granted assumption that there is one way to do a literature review. This paper argues that the manner of reviewing literature needs to be congruent with the particular research methodology. As an example, the authors explicate reviewing literature in hermeneutic research. The paper begins by discussing philosophical assumptions. The authors then offer personal accounts of their experiences of working with literature in ways that are congruent with hermeneutic methodology. It is argued that the key purpose of exploring literature in hermeneutic research is to provide context and provoke thinking. Literature, which can include anything that provokes thinking on the phenomenon of interest, becomes an essential dialogical partner from which scholarly thinking and new insights emerge. In conclusion distinguishing hallmarks of ways of working hermeneutically with literature are articulated

  18. Compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, 1957-1984. Volume 1. Project Reviews A-F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This six-volume compilation contains over 1000 reports prepared by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards from September 1957 through December 1984. The reports are divided into two groups: Part 1: ACRS Reports on Project Reviews, and Part 2: ACRS Reports on Generic Subjects. Part 1 contains ACRS reports alphabetized by project name and within project name by chronological order. Part 2 categorizes the reports by the most appropriate generic subject area and within subject area by chronological order. This volume contains project reviews arranged alphabetically from A to F

  19. Great Lakes Research Review, 1982. Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    7D-i53 28 GREAT LAKES RESEARCH REVIEW 1982 PPENDICES (U) / PETROLEUM REFINERY PO INT SOURCE TASK FORCE WINDSOR (ONTARIO) NOV 82UNCLASSIFIED F/G 8...C7 U. 3 X 7 45 1 2 0. ODm C of. C.’ WC.’ L. LI 7 R-Ri53 62B GREAT LKES RESEARCH REVIEW 1982 PPENDICES (U) 2/3 PETROLEUM REFINERY POINT SOURCE TASK...NUMBER ORGANIZATION* TITLE OF PROJECT 001 A** 0300 ERL-D Acute and Early Life Stage Toxicity Testing of Priority Pollutant Chemicals 002 A 0302 ERL-D

  20. A Case-Study of the Resources and Functioning of Two Research Ethics Committees in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenneville, Tiffany; Menezes, Lynette; Kosambiya, Jayendrakumar; Baxi, Rajendra

    2016-12-01

    Assessing the resources and functioning of research ethics committees (RECs) in low-resource settings poses many challenges. We conducted a case study of two medical college RECs (A and B) in Western India utilizing the Research Ethics Committee Quality Assurance Self-Assessment Tool (RECQASAT) as well as in-depth interviews with representative members to evaluate REC effectiveness. REC A and B obtained 62% and 67% of allowable points on the RECQASAT. These scores together with findings from the in-depth interviews suggest the need for significant improvement in REC effectiveness particularly in the areas of membership and educational training, organizational aspects, recording minutes, communicating decisions, and REC resources. Developing evidence-based best practices and strengthening infrastructure are essential to enhancing REC efficacy in low-resource countries.

  1. Radioactivity in the terrestrial environment; review of UK research 1993-1996 and recommendations for future work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The national Radioactivity Research and Environmental Monitoring Committee (RADREM) provides a forum for liaison on UK research and monitoring in the radioactive substances and radioactive waste management fields. It is subscribed to by Government departments, national regulatory bodies, the UK nuclear industry and other bodies with relevant research sponsorship and monitoring interests. A key function of the RADREM committee is to ensure that there is no unnecessary overlap between or significant omission from the research sponsored by the organisations represented upon it. To this end periodic reviews of research sector programmes are carried out. This report covers a review which was carried out by the Terrestrial Environment Sub-Committee (TESC) of RADREM for the period 1993-1996. In particular possible future research requirements are considered and evaluated. Such omissions are as identified do not reflect Sub-Committee views on the adequacy of any individual organisations research programme. Rather they should be seen as areas where gaps in knowledge may exist, which all organisations are free to consider and prioritise in the formulation of their future research requirements. (author)

  2. A need for an augmented review when reviewing rehabilitation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Lynn H; Nava, Andrew; Garfinkel, Steven; Goel, Divya; Weinstein, Ali A; Cai, Cindy

    2016-10-01

    There is a need for additional strategies for performing systematic reviews (SRs) to improve translation of findings into practice and to influence health policy. SRs critically appraise research methodology and determine level of evidence of research findings. The standard type of SR identifies randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as providing the most valid data and highest level of evidence. RCTs are not among the most frequently used research design in disability and health research. RCTs usually measure impairments for the primary research outcome rather than improved function, participation or societal integration. It forces a choice between "validity" and "utility/relevance." Other approaches have effectively been used to assess the validity of alternative research designs, whose outcomes focus on function and patient-reported outcomes. We propose that utilizing existing evaluation tools that measure knowledge, dissemination and utility of findings, may help improve the translation of findings into practice and health policy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Research Review: Death Online - Alive and Kicking!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotved, Stine

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the physical death, the related grief, and the ensuing memorials has become visible in the digital arena. As every other aspect of life is to be found online, so are death and the surrounding issues. The research into the area is not far behind, and using the approach of a timeline...... with different stakeholders, this research review offers a systematic way of keeping track. The rather simple timeline relates to the death of a person, there is before, just around, and after death, appropriately named in a dead language: Ante Mortem, Peri Mortem, and Post Mortem. This review deals exclusively...... with the digital context of the physical death of existing human beings, as opposed to, e.g., in-game death experience or memorials for fictional characters. These are no doubt interesting issues that deserve their own review, although we might need to put citation marks around "death"....

  4. Research in Review: What Causes Cruelty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, Bill

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the problem of cruelty to animals from a research perspective. Studies of possible causes of childhood cruelty to animals are reviewed and common contributing environmental factors are identified. Implications for educators are discussed and directives for detection and prevention of cruelty are suggested. (ML)

  5. A Research Review of Nurse Teachers' Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatanovic, Tatjana; Havnes, Anton; Mausethagen, Sølvi

    2017-01-01

    The conceptions of what constitutes nursing competence and how such competence is taught and learned are changing, due to rapid changes in in the health sector. Nurse teachers' competencies for providing high-quality, up-to-date nursing education, are developing accordingly. This paper reviews the existing research on nurse teachers' competencies…

  6. Review of research in feature based design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, O.W.; van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Kals, H.J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Research in feature-based design is reviewed. Feature-based design is regarded as a key factor towards CAD/CAPP integration from a process planning point of view. From a design point of view, feature-based design offers possibilities for supporting the design process better than current CAD systems

  7. Narrative research in psychotherapy: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdi, Evrinomy; Georgaca, Eugenie

    2007-09-01

    This paper is a review of studies which utilise the notion of narrative to analyse psychotherapy. Its purpose is to systematically present this diverse field of research, to highlight common themes and divergences between different strands and to further the development and integration of narrative research in psychotherapy. The paper reviews studies which employ an applied textual analysis of narratives produced in the context of psychotherapy. Criteria for inclusion of studies are, firstly, the analysis of therapeutic and therapy-related texts and, secondly, the adoption of a narrative psychological perspective. The studies were examined on the basis of the notion of narrative they employ and the aspects of client narratives they focus on, and were grouped accordingly in the review. The majority of the studies reviewed assume a constructivist approach to narrative, adopt a representational view of language, focus primarily on client micro-narratives and relate to cognitive-constructivist and process-experiential psychotherapeutic approaches. A smaller group of studies assume a social constructionist approach to narrative and a functional view of language, focus on micro-narratives, highlight the interactional and wider social aspects of narrative and relate to postmodern trends in psychotherapy. The range of conceptualisations of narrative in the studies reviewed, from a representational psychological view to a constructionist social view, reflects tensions within narrative psychology itself. Moreover, two trends can be discerned in the field reviewed, narrative analysis of therapy, which draws from narrative theory and utilises the analytic approaches of narrative research to study psychotherapy, and analyses of narrative in therapy, which study client narratives using non-narrative qualitative methods. Finally, the paper highlights the need for integration of this diverse field of research and urges for the development of narrative studies of psychotherapy

  8. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators

  9. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  10. Grounded theory research: literature reviewing and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Gerry; Marland, Glenn R; Atkinson, Jacqueline

    2007-11-01

    This paper is a report of a discussion of the arguments surrounding the role of the initial literature review in grounded theory. Researchers new to grounded theory may find themselves confused about the literature review, something we ourselves experienced, pointing to the need for clarity about use of the literature in grounded theory to help guide others about to embark on similar research journeys. The arguments for and against the use of a substantial topic-related initial literature review in a grounded theory study are discussed, giving examples from our own studies. The use of theoretically sampled literature and the necessity for reflexivity are also discussed. Reflexivity is viewed as the explicit quest to limit researcher effects on the data by awareness of self, something seen as integral both to the process of data collection and the constant comparison method essential to grounded theory. A researcher who is close to the field may already be theoretically sensitized and familiar with the literature on the study topic. Use of literature or any other preknowledge should not prevent a grounded theory arising from the inductive-deductive interplay which is at the heart of this method. Reflexivity is needed to prevent prior knowledge distorting the researcher's perceptions of the data.

  11. Ocean Science for the Year 2000. A Report on an Inquiry by the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research and the Advisory Committee on Marine Resources Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission.

    This report, which examines expected major trends in ocean research up to the year 2000, focuses on the most important ocean research problems that should receive particular attention during the next decades, what major advances should be expected and what kinds of research should be encouraged for them to be achieved, and impediments to achieving…

  12. A Scoping Review of Empirical Research Relating to Quality and Effectiveness of Research Ethics Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stuart G.; Hayes, Tavis P.; Brehaut, Jamie C.; McDonald, Michael; Weijer, Charles; Saginur, Raphael; Fergusson, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Background To date there is no established consensus of assessment criteria for evaluating research ethics review. Methods We conducted a scoping review of empirical research assessing ethics review processes in order to identify common elements assessed, research foci, and research gaps to aid in the development of assessment criteria. Electronic searches of Ovid Medline, PsychInfo, and the Cochrane DSR, ACP Journal Club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED, were conducted. After de-duplication, 4234 titles and abstracts were reviewed. Altogether 4036 articles were excluded following screening of titles, abstracts and full text. A total of 198 articles included for final data extraction. Results Few studies originated from outside North America and Europe. No study reported using an underlying theory or framework of quality/effectiveness to guide study design or analyses. We did not identify any studies that had involved a controlled trial - randomised or otherwise – of ethics review procedures or processes. Studies varied substantially with respect to outcomes assessed, although tended to focus on structure and timeliness of ethics review. Discussion Our findings indicate a lack of consensus on appropriate assessment criteria, exemplified by the varied study outcomes identified, but also a fragmented body of research. To date research has been largely quantitative, with little attention given to stakeholder experiences, and is largely cross sectional. A lack of longitudinal research to date precludes analyses of change or assessment of quality improvement in ethics review. PMID:26225553

  13. A Scoping Review of Empirical Research Relating to Quality and Effectiveness of Research Ethics Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stuart G; Hayes, Tavis P; Brehaut, Jamie C; McDonald, Michael; Weijer, Charles; Saginur, Raphael; Fergusson, Dean

    2015-01-01

    To date there is no established consensus of assessment criteria for evaluating research ethics review. We conducted a scoping review of empirical research assessing ethics review processes in order to identify common elements assessed, research foci, and research gaps to aid in the development of assessment criteria. Electronic searches of Ovid Medline, PsychInfo, and the Cochrane DSR, ACP Journal Club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED, were conducted. After de-duplication, 4234 titles and abstracts were reviewed. Altogether 4036 articles were excluded following screening of titles, abstracts and full text. A total of 198 articles included for final data extraction. Few studies originated from outside North America and Europe. No study reported using an underlying theory or framework of quality/effectiveness to guide study design or analyses. We did not identify any studies that had involved a controlled trial--randomised or otherwise--of ethics review procedures or processes. Studies varied substantially with respect to outcomes assessed, although tended to focus on structure and timeliness of ethics review. Our findings indicate a lack of consensus on appropriate assessment criteria, exemplified by the varied study outcomes identified, but also a fragmented body of research. To date research has been largely quantitative, with little attention given to stakeholder experiences, and is largely cross sectional. A lack of longitudinal research to date precludes analyses of change or assessment of quality improvement in ethics review.

  14. A Scoping Review of Empirical Research Relating to Quality and Effectiveness of Research Ethics Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Nicholls

    Full Text Available To date there is no established consensus of assessment criteria for evaluating research ethics review.We conducted a scoping review of empirical research assessing ethics review processes in order to identify common elements assessed, research foci, and research gaps to aid in the development of assessment criteria. Electronic searches of Ovid Medline, PsychInfo, and the Cochrane DSR, ACP Journal Club, DARE, CCTR, CMR, HTA, and NHSEED, were conducted. After de-duplication, 4234 titles and abstracts were reviewed. Altogether 4036 articles were excluded following screening of titles, abstracts and full text. A total of 198 articles included for final data extraction.Few studies originated from outside North America and Europe. No study reported using an underlying theory or framework of quality/effectiveness to guide study design or analyses. We did not identify any studies that had involved a controlled trial--randomised or otherwise--of ethics review procedures or processes. Studies varied substantially with respect to outcomes assessed, although tended to focus on structure and timeliness of ethics review.Our findings indicate a lack of consensus on appropriate assessment criteria, exemplified by the varied study outcomes identified, but also a fragmented body of research. To date research has been largely quantitative, with little attention given to stakeholder experiences, and is largely cross sectional. A lack of longitudinal research to date precludes analyses of change or assessment of quality improvement in ethics review.

  15. Public Attitudes toward Animal Research: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth H. Ormandy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of public attitudes toward animal research is important given recent developments in animal research (e.g., increasing creation and use of genetically modified animals, and plans for progress in areas such as personalized medicine, and the shifting relationship between science and society (i.e., a move toward the democratization of science. As such, public engagement on issues related to animal research, including exploration of public attitudes, provides a means of achieving socially acceptable scientific practice and oversight through an understanding of societal values and concerns. Numerous studies have been conducted to explore public attitudes toward animal use, and more specifically the use of animals in research. This paper reviews relevant literature using three categories of influential factors: personal and cultural characteristics, animal characteristics, and research characteristics. A critique is given of survey style methods used to collect data on public attitudes, and recommendations are given on how best to address current gaps in public attitudes literature.

  16. Family firm research – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Cheng

    2014-09-01

    Part I of the article discusses the fundaments of family firms: the prevalence of and the agency conflicts within family firms. Part II summarizes the findings of recent U.S. family firm studies. It reviews the evidence on the family firm premium (how, which, and when family firms are associated with a valuation premium, the manifestation of the agency conflict between majority and minority shareholders in family firms, earnings quality and corporate disclosure, and the determinants of family ownership and control. Part III discusses the prevalence and characteristics of Chinese family firms and reviews the findings of related studies. The article concludes with some suggestions for future research.

  17. Hydrometeorological Research in South Africa: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Botai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Water resources, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions of the world are of great concern, as they are closely linked to the wellbeing of humankind. Sophisticated hydrological prediction tools are required to assess climatic and hydrometeorological conditions, as they impact the sustainability of water resources as well as water availability. Research and data collection activities from multi-hydrometeorological sensors (e.g., gauges, radars, satellites form the basis for quantifying the impact of extreme episodes along the hydrologic phases that manifest in terms of the magnitude, duration and frequency of floods, droughts and other hydrometeorological hazards that affect water resources management. A number of hydrometeorological research activities have been reported in the literature by various researchers and research groups globally. This contribution presents (a a review of the hydrometeorology resource landscape in South Africa; (b an analysis of the hydrometeorology services and products in South Africa; (c a review of the hydrometeorological research that has been conducted in South Africa for the last four decades; and (d highlights on some of the challenges facing the sustained advancement of research in hydrometeorology in South Africa.

  18. Yoga in school settings: a research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S; Butzer, Bethany

    2016-06-01

    Research on the efficacy of yoga for improving mental, emotional, physical, and behavioral health characteristics in school settings is a recent but growing field of inquiry. This systematic review of research on school-based yoga interventions published in peer-reviewed journals offers a bibliometric analysis that identified 47 publications. The studies from these publications have been conducted primarily in the United States (n = 30) and India (n = 15) since 2005, with the majority of studies (n = 41) conducted from 2010 onward. About half of the publications were of studies at elementary schools; most (85%) were conducted within the school curriculum, and most (62%) also implemented a formal school-based yoga program. There was a high degree of variability in yoga intervention characteristics, including overall duration, and the number and duration of sessions. Most of these published research trials are preliminary in nature, with numerous study design limitations, including limited sample sizes (median = 74; range = 20-660) and relatively weak research designs (57% randomized controlled trials, 19% uncontrolled trials), as would be expected in an infant research field. Nevertheless, these publications suggest that yoga in the school setting is a viable and potentially efficacious strategy for improving child and adolescent health and therefore worthy of continued research. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. 15 CFR Supplement No. 9 to Part 748 - End-User Review Committee Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... potential validated end-user is not included in calculating the 30 calendar day deadline for the ERC's... matter to the Advisory Committee on Export Policy (ACEP). The procedures and time frame for escalating... Supplement No. 7 to this part operates as clearance by all member agencies to publish the amendment in the...

  20. Integrating natural language processing expertise with patient safety event review committees to improve the analysis of medication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Harriott, Nicole; Walters, Donna M; Foley, Hanan; Morrissey, Richard; Ratwani, Raj R

    2017-08-01

    Many healthcare providers have implemented patient safety event reporting systems to better understand and improve patient safety. Reviewing and analyzing these reports is often time consuming and resource intensive because of both the quantity of reports and length of free-text descriptions in the reports. Natural language processing (NLP) experts collaborated with clinical experts on a patient safety committee to assist in the identification and analysis of medication related patient safety events. Different NLP algorithmic approaches were developed to identify four types of medication related patient safety events and the models were compared. Well performing NLP models were generated to categorize medication related events into pharmacy delivery delays, dispensing errors, Pyxis discrepancies, and prescriber errors with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curve of 0.96, 0.87, 0.96, and 0.81 respectively. We also found that modeling the brief without the resolution text generally improved model performance. These models were integrated into a dashboard visualization to support the patient safety committee review process. We demonstrate the capabilities of various NLP models and the use of two text inclusion strategies at categorizing medication related patient safety events. The NLP models and visualization could be used to improve the efficiency of patient safety event data review and analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Compilation of reports of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, 1957-1984. Volume 3. Project Reviews Q-Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This six-volume compilation contains over 1000 reports prepared by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards from September 1957 through December 1984. The reports are divided into two groups: Part 1: ACRS Resports on Project Reviews, and Part 2: ACRS Reports on Generic Subjects. Part 1 contains ACRS reports alphabetized by project name and within project name by chronological order. Part 2 categorizes the reports by the most appropriate generic subject area and within subject area by chronological order. This volume includes reports arranged alpbabetically from Q to Z

  2. Contesting the science/ethics distinction in the review of clinical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angus J; Yentis, Steve M

    2007-01-01

    Recent policy in relation to clinical research proposals in the UK has distinguished between two types of review: scientific and ethical. This distinction has been formally enshrined in the recent changes to research ethics committee (REC) structure and operating procedures, introduced as the UK response to the EU Directive on clinical trials. Recent reviews and recommendations have confirmed the place of the distinction and the separate review processes. However, serious reservations can be mounted about the science/ethics distinction and the policy of separate review that has been built upon it. We argue here that, first, the science/ethics distinction is incoherent, and, second, that RECs should not only be permitted to consider a study's science, but that they have anobligation do so. PMID:17329389

  3. Review of research on pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J B

    1993-06-01

    The literature including a number of review articles was examined for answers to the questions, have distinctive personality test profiles of pathological gamblers been identified, do pathological gamblers have control over their behavior, have studies of alcoholism and addiction increased understanding of compulsive gambling, and has psychotherapy or Gamblers Anonymous been successful for them? Much more information is needed to build on what research on these questions has yielded.

  4. ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: research & recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Kreider, Richard B; Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem; Campbell, Bill; Almada, Anthony L; Collins, Rick; Cooke, Mathew; Earnest, Conrad P; Greenwood, Mike; Kalman, Douglas S; Kerksick, Chad M; Kleiner, Susan M; Leutholtz, Brian; Lopez, Hector; Lowery, Lonnie M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with hundreds of research papers published annually. For this reason, keeping up to date with the literature is often difficult. This paper is a five year update of the sports nutrition review article published as the lead paper to launch the JISSN in 2004 and presents a well-referenced overview of the current state of the science related to how to optimize training and athletic performance through nutrition. More specifically, this pap...

  5. Review of present trends in luminescence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.; Delaware Univ., Newark

    1981-01-01

    The difficulties of a comprehensive review of the broad and diverse branches of molecular and solid-state luminescence research are noted. This review is thus limited to selective topics. Some general concepts and trends are then introduced, including: luminescence excitation as a collective excitation of a many-body problem, encompassing in some cases the source and probe in its formulation; continuing trends towards extremal conditions of experiments and towards inhomogeneous and structured materials, from man-made superlattices to biological materials; and increased attention to applications of luminescence research to lamps, displays, solar devices and biological research. Representative recent and new specific research areas include: site selection spectroscopy and 'hole burning'; picosecond delayed coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering; computer simulation of dynamical processes in luminescence; electron-hole expansion from the Fermi pressure of e-h plasmas; and hot electron phenomena and hot luminescence. Finally some pending problems in luminescence research, such as reconciling the configuration coordinate model and the electronic band theory and clarifying multi-phonon non-radiative processes, are discussed. (orig.)

  6. 76 FR 29722 - Elko Resource Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... (Pub. L. 110-343) (the Act) and operates in compliance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The...- Determination Act; (2) Review roles of RAC committee members and Committee Chairman; (3) Overview of project...

  7. Tire Crumb Research Study Literature Review / Gap ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to more fully understand data gaps in human exposure and toxicity to tire crumb materials, ATSDR, CPSC and EPA undertook a collaborative effort in the form of a scientific literature review and subsequent gaps analysis. The first objective of the Literature Review and Gap Analysis (LRGA) collaboration was to identify the existing body of literature related specifically to human exposure to tire crumb materials through the use of synthetic turf athletic fields and playgrounds. The second objective was to characterize and summarize the relevant data from the scientific literature. The final objective was to review the summary information and identify data gaps to build on the current understanding of the state-of-the-science and inform the development of specific research efforts that would be most impactful in the near-term. Because of the need for additional information, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) launched a multi-agency action plan to study key environmental human health questions. The Federal Research Action Plan includes numerous activities, including research studies (U.S. EPA, 2016). A key objective of the Action Plan is to identify key knowledge gaps.

  8. Report of research and investigation committee for infrared radiation heating technology. Sekigai hosha kanetsu gijutsu kenkyu chosa iinkai hokoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsui, M. (Fukuyama Univ., Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    The committee was established in July 1990 for research and investigation of infrared (IR) heating technology and finished its activity in March 1993. This report describes the committee members and the results of research and investigation. (1) Application of IR radiation (sensing): the research and investigation results were reported on the following items; the recognition of letters and patterns on cultural properties by IR radiation, the passive sensor (detecting the IR radiated from the object without emitting from the sensor), the IR image system, and the diagnosis of outer wail of buildings. (2) The following were researched on the IR radiation source and IR emitting material; multi-functional heating element having far infrared radiation function and deodorant function, the emissivity of far IR radiation, and the evaluation of the functions by the difference in emissivity. (3) The IR heating technology was described on the following: drying the persimmon using far IR radiation, the present situation of research on IR heating done by foreign power supply companies, and the feature and the application of far IR heater. In addition to these, the following were also reported; (4) measurement of IR radiation and (5) effect of living body and organism.

  9. Fusion Energy Advisory Committee report on program strategy for US magnetic fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Berkner, K.H.; Culler, F.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dreyfus, D.A.; Holdren, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; Parker, R.R.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Siemon, R.E.; Staudhammer, P.; Weitzner, H.

    1992-09-01

    The Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) was charged by the Department of Energy (DOE) with developing recommendations on how best to pursue the goal of a practical magnetic fusion reactor in the context of several budget scenarios covering the period FY 1994-FY 1998. Four budget scenarios were examined, each anchored to the FY 1993 figure of $337.9 million for fusion energy (less $9 million for inertial fusion energy which is not examined here)

  10. Fusion Policy Advisory Committee (FPAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee. The report conveys the Committee's views on the matters specified by the Secretary in his charge and subsequent letters to the Committee, and also satisfies the provisions of Section 7 of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980, Public Law 96-386, which require a triennial review of the conduct of the national Magnetic Fusion Energy program. Three sub-Committee's were established to address the large number of topics associated with fusion research and development. One considered magnetic fusion energy, a second considered inertial fusion energy, and the third considered issues common to both. For many reasons, the promise of nuclear fusion as a safe, environmentally benign, and affordable source of energy is bright. At the present state of knowledge, however, it is uncertain that this promise will become reality. Only a vigorous, well planned and well executed program of research and development will yield the needed information. The Committee recommends that the US commit to a plan that will resolve this critically important issue. It also outlines the first steps in a development process that will lead to a fusion Demonstration Power Plant by 2025. The recommended program is aggressive, but we believe the goal is reasonable and attainable. International collaboration at a significant level is an important element in the plan

  11. Report on the Concept Review Committee recommendations for proof-of-principle alternate concept programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The report is organized as follows: Section II contains a discussion of the meeting procedures used on October 16--18, 1978, and the rules employed for technical consultants and advisors to the CRC. Section III contains a discussion of the CRC recommendations and some of the factors taken into consideration by the Committee. Section IV briefly discusses where do we go from here in DOE's alternate concepts program

  12. Review of research on simulation engineering in FY2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    Research on simulation engineering for nuclear applications, based on 'the plan for meeting the mid-term goal of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (CCSE/JAEA). CCSE established the committee consisting outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes results of the evaluation by the committee on the followings. (1) Research and development on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in FY2009. (2) Research and development on simulation engineering performed at CCSE/JAEA in the period of the midterm plan (October 1st, 2005 - March 31st, 2010). (author)

  13. 2012 review of French research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrade, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Proposed by the French Reactor Operators' Club (CER), the meeting and discussion forum for operators of French research reactors, this report first gives a brief presentation of these reactors and of their scope of application, and a summary of highlights in 2012 for each of them. Then, it proposes more detailed presentations and reviews of characteristics, activities, highlights, objectives and results for the different types of reactors: neutron beam reactors (Orphee, High flux reactor-Laue-Langevin Institute or HFR-ILL), technological irradiation reactors (Osiris and Phenix), training reactors (Isis and Azur), reactors for safety research purposes (Cabri and Phebus), reactors for neutronic studies (Caliban, Prospero, Eole, Minerve and Masurca), and new research reactors (the RES facility and the Jules Horowitz reactor or JHR)

  14. 1974 review of the research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The role of the Research Program in Controlled Thermonuclear Research, the activities that are contained within the Research Program, and summaries of the reports prepared by the study groups that analyzed the six activity areas that make up the Research Program are described. The recommendations by an ''Overview Panel'' are given. The recommendations are based on an analysis of the individual study group reports, consultations with CTR staff and field scientists, and on independent review of CTR program plans and needs. In some cases the recommendations of the Overview Panel are identical with study group recommendations and in other cases they are not. Some recommendations by the Overview Panel take into account factors and information that go beyond that available to the study groups. The five-year budget needed to accomplish the recommended Research Program is discussed. The Overview Panel chose to normalize its budget recommendations to the actual FY 1975 Research Program budget, reflecting the fact that this is already determined. The budgets for subsequent years are then based on this starting point. The complete reports prepared by the six study groups are given. Each report is based on an analysis of the needs as dictated by the Magnetic Confinement Systems and Development and Technology Program Plans. (U.S.)

  15. Review of research methodologies for tigers: telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clayton S; Hebblewhite, Mark; Goodrich, John M; Miquelle, Dale G

    2010-12-01

    Over the past half century, wildlife research has relied on technological advances to gain additional insight into the secretive lives of animals. This revolution started in the 1960s with the development of radio telemetry and continues today with the use of Global Positioning System (GPS)-based research techniques. In the present paper we review the history of radio telemetry from its origins with grizzly bears in Yellowstone to its early applications in tiger research and conservation in Asia. We address the different types of data that are available using radio telemetry as opposed to using other research techniques, such as behavioral observations, camera trapping, DNA analysis and scat analysis. In the late 1990s, the rapid development of GPS collar technology revolutionized wildlife research. This new technology has enabled researchers to dramatically improve their ability to gather data on animal movements and ecology. Despite the ecological and conservation benefits of radio telemetry, there have been few telemetry studies of tigers in the wild, and most have been on the Bengal or Amur subspecies. We close with an assessment of the current tiger conservation efforts using GPS technology and discuss how this new information can help to preserve tigers for future generations. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  16. Non-commercial vs. commercial clinical trials: a retrospective study of the applications submitted to a research ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes Camps, Inmaculada; Rodríguez, Alexis; Agustí, Antonia

    2018-02-15

    There are many difficulties in undertaking independent clinical research without support from the pharmaceutical industry. In this retrospective observational study, some design characteristics, the clinical trial public register and the publication rate of noncommercial clinical trials were compared to those of commercial clinical trials. A total of 809 applications of drug-evaluation clinical trials were submitted from May 2004 to May 2009 to the research ethics committee of a tertiary hospital, and 16.3% of trials were noncommercial. They were mainly phase IV, multicentre national, and unmasked controlled trials, compared to the commercial trials that were mainly phase II or III, multicentre international, and double-blind masked trials. The commercial trials were registered and published more often than noncommercial trials. More funding for noncommercial research is still needed. The results of the research, commercial or noncommercial, should be disseminated in order not to compromise either its scientific or its social value. © 2018 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. Appendix - A small scale research review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund

    over two questions asked in the abstract concerning workshop C - Effects of teacher training in lifelong learning - at the current ASEM conference. At first it is asked what do we already know about teacher training effects in relation to adult learners? This will be identified by a search...... for systematic reviews in the international This will be identified by a search for systematic reviews in the international clearinghouses and afterwards by a small scale mapping done in the pedagogic databaseERIC. The second question sounds: which methods can be used to measure the effects of teacher...... training? This will be illustrated by describing a research design in progress at the National Centre of Competence Development, DK, regarding a program where teachers are taught Cooperative Learning as a pedagogical and didactical method. This appendix concerns the first question. In search for empiric results concerning: What do...

  18. Activities of RILEM Technical Committee: Internal Curing of Concrete and Anticipated Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    in the domain. To account for the different practices and different standards around the world, the TC included representatives from three different world regions: Europe, North America and Asia. Totally more than 30 members from 17 countries contributed in the committee work. Some of them serve in parallel...... of Concrete” of the International Union of Laboratories and Experts in Construction Materials, Systems and Structures (RILEM). The authors of this short communication served as a chair (K. Kovler) and secretary (O.M. Jensen) of the TC. The regular and corresponding members were acknowledged RILEM experts...

  19. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 2005 Research Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, H.; Gwinner, D.; Miller, M.; Pitchford, P.

    2006-06-01

    Science and technology are at the heart of everything we do at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, as we pursue innovative, robust, and sustainable ways to produce energy--and as we seek to understand and illuminate the physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering behind alternative energy technologies. This year's Research Review highlights the Lab's work in the areas of alternatives fuels and vehicles, high-performing commercial buildings, and high-efficiency inverted, semi-mismatched solar cells.

  20. INDEFINITE CONTRACT REVIEW 1999 Procedure for Research Physicists (Professional Category 1)

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    In view of the long-standing deliberate turnover policy of professional category 1 research physicists on fixed-term contracts, a special procedure is defined, distinct from the other professional categories. This procedure takes into account that research physicists stay at CERN for only up to 6 years and that periods of service as Fellow may be counted within these six years.The following procedure has been agreed:1.\tThe review covers research physicists holding fixed-term contracts and having completed at least 4 years of service on 30 June 1999. Prior years as Fellow may be taken into consideration in the specific context.\tAll candidates are informed individually.2.\tThe files of all candidates are considered by search committees. The members of the committees are nominated by the Director-General and comprise members of the senior CERN staff as well as at least one senior external physicist. The committees are free to take up references and to interview the candidates.3.\tIn ord...

  1. Review of defense display research programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulis, Robert W.; Hopper, Darrel G.; Morton, David C.; Shashidhar, Ranganathan

    2001-09-01

    Display research has comprised a substantial portion of the defense investment in new technology for national security for the past 13 years. These investments have been made by the separate service departments and, especially, via several Defense Research Projects Agency (DARPA) programs, known collectively as the High Definition Systems (HDS) Program (which ended in 2001) and via the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) Defense Production Act (DPA) Title III Program (efforts ended in 2000). Using input from the Army, Navy, and Air Force to focus research and identify insertion opportunities, DARPA and the Title III Program Office have made investments to develop the national technology base and manufacturing infrastructure necessary to meet the twin challenge of providing affordable displays in current systems and enabling the DoD strategy of winning future conflicts by getting more information to all participants during the battle. These completed DARPA and DPA research and infrastructure programs are reviewed. Service investments have been and are being made to transition display technology; examples are described. Display science and technology (S&T) visions are documented for each service to assist the identification of areas meriting consideration for future defense research.

  2. The Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC) research reactor project: a status review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusch, R.; Jacobi, A. Jr.; Yamkate, P.

    2001-01-01

    The new Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center in the vicinity of Bangkok, Thailand is planned to replace the more than 30 years old facilities located in the Chatuchak district, Bangkok. An international team led by general atomics (GA) is designing and constructing the new research complex. It comprises a 10 MW TRIGA type reactor, an isotope production and a centralized waste processing and storage facility. Electrowatt-Ekono Ltd. was hired by the Thai Government Agency, the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), as a consultant to the project. As the project is now approaching the end of its 4 th year, it now stands at a decisive turning point. Basic design is nearly completed and detailed design is well advanced. The turnkey part of the contract including the reactor island, the isotope and waste facilities are still awaiting the issuance of the Construction Permit. Significant progress has been made on the other part of the project, which includes all the supporting infrastructure facilities. The Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), prepared by GA, has been reviewed by various parties, including by nuclear safety experts from the IAEA, which has provided continuous support to the OAEP. Experts from the Argonne National Laboratory have been involved in the reviews as well. The PSAR is now under consideration at the Nuclear Facility Safety Sub-Committee (NFSS) of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission for issuing the Construction Permit of the ONRC Research Reactor. The following paper gives an overview of the project and its present status, outlining the features of the planned facilities and the issues the project is presently struggling with. Major lessons of the past 4 years are highlighted and an outlook into the future is attempted. (orig.)

  3. Variability in research ethics review of cluster randomized trials: a scenario-based survey in three countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) present unique ethical challenges. In the absence of a uniform standard for their ethical design and conduct, problems such as variability in procedures and requirements by different research ethics committees will persist. We aimed to assess the need for ethics guidelines for CRTs among research ethics chairs internationally, investigate variability in procedures for research ethics review of CRTs within and among countries, and elicit research ethics chairs’ perspectives on specific ethical issues in CRTs, including the identification of research subjects. The proper identification of research subjects is a necessary requirement in the research ethics review process, to help ensure, on the one hand, that subjects are protected from harm and exploitation, and on the other, that reviews of CRTs are completed efficiently. Methods A web-based survey with closed- and open-ended questions was administered to research ethics chairs in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. The survey presented three scenarios of CRTs involving cluster-level, professional-level, and individual-level interventions. For each scenario, a series of questions was posed with respect to the type of review required (full, expedited, or no review) and the identification of research subjects at cluster and individual levels. Results A total of 189 (35%) of 542 chairs responded. Overall, 144 (84%, 95% CI 79 to 90%) agreed or strongly agreed that there is a need for ethics guidelines for CRTs and 158 (92%, 95% CI 88 to 96%) agreed or strongly agreed that research ethics committees could be better informed about distinct ethical issues surrounding CRTs. There was considerable variability among research ethics chairs with respect to the type of review required, as well as the identification of research subjects. The cluster-cluster and professional-cluster scenarios produced the most disagreement. Conclusions Research ethics committees

  4. Marketing of radurised food in South Africa: review of a steering committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basson, J.K.; Basson, R.A.; Brodrick, H.T.; Du Plessis, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    The marketing of radurised food has been developed by a Steering Committee appointed by the Minister of Agriculture in 1981. Membership included representatives from relevant government departments, scientific institutions, organised agriculture, commerce, consumer organisations and the food industry. Its investigations concentrated on the application of the radurisation process to the commercial treatment of food in South Africa and included marketing trials, public perception, safety aspects and possible international trade. Results of a recent status report are presented, which could serve as an example to other countries developing commercial radurisation. (Author)

  5. 75 FR 36698 - Committee Management Renewals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    .... Committees Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering, 1173 Advisory Committee for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, 1115 Advisory Committee for GPRA Performance Assessment..., and Transport Systems, 1189 Proposal Review Panel for Chemistry, 1191 Proposal Review Panel for Civil...

  6. Crystalline Repository Project: Review and comment of the Leech Lake Reservation Business Committee: Draft area recommendation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Leech Lake Reservation Business Committee (LLRBC) has reviewed five documents related to the US Department of Energy's Crystalline Repository Project (CRP). They are the ''National Survey of Crystalline Rocks,'' ''General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories;' Final Siting Guidelines (10 CFR Part 960),'' ''Regional Characterization Reports for the North Central Region,'' the ''Region to Area Screening Methodology Document'' (SMD) and the ''Draft Area Recommendation Report'' (DARR). The comments and discussions of issues contained in this review will be considered in the preparation of the Final Area Recommendation Report, which will formally identify potentially acceptable sites for a second national repository for the permanent disposal of high level nuclear waste. Following a review of the above referenced documents, the LLRBC has concluded that the identification of potentially acceptable sites in the Draft Area Recommendation Report is based upon inferior and incomplete technical information being applied to a flawed screening process which, among other deficiencies, pays little attention to the importance of hydrological factors in the siting process. Although the DOE prefers that comments from states and tribes be directed at the Draft Area Recommendation Report alone, the Leech Lake Reservation Business Committee is extremely concerned about inadequacies in the ''National Survey of Crystalline Rocks'' (ORCD-1), which serves as the foundation for all siting work done to date. The national survey was conducted utilizing little of the time or staffing required for this important phase of the Crystalline Repository Program. As a result, the national survey is based upon out-of-date scientific literature, exaggerates certain screening variables that favor the selection of regions in the eastern US and arbitrarily eliminated the few western crystalline rock bodies that passed the questionable screening process utilized

  7. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degteva, M.O.; Drozhko, E.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Napier, B.A.; Bouville, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted

  8. Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degteva, M.O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E. [Branch 1 of Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozersk (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bouville, A.C. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted.

  9. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center: Report to the Steering Committee, June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (SDA) and Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (PJFF) - Carbon Injection System. Investigations also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit, while the 1.0 MW Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode as monthly inspections were conducted. Pilot Testing Highlights Testing efforts in June were focused on the HAP test block and the Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block. Both programs were conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and PJFF unit. The HAP test block was temporarily concluded in June to further review the test data. This program began in March as part of the DOE Advanced Power Systems Program; the mission of this program is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The 1996 HAP test block focuses on three research areas, including: Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. The TER test block is part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions.

  10. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on “Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)”, has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2016 (April 1st, 2016 - March 31st, 2017), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2016. (author)

  11. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on 'Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016). (author)

  12. Final Progress Report for the activity called AMO2010 committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Shapero; Michael Moloney

    2006-12-31

    The committee was charged to produce a comprehensive report on the status of AMO Science. The committee was charged to produce a report that: 1. Reviewed the field of AMO science, emphasize recent accomplishments, and identify new opportunities and compelling scientific questions; 2. Identified the impact of AMO science on other scientific fields, emerging technologies, and national needs; 3. Identified future workforce, societal and educational needs for AMO science; and 4. Made recommendations on how the US research enterprise might realize the full potential of AMO science. The committee also produced an intermediate report addressing key research issues and themes facing the research community.

  13. 78 FR 32698 - Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8340] Shipping Coordinating Committee; Notice of Committee... Technical Co-operation Committee --Protection of vital shipping lanes --Periodic review of administrative... of the Organization since the twenty-eighth regular session of the Assembly --External relations...

  14. Energy in transition, 1985-2010. Final report of the Committee on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems, National Research Council

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    This exhaustive study, in assessing the roles of nuclear and alternative energy systems in the nation's energy future, focuses on the period between 1985 and 2010. Its intent is to illuminate the kinds of options the nation may wish to keep open in the future and to describe the actions, policies, and R and D programs that may be required to do so. The timing and the context of these decisions depend not only on the technical, social, and economic features of energy-supply technologies, but also on assumptions about future demand for energy and the possibilities for energy conservation through changes in consumption patterns and improved efficiency of the supply and end-use systems. The committee developed a three-tiered functional structure for the project. The first tier was CONAES itself, whose report embodies the ultimate findings, conclusions, and judgments of the study. To provide scientific and engineering data and economic analyses for the committee, a second tier of four panels was appointed by the committee to examine (1) energy demand and conservation, (2) energy supply and delivery systems, (3) risks and impacts of energy supply and use, and (4) various models of possible future energy systems and decision making. Each panel in turn established a number of resource groups - some two dozen in all - to address in detail an array of more particular matters. Briefly stated, recommended strategies are: (1) increased energy conservation; (2) expansion of the nation's balanced coal and nuclear electrical generation base; (3) retention of the breeder option; (4) stimulation of fluid energy development; and (5) immediate increase in research and development of new energy options to ensure availability over the long term.

  15. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal. Journal Home > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. How US institutional review boards decide when researchers need to translate studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzman, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Informed consent is crucial in research, but potential participants may not all speak the same language, posing questions that have not been examined concerning decisions by institutional review boards (IRBs) and research ethics committees' (RECs) about the need for researchers to translate consent forms and other study materials. Sixty US IRBs (every fourth one in the list of the top 240 institutions by The National Institutes of Health funding) were contacted, and leaders (eg, chairs) from 34 (response rate=57%) and an additional 12 members and administrators were interviewed. IRBs face a range of problems about translation of informed consent documents, questionnaires and manuals-what, when and how to translate (eg, for how many or what proportion of potential subjects), why to do so and how to decide. Difficulties can arise about translation of specific words and of broader cultural concepts regarding processes of informed consent and research, especially in the developing world. In these decisions, IRBs weigh the need for autonomy (through informed consent) and justice (to ensure fair distribution of benefits and burdens of research) against practical concerns about costs to researchers. At times IRBs may have to compromise between these competing goals. These data, the first to examine when and how IRBs/RECs require researchers to translate materials, thus highlight a range of problems with which these committees struggle, suggesting a need for further normative and empirical investigation of these domains, and consideration of guidelines to help IRBs deal with these tensions.

  18. Research Ethics Review and Aboriginal Community Values: Can the Two be Reconciled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Kathleen Cranley; Kaufert, Joseph

    2007-06-01

    CONTEMPORARY RESEARCH ETHICS REVIEW COMMITTEES (RECs) are heavily influenced by the established academic or health care institutional frameworks in which they operate, sharing a cultural, methodological and ethical perspective on the conduct of research involving humans. The principle of autonomous choice carries great weight in what is a highly individualistic decision-making process in medical practice and research. This assumes that the best protection lies in the ability of patients or research participants to make competent, voluntary, informed choices, evaluating the risks and benefits from a personal perspective. Over the past two decades, North American and international indigenous researchers, policy makers and communities have identified key issues of relevance to them, but ignored by most institutional or university-based RECs. They critique the current research review structure, and propose changes on a variety of levels in an attempt to develop more community sensitive research ethics review processes. In doing so, they have emphasized recognition of collective rights including community consent. Critics see alternative policy guidelines and community-based review bodies as challenging the current system of ethics review. Some view them as reflecting a fundamental difference in values. In this paper, we explore these developments in the context of the political, legal and ethical frameworks that have informed REC review. We examine the process and content of these frameworks and ask how this contrasts with emerging Aboriginal proposals for community-based research ethics review. We follow this with recommendations on how current REC review models might accommodate the requirements of both communities and RECs.

  19. View and review on viral oncology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolin Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens.

  20. 77 FR 38768 - Smart Grid Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ...The Smart Grid Advisory Committee (SGAC or Committee) will hold a meeting via teleconference on Friday, July 27, 2012 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern Time (ET). The primary purposes of this meeting are to review updates on the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel transition plan, review the status of the research subcommittee and the August Smart Grid Workshop in Boulder, Colorado, and plan for a fall meeting. Interested members of the public will be able to participate in the meeting from remote locations by calling into a central phone number.

  1. Personality and culture, the Social Science Research Council, and liberal social engineering: the Advisory Committee on Personality and Culture, 1930-1934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    The field of personality and culture was given a significant impetus during the 1930s with the establishment of the Advisory Committee on Personality and Culture (1930-1934) by the Social Science Research Council. This committee provided an early formulation of personality and culture that emphasized the interdisciplinary focus on the processes of personality formation within small-scale social settings. The committee's formulation also coupled personality and culture with a liberal social engineering approach geared toward cultural reconstruction. Major social scientists and clinicians were involved in the activities of the committee, including Edward Sapir, W. I. Thomas, E. W. Burgess, E. A. Bott, Robert S. Woodworth, Harry Stack Sullivan, C. M. Hincks, and Adolf Meyer.

  2. Report on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste - Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    By letter of 13 May 2003 the Council consulted Parliament, pursuant to Articles 31 and 32 of the EURATOM Treaty, on the proposal for a Council directive (EURATOM) on the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste (COM(2003) 32 - 2003/0022(CNS)). At the sitting of 15 May 2003 the President of Parliament announced that he had referred the proposal to the Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy as the committee responsible and the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy for its opinion (C5-0229/2003). The Committee on Industry, External Trade, Research and Energy appointed Alejo Vidal-Quadras Roca Rapporteur at its meeting of 22 May 2003. The committee considered the Commission proposal and draft report at its meetings of 9 July, 9 September, 6 October, 3 November and 27 November 2003. At the last meeting it adopted the draft legislative resolution by 36 votes to 7, with 2 abstentions. The opinion of the Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Consumer Policy is attached. The report was tabled on 1 December 2003

  3. Report of the expert committee on the review of data on atmospheric fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The terms of reference of the committee were to review the published scientific literature and other relevant scientific data on the short and long-term effects of fallout arising from British nuclear tests in Australia; to comment on the adequacy of the data available and the collection methodology; to assess the fallout levels arising from each of the tests, the immediate and subsequent hazards from the fallout to the Australian population and individual Australians, including Australian personnel involved and aborigines in South Australia, and the adequacy of the criteria for safe firing of each of the tests. A comparison is made of radiation protection standards adopted during the nuclear test period with current standards. The recommendations include the setting up of a public inquiry to determine how the conduct and consequences of the British nuclear tests affected the health and well-being of Australians

  4. Sulfosalt systematics: a review. Report of the sulfosalt sub-committee of the IMA Commission on Ore Mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moelo, Y.; Makovicky, E.; Mozgova, N.N.

    2008-01-01

    , Nomenclature and Classification (CNMNC-IMA). Part I presents generalities of sulfosalt definition and nomenclature. After an extended chemical definition of sulfosalts, attention is focused on "classic" sulfosalts with As3+, Sb3+, Bi3+ or Te4+ as cations, corresponding to the general formula (Me+, Me'(2+), etc......This report deals with a general reexamination of the systematics of sulfosalts. It represents an update of the activity of the Sulfosalt Sub-Committee within the Commission on Ore Mineralogy of the International Mineralogical Association, in connection with the Commission on New Minerals.......), [(Bi, Sb, As)(3+), Te4+](y) [(S, Se, Te)(2-)](z) (Me, Me': various metals). General aspects of their chemistry and classification principles are summarized, especially with regard to chemical substitutions and modular analysis of complex crystal structures. On this basis, Part II presents a review...

  5. ISSN Exercise & Sport Nutrition Review: Research & Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendel Ron

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sport nutrition is a constantly evolving field with literally thousands of research papers published annually. For this reason, keeping up to date with the literature is often difficult. This paper presents a well-referenced overview of the current state of the science related to how to optimize training through nutrition. More specifically, this article discusses: 1. how to evaluate the scientific merit of nutritional supplements; 2. general nutritional strategies to optimize performance and enhance recovery; and, 3. our current understanding of the available science behind weight gain, weight loss, and performance enhancement supplements. Our hope is that ISSN members find this review useful in their daily practice and consultation with their clients.

  6. ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: research & recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with hundreds of research papers published annually. For this reason, keeping up to date with the literature is often difficult. This paper is a five year update of the sports nutrition review article published as the lead paper to launch the JISSN in 2004 and presents a well-referenced overview of the current state of the science related to how to optimize training and athletic performance through nutrition. More specifically, this paper provides an overview of: 1.) The definitional category of ergogenic aids and dietary supplements; 2.) How dietary supplements are legally regulated; 3.) How to evaluate the scientific merit of nutritional supplements; 4.) General nutritional strategies to optimize performance and enhance recovery; and, 5.) An overview of our current understanding of the ergogenic value of nutrition and dietary supplementation in regards to weight gain, weight loss, and performance enhancement. Our hope is that ISSN members and individuals interested in sports nutrition find this review useful in their daily practice and consultation with their clients.

  7. ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: research & recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendel Ron

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with hundreds of research papers published annually. For this reason, keeping up to date with the literature is often difficult. This paper is a five year update of the sports nutrition review article published as the lead paper to launch the JISSN in 2004 and presents a well-referenced overview of the current state of the science related to how to optimize training and athletic performance through nutrition. More specifically, this paper provides an overview of: 1. The definitional category of ergogenic aids and dietary supplements; 2. How dietary supplements are legally regulated; 3. How to evaluate the scientific merit of nutritional supplements; 4. General nutritional strategies to optimize performance and enhance recovery; and, 5. An overview of our current understanding of the ergogenic value of nutrition and dietary supplementation in regards to weight gain, weight loss, and performance enhancement. Our hope is that ISSN members and individuals interested in sports nutrition find this review useful in their daily practice and consultation with their clients.

  8. Informed consent in Sri Lanka: A survey among ethics committee members

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hewage, Suwin; Lekamwattage, Manura; Athukorale, Manjula; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Murray, Joanna; Prince, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Approval of the research proposal by an ethical review committee from both sponsoring and host countries is a generally agreed requirement in externally sponsored research. However, capacity for ethics review is not universal. Aim of this study was to identify opinions and views of the members serving in ethical review and ethics committees in Sri Lanka on informed consent, essential components in the information leaflet and the consent form. Methods We obtained ethical ap...

  9. Committee Report of the BEPC-II Project Design Review May 13-15, 2002, SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Traci M.

    2002-08-26

    As part of the US-China Cooperative Program in High Energy Physics for the year 2002, a BEPC-II Upgrade Review meeting was held at SLAC, May 13-15, 2002. The upgrade is aimed at improving the luminosity and performance of the BEPC facility at IHEP in Beijing, China with major upgrades to the injector linac, storage ring, and detector. This review addresses mainly the accelerator related issues. Prior to the review, an updated Draft Design Report was made available to the review team. Most important technical change since April 2001 has been a change from a single-ring configuration to a doublering. The goal of the review is to determine whether BEPC-II, if built as described, will meet the operations and physics goals. The charge to the review team is attached as Appendix A.

  10. Ensuring Resident Competence: A Narrative Review of the Literature on Group Decision Making to Inform the Work of Clinical Competency Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; Cate, Olle Ten; Boscardin, Christy K; Iobst, William; Holmboe, Eric S; Chesluk, Benjamin; Baron, Robert B; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2016-05-01

    Background The expectation for graduate medical education programs to ensure that trainees are progressing toward competence for unsupervised practice prompted requirements for a committee to make decisions regarding residents' progress, termed a clinical competency committee (CCC). The literature on the composition of these committees and how they share information and render decisions can inform the work of CCCs by highlighting vulnerabilities and best practices. Objective We conducted a narrative review of the literature on group decision making that can help characterize the work of CCCs, including how they are populated and how they use information. Methods English language studies of group decision making in medical education, psychology, and organizational behavior were used. Results The results highlighted 2 major themes. Group member composition showcased the value placed on the complementarity of members' experience and lessons they had learned about performance review through their teaching and committee work. Group processes revealed strengths and limitations in groups' understanding of their work, leader role, and information-sharing procedures. Time pressure was a threat to the quality of group work. Conclusions Implications of the findings include the risks for committees that arise with homogeneous membership, limitations to available resident performance information, and processes that arise through experience rather than deriving from a well-articulated purpose of their work. Recommendations are presented to maximize the effectiveness of CCC processes, including their membership and access to, and interpretation of, information to yield evidence-based, well-reasoned judgments.

  11. The experts from the Review of LHC Superconducting Cables and Magnet Production, accompanied by the committee's secretary and the Head of the Magnets and Superconductors Group.

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: Ron Scanlan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US), Taka Shintomi (KEK Laboratory, Japan), Claudine Bosteels (Secretary of the Review, AT-MAS Group, CERN), Lucio Rossi (Head of AT-MAS Group, CERN), Ettore Salpietro (EDFA-Iter project), Bruce Strauss (US Department of Energy, Chairman of the committee), and Pierre Vedrine (CEA-DAPNIA-SACM, France).

  12. Scientific and technical advisory committee review of the nutrient inputs to the watershed model

    Science.gov (United States)

    The following is a report by a STAC Review Team concerning the methods and documentation used by the Chesapeake Bay Partnership for evaluation of nutrient inputs to Phase 6 of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model. The “STAC Review of the Nutrient Inputs to the Watershed Model” (previously referred to...

  13. 77 FR 53228 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... and findings of fact related to the identity or cultural affiliation of human remains or other...)(3), for review and findings of fact related to the identity or cultural affiliation of human remains...), for review and findings of fact related to the identity or cultural affiliation of human remains or...

  14. Geothermal-subsidence research program plan and review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Noble, J.E.; Simkin, T.L.

    1980-09-01

    The revised Geothermal Subsidence Research Plan (GSRP) presented here is the result of two years of research based on the recommendations of a technical advisory committee and on the DOE/DGE's wish to include specific components applicable to the geopressure resources on the Gulf Coast. This revised plan describes events leading up to FY 1979 and 1980 and the resulting research activities completed for that period. At the time of this writing most of the projects are completed; this document summarizes the accomplishments of the GSRP during FY 1979 and 1980 and includes recommendations for the FY 1981 and 1982 programs.

  15. Researchers' experience with project management in health and medical research: Results from a post-project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Project management is widely used to deliver projects on time, within budget and of defined quality. However, there is little published information describing its use in managing health and medical research projects. We used project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project (2006-2008) http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and in this paper report researchers' opinions on project management and whether it made a difference to the project. Methods A national interdisciplinary group of 20 researchers, one of whom was the project manager, formed the Steering Committee for the project. We used project management to ensure project outputs and outcomes were achieved and all aspects of the project were planned, implemented, monitored and controlled. Sixteen of the researchers were asked to complete a self administered questionnaire for a post-project review. Results The project was delivered according to the project protocol within the allocated budget and time frame. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) completed a questionnaire. They reported that project management increased the effectiveness of the project, communication, teamwork, and application of the interdisciplinary group of researchers' expertise. They would recommend this type of project management for future projects. Conclusions Our post-project review showed that researchers comprehensively endorsed project management in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project and agreed that project management had contributed substantially to the research. In future, we will project manage new projects and conduct post-project reviews. The results will be used to encourage continuous learning and continuous improvement of project management, and provide greater transparency and accountability of health and medical research. The use of project management can benefit both management and scientific outcomes of health and medical research projects. PMID:21635721

  16. Competency, Programming, and Emerging Innovation in Graduate Education within Schools of Pharmacy: The Report of the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloyac, Samuel M; Block, Kirsten F; Cavanaugh, Jane E; Dwoskin, Linda P; Melchert, Russell B; Nemire, Ruth E; O'Donnell, James M; Priefer, Ronny; Touchette, Daniel R

    2017-10-01

    Graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences is a cornerstone of research within pharmacy schools. Pharmaceutical scientists are critical contributors to addressing the challenges of new drug discovery, delivery, and optimal care in order to ensure improved therapeutic outcomes in populations of patients. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) charged the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee (RGAC) to define the competencies necessary for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences (Charge 1), recommend collaborative curricular development across schools of pharmacy (Charge 2), recommend AACP programing for graduate education (Charge 3), and provide guidance on emerging areas for innovation in graduate education (Charge 4). With respect to Charges 1 and 2, the RGAC committee developed six domains of core competencies for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences as well as recommendations for shared programming. For Charge 3, the committee made 3 specific programming recommendations that include AACP sponsored regional research symposia, a professional development forum at the AACP INterim Meeting, and the addition of a graduate research and education poster session at the AACP Annual Meeting. For Charge 4, the committee recommended that AACP develop a standing committee of graduate program deans and directors to provide guidance to member schools in support of graduate program representation at AACP meetings, develop skills for interprofessional teamwork and augment research through integration of Pharm.D., Ph.D., postdoctoral associates, resident, and fellow experiences. Two proposed policy statements by the committee are that AACP believes core competencies are essential components of graduate education and AACP supports the inclusion of research and graduate education focuses in its portfolio of meetings and programs.

  17. A review of the HDR research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Koski, K.; Rintamaa, R.; Keskinen, R.

    1995-10-01

    In the German HDR (Heissdampfreaktor, hot steam reactor) reactor safety programme, experiments and simulating numerical analyses have been undertaken since 1976 to study the integrity and safety of light water reactors under operational and faulted conditions. The last experiments of the programme were conducted in 1991. The post test analyses have been finished by March 1994 and the last final reports were obtained a few months later. The report aims to inform the utilities and the regulatory body of Finland about the contents of the lokset HDR research programme and to consider the applicability of the results to safety analyses of Finnish nuclear power plants. The report centers around the thermal shock and piping component experiments within the last or third phase of the HDR programme. Investigations into severe reactor accidents, fire safety and non-destructive testing, also conducted during the third phase, are not considered. The report presents a review of the following experiment groups: E21 (crack growth under corrosive conditions, loading due to thermal stratification), E22 (leak rate and leak detection experiments of through-cracked piping), E23 (thermal transient and stratification experiments for a pipe nozzle), E31 (vibration of cracked piping due to blow down and closure of isolation valve), E32 (seismically induced vibrations of cracked piping), E33 (condensation phenomena in horizontal piping during emergency cooling). A comprehensive list of reference reports, received by VTT and containing a VTT more detailed description, is given for each experiment group. The review is focused on the loading conditions and their theoretical modelling. A comparison of theoretical and experimental results is presented for each experiment group. The safety margins are finally assessed with special reference to leak-before-break, a well known principle for assuring the integrity of primary circuit piping of nuclear power plants. (orig.) (71 figs., 5 tabs.)

  18. Developments in cooperative learning: review of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn M. Gillies

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cooperative learning, where students work in small groups to accomplish shared goals, is widely recognized as a teaching strategy that promotes learning and socialization among students from kindergarten through college and across different subject domains. It has been used successfully to promote reading and writing achievements, understanding and conceptual development in science classes, problem-solving in mathematics, and higher-order thinking and learning to name just a few. It has been shown to enhance students' willingness to work cooperatively and productively with others with diverse learning and adjustment needs and to enhance intergroup relations with those from culturally and ethnically different backgrounds. It has also been used as a teaching strategy to assist students to manage conflict and to help students identified as bullies learn appropriate interpersonal skills. In fact, it has been argued that cooperative learning experiences are crucial to preventing and alleviating many of the social problems related to children, adolescents, and young adults. There is no doubt that the benefits attributed to cooperative learning are widespread and numerous and it is the apparent success of this approach to learning that has led to it being acclaimed as one of the greatest educational innovations of recent times. The purpose of this paper is not only to review developments in research on cooperative learning but also to examine the factors that mediate and moderate its success. In particular, the review focuses on the types of student and teacher interactions generated and the key role talk plays in developing student thinking and learning, albeit through the expression of contrasting opinions or constructed shared meaning. The intention is to provide additional insights on how teachers can effectively utilize this pedagogical approach to teaching and learning in their classrooms.

  19. Response margins investigation of piping dynamic analyses using the independent support motion method and PVRC [Pressure Vessel Research Committee] damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; Wang, Y.K.; Reich, M.

    1988-03-01

    An evaluation of Independent Support Motion (ISM) response spectrum methods of analysis coupled with the Pressure Vessel Research Committee (PVRC) recommendation for damping, to compute the dynamic component of the seismic response of piping systems, was completed. Response estimates for five piping/structural systems were developed using fourteen variants of the ISM response spectrum method, the Uniform Support Motions response spectrum method and the ISM time history analysis method, all based on the PVRC recommendations for damping. The ISM/PVRC calculational procedures were found to exhibit orderly characteristics with levels of conservatism comparable to those obtained with the ISM/uniform damping procedures. Using the ISM/PVRC response spectrum method with absolute combination between group contributions provided consistently conservative results while using the ISM/PVRC response spectrum method with square root sum of squares combination between group contributions provided estimates of response which were deemed to be acceptable

  20. The implementation and discussion on review of periodic safety reviews (PSRs) for research reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Quanyuan

    2011-01-01

    The overview of regulations with which the review of PSRs for research reactors shall comply, the implementation of the review of PSRs for research reactors in China and its effects, the discussion on several issues about PSRs for research reactors and its review, and suggestions on reinforcing the PSRs for research reactors in China are concerned. (author)

  1. Strategies to Prevent or Reduce Gender Bias in Peer Review of Research Grants: A Rapid Scoping Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea C Tricco

    Full Text Available To review the literature on strategies implemented or identified to prevent or reduce gender bias in peer review of research grants.Studies of any type of qualitative or quantitative design examining interventions to reduce or prevent gender bias during the peer review of health-related research grants were included. Electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC, PsycINFO, Joanna Briggs, the Cochrane Library, Evidence Based Medicine (EBM Reviews, and the Campbell Library were searched from 2005 to April 2016. A search for grey (i.e., difficult to locate or unpublished literature was conducted and experts in the field were consulted to identify additional potentially relevant articles. Two individuals screened titles and abstracts, full-text articles, and abstracted data with discrepancies resolved by a third person consistently.After screening 5524 citations and 170 full-text articles, one article evaluating gender-blinding of grant applications using an uncontrolled before-after study design was included. In this study, 891 applications for long-term fellowships in 2006 were included and 47% of the applicants were women. These were scored by 13 peer reviewers (38% were women. The intervention included eliminating references to gender from the applications, letters of recommendations, and interview reports that were sent to the committee members for evaluation. The proportion of successful applications led by women did not change with gender-blinding, although the number of successful applications that were led by men increased slightly.There is limited research on interventions to mitigate gender bias in the peer review of grants. Only one study was identified and no difference in the proportion of women who were successful in receiving grant funding was observed. Our results suggest that interventions to prevent gender bias should be adapted and tested in the context of grant peer review to

  2. Evaluation of the safety research programme 1985-1989 by the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.

    1990-01-01

    Joint Nordic research programmes in nuclear safety have been conducted since 1977 under the direction of the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy. Each of these four-year programmes is evaluated according to a procedure established by the Nordic Committee for Safety Research, NKS. The latest programme covered the period 1985-89 and included items that are of interest to countries that have nuclear power plants (Finland and Sweden) as well as to countries without (Denmark, Iceland and Norway). This last programme has been evaluated in 1990. The first area (AKT) deals with phenomena that might occur within the reactor containment during accidents. It also deals with potential pathways of radioactive material that could be released, as well as effects in the environment and possible counter-measures. The second area (KAV) investigates several topics related to waste management, such as waste arising in Scandinavia from power plant operation and decommissioning, and related transportation needs. It also deals with the methods used for modelling possible leaks from waste repositories and the uncertainty related to such calculations. The third area (RAS) deals with risk management - how decisions on safety issues are made, and what is the relative risk of nuclear activities. It also deals with methods for safety calculations that are based on a probabilistic approach. In the fourth area (MAT), the tendency of materials to develop cracks under tough external conditions is examined together with corrosion issues relevant to nuclear plants. Finally, the fifth area (INF) deals with the possibility of using modern information technology to support communication and decision making during emergency situations at compelx industrial plants. (author)

  3. An overview on ethical considerations in stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendations: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajkhoda, Tahmineh

    2017-01-01

    Conducting research on the stem cell lines might bring some worthy good to public. Human Stem Cells (hSCs) research has provided opportunities for scientific progresses and new therapies, but some complex ethical matters should be noticed to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. The aim of this review article is to discuss the importance of stem cell research, code of ethics for stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendation. Generation of stem cells for research from human embryo or adult stem cells, saving, maintenance and using of them are the main ethical, legal and jurisprudence concerns in Iran. Concerns regarding human reproduction or human cloning, breach of human dignity, genetic manipulation and probability of tumorogenisity are observed in adult/somatic stem cells. Destruction of embryo to generate stem cell is an important matter in Iran. In this regards, obtaining stem cell from donated frozen embryos through infertility treatment that would be discarded is an acceptable solution in Iran for generation of embryo for research. Ethical, legal, and jurisprudence strategies for using adult/somatic stem cells are determination of ownership of stem cells, trade prohibition of human body, supervision on bio banks and information of Oversight Committee on Stem Cell Research. Recommendations to handle ethical issues for conducting stem cell research are well-designed studies, compliance codes of ethics in biomedical research (specifically codes of ethics on stem cell research, codes of ethics on clinical trials studies and codes of ethics on animals studies), appropriate collaboration with ethics committees and respecting of rights of participants (including both of human and animal rights) in research. In addition, there is a necessity for extending global networks of bioethics for strengthening communications within organizations at both the regional and international level, strengthening legislation systems

  4. An overview on ethical considerations in stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendations: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Farajkhoda

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Conducting research on the stem cell lines might bring some worthy good to public. Human Stem Cells (hSCs research has provided opportunities for scientific progresses and new therapies, but some complex ethical matters should be noticed to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. The aim of this review article is to discuss the importance of stem cell research, code of ethics for stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendation. Generation of stem cells for research from human embryo or adult stem cells, saving, maintenance and using of them are the main ethical, legal and jurisprudence concerns in Iran. Concerns regarding human reproduction or human cloning, breach of human dignity, genetic manipulation and probability of tumorogenisity are observed in adult/somatic stem cells. Destruction of embryo to generate stem cell is an important matter in Iran. In this regards, obtaining stem cell from donated frozen embryos through infertility treatment that would be discarded is an acceptable solution in Iran for generation of embryo for research. Ethical, legal, and jurisprudence strategies for using adult/somatic stem cells are determination of ownership of stem cells, trade prohibition of human body, supervision on bio banks and information of Oversight Committee on Stem Cell Research. Recommendations to handle ethical issues for conducting stem cell research are well-designed studies, compliance codes of ethics in biomedical research (specifically codes of ethics on stem cell research, codes of ethics on clinical trials studies and codes of ethics on animals studies, appropriate collaboration with ethics committees and respecting of rights of participants (including both of human and animal rights in research. In addition, there is a necessity for extending global networks of bioethics for strengthening communications within organizations at both the regional and international level, strengthening

  5. An overview on ethical considerations in stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendations: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajkhoda, Tahmineh

    2017-02-01

    Conducting research on the stem cell lines might bring some worthy good to public. Human Stem Cells (hSCs) research has provided opportunities for scientific progresses and new therapies, but some complex ethical matters should be noticed to ensure that stem cell research is carried out in an ethically appropriate manner. The aim of this review article is to discuss the importance of stem cell research, code of ethics for stem cell research in Iran and ethical recommendation. Generation of stem cells for research from human embryo or adult stem cells, saving, maintenance and using of them are the main ethical, legal and jurisprudence concerns in Iran. Concerns regarding human reproduction or human cloning, breach of human dignity, genetic manipulation and probability of tumorogenisity are observed in adult/somatic stem cells. Destruction of embryo to generate stem cell is an important matter in Iran. In this regards, obtaining stem cell from donated frozen embryos through infertility treatment that would be discarded is an acceptable solution in Iran for generation of embryo for research. Ethical, legal, and jurisprudence strategies for using adult/somatic stem cells are determination of ownership of stem cells, trade prohibition of human body, supervision on bio banks and information of Oversight Committee on Stem Cell Research. Recommendations to handle ethical issues for conducting stem cell research are well-designed studies, compliance codes of ethics in biomedical research (specifically codes of ethics on stem cell research, codes of ethics on clinical trials studies and codes of ethics on animals studies), appropriate collaboration with ethics committees and respecting of rights of participants (including both of human and animal rights) in research. In addition, there is a necessity for extending global networks of bioethics for strengthening communications within organizations at both the regional and international level, strengthening legislation systems

  6. A Review of Smoking Research In Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, L H; Chan, C M H; Yogarabindranath, S N

    2016-06-01

    Two hundred and seventy one original published materials related to tobacco use were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to Medicine and Health in Malaysia from 1996 - 2015. A total of 147 papers were selected and reviewed on the basis of their relevance and implications for future research. Findings were summarised, categorised and presented according to epidemiology, behaviour, clinical features and management of smoking. Most studies are cross-sectional with small sample sizes. Studies on smoking initiation and prevalence showed mixed findings with many small scale studies within the sub-groups. The majority of the studies were related to factors that contribute to initiation in adolescents. Nonetheless, there are limited studies on intervention strategies to curb smoking among this group. There is a lack of clinical studies to analyse tobacco use and major health problems in Malaysia. In addition, studies on the best treatment modalities on the use of pharmacotherapy and behavioural counselling have also remained unexplored. Reasons why smokers do not seek clinic help to quit smoking need further exploration. A finding on the extent of effort carried out by healthcare providers in assisting smokers to make quit attempts is not known. Studies on economic and government initiatives on policies and tobacco use focus mainly on the effects of cigarette bans, increased cigarettes taxes and the influence of the tobacco industry. Recommendations are given for the government to increase efforts in implementing smoke-free legislation, early and tailored interventions. Clinical studies in this area are lacking, as are opportunities to research on ways to reduce smoking initiation age and the most effective quit smoking strategies.

  7. A review of depression research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C G

    2014-08-01

    Depression is a debilitating illness and has become a leading cause of morbidity globally. We aim to summarise the evidence available in regard to the prevalence, type of assessment tools used and treatment options for depression in Malaysia. Two hundred and forty seven articles related to depression were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. Fifty seven articles were selected and reviewed on the basis of clinical relevance and future research implications. Findings were summarised, categorised and presented according to prevalence of depression, depression in women, depression in clinical condition, assessment tools, and treatment of depression. The prevalence of depression in Malaysia was estimated to be between 8 and 12%. The figures were higher among women of low socio-economic background or those with comorbid medical condition. The common assessment tools used in Malaysia include Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS), Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). They were translated into the Malay language and their psychometric properties were established. Both pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy were commonly used in Malaysia, and were highly recommended in local clinical practice guidelines. There are discrepancies in the reported rates of depression in Malaysia and this needs to be addressed. There were lack of studies looking into the depression among subgroups in Malaysia especially in the male population. There were several instruments available for assessment of depression in Malaysia but their suitability for the local setting need further research. Both pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy were recommended in the local treatment guideline in Malaysia. With the emergence of generic medication, we need to compare their clinical efficacy and tolerability

  8. A review of algal research in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, Tobias; Kociolek, Patrick; Klaus, David

    2018-05-01

    With the continued expansion of human presence into space, typical mission durations will routinely exceed six months and extend to distances beyond the Moon. As such, sending periodic resupply vehicles, as currently provided to the International Space Station, will likely no longer be feasible. Instead, self-sustaining life support systems that recycle human waste products will become increasingly necessary, especially for planetary bases. The idea of bioregenerative life support systems using algal photobioreactors has been discussed since the beginning of the space age. In order to evaluate how such a system could be implemented, a variety of space flight studies aimed at characterizing the potential for using algae in air revitalization, water recycling, food production, and radiation shielding applications have been conducted over the years. Also, given the recent, growing interest in algal research for regenerative fuel production, food supplements, and cosmetics, many algal strains are already well documented from related terrestrial experiments. This paper reviews past algal experiments flown in space from 1960 until today. Experimental methods and results from 51 investigations utilizing either green algae (Chlorophyta), cyanobacteria (Cyanophyta), or Euglenophyta are analyzed and categorized by a variety of parameters, including size, species and duration. The collected data are summarized in a matrix that allows easy comparison between the experiments and provides important information for future life support system requirement definition and design. Similarities between experiment results are emphasized. Common problems and shortcomings are summarized and analyzed in terms of potential solutions. Finally, key research gaps, which must be closed before developing a functional life support system, are identified.

  9. Bank loan loss provisions research: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson K. Ozili

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the recent academic and policy literature on bank loan loss provisioning. Among other things, we observe that there exist some interaction between LLPs and existing prudential, accounting, institutional, cultural, religious, tax and fiscal frameworks which differ across countries; and we find that managerial discretion in provisioning is strongly linked to income smoothing, capital management, signalling, tax management and other objectives. We also address several issues including the ethical dimensions of income smoothing, factors influencing income smoothing, methodological issues in LLP modelling and the dynamic loan loss provisioning experiment; which opens up several avenues for further research such as: finding a balance between sufficient LLPs which regulators want versus transparent LLPs which standard setters want; the sensitivity of abnormal LLPs to changes in equity; the persistence of abnormal LLPs following CEO exit; country-specific interventions that induce LLP procyclicality in emerging countries; the impact of Basel III on banks' provisioning discretion; LLP behaviour among systemic and non-systemic financial institutions; etc. We conclude that regulators need to pay attention to how much discretion lending institutions should have in determining reported provision estimates, and this has been a long standing issue.

  10. Magnetic particles in medical research - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic (or magnetizable) particles have assumed increasing importance in medical and biological research since 1966 when the effect of a magnetic field on the movement of suspended particles was initially studied. In fields like haematology, cell biology, microbiology, biochemistry and immunoassays, they currently provide the basis for separation techniques, which previously relied on gravitational forces. The body cells (e.g., blood cells) can be made magnetic by incubating them in a medium containing several Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ particles, which are adsorbed to the membrane surfaces. Some bacteria (also called magnetostatic bacteria) respond to externally applied magnetic lines of force due to their intracellular magnetic particles. These properties are useful in the isolation of these cells/bacteria. In biochemistry magnetic particles are used to immobilize enzymes without any loss of enzyme activity. The immobilized enzymes can facilitate the separation of end products without extensive instrumentation. In immunoassays the antibodies are covalently linked to polymer coated iron oxide particles. An electromagnet is used to sediment these particles after reaction. This excludes the use of centrifuge to separate antigen-antibody complexes. In pharmacy and pharmacology the magnetic particles are important in drug transport. In techniques like ferrography, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), spectroscopic studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the magnetic particles serve as contrast agents and give clinically important spatial resolution. Magnetic particles also find extensive applications in cancer therapy, genetic engineering, pneumology, nuclear medicine, radiology and many other fields. This article reviews these applications. (author)

  11. LITERATURE REVIEWING WITH RESEARCH TOOLS, Part 3: Writing Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Research Tools” enable researchers to collect, organize, analyze, visualize and publicized research outputs. Dr. Nader has collected over 700 tools that enable students to follow the correct path in research and to ultimately produce high-quality research outputs with more accuracy and efficiency. It is assembled as an interactive Web-based mind map, titled “Research Tools”, which is updated periodically. “Research Tools” consists of a hierarchical set of nodes. It has four main nodes: (1)...

  12. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 3. Evaluation of potential for pipe breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-11-01

    The Executive Director for Operations (EDO) in establishing the Piping Review Committee concurred in its overall scope that included an evaluation of the potential for pipe breaks. The Pipe Break Task Group has responded to this directive. This report summarizes a review of regulatory documents and contains the Task Group's recommendations for application of the leak-before-break (LBB) approach to the NRC licensing process. The LBB approach means the application of fracture mechanics technology to demonstrate that high energy fluid piping is very unlikely to experience double-ended ruptures or their equivalent as longitudinal or diagonal splits. The Task Group's reommendations and discussion are founded on current and ongoing NRC staff actions as presented in Section 3.0 of this report. Additional more detailed comments and discussion are presented in Section 5.0 and in Appendices A and B. The obvious issues are the reexamination of the large pipe break criteria and the implications of any changes in the criteria as they influence items such as jet loads and pipe whip. The issues have been considered and the Task Group makes the following recommendations.

  13. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 3. Evaluation of potential for pipe breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The Executive Director for Operations (EDO) in establishing the Piping Review Committee concurred in its overall scope that included an evaluation of the potential for pipe breaks. The Pipe Break Task Group has responded to this directive. This report summarizes a review of regulatory documents and contains the Task Group's recommendations for application of the leak-before-break (LBB) approach to the NRC licensing process. The LBB approach means the application of fracture mechanics technology to demonstrate that high energy fluid piping is very unlikely to experience double-ended ruptures or their equivalent as longitudinal or diagonal splits. The Task Group's reommendations and discussion are founded on current and ongoing NRC staff actions as presented in Section 3.0 of this report. Additional more detailed comments and discussion are presented in Section 5.0 and in Appendices A and B. The obvious issues are the reexamination of the large pipe break criteria and the implications of any changes in the criteria as they influence items such as jet loads and pipe whip. The issues have been considered and the Task Group makes the following recommendations

  14. Statement of Aaron Cohen, Director, Research and Engineering, Johnson Space Center and Chairman, Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The activities of NASA's Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee is discussed. Advanced Technology Advisory Committee (ATAC) activities over the last year are reviewed in preparation of the report to Congress on the potential for advancing automation and robotics technology for the space station and for the U.S. economy.

  15. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). Seventh annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    In 1990--91 CIRRPC's program included efforts to improve interagency coordination on ionizing radiation risk assessments, a review of the reported health risks to humans from exposure to extremely low- frequency electric and magnetic fields (ELF/EMF), and increased coordination with national and international organizations such as NCRP and ICRP

  16. [Review of the methodological, ethical, legal and social issues of research projects in healthcare with big data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lecuona, Itziar

    2018-05-31

    The current model for reviewing research with human beings basically depends on decision-making processes within research ethics committees. These committees must be aware of the importance of the new digital paradigm based on the large-scale exploitation of datasets, including personal data on health. This article offers guidelines, with the application of the EU's General Data Protection Regulation, for the appropriate evaluation of projects that are based on the use of big data analytics in healthcare. The processes for gathering and using this data constitute a niche where current research is developed. In this context, the existing protocols for obtaining informed consent from participants are outdated, as they are based not only on the assumption that personal data are anonymized, but that they will continue to be so in the future. As a result, it is essential that research ethics committees take on new capabilities and revisit values such as privacy and freedom, updating protocols, methodologies and working procedures. This change in the work culture will provide legal security to the personnel involved in research, will make it possible to guarantee the protection of the privacy of the subjects of the data, and will permit orienting the exploitation of data to avoid the commodification of personal data in this era of deidentification, so that research meets actual social needs and not spurious or opportunistic interests disguised as research. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. The Battlefield Health and Trauma Research Institute Scientific Ethics Committee: An Evolving Model for Fostering a Culture of Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    grants and contracts.8 The ORI defines research misconduct as ‘‘fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research...fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism (FFP) is only 1% to 2%, based on self-reporting.10,11 However, approx- imately 33% of scientists admitted...provide investigators training and guidance? THE ACADEMIC MODEL Just as regulations governing the ethical use of human and animal research subjects grew

  18. “I Don't Think that Any Peer Review Committee . . . Would Ever ‘Get’ What I Currently Do”: How Institutional Metrics for Success and Merit Risk Perpetuating the (Reproduction of Colonial Relationships in Community-Based Participatory Research Involving Indigenous Peoples in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Castleden

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on findings from a study that explored how a group of leading health researchers who do Indigenous community-engaged research (n = 20 in Canada envision enacting ethically sound research with Indigenous communities, as well as the concomitant tensions associated with doing so. In particular, we explore how institutional metrics for assessing merit and granting tenure are seen to privilege conventional discourses of productivity and validity in research and, as a result, are largely incongruent with the relational values associated with decolonizing research through community-based participatory health research. Our findings reveal that colonial incursion from the academy risk filtering into such research agendas and create a conflict between relational accountability to community partners and academic accountability to one’s discipline and peers.

  19. Review of the secret committees deal with old beliver’s schism in the reign of the Emperor Alexander I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serebrjakova Julija

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a history of secret committees deal with measures against old believer’s schism. The author studied archival documents possible to consider confessional politics of the Emperor Alexander I as a new stage of struggle with the old believer’s schism. The first secret committee was established by order of Emperor Alexander I in 1820. This committee was a unique phenomenon in the history of the secret committees of the 19th century and the first experience ofjoint efforts of Church and State against.

  20. 76 FR 12132 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... fact related to the identity or cultural affiliation of human remains or other cultural items, or the...), for review and findings of fact related to the identity or cultural affiliation of human remains or... consensus clearly has not been reached among affected parties regarding the identity or cultural affiliation...