WorldWideScience

Sample records for research obpr physical

  1. Path to a Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the status and goals for the NASA OBPR Physical Science Research Program. The following text was used to summarize the presentation. The OBPR Physical Sciences Research program has been comprehensively reviewed and endorsed by National Research Council. The value and need for the research have been re-affirmed. The research program has been prioritized and resource re-allocations have been carried out through an OBPR-wide process. An increasing emphasis on strategic, mission-oriented research is planned. The program will strive to maintain a balance between strategic and fundamental research. A feasible ISS flight research program fitting within the budgetary and ISS resource envelopes has been formulated for the near term (2003-2007). The current ISS research program will be significantly strengthened starting 2005 by using discipline dedicated research facility racks. A research re-planning effort has been initiated and will include active participation from the research community in the next few months. The research re-planning effort will poise PSR to increase ISS research utilization for a potential enhancement beyond ISS IP Core Complete. The Physical Sciences research program readily integrates the cross-disciplinary requirements of the NASA and OBPR strategic objectives. Each fundamental research thrust will develop a roadmap through technical workshops and Discipline Working Groups (DWGs). Most fundamental research thrusts will involve cross-disciplinary efforts. A Technology Roadmap will guide the Strategic Research for Exploration thrust. The Research Plan will integrate and coordinate fundamental Research Thrusts Roadmaps with the Technology Roadmap. The Technology Roadmap will be developed in coordination with other OBPR programs as well as other Enterprise (R,S,M,N). International Partners will contribute to the roadmaps and through research coordination. The research plan will be vetted with the discipline

  2. Physics research 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Research programmes at Oxford University are given for the year 1980 of the Clarendon Laboratory, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department and the Atmospheric Physics Department, together with provisional research programmes in Astrophysics, Metallurgy and the Science of Materials, and Archaeology and the History of Art. Items of interest to physicists are also included from Engineering Science, Geology and Mineralogy, Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Physical Chemistry Laboratory and the Chemical Crystallography Laboratory. (U.K.)

  3. Research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. We are active in seven principal areas which will be discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of e + e - and bar pp collisions; MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; and Muon detectors for the GEM Experiment

  4. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  5. High energy physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piroue, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    The goal of this research is to understand the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. At this time, the following activities are underway: e + e - interactions and Z 0 physics at CERN; studies to upgrade the L3 detector at LHC; very high statistics charm physics at Fermilab; search for the H particle at BNL; search for the fifth force; rare kaon decay experiments at BNL; study of B-meson physics at hadron colliders; e + e - pair creation by light at SLAC; R ampersand D related to SSC experiments and the GEM detector; and theoretical research in elementary particle physics and cosmology. The main additions to the activities described in detail in the original grant proposal are (1) an experiment at SLAC (E-144) to study strong-field QED effects in e-laser and γ-laser collisions, and (2) a search for the H particle at BNL (E-188). The R ampersand D efforts for the GEM detector have also considerably expanded. In this paper we give a brief status report for each activity currently under way

  6. Research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron endash positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the ''electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider

  7. Gravitational Physics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitational physics research at ISPAE is connected with NASA's Relativity Mission (Gravity Probe B (GP-B)) which will perform a test of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. GP-B will measure the geodetic and motional effect predicted by General Relativity Theory with extremely stable and sensitive gyroscopes in an earth orbiting satellite. Both effects cause a very small precession of the gyroscope spin axis. The goal of the GP-B experiment is the measurement of the gyroscope precession with very high precision. GP-B is being developed by a team at Stanford University and is scheduled for launch in the year 2001. The related UAH research is a collaboration with Stanford University and MSFC. This research is focussed primarily on the error analysis and data reduction methods of the experiment but includes other topics concerned with experiment systems and their performance affecting the science measurements. The hydrogen maser is the most accurate and stable clock available. It will be used in future gravitational physics missions to measure relativistic effects such as the second order Doppler effect. The HMC experiment, currently under development at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), will test the performance and capability of the hydrogen maser clock for gravitational physics measurements. UAH in collaboration with the SAO science team will study methods to evaluate the behavior and performance of the HMC. The GP-B data analysis developed by the Stanford group involves complicated mathematical operations. This situation led to the idea to investigate alternate and possibly simpler mathematical procedures to extract the GP-B measurements form the data stream. Comparison of different methods would increase the confidence in the selected scheme.

  8. Research in theoretical physical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1989-11-01

    We summarize the results of a research into the nature of the new physical phenomena observed in the interactions of photons and neutrinos of energies ≤ 1 EeV, emitted by various point sources in the sky. Contrary to expectations based on the Standard Model, the extensive air showers generated by these particles contain too many muons by a factor of (approximately) 100. This phenomenon can be explained by a composite structure of neutrinos, such that at sufficiently high energies they develop strong interactions. This hypothesis can be tested by studying the absorption characteristics of the primaries on the 3 degree K background. We find that the primaries contain a component which, unlike photons, is not absorbed by the background. It interacts with a cross section of a few mb/nucleon, thus giving further evidence for the existence of a substructure of quarks and leptons

  9. Research in theoretical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1992-12-01

    Progress made in the following areas is summarized: simulation of extensive air showers induced by interactions existing beyond the currently accepted ''Standard Model'' of elementary particle interactions; search for physics beyond the ''Standard Model'' in gluonic inclusive decays of heavy quarks; obtaining limits on the applicability of the special theory of relativity; an improved method of obtaining upper limits on the masses of primaries of extensive air showers associated with point sources in the sky. 8 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs

  10. Physical Research Laboratory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies on star formation processes, active galaxies, BL Lac objects and ... photospheric and chromospheric studies and observations for the international GONG ... Research in computer science with focus on image processing and.

  11. Physics Research at the Naval Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Timothy

    2001-03-01

    The United States Naval Research Laboratory conducts a broad program of research into the physical properties of matter. Studies range from low temperature physics, such as that associated with superconducting systems to high temperature systems such as laser produced or astrophysical plasmas. Substantial studies are underway on surface science and nanoscience. Studies are underway on the electronic and optical properties of materials. Studies of the physical properties of the ocean and the earth’s atmosphere are of considerable importance. Studies of the earth’s sun particularly as it effects the earth’s ionosphere and magnetosphere are underway. The entire program involves a balance of laboratory experiments, field experiments and supporting theoretical and computational studies. This talk will address NRL’s funding of physics, its employment of physicists and will illustrate the nature of NRL’s physics program with several examples of recent accomplishments.

  12. [Elementary particle physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherfoord, J.

    1992-01-01

    This summary of our activities supported by our DOE contract DE-SC02-91ER40605 covers the period from 1 January to 31 January 1992. The major areas which consumed most of our time are D0 at the Fermilab collider, E800 at the Fermilab fixed target facility and SSC work on major detectors and in detector R ampersand D. The research in these areas is discussed in this report

  13. Research in Neutrino Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busenitz, Jerome [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    2014-09-30

    We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for θ13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that θ13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2(2θ13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst). The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2(2θ13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will

  14. Physics research needs for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1995-01-01

    Design of ITER entails the application of physics design tools that have been validated against the world-wide data base of fusion research. In many cases, these tools do not yet exist and must be developed as part of the ITER physics program. ITER's considerable increases in power and size demand significant extrapolations from the current data base; in several cases, new physical effects are projected to dominate the behavior of the ITER plasma. This paper focuses on those design tools and data that have been identified by the ITER team and are not yet available; these needs serve as the basis for the ITER Physics Research Needs, which have been developed jointly by the ITER Physics Expert Groups and the ITER design team. Development of the tools and the supporting data base is an on-going activity that constitutes a significant opportunity for contributions to the ITER program by fusion research programs world-wide

  15. Research on burnup physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1974-07-01

    One of the major problems in burnup studies is the reasonably fast and accurate calculation of the space-and-energy dependent neutron flux and reaction rates for realistic power reactor fuel geometries and compositions, and its optimal integration in the global reactor calculations. The scope of the present research was to develop improved methods trying to satisfy the above requirements. In the epithermal region, simple and efficient approximation is proposed which allows the analytical solution for the space dependence of the spherical harmonics flux moments, and hence the derivation of the recurrence relations between he flux moments at successive lethargy pivotal points. A new matrix formalism to invert the coefficient matrix of band structure resulted in a reduce computer time and memory demands. The research on epithermal region is finalized in computing programme SPLET, which calculates the space-lethargy distribution of the spherical harmonics neutron flux moments, and the related integral quantities as reaction rates and resonance integrals. For partial verification of the above methods a Monte Carlo procedure was developed. Using point-wise representation of variables, a flexible and fast convergent integral transport method SEPT i developed. Expanding the neutron source and flux in finite series of arbitrary polynomials, the space-and-energy dependent integral transport equation is transformed into a general linear algebraic form, which is solved numerically. A simple and efficient procedure for deriving multipoint equations and constructing matrix is proposed and examined, and no unwanted oscillations were noticed. The energy point method was combined with the spherical harmonics method as well. A multi zone few-group program SPECTAR for global reactor calculations was developed. For testing, the flux distribution, neutron leakage and effective multiplication factor for the PWR reactor of the power station San Onofre were calculated. In order to verify

  16. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The introductory section describes the goals, main thrusts, and interrelationships between the various activities in the program and principal achievements of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group during 1992--93. Details and specific accomplishments are related in abstract form. Current research is taking place in the following areas: strong interaction physics (the physics of hadrons, QCD and the nucleus, QCD at finite temperature and high density), relativistic heavy-ion physics, nuclear structure and nuclear many- body theory, and nuclear astrophysics

  17. Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted in high energy physics in the following areas; quantum chromodynamics; drift chambers; proton-antiproton interactions; particle decays; particle production; polarimeters; quark-gluon plasma; and conformed field theory

  18. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas of high energy physics: B meson mixing; CDF response to low energy jets; jet scaling behavior; search for pair produced leptoquarks at CDF; SSC program; quantum field theory; and neural networks. (LSP)

  19. [Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses progress in the following research in high energy physics: The crystal ball experiment; delco at PEP; proton decay experiment; MACRO detector; mark III detector; SLD detector; CLEO II detector; and the caltech L3 group

  20. Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted in high energy physics in the following areas: quantum chromodynamics; drift chambers; proton-antiproton interactions; particle decays; particle production; polarimeters; quark-gluon plasma; and conformed field theory

  1. Nuclear physics research report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the 1988 Nuclear Physics Research Report for the University of Surrey, United Kingdom. The report includes both experimental nuclear structure physics and theoretical nuclear physics research work. The experimental work has been carried out predominantly with the Nuclear Structure Facility at the SERC Daresbury Laboratory, and has concerned nuclear shapes, shape coexistence, shape oscillations, single-particle structures and neutron-proton interaction. The theoretical work has involved nuclear reactions with a variety of projectiles below 1 GeV per nucleon incident energy, and aspects of hadronic interactions at intermediate energies. (U.K.)

  2. Research ethics in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César Schmitt Rocha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective here is to point out ethics in Physical Education research against a backdrop of individual and collective human conduct. Since Plato, the question of ethics in the Western world has been an incessant search for the virtues to harmonize personal and social wellbeing and for the absolute principles of conduct: Autonomy, Beneficence and Justice. Physical Education cannot exempt itself from these and its countless areas of research. In addition to the moral education that develops and solidifies within social groups, the characteristic of which is action on an individual level, we must also consider ethical principles such as those defended by the Physical Education World Manifesto and those that regulate the professional activities of Physical Education professionals. Irrespective of the area investigated, Research in Physical Education will always clash with institutionalized ethical principles enforced by ethics committees, councils and the values accepted by the researchers. Committees strive to preserve the integrity and dignity of the people enrolled on research studies while the researchers challenge the limits of knowledge at an uncomfortable frontier between the acceptable and the unacceptable within a given context of academic vision and needs.

  3. Science Education Research vs. Physics Education Research: A Structural Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Bayram

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to introduce physics education research (PER) to researchers in other fields. Topics include discussion of differences between science education research (SER) and physics education research (PER), physics educators, research design and methodology in physics education research and current research traditions and…

  4. Quantum computing for physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeot, B.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum computers hold great promises for the future of computation. In this paper, this new kind of computing device is presented, together with a short survey of the status of research in this field. The principal algorithms are introduced, with an emphasis on the applications of quantum computing to physics. Experimental implementations are also briefly discussed

  5. Physical security at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Of the 84 non-power research facilities licensed under 10 CFR Part 50, 73 are active (two test reactors, 68 research reactors and three critical facilities) and are required by 10 CFR Part 73.40 to provide physical protection against theft of SNM and against industrial sabotage. Each licensee has developed a security plan required by 10 CFR Part 50.34(c) to demonstrate the means of compliance with the applicable requirements of 10 CFR Part 73. In 1974, the Commission provided interim guidance for the organization and content of security plans for (a) test reactors, (b) medium power research and training reactors, and (c) low power research and training reactors. Eleven TRIGA reactors, with power levels greater than 250 kW and all other research and training reactors with power levels greater than 100 kW and less than or equal to 5,000 kW are designated as medium power research and training reactors. Thirteen TRIGA reactors with authorized power levels less than 250 kW are considered to be low power research and training reactors. Additional guidance for complying with the requirements of 73.50 and 73.60, if applicable, is provided in the Commission's Regulatory Guides. The Commission's Office of Inspection and Enforcement inspects each licensed facility to assure that an approved security plan is properly implemented with appropriate procedures and physical protection systems

  6. Research on reactor physics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    In the early years of nuclear reactor research, each national program tended to develop its own reactor physics information. The Government of Norway proposed to the Agency the undertaking of a joint program in reactor physics utilizing the facilities and staff of its zero power reactor NORA then under construction. Following the approval by the Board of Governors in February, the Agency invited Member States to submit the names and qualifications of scientists they wished to suggest for the project. All the results and information gained through the program, which is expected to last about three years, will be placed at the disposal of the Agency's Member States

  7. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, T.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the accomplishments in basic research in nuclear physics carried out by the theoretical nuclear physics group in the Department of Physics at the University of Texas at Austin, during the period of November 1, 1992 to October 31, 1993. The work done covers three separate areas, low-energy nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, and nuclear structure studies. Although the subjects are thus spread among different areas, they are based on two techniques developed in previous years. These techniques are a powerful method for continuum-random-phase-approximation (CRPA) calculations of nuclear response and the breakup-fusion (BF) approach to incomplete fusion reactions, which calculation on a single footing of various incomplete fusion reaction cross sections within the framework of direct reaction theories. The approach was developed as a part of a more general program for establishing an approach to describing all different types of nuclear reactions, i.e., complete fusion, incomplete fusion and direct reactions, in a systematic way based on single theoretical framework

  8. Experimental High Energy Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics and Space Sciences

    2016-01-13

    This final report summarizes activities of the Florida Tech High Energy Physics group supported by DOE under grant #DE-SC0008024 during the period June 2012 – March 2015. We focused on one of the main HEP research thrusts at the Energy Frontier by participating in the CMS experiment. We were exploiting the tremendous physics opportunities at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and prepared for physics at its planned extension, the High-Luminosity LHC. The effort comprised a physics component with analysis of data from the first LHC run and contributions to the CMS Phase-2 upgrades in the muon endcap system (EMU) for the High-Luminosity LHC. The emphasis of our hardware work was the development of large-area Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) for the CMS forward muon upgrade. We built a production and testing site for such detectors at Florida Tech to complement future chamber production at CERN. The first full-scale CMS GE1/1 chamber prototype ever built outside of CERN was constructed at Florida Tech in summer 2013. We conducted two beam tests with GEM prototype chambers at CERN in 2012 and at FNAL in 2013 and reported the results at conferences and in publications. Principal Investigator Hohlmann served as chair of the collaboration board of the CMS GEM collaboration and as co-coordinator of the GEM detector working group. He edited and authored sections of the detector chapter of the Technical Design Report (TDR) for the GEM muon upgrade, which was approved by the LHCC and the CERN Research Board in 2015. During the course of the TDR approval process, the GEM project was also established as an official subsystem of the muon system by the CMS muon institution board. On the physics side, graduate student Kalakhety performed a Z' search in the dimuon channel with the 2011 and 2012 CMS datasets that utilized 20.6 fb⁻¹ of p-p collisions at √s = 8 TeV. For the dimuon channel alone, the 95% CL lower limits obtained on the mass of a Z' resonance are 2770 Ge

  9. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1993-01-01

    The main subject of research was the physics of matter at energy densities greater than 0.15 GeV/fm 3 . Theory encompasses the relativistic many-body/quantum field theory aspects of QCD and the electroweak interactions at these high energy densities, both in and out of thermal equilibrium. Applications range from neutron stars/pulsars to QCD and electroweak phase transitions in the early universe, from baryon number violation in cosmology to the description of nucleus-nucleus collisions at CERN and at Brookhaven. Recent activity to understand the properties of matter at energy densities where the electroweak W and Z boson degrees of freedom are important is reported. This problem has applications to cosmology and has the potential to explain the baryon asymmetry produced in the big bang at energies where the particle degrees of freedom will soon be experimentally, probed. This problem is interesting for nuclear physics because of the techniques used in many-body, physics of nuclei and the quark-gluon plasma may be extended to this new problem. The was also interested in problems related to multiparticle production. This includes work on production of particles in heavy-ion collisions, the small x part, of the nuclear and hadron wave function, and multiparticle production induced by instantons in weakly coupled theories. These problems have applications in the heavy ion program at RHIC and the deep inelastic scattering experiments at HERA

  10. Research trends in neutron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    The trends in neutron research are discussed from the viewpoints of development of pulsed neutron sources, the ingenuity of specialization of instrumentation and experimental techniques, and research programs. The latter comprise the large and still expanding requirements of nuclear data for nuclear power technology, the requirements of other fundamental sciences, and the experimental and theoretical developments required for a more fundamental understanding of the subject of neutron and related nuclear reactions itself. The general conclusion is that high energy resolution coupled with high intensity for detecting weak reactions provides the key to further progress, and that (provided financial limitations do not stifle the further development of experimental facilities, particularly neutron sources) the subject of neutron physics still has a long and fruitful future

  11. New researchers for applied physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Rita Giuffredi, PicoSEC project

    2012-01-01

    On 12 September, thirteen PicoSEC researchers met in Lyon for the first time, at the project’s kick-off meeting. The meeting was the opportunity for them to get to know each other and start building a fruitful working and human relationship. A hard task awaits them: reaching the 200-picosecond-limit on time resolution in photon detectors.    The 13 researchers recruited for the PicoSEC project and the organizers of the project, September 2012. Photon detectors are used in many different fields ranging from high-energy physics calorimetry for the future generation of colliders to the photon time-of-flight technique for the next generation of PET scanners. Within the PicoSEC EU-funded Marie Curie Initial Training Network, 18 Early Stage Researchers and 4 Experienced Researchers are being trained to develop new detection techniques based on very fast scintillating crystals and photo detectors. In a multi-site project like PicoSEC, in which 11 institutes and companies from 6 ...

  12. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  13. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, R.W.; Greensite, J.

    1992-01-01

    Task A of this contract supports research in elementary particle physics using cryogenic particle detectors. We have developed superconducting aluminum tunnel-junction detectors sensitive to a variety of particle signals, and with potential application to a number of particle-physics problems. We have extended our range of technologies through a collaboration with Simon Labov, on niobium tri-layer junctions, and Jean-Paul Maneval, on high-T c superconducting bolometers. We have new data on response to low-energy X-rays and to alpha-particle signals from large-volume detectors. The theoretical work under this contract (Task B) is a continued investigation of nonperturbative aspects of quantum gravity. A Monte Carlo calculation is proposed for Euclidian quantum gravity, based on the ''fifth-time action'' stabilization procedure. Results from the last year include a set of seven papers, summarized below, addressing various aspects of nonperturbative quantum gravity and QCD. Among the issues- addressed is the so-called ''problem of time'' in canonical quantum gravity

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This report contains abstracts of ongoing projects in the following areas: strong interaction physics; relativistic heavy ion physics; nuclear structure and nuclear many-body theory; and nuclear astrophysics

  15. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    We shall organize the description of our many activities under following broad headings: Strong Interaction Physics: the physics of hadrons; QCD and the nucleus; and QCD at finite temperature and high density. Relativistic Heavy Ion Physics. Nuclear Structure and Many-body Theory. Nuclear Astrophysics. While these are the main areas of activity of the Stony Brood group, they do not cover all activities

  16. Research in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Andrew Paul [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); De, Kaushik [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Brandt, Andrew [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Farbin, Amir [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-02-02

    This report details the accomplishments and research results for the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington at the Energy and Intensity Frontiers. For the Energy Frontier we have made fundamental contributions in the search for supersymmetric particles, proposed to explain the stabilization of the mass of the Higgs Boson – the agent giving mass to all known particles. We have also made major contributions to the search for additional Higgs Bosons and to the planning for future searches. This work has been carried out in the context of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN (European Nuclear Research Laboratory) and for which we have made major contributions to computing and data distribution and processing, and have worked to calibrate the detector and prepare upgraded electronics for the future. Our other contribution to the Energy Frontier has been to the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, potentially hosted by Japan, and to the Silicon Detector Concept (SiD) in particular. We have lead the development of the SiD Concept and have worked on a new form of precise energy measurement for particles from the high energy collisions of electrons and positrons at the ILC. For the Intensity Frontier, we have worked to develop the concept of Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment(s) (LBNE) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Our contributions to detector development, neutrino beam studies, particle identification, software development will facilitate future studies of the oscillation of one type of neutrino into other type(s), establish the order of the neutrino masses, and, through an innovative new idea, allow us to create a beam of dark matter particles.

  17. Research in experimental nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.F.

    1989-09-01

    Our program concentrates on pion physics experimental results obtained using the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer (EPICS), Pion and Particle Physics channel (P 3 ), and the Low Energy Pion physics channel (LEP). These facilities are unique in the world in their intensity and resolution. Two classes of experiments can be done best with this equipment: scattering (elastic and inelastic) and double charge exchange (DCX). Several coincidence experiments are in progress and are discussed in this paper

  18. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This report discusses the following areas of investigation of the Stony Brook Nuclear Theory Group: the physics of hadrons; QCD and the nucleus; QCD at finite temperature and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and many-body theory; and heavy ion physics

  19. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, T.

    1991-10-01

    The work done during the past year covers three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions intermediate energy physics, and nuclear structure studies. This manuscript summarizes our achievements made in these three areas

  20. Research program in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Dicus, D.A.; Ritchie, J.L.; Lang, K.

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Quantum Gravity and Mathematical Physics; Phenomenology; Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory; Status of BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 888; and SSC Activities

  1. [Research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LoSecco, J.

    1989-01-01

    We review the efforts of the Notre Dame non accelerator high energy physics group. Our major effort has been directed toward the IMB deep underground detector. Since the departure of the Michigan group our responsibilities to the group have grown. We are also very active in pursuing physics with the IMB 3 detector. Currently we are studying proton decay, point neutrino sources and neutrino oscillations with the contained event sample

  2. Research in theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect

  3. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology

  4. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Takeshi.

    1990-10-01

    The work done during the past year or so may be divided into three separate areas, low energy nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics and nuclear structure studies. In this paper, we shall separately summarize our achievements made in these three areas

  5. Research in theoretical physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the research carried out under Grant DE-FG02-85ER40211. The main topics covered are: astroparticle physics at very high and ultrahigh energies; search for new physics by means of detectors of ultrahigh energy particles of extraterrestrial origin. Methods for searching in heavy quark decays for signatures of physics beyond the standard model are developed

  6. Research in theoretical physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domokos, G.; Kovesi-Domokos, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the research carried out under Grant DE-FG02-85ER40211. The main topics covered are: astroparticle physics at very high and ultrahigh energies; search for new physics by means of detectors of ultrahigh energy particles of extraterrestrial origin. Methods for searching in heavy quark decays for signatures of physics beyond the standard model are developed.

  7. Research on elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the activities of the University of Illinois Experimental High Energy Physics Group. The physicists in the University of Illinois High Energy Physics Group are engaged in a wide variety of experiments at current and future accelerator laboratories. These include: (1) The CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevetron p bar p collider. (2) Design and developmental work for the SDC group at SSCL. (3) Experiments at the wide band photon beam at Fermilab. (4) The SLD experiment at SLAC and design studies for a τ-charm factor. (5) CP violation experiments at Fermilab. (6) The HiRes cosmic ray experiment at Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. (7) Computational facilities. (8) Electronics systems development

  8. Research in accelerator physics (theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Shoroku.

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss the present status, expected effort during the remainder of the project, and some of the results of their activities since the beginning of the project. Some of the areas covered are: (1) effects of helical insertial devices on beam dynamics; (2) coupling impedance of apertures in accelerator beam pipes; (3) new calculation of diffusion rate; (4) integrable polynomial factorization for symplectic map tracking; and (5) physics of magnet sorting in superconducting rings

  9. Experimental atomic and molecular physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The Atomic Physics research in the Physics Division consists of five ongoing experimental programs: dissociation and other interactions of energetic molecular ions in solid and gaseous targets; beam-foil research and collision dynamics of heavy ions; photoionization-photoelectron research; spectroscopy of free atoms and molecules, high precision laser-rf double-resonance spectroscopy with atomic and molecular beams; and Moessbauer effect research

  10. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapusta, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    Research programs in nuclear theory are discussed in this paper. The topics discussed are: neutron stars and pulsars; transverse momentum distribution; intermittency and other correlations; photon and delepton production; electroweak theory at high temperature; and fractional statistics

  11. Physical Research Program: research contracts and statistical summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The physical research program consists of fundamental theoretical and experimental investigations designed to support the objectives of ERDA. The program is directed toward discovery of natural laws and new knowledge, and to improved understanding of the physical sciences as related to the development, use, and control of energy. The ultimate goal is to develop a scientific underlay for the overall ERDA effort and the fundamental principles of natural phenomena so that these phenomena may be understood and new principles, formulated. The physical research program is organized into four functional subprograms, high-energy physics, nuclear sciences, materials sciences, and molecular sciences. Approximately four-fifths of the total physical research program costs are associated with research conducted in ERDA-owned, contractor-operated federally funded research and development centers. A little less than one-fifth of the costs are associated with the support of research conducted in other laboratories

  12. [Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Research in progress and plans for future investigations are briefly summarized for the following areas: light-ion structure and reactions; nuclear structure; peripheral heavy-ion reactions at medium and high energy; medium-energy heavy-ion collisions and properties of highly excited nuclear matter; and high-energy heavy-ion collisions and QCD plasma

  13. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    This paper covers the following topics: Experiment 87-02: Threshold Electrodisintegration of the Deuteron at High Q 2 ; Measurement of the 5th Structure Function in Deuterium and 12 C; Single-Particle Densities of sd-Shell Nuclei; Experiment 84-28: Transverse Form Factors of 117 Sn; Experiment 82-11: Elastic Magnetic Electron Scattering from 13 C; Experiment 89-09: Measurement of the Elastic Magnetic Form Factor of 3 He at High Momentum Transfer; Experiment 89-15: Coincidence Measurement of the D(e,e'p) Cross-Section at Low Excitation Energy and High Momentum Transfer; Experiment 87-09: Measurement of the Quadrupole Contribution to the N → Δ Excitation; Experiment E-140: Measurement of the x-, Q 2 and A-Dependence of R = σ L /σ T ; PEP Beam-Gas Event Analysis: Physics with the SLAC TPC/2γ Detector; Drift Chamber Tests at Brookhaven National Laboratory; Experiment PR-89-031: Multi-nucleon Knockout Using the CLAS Detector; Electronics Design for the CLAS Region 1 Drift Chamber; Color Transparencies in the Electroproduction of Nucleon Resonances; and Experiment PR-89-015: Study of Coincidence Reactions in the Dip and Delta-Resonance Regions

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayman, B.F.

    1982-01-01

    Research progress on the following subjects is summarized: (1) first and second order contributions to two-neutron transfer, (2) proximity potential in coupled-channel calculations, (3) spin-dependent interactions in heavy ion reactions, (4) nuclear field theory and standard Goldstone perturbation theory, (5) effective operators with potential from meson theory, (6) microscopic study of the 3 He(α,γ) 7 Be electric-dipole capture reaction, and (7) influence of target clustering on internuclear antisymmetrization. Project proposals are reviewed and publications are listed

  15. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Nuclear Physics Program continues to concentrate upon the use of the electromagnetic interaction in a joint experimental and theoretical approach to the study of nucleon and nuclear properties. During the past year the activities of the group involved data analysis, design and construction of equipment, planning for new experiments, completion of papers and review articles for publication, writing of proposals for experiments, but very little actual data acquisition. Section II.A. described experiments at Bates Linear Accelerator Center. They include the following: electrodisintegration of deuteron; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of 3 He; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e'p) cross section; transverse form factors of 117 Sn; ground state magnetization density of 89 Y; and measurement of the 5th structure function in deuterium and 12 C. Section II.B. includes the following experiments at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center: deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; separation of charge and magnetic form factors of the neutron and proton; measurement of the X-, Q 2 , and A-dependence of R = σ L /σ T ; and analysis of 14.5 GeV electrons and positions scattered from gases in the PEP Storage Ring. Section III.C. includes the following experiments at NIKHEF and Lund: complementary studies of single-nucleon knockout and single-nucleon wave functions using electromagnetic interactions and single-particle densities of sd-shell nuclei. Section II.D. discusses preparations for future work at CEBAF: electronics for the CLAS region 1 drift chamber Section III. includes theoretical work on parity-violating electron scattering and nuclear structure

  16. Attitude Research in Physical Education: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of attitude research in physical education. The first section reviews theoretical models that are prevalent in attitude research. Then, the next section describes the methods that were used to locate the research used in the remainder of the paper. The third section discusses measurement issues in…

  17. Physics Research Integrated Development Environment (PRIDE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, J.; Cormell, L.

    1993-12-01

    Past efforts to implement a Software Engineering approach to High Energy Physics computing have been met with significant resistance and have been, in many cases, only marginally successful. At least a portion of the problem has been the Lick of an integrated development environment, tailored to High Energy Physics and incorporating a suite of Computer Aided Software Engineering tools. The Superconducting Super Collider Physics Research Division Computing Department is implementing pilot projects to develop just such an environment

  18. Medium energy nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, G.A.; Dubach, J.F.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimen, R.A.

    1991-06-01

    This report discusses research conducted on the following topics: transverse from factors of 117 Sn; elastic magnetic electron scattering from 13 C at Q 2 = 1 GeV 2 /c 2 ; a re-analysis of 13 C elastic scattering; deuteron threshold electrodisintegration; measurement of the elastic magnetic form factor of 3 He at high momentum transfer; coincidence measurement of the D(e,e'p) cross-section at low excitation energy and high momentum transfer; measurement of the quadrupole contribution to the N → Δ excitation; measurement of the x-, Q 2 -, and A-dependence of R = σ L /σ T ; the PEGASYS project; PEP beam-gas event analysis; plans for other experiments at SLAC: polarized electron scattering on polarized nuclei; experiment PR-89-015: study of coincidence reactions in the dip and delta-resonance regions; experiment PR-89-031: multi-nulceon knockout using the CLAS detector; drift chamber tests; a memorandum of understanding and test experiments; photoprotons from 10 B; and hadronic electroproduction at LEP

  19. The EPFL Plasma Physics Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Research Centre (CRPP) is a non-departmental unit of the EPFL, and currently employs about 130 people, about 105 on the EPFL site and the rest at the Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, in Villigen, Switzerland. The CRPP is a National Competence Centre in the field of Plasma Physics. In addition to plasma physics teaching, its missions are primarily the pursuit of scientific research in the field of controlled fusion within the framework of the EURATOM-Swiss Confederation Association and the development of its expertise as well as technology transfer in the field of materials research. As the body responsible for all scientific work on controlled fusion in Switzerland, the CRPP plays a national role of international significance. This document of 6 pages presents the explanation of the Plasma Physics Research Centre' activities (CRPP). (author)

  20. Experimental nuclear physics research in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltay, Ede.

    1984-01-01

    The status and recent results of experimental nuclear physics in Hungary is reviewed. The basic nuclear sciences, instrumental background and international cooperation are discussed. Personal problems and the effects of the international scientific deconjuncture are described. The applied nuclear and interdisciplinary researches play an important role in Hungarian nuclear physics. Some problems of cooperation of Hungarian nuclear and other research institutes applying or producing nuclear analytical technology are reviewed. The new instrument, the Debrecen cyclotron under construction gives new possibilities to basic and applied researches. A new field of Hungarian nuclear physics is the fusion and plasma research using tokamak equipment, the main topics of which are plasma diagnostics and fusion control systems. Some practical applications of Hungarian nuclear physical results, e.g. establishment of new analytical techniques like PIXE, RBS, PIGE, ESCA, etc. are summarized. (D.Gy.)

  1. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    These technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded

  2. Gesture analysis for physics education researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Scherr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Systematic observations of student gestures can not only fill in gaps in students’ verbal expressions, but can also offer valuable information about student ideas, including their source, their novelty to the speaker, and their construction in real time. This paper provides a review of the research in gesture analysis that is most relevant to physics education researchers and illustrates gesture analysis for the purpose of better understanding student thinking about physics.

  3. Recent nuclear physics research at IMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Genming

    1998-01-01

    The recent progresses in the nuclear physics research in IMP (Institute of Modern Physics) are reviewed including the synthesis and studies of nuclei far from stability and properties of hot nuclei. Heavy Ion Research Facility Lanzhou (HIRFL) is of cyclotron family delivering intermediate energy heavy ions. During the recent years, progresses have been made in the studies of heavy ion physics as well as in the development of the HIRFL. This paper will begin with the recent upgrading of HIRFL with an emphasis on the development of Radioactive Ion Beam Line Lanzhou (RIBLL), and then be focused on the physics research in IMP including intermediate energy heavy ion collisions and hot nuclei, synthesis and studies of nuclei far from stability. (J.P.N)

  4. An overview of nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    This overview is aimed to give a general picture of the global developments in nuclear physics research over the years since the beginning. It is based on the inaugural talk given at the 54th annual nuclear physics symposium organized by the Department of Atomic Energy, which was held as an International Symposium at BARC, Mumbai during Dec 8-12, 2009. The topics of nuclear fission, nuclear shell effects, super-heavy nuclei, and expanding frontiers of nuclear physics research with the medium to ultra-relativistic energy heavy-ion reactions are in particular highlighted. Accelerator driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) is briefly described in the end as an example of spin-off of nuclear physics research. (author)

  5. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e + e - analysis, bar P decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the φ factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K L 0 → π 0 γγ and π 0 ν bar ν, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R ampersand D

  6. Health physics research abstracts No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    No. 13 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of bulletins published by the IAEA since 1967 and which collect reports from Member States on health physics research in progress or just completed. The present issue contains 370 reports received up to March 1987 and covers the following topics: Personnel monitoring, dosimetry, assessment of dose to man, operational radiation protection techniques, radiation levels, effects of radiation, environmental studies, pathways and monitoring, analysis and evaluation of radiation hazards resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, epidemiology of radiation damage, optimization of radiation protection, research programmes and projects

  7. Health physics research abstracts No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The No. 12 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of Bulletins published by the IAEA since 1967 and which collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The present issue contains 386 reports received up to December 1984 and covering the following topics: personnel monitoring, dosimetry, assessment of dose to man, operational radiation protection techniques, biological effects of radiations, environmental studies, pathways and monitoring, radiation hazards resulting from the operation of nuclear facilities, radiation accidents and emergency plans, epidemiology of radiation damage, optimization of radiation protection, research programs and projects

  8. Application of PIN diodes in Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez-Jimenez, F. J.; Mondragon-Contreras, L.; Cruz-Estrada, P.

    2006-01-01

    A review of the application of PIN diodes as radiation detectors in different fields of Physics research is presented. The development and research in semiconductor technology, the use of PIN diodes in particle counting, X-and γ-ray spectroscopy, medical applications and charged particle spectroscopy are considered. Emphasis is made in the activities realized in the different research and development Mexican institutions dealing with this kind of radiation detectors

  9. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-02-01

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators

  10. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  11. Nuclear Physics Research at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfir, N. V.

    2018-05-01

    The new research facility Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) is under construction in Romania, on the Magurele Physics campus. Valued more than 300 Meuros the center will be operational in 2019. The research center will use a high brilliance Gamma Beam and a High-power Laser beam, with unprecedented characteristics worldwide, to investigate the interaction of very intense radiation with matter with specific focus on nuclear phenomena and their applications. The energetic particle beams and radiation produced by the 2x10 PW laser beam interacting with matter will be studied. The precisely tunable energy and excellent bandwidth of the gamma-ray beam will allow for new experimental approaches regarding nuclear astrophysics, nuclear resonance fluorescence, and applications. The experimental equipment is presented, together with the main directions of the research envisioned with special emphasizes on nuclear physics studies.

  12. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  13. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The brochure contains the abstracts of the papers presented at the 7th EPS meeting 1980 in Darmstadt. The main subjects were: a) Neutron scattering and Moessbauer effect in materials research, b) ion implantation in micrometallurgy, c) applications of nuclear reactions and radioisotopes in research on solids, d) recent developments in activation analysis and e) pions, positrons, and heavy ions applied in solid state physics. (RW) [de

  14. Intuitive Physics: Current Research and Controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubricht, James R; Holyoak, Keith J; Lu, Hongjing

    2017-10-01

    Early research in the field of intuitive physics provided extensive evidence that humans succumb to common misconceptions and biases when predicting, judging, and explaining activity in the physical world. Recent work has demonstrated that, across a diverse range of situations, some biases can be explained by the application of normative physical principles to noisy perceptual inputs. However, it remains unclear how knowledge of physical principles is learned, represented, and applied to novel situations. In this review we discuss theoretical advances from heuristic models to knowledge-based, probabilistic simulation models, as well as recent deep-learning models. We also consider how recent work may be reconciled with earlier findings that favored heuristic models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Health physics research abstracts no. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The present issue No. 11 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of Bulletins published by the Agency since 1967. They collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The main aim in issuing such reports is to draw attention to work that is about to be published and to enable interested scientists to obtain further information through direct correspondence with the investigators. The attention of users of this publication is drawn to the fact that abstracts of published documents on Health Physics are published eventually in INIS Atomindex, which is one of the output products of the Agency's International Nuclear Information System. The present issue contains 235 reports received up to December 1983 from the following Member States. In parentheses the country's ISO code and number of reports are given

  16. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of synchrotron radiation to research in high-energy atomic physics are summarized. These lie in the areas of photoelectron spectrometry, photon scattering, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved measurements, resonance spectroscopy and threshold excitation, and future, yet undefined studies

  17. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded. The specifications were written to satisfy the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0540, September 1, 1972

  18. Development of a cryostat for physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Futang

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the structure and performances of a cryostat for physics research on hybrid magnet or water-cooled magnet. The cryostat can provide a wide temperature range from 1 K to room temperature. The temperature stability (above 4.2 K) is very convenient for replacing samples

  19. Engaging college physics students with photonics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Rhys; Chen, Lawrence R.

    2017-08-01

    As educators and researchers in the field of photonics, we find what we do to be very exciting, and sharing this passion and excitement to our university students is natural to us. Via outreach programs and college research funding, a new college and university collaboration has broadened our student audience: photonics is brought into the college classroom and research opportunities are provided to college students. Photonics-themed active learning activities are conducted in the college Waves and Modern Physics class, helping students forge relationships between course content and modern communications technologies. Presentations on photonics research are prepared and presented by the professor and past college student-researchers. The students are then given a full tour of the photonics university laboratories. Furthermore, funds are set aside to give college students a unique opportunity to assist the college professor with experiments during a paid summer research internship.

  20. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the geosciences which are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering and Geosciences, part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Office of Energy Research, supports the Geosciences Research Program. The participants in this program include Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities, and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, briefly describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar physics, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource modeling and analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's long-range technological needs.

  1. Mathematical models of physics problems (physics research and technology)

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is intended to provide a foundation for a one-semester introductory course on the advanced mathematical methods that form the cornerstones of the hard sciences and engineering. The work is suitable for first year graduate or advanced undergraduate students in the fields of Physics, Astronomy and Engineering. This text therefore employs a condensed narrative sufficient to prepare graduate and advanced undergraduate students for the level of mathematics expected in more advanced graduate physics courses, without too much exposition on related but non-essential material. In contrast to the two semesters traditionally devoted to mathematical methods for physicists, the material in this book has been quite distilled, making it a suitable guide for a one-semester course. The assumption is that the student, once versed in the fundamentals, can master more esoteric aspects of these topics on his or her own if and when the need arises during the course of conducting research. The book focuses on two cor...

  2. Physics and safety of advanced research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Hardt, P. von der

    1987-01-01

    Advanced research reactor concepts are presently being developed in order to meet the neutron-based research needs of the nineties. Among these research reactors, which are characterized by an average power density of 1-10 MW per liter, highest priority is now generally given to the 'beam tube reactors'. These provide very high values of the thermal neutron flux (10 14 -10 16 cm -2 s -1 ) in a large volume outside of the reactor core, which can be used for sample irradiations and, in particular, for neutron scattering experiments. The paper first discusses the 'inverse flux trap concept' and the main physical aspects of the design and optimization of beam tube reactors. After that two examples of advanced research reactor projects are described which may be considered as two opposite extremes with respect to the physical optimization principle just mentioned. The present situation concerning cross section libraries and neutronic computer codes is more or less satisfactory. The safety analyses of advanced research reactors can largely be updated from those of current new designs, partially taking advantage of the immense volume of work done for power reactors. The paper indicates a few areas where generic problems for advanced research reactor safety are to be solved. (orig.)

  3. Research in theoretical and elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitselmakher, G.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995 the University of Florida started a major expansion of the High Energy Experimental Physics group (HEE) with the goal of adding four new faculty level positions to the group in two years. This proposal covers the second year of operation of the new group and gives a projection of the planned research program for the next five years, when the group expects their activities to be broader and well defined. The expansion of the HEE group started in the Fall of 1995 when Guenakh Mitselmakher was hired from Fermilab as a Full Professor. A search was then performed for two junior faculty positions. The first being a Research Scientist/Scholar position which is supported for 9 months by the University on a faculty line at the same level as Assistant Professor but without the teaching duties. The second position is that of an Assistant Professor. The search has been successfully completed and Jacobo Konigsberg from Harvard University has accepted the position of Research Scientist and Andrey Korytov from MIT has accepted the position of Assistant Professor. They will join the group in August 1996. The physics program for the new group is focused on hadron collider physics. G. Mitselmakher has been leading the CMS endcap muon project since 1994. A Korytov is the coordinator of the endcap muon chamber effort for CMS and a member of the CDF collaboration and J. Konigsberg is a member of CDF where he has participated in various physics analyses and has been coordinator of the gas calorimetry group. The group at the U. of Florida has recently been accepted as an official collaborating institution on CDF. They have been assigned the responsibility of determining the collider beam luminosity at CDF and they will also be an active participant in the design and operation of the muon detectors for the intermediate rapidity region. In addition they expect to continue their strong participation in the present and future physics analysis of the CDF data

  4. RCOP: Research Center for Optical Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibi, Bagher M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    During the five years since its inception, Research Center for Optical Physics (RCOP) has excelled in the goals stated in the original proposal: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, there have been 16 Bachelors degrees and 9 Masters degrees awarded to African American students working in RCOP during the last five years. RCOP has also provided research experience to undergraduate and high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been instrumental in the development of the Ph.D. program in physics which is in its fourth year at Hampton. There are currently over 40 graduate students in the program and 9 African American graduate students, working in RCOP, that have satisfied all of the requirements for Ph.D. candidancy and are working on their dissertation research. At least three of these students will be awarded their doctoral degrees during 1997. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. During the first five years of existence, RCOP researchers have generated well over $3 M in research funding that directly supports the Center. Close ties with NASA Langley and NASA Lewis have been established, and collaborations with NASA scientists, URC's and other universities as well as with industry have been developed. This success is evidenced by the rate of publishing research results in refereed journals, which now exceeds that of the goals in the original proposal (approx. 2 publications per faculty per year). Also, two patents have been awarded to RCOP scientists.

  5. Summary of Research 1998, Department of Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Faculty of the Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School

    1998-01-01

    The views expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. This report contains summaries of research projects in the Department of Physics. A list of recent publications is also included which consists of conference presentations and publications, books, contributions to books, published journal papers, technical reports, and thesis abstracts.

  6. Research Misconduct and the Physical Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HM Kerch; JJ Dooley

    1999-10-11

    Research misconduct includes the fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism (FFP) of concepts or ideas; some institutions have expanded this concept to include ''other serious deviations (OSD) from accepted research practice.'' An action can be evaluated as research misconduct if it involves activities unique to the practice of science and could negatively affect the scientific record. Although the number of cases of research misconduct is uncertain (formal records are kept only by the NIH and the NSF), the costs are high in integrity of the scientific record, diversions from research to investigate allegations, ruined careers of those eventually exonerated, and erosion of public confidence in science. Currently, research misconduct policies vary from institution to institution and from government agency to government agency; some have highly developed guidelines that include OSD, others have no guidelines at ail. One result has been that the federal False Claims Act has been used to pursue allegations of research misconduct and have them adjudicated in the federal court, rather than being judged by scientific peers. The federal government will soon establish a first-ever research misconduct policy that would apply to all research funded by the federal government regardless of what agency funded the research or whether the research was carried out in a government, industrial or university laboratory. Physical scientists, who up to now have only infrequently been the subject or research misconduct allegations, must none-the-less become active in the debate over research misconduct policies and how they are implemented since they will now be explicitly covered by this new federal wide policy.

  7. Collaboration in Australian condensed matter physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cushion, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This year marks the 'coming of age' of the annual Condensed Matter Physics Meetings which has constituted possibly the most successful physics series which has been run in Australia and New Zealand. The conferences have become colloquially known as the 'Wagga conferences' to the community, leading to such strange but interpretable phrases as 'Wagga is in New Zealand this year'. It seems an appropriate time to take stock of some of the changes which have taken place in Australian condensed matter physics research over the past 21 years. Statistics will be presented on some of the trends over this time, using the Wagga abstract books as the data source. Particular emphasis will be placed on the increase in collaborative research which has occurred, fuelled by a combination of government policies, reduction in resources and increasing complexity of some of the research projects. Collaborative papers now frequently include authors from more than one university as well as from CSIRO, ANSTO/AINSE, other government and semi-government laboratories and private industry. None of these occurred in the 'early days' but most would agree that the health of the discipline has been improved by the change. It is also appropriate to point out the role of the Wagga conferences in fostering these collaborations by bringing together the groups so that they could meet, interact and discover which people had the missing expertise to make a particular project viable

  8. Princeton University High Energy Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlow, Daniel R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-06-30

    This is the Final Report on research conducted by the Princeton Elementary Particles group over the approximately three-year period from May 1, 2012 to April 30, 2015. The goal of our research is to investigate the fundamental constituents of matter, their fields, and their interactions; to understand the properties of space and time; and to study the profound relationships between cosmology and particle physics. During the funding period covered by this report, the group has been organized into a subgroup concentrating on the theory of particles, strings, and cosmology; and four subgroups performing major experiments at laboratories around the world: CERN, Daya Bay, Gran Sasso as well as detector R\\&D on the Princeton campus. Highlights in of this research include the discovery of the Higgs Boson at CERN and the measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by the Daya Bay experiment. In both cases, Princeton researchers supported by this grant played key roles.

  9. Summaries of FY 1978 research in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    Programs funded in Fiscal Year 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, U.S. Department of Energy are briefly summarized. Long-range goals and major objectives of nuclear physics are stated. Research projects are listed alphabetically by institution under the following headings: medium-energy nuclear physics--research; medium-energy nuclear physics--operations; heavy-ion nuclear physics--research; heavy-ion nuclear physics--operations; and nuclear theory. (RWR)

  10. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in eight projects in high energy physics research: Colliding Beams Physics; Accelerator Design Physics; MACRO Project; Proton Decay Project; Theoretical Particle Physics; Muon G-2 Project; and Hadron Collider Physics. The scope of each of these projects is presented in detail in this paper

  11. Supporting Solar Physics Research via Data Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angryk, Rafal; Banda, J.; Schuh, M.; Ganesan Pillai, K.; Tosun, H.; Martens, P.

    2012-05-01

    In this talk we will briefly introduce three pillars of data mining (i.e. frequent patterns discovery, classification, and clustering), and discuss some possible applications of known data mining techniques which can directly benefit solar physics research. In particular, we plan to demonstrate applicability of frequent patterns discovery methods for the verification of hypotheses about co-occurrence (in space and time) of filaments and sigmoids. We will also show how classification/machine learning algorithms can be utilized to verify human-created software modules to discover individual types of solar phenomena. Finally, we will discuss applicability of clustering techniques to image data processing.

  12. Research accomplishments in particle physics: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This document presents our report of the research accomplishments of Boston University researchers in six projects in high energy physics research: Colliding Beams Physics; Proton Decay; Monopole Detection with MACRO; Precision Muon G-2 Experiment; Accelerator Design Physics; and Theoretical Physics

  13. Proceedings of the eighth national conference on research in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This is a book of abstracts of the oral presentations that were presented during the eighth national conference on research in physics that was held from 20 to 23 deecember 2005 in Tunisia (Elkantaoui- Sousse). The following themes were covered : Nuclear and theoretical physics; Optical, molecular and atomic physics; Condensed matter physics; Soft matter physics; Mechanis; Thermal transfert; Electronics; physics engineering

  14. Proceedings of the Ninth National Conference on Research in Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a book of abstracts of the oral presentations that were presented during the ninth national conference on research in physics that was held from 17 to 20 mars 2008 in Tunisia (Yasmine Hammamet). The following themes were covered : Nuclear and theoretical physics; optical, molecular and atomic physics; condensed matter physics; Soft matter physics; Mechanics; Thermal transfer; Electronics; physics engineering

  15. Physics Education Research and the Teaching and Learning of Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Rojas, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    A brief account of some recent controversies about the teaching and learning of physics is presented. A shorter version of this outcome was accepted by The Physics Teacher, but publication is still pending.

  16. Current status of nuclear physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, Carlos A.; Hussein, Mahir S.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as 4 He, 7 Li, 9 Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate students interested

  17. Current status of nuclear physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertulani, Carlos A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce (United States); Hussein, Mahir S., E-mail: hussein@if.usp.br [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2015-12-15

    In this review, we discuss the current status of research in nuclear physics which is being carried out in different centers in the world. For this purpose, we supply a short account of the development in the area which evolved over the last nine decades, since the discovery of the neutron. The evolution of the physics of the atomic nucleus went through many stages as more data became available. We briefly discuss models introduced to discern the physics behind the experimental discoveries, such as the shell model, the collective model, the statistical model, the interacting boson model, etc., some of these models may be seemingly in conflict with each other, but this was shown to be only apparent. The richness of the ideas and abundance of theoretical models attests to the important fact that the nucleus is a really singular system in the sense that it evolves from two-body bound states such as the deuteron, to few-body bound states, such as {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, etc. and up the ladder to heavier bound nuclei containing up to more than 200 nucleons. Clearly, statistical mechanics, usually employed in systems with very large number of particles, would seemingly not work for such finite systems as the nuclei, neither do other theories which are applicable to condensed matter. The richness of nuclear physics stems from these restrictions. New theories and models are presently being developed. Theories of the structure and reactions of neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclei, called exotic nuclei, halo nuclei, or Borromean nuclei, deal with the wealth of experimental data that became available in the last 35 years. Furthermore, nuclear astrophysics and stellar and Big Bang nucleosynthesis have become a more mature subject. Due to limited space, this review only covers a few selected topics, mainly those with which the authors have worked on. Our aimed potential readers of this review are nuclear physicists and physicists in other areas, as well as graduate

  18. Annual report 1977. Research institute of physics, Stockholm Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    A summary of the research activities during 1977 is presented. The following headings are given: Atomic and Molecular Physics, Surface Physics, Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Theory, Exotic Atoms, and instrumentation and Methods. Lists of publications, seminars, conferences, and personnel are given

  19. Physics Research on the International Space Station

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is orbiting Earth at an altitude of around 400 km. It has been manned since November 2000 and currently has a permanent crew of six. On-board ISS science is done in a wide field of sciences, from fundamental physics to biology and human physiology. Many of the experiments utilize the unique conditions of weightlessness, but also the views of space and the Earth are exploited. ESA’s (European Space Agency) ELIPS (European Programme Life and Physical sciences in Space) manages some 150 on-going and planned experiments for ISS, which is expected to be utilized at least to 2020. This presentation will give a short introduction to ISS, followed by an overview of the science field within ELIPS and some resent results. The emphasis, however, will be on ISS experiments which are close to the research performed at CERN. Silicon strip detectors like ALTEA are measuring the flux of ions inside the station. ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) will provide unprecedented global ti...

  20. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.

    1993-01-01

    Progress on seven tasks is reported. (I)UCLA hadronization model, antiproton decay, PEP4/9 e + e - analysis: In addition to these topics, work on CP and CPT phenomenology at a φ factory and letters of support on the hadronization project are included. (II)ICARUS detector and rare B decays with hadron beams and colliders: Developments are summarized and some typcial events as shown; in addition, the RD5 collaboration at CERN and the asymmetric φ factory project are sketched. (III)Theoretical physics: Feynman diagram calculations in gauge theory; supersymmetric standard model; effects of quantum gravity in breaking of global symmetries; models of quark and lepton substructure; renormalized field theory; large-scale structure in the universe and particle-astrophysics/early universe cosmology. (IV)H dibaryon search at BNL, kaon experiments (E799/KTeV) at Fermilab: Project design and some scatterplots are given. (V)UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab. (VI)Detectors for hadron physics at ultrahigh energy colliders: Scintillating fiber and visible light photon counter research. (VII)Administrative support and conference organization

  1. Research on Technology and Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott

    2010-10-01

    From Facebook to smart phones, technology is an integral part of our student's lives. For better or for worse, technology has become nearly inescapable in the classroom, enhancing instruction, distracting students, or simply complicating life. As good teachers we want to harness the power we have available to impact our students, but it is getting harder as the pace of technological change accelerates. How can we make good choices in which technologies to invest time and resources in to use effectively? Do some technologies make more of a difference in student learning? In this talk we will look at research studies looking at technology use in the physics classroom---both my work and that of others---and their impact on student learning. Examples will include computers in the laboratory, web-based homework, and different forms of electronic communication. From these examples, I will draw some general principles for effective educational technology and physics education. Technology is simply a tool; the key is how we use those tools to help our students develop their abilities and understanding.

  2. Alternative approaches to research in physical therapy: positivism and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, K F; Jensen, G M; Schmoll, B J; Hack, L M; Gwyer, J

    1993-02-01

    This article presents philosophical approaches to research in physical therapy. A comparison is made to demonstrate how the research purpose, research design, research methods, and research data differ when one approaches research from the philosophical perspective of positivism (predominantly quantitative) as compared with the philosophical perspective of phenomenology (predominantly qualitative). Differences between the two approaches are highlighted by examples from research articles published in Physical Therapy. The authors urge physical therapy researchers to become familiar with the tenets, rigor, and knowledge gained from the use of both approaches in order to increase their options in conducting research relevant to the practice of physical therapy.

  3. New computing techniques in physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret-Gallix, D.; Wojcik, W.

    1990-01-01

    These proceedings relate in a pragmatic way the use of methods and techniques of software engineering and artificial intelligence in high energy and nuclear physics. Such fundamental research can only be done through the design, the building and the running of equipments and systems among the most complex ever undertaken by mankind. The use of these new methods is mandatory in such an environment. However their proper integration in these real applications raise some unsolved problems. Their solution, beyond the research field, will lead to a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of software engineering and artificial intelligence. Here is a sample of subjects covered in the proceedings : Software engineering in a multi-users, multi-versions, multi-systems environment, project management, software validation and quality control, data structure and management object oriented languages, multi-languages application, interactive data analysis, expert systems for diagnosis, expert systems for real-time applications, neural networks for pattern recognition, symbolic manipulation for automatic computation of complex processes

  4. Final Report: Particle Physics Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karchin, Paul E. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy; Harr, Robert F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy; Mattson, Mark. E. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy

    2011-09-01

    We describe recent progress in accelerator-based experiments in high-energy particle physics and progress in theoretical investigations in particle physics. We also describe future plans in these areas.

  5. Space research and cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1983-08-01

    Scientific progress depends on the development of new instruments. The change from Ptolemaic to Copernican cosmology was to a large extent caused by the introduction of telescopes. Similarly, space research has changed our possibilities to explore our large scale environment so drastically that a thorough revision of cosmic physics is now taking place. A list is given of a large number of fields in which this revision is in progress or is just starting. The new view are based on in situ measurements in the magnetospheres. By extrapolating these measurments to more distant regions, also plasma astrophysics in general has to be reconsidered. In certain important fields the basic approach has to be changed. This applies to cosmogony (origin and evolution of the solar system) and to cosmology. New results from laboratory and magnetospheric measurements extrapolated to cosmogonic conditions give an increased reliability to our treatment of the origin and evolution of the Solar system. Especially the Voyager observations of the saturnian rings give us the hope that we may transfer cosmogony from a playground for more or less crazy ideas into a respectable science. (author)

  6. Opportunities for physics research at Australia's replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 20-MW Australian Replacement Research Reactor represents possibly the greatest single research infrastructure investment in Australia's history. Construction of the facility has commenced, following award of the construction contract in July 2000, and the construction licence in April 2002. The project includes a large state-of-the-art liquid deuterium cold-neutron source and supermirror guides feeding a large modern guide hall, in which most of the instruments are placed. Alongside the guide hall, there is good provision of laboratory, office and space for support activities. While the facility has 'space' for up to 18 instruments, the project has funding for an initial set of 8 instruments, which will be ready when the reactor is fully operational in January 2006. Instrument performance will be competitive with the best research-reactor facilities anywhere, and our goal is to be in the top 3 such facilities worldwide. Staff to lead the design effort and man these instruments have been hired on the international market from leading overseas facilities, and from within Australia, and 6 out of 8 instruments have been specified and costed. At present the instrumentation project carries ∼15% contingency. An extensive dialogue has taken place with the domestic user community and our international peers, via various means including a series of workshops over the last 2 years covering all 8 instruments, emerging areas of application like biology and the earth sciences, and computing infrastructure for the instruments. In December 2002, ANSTO formed the Bragg Institute, with the intent of nurturing strong external partnerships, and covering all aspects of neutron and X-ray scattering, including research using synchrotron radiation. I will discuss the present status and predicted performance of the neutron-beam facilities at the Replacement Reactor, synergies with the synchrotron in Victoria, in-house x-ray facilities that we intend to install in the Bragg

  7. What Can We Learn from PER: Physics Education Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2014-01-01

    Physics Education Research (PER) focuses on understanding how students learn physics at all levels and developing strategies to help students with diverse prior preparations learn physics more effectively. New physics instructors are encouraged to visit http://PhysPort.org, a website devoted to helping instructors find effective teaching resources…

  8. High energy physics division semiannual report of research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  9. Nuclear physics methods in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethge, K.; Baumann, H.; Jex, H.; Rauch, F.

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings of the seventh divisional conference of the Nuclear Physics Division held at Darmstadt, Germany, from 23rd through 26th of September, 1980. The scope of this conference was defined as follows: i) to inform solid state physicists and materials scientists about the application of nuclear physics methods; ii) to show to nuclear physicists open questions and problems in solid state physics and materials science to which their methods can be applied. According to the intentions of the conference, the various nuclear physics methods utilized in solid state physics and materials science and especially new developments were reviewed by invited speakers. Detailed aspects of the methods and typical examples extending over a wide range of applications were presented as contributions in poster sessions. The Proceedings contain all the invited papers and about 90% of the contributed papers. (orig./RW)

  10. Main directions of Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.

    1997-01-01

    The characteristic of main directions of the Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretic Physics (RIETF) activity is given in the paper. It is noted, that Institute is headquarters organisation in 4 following scientific programs of Ministry of Science - Academy of Science of Republic of Kazakhstan: Physics and mechanics of gases, plasma and liquid; Theoretical physics; Nonlinear processes and structural self-organization of substance; Research works Comet. Since 1994 RIETF is one of executors on interstate scientific program ITER. There are following priorities in activity of the institute: - actual problems of relativity theory, gravitation and quantum mechanics; - research on combustion problems and heat-mass-transfer; - physics of gases, plasma and liquid; physics non-equilibrium processes in plasma an in plasma-similar media; - solid state physics and material testing problems; modification of materials properties; electrophysical, optical and structural researches of substance; - interactions of nuclear, electromagnet radiation and accelerated particles with substance; - theoretical and experimental nuclear physics and physics of cosmic rays

  11. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... with reference to game-specific-, anthropometric-, physical and motor variables · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  12. Research in High Energy Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, John S.

    2013-08-09

    This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

  13. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Full text: During the last decade, growing efforts have been devoted to studying the possible forms an electricity-producing thermonuclear reactor might take and the various technical problems that will have to be overcome. Previous IAEA Conferences took place in Salzburg (1961), Culham (1965), Novosibirsk (1968), Madison (1971), Tokyo (1974), Berchtesgaden (1976) and Innsbruck (1978) The exchange of information that has characterized this series of meetings is an important example of international co-operation and has contributed substantially to progress in controlled fusion research. The results of experiments in major research establishments, as well as the growing scientific insights in the field of plasma physics, give hope that the realization of nuclear fusion will be made possible on a larger scale and beyond the laboratory stage by the end of this century. The increase of the duration of existing tokamak discharges requires solution of the impurity control problem. First results from the new big machines equipped with the poloidal divertor recently came into operation. PDX (USA) and ASDEX (F.R. of Germany) show that various divertor configurations can be established and maintained and that the divertors function in the predicted manner. The reduction of high-Z impurities on these machines by a factor 10 was achieved. As a result of extensive research on radio-frequency (RF) plasma heating on tokamaks: PLT (USA), TFR (France), JFT-2 (Japan), the efficiency of this attractive method of plasma heating comparable to neutral beam heating was demonstrated. It was shown that the density of the input power of about 5-10 kW/cm 2 is achievable and this limit is high enough for application to reactor-like machines. One of the inspiring results reported at the conference was the achievement of value (the ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure) of ∼ 3% on tokamaks T-11 (USSR) and ISX-B (USA). It is important to note that this value exceeds the

  14. Research in theoretical nuclear physics: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In April 1988 we, along with the nuclear theory groups of Brookhaven and MIT, submitted a proposal to the Department of Energy for a national Institute of Theoretical Nuclear Physics. The primary areas of investigation proposed for this Institute are: Strong Interaction Physics--including (1) The physics of hadrons, (2) QCD and the nucleus, (3) QCD at finite temperatures and high density; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure and nuclear many-body theory; and nuclear tests of fundamental interactions. It is, of course, no coincidence that these are the main areas of activity of the three groups involved in this proposal and of our group in particular. Here, we will organize an outline of the progress made at Stony Brook during the past year along these lines. These four areas do not cover all of the activities of our group

  15. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-01

    The summaries in this document describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1984-1985. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

  16. Summaries of research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The compilation of summaries of research and technology R and D efforts contained in this volume is intended to present a detailed narrative description of the scope and nature of the HEP activities funded by the Department of Energy in the FY 1985/FY 1986 time period. Topic areas covered include the following: experimental research using the accelerators and particle detector facilities and other related research; theoretical research; conception, design, construction, and operation of particle accelerators and detectors facilities; and research and development programs intended to advance accelerator technology, particle detector technology, and data analysis capabilities

  17. The Impact of the Physical Activity Policy Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteiga, Alicia M; Eyler, Amy A; Valko, Cheryl; Brownson, Ross C; Evenson, Kelly R; Schmid, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Lack of physical activity is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. The Physical Activity Policy Research Network (PAPRN) is a thematic network established in 2004 to identify determinants, implementation, and outcomes of policies that are effective in increasing physical activity. The purpose of this study is to describe the products of PAPRN and make recommendations for future research and best practices. A mixed methods approach was used to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data on the network. First, in 2014, PAPRN's dissemination products from 2004 to 2014 were extracted and reviewed, including 57 publications and 56 presentations. Next, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 key network participants from 17 locations around the U.S. The transcripts were transcribed and coded. The results of the interviews indicated that the research network addressed several components of its mission, including the identification of physical activity policies, determinants of these policies, and the process of policy implementation. However, research focusing on physical activity policy outcomes was limited. Best practices included collaboration between researchers and practitioners and involvement of practitioners in research design, data collection, and dissemination of results. PAPRN is an example of a productive research network and has contributed to both the process and content of physical activity policy research over the past decade. Future research should emphasize physical activity policy outcomes. Additionally, increased partnerships with practitioners for collaborative, cross-sectoral physical activity policy research should be developed. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the scope of the individual programs. The Geoscience Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including their various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related either directly or indirectly to the Department of Energy's technological needs.

  19. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas

  20. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound foundation of fundamental knowledge in those areas of earth, atmospheric, and solar-terrestrial sciences that are germane to the Department of Energy's many missions. The summaries describe the scope of the individual programs and detail the research performed during 1980 to 1981. The Geosciences Research Program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology, and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas.

  1. Final Report. Research in Theoretical High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greensite, Jeffrey P. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States); Golterman, Maarten F.L. [San Francisco State Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Grant-supported research in theoretical high-energy physics, conducted in the period 1992-2015 is briefly described, and a full listing of published articles result from those research activities is supplied.

  2. Basic research in theoretical high energy physics. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    Activities in numerous areas of basic research in theoretical high energy physics are listed, and some highlights are given. Areas of research include statistical mechanics, quantum field theory, lattice gauge theories, and quantum gravity. 81 references

  3. Research on elementary particle physics: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the activities of the University of Illinois Experimental High Energy Physics Group. The physicists in the University of Illinois High Energy Physics Group are engaged in a wide variety of experiments at current and future accelerator laboratories. These include: (1) The CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevetron p bar p collider. (2) Design and developmental work for the SDC group at SSCL. (3) Experiments at the wide band photon beam at Fermilab. (4) e + e - experiments, the Mark III and SLD at SLAC and CLEO at Cornell. (5) CP violation experiments at Fermilab. (6) The HiRes cosmic ray experiment at Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. (7) Computational facilities. (8) Electronics systems development

  4. Importance of basic research in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolyubov, N.N.

    1976-01-01

    A brief survey is given of the significance of fundamental discoveries in nuclear physics. It is shown how theoretical and experimental discoveries transform our current views of the world around us and how in their practical implementation these discoveries bring revolutionary technical development. The latest progress in the field of elementary particles and their interactions and in the field of the atomic nucleus are briefly discussed. (I.W.)

  5. DETECTORS USED IN PARTICLE PHYSICS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melissines, A. C.

    1963-10-15

    Detectors used in particle physics are discussed, and their specific properties are compared. With the pictorial'' devices are included nuclear emulsions, cloud and bubble chambers, and spark chambers. Included in the digital'' devices are counters, e.g., the Geiger counter, scintillation counters, solid-state detectors, Cherenkov counters, and spark counters. Sensitivity, resolving power, time resolutions, saturation level, and energy detection are discussed. (R.E.U.)

  6. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound underlay of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences that relate to the Department of Energy's many missions. The Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, which is a part of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences and comes under the Director of Energy Research, supports under its Geosciences program major Department of Energy laboratories, industry, universities and other governmental agencies. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the overall scope of the individual programs and details of the research performed during 1979-1980. The Geoscience program includes research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary areas. All such research is related to the Department's technological needs, either directly or indirectly.

  7. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-30

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics research. We have a broad program of participation in both non-accelerator and accelerator-based efforts. High energy research at Boston University has a special focus on the physics program of the Superconducting Supercollider. We are active in research and development for detector subsystems, in the design of experiments, and in study of the phenomenology of the very high energy interactions to be observed at the SSC. The particular areas discussed in this paper are: colliding beams physics; accelerator design physics; MACRO project; proton decay project; theoretical particle physics; muon G-2 project; fast liquid scintillators; SSCINTCAL project; TRD project; massively parallel processing for the SSC; and physics analysis and vertex detector upgrade at L3.

  8. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development

  9. High energy physics research. Final technical report, 1957--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.H.

    1995-10-01

    This is the final technical report to the Department of Energy on High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania. It discusses research conducted in the following areas: neutrino astrophysics and cosmology; string theory; electroweak and collider physics; supergravity; cp violation and baryogenesis; particle cosmology; collider detector at Fermilab; the sudbury neutrino observatory; B-physics; particle physics in nuclei; and advanced electronics and detector development.

  10. Proposed activity - Budget for research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Camerini, U.; Carlsmith, D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper contains task reports on the following topics: Hadron physics at Fermilab; Lepton hadron scattering; Electroweak and weak interactions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Hyperon beam program/hadroproduction of heavy flavors at Fermilab; High energy physics colliding beam detector facility at Fermilab; Data analysis facility; Institute for Elementary Particle Physics research; Study of weak and electromagnetic interactions at Desy and Cern; Theoretical high energy physics; Dumand; and Ultra high energy gamma rays

  11. IRT-type research reactor physical calculation methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrera, W.; Castaneda, S.; Garcia, F.; Garcia, L.; Reyes, O.

    1990-01-01

    In the present paper an established physical calculation procedure for the research reactor of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is described. The results obtained by the method are compared with the ones reported during the physical start up of a reactor with similar characteristics to the CIN reactor. 11 refs

  12. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-16

    II 1 Associate Investigator and 11 Graduate Students. Other faculty investigators from Electrical Engineerings, Physics and Chemistry , also...admixtu4 P’.*rs’ OfC0 o as atar 12. i. 4 hws 11.BUNAY FECSAN ... AILTE SCHAEFER AND SCHOENRACH: DIFFUSE DISCHARGE oPENiNG swrrcHEs - 40 increasing velocity...a complete set of cross sections is available for N2 18) and the plasma . chemistry in a mixture of N2 and N20 appeared to be U a s is 2 2 relatively

  13. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  14. [Research programs in plasma physics]: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper contains a brief review of the work done in 1987 at New York University in plasma physics. Topics discussed in this report are: reduction and interpretation of experimental tokamak data, turbulent transport in tokamaks and RFP's, laminar flow transport, wave propagation in different frequency regimes, stability of flows, plasma fueling, magnetic reconnection problems, development of new numerical techniques for Fokker-Planck-like equations, and stability of shock waves. Outside of fusion there has been work in free electron lasers, heating of solar coronal loops and renormalized theory of fluid turbulence

  15. Summaries of FY 1986 research in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, during FY 1986. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research, the basic research branch of the US Department of Energy, and provides about 80% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objective of the Nuclear Physics program is to understand the interactions, properties, and structures of nuclei and nuclear matter and to understand the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in atomic nuclei. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics

  16. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Brown, Tyish S.; Collier, Scott R.; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. PMID:28052867

  17. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O 2 , and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Education Research in Physical Therapy: Visions of the Possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gail M; Nordstrom, Terrence; Segal, Richard L; McCallum, Christine; Graham, Cecilia; Greenfield, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    Education research has been labeled the "hardest science" of all, given the challenges of teaching and learning in an environment encompassing a mixture of social interactions, events, and problems coupled with a persistent belief that education depends more on common sense than on disciplined knowledge and skill. The American Educational Research Association specifies that education research-as a scientific field of study-examines teaching and learning processes that shape educational outcomes across settings and that a learning process takes place throughout a person's life. The complexity of learning and learning environments requires not only a diverse array of research methods but also a community of education researchers committed to exploring critical questions in the education of physical therapists. Although basic science research and clinical research in physical therapy have continued to expand through growth in the numbers of funded physical therapist researchers, the profession still lacks a robust and vibrant community of education researchers. In this perspective article, the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy Task Force on Education Research proposes a compelling rationale for building a much-needed foundation for education research in physical therapy, including a set of recommendations for immediate action. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Perspectives of experimental nuclear physics research at RBI Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soic, N.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental nuclear physics has been one of the top research activities at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute, the largest and leading Croatian research center in science and applications. The RBI nuclear physics group has strong link with the researchers at the University of Zagreb. RBI scientists perform experiments at the RBI Tandem accelerator facility and at the top European experimental facilities in collaboration with the prominent research groups in the field. Current status of the RBI experimental nuclear physics research and our recent activities aimed to strengthen our position at the RBI and to increase our international reputation and impact in collaborative projects will be presented. Part of these activities is focused on local accelerator facilities, at present mainly used for application research, and their increased usage for nuclear physics research and for development and testing of novel research equipment for large international facilities. Upgrade of the local research equipment is on the way through FP7 REGPOT project 'CLUNA: Clustering phenomena in nuclear physics: strengthening of the Zagreb-Catania-Birmingham partnership'. Recently, steps to exploit potential of the facility for nuclear astrophysics research have been initiated. Possible future actions for further strengthening of the RBI experimental nuclear physics research will be discussed.(author)

  20. Summaries of physical research in the geosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Department of Energy supports research in the geosciences in order to provide a sound underlay of fundamental knowledge in those areas of the earth, atmospheric, and solar/terrestrial sciences which relate to DOE's many missions. This research may be conducted in the major DOE laboratories, industry, universities and other government agencies. Such support provides for payment of salaries, purchase of equipment and other materials, an allowance for overhead costs, and is formalized by a contract between the Department and the organization performing the work. The summaries in this document, prepared by the investigators, describe the work performed during 1977, include the scope of the work to be performed in 1978 and provide information regarding some of the research planned for 1979. The Division of Engineering, Mathematics, and Geosciences, which is a part of the Office of Energy Research, supports, under its Geoscience Program, research in geology, petrology, geophysics, geochemistry, hydrology, solar-terrestrial relationships, aeronomy, seismology and natural resource analysis, including the various subdivisions and interdisciplinary relationships, as well as their relationship to the Department's technological needs

  1. New computing techniques in physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becks, Karl-Heinz; Perret-Gallix, Denis

    1994-01-01

    New techniques were highlighted by the ''Third International Workshop on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems for High Energy and Nuclear Physics'' in Oberammergau, Bavaria, Germany, from October 4 to 8. It was the third workshop in the series; the first was held in Lyon in 1990 and the second at France-Telecom site near La Londe les Maures in 1992. This series of workshops covers a broad spectrum of problems. New, highly sophisticated experiments demand new techniques in computing, in hardware as well as in software. Software Engineering Techniques could in principle satisfy the needs for forthcoming accelerator experiments. The growing complexity of detector systems demands new techniques in experimental error diagnosis and repair suggestions; Expert Systems seem to offer a way of assisting the experimental crew during data-taking

  2. Gesture Analysis for Physics Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Rachel E.

    2008-01-01

    Systematic observations of student gestures can not only fill in gaps in students' verbal expressions, but can also offer valuable information about student ideas, including their source, their novelty to the speaker, and their construction in real time. This paper provides a review of the research in gesture analysis that is most relevant to…

  3. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  4. AECL programs in basic physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomew, G.A.; Dolling, G.; Harvey, M.; Milton, J.C.D.

    1982-02-01

    This report describes the CRNL program of research into the basic properties of atomic nuclei and condensed matter (liquids and solids). Brief descriptions are given of some of the current experimental programs done principally at the NRU reactor and MP tandem accelerator, the associated theoretical studies, and some highlights of past achievements

  5. Physics Education Research efforts to promote diversity: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmia, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    We begin this talk with a brief description of the gender and ethnic diversity of the physics community. We then discuss several current efforts within Physics Education Research that have the potential to further our understanding of issues surrounding underrepresentation. These efforts include research into (1) the role of community and strategies for developing effective communities; (2) physics identity and self-efficacy; (3) the affordances that students from underrepresented groups bring to physics learning; (4) socioeconomics and its impact on mathematization. One of the challenges to conducting this research is the relatively small proportion of underrepresented minority students in current physics classes, and the small number of women in physics and engineering majors. In collaboration with Stephen Kanim, New Mexico State University.

  6. CERN and ESA examine future fundamental physics research in space

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    A special workshop on Fundamental Physics in Space and related topics will be held at CERN in Geneva from 5 to 7 April 2000. Remarkable advances in technology and progress made in reliability and cost effectiveness of European space missions in recent years have opened up exciting new directions for such research. The workshop provides a forum for sharing expertise gained in high energy physics research with colleagues working in research in space.

  7. Nuclear physics and heavy element research at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, M A; Ahle, L E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Burke, J T; Dashdorj, D; Henderson, R A; Hurst, A M; Kenneally, J M; Lesher, S R; Moody, K J; Nelson, S L; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Scielzo, N D; Shaughnessy, D A; Sheets, S A; Stoeffl, W; Stoyer, N J; Wiedeking, M; Wilk, P A; Wu, C Y

    2009-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the current basic nuclear physics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The work at LLNL concentrates on investigating nuclei at the extremes. The Experimental Nuclear Physics Group performs research to improve our understanding of nuclei, nuclear reactions, nuclear decay processes and nuclear astrophysics; an expertise utilized for important laboratory national security programs and for world-class peer-reviewed basic research.

  8. Overview of physics research on the TCV tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasoli, A.; Alberti, S.; Amorim, P.; Angioni, C.; Asp, E.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Berrino, J.; Blanchard, P.; Bortolon, A.; Brunner, S.; Camenen, Y.; Cirant, S.; Coda, S.; Curchod, L.; DeMeijere, K.; Duval, B. P.; Fable, E.; Fasel, D.; Felici, F.; Furno, I.; Garcia, O.E.; Giruzzi, G.; Gnesin, S.; Goodman, T.; Graves, J.; Gudozhnik, A.; Gulejova, B.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J. Ph.; Horáček, Jan; Joye, B.; Karpushov, A.; Kim, S.-H.; Laqua, H.; Lister, J. B.; Llobet, X.; Madeira, T.; Marinoni, A.; Marki, J.; Martin, Y.; Maslov, M.; Medvedev, S.; Moret, J.-M.; Paley, J.; Pavlov, I.; Piffl, Vojtěch; Piras, F.; Pitts, R.A.; Pitzschke, A.; Pochelon, A.; Porte, L.; Reimerdes, H.; Rossel, J.; Sauter, O.; Scarabosio, A.; Schlatter, C.; Sushkov, A.; Testa, D.; Tonetti, G.; Tskhakaya, D.; Tran, M. Q.; Turco, F.; Turri, G.; Tye, R.; Udintsev, V.; Véres, G.; Villard, L.; Weisen, H.; Zhuchkova, A.; Zucca, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104005-104005 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : overview highlights * fusion research * tokamak TCV * self-generated current * H-mode physics * Electron internal transport barrier * electron cyclotron heating * electron cyclotron current drive physics * density peaking * MHDactivity * edge physics * reciprocating Mach probe * Pfirsch–Schlueter component. Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://stacks.iop.org/NF/49/104005

  9. Review of plasma physics research in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1982-01-01

    The energy trends of Malaysia projected for the next few decades are briefly discussed as a background to the rationale for Malaysian research into new forms of energy including plasma fusion. The planning of this research started nearly two decades ago. Today research facilities at PLUM centre on two capacitor banks, one rated at 40 kV, 48 kJ, 2 MA short circuit current and the other at 60 kV, 40 kJ, 2 MA. Other equipment includes several smaller capacitor banks, vacuum systems, oscilloscopes, diagnostic systems, a screened room, a transient digitizer, an Imacon camera and a 100 MW pulsed ruby laser for discharge initiation and diagnostics. The research devices include two plasma focus machines, one vacuum fusion spark, a shock tube and minor experiments like the glow discharge. The main focus facility, the UMDPF1, was designed and built entirely by indigenous effort, using 40 kV capacitors donated by Britain under the Colombo Plan. Difficulties were encountered especially in the need to adapt what is locally available or readily importable to all phases of the design, construction, testing and measurement. Nevertheless, the focus group has achieved the following results: measurement, in 1973, of neutrons produced in the deuterium focus; current, voltage, magnetic field and pressure measurements to interpret plasma dynamics and focus mechanism and to compare with computer simulation of plasma trajectory and configuration; soft X-ray measurements to determine electron temperature; study of the effect on the focus of rotation and multiple ionization up to Argon XVIII; and optimization of focus performance as judged from neutron yield. In 1977 PLUM acquired the Juelich DPF1 which was reassembled as a fast focus, the UMDPF2. This device has been converted to operate as a vacuum spark with the aim of demonstrating the spark as a neutron source when using a deuterided anode. We have measured temperatures of 8 keV in the dense plasma spots. Plasma research work here has

  10. [Heavy ion physics research at Creighton University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherney, M.

    1992-01-01

    This research continues the baseline efforts i n the investigation of the behavior of hadronic matter under extreme conditions. The project is concerned with the search for indications of a phase transition from hadronic to quark matter in the STAR, NA44 and NA36 experiments. It is believed that the conditions. This project contributes to the development of a slow control system and time projection chamber tracking for the STAR experiment, upgrades for the NA44 experiment at CERN through studies of a spot focusing Cherenkov-detector, and the remaining analysis of data collected with the NA36 experiment at CERN.

  11. [Heavy ion physics research at Creighton University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherney, M.

    1992-01-01

    This research continues the baseline efforts i n the investigation of the behavior of hadronic matter under extreme conditions. The project is concerned with the search for indications of a phase transition from hadronic to quark matter in the STAR, NA44 and NA36 experiments. It is believed that the conditions. This project contributes to the development of a slow control system and time projection chamber tracking for the STAR experiment, upgrades for the NA44 experiment at CERN through studies of a spot focusing Cherenkov-detector, and the remaining analysis of data collected with the NA36 experiment at CERN

  12. Coordinated Research Program in Pulsed Power Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-27

    storage element and the spark gap sectional area at the injected beam) which helps reduce elec- are both contained within the high pressure vessel of a...ns At the present time the continued research is aimed at duration of the first region corresponds closely to the FWHM answering various unresolved...10-ns e-beam has been used to trigger a spark gap pressurized to 3 atm of N2 . The gap voltage is close to self-breakdown voltage (Le., 0.95 Vb

  13. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research School of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The diverse activities currently in progress in the School of Physics at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay are reported in detail. The activities involving theoretical and experimental research are grouped under the following areas: (1) pure physics (2) astronomy and space science (3) chemical and biological studies and (4) applied research. In pure physics, studies are in progress in nuclear physics, high energy physics and solid state physics. In astronomy and space science, the fields of investigation comprise: cosmic ray physics, theoretical astrophysics and radio-astronomy. In chemical physics, structure of a variety of systems have been investigated using NMR and Moessbauer techniques. In molecular biology, basic biological processes have been studied in terms of structure and properties of biomolecules. In addition to these areas of pure research, considerable advances have been made in computer science and technology, solid state electronics, microwave engineering and hydrogy. The work done in each one of these areas is briefly summarized. A number of supporting research facilities are mentioned. A brief mention has also been made on the existing education and training programmes. (A.K.)

  14. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1981-08-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. A synopsis of research carried out last year is given. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research

  15. Synthesis of discipline-based education research in physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Docktor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive synthesis of physics education research at the undergraduate level. It is based on work originally commissioned by the National Academies. Six topical areas are covered: (1 conceptual understanding, (2 problem solving, (3 curriculum and instruction, (4 assessment, (5 cognitive psychology, and (6 attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning. Each topical section includes sample research questions, theoretical frameworks, common research methodologies, a summary of key findings, strengths and limitations of the research, and areas for future study. Supplemental material proposes promising future directions in physics education research.

  16. Teaching and physics education research: bridging the gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, James M; Miller, Kelly; Dowd, Jason E; Tucker, Laura; Mazur, Eric; Timan, Anneke L

    2014-01-01

    Physics faculty, experts in evidence-based research, often rely on anecdotal experience to guide their teaching practices. Adoption of research-based instructional strategies is surprisingly low, despite the large body of physics education research (PER) and strong dissemination effort of PER researchers and innovators. Evidence-based PER has validated specific non-traditional teaching practices, but many faculty raise valuable concerns toward their applicability. We address these concerns and identify future studies required to overcome the gap between research and practice. (key issues reviews)

  17. Summaries of FY 1988 research in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, during FY 1986. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research, the basic research branch of the US Department of Energy, and provides about 80% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objective of the Nuclear Physics program is to understand the interactions, properties, and structures of nuclei and nuclear matter and to understand the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in atomic nuclei. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. The nuclear physics research summaries in this document were initially prepared by the investigators, then reviewed and edited by DOE staff. They describe the general character and goals of the research programs, current research efforts, especially significant recent results, and plans for the near future. The research summaries are organized into two groups: research programs at national laboratories and those at universities, with the material arranged alphabetically by institution. The names of all Ph.D.-level personnel who are primarily associated with the work are included. The FY 1988 funding levels are also provided. Included for the first time are activities of the nuclear data program, which was incorporated within nuclear physics in FY 1987. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics program. Primary publications should be used for reference to the work and for a more complete and accurate understanding

  18. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation: Advanced Search ... education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., archive ((journal OR ... Alexandria Journal of Medicine, Anatomy Journal of Africa, Animal Production Research Advances .... Advanced filters ...

  19. Research in Particle Physics at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham Seiden

    2003-01-01

    The Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics is an Organized Research Unit within the University of California system. This is a special structure allowing a focused emphasis on research and includes special commitments for space and personnel from the Santa Cruz campus. The Institute serves to consolidate the research in experimental and theoretical particle physics on campus. This report covers four separate experimental projects. The projects are the BaBar experiment, the ATLAS experiment, the GLAST space satellite, and work toward a Linear Collider and its detector. Research in High Energy Physics (last final report for period 1996-2000)

  20. From students to researchers: The education of physics graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhfen

    This dissertation aims to make two research contributions: (1) In physics education research, this work aims to advance our understanding of physics student learning at the graduate level. This work attempts to better understand how physics researchers and teachers are produced, and what factors support or encourage the process of becoming a researcher and a teacher. (2) In cognitive science research in the domain of expert/novice differences, researchers are interested in defining and understanding what expertise is. This work aims to provide some insight into some of the components of expertise that go into becoming a competent expert researcher in the domain of physics. This in turn may contribute to our general understanding of expertise across multiple domains. Physics graduate students learn in their classes as students, teach as teaching assistants, and do research with research group as apprentices. They are expected to transition from students to independent researchers and teachers. The three activities of learning, teaching, and research appear to be very different and demand very different skill-sets. In reality, these activities are interrelated and have subtle effects on each other. Understanding how students transition from students to researchers and teachers is important both to PER and physics in general. In physics, an understanding of how physics students become researchers may help us to keep on training physicists who will further advance our understanding of physics. In PER, an understanding of how graduate students learn to teach will help us to train better physics teachers for the future. In this dissertation, I examine physics graduate students' approaches to teaching, learning, and research through semi-structured interviews. The collected data is interpreted and analyzed through a framework that focuses on students' epistemological beliefs and locus of authority. The data show how students' beliefs about knowledge interact with their

  1. Integration and Physical Education: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttinen, Risto Harri Juhani; McLoughlin, Gabriella; Fredrick, Ray, III; Novak, Dario

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards Initiative has placed an increased focus on mathematics and English language arts. A relationship between physical activity and academic achievement is evident, but research on integration of academic subjects with physical education is still unclear. This literature review examined databases for the years…

  2. Top 10 research questions related to children physical activity motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ang

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity motivation. The findings have informed researchers and practitioners about motivation sources for children and effective strategies to motivate children in given physical activity settings. Built on the extensive knowledge base and theoretical platforms formed by these research studies, the purpose of this article is to take a look at the current research landscape and provide subjective thoughts about what we still need to know about children's physical activity motivation. The product of this subjective thinking process rendered 10 potential questions for future research on children's physical activity motivation in both in-school and out-of-school settings. These topics encompass those focusing on children's physical activity motivation as a mental dispositional process, those conceptualizing the motivation as an outcome of person-environment interactions, and those attempting to dissect the motivation as an outcome of social-cultural influences and educational policies. It is hoped that the topics can serve researchers interested in children's physical activity motivation as starting blocks from which they can extend their conceptual thinking and identify research questions that are personally meaningful. It is also hoped that the list of potential questions can be helpful to researchers in accomplishing the imperative and significant mission to motivate children to be physically active in the 21st century and beyond.

  3. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... Comparative effect of land- and Aquatic-based plyometric training on jumping ... and adventure recreation and tourism in the Western Cape: GIS application ...

  4. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... Resident reactions to staging Tour de Taiwan 2012: Comparison of pre- and ... involvement and subjective well-being: Moderating effect of spousal support ...

  5. Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, ... hip circumference in under 35 years and body mass index in under 45 year age groups were ... Comparison with findings in other parts of the world showed that Ethiopians ...

  6. Physical Attractiveness Research. Toward a Developmental Social Psychology of Beauty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews research on physical attractiveness from a dialectical-interactional perspective and attempts to examine the relationship between outer appearance and inner psychological characteristics from a developmental perspective. (BD)

  7. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ... Modifying scoring system at South African University rugby level changes game dynamics · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  8. Theoretical high energy physics research at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.; Martinec, E.J.; Sachs, R.G.

    1990-09-01

    This report discusses research being done at the University of Chicago in High Energy Physics. Some topic covered are: CP violation; intermediate vector bosons; string models; supersymmetry; and rare decay of kaons

  9. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... Contributions from the fields of Sport Science, Movement Education, ... Causes of customer dropouts in fitness and wellness centres: A qualitative analysis ...

  10. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... of parents, children and coaches of 9-a-side football in an under-8 competition ... and goals scored in soccer matches: Implications for coaching and training ...

  11. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed

  12. Summaries of FY 1992 research in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the research projects supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics in the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics during FY 1992. This Division is a component of the Office of Energy Research and provides about 85% of the funding for nuclear physics research in the United States. The objectives of the Nuclear Physics Program are two-fold: (1) to understand the interactions and structures of atomic nuclei and nuclear matter and the fundamental forces of nature as manifested in nuclear matter and (2) to foster application of this knowledge to other sciences and technical disciplines. These summaries are intended to provide a convenient guide for those interested in the research supported by the Division of Nuclear Physics. We remind the readers that this compilation is just an overview of the Nuclear Physics Program. What we attempt to portray correctly is the breadth of the program and level of activity in the field of nuclear physics research as well as the new capabilities and directions that continually alter the public face of the nuclear sciences. We hope that the limitations of space, constraints of fon-nat, and rigors of editing have not extinguished the excitement of the science as it was originally portrayed.

  13. Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Annual progress report No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Research programs in four major areas are described: the structure of the nucleon and the nucleon-nucleon interaction, strangeness, and strange baryons; the equation of state of dense matter with specific concern both for the problems of stellar collapse and supernova explosions and of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, nuclear structure physics; and relativistic effects in nuclear particularly heavy ion reactions and quark matter physics. New research efforts in many-body theory are also described

  14. Annual Report 1979. Research Institute of physics Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Following a list of the research personnel, brief reports are presented on research projects in the fields of surface, atomic and molecular physics, atomic and molecular theory, nuclear physics, nuclear theory, exotic atoms and instrumentation and methods. There follow lists of seminars held, publications, theses and the main topics of a workshop on very stable nuclear systems held at Kornoe, 26-28 Aug 1979. (JIW)

  15. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  16. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research. PMID:22972972

  17. Radiotherapy physics research in the UK: challenges and proposed solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, R I; Burnet, N G; Green, S; Illidge, T M; Staffurth, J N

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the Clinical and Translational Radiotherapy Research Working Group (CTRad) of the National Cancer Research Institute brought together UK radiotherapy physics leaders for a think tank meeting. Following a format that CTRad had previously and successfully used with clinical oncologists, 23 departments were asked to complete a pre-meeting evaluation of their radiotherapy physics research infrastructure and the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats within their own centre. These departments were brought together with the CTRad Executive Group and research funders to discuss the current state of radiotherapy physics research, perceived barriers and possible solutions. In this Commentary, we summarise the submitted materials, presentations and discussions from the meeting and propose an action plan. It is clear that there are challenges in both funding and staffing of radiotherapy physics research. Programme and project funding streams sometimes struggle to cater for physics-led work, and increased representation on research funding bodies would be valuable. Career paths for academic radiotherapy physicists need to be examined and an academic training route identified within Modernising Scientific Careers; the introduction of formal job plans may allow greater protection of research time, and should be considered. Improved access to research facilities, including research linear accelerators, would enhance research activity and pass on developments to patients more quickly; research infrastructure could be benchmarked against centres in the UK and abroad. UK National Health Service departments wishing to undertake radiotherapy research, with its attendant added value for patients, need to develop a strategy with their partner higher education institution, and collaboration between departments may provide enhanced opportunities for funded research.

  18. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Physics Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Research on controlled nuclear fusion was first disclosed at the Second United Nations Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, held at Geneva in 1958. From the information given, it was evident that a better understanding of the behaviour of hot dense plasmas was needed before the goal of economic energy release from nuclear fusion could be reached. The fact that research since then has been most complex and costly has enhanced the desirability of international co-operation and exchange of information and experience. Having organized its First Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research at Salzburg in 1961, the International Atomic Energy Agency again provided the means for such cooperation in organizing its Second Conference on this subject on 6-10 September, 1965, at Culham, Abingdon, Berks, England. The meeting was arranged with the generous help of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at their Culham Laboratory, where the facilities and assistance of the staff were greatly appreciated. At the meeting, which was attended by 268 participants from 26 member states and three international organizations, significant results from many experiments, including those from the new and larger machines, became available. It has now become feasible to intercorrelate data obtained from a number of similar machines; this has led to a more complete understanding of plasma behaviour. No breakthrough was reported nor had been expected towards the economical release of the energy from fusion, but there was increased understanding of the problems of production, control and containment of high-density and high-temperature plasmas

  19. Physics of thin films advances in research and development

    CERN Document Server

    Hass, Georg; Vossen, John L

    2013-01-01

    Physics of Thin Films: Advances in Research and Development, Volume 12 reviews advances that have been made in research and development concerning the physics of thin films. This volume covers a wide range of preparative approaches, physics phenomena, and applications related to thin films. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with a discussion on metal coatings and protective layers for front surface mirrors used at various angles of incidence from the ultraviolet to the far infrared. Thin-film materials and deposition conditions suitable for minimizing reflectance changes with

  20. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. We are active in eight principal areas which are discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of electron-positron annihilation; Accelerator Design Physics - advanced accelerator design; Monopole/ Neutrino - searchers for magnetic monopoles and for neutrino oscillations; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of nonaccelarator physics; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particles physics; Muon G-2 - an experiment to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon with a factor of 20 better precision than currently achieved; SSSintcal - scintillating fiber calorimetry for the SSC; and SSC Muon Detectors - development of muon detectors for the GEM Experiment at the SSC

  1. Summaries of FY 1977, research in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Research and the Division of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, provides approximately 90% of the total federal support for high energy physics research effort in the United States. The High Energy Physics Program primarily utilizes four major U.S. high energy accelerator facilities and over 50 universities under contract to do experimental and theoretical investigations on the properties, structure and transformation of matter and energy in their most basic forms. This compilation of research summaries is intended to present a convenient report of the scope and nature of high energy physics research presently funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The areas covered include conception, design, construction, and operation of particle accelerators; experimental research using the accelerators and ancillary equipment; theoretical research; and research and development programs to advance accelerator technology, particle detector systems, and data analysis capabilities. Major concepts and experimental facts in high energy physics have recently been discovered which have the promise of unifying the fundamental forces and of understanding the basic nature of matter and energy. The summaries contained in this document were reproduced in essentially the form submitted by contractors as of January 1977.

  2. Summaries of FY 1977, research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Research and the Division of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, provides approximately 90% of the total federal support for high energy physics research effort in the United States. The High Energy Physics Program primarily utilizes four major U.S. high energy accelerator facilities and over 50 universities under contract to do experimental and theoretical investigations on the properties, structure and transformation of matter and energy in their most basic forms. This compilation of research summaries is intended to present a convenient report of the scope and nature of high energy physics research presently funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The areas covered include conception, design, construction, and operation of particle accelerators; experimental research using the accelerators and ancillary equipment; theoretical research; and research and development programs to advance accelerator technology, particle detector systems, and data analysis capabilities. Major concepts and experimental facts in high energy physics have recently been discovered which have the promise of unifying the fundamental forces and of understanding the basic nature of matter and energy. The summaries contained in this document were reproduced in essentially the form submitted by contractors as of January 1977

  3. Summaries of FY 1984 research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Research, Division of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, provides approximately 90 percent of the total federal support for high energy physics research effort in the United States. The High Energy Physics Program primarily utilizes four major US high energy accelerator facilities and over 90 universities under contract to do experimental and theoretical investigations on the properties, structure, and transformation of matter and energy in their most basic forms. This compilation of research summaries is intended to present a convenient report of the scope and nature of high energy physics research presently funded by the US Department of Energy. The areas covered include: (1) conception, design, construction, and operation of particle accelerators; (2) experimental research using the accelerators and ancillary equipment; (3) theoretical research; and (4) research and development programs to advance accelerator technology, particle detector systems, and data analysis capabilities. Major concepts and experimental facts in high energy physics have recently been discovered which have the promise of unifying the fundamental forces and of unerstanding the basic nature of matter and energy

  4. Workshop on Energy Research for Physics Graduate Students and Postdocs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Ken

    2015-03-01

    One-day workshop for a small group of graduate students and post-docs to hear talks and interact with experts in a variety of areas of energy research. The purpose is to provide an opportunity for young physicists to learn about cutting-edge research in which they might find a career utilizing their interest and background in physics.

  5. Theoretical high energy physics research at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.; Martinec, E.J.; Sachs, R.G.

    1989-12-01

    This report contains brief discussions on theoretical High Energy Physics research done by the researchers at University of Chicago. Some topics covered are: lepton production; kaon decay; Higgs boson production; electric dipole moment of the neutron; string models; supersymmetry; and cosmic ray shower

  6. Collaboration between physical activity researchers and transport planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crist, Katie; Bolling, Khalisa; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between physical activity (PA) researchers and transport planners is a recommended strategy to combat the physical inactivity epidemic. Data collected by PA researchers could be used to identify, implement and evaluate active transport (AT) projects. However, despite aligned interests......, researchers and transport planners rarely collaborate. This study utilized qualitative methods to 1) gain an in-depth understanding of the data utilized in AT planning, 2) explore the utility of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and accelerometer data in supporting the planning process, 3) identify...... expertise in health or transport planning. A thematic analysis was conducted following structural coding by two researchers. The analysis revealed that geographic and physical activity data that are current, local, objective and specific to individual AT trips would improve upon currently available data...

  7. Integrating research evidence and physical activity policy making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, Arja R.; Bertram, Maja; Hämäläinen, Riitta-Maija

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that regular physical activity is enhanced by supporting environment. Studies are needed to integrate research evidence into health enhancing, cross-sector physical activity (HEPA) policy making. This article presents the rationale, study design, measurement procedures...... and the initial results of the first phase of six European countries in a five-year research project (2011-2016), REsearch into POlicy to enhance Physical Activity (REPOPA). REPOPA is programmatic research; it consists of linked studies; the first phase studied the use of evidence in 21 policies in implementation...... to learn more in depth from the policy making process and carried out 86 qualitative stakeholder interviews. The second, ongoing phase builds on the central findings of the first phase in each country; it consists of two sets of interventions: game simulations to study cross-sector collaboration...

  8. Physics in ;Real Life;: Accelerator-based Research with Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klay, J. L.

    All undergraduates in physics and astronomy should have access to significant research experiences. When given the opportunity to tackle challenging open-ended problems outside the classroom, students build their problem-solving skills in ways that better prepare them for the workplace or future research in graduate school. Accelerator-based research on fundamental nuclear and particle physics can provide a myriad of opportunities for undergraduate involvement in hardware and software development as well as ;big data; analysis. The collaborative nature of large experiments exposes students to scientists of every culture and helps them begin to build their professional network even before they graduate. This paper presents an overview of my experiences - the good, the bad, and the ugly - engaging undergraduates in particle and nuclear physics research at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center.

  9. Synthesis of discipline-based education research in physics

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer L. Docktor; José P. Mestre

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive synthesis of physics education research at the undergraduate level. It is based on work originally commissioned by the National Academies. Six topical areas are covered: (1) conceptual understanding, (2) problem solving, (3) curriculum and instruction, (4) assessment, (5) cognitive psychology, and (6) attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning. Each topical section includes sample research questions, theoretical frameworks, common research methodolog...

  10. Engaging undergraduate students in hadron physics research and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Tanja

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear physics research is fundamental to our understanding of the visible universe and at the same time intertwined with our daily life. Nuclear physics studies the origin and structure of the atomic nuclei in terms of their basic constituents, the quarks and gluons. Atoms and molecules would not exist without underlying quark-gluon interactions, which build nearly all the mass of the visible universe from an assembly of massless gluons and nearly-massless quarks. The study of hadron structure with electromagnetic probes through exclusive and semi-inclusive scattering experiments carried out at the 12 GeV Jefferson Laboratory plays an important role in this effort. In particular, planned precision measurements of pion and kaon form factors and longitudinal-transverse separated deep exclusive pion and kaon electroproduction cross sections to the highest momentum transfers achievable play an important role in understanding hadron structure and masses and provide essential constraints for 3D hadron imaging. While a growing fraction of nuclear physics research is carried out at large international laboratories, individual university research groups play critical roles in the success of that research. These include data analysis projects and the development of state-of-the-art instrumentation demanded by increasingly sophisticated experiments. These efforts are empowered by the creativity of university faculty, staff, postdocs, and provide students with unique hands-on experience. As an example, an aerogel Cherenkov detector enabling strangeness physics research in Hall C at Jefferson Lab was constructed at the Catholic University of America with the help of 16 undergraduate and high school students. The ''Conference Experience for Undergraduates'' (CEU) provides a venue for these students who have conducted research in nuclear physics. This presentation will present the experiences of one of the participants in the first years of the CEU, her current research program

  11. Experience acquired in health physics at Saclay Nuclear Research Establishment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, L.; Joffre, H.

    1963-06-15

    Description is given of the general organization and functions of the Health Physics Department of Saclay Nuclear Research Establishment. The means employed for the various installations covered and the general rules adopted for health physics are presented. From an overall survey of the results obtained in 1962, conclusions were drawn from past experience and to foresee improvements for the future are foreseen. (P.C.H.)

  12. Physical activity and pediatric multiple sclerosis: Developing a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; Grover, Stephanie A; Motl, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Three-quarters of children with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue or depression, and progressive neurocognitive decline may be seen as early as two years after MS diagnosis. Furthermore, a higher magnetic resonance imaging disease burden is seen in pediatric-onset MS compared with adult-onset MS. To date, limited knowledge exists regarding behavioral methods for managing symptoms and disease progression in pediatric MS. To that end, this paper builds an evidence-based argument for the possible symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of exercise and physical activity in pediatric MS. This will be accomplished through: (a) a review of pediatric MS and its consequences; (b) a brief overview of physical activity and its consequences in children and adults with MS; and (c) a selective review of research on the neurological benefits of physical activity in pediatric populations. This topical review concludes with a list of 10 questions to guide future research on physical activity and pediatric MS. The objective of this paper is the provision of a research interest, focus and agenda involving pediatric MS and its lifelong management though exercise and physical activity behavior. Such an agenda is critical as the effects and maintenance of physical activity and exercise track across the lifespan, particularly when developed in the early stages of life. © The Author(s), 2015.

  13. Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research & Development - A Physics Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maceira, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blom, Philip Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Maccarthy, Jonathan K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marcillo, Omar Eduardo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Euler, Garrett Gene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Begnaud, Michael Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ford, Sean R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pasyanos, Michael E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Orris, Gregory J. [Naval Research Laboratory; Foxe, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Arrowsmith, Stephen J. [Sandia National Laboratory; Merchant, B. John [Sandia National Laboratory; Slinkard, Megan E. [Sandia National Laboratory

    2017-06-01

    This document entitled “Trends in Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Development – A Physics Perspective” reviews the accessible literature, as it relates to nuclear explosion monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT, 1996), for four research areas: source physics (understanding signal generation), signal propagation (accounting for changes through physical media), sensors (recording the signals), and signal analysis (processing the signal). Over 40 trends are addressed, such as moving from 1D to 3D earth models, from pick-based seismic event processing to full waveform processing, and from separate treatment of mechanical waves in different media to combined analyses. Highlighted in the document for each trend are the value and benefit to the monitoring mission, key papers that advanced the science, and promising research and development for the future.

  14. Future atomic physics researches at HIRFL-CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xiaohong; Xia Jiawen; Zhan Wenlong

    1999-01-01

    A new storage ring system, HIRFL-CSR, is now in construction in the National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou, China. The new facility consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). With the flexibility of the production and the investigation of highly charged ions and radioactive ion beams the new HIRFL-CSR facility will make many frontier atomic physics researches possible in near future. The future physics researches at the HIRFL-CSR are now under consideration. In this paper an overview of the HIRFL-CSR project is given, and the main atomic physics programs to be carried at the HIRFL-CSR are presented. (orig.)

  15. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end

  16. Physics Education Research: A Research Subfield of Physics with Gender Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Ramón S.; Van Dusen, Ramón S.; Henderson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Women currently outnumber men in obtaining undergraduate degrees but are underrepresented within STEM fields. However, women's representation varies by STEM field, and even further by STEM subfield. One field that has held a persistent low representation of women is physics. This paper seeks to uncover the truth behind an anecdotal claim that the…

  17. Confinement Physics Research Facility/ZTH: A progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.; Thullen, P.

    1989-01-01

    In October 1985 the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) Division began the design and construction of the Confinement Physics Research Facility (CPRF) and the ZTH toroidal, reversed-field-pinch (RFP), plasma physics experiment. The CPRF is a facility which will provide the buildings, utilities, pulsed power system, control system and diagnostics needed to operate a magnetically confined fusion experiment, and ZTH will be the first experiment operated in the facility. The construction of CPRF/ZTH is scheduled for completion in the first quarter of 1993. 5 figs

  18. Bringing Earth Magnetism Research into the High School Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Bluth, G.; Engel, E.; Kurpier, K.; Foucher, M. S.; Anderson, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present our work in progress from an NSF CAREER project that aims to integrate paleomagnetic research and secondary school physics education. The research project is aimed at quantifying the strength and geometry of the Precambrian geomagnetic field. Investigation of the geomagnetic field behavior is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of field generation, and the development of the Earth's atmosphere and biosphere, and can serve as a focus for connecting high-level Earth science research with a standard physics curriculum. High school science teachers have participated in each summer field and research component of the project, gaining field and laboratory research experience, sets of rock and mineral samples, and classroom-tested laboratory magnetism activities for secondary school physics and earth science courses. We report on three field seasons of teacher field experiences and two years of classroom testing of paleomagnetic research materials merged into physics instruction on magnetism. Students were surveyed before and after dedicated instruction for both perceptions and attitude towards earth science in general, then more specifically on earth history and earth magnetism. Students were also surveyed before and after instruction on major earth system and magnetic concepts and processes, particularly as they relate to paleomagnetic research. Most students surveyed had a strongly positive viewpoint towards the study of Earth history and the importance of studying Earth Sciences in general, but were significantly less drawn towards more specific topics such as mineralogy and magnetism. Students demonstrated understanding of Earth model and the basics of magnetism, as well as the general timing of life, atmospheric development, and magnetic field development. However, detailed knowledge such as the magnetic dynamo, how the magnetic field has changed over time, and connections between earth magnetism and the development of an atmosphere remained largely

  19. Research in high energy physics. Closeout report, 1992--1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This is the closeout report for DOE supported research in high energy physics for the period 1992-1996, under grant number DE-FG03-92ER40689 at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) at UC Santa Cruz. The research during this period consisted primarily of: (1) data taking with the SLD detector at the SLC at SLCA. This effort built on substantial work on commissioning of the SLC accelerator and has resulted in the single most accurate measurement of the Weinberg angle. (2) Participation in the ALEPH physics program at LEP and LEP-2 at CERN in Geneva, with a technical emphasis on its silicon vertex detector and physics emphasis on events containing b quarks. (3) Electronics development for the leading proton spectrometer for the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg, data taking with ZEUS, and studies of both diffractive and rare events. (4) Participation in the SMC experiment at CERN, with a particular interest in searches for lepton flavor violation. (5) Participation in design and construction activities for the BaBar detector for CP violation studies at SLAC. (6) Design, testing and development for a silicon tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, building on our earlier work for the SSC. (7) Theoretical physics program emphasizing phenomenology, electroweak radiative corrections, Higgs physics, unification, supersymmetry, and some issues in cosmology. We summarize below the accomplishments in each of the areas listed above

  20. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Zaetta, A.; Johner, J.; Mathoniere, G.

    2000-01-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  1. Some results of applied spallation physics research at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Gilmore, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have an active effort in the general area of Applied Spallation Physics Research. The main emphasis of this activity has been on obtaining basic data relevant to spallation neutron source development, accelerator breeder technology, and validation of computer codes used in these applications. We present here an overview of our research effort and show some measured and calculated results of differential and clean integral experiments

  2. Prevention Research Matters-Communities Working to Improve Physical Activity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-02-15

    We know that children who are physically active every day are less likely to develop chronic diseases as adults, including obesity. Dr. Sandy Slater, a researcher with the University of Illinois, Chicago Prevention Research Center, discusses how a park improvement project in Chicago helped engage communities to improve areas for play and activity.  Created: 2/15/2018 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/15/2018.

  3. Status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt is reviewed. There are nine institutes with plasma research activities. The largest is the Atomic energy Authority (AEA), which has activities in fundamental plasma studies, fusion technology, plasma and laser applications, and plasma simulation. The experiments include Theta Pinches, a Z Pinch, a coaxial discharge, a glow discharge, a CO 2 laser, and the EGYPTOR tokamak. (author)

  4. Experimental And Theoretical High Energy Physics Research At UCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousins, Robert D. [University of California Los Angeles

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report of the UCLA High Energy Physics DOE Grant No. DE-FG02- 91ER40662. This report covers the last grant project period, namely the three years beginning January 15, 2010, plus extensions through April 30, 2013. The report describes the broad range of our experimental research spanning direct dark matter detection searches using both liquid xenon (XENON) and liquid argon (DARKSIDE); present (ICARUS) and R&D for future (LBNE) neutrino physics; ultra-high-energy neutrino and cosmic ray detection (ANITA); and the highest-energy accelerator-based physics with the CMS experiment and CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. For our theory group, the report describes frontier activities including particle astrophysics and cosmology; neutrino physics; LHC interaction cross section calculations now feasible due to breakthroughs in theoretical techniques; and advances in the formal theory of supergravity.

  5. Grand Challenges in Physics Education Research: Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula

    2015-04-01

    The courses, curricula and programs that produce new K-12 teachers have been the subject of research in the physics education community for many years. In terms of recruitment, curricula, and mentoring, programs and pathways vary considerably from institution to institution. Each program addresses many different aspects of teaching including knowledge of the content and familiarity with best teaching practices. At the same time, even within physics (or physical science) there is a broad range of student outcomes that are considered important, including acquisition of factual knowledge, development of skill with disciplinary practices, and positive attitudes toward the discipline and one's own abilities. Given the broad range of both input and outcome variables it is no surprise that there are very few clear answers about the impact of teacher preparation on teachers, students and society. In this talk I will summarize some of the main findings to date, and identify some areas where much more research is needed.

  6. Steps toward validity in active living research: research design that limits accusations of physical determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, William

    2014-03-01

    "Active living research" has been accused of being overly "physically deterministic" and this article argues that urban planners must continue to evolve research and address biases in this area. The article first provides background on how researchers have dealt with the relationship between the built environment and health over years. This leads to a presentation of how active living research might be described as overly deterministic. The article then offers lessons for researchers planning to embark in active-living studies as to how they might increase validity and minimize criticism of physical determinism. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Synthesis of Discipline-Based Education Research in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Mestre, José P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive synthesis of physics education research at the undergraduate level. It is based on work originally commissioned by the National Academies. Six topical areas are covered: (1) conceptual understanding, (2) problem solving, (3) curriculum and instruction, (4) assessment, (5) cognitive psychology, and (6) attitudes…

  8. Cyclotrons at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    In this article the destruction by American forces, during World War II, of the Japanese cyclotrons and the subsequent construction of new cyclotrons at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan is described. Their use for biological and medical radiation chemistry studies is summarized. (UK)

  9. My 50 years of research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    Some of my work of the last 50 years in the field of theoretical particle physics is described with particular emphasis on the motivation, the process of investigation, relationship to the work of others, and its impact. My judgment is unavoidably subjective, although I do present the comments of other researchers as much as possible. (author)

  10. Physical activity parenting measurement and research: Challenges, explanations, and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical activity (PA) parenting research has proliferated over the past decade, with findings verifying the influential role that parents play in children's emerging PA behaviors. This knowledge, however, has not translated into effective family-based PA interventions. During a preconference worksh...

  11. New chair for the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Peter Warry has been appointed as Chair of PPARC for the next 4 years. Chairman of Victrex plc, whose business is in speciality chemicals, he has been an Industrial Professor at the University of Warwick since 1993. PPARC pursues a programme of high quality basic research in particle physics, astronomy, cosmology and space science and its budget for 2002 is approximately 220 million GBP.

  12. Authentic student research projects on physics and the human body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heck, A.; Ellermeijer, T.; Kędzierska, E.

    2010-01-01

    Students in Dutch senior secondary education are obliged to perform their own research project of approximately 80 hours. They are stimulated to choose the topic themselves (preferably with relations to two subjects, like physics and mathematics) and have a lot of freedom in the design of the

  13. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  14. How Do They Get Here?: Paths into Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelemy, Ramon S.; Henderson, Charles; Grunert, Megan L.

    2013-01-01

    Physics education research (PER) is a relatively new and rapidly growing area of Ph.D. specialization. To sustain the field of PER, a steady pipeline of talented scholars needs to be developed and supported. One aspect of building this pipeline is understanding how students come to graduate and postdoctoral work in PER and what their career goals…

  15. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation. ... of Grade 1 learners in the North-West province of South Africa: NW-Child study ... A qualitative vision of artificial turf football fields: Elite players and coaches ...

  16. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  17. Physical sciences research plans for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The restructuring of the research capabilities of the International Space Station has forced a reassessment of the Physical Sciences research plans and a re-targeting of the major scientific thrusts. The combination of already selected peer-reviewed flight investigations with the initiation of new research and technology programs will allow the maximization of the ISS scientific and technological potential. Fundamental and applied research will use a combination of ISS-based facilities, ground-based activities, and other experimental platforms to address issues impacting fundamental knowledge, industrial and medical applications on Earth, and the technology required for human space exploration. The current flight investigation research plan shows a large number of principal investigators selected to use the remaining planned research facilities. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Research at the Section of Experimental Nuclear Physics of ATOMKI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasznahorkay, A.; Fenyes, T.; Dombradi, Zs.; Nyako, B.M.; Timar, J.; Algora, A.; Csatlos, M.; Csige, L.; Gacsi, Z.; Gulyas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Nuclear physics research was started in Debrecen by Alexander Szalay (1909-1987) back in the 30's. He had been a postdoc of the Nobel-laureate biologist Albert Szent-Gyorgyi in Szeged and of Lord Rutherford in Cambridge. ATOMKI was founded in Debrecen later, in 1954. The Institute was meant to pursue scientific research in certain areas of experimental nuclear physics and to develop research instruments In the early years the country was pretty isolated, but the institute's state of isolation was gradually easing up from the mid-sixties. During the period 1962-1975 the research work was performed in collaboration with Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), where up-to-date high-energy accelerators were available for the production of desired isotopes. After finishing the construction of a home-made 5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator (1972) and later on the installation of a K=20 light ion cyclotron (1985) the Institute has become the main centre of accelerator-based nuclear physics in Hungary. In the period 1975-1995 our group performed extensive nuclear structure studies in Debrecen by using γ and conversion electron spectroscopy. At the same time fruitful collaborations were initiated with Jyvaskyla (Finland), with University of Kentucky and University of Zagreb. In 1993 the former Nuclear Reaction Group (NRG) merged with our group. Parallel with this structural change, the main topics of our γ-spectroscopic work has also changed, which resulted that the location of our experiments were shifted from the home institute to foreign large-scale facilities. New topics were brought partly by the emerging NRG, partly by group members returning from postdoctoral fellowships. They also brought important non γ-spectroscopic topics, which enriched our research palette. These new topics have by now become joint endeavours involving more and more group members. The Nuclear Physics European Coordination Committee (NuPECC) has recently stated that the aim of

  19. Research-Design Model for Professional Development of Teachers: Designing Lessons with Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

    2006-01-01

    How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER) and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers' physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional…

  20. Research-based active-learning instruction in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David E.; Thornton, Ronald K.

    2013-04-01

    The development of research-based active-learning instructional methods in physics has significantly altered the landscape of U.S. physics education during the past 20 years. Based on a recent review [D.E. Meltzer and R.K. Thornton, Am. J. Phys. 80, 478 (2012)], we define these methods as those (1) explicitly based on research in the learning and teaching of physics, (2) that incorporate classroom and/or laboratory activities that require students to express their thinking through speaking, writing, or other actions that go beyond listening and the copying of notes, or execution of prescribed procedures, and (3) that have been tested repeatedly in actual classroom settings and have yielded objective evidence of improved student learning. We describe some key features common to methods in current use. These features focus on (a) recognizing and addressing students' physics ideas, and (b) guiding students to solve problems in realistic physical settings, in novel and diverse contexts, and to justify or explain the reasoning they have used.

  1. Measuring presenteeism: which questionnaire to use in physical activity research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen Elizabeth; Burton, Nicola; Gilson, Nicholas David; Brown, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    An emerging area of interest in workplace health is presenteeism; the measurable extent to which physical or psychosocial symptoms, conditions and disease adversely affect the work productivity of those who choose to remain at work. Given established links between presenteeism and health, and health and physical activity, presenteeism could be an important outcome in workplace physical activity research. This study provides a narrative review of questionnaires for use in such research. Eight self-report measures of presenteeism were identified. Information regarding development, constructs measured and psychometric properties was extracted from relevant articles. Questionnaires were largely self-administered, had 4-44 items, and recall periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. Items were identified as assessing work performance, physical tolerance, psychological well-being and social or role functioning. Samples used to test questionnaires were predominantly American male employees, with an age range of 30-59 years. All instruments had undergone psychometric assessment, most commonly discriminant and construct validity. Based on instrument characteristics, the range of conceptual foci covered and acceptable measurement properties, the Health and Work Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and Work Limitations Questionnaire are suggested as most suitable for further exploring the relationship between physical activity and presenteeism.

  2. Research report of the faculty of physics 1974-1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This research report for the years 1974 to 1976 is the 4th of its kind and gives a short summary of the scientific publications published by the Institutes of Physics. In the 1st part of this report, the institutes of the faculty and their main fields of activity are listed. This part gives a short survey of the fields of physics and will also give laymen an idea of the research work carried out in Karlsruhe. The second part, which is longer, gives a more detailed description of the work of the faculties, prouped according to subjects. Each chapter is followed by a list of papers published in the period under report. Thus experts will be able to obtain detailed information on special research projects carried out in Karlsruhe. The lists of publications do not give theses for diplomas or state examinations; the same applies to short papers on DGP meetings and colloquia. (orig./HK) [de

  3. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document presents a report of the research accomplishments of Boston University researchers in six projects in high energy physics research: Study of high energy electron-positron annihilation, using the ASP and SLD detectors at SLAC; Search for proton decay and neutrinos from point astrophysical sources, as well as the study of cosmic ray muons and neutrinos in the IMB detector; Development of a new underground detector facility in the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy for magnetic monopoles and to study astrophysical muons and neutrinos; Preparation of an experiment to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a new superconducting storage ring and detector system at BNL; Development of new concepts for particle accelerator components, including design and prototyping of high-precision electrostatic and magnetic elements; and Study of theoretical particle physics, including lattice gauge theories, string theories, phenomenology of the Standard Model and its extensions, and application of particle physics concepts to the early universe, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as the extension of these techniques into computational physics

  4. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This document presents our proposal to continue the activities of Boston University researchers in eight projects in high energy physics research: study of high energy electron-positron annihilation, using SLD detector at SLAC. Development of integrated transition radiation detection and tracking for an SSC detector; Development of new concepts for particle accelerator components, including design and prototyping of high-precision electrostatic and magnetic elements; Development of a new underground detector facility in the Gran Saso Laboratory in Italy to search for magnetic monopoles and to study astrophysical muons and neutrinos; Search for proton decay and neutrinos from point astrophysical sources, and the study of cosmic ray muons and neutrinos in the IMB detector; Study of theoretical particle physics, including lattice gauge theories, string theories, phenomenology of the Standard Model and its extensions, and application of particle physics concepts to the early universe, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as the extension of these techniques into computational physics; Preparation of an experiment to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a new superconducting storage ring and detector system at BNL; Fabrication (with M.I.T. and Princeton) of the BGO endcaps and associated tracking chambers for the L3 detector at LEP. Development of a central tracker for the SSC; and This new tasks requests support for research, development, and beam testing of a prototype SSC calorimeter featuring a tower geometry and composed of lead alloy and scintillating fibers

  5. Experimental and theoretical high energy physics research. [UCLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, Charles D.; Cline, David B.; Byers, N.; Ferrara, S.; Peccei, R.; Hauser, Jay; Muller, Thomas; Atac, Muzaffer; Slater, William; Cousins, Robert; Arisaka, Katsushi

    1992-01-01

    Progress in the various components of the UCLA High-Energy Physics Research program is summarized, including some representative figures and lists of resulting presentations and published papers. Principal efforts were directed at the following: (I) UCLA hadronization model, PEP4/9 e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} analysis, {bar P} decay; (II) ICARUS and astroparticle physics (physics goals, technical progress on electronics, data acquisition, and detector performance, long baseline neutrino beam from CERN to the Gran Sasso and ICARUS, future ICARUS program, and WIMP experiment with xenon), B physics with hadron beams and colliders, high-energy collider physics, and the {phi} factory project; (III) theoretical high-energy physics; (IV) H dibaryon search, search for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{bar {nu}}, and detector design and construction for the FNAL-KTeV project; (V) UCLA participation in the experiment CDF at Fermilab; and (VI) VLPC/scintillating fiber R D.

  6. Fusion plasma physics research on the H-1 national facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Australia has a highly leveraged fusion plasma research program centred on the H-1 National Facility device at the ANU. H-1 is a heliac, a novel helical axis stellarator that was experimentally pioneered in Australia, but has a close correlation with the worldwide research program on toroidal confinement of fusion grade plasma. Experiments are conducted on H-1 by university researchers from the Australian Fusion Research Group (comprising groups from the ANU, the Universities of Sydney, Western Sydney, Canberra, New England, and Central Queensland University) under the aegis of AINSE; the scientists also collaborate with fusion researchers from Japan and the US. Recent experiments on H-1 have focused on improved confinement modes that can be accessed at very low powers in H-1, but allow the study of fundamental physics effects seen on much larger machines at higher powers. H-1 is now being upgraded in magnetic field and heating power, and will be able to confine hotter plasmas beginning in 1999, offering greatly enhanced research opportunities for Australian plasma scientists and engineers, with substantial spillover of ideas from fusion research into other areas of applied physics and engineering

  7. Fundamental physics research at Harwell in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    This paper describes the work during the 1950s of a Group in the Nuclear Physics Division which was particularly free to pursue its own chosen lines of research. The academic achievements and the spin-off in practical terms which derived from this Group are discussed, with some assessments of their value to Harwell and the British scientific community. The topics covered include the exploitation of proportional counters for low energy X- and #betta#-ray spectroscopy, mesonic atoms, and ionization energy loss; cosmic-ray showers; Cherenkov radiation; transition radiation; and fission physics. (author)

  8. Theoretical high energy physics research. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The research activities summarized include: neutral heavy leptons, unusual DESY and CERN events, exotic fermions in superstring models, magnetic monopoles, nonleptonic hyperon decays, heavy quark spectroscopy, supersymmetric quantum mechanics and inverse scattering, SU(3) breaking and the H dibaryon, P-wave mesons with one heavy quark, CP violation, magnetic moments of baryons, dynamical mass generation, lattice gauge theories that include fermions, modification of quantum mechanics to include a fundamental length, speculation concerning physics near the Planck scale, novel physics possibilities of hadron colliders, inclusive structure functions in e + e - colliders especially at the Z 0 resonance, and global structure of supermanifolds. 103 refs

  9. UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, 1993 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.; Clajus, M.; Price, J.W.; Tippens, W.B.; White, D.B.

    1993-09-01

    The research programs of the UCLA Particle and Nuclear Physics Research Group, the research objectives, results of experiments, the continuing activities and new initiatives are presented. The primary goal of the research is to test the symmetries and invariances of particle/nuclear physics with special emphasis on investigating charge symmetry, isospin invariance, charge conjugation, and CP. Another important part of our work is baryon spectroscopy, which is the determination of the properties (mass, width, decay modes, etc.) of particles and resonances. We also measure some basic properties of light nuclei, for example the hadronic radii of 3 H and 3 He. Special attention is given to the eta meson, its production using photons, electrons, π ± , and protons, and its rare and not-so-rare decays. In Section 1, the physics motivation of our research is outlined. Section 2 provides a summary of the research projects. The status of each program is given in Section 3. We discuss the various experimental techniques used, the results obtained, and we outline the plans for the continuing and the new research. Details are presented of new research that is made possible by the use of the Crystal Ball Detector, a highly segmented NaI calorimeter and spectrometer with nearly 4π acceptance (it was built and used at SLAC and is to be moved to BNL). The appendix contains an update of the bibliography, conference participation, and group memos; it also indicates our share in the organization of conferences, and gives a listing of the colloquia and seminars presented by us

  10. Workshop on Energy Research Opportunities for Physics Graduates & Postdocs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kate Kirby

    2010-03-14

    Young people these days are very concerned about the environment. There is also a great deal of interest in using technology to improve energy efficiency. Many physics students share these concerns and would like to find ways to use their scientific and quantitative skills to help overcome the environmental challenges that the world faces. This may be particularly true for female students. Showing physics students how they can contribute to environmental and energy solutions while doing scientific research which excites them is expected to attract more physicists to work on these very important problems and to retain more of the best and the brightest in physical science. This is a major thrust of the 'Gathering Storm' report, the 'American Competitiveness Initiative' report, and several other studies. With these concerns in mind, the American Physical Society (APS) and more specifically, the newly formed APS Topical Group on Energy Research and Applications (GERA), organized and conducted a one-day workshop for graduate students and post docs highlighting the contributions that physics-related research can make to meeting the nation's energy needs in environmentally friendly ways. A workshop program committee was formed and met four times by conference call to determine session topics and to suggest appropriate presenters for each topic. Speakers were chosen not only for their prominence in their respective fields of energy research but also for their ability to relate their work to young people. The workshop was held the day before the APS March Meeting on March 14, 2009 in Portland, OR. The workshop was restricted to approximately 80 young physicists to encourage group discussion. Talks were planned and presented at a level of participants with a physics background but no special knowledge of energy research. Speakers were asked to give a broad overview of their area of research before talking more specifically about their own work. The

  11. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V. [PI; Goshaw, Al [Co-PI; Kruse, Mark [Co-PI; Oh, Seog [Co-PI; Scholberg, Kate [Co-PI; Walter, Chris [Co-PI

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, ve postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the ! e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detec- tor. This water- lled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  12. Research in High Energy Physics at Duke University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goshaw, Alfred; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kruse, Mark; Oh, Seog; Scholberg, Kate; Walter, Chris

    2013-07-29

    This is the Closeout Report for the research grant in experimental elementary particle physics, carried out by the Duke University High Energy Physics (HEP) group. We re- port on physics results and detector development carried out under this grant, focussing on the recent three-year grant period (2010 to 2013). The Duke HEP group consisted of seven faculty members, two senior scientists, five postdocs and eight graduate students. There were three thrusts of the research program. Measurements at the energy frontier at CDF and ATLAS were used to test aspects of elementary particle theory described by the Stan- dard Model (SM) and to search for new forces and particles beyond those contained within the SM. The neutrino sector was explored using data obtained from a large neutrino detector located in Japan, and R & D was conducted on new experiments to be built in the US. The measurements provided information about neutrino masses and the manner in which neutri- nos change species in particle beams. Two years ago we have started a new research program in rare processes based on the Mu2E experiment at Fermilab. This research is motivated by the search for the {mu} {yields} e transition with unprecedented sensitivity, a transition forbidden in the standard model but allowed in supersymmetric and other models of new physics. The high energy research program used proton and antiproton colliding beams. The experiments were done at the Fermilab Tevatron (proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV) and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (proton-proton collisions at 7-8 TeV). The neutrino program used data obtained from the Super-Kamiokande detector. This water-filled Cherenkov counter was used to detect and measure the properties of neutrinos produced in cosmic ray showers, and from neutrino beams produced from acceler- ators in Japan. The Mu2E experiment will use a special stopped muon beam to be built at Fermilab.

  13. Research and analyze of physical health using multiple regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Kyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the research which is trying to create a mathematical model of the "healthy people" using the method of regression analysis. The factors are the physical parameters of the person (such as heart rate, lung capacity, blood pressure, breath holding, weight height coefficient, flexibility of the spine, muscles of the shoulder belt, abdominal muscles, squatting, etc.., and the response variable is an indicator of physical working capacity. After performing multiple regression analysis, obtained useful multiple regression models that can predict the physical performance of boys the aged of fourteen to seventeen years. This paper represents the development of regression model for the sixteen year old boys and analyzed results.

  14. Solid state physics advances in research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Turnbull, David

    1991-01-01

    The explosion of the science of mesoscopic structures is having a great impact on physics and electrical engineering because of the possible applications of these structures in microelectronic and optoelectronic devices of the future. This volume of Solid State Physics consists of two comprehensive and authoritative articles that discuss most of the physical problems that have so far been identified as being of importance in semiconductor nanostructures. Much of the volume is tutorial in characture--while at the same time time presenting current and vital theoretical and experimental results and a copious reference list--so it will be essential reading to all those taking a part in the research and development of this emerging technology.

  15. Annual report 1978. From the Research Institute of Physics, Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the activities in 1978 at the Research Institute of Physics, Stockholm, Sweden. During this year the construction work on the caves for nuclear physics research in the new experimental hall has been completed. The cyclotron has been started up again after a shut-down of about 15 months. A new mini-computer system has been bought and installed at the institute which will be used for on-line data aquisition as well as for off-line computations and analysis. The experimental nuclear physics program has naturally been hampered by the shut-down of the cyclotron. During the main part of the year, experiments with participation of nuclear physicists from the institute have been carried out at laboratories in Uppsala, Aabo, Risoe, Darmstadt and Orsay. The collaboration with the CERN group studying exotic atoms has continued. The activities of the group working in the field of atomic physics at the 400kV accelerator show a clear trend towards the studies of reaction phenomena occuring in collisions of ions with solids and gases. The construction of the new high-power electron accelerator for research in time-resolved precision spectroscopy of atoms and molecules has been completed. The fusion-related experimental program of the surface physics group has continued with an emphasis on the work done in collaboration with the Institut fur Plasmaphysik, KFA, Julich. In order to be able to perform in situ sputtering and thin film migration studies, a new ultra-high-vacuum chamber is being connected simultaneously to the new 100V-10kV low-energy accelerator and the 2MV Van de Graaff accelerator. (E.R.)

  16. The Primary Schoolteacher and Physical Education: A Review of Research and Implications for Irish Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Tim; Mandigo, James

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews research on primary physical education (PE). In primary schools around the world PE is taught by the classroom teacher rather than by a PE specialist. Most classroom teachers feel poorly prepared to teach PE programmes that are meaningful to pupils and provide the types of experiences that lead to lifelong participation. This…

  17. Quantitative Methodology: A Guide for Emerging Physical Education and Adapted Physical Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging professionals, particularly senior-level undergraduate and graduate students in kinesiology who have an interest in physical education for individuals with and without disabilities, should understand the basic assumptions of the quantitative research paradigm. Knowledge of basic assumptions is critical for conducting, analyzing, and…

  18. Research accomplishments and future goals in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This document reports the past year's achievements and the present directions of the activities of Boston University researchers in seven projects in high energy physics research: study of high energy electron-positron annihilation, using the SLD detector at SLAC; search for proton decay and neutrinos from point astrophysical sources, as well as the study of cosmic ray muons and neutrinos in the IMB detector; development of a new underground detector facility in the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy for magnetic monopoles and to study astrophysical muons and neutrinos; preparation of an experiment to measure the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a new superconducting storage ring detector system at BNL; development of new concepts for particle accelerator components, including design and prototyping of high-precision electrostatic and magnetic elements; study of proton-antiproton collisions using the UA1 detector at CERN; and study of theoretical particle physics, including lattice gauge theories, string theories, phenomenology of the Standard Model and its extensions, and application of particle physics concepts to the early universe, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as the extension of these techniques into computational physics

  19. Commercial Scholarship: Spinning Physics Research into a Business Enterprise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Orville

    2013-03-01

    The American Institute of Physics' Center for History of Physics has conducted a three year NSF funded study of physicist entrepreneurs during which we interviewed 140 physicists who have founded ninety-one startups. Forty of those companies have spun research out of twenty-some universities. Startups spun out of university research tend to be technology push companies, creating new potentially disruptive technologies for which markets do not yet clearly exist, in contrast to market pull companies founded to address innovations responding to market demands. This paper addresses the unique issues found in university spinout companies and their responses to them. While technology push companies are generally considered to be higher risk compared to market pull companies, the university spinouts in our study had a higher rate of both SBIR and venture capital funding than did the market pull companies in our study.

  20. Physics Regimes in the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. Meade; S.C.Jardin; C.E. Kessel; M.A. Ulrickson; J.H. Schultz; P.H. Rutherford; J.A. Schmidt; J.C. Wesley; K.M. Young; N.A.Uckan; R.J. Thome; P. Heitzenroeder; B.E. Nelson; and C.C.Baker

    2001-01-01

    Burning plasma science is recognized widely as the next frontier in fusion research. The Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) is a design study of a next-step burning plasma experiment with the goal of developing a concept for an experimental facility to explore and understand the strong nonlinear coupling among confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) self-heating, stability, edge physics, and wave-particle interactions that is fundamental to fusion plasma behavior. This will require plasmas dominated by alpha heating (Q greater than or equal to 5) that are sustained for a duration comparable to characteristic plasma timescales (greater than or equal to 10) tau(subscript ''E''), approximately 4 tau(subscript ''He''), approximately 2 tau(subscript ''skin''). The work reported here has been undertaken with the objective of finding the minimum size (cost) device to achieve these physics goals

  1. Twenty years of health physics research reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.; Gilley, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been in regular use for more than two decades. Safe operation of this fast reactor over this extended period indicates that (1) fundamental design, (2) operational procedures, (3) operator training and performance, (4) maintenance activites, and (5) management have all been eminently satisfactory. The reactor and its uses are described, the operational history and significant events are reviewed, and operational improvements and maintenance are discussed

  2. Canberra semiconductor, an industrial partner for physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verplancke, J.; Burger, P.; Schoenmaekers, W.

    1990-01-01

    Canberra semiconductor produces germanium and silicon solid state detectors for nuclear radiation. Its business domain covers the production of standard detectors on an industrial basis, for industrial and applied physics applications, as well as the development of special detectors and electronics, tailored to the needs of a particular application, in science and research. There exists an important and beneficial interaction between these two activities. (orig.)

  3. An automation of physics research on base of open standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.A.

    1997-01-01

    A wide range of problems is considered concerning an automation of Laboratory of High Energies, JINR set-ups oriented to carry out the experimental researches in high energy and relativistic nuclear physics. Electronics of discussed automation systems is performed in open standards. Main peculiarities in the creation process of automation tools for experimental set-ups, stands and accelerators are shown. Some possibilities to build some accelerator control subsystems on base of industrial automation methods and techniques are discussed

  4. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1990. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Volume 1 of the Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research contains papers given in two of the sessions: A and E. Session A contains the Artsimovich Memorial Lecture and papers on tokamaks; session E papers on plasma heating and current drive. The titles and authors of each paper are listed in the Contents. Abstracts accompany each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. On the research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first egyptian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A review on the most important research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first Egyptian Research Reactor (ET-RR-1) is given. An out look on: neutron cross-sections, neutron flux, neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, neutron diffraction and radiation shielding experiments, is presented

  6. Developing a physics expert identity in a biophysics research group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird H.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the development of expert identities through the use of the sociocultural perspective of learning as participating in a community of practice. An ethnographic case study of biophysics graduate students focuses on the experiences the students have in their research group meetings. The analysis illustrates how the communities of practice-based identity constructs of competencies characterize student expert membership. A microanalysis of speech, sound, tones, and gestures in video data characterize students' social competencies in the physics community of practice. Results provide evidence that students at different stages of their individual projects have opportunities to develop social competencies such as mutual engagement, negotiability of the repertoire, and accountability to the enterprises as they interact with group members. The biophysics research group purposefully designed a learning trajectory including conducting research and writing it for publication in the larger community of practice as a pathway to expertise. The students of the research group learn to become socially competent as specific experts of their project topic and methodology, ensuring acceptance, agency, and membership in their community of practice. This work expands research on physics expertise beyond the cognitive realm and has implications for how to design graduate learning experiences to promote expert identity development.

  7. Undergraduate Research in Physics as an Educational Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Toufic M.; Garg, Shila

    2001-03-01

    The National Science Foundation's 1996 report "Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology" urged that in order to improve SME&T education, decisive action must be taken so that "all students have access to excellent undergraduate education in science .... and all students learn these subjects by direct experience with the methods and processes of inquiry." Research-related educational activities that integrate education and research have been shown to be valuable in improving the quality of education and enhancing the number of majors in physics departments. Student researchers develop a motivation to continue in science and engineering through an appreciation of how science is done and the excitement of doing frontier research. We will address some of the challenges of integrating research into the physics undergraduate curriculum effectively. The departmental and institutional policies and infrastructure required to help prepare students for this endeavor will be discussed as well as sources of support and the establishment of appropriate evaluation procedures.

  8. Trends of plasma physics and nuclear fusion research life cycle and research effort curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohe, Takeru; Kanada, Yasumasa; Momota, Hiromu; Ichikawa, Y.H.

    1979-05-01

    This paper presents a quantitative analysis of research trends in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. This analysis is based on information retrieval from available data bases such as INSPEC tapes. The results indicate that plasma physics research is now in the maturation phase of its life cycle, and that nuclear fusion research is in its growth phase. This paper indicates that there is a correlation between the number of accumulated papers in the fields of plasma physics and nuclear fusion and the experimentally attained values of the plasma ignition parameter ntT. Using this correlation ''research effort curve'', we forecast that the scientific feasibility of controlled fusion using magnetic confinement systems will be proved around 1983. (author)

  9. 76 FR 38191 - New Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National... comment. Proposed Collection: Title: Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology... Development* to conduct a national longitudinal study of environmental influences (including physical...

  10. Applied Physics Research at the Idaho Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, D. S.; Hunt, A. W.; Chouffani, K.; Wells, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    The Idaho Accelerator Center, founded in 1996 and based at Idaho State University, supports research, education, and high technology economic development in the United States. The research center currently has eight electron linear accelerators ranging in energy from 6 to 44 MeV with the latter linear accelerator capable of picosecond pulses, a 2 MeV positive-ion Van de Graaff, a 4 MV Nec tandem Pelletron, and a pulsed-power 8 k A, 10 MeV electron induction accelerator. Current research emphases include, accelerator physics research, accelerator based medical isotope production, active interrogation techniques for homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation applications, non destructive testing and materials science studies in support of industry as well as the development of advanced nuclear fuels, pure and applied radio-biology, and medical physics. This talk will highlight three of these areas including the production of the isotopes 99 Tc and 67 Cu for medical diagnostics and therapy, as well as two new technologies currently under development for nuclear safeguards and homeland security - namely laser Compton scattering and the polarized photofission of actinides

  11. The Applied Behavior Analysis Research Paradigm and Single-Subject Designs in Adapted Physical Activity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A; Hodge, Samuel Russell

    2015-10-01

    There are basic philosophical and paradigmatic assumptions that guide scholarly research endeavors, including the methods used and the types of questions asked. Through this article, kinesiology faculty and students with interests in adapted physical activity are encouraged to understand the basic assumptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) methodology for conducting, analyzing, and presenting research of high quality in this paradigm. The purposes of this viewpoint paper are to present information fundamental to understanding the assumptions undergirding research methodology in ABA, describe key aspects of single-subject research designs, and discuss common research designs and data-analysis strategies used in single-subject studies.

  12. Multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity: Fundamental research and strategic research for exploration of space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    2003-01-01

    NASA is preparing to undertake science-driven exploration missions. The NASA Exploration Team's vision is a cascade of stepping stones. The stepping-stone will build the technical capabilities needed for each step with multi-use technologies and capabilities. An Agency-wide technology investment and development program is necessary to implement the vision. The NASA Exploration Team has identified a number of areas where significant advances are needed to overcome all engineering and medical barriers to the expansion of human space exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. Closed-loop life support systems and advanced propulsion and power technologies are among the areas requiring significant advances from the current state-of-the-art. Studies conducted by the National Academy of Science's National Research Council and Workshops organized by NASA have shown that multiphase flow and phase change play a crucial role in many of these advanced technology concepts. Lack of understanding of multiphase flow, phase change, and interfacial phenomena in the microgravity environment has been a major hurdle. An understanding of multiphase flow and phase change in microgravity is, therefore, critical to advancing many technologies needed. Recognizing this, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR) has initiated a strategic research thrust to augment the ongoing fundamental research in fluid physics and transport phenomena discipline with research especially aimed at understanding key multiphase flow related issues in propulsion, power, thermal control, and closed-loop advanced life support systems. A plan for integrated theoretical and experimental research that has the highest probability of providing data, predictive tools, and models needed by the systems developers to incorporate highly promising multiphase-based technologies is currently in preparation. This plan is being developed with inputs from scientific community, NASA mission planners and industry personnel

  13. Rethinking Physics for Biologists: A design-based research approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    2015-03-01

    Biology majors at the University of Maryland are required to take courses in biology, chemistry, and physics - but they often see these courses as disconnected. Over the past three years the NEXUS/Physics course has been working to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment that bridges the disciplinary domains of biology and physics. Across the three years we have gone from teaching in a small class with one instructor to teaching in a large lecture hall with multiple instructors. We have used a design-based research approach to support critical reflection of the course at multiple-time scales. In this presentation I will detail our process of collecting systematic data, listening to and valuing students' reasoning, and bridging diverse perspectives led. I will demonstrate how this process led to improved curricular design, refined assessment objectives, and new design heuristics. This work is supported by NSF-TUES DUE 11-22818, the HHMI NEXUS grant, and a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (DGE 0750616).

  14. Future Research on Cyber-Physical Emergency Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Jing Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-physical systems that include human beings and vehicles in a built environment, such as a building or a city, together with sensor networks and decision support systems have attracted much attention. In emergencies, which also include mobile searchers and rescuers, the interactions among civilians and the environment become much more diverse, and the complexity of the emergency response also becomes much greater. This paper surveys current research on sensor-assisted evacuation and rescue systems and discusses the related research issues concerning communication protocols for sensor networks, as well as several other important issues, such as the integrated asynchronous control of large-scale emergency response systems, knowledge discovery for rescue and prototyping platforms. Then, we suggest directions for further research.

  15. Overview of research in physics and health sciences at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, J.C.D.

    1988-01-01

    Toxicology research was a logical extension of existing program at Chalk River. Research in radiotoxicology has been going on there since the early forties. An overview of the existing physics and health sciences research programs operating at the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited was presented. Programs in nuclear physics, heavy ion nuclear physics, astrophysical neutrino physics, condensed matter physics, fusion, biology, dosimetry, and environmental sciences were briefly described. In addition, a description of the research company organization was provided

  16. Development and Physical Control Research on Prototype Artificial Leg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To provide an ideal platform for research on intelligent bionic leg (IBL, this paper proposes a model of a biped robot with heterogeneous legs (BRHL. A prototype of an artificial leg is developed based on biological structure and motion principle analysis of human lower extremities. With regard to the driving sources, servomotors are chosen for the hip joint and ankle joint, while pneumatic muscle actuators (PMAs are chosen for the knee joint. The control system of the bionic artificial leg is designed and a physical experimental platform is established. The physical control experiments are done based on proportional-integral-derivative (PID control strategy. The experimental results show that such a system can realize the expected goals.

  17. Experimental nuclear physics research challenges at low energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, E.; Morales G, L. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Murillo O, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental research with low energy beams of ions (a few MeV) in nuclear physics has gone through a phase transition along its evolution in fifty years because of the increasing complexity (and cost) of the equipment required to conduct meaningful investigations. Many of the small cyclotrons and Van de Graaff (single ended and tandem) accelerators have been used for the last three decades mostly in applications related to the characterization and modification of materials. Specific experimental investigations in nuclear physics with low energy accelerators are proposed in this work. Specifically we discuss the topic of nuclear radii measurements of radioactive species produced via (d,n) reactions. Some emphasis is given to the instrumentation required. (Author)

  18. Operating manual for the Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    This manual is intended to serve as a guide in the operation and maintenance of the Health Physics Researh Reactor (HPRR) of the Health Physics Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility. It includes descriptions of the HPRR and of associated equipment such as the reactor positioning devises and the derrick. Procedures for routine operation of the HPRR are given in detail, and checklists for the various steps are provided where applicable. Emergency procedures are similarly covered, and maintenance schedules are outlined. Also, a bibliography of references giving more detailed information on the DOSAR Facility is included. Changes to this manual will be approved by at least two of the following senior staff members: (1) the Operations Division Director, (2) the Reactor Operations Department Head, (3) the Supervisor of Reactor Operations TSF-HPRR Areas. The master copy and the copy of the manual issued to the HPRR Operations Supervisor will always reflect the latest revision. 22 figs

  19. Some questions on the research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    Some new developments in elementary particle physics and interaction processes are reviewed. Recent advances in the field of particle physics including the observation of an anomalous behaviour of interaction cross section at high energy levels, the deep inelastic scattering of electrons from protons, the existence of neutral currents and the relative frequency of events with high transverse pulses are pointed out. A special development is the discovery and identification of a number of new particles and processes. New advances in understanding of the structure of subelementary particles, and the combination of electromagnetic and weak interactions are described. After a discussion of the technical and instrumental requirements and possibilities in the field of elementary particle research, the role and achievements of Hungarian scientists in high-energy facilities of the Soviet Union are emphasized. (P.J.)

  20. The future of physical activity research: funding, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernhall, Bo; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Babu, Abraham S

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide impact of physical activity (PA) on health consequences has received increasing attention. At this point in time, there is little disagreement that increasing levels of PA is an important aspect of public health worldwide. The world literature on PA, exercise and fitness has also grown exponentially since the early 1990's. It is clear that there is a voluminous literature in this area of research and the exponential increase in the number of manuscripts has gained substantial momentum since the year 2000. Given the importance of PA research in regards to health outcomes, and apparent popularity of such research (based on the number of manuscripts published), one could argue that the viability and future of PA are indeed bright. However, one could also assume a different view, that although the field is popular, it is saturated and we already know what we need to know regarding the impact of PA on public health. Much of the future viability of PA research will also be dependent on funding sources available. It is also possible that the impact of PA may vary around the world, thus the "global" impact of PA research may be dependent on location. This review will discuss what we perceive as the current landscape and the future of PA research in three select areas of the world, the United States, South America and Asia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Particle accelerator physics and technology for high energy density physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Ni, P.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [Darmstadt Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Schlobgartenstr. 9 (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Kain, V.; Schmidt, R.; Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Zioutas, K. [Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Mintsev, V.; Fortov, V.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    Interaction phenomena of intense ion- and laser radiation with matter have a large range of application in different fields of science, extending from basic research of plasma properties to applications in energy science, especially in inertial fusion. The heavy ion synchrotron at GSI now routinely delivers intense uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Our simulations show that the new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. A natural example of hot dense plasma is provided by our neighbouring star the sun, and allows a deep insight into the physics of fusion, the properties of matter at high energy density, and is moreover an excellent laboratory for astro-particle physics. As such the sun's interior plasma can even be used to probe the existence of novel particles and dark matter candidates. We present an overview on recent results and developments of dense plasma physics addressed with heavy ion and laser beams combined with accelerator- and nuclear physics technology. (authors)

  2. REPORT OF RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND FUTURE GOALS HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, Mark B. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Kapustin, Anton N. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Schwarz, John Henry [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Carroll, Sean [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Ooguri, Hirosi [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Gukov, Sergei [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Preskill, John [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Hitlin, David G. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Porter, Frank C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Patterson, Ryan B. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Newman, Harvey B. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Spiropulu, Maria [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Golwala, Sunil [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-08-26

    effort. Areas of activity include: CDMS II data analysis, contributions to SuperCDMS Soudan operations and analysis, R&D towards SuperCDMS SNOLAB, development of a novel screener for radiocontamination (the BetaCage), and development of new WIMP detector concepts. Ren-Yuan Zhu leads the HEP crystal laboratory for the advanced detector R&D effort. The crystal lab is involved in development of novel scintillating crystals and has proposed several crystal based detector concepts for future HEP experiments at the energy and intensity frontiers. Its current research effort is concentrated on development of fast crystal scintillators with good radiation hardness and low cost. II) THEORETICAL PHYSICS The main theme of Sergei Gukov's current research is the relation between the geometry of quantum group invariants and their categorification, on the one hand, and the physics of supersymmetric gauge theory and string theory, on the other. Anton Kapustin's research spans a variety of topics in non-perturbative Quantum Field Theory (QFT). His main areas of interest are supersymmetric gauge theories, non-perturbative dualities in QFT, disorder operators, Topological Quantum Field Theory, and non-relativistic QFT. He is also interested in the foundations and possible generalizations of Quantum Mechanics. Hirosi Ooguri's current research has two main components. One is to find exact results in Calabi-Yau compactification of string theory. Another is to explore applications of the AdS/CFT correspondence. He also plans to continue his project with Caltech postdoctoral fellows on BPS spectra of supersymmetric gauge theories in diverse dimensions. John Preskill works on quantum information science. This field may lead to important future technologies, and also lead to new understanding of issues in fundamental physics John Schwarz has been exploring a number of topics in superstring theory/M-theory, supersymmetric gauge theory, and their AdS/CFT relationships. Much of the

  3. Health physics research abstracts No.14: Information on research in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The present issue No. 14 of Health Physics Research Abstracts is the continuation of a series of bulletins published by the Agency since 1967. They collect reports from Member States on Health Physics research in progress or just completed. The main aim in issuing such reports is to draw attention to work that is about to be published and to enable interested scientists to obtain further information through direct correspondence with the investigator. The present issue contains 381 reports received up to September 1988

  4. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeger, Karsten M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-09-13

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  5. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeger, Karsten M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta . Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  6. 76 FR 23609 - New Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ...; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National... Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's Study (NCS) Type of Information Collection Request... clearance to conduct formative research featuring biospecimen and physical measurement collections. The NCS...

  7. Bringing the physical sciences into your cell biology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2012-11-01

    Historically, much of biology was studied by physicists and mathematicians. With the advent of modern molecular biology, a wave of researchers became trained in a new scientific discipline filled with the language of genes, mutants, and the central dogma. These new molecular approaches have provided volumes of information on biomolecules and molecular pathways from the cellular to the organismal level. The challenge now is to determine how this seemingly endless list of components works together to promote the healthy function of complex living systems. This effort requires an interdisciplinary approach by investigators from both the biological and the physical sciences.

  8. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Physical Properties of Nano systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bonca, Janez

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience have demonstrated that fundamentally new physical phenomena are found when systems are reduced to sizes comparable to the fundamental microscopic length scales of the material investigated. There has been great interest in this research due, in particular, to its role in the development of spintronics, molecular electronics and quantum information processing. The contributions to this volume describe new advances in many of these fundamental and fascinating areas of nanophysics, including carbon nanotubes, graphene, magnetic nanostructures, transport through coupled quantum dots, spintronics, molecular electronics, and quantum information processing.

  9. A Summer Research Experience in Particle Physics Using Skype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Curran; Alexander, Steven; Mahmood, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    This last summer I did research in particle physics as part of a ``remote REU.'' This poster will describe that experience and the results of my project which was to experimentally verify the mass ranges of the Z' boson. Data from the LHC's Atlas detector was filtered by computers to select for likely Z boson decays; my work was in noting all instances of Z or Z' boson decays in one thousand events and their masses, separating the Z from Z' bosons, and generating histograms of the masses.

  10. Physics Education Research in Perspective: An Historical and Conceptual Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David E.

    2011-04-01

    I will discuss the evolution of physics education research (PER) within an historical perspective that begins in the 1860s, focuses on developments in the post-World War II period, and extends towards diverse future pathways. PER has incorporated a broad array of themes that resonate with past developments in science education; however, it also provides unique perspectives that offer promise of potential breakthroughs in areas previously underexplored. Nonetheless, there is a long road from promise to realization, and I will try to identify key aspects of past accomplishments as well as of present and future challenges. Supported in part by NSF PHY-0108787 and DUE-0817282.

  11. Research in Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics: Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    The Boston University Neutrino Physics and Particle Astrophysics Group investigates the fundamental laws of particle physics using natural and man-made neutrinos and rare processes such as proton decay. The primary instrument for this research is the massive Super-Kamiokande (SK) water Cherenkov detector, operating since 1996 at the Kamioka Neutrino Observatory, one kilometer underground in a mine in Japan. We study atmospheric neutrinos from cosmic rays, which were first used to discover that neutrinos have mass, as recognized by the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics. Our latest measurements with atmospheric neutrinos are giving valuable information, complementary to longbaseline experiments, on the ordering of massive neutrino states and as to whether neutrinos violate CP symmetry. We have studied a variety of proton decay modes, including the most frequently predicted modes such as p → e+π0 and p → ν K+, as well as more exotic baryon number violating processes such as dinucleon decay and neutronantineutron oscillation. We search for neutrinos from dark matter annihilation or decay in the universe. Our group has made significant contributions to detector operation, particularly in the area of electronics. Most recently, we have contributed to planning for an upgrade to the SK detector by the addition of gadolinium to the water, which will enable efficient neutron capture detection.

  12. Interdisciplinary physics research in the Japanese Hadron Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-09-01

    The Japanese Hadron Project (JHP) is a large future plan of interdisciplinary and international scope, aimed at basic physics research by creating and using various secondary unstable particle beams such as mesons, muons, neutrons and accelerated exotic nuclei. It comprises a high-intensity proton linac of 1 GeV, a compressor/stretcher ring and an ISOL/accelerator to deliver beams to MESON, NEUTRON and EXOTIC NUCLEI arena's. In addition, as the present ongoing project, we are pushing KAON arena based on the KEK 12 GeV proton synchrotron. The present paper describes the scientific motivation and technological bases for this future project as well as the presently going pre-JHP research activities. (author)

  13. Towards Reproducible Research Data Analyses in LHC Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Simko, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    The reproducibility of the research data analysis requires having access not only to the original datasets, but also to the computing environment, the analysis software and the workflow used to produce the original results. We present the nascent CERN Analysis Preservation platform with a set of tools developed to support particle physics researchers in preserving the knowledge around analyses so that capturing, sharing, reusing and reinterpreting data becomes easier. The presentation will focus on three pillars: (i) capturing structured knowledge information about data analysis processes; (ii) capturing the computing environment, the software code, the datasets, the configuration and other information assets used in data analyses; (iii) re-instantiating of preserved analyses on a containerised computing cloud for the purposes of re-validation and re-interpretation.

  14. Educational trajectories of graduate students in physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dusen, Ben; Barthelemy, Ramón S.; Henderson, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Physics education research (PER) is a rapidly growing area of PhD specialization. In this article we examine the trajectories that led respondents into a PER graduate program as well as their expected future trajectories. Data were collected in the form of an online survey sent to graduate students in PER. Our findings show a lack of visibility of PER as a field of study, a dominance of work at the undergraduate level, and a mismatch of future desires and expectations. We suggest that greater exposure is needed so PER is known as a field of inquiry for graduates, that more emphasis should be placed on research beyond the undergraduate level, and that there needs to be stronger communication to graduate students about potential careers.

  15. ESNET requirements for physics research at the SSCL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormell, L.; Johnson, T.

    1993-06-01

    High energy physics (HEP) research at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is a highly collaborative affair. Scientists participating in SSC research come from a worldwide distribution of institutions. The Solenoid Detector Collaboration (SDC) currently has more than 1100 members from 20 countries. Likewise, the Gamma, Electron, Muon (GEM) collaboration members number more than 1000 from 17 countries. Roughly half of the collaborators on these experiments are from outside the US Communications, in general, and data transmission, in particular, are crucial to the success of the collaborations and to the ultimate success of the SSC. The bulk of data transmission to and from the Laboratory is over the Energy Science NETwork (ESNET). The purpose of this document is to describe the anticipated network capacity needed to provide adequate communication among these widespread collaborations

  16. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V. [Department of Plasma Physics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Lomonosov, I.V. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Tomsk University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Borm, B. [Department of Physics, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A. [E.T.S.I. Industrials, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Planetary physics research programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research at Darmstadt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, N.A.; Neumayer, P.; Bagnoud, V.; Lomonosov, I.V.; Borm, B.; Piriz, A.R.; Piriz, S.A.; Shutov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary physics research is an important part of the high energy density (HED) physics programme at the Facility for Antiprotons and Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt. In this paper, we report numerical simulations of a proposed experiment named LAboratory PLAnetary Sciences (LAPLAS). These simulations show that in such experiments, an Fe sample can be imploded to extreme physical conditions that are expected to exist in the interior of the Earth and in the interior of more massive rocky planets named, super-Earths. The LAPLAS experiments will thus provide very valuable information on the equation-of-state (EOS) and transport properties of HED Fe, which will help the scientists to understand the structure and evolution of the planets in our solar system and of the extrasolar system planets. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Towards Primary School Physics Teaching and Learning: Design Research Approach. Research Report 256

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuti, Kalle

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a project to design a primary school physics learning environment which takes into account teachers' needs, design procedures, properties of the learning environment, and pupil learning outcomes. The project's design team has wide experience in research and development work in relation to science education, the use of ICT in…

  19. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

    2006-12-01

    How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER) and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6) developed during a year and a half (about 330h ), several lessons (minimodules) dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a) Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b) teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c) a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d) the formation of a community of practice; and (e) acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  20. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bagno

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6 developed during a year and a half (about 330 h , several lessons (minimodules dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d the formation of a community of practice; and (e acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  1. Research-design model for professional development of teachers: Designing lessons with physics education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bat-Sheva Eylon

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available How can one increase the awareness of teachers to the existence and importance of knowledge gained through physics education research (PER and provide them with capabilities to use it? How can one enrich teachers’ physics knowledge and the related pedagogical content knowledge of topics singled out by PER? In this paper we describe a professional development model that attempts to respond to these needs. We report on a study of the model’s implementation in a program for 22 high-school experienced physics teachers. In this program teachers (in teams of 5-6 developed during a year and a half (about 330h, several lessons (minimodules dealing with a topic identified as problematic by PER. The teachers employed a systematic research-based approach and used PER findings. The program consisted of three stages, each culminating with a miniconference: 1. Defining teaching and/or learning goals based on content analysis and diagnosis of students’ prior knowledge. 2. Designing the lessons using PER-based instructional strategies. 3. Performing a small-scale research study that accompanies the development process and publishing the results. We describe a case study of one of the groups and bring evidence that demonstrates how the workshop advanced: (a Teachers’ awareness of deficiencies in their own knowledge of physics and pedagogy, and their perceptions about their students’ knowledge; (b teachers’ knowledge of physics and physics pedagogy; (c a systematic research-based approach to the design of lessons; (d the formation of a community of practice; and (e acquaintance with central findings of PER. There was a clear effect on teachers’ practice in the context of the study as indicated by the materials brought to the workshop. The teachers also reported that they continued to use the insights gained, mainly in the topics that were investigated by themselves and by their peers.

  2. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  3. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1990--June 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses research programs at ANL in High Energy Physics. The major categories of this research are: experimental programs; theoretical program; experimental facilities research; accelerator research and development; and SSC detector research and development

  5. Physical Characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Quang Huy

    1994-10-01

    The operation of the TRIGA MARK II reactor of nominal power 250 KW has been stopped as all the fuel elements have been dismounted and taken away in 1968. The reconstruction of the reactor was accomplished with Russian technological assistance after 1975. The nominal power of the reconstructed reactor is of 500 KW. The recent Dalat reactor is unique of its kind in the world: Russian-designed core combined with left-over infrastructure of the American-made TRIGA II. The reactor was loaded in November 1983. It has reached physical criticality on 1/11/1983 (without central neutron trap) and on 18/12/1983 (with central neutron trap). The power start up occurred in February 1984 and from 20/3/1984 the reactor began to be operated at the nominal power 500 KW. The selected reports included in the proceedings reflect the start up procedures and numerous results obtained in the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute and the Centre of Nuclear Techniques on the determination of different physical characteristics of the reactor. These characteristics are of the first importance for the safe operation of the Dalat reactor

  6. Final report. [Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This report gives summaries of particle physics research conducted by different group members for Task A. A summary of work on the CLEO experiment and detector is included for Task B along with a list of CLEO publications. During the present grant period for Task C, the authors had responsibility for the design, assembly, and programming of the high-resolution spectrometer which looks for narrow peaks in the output of the cavity in the LLNL experiment. They successfully carried out this task. Velocity peaks are expected in the spectrum of dark matter axions on Earth. The computing proposal (Task S) is submitted in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and the Theory tasks

  7. CLOUD EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES FOR PHYSICS LEARNING RESEARCHES SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Merzlykin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The definition of cloud educational resource is given in paper. Its program and information components are characterized. The virtualization as the technological ground of transforming from traditional electronic educational resources to cloud ones is reviewed. Such levels of virtualization are described: data storage device virtualization (Data as Service, hardware virtualization (Hardware as Service, computer virtualization (Infrastructure as Service, software system virtualization (Platform as Service, «desktop» virtualization (Desktop as Service, software user interface virtualization (Software as Service. Possibilities of designing the cloud educational resources system for physics learning researches support taking into account standards of learning objects metadata (accessing via OAI-PMH protocol and standards of learning tools interoperability (LTI are shown. The example of integration cloud educational resources into Moodle learning management system with use of OAI-PMH and LTI is given.

  8. Girls in the physics classroom: a review of the research on the participation of girls in physics

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Patricia; Whitelegg, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    A review of research spanning the past 15 years into the participation of girls in physics at secondary school level. The review was commissioned by the Institute of Physics in order to inform policy setting agendas for the Institute and to reveal important messages about participation in physics which the Institute could use to develop plans for action.

  9. History of Physics Education Research as a Model for Geoscience Education Research Community Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    Discipline-based Education Research (DBER) is a research field richly combining a deep understanding of how to teach a particular discipline with an evolving understanding how people learn that discipline. At its center, DBER has an overarching goal of improving the teaching and learning of a discipline by focusing on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms learners use as they develop expertise. Geoscience Education Research, or GER, is a young but rapidly advancing field which is poised to make important contributions to the teaching and learning of earth and space science. Nascent geoscience education researchers could accelerate their community's progress by learning some of the lessons from the more mature field of Physics Education Research, PER. For the past three decades, the PER community has been on the cutting edge of DBER. PER started purely as an effort among traditionally trained physicists to overcome students' tenaciously held misconceptions about force, motion, and electricity. Over the years, PER has wrestled with the extent to which they included the faculty from the College of Education, the value placed on interpretive and qualitative research methods, the most appropriate involvement of professional societies, the nature of its PhD programs in the College of Science, and how to best disseminate the results of PER to the wider physics teaching community. Decades later, as a more fully mature field, PER still struggles with some of these aspects, but has learned important lessons in how its community progresses and evolves to be successful, valuable, and pertinent.

  10. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1983-12-31

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC, FERMILAB, and DESY.

  11. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and furture goals, FY1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barish, B C

    1981-05-08

    Continuing research in high energy physics carried out by the group from the California Institute of Technology. The program includes research in theory, phenomenology, and experimental high energy physics. The experimental program includes experiments at SLAC and FERMILAB.

  12. Research accomplishments in particle physics: Research progress report, July 16, 1986 to July 15, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This document reports the activities of Boston University researchers in five projects in high energy physics research during the period July 16, 1986 to July 15, 1987. These include: search for proton decay and neutrinos from point astrophysical sources, as well as the study of cosmic ray muons and neutrinos in the IMB detector; study of high energy electron-positron annihilation, using the ASP and SLD detectors at SLAC; development of a new underground detector facility in the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy for magnetic monopoles and to study astrophysical muons and neutrinos; measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a new superconducting storage ring and detector system at BNL, with a major portion of design and construction of accelerator components at Boston University; and study of theoretical particle physics, including lattice gauge theories, string theories, phenomenology of the Standard Model and its extensions, and application of particle physics concepts to the early universe, cosmology and astrophysics, as well as the extension of these techniques into computational physics

  13. Reference earth orbital research and applications investigations (blue book). Volume 3: Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The definition of physics experiments to be conducted aboard the space station is presented. The four functional program elements are: (1) space physics research laboratory, (2) plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory, (3) cosmic ray physics laboratory, and (4) physics and chemistry laboratory. The experiments to be conducted by each facility are defined and the crew member requirements to accomplish the experiments are presented.

  14. Physics Faculty Perceptions of Research-based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Eleanor

    2016-03-01

    When research-based resources are well aligned with the perceived needs of faculty, faculty members will more readily take them up. We used phenomenographic interviews of ordinary physics faculty and department chairs to identify four families of issues that faculty have around research-based assessments (RBAs). First, many faculty are interested in using RBAs, but need help with the practicalities of administering RBAs: how to find them, which ones there are, and how to administer them. Second, at the same time, many faculty think that RBAs are limited and don't measure many of the things they care about, or aren't applicable in their classes. They want assessments to measure skills, perceptions, and specific concepts. Third, many faculty want to turn to communities of other faculty and experts to help them interpret their assessment results and suggest other ways to do assessment. They want to better understand their assessment results by comparing to others and interacting with faculty from other schools to learn about how they do assessment. Fourth, many faculty consider their courses in the broader contexts of accountability and their departments. They want help with assessment in these broader contexts. We also discuss how faculty members' roles in their departments and institutions influence their perceived wants and needs around assessment. Supported by NSF DUE-1256354, DUE-1256354, DUE-1347821, DUE-1347728.

  15. Progress report of a research program in computational physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guralnik, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    Task D's research is focused on the understanding of elementary particle physics through the techniques of quantum field theory. We make intensive use of computers to aid our research. During the last year we have made significant progress in understanding the weak interactions through the use of Monte Carlo methods as applied to the equations of quenched lattice QCD. We have launched a program to understand full (not quenched) lattice QCD on relatively large lattices using massively parallel computers. Because of our awareness that Monte Carlo methods might not be able to give a good solution to field theories with the computer power likely to be available to us for the forseeable future we have launched an entirely different numerical approach to study these problems. This ''Source Galerkin'' method is based on an algebraic approach to the field theoretic equations of motion and is (somewhat) related to variational and finite element techniques applied to a source rather than a coordinate space. The results for relatively simple problems are sensationally good. In particular, fermions can be treated in a way which allows them to retain their status as independent dynamical entities in the theory. 8 refs

  16. Experimental particle physics research at Texas Tech University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akchurin, Nural; Lee, Sung-Won; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The high energy physics group at Texas Tech University (TTU) concentrates its research efforts on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on generic detector R&D for future applications. Our research programs have been continuously supported by the US Department of Energy for over two decades, and this final report summarizes our achievements during the last grant period from May 1, 2012 to March 31, 2016. After having completed the Run 1 data analyses from the CMS detector, including the discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012, we concentrated on commissioning the CMS hadron calorimeter (HCAL) for Run 2, performing analyses of Run 2 data, and making initial studies and plans for the second phase of upgrades in CMS. Our research has primarily focused on searches for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics via dijets, monophotons, and monojets. We also made significant contributions to the analyses of the semileptonic Higgs decays and Standard Model (SM) measurements in Run 1. Our work on the operations of the CMS detector, especially the performance monitoring of the HCAL in Run 1, was indispensable to the experiment. Our team members, holding leadership positions in HCAL, have played key roles in the R&D, construction, and commissioning of these detectors in the last decade. We also maintained an active program in jet studies that builds on our expertise in calorimetry and algorithm development. In Run 2, we extended some of our analyses at 8 TeV to 13 TeV, and we also started to investigate new territory, e.g., dark matter searches with unexplored signatures. The objective of dual-readout calorimetry R&D was intended to explore (and, if possible, eliminate) the obstacles that prevent calorimetric detection of hadrons and jets with a comparable level of precision as we have grown accustomed to for electrons and photons. The initial prototype detector was successfully tested at the SPS/CERN in 2003-2004 and evolved over the

  17. Experimental particle physics research at Texas Tech University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akchurin, Nural [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Lee, Sung-Won [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Volobouev, Igor [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Wigmans, Richard [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2016-06-22

    The high energy physics group at Texas Tech University (TTU) concentrates its research efforts on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and on generic detector R&D for future applications. Our research programs have been continuously supported by the US Department of Energy for over two decades, and this final report summarizes our achievements during the last grant period from May 1, 2012 to March 31, 2016. After having completed the Run 1 data analyses from the CMS detector, including the discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012, we concentrated on commissioning the CMS hadron calorimeter (HCAL) for Run 2, performing analyses of Run 2 data, and making initial studies and plans for the second phase of upgrades in CMS. Our research has primarily focused on searches for Beyond Standard Model (BSM) physics via dijets, monophotons, and monojets. We also made significant contributions to the analyses of the semileptonic Higgs decays and Standard Model (SM) measurements in Run 1. Our work on the operations of the CMS detector, especially the performance monitoring of the HCAL in Run 1, was indispensable to the experiment. Our team members, holding leadership positions in HCAL, have played key roles in the R&D, construction, and commissioning of these detectors in the last decade. We also maintained an active program in jet studies that builds on our expertise in calorimetry and algorithm development. In Run 2, we extended some of our analyses at 8 TeV to 13 TeV, and we also started to investigate new territory, e.g., dark matter searches with unexplored signatures. The objective of dual-readout calorimetry R&D was intended to explore (and, if possible, eliminate) the obstacles that prevent calorimetric detection of hadrons and jets with a comparable level of precision as we have grown accustomed to for electrons and photons. The initial prototype detector was successfully tested at the SPS/CERN in 2003-2004 and evolved over the

  18. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

  19. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3)

  20. Actinide targets for fundamental research in nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, K.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Haas, R.; Mokry, Ch.; Runke, J.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Trautmann, N.

    2018-05-01

    Thin actinide layers deposited on various substrates are widely used as calibration sources in nuclear spectroscopy. Other applications include fundamental research in nuclear chemistry and -physics, e.g., the chemical and physical properties of super-heavy elements (SHE, Z > 103) or nuclear reaction studies with heavy ions. For the design of future nuclear reactors like fast-fission reactors and accelerator-driven systems for transmutation of nuclear waste, precise data for neutron absorption as well as neutron-induced fission cross section data for 242Pu with neutrons of different energies are of particular importance, requiring suitable Pu-targets. Another application includes studies of nuclear transitions in 229Th harvested as α-decay recoil product from a thin layer of its 233U precursor. For this, a thin and very smooth layer of 233U is used. We report here on the production of actinide layers mostly obtained by Molecular Plating (MP). MP is currently the only fabrication method in cases where the desired actinide material is available only in very limited amounts or possesses a high specific activity. Here, deposition is performed from organic solution applying a current density of 1-2 mA/cm2. Under these conditions target thicknesses of 500-1000 μg/cm2 are possible applying a single deposition step with deposition yields approaching 100 %. For yield determination α-particle spectroscopy, γ-spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis is routinely used. Layer homogeneity is checked with Radiographic Imaging. As an alternative technique to MP the production of thin lanthanide and actinide layers by the so-called "Drop on Demand"-technique applied e.g., in ink-jet printing is currently under investigation.

  1. Research in high energy theoretical physics: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavelli, L.J.; Harms, B.C.; Jones, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses many papers submitted in theoretical High Energy Physics by the Physics Department of the University of Alabama. Most papers cover superstring theory, parity violations, and particle decay

  2. Top 10 Research Questions Related to Children Physical Activity Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ang

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity…

  3. Well Researched, Yet Little Understood: Young Adults and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Donetta; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2005-01-01

    The authors present two beginning studies. One investigated the teaching-style preferences of young adults, and the other looked at physical activity trends within this age group. One key to understanding young adults and physical activity is to recognize the importance of participant cognition on physical activity patterns. From this…

  4. Advanced quantitative measurement methodology in physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    The ultimate goal of physics education research (PER) is to develop a theoretical framework to understand and improve the learning process. In this journey of discovery, assessment serves as our headlamp and alpenstock. It sometimes detects signals in student mental structures, and sometimes presents the difference between expert understanding and novice understanding. Quantitative assessment is an important area in PER. Developing research-based effective assessment instruments and making meaningful inferences based on these instruments have always been important goals of the PER community. Quantitative studies are often conducted to provide bases for test development and result interpretation. Statistics are frequently used in quantitative studies. The selection of statistical methods and interpretation of the results obtained by these methods shall be connected to the education background. In this connecting process, the issues of educational models are often raised. Many widely used statistical methods do not make assumptions on the mental structure of subjects, nor do they provide explanations tailored to the educational audience. There are also other methods that consider the mental structure and are tailored to provide strong connections between statistics and education. These methods often involve model assumption and parameter estimation, and are complicated mathematically. The dissertation provides a practical view of some advanced quantitative assessment methods. The common feature of these methods is that they all make educational/psychological model assumptions beyond the minimum mathematical model. The purpose of the study is to provide a comparison between these advanced methods and the pure mathematical methods. The comparison is based on the performance of the two types of methods under physics education settings. In particular, the comparison uses both physics content assessments and scientific ability assessments. The dissertation includes three

  5. Physics of Laser in Contemporary Visual Arts: the research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaa Ahmedien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This protocol articulates an ongoing PhD thesis in Laser Art as an independent artistic trend including its history, classification criteria, philosophical and aesthetical aspects. Via several analytical studies theoretically and practically, the thesis is going to prove that laser art actively contributes, as an independent artistic trend, to change the conceptual definition of the artistic material. On the other hand, it bridges the gap between the artistic context and the technical issues, in which the conceptual values became fully integrated into the physical properties of the medium (laser beam, therefore it became impossible to separate the idea and the material of the artwork from each other. Besides, the thesis reveals the potential hidden conceptual and philosophical dimensions of the holographic art as one of the most important branches of laser art. In advanced step, the research suggestes a new model of interactive holographic art based on neural controlling system, and how this advanced approach can lead us towards a new kind of the aesthetic values, in which participants effectively contribute neurologically to constituting the artwork.

  6. Pulsed power research at the institute of fluid physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianjun; Shi Jinshui; Cao Kefeng; Xie Weiping; Zhang Linwen; Wang Meng

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Fluid Physics was the earliest institution in China to engage in pulsed power research, covering areas such as the development of high power switches, linear induction accelerators, facilities for Z-pinch studies, pulsed X-ray machines, explosive magnetic compression technology, rep-rate pulsed power generation, time resolved diagnostic technology, and so on. The newly built Dragon-I facility (20 MeV, 2.5kA, 80 ns), currently the most advanced linear induction accelerator in the world, is described. The status of the Primary Test Stand (PTS, 8-10 MA, 130ns) for Z-pinch studies that is still under construction is also reported. The PTS consists of 24 modules based on the Marx generator-water PFL (pulse forming line) technology. The single module prototype has been tested successfully. Other progress on the rep-rate pulsed power generator, linear transfer driver, and time resolved diagnostic technology is also presented. (authors)

  7. Physical Research Laboratory radiocarbon 14C dates : CS-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, D.P.; Krishnamurthy, R.V.; Kusumgar, Sheela; Pant, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The 14 C dates of archaeological samples measured at the Radiocarbon Laboratory of the Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad are presented. Samples were converted into methane and measured in gas proportional counters. Ninety-five percent activity of NBS oxalic acid was used as modern standard. The dates in years B.P. are given for each sample based on the half-life values of 5568 +- 30 years and 5730 +- 40 years, the latter within parenthesis. The dates are not calibrated for 14 C/ 12 C variations. To convert the dates into AD/BC scale, 1950 AD should be used as reference year. A number of 14 C dates (PRL-81, -83, -67, -68) now confirm that the Painted Grey Ware culture extended upto the 3rd century BC. Some of the dates from Barkhera (PRL-113), Bateshwar (PRL-200), Bhimbetka (PRL-17) and Koldihawa (PRL-100, 101) are older than normally expected, probably indicative of some hitherto unknown basal cultures in these regions. 14 C dates on in situ Megalithic materials do not seem to go beyond 200 BC. (author)

  8. Research program in theoretical high-energy physics. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, D.; Fried, H.M.; Guralnik, G.S.

    1979-01-01

    Last year's research program dealt with a large range of topics in high energy theoretical physics. Included in the problems studied were: flavor mixing angles in flavor gauge theory; grand unification schemes; neutral current phenomenology; charmonium decays; perturbative aspects of soft hadronic phenomena within the framework of the dual topological expansion; Regge trajectory slopes and the shape of the inclusive spectra; bound states in quantum electrodynamics; calculations of the Lamb Shift and hyperfine splitting in hydrogen (and muonium) through order α(Zα) 6 ; perturbation theory resummation techniques; collective behavior of instantons in quantum chromodynamics; 1/N expansion and mean field expansion techniques (applied to the nonlinear sigma model, classical solutions to Yang-Mills theories, and renormalized four-Fermi models of weak interactions); semiclassical calculation of Z 1 (α) in scalar QED; group theoretic studies of spontaneous symmetry breaking; fibre bundles applied to the topological aspects of gauge theories; strong-coupling expansions (as an aspect of infrared behavior, as a systematic perturbation expansion with reference to lattice extrapolation, applied to classical statistical mechanics, applied to problems with nonquadratic kinetic energy terms, and in transfer matrix formulations); eikonal methods (three-body Coulomb scattering, quark-antiquark potentials); computer augmented solutions to quantum field theory; topological excitations in two-dimensional models and WKB approximation on a lattice. A list of publications is included

  9. Physics of Laser in Contemporary Visual Arts: the research protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaa Ahmedien

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This protocol articulates an ongoing PhD thesis in Laser Art as an independent artistic trend including its history, classification criteria, philosophical and aesthetical aspects. Via several analytical studies theoretically and practically, the thesis is going to prove that laser art actively contributes, as an independent artistic trend, to change the conceptual definition of the artistic material. On the other hand, it bridges the gap between the artistic context and the technical issues, in which the conceptual values became fully integrated into the physical properties of the medium (laser beam, therefore it became impossible to separate the idea and the material of the artwork from each other. Besides, the thesis reveals the potential hidden conceptual and philosophical dimensions of the holographic art as one of the most important branches of laser art. In advanced step, the research suggestes a new model of interactive holographic art based on neural controlling system, and how this advanced approach can lead us towards a new kind of the aesthetic values, in which participants effectively contribute neurologically to constituting the artwork.

  10. An ethnographic study: Becoming a physics expert in a biophysics research group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Idaykis

    Expertise in physics has been traditionally studied in cognitive science, where physics expertise is understood through the difference between novice and expert problem solving skills. The cognitive perspective of physics experts only create a partial model of physics expertise and does not take into account the development of physics experts in the natural context of research. This dissertation takes a social and cultural perspective of learning through apprenticeship to model the development of physics expertise of physics graduate students in a research group. I use a qualitative methodological approach of an ethnographic case study to observe and video record the common practices of graduate students in their biophysics weekly research group meetings. I recorded notes on observations and conduct interviews with all participants of the biophysics research group for a period of eight months. I apply the theoretical framework of Communities of Practice to distinguish the cultural norms of the group that cultivate physics expert practices. Results indicate that physics expertise is specific to a topic or subfield and it is established through effectively publishing research in the larger biophysics research community. The participant biophysics research group follows a learning trajectory for its students to contribute to research and learn to communicate their research in the larger biophysics community. In this learning trajectory students develop expert member competencies to learn to communicate their research and to learn the standards and trends of research in the larger research community. Findings from this dissertation expand the model of physics expertise beyond the cognitive realm and add the social and cultural nature of physics expertise development. This research also addresses ways to increase physics graduate student success towards their PhD. and decrease the 48% attrition rate of physics graduate students. Cultivating effective research

  11. A survey of research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baton, J.P.; Cohen-Tannoudji, G.

    1986-05-01

    These notes are devoted to the current trends in elementary particle physics. They are not intended for the training of experts in the field. After a brief historical survey, one discusses the difficulties which have made necessary to move from classical physics to relativistic quantum physics. The main concepts of this new theory are rapidly presented. The experimental methods are discussed within a few typical experiments, already performed or scheduled. The main questions which are still unsolved are rapidly mentioned [fr

  12. A survey of research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baton, J.P.; Cohen-Tannoudji, G.

    1986-10-01

    These notes are devoted to the current trends in elementary particle physics. They are not intended for the training of experts in the field. After a brief historical survey, one discusses the difficulties which have made necessary to move from classical physics to relativistic quantum physics. The main concepts of this new theory are rapidly presented. The experimental methods are discussed within a few typical experiments, already performed or scheduled. The main questions which are still unsolved are rapidly mentioned [fr

  13. Action Research as an Agent for Enhancing Teaching and Learning in Physical Education: A Physical Education Teacher's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Action research is a useful method for implementing change through its spiral of plan, act, observe, and reflect, but little research has been published on it in the area of physical education. The purpose of this intervention was to assess the effectiveness of action research as an agent of change and its impact on enhancing my…

  14. Some recent advances of shock wave physics research at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jing Fu Qian

    2002-01-01

    Progress made in recent years on three topics that have been investigated at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research are presented in this report. (1) A new equation of state (EOS) has been derived which can be used from a standard state to predict state variable change along an isobaric path. Good agreements between calculations for some representative metals using this new EOS and experiments have been found, covering a wide range from hundreds of MPa to hundreds of GPa and from ambient temperature to tens of thousands of GPa. (2) An empirical relation of Y/G = constant (Y is yield strength, G is shear modulus) at HT-HP has been reinvestigated and confirmed by shock wave experiment. 93W alloy was chosen as a model material. The advantage of this relation is that it is beneficial to formulate a kind of simplified constitutive equation for metallic solids under shock loading, and thus to faithfully describe the behaviours of shocked solids through hydrodynamic simulations. (3) An attempt...

  15. High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998 - June 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1 - June 30, 1996. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. List of Division publications and colloquia are included

  17. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-11-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1992--June 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  18. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1994-June 30, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  19. High Energy Physics Division. Semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1995-July 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included.

  20. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  1. High Energy Physics Division. Semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1995-July 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  2. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities July 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Schuur, C.; Wagner, R.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1997--December 31, 1997. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included

  3. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1992--December 30, 1992. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  4. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.; Moonier, P.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1994-05-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1993--December 31, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  5. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1994-June 30, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  6. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoessow, P.; Moonier, P.; Talaga, R.; Wagner, R.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1993--June 30, 1993. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  7. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.; Schoessow, P.; Talaga, R.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  8. High Energy Physics division semiannual report of research activities, January 1, 1998--June 30, 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Blair, R.; Bodwin, G. T.; Drake, G.; Goodman, M. C.; Guarino, V.; Klasen, M.; Lagae, J.-F.; Magill, S.; May, E. N.; Nodulman, L.; Norem, J.; Petrelli, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Repond, J.; Schoessow, P. V.; Sinclair, D. K.; Spinka, H. M.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.; Wagner, R.; White, A. R.; Yokosawa, A.; Zachos, C.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period of January 1, 1998 through June 30, 1998. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of Division publications and colloquia are included.

  9. NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry |

    Science.gov (United States)

    News | NREL 7 » NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry News Release: NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry January 10, 2007 The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. The Dec. 21 issue was titled The Arthur J. Nozik Festschrift (Volume 110

  10. The physics of global climate change: challenges for research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaxo, Paulo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada

    2009-07-01

    Full text: There are major issues in our scientific understanding of the functioning of our planet Earth. The growing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, changing in surface albedo, changes in distribution and lifetime of clouds, alteration in aerosol properties and distribution, are all key issues in the radiation balance that controls the climate of our planet. Earth is a non linear highly complex system. Since the industrial revolution, concentration of greenhouse gases, in particular carbon dioxide and methane have increase by 30 to 100%. The fraction of infrared radiation trapped in the atmosphere has increased by about 1.6 watts/m{sup 2}. This additional energy has increased the average temperature by 0.79 degrees centigrade, with certain regions. But, we know very little of the physics, chemistry and biology that controls emissions, sinks and effects in Earth climate. Every week new important scientific findings are published in this area, and models that could predict the future of Earth climate are quite primitive and lack key issues. The hard science of global change is closely associated with socio-economic issues. Humanity have taken the main control role on Earth climate, and the potential for an average increase in temperature of 3 to 5 degrees is large, although there are tentative to limit the average temperature growth to 2 degrees. But even with this ambitious target, Amazonia and the Arctic will probably be much hotter than 3-4 degrees, with important feedbacks in the climate system. The talk will deal with these issues and new research that is needed to increase our knowledge on how the climate of our planet works and which climate we could have in the next decades. (author)

  11. Physical Education and Children with CHARGE Syndrome: Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Haibach, Pamela; Schedlin, Haley

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Children with CHARGE syndrome often experience significantly delayed motor development, which affects their performance in many motor skills and physical activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the status of physical education provided to children with CHARGE syndrome. There were five main areas of focus: (1) physical…

  12. Linking Physical Climate Research and Economic Assessments of Mitigation Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainforth, David; Calel, Raphael

    2017-04-01

    Evaluating climate change policies requires economic assessments which balance the costs and benefits of climate action. A certain class of Integrated Assessment Models (IAMS) are widely used for this type of analysis; DICE, PAGE and FUND are three of the most influential. In the economics community there has been much discussion and debate about the economic assumptions implemented within these models. Two aspects in particular have gained much attention: i) the costs of damages resulting from climate change - the so-called damage function, and ii) the choice of discount rate applied to future costs and benefits. There has, however, been rather little attention given to the consequences of the choices made in the physical climate models within these IAMS. Here we discuss the practical aspects of the implementation of the physical models in these IAMS, as well as the implications of choices made in these physical science components for economic assessments[1]. We present a simple breakdown of how these IAMS differently represent the climate system as a consequence of differing underlying physical models, different parametric assumptions (for parameters representing, for instance, feedbacks and ocean heat uptake) and different numerical approaches to solving the models. We present the physical and economic consequences of these differences and reflect on how we might better incorporate the latest physical science understanding in economic models of this type. [1] Calel, R. and Stainforth D.A., "On the Physics of Three Integrated Assessment Models", Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, in press.

  13. Annual progress report of the physical chemistry department. Basic research 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Basic research for 1987 in physical chemistry of the French Atomic Energy Commission are reviewed. Topics include molecular chemistry, isotopic geochemistry, molecular photophysics, laser photochemistry, solid and surface physical chemistry. A list of publications and thesis is given [fr

  14. Institutional supporting research highlights in physics and mathematics, fiscal year 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil, J.C.

    1984-03-01

    Highlights of FY 1983 Institutional Supporting Research and Development activities within the six Physics and Mathematics divisions and the Center for Nonlinear Studies are presented. The highlights are but a fraction of the ISRD activities in the Directorate and are intended to be a representative sample of progress in the various research areas. FY 1983 ISRD activities within the Physics and Mathematics divisions included both basic and applied research and were divided into 11 research areas: mathematics and numerical methods, low-energy nuclear physics, medium- and high-energy nuclear physics, atomic and molecular physics, solid-state physics and materials science, fluid dynamics, plasma physics and intense particle beam theory, astrophysics and space physics, particle transport methods, accelerator and fusion technology, and biophysics. Highlights from each of these areas are presented

  15. Innovative quantum technologies for microgravity fundamental physics and biological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, I. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a new technology program, within the fundamental physics, focusing on four quantum technology areas: quantum atomics, quantum optics, space superconductivity and quantum sensor technology, and quantum field based sensor and modeling technology.

  16. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B M.K. [Principal Investigator, ed.; Goetz, J; Lapik, A; Korolija, M; Prakhov, S; Starostin, A [ed.

    2011-05-18

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup 0}, 2{pi}{sup }0, 3{pi}{sup 0}, {eta} , {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4 . It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G-parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta} ,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta} and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular

  17. Nuclear physics research requirements for electron and heavy ion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, E.

    1983-03-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in a variety of new machines intended to probe atomic nuclei for hadronic and quark aspects which lie beyond the familiar shell model view of nuclei. This paper gives the physics perspective within which the proposals for such machines have arisen and discusses the two classes of tools - high energy cw electron machines and relativistic heavy ion machines - which lie at opposite ends of the arsenal being gathered for the pursuit of QCD in nuclei. The electron machines present a reasoned analytic approach to the simplest systems and the heavy ion machines a major thrust for starting new physics in the quark-gluon sea

  18. Computer algebra as a research tool in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouffe, J.M.

    1985-04-01

    The progress of computer algebra observed during these last years has had certainly an impact in physics. I want to precise the role of these new techniques in this application domain and to analyze their present limitations. In Section 1, I describe briefly the use of algebraic manipulation programs at the elementary level. The numerical and symbolic solutions of problems are compared in Section 2. Section 3 is devoted to a prospective about the use of computer algebra at the highest level, as an ''intelligent'' system. I recall in Section 4 what is required from a system to be used in physics

  19. Definitions of Physical Concepts: A Study of Physics Teachers' Knowledge and Views. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal; Lehavi, Yaron

    2006-01-01

    A study was made of the ability of a population of high-school physics teachers to define physics concepts and of their views regarding the importance of such definitions. It was found possible to arrange the definitions accumulated in categories, and the classification so obtained was consonant with that of the philosophy of science. Although the…

  20. PHYSICS AND SAFETY ANALYSIS FOR THE NIST RESEARCH REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHENG, L.; HANSON, A.; DIAMOND, D.; XU, J.; CAREW, J.; RORER, D.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed reactor physics and safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D 2 O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analyses provide an update to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport calculations were performed with the MCNP code to determine the safety parameters for the NBSR. The core depletion and determination of the fuel compositions were performed with MONTEBURNS. MCNP calculations were performed to determine the beginning, middle, and end-of-cycle power distributions, moderator temperature coefficient, and shim safety arm, beam tube and void reactivity worths. The calculational model included a plate-by-plate description of each fuel assembly, axial mid-plane water gap, beam tubes and the tubular geometry of the shim safety arms. The time-dependent analysis of the primary loop was determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. The statistical analysis used to assure protection from critical heat flux (CHF) was performed using a Monte Carlo simulation of the uncertainties contributing to the CHF calculation. The power distributions used to determine the local fuel conditions and margin to CHF were determined with MCNP. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow resulting from loss of electrical power, (4) loss-of-flow resulting from a primary pump seizure, (5) loss-of-flow resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve, (6) loss-of-flow resulting from failure of both shutdown cooling pumps and (7) misloading of a fuel element. In both the startup and maximum reactivity insertion accidents, the core

  1. Theoretical research in intermediate energy nuclear physics: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress that has been made on the following problems: a numerical calculation of Skyrmiron scattering; (e,e'p) at high momentum transfer; spin-orbit nucleon-nucleon potential from Skyrme model; pionic atom anomaly; and field theory problems. The problems deal with various topics in intermediate-energy nuclear physics

  2. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of the physical fitness and coronary heart disease risk factors of white females in the Zululand area that attend health and fitness clubs · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Marius F. Coetsee, 13-22. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajrs.v25i1.25827 ...

  3. High School Student Physics Research Experience Yields Positive Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, K. R.; Walters, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    All high school students that wish to continue onto college are seeking opportunities to be competitive in the college market. They participate in extra-curricular activities which are seen to foster creativity and the skills necessary to do well in the college environment. In the case of students with an interest in physics, participating in a…

  4. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1990-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek)

  5. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1991-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek).

  6. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1991-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek)

  7. research proposal to the national accelerator centre: physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COWLEY

    the study by Moussa however differ from this study since building material was .... The efficiency calibrations measurements of the system were done at a standard ..... underlying geochemical and -physical principles”. ... sites – a case study from East Sinai, Egypt”. ... “A new high background radiation area in the geothermal.

  8. Analysis of Doctoral research at the Department of Physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve (12) studies were reviewed over the 25-year period which cut across a broad spectrum of areas of study in Physical Education and Sport ranging from Anthropology and Sports History, Didactics, Sports Administration, Outdoor Education, Social-Psychology of Sports, fitness and health-related aspects. Soccer ...

  9. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1992-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek).

  10. Solid state physics advances in research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrenreich, Henry

    1994-01-01

    The latest volume in the world renowned Solid State Physics series marks the fruition of Founding Editor David Turnbull''s outstanding tenure as series editor. Volume 47 presents five articles written by leadingexperts on areas including crystal-melt interfacial tension, order-disorder transformation in alloys, brittle matrix composites, surfaces and interfaces, and magnetoresistance.

  11. Research in elementary particle physics. [Ohio State Univ. , Columbus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  12. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion research 1988. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Volume 3 of the proceedings of the twelfth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion, held in Nice, France, 12-19 October, 1988, contains papers presented on inertial fusion. Direct and indirect laser implosion experiments, programs of laser construction, computer modelling of implosions and resulting plasmas, and light ion beam fusion experiments are discussed. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Argonne National Laboratory, High Energy Physics Division, semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory in the following areas: Experimental High Energy Physics; Theoretical High Energy Physics; Experimental Facilities Research; Accelerator Research and Development; and SSC Detector Research and Development

  14. Physical protection of radioactive materials in a University Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1998-01-01

    Although nuclear research centers attached to universities usually do not keep large inventories of radioactive or special nuclear material, the mentioned material has still to be under strict surveillance and safeguards if applicable. One problem in such research centers is the large and frequent fluctuation of persons - mainly students, scientists or visiting guest scientists - using such materials for basic or applied research. In the present paper an overview of protective actions in such a research institute will be given and experience of more than 36 years will be presented. (author)

  15. Enriching Gender in Physics Education Research: A Binary Past and a Complex Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Adrienne L.; Cid, Ximena C.; Blue, Jennifer; Barthelemy, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we draw on previous reports from physics, science education, and women's studies to propose a more nuanced treatment of gender in physics education research (PER). A growing body of PER examines gender differences in participation, performance, and attitudes toward physics. We have three critiques of this work: (i) it does not…

  16. DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics October 3, 2006 WASHINGTON, DC Space Flight Center for co-winning the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. "I offer my congratulations to with the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics," Secretary Bodman said. "The groundbreaking work of

  17. Overview of experimental research on nuclear structure in department of modern applied physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shengjiang

    1999-01-01

    The experimental research on nuclear structure in Department of Modern Applied Physics, Tsinghua University has been summarized. The main research results in high spin states of nuclear structure, as well as some low spin states, have been reported

  18. Recent LAMPF [Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility] research using muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    In addition to the core programs in nuclear and particle physics, diverse experiments have been carried out that address interdisciplinary and applied topics at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). These include muon-spin-relaxation experiments to study magnetic dynamics in spin glasses and electronic structure in heavy-fermion superconductors; muon channeling experiments to provide information on pion stopping sites in crystals; tomographic density reconstruction studies using proton energy loss; and radiation-effects experiments to explore microstructure evolution and to characterize materials for fusion devices and high-intensity accelerators. Finally, the catalysis of the d-t fusion reaction using negative muons has been extensively investigated with some surprising results including a stronger than linear dependence of the mesomolecular formation rate on target density and the observation of 150 fusions per muon under certain conditions. Recent results in those programs involving pions and muons interacting with matter are discussed

  19. Physical methods in air pollution research: The second decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahill, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    The ''Second Decade'' in the application of physical techniques to air pollution has been a profound change in the understanding and capabilities. A great deal remains to be done with the new tools. But what about the next phase? The author feels that it will probably involve greater chemical and biological emphasis, as opposed to merely elemental analysis. But this will not be easy, and one will again need an influx of new people and ideas into the field, most likely from the biological, organic chemical, and medical communities. The author predicts that because of the inherent complexity of the problem, it will not happen in just 10 years. In the meantime, one will somehow manage to keep busy rediscovering atmospheric aerosols yet again, but with the new eyes the improved physical methods have gained

  20. Teaching Einsteinian physics at schools: part 3, review of research outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tejinder; Blair, David; Moschilla, John; Stannard, Warren; Zadnik, Marjan

    2017-11-01

    This paper reviews research results obtained from Einsteinian physics programs run by different instructors with Years 6, 9, 10 and 11 students using the models and analogies described in parts 1 and 2. The research aimed to determine whether it is possible to teach Einsteinian physics and to measure the changes in student attitudes to physics engendered by introducing the modern concepts that underpin technology today. Results showed that students easily coped with the concepts of Einsteinian physics, and considered that they were not too young for the material presented. Importantly, in all groups, girls improved their attitude to physics considerably more than the boys, generally achieving near parity with the boys.

  1. Physical sciences HDR (Accreditation to supervise research) diploma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocellier, P.

    1987-09-01

    This document briefly reports the educational and professional course, as well as the activities of a researcher in the field of nuclear techniques for surface analysis and micro-analysis. These researches deal with the analytical development of surface characterization analytical tools for solid media in relationship with different application domains: corrosion, volcanology, biology, material science, reprocessing, and so on

  2. Health physics aspects of a research reactor fuel shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    In June 1982, 92 irradiated fuel elements were shipped from the Oregon State University TRIGA Reactor to Westinghouse Hanford Corporation to be used in the Fuel Materials Examination Facility, This paper describes some of the health physics aspects of the planning, preparation and procedures associated with that shipment. In particular, the lessons learned are described in order that the benefits of the experience gained may be readily available to other small institutions. (author)

  3. Theoretical high energy physics research at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.; Martinec, E.J.; Sachs, R.G.

    1993-04-01

    Brief narrative descriptions of work performed are given on numerous topics including the following: CP violation, Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa matrix, and B physics; radiative corrections and electroweak observables; heavy quark symmetry; heavy meson spectroscopy; composite models of quarks and leptons; supersymmetric quantum mechanics, inverse scattering, and the vertex operator; cosmological constraints on lepton-number violation in SO(10) models; black hole evaporation; the light cone in string theory; surfaces in the 3D Ising model; and conformal field theories

  4. Proceedings of the tenth biennial national conference of Physics Academy of North East: recent advances in physics research and its relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutia, Simanta; Saikia, Shantu

    2017-06-01

    This conference provided a platform to discuss the recent developments in Physics research in different fields which includes high energy astrophysics, condensed matter physics, electronics, spectroscopy, atmospheric sciences, cosmology, general physics etc. The papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  5. Simplified Physics Based Models Research Topical Report on Task #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Ganesh, Priya

    2014-10-31

    We present a simplified-physics based approach, where only the most important physical processes are modeled, to develop and validate simplified predictive models of CO2 sequestration in deep saline formation. The system of interest is a single vertical well injecting supercritical CO2 into a 2-D layered reservoir-caprock system with variable layer permeabilities. We use a set of well-designed full-physics compositional simulations to understand key processes and parameters affecting pressure propagation and buoyant plume migration. Based on these simulations, we have developed correlations for dimensionless injectivity as a function of the slope of fractional-flow curve, variance of layer permeability values, and the nature of vertical permeability arrangement. The same variables, along with a modified gravity number, can be used to develop a correlation for the total storage efficiency within the CO2 plume footprint. Similar correlations are also developed to predict the average pressure within the injection reservoir, and the pressure buildup within the caprock.

  6. Ettore Majorana unpublished research notes on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Recami, E; Van der Merwe, A; Battiston, R

    2009-01-01

    The editors of this volume bring to life a major part of Ettore Majorana’s work that up to now was not accessible to the general audience. These are the contents of the Quaderni (notebooks) of Ettore Majorana, edited and translated in English. Ettore Majorana had an astounding talent for Physics that made an impression on all the colleagues who had the opportunity to know him. Enrico Fermi, who took him in his group when he was a student, ranked him with Galilei and Newton. Ettore Majorana’s career was cut short in 1938, as he mysteriously disappeared at the age of 32, leaving many unpublished works. This book reveals an interesting perspective over the points of view, the interests, the approach to physical problems of this great physicist and it shows that he had advanced his comprehension of physics to levels that were only reached by other physicists ten years after, or even later. The editors have inserted minimal text, in order to leave the original calculations by Majorana intact, and at the same t...

  7. Research of Simulation in Character Animation Based on Physics Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer 3D character animation essentially is a product, which is combined with computer graphics and robotics, physics, mathematics, and the arts. It is based on computer hardware and graphics algorithms and related sciences rapidly developed new technologies. At present, the mainstream character animation technology is based on the artificial production of key technologies and capture frames based on the motion capture device technology. 3D character animation is widely used not only in the production of film, animation, and other commercial areas but also in virtual reality, computer-aided education, flight simulation, engineering simulation, military simulation, and other fields. In this paper, we try to study physics based character animation to solve these problems such as poor real-time interaction that appears in the character, low utilization rate, and complex production. The paper deeply studied the kinematics, dynamics technology, and production technology based on the motion data. At the same time, it analyzed ODE, PhysX, Bullet, and other variety of mainstream physics engines and studied OBB hierarchy bounding box tree, AABB hierarchical tree, and other collision detection algorithms. Finally, character animation based on ODE is implemented, which is simulation of the motion and collision process of a tricycle.

  8. Progress report. [Research in theoretical nuclear and subnuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Sergei Ananyan has completed one nice piece of nuclear physics on 'Electroweak Processes Involving (0 + 0) Excitations in Nuclei' and has written this work up for publication. He is well into his main thesis problem on weak axial vector exchange currents and already has some very interesting new results. Bryan Barmore is now finishing numerical calculations on the problem of radiating meson fields in relativistic heavy ion collisions. Gary Prezeau has just started on the problem of chiral QHD with vector mesons. Gary should finish his Ph.D. in 1998. A PC has been purchased for the group through CEBAF and they are now tied into the CEBAF computer system., They have organized a Nuclear Theory Study Group in the Department and last year they worked through the books on 'Computational Nuclear Physics.' Next year they will run a series on effective field theories and chiral perturbation theory. Tod Bachman just completed a senior thesis on relativistic Hartree calculations of the newly-found doubly magic nuclei 100 Sn and 132 Sn. The book on 'Theoretical Nuclear and Subnuclear Physics' has now been published by Oxford Press. Also included here is the proposal for renewal of the contract

  9. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Advances in Nuclear Physics. Fifty Years of Institutional Physics Research in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenaru, Dorin; Stoica, Sabin

    2000-01-01

    This Symposium was devoted to the cerebration of 50 years of Institutional Physics Research in Romania. The inaugural talk was given by professor W. Greiner on development in fission, fusion, cluster radioactivity and the extension of the periodic system of elements. Seven divisions followed on the items: super heavy nuclei (4 talks); new fission modes (4 talks); astrophysics and cosmic rays (5 talks); particle and high energy physics (6 talks); hadronic matter (6 talks); nuclear structure and reactions (13 talks); atomic physics (4 talks); applications and history. Many of these talks highlighted the substantial Romanian contributions to the scientific achievements in these fields

  10. Inspection methods for physical protection Task III review of other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Task I of this project, the current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) position-on physical security practices and procedures at research reactors were reviewed. In the second task, a sampling of the physical security plans was presented and the three actual reactor sites described in the security plans were visited. The purpose of Task III is to review other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors. During this phase, the actions, procedures and policies of two domestic and two foreign agencies other than the NRC that relate to the research reactor community were examined. The agencies examined were: International Atomic Energy Agency; Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board; Department of Energy; and American Nuclear Insurers

  11. Physical chemistry research for engineering and applied sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Eli M; Pethrick, Richard A; Zaikov, Gennady E

    2015-01-01

    PrefaceRegularity of Oxidation of Waste Fibrous and Film Materials of Polyethylene and Polypropylene: A Research Note; M. V. Bazunova, S. V. Kolesov, R. F. Tukhvatullin, E. I. Kulish, G. E. ZaikovA Research Note on Creation of ?arbon-Polymer Nanocomposites with Polyethylene as a Binder; Sergei V. Kolesov, Marina V. Bazunova, Elena I. Kulish, Denis R. Valiev, and Gennady E. ZaikovA Research Note on the Influence of Hybrid Antioxidants Ichphans on the Structure of Liposome Lipid Bilayer; E. Yu. Parshina, L. Ya. Gendel', and A. B. RubinDynamically Vulcanized Thermoelastoplastics Based on Butadien

  12. Annual report of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, for fiscal 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This annual report describes the abstracts of researches and oral presentations and papers reported as the results for fiscal 1998 in each laboratory of RIKEN (the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research). Moreover, the themes of special project funding for basic science, grant research, contract research, industrial properties, research subjects of special postdoctoral researchers and junior research associate and technology research subjects of technology research fellow are inserted. The abstract of researches, oral presentations and publications reported by Frontier Research Program, Brain Science Institute, Riken and Riken Genomic Science Center are contained. Riken Symposia and Symposia Sponsored by Riken are explained. (S.Y.)

  13. Research priorities for child and adolescent physical activity and sedentary behaviours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillis, Lauren; Tomkinson, Grant; Olds, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The quantity and quality of studies in child and adolescent physical activity and sedentary behaviour have rapidly increased, but research directions are often pursued in a reactive and uncoordinated manner.......The quantity and quality of studies in child and adolescent physical activity and sedentary behaviour have rapidly increased, but research directions are often pursued in a reactive and uncoordinated manner....

  14. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R ampersand D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC

  15. High Energy Physics: Report of research accomplishments and future goals, FY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-05

    This report discusses high energy physics research in the following areas: Research in theoretical physics; phenomenology; experimental computer facility at Caltech; Beijing BES; MACRO; CLEO II; SLD; L3 at LEP; the B Factory R & D Program; SSC GEM Detector; and a high resolution barium fluoride calorimeter for the SSC.

  16. Research and development activities of the Neutron Physics Division for the period January 1977-December 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanadham, M.; Joneja, O.P.

    1979-01-01

    The research and development programmes of the Neutron Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, for the period 1977-1978 are outlined. The fields covered include reactor (neutron) physics, fusion and plasma neutronics, biological and high precision crystallography, solid state phenomena and seismology as well as the associated workshop facilities. (K.B.)

  17. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF THERMO-PHYSICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL INTERNALS OF BIO-DIESEL FUEL

    OpenAIRE

    V. N. Goryachkin; A. V. Ivaschenko

    2010-01-01

    The conducted researches are related to transfer of diesel engines to biodiesel fuel. The technique and results of an experimental research of thermo-physical and physical-and-chemical properties of biodiesel fuel as well as mixes of biodiesel fuel with the petroleum one are presented.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF THERMO-PHYSICAL AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL INTERNALS OF BIO-DIESEL FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Goryachkin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The conducted researches are related to transfer of diesel engines to biodiesel fuel. The technique and results of an experimental research of thermo-physical and physical-and-chemical properties of biodiesel fuel as well as mixes of biodiesel fuel with the petroleum one are presented.

  19. Research and development activities of the Neutron Physics Division for the period January 1980 - December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, T.K.; Bhakay-Tamhane, S.

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of the research and development (R and D) activities of the Neutron Physics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during January - December 1980 are summarised. The R and D activities are in the fields of critical and subcritical fission systems, the plasma focus device, applied neutron physics, neutron and X-ray crystallography, materials physics and seismology. (M.G.B.)

  20. Theoretical research in intermediate-energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses progress that has been made on the following six problems: (1) final state interactions in (e,e'p) at high momentum transfer; (2) a numerical calculation of skyrmion-antiskyrmion annihilation; (3) pion-nucleus interactions above 0.5 GeV/c; (4) pionic atom anomaly; (5) baryon interactions in Skyrme model; and (6) large N c quantum hydrodynamics. The problems deal with various topics in intermediate-energy nuclear physics. Since we plan to continue the investigation of these problems in the third year, we describe the plan of the investigation together

  1. Data presentation options to manage variability in physical activity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Diego; Miller, Bryon G; Samaha, Andrew L; Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents seven tactics for managing the variability evident in some physical activity data. High levels of variability in daily step-count data from pedometers or accelerometers can make typical visual inspection difficult. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to discuss several strategies that might facilitate the visual interpretation of highly variable data. The seven strategies discussed in this paper are phase mean and median lines, daily average per week, weekly cumulative, proportion of baseline, 7-day moving average, change point detection, and confidence intervals. We apply each strategy to a data set and discuss the advantages and disadvantages. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  2. System for measurements and data processing in neutron physics researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadashevich, V.I.; Kondurov, I.A.; Nikolaev, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.F.

    1976-01-01

    A system of measuring and computing means created for automation of studies in the field of the neutron physics is discussed. Within the framework of this system each experiment is provided with its individual measuring station which consists of a set of analog and digital modules implemented in accordance with the CAMAC standard. On the higher level of this system there are measuring-computing centres (MCC) which simultaneously serve a number of physical installations. These MCCs are based on ''Minsk-22'' computers whose computational facilities are used for the preliminary processing and for creation of temporary data archives. In its turn, all the MCCs are users of the time-sharing system on the basis of the ''Minsk-32'' computers. This system extends possibilities for user's fast data processing, archive creation and provides transfer of required information to the main computing system based on the BESM-6 computer. Transfer of information and preliminary processing are performed by remote terminals with the help of a special directive language

  3. High Energy Physics Research with the CMS Experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, Gail G.

    2013-01-01

    The highlight of our last budget period, June 1, 2010, to May 31, 2013, was the discovery of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), announced on July 4, 2012, and for which Francois Englert and Peter Higgs were awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics on October 8, 2013. The Higgs boson was postulated in 1964 to explain how elementary particles obtain mass and was the missing piece of the Standard Model. However, the Standard Model does not describe everything that we know. There are many unanswered questions, such as how can the Higgs boson have the mass that we have observed, are there more Higgs bosons, why is there more matter than antimatter, and what is the invisible dark matter, which constitutes about 85% of the matter in the universe. Our group played a significant role in the discovery of the Higgs boson and in subsequent analyses. We also carried out searches for new physics, in ways that could help elucidate some of the remaining questions. Our role in the CMS detector focused on the Tracker, a silicon strip outer tracker and pixel inner tracker.

  4. Research on effectiveness assessment programs for physical protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik; Ham, Taekyu [Korea Institute of Nuclear Non-proliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    PPS (Physical Protection System) is an integrated set of procedures, installation and human resources to protect valuable assets from physical attack of potential adversaries. Since nuclear facilities or radioactive materials can be attractive targets for terrorists, PPS should be installed and maintained throughout the entire lifecycle of nuclear energy systems. One of key ingredients for effective protection is a reliable assessment procedure of the PPS capability. Due to complexity of possible threat categories and pathways, several pathway analysis programs have been developed to ease analysis or visualization. ASSESS using ASD approach runs fast and adopts a relatively simple modeling process for facility elements. But uncertainty due to assumptions used in modeling might complicate the interpretation of results. On the other hand, 2D pathway program such as TESS can utilize more self-consistent detection probability and delay time since actual pathway on 2D map is available. Also, this pathway visualization helps users understand analysis result more intuitively. But, in general, 2D pathway programs require strong computational power and careful optimization. Another possible difference between two approaches is response force deployment and RFT.

  5. Research on effectiveness assessment programs for physical protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Janghoon; Yoo, Hosik; Ham, Taekyu

    2015-01-01

    PPS (Physical Protection System) is an integrated set of procedures, installation and human resources to protect valuable assets from physical attack of potential adversaries. Since nuclear facilities or radioactive materials can be attractive targets for terrorists, PPS should be installed and maintained throughout the entire lifecycle of nuclear energy systems. One of key ingredients for effective protection is a reliable assessment procedure of the PPS capability. Due to complexity of possible threat categories and pathways, several pathway analysis programs have been developed to ease analysis or visualization. ASSESS using ASD approach runs fast and adopts a relatively simple modeling process for facility elements. But uncertainty due to assumptions used in modeling might complicate the interpretation of results. On the other hand, 2D pathway program such as TESS can utilize more self-consistent detection probability and delay time since actual pathway on 2D map is available. Also, this pathway visualization helps users understand analysis result more intuitively. But, in general, 2D pathway programs require strong computational power and careful optimization. Another possible difference between two approaches is response force deployment and RFT

  6. Research on condensed matter and atomic physics using major experimental facilities and devices: Physics, chemistry, biology. Reports on results. Vol. 2. 3. Solid state physics and materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report in three volumes substantiates the contents of the programme survey published in September 1989. The progress reports cover the following research areas: Vol. I, (1). Atomic and molecular physics - free atoms, molecules, macromolecules, clusters, matrix-isolated atoms and molecules. (2) Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces - epitaxy, surface structure, adsorption, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, thin films, synthetic layer structure. Vol. II, (3). Solid-state physics, and materials science -structural research, lattice dynamics, magnetic structure and dynamics, electronic states; load; spin and pulse density fluctuations; diffusion and internal motion, defects, unordered systems and liquids. Vol. III, (4). Chemistry - bonding and structure, kinetics and reaction mechanisms, polymer research, analysis and synthesis. (5). Biology, - structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules, membrane and cell biology. (6) Development of methods and instruments - neutron sources, synchrotron sources, special accelerators, research with interlinked systems and devices. (orig.) [de

  7. Nuclear Physics Research Activity In Vietnam During Period From 2005 To 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Duc Thiep

    2008-01-01

    During the recent years though the difficult conditions as the limit in research budget, the lack in experimental facilities and in manpower, the Nuclear Physics Research in Vietnam still continues to develop and has achieved promising results. This expresses the efforts from the Government as well as from the nuclear physics scientists. In this report we would like to present the Nuclear Physics Research Activity and the achieved results in Vietnam during period from 2005 to 2007 in following directions: Nuclear Reaction and Structure, Nuclear Matter and Nuclear Data, Nuclear Reactor Physics, Nuclear Physics Research based on Accelerators, Physics of Cosmic Rays, Nuclear Physics Related Researches. The report also concerns the problems of manpower, the joining of research institutes in the Country and the expansion of international collaborations in the coming period of the Nuclear Physics Research Activity. The Report was prepared mainly on the basis of the reports that will be presented at the 7th National Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology, held from 30-31 August 2007 in Danang city. (author)

  8. Crystal Growth and Other Materials Physical Researches in Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mingxiang

    Material science researches in space environment are based on reducing the effects of buoyancy driven transport, the effects of atomic oxygen, radiation, extremes of heat and cold and the ultrahigh vacuum, so as to unveil the underlying fundamental phenomena, lead maybe to new potential materials or new industrial processes and develop space techniques. Currently, research program on materials sciences in Chinese Manned Space Engineering (CMSE) is going on. More than ten projects related to crystal growth and materials processes are selected as candidates to be executed in Shenzhou spacecraft, Tiangong Space Laboratory and Chinese Space Station. In this talk, we will present some examples of the projects, which are being prepared and executed in the near future flight tasks. They are both basic and applied research, from discovery to technology.

  9. Connecting Physical University Spaces with Research-Based Education Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnell, Brent

    2017-01-01

    This paper looks at the link between enhancing education and ensuring an innovative fit-for-purpose estate. It argues that a nuanced approach and joined-up dialogue is needed between university staff whose remit covers these areas. Drawing from fifteen semi-structured interviews with students and staff at a research-intensive university in London,…

  10. Experimental Research at the Intensity Frontier in High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshak, Marvin L. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-30

    This Final Report describes DOE-supported Intensity Frontier research by the University of Minnesota during the interval April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014. Primary activities included the MINOS, NOvA and LBNE Experiments and Heavy Quark studies at BES III.

  11. Accelerating complex for basic researches in the nuclear physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovbnya, A.N.; Guk, I.S.; Kononenko, S.G.; Peev, F.A.; Tarasenko, A.S.; Botman, J.I.M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2003 in NSC KIPT was begun the work on development the project of accelerator, base facility IHEPNP NSC KIPT electron recirculator SALO. The accelerator will be disposed in target hall of accelerator LU 2000 complex. It is projected first of all as facility for basic researches in the field of

  12. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Talent identification and development in youth rugby players: a research review · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. EJ Spamer. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sajrs.v31i2.46332 ...

  13. ECR-based atomic collision physics research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, F.W.; Bannister, M.E.; Hale, J.W.; Havener, C.C.

    1997-01-01

    After a brief summary of the present capability and configuration of the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF), and of upcoming upgrades and expansions, the presently on-line atomic collisions experiments are described. In the process, the utility of intense, cw ion beams extracted from ECR ion sources for low-signal rate experiments is illustrated

  14. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  15. Report on Research in Experimental High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusack, Roger W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Cushman, Priscilla [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Poling, Ronald [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-01-06

    In the past three years the groups supported by the DOE have all made significant progress and posted major successes. The Minnesota CMS group has played leading roles in five data analyses and has had major roles in detector operations, the data management and the detector upgrades that are planned for for the LHC and those that are planned for the high-luminosity LHC. The CDMS-II experiment held the lead in WIMP sensitivity over the last decade, and is still the most sensitive detector in the world in the low WIMP mass region, with a recent 3σ hint of 8 GeV/c2 WIMP candidates in the silicon data. SuperCDMS, with three orders of magnitude better electron recoil background rejection, has been collecting data since October 2011. Since all dark matter experiments require a better understanding of neutron backgrounds to make further advances in sensitivity, Cushman has expanded the Minnesota effort on backgrounds to the national level, where she is leading a coordinated effort in neutron simulations for underground physics. The work of Mandic on 100 mm detectors both for Super-CDMS and beyond has advanced rapidly. Also at the Intensity Frontier, the BESIII experiment has had a successful year of operation largely focused on searches for and studies of new "charmonium-like" states above DD threshold. At least one new state has been observed so far, with hints of others. An intensive effort to understand their nature and gain new insight into the strong interaction continues. BESIII has also produced a large number of other results in charmonium decay and light-hadronic physics.

  16. Cognitive development in introductory physics: A research-based approach to curriculum reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodorescu, Raluca Elena

    This project describes the research on a classification of physics problems in the context of introductory physics courses. This classification, called the Taxonomy of Introductory Physics Problems (TIPP), relates physics problems to the cognitive processes required to solve them. TIPP was created for designing and clarifying educational objectives, for developing assessments that can evaluate individual component processes of the problem-solving process, and for guiding curriculum design in introductory physics courses, specifically within the context of a "thinking-skills" curriculum. TIPP relies on the following resources: (1) cognitive research findings adopted by physics education research, (2) expert-novice research discoveries acknowledged by physics education research, (3) an educational psychology taxonomy for educational objectives, and (4) various collections of physics problems created by physics education researchers or developed by textbook authors. TIPP was used in the years 2006--2008 to reform the first semester of the introductory algebra-based physics course (called Phys 11) at The George Washington University. The reform sought to transform our curriculum into a "thinking-skills" curriculum that trades "breadth for depth" by focusing on fewer topics while targeting the students' cognitive development. We employed existing research on the physics problem-solving expert-novice behavior, cognitive science and behavioral science findings, and educational psychology recommendations. Our pedagogy relies on didactic constructs such as the GW-ACCESS problem-solving protocol, learning progressions and concept maps that we have developed and implemented in our introductory physics course. These tools were designed based on TIPP. Their purpose is: (1) to help students build local and global coherent knowledge structures, (2) to develop more context-independent problem-solving abilities, (3) to gain confidence in problem solving, and (4) to establish

  17. The first Italian doctorate (PhD Course) in Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marisa; Santi, Lorenzo

    2008-05-01

    The first PhD Italian course in Physics Education Research in Udine aims to qualify young researchers and teachers coming from all the Italian groups of research in the field. It becomes a context for developing research projects carried out following parallel research lines on: Teaching/Learning paths for didactic innovation, cognitive research, ICT for strategies to overcome conceptual knots in physics; E-learning for personalization; d) Computer on-line experiments and modelling; e) Teacher formation and training; f) Informal learning in science.

  18. Nuclear physics and heavy element research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Mark A; Ahle, L E; Becker, J A; Bernshein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Burke, J T; Dashdorj, D; Henderson, R A; Hurst, A M; Kenneally, Jacqueline M; Lesher, S R; Moody, K J; Nelson, S L; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Scielzo, N D; Shaughnessy, D A; Sheets, S A; Stoeffl, W; Stoyer, N J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore (United States)

    2009-12-31

    This paper highlights some of the current basic nuclear physics research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The work at LLNL concentrates on investigating nuclei at the extremes. The Experimental Nuclear Physics Group performs research to improve our understanding of nuclei, nuclear reactions, nuclear decay processes and nuclear astrophysics; an expertise utilized for important laboratory national security programs and for world-class peer-reviewed basic research.

  19. Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cullen, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Defined as the scientific study of matter and energy, physics explains how all matter behaves. Separated into modern and classical physics, the study attracts both experimental and theoretical physicists. From the discovery of the process of nuclear fission to an explanation of the nature of light, from the theory of special relativity to advancements made in particle physics, this volume profiles 10 pioneers who overcame tremendous odds to make significant breakthroughs in this heavily studied branch of science. Each chapter contains relevant information on the scientist''s childhood, research, discoveries, and lasting contributions to the field and concludes with a chronology and a list of print and Internet references specific to that individual.

  20. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas

  1. Research in high energy physics. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, S.L.; Tata, X.

    1996-01-01

    The high energy physics research program at the University of Hawaii is directed toward the study of the properties of the elementary particles and the application of the results of these studies to the understanding of the physical world. Experiments using high energy accelerators are aimed at searching for new particles, testing current theories, and measuring properties of the known particles. Experiments using cosmic rays address particle physics and astrophysical issues. Theoretical physics research evaluates experimental results in the context of existing theories and projects the experimental consequences of proposed new theories

  2. Participative mental health consumer research for improving physical health care: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Ewart, Stephanie B; Platania-Phung, Chris; Stanton, Robert

    2016-10-01

    People with mental illness have a significantly lower life expectancy and higher rates of chronic physical illnesses than the general population. Health care system reform to improve access and quality is greatly needed to address this inequity. The inclusion of consumers of mental health services as co-investigators in research is likely to enhance service reform. In light of this, the current paper reviews mental health consumer focussed research conducted to date, addressing the neglect of physical health in mental health care and initiatives with the aim of improving physical health care. The international literature on physical healthcare in the context of mental health services was searched for articles, including mental health consumers in research roles, via Medline, CINAHL and Google Scholar, in October 2015. Four studies where mental health consumers participated as researchers were identified. Three studies involved qualitative research on barriers and facilitators to physical health care access, and a fourth study on developing technologies for more effective communication between GPs and patients. This review found that participatory mental health consumer research in physical health care reform has only become visible in the academic literature in 2015. Heightened consideration of mental health consumer participation in research is required by health care providers and researchers. Mental health nurses can provide leadership in increasing mental health consumer research on integrated care directed towards reducing the health gap between people with and without mental illness. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. [Research in experimental and theoretical high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Experimental High Energy Physics Program is directed toward the execution of experiments at both national and international accelerator facilities. During the next fiscal year, we will be primarily concentrating on the following projects: Fermilab direct photon experiment E706; Tevatron proton-antiproton collider experiment D-Zero; Analysis of Fermilab neutrino experiments and hadron experiment; Analysis of SLAC experiment E140 and all previous SLAC data; Running of the SLAC E140 extension (approved to run in 89/90); SLAC experiment NE11 (ran in 1989); Brookhaven galactic axion experiment; Coherent production of axions and Dellbruck scattering at BNL; The AMY experiment at TRISTAN; and Laser Switched LINAC at the Rochester Laser Laboratory. Projects which are in the completion stages: Search for new states of matter using the Rochester Tandem and SLAC experiment E141 Axion search. Projects in study and planning stages: Nonlinear Compton Scattering at LEP; Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear coulomb field; Neutrino experiment for the Tevatron upgrade and the SSC; and Involvement in the CDF upgrade and the SSC

  4. Non-European facilities for elementary particle physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The facilities we now employ in high energy physics cover a broad spectrum of particle energies and intensities and provide therefore a multiplicity of probes with which to study the behavior of elementary particles. In general, the goal has been to achieve ever higher particle energies and intensities, with emphasis on energy, and to develop more versatile and more sensitive detectors with which to study the resultant particle-particle interactions. Most energy regimes that have been explored have yielded new, fundamental information which often becomes clearer and more easily developed when particle energies are further increased. In this talk I shall try to delineate the nature of those facilities in Canada, Japan and the U.S.A. It is useful, I believe, to begin with a brief discussion of the funding and management of facilities in those countries and a short summary of recent history. The main body of the talk concentrates on the present, planned and contemplated facilities of the major non-European accelerator laboratories, and address briefly the status of accelerator development. The concluding section will summarize the salient features of the discussion. (author)

  5. Electron accelerators for research at the frontiers of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunder, H.A.; Hartline, B.K.; Corneliussen, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    Electron accelerators for the frontiers of nuclear physics must provide high duty factor (>80%) for coincidence measurements; few-hundred-MeV through few-GeV energy for work in the nucleonic, hadronic, and confinement regimes; energy resolution of ∼10 -4 ; and high current (≥ 100 μA). To fulfill these requirements new machines and upgrades of existing ones are being planned or constructed. Representative microtron-based facilities are the upgrade of MAMI at the University of Mainz (West Germany), the proposed two-stage cascaded microtron at the University of Illinois (USA), and the three-stage Troitsk ''polytron'' (USSR). Representative projects to add pulse stretcher rings to existing linacs are the upgrades at MIT-Bates (USA) and at NIKHEF-K (Netherlands). Recent advances in superconducting rf technology, especially in cavity design and fabrication, have made large superconducting cw linacs become feasible. Recirculating superconducting cw linacs are under construction at the University of Darmstadt (West Germany) and at CEBAF (USA), and a proposal is being developed at Saclay (France). 31 refs

  6. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarcevic, Ina [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2014-06-14

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  7. Research in theoretical nuclear and neutrino physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcevic, Ina

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of the research supported by the nuclear theory grant DE-FG02-04ER41319 was on studying parton dynamics in high-energy heavy ion collisions, perturbative approach to charm production and its contribution to atmospheric neutrinos, application of AdS/CFT approach to QCD, neutrino signals of dark mattter annihilation in the Sun and on novel processes that take place in dense stellar medium and their role in stellar collapse, in particular the effect of new neutrino interactions on neutrino flavor conversion in Supernovae. We present final technical report on projects completed under the grant.

  8. Plasma source ion implantation research at southwestern institute of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhenkui; Geng Man; Tong Honghui

    1997-10-01

    The PSII-EX device and PSII-IM device for research and development of plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technology are described briefly. The functions, main technical specifications and properties of the devices are also discussed. After ion implantation by PSII, the improvements of the surface-mechanical properties (such as microhardness, wear-resistance, friction factor, biological compatibility, etc) for some materials, microanalysis and numerical simulation of modified layers of materials, the technical developments for the practical workpiece treatments and the preliminary experiments for plasma source ion implantation-enhanced deposition are introduced too. As last, the future work about PSII have been proposed

  9. Application of the selected physical methods in biological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Tlačbaba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of acoustic emission (AE, which is a part of the non-destructive methods, currently having an extensive application. This method is used for measuring the internal defects of materials. AE has a high potential in further research and development to extend the application of this method even in the field of process engineering. For that matter, it is the most elaborate acoustic emission monitoring in laboratory conditions with regard to external stimuli. The aim of the project is to apply the acoustic emission recording the activity of bees in different seasons. The mission is to apply a new perspective on the behavior of colonies by means of acoustic emission, which collects a sound propagation in the material. Vibration is one of the integral part of communication in the community. Sensing colonies with the support of this method is used for understanding of colonies biological behavior to stimuli clutches, colony development etc. Simulating conditions supported by acoustic emission monitoring system the illustrate colonies activity. Collected information will be used to represent a comprehensive view of the life cycle and behavior of honey bees (Apis mellifera. Use of information about the activities of bees gives a comprehensive perspective on using of acoustic emission in the field of biological research.

  10. IAEA NAPRO coordinated research project: physical properties of sodium - 15331

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passerini, S.; Gerardi, C.; Grandy, C.; Azpitarte, O.E.; Chocron, M.; Japas, M.L.; Bubelis, E.; Perez-Martin, S.; Jayaraj, S.; Roelofs, F.; Latge, C.; Gerschenfeld, A.; Long, Bin; Selvaraj, P.; Marinenko, E.; Zagorulko, Y.; Ohira, H.; Monti, S.

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) recently established a CRP on 'Sodium properties and safe operation of experimental facilities in support of the development and deployment of Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors - NAPRO', to be carried out in the period 2013-2017. The first phase of the CRP is focused on the collection and assessment of sodium properties, and it will lead to a consistent property data set which will be published in the form of a handbook. This work is carried out by the 11 participating organizations from 10 Member States through the review and evaluation of the existing available data, the identification of the data gaps and the development of recommendations for experimental programmes to support closing these data gaps. A specific work package (WP 1.1), under the leadership of Argonne National Laboratory, is focused on the analysis of physical properties of sodium: 19 thermodynamic properties (including gaseous state) and 12 transport properties. The expected outcome includes the improved understanding of the availability, accuracy and range of applications of sodium properties centered on fast reactors and other technological applications. The implemented methodology for WP 1.1 (including the division of work among participants and an overall overview of the collected references) is described and so the properties included in WP 1.1 and their classification. Major findings to date related to WP 1.1 are presented in this work, including detailed analysis of two selected properties. The availability of relevant data in principal and out-of-principal references is discussed. Finally, challenges encountered with the collection of references, uncertainty and lack of recent experimental investigation are also listed and adjustments to the methodological approach are proposed as future work. (authors)

  11. Research in theoretical nuclear physics, Nuclear Theory Group. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.E.; Jackson, A.D.; Kuo, T.T.S.

    1984-01-01

    Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the nature of nucleon-nucleon and meson-nucleon interactions and on determining the consequences of such microscopic interactions in nuclear systems. We have constructed models of baryons which smoothly interpolate between currently popular bag and Skyrme models of hadrons and provide a vehicle for introducing the notions of quantum chromodynamics to low energy nuclear physics without violating the constraints of chiral invariance. Such models have been used to study the nucleon-nucleon interaction, the spectrum of baryons, and the important question of the radius of the quark bag. We have used many-body techniques to consider a variety of problems in finite nuclei and infinite many-body systems. New light has been shed on the nuclear coexistence of spherical and deformed states in the A = 18 region as well as the role of genuine three-body forces in this region. Phenomenological studies of infinite systems have led to a number of predictions particularly regarding the spin-polarized quantum liquids of current experimental interest. Microscopic many-body theories, based on the parquet diagrams, have been improved to a fully quantitative level for the ground state properties of infinite many-body systems. Finite temperature theories of nuclear matter, important in the study of heavy ion reactions, have been constructed. An expanded program in heavy ion theory has led to major advances in the multi-dimensional barrier penetration problem. Activities in nuclear astrophysics have provided a far more reliable description of the role of electron capture processes in stellar collapse. As a consequence, we have been able to perform legitimate calculations of the unshocked mass in Type II supernovae

  12. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, E.; Moonier, P.; May, E.; Norem, J.

    1991-02-01

    A report is presented of research and development activities conducted in the High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory during the six month period July 1 through December 31, 1990. Analyses of data from experiments performed by members of the Division are summarized, and the status of experiments taking data and of those being prepared is reviewed. Descriptions are included of research on theoretical and phenomenological topics in particle physics. Progress reports are provided on accelerator research and development, detector research and development, and experimental facilities research. Lists are presented of publications, of colloquia and conference talks, and of significant external community activities of members of the Division

  13. Neighborhoods on the move: a community-based participatory research approach to promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suminski, Richard R; Petosa, Rick L; Jones, Larry; Hall, Lisa; Poston, Carlos W

    2009-01-01

    There is a scientific and practical need for high-quality effectiveness studies of physical activity interventions in "real-world" settings. To use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop, implement, operate, and evaluate an intervention for promoting physical activity called Neighborhoods on the Move. Two communities with similar physical and social characteristics participated in this study. One community was involved in Neighborhoods on the Move; the other (comparison community) participated only in the assessments. Academic personnel and residents/organizations in the Neighborhoods on the Move community worked together to create a community environment that was more conducive for physical activity. Pre- and posttest data on new initiatives promoting physical activity, existing physical activity initiatives, and business policies supporting physical activity were collected simultaneously in both communities. The success of the CBPR approach was evidenced by several developments, including substantial resident involvement and the formation of a leadership committee, marketing campaign, and numerous community partnerships. The number of businesses with policies promoting physical activity and breadth of existing physical activity initiatives (participants, activities, hours) increased substantially more in the Neighborhoods on the Move community than in the comparison community. A total of sixty new initiatives promoting physical activity were implemented in the Neighborhoods on the Move community during the intervention. The CBPR approach is an effective strategy for inducing environmental changes that promote physical activity. Additional research is needed to assess the portability and sustainability of Neighborhoods on the Move.

  14. Calibration of self-report tools for physical activity research: the Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F; Welk, Gregory J; Beyler, Nicholas K; Bartee, Roderick T; Heelan, Kate A

    2014-05-16

    The utility of self-report measures of physical activity (PA) in youth can be greatly enhanced by calibrating self-report output against objectively measured PA data.This study demonstrates the potential of calibrating self-report output against objectively measured physical activity (PA) in youth by using a commonly used self-report tool called the Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ). A total of 148 participants (grades 4 through 12) from 9 schools (during the 2009-2010 school year) wore an Actigraph accelerometer for 7 days and then completed the PAQ. Multiple linear regression modeling was used on 70% of the available sample to develop a calibration equation and this was cross validated on an independent sample of participants (30% of sample). A calibration model with age, gender, and PAQ scores explained 40% of the variance in values for the percentage of time in moderate-to-vigorous PA (%MVPA) measured from the accelerometers (%MVPA = 14.56 - (sex*0.98) - (0.84*age) + (1.01*PAQ)). When tested on an independent, hold-out sample, the model estimated %MVPA values that were highly correlated with the recorded accelerometer values (r = .63) and there was no significant difference between the estimated and recorded activity values (mean diff. = 25.3 ± 18.1 min; p = .17). These results suggest that the calibrated PAQ may be a valid alternative tool to activity monitoring instruments for estimating %MVPA in groups of youth.

  15. ReleQuant – Improving teaching and learning in quantum physics through educational design research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berit Bungum

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantum physics and relativity are demanding for teachers and students, but have the potential for students to experience physics as fascinating and meaningful. Project ReleQuant engaged in educational design research to improve teaching and learning in these topics in Norwegian upper secondary schools. The paper focuses on the first cycle of development of a teaching module on quantum physics and how design principles were developed. We construct the design principles by reviewing relevant research literature and conducting three pilot studies. The process resulted in the following principles for designing the quantum physics teaching module: 1 clarify how quantum physics breaks with classical physics; 2 use simulations of phenomena that cannot be experienced directly; 3 provide students to use written and oral language; 4 address and discuss wave-particle duality and the uncertainty

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, January 1 - June 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into: the experimental research program; theoretical physics program; accelerator research and development; and divisional computing activities. The experimental research program covers: experiments with data; experiments in planning or construction; and detector development. Work done for this period is summarized for each area

  17. Present and future neutrino physics research at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility is currently the site of two neutrino experiments. A measurement of elastic scattering of electron-neutrinos on electrons is providing confirmation of the destructive interference between the weak neutral and charged currents predicted in the standard electroweak theory. A search for the appearance of /bar/ν//sub e/ is being carried out at the LAMPF beam stop, as well. The status of this experiment is described. A major new initiative is being undertaken to measure neutrino-electron scattering in a large water Cerenkov detector. This meaurement will be precise enough to provide, in combination with the meaurements to be performed at the new generation of high-energy electron-positron colliers, the first experimental study of the standard electrowak theory at the level of one-loop radiative corrections. The detector will also be a vehicle for neutrino-oscillation searches, measurement of neutrinos from supernovae, and other fundamental physics. The apparatus will consist of a neutrino production target and shield surrounded by a water Cerenkov detector. The fiducial volume of water will be approximately 7000 tons, viewed by approximately 13000 20 cm diameter photomultiplier tubes. 11 refs., 6 figs

  18. Public open space, physical activity, urban design and public health: Concepts, methods and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohsari, Mohammad Javad; Mavoa, Suzanne; Villanueva, Karen; Sugiyama, Takemi; Badland, Hannah; Kaczynski, Andrew T; Owen, Neville; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2015-05-01

    Public open spaces such as parks and green spaces are key built environment elements within neighbourhoods for encouraging a variety of physical activity behaviours. Over the past decade, there has been a burgeoning number of active living research studies examining the influence of public open space on physical activity. However, the evidence shows mixed associations between different aspects of public open space (e.g., proximity, size, quality) and physical activity. These inconsistencies hinder the development of specific evidence-based guidelines for urban designers and policy-makers for (re)designing public open space to encourage physical activity. This paper aims to move this research agenda forward, by identifying key conceptual and methodological issues that may contribute to inconsistencies in research examining relations between public open space and physical activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inquiring Sport and Physical Activity students’ perceptions using metaphors as research tools

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Ruiz, María Ángeles; Ávalos Ramos, María Alejandra; Merma Molina, Gladys

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the metaphorical expressions designed by Science of Sport and Physical Activity university students, as a tool of inquiring two research questions: their perceptions of their physical education teachers, and the meaning physical activity has in students’ personal life. 51 students from the University of Alicante have participated in the study. Qualitative data analysis software AQUAD 6 was used for data processing. The results obtained from the analysis of ...

  20. Conceptualizing and Defining the Intention Construct for Future Physical Activity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ryan E; Rebar, Amanda L

    2017-10-01

    Intention has been an extremely important concept in physical activity theory and research but is complicated by a double-barreled definition of a decision to perform physical activity and the commitment to enact that decision. We put forth the hypothesis that these separate meanings have different measurement requirements, are situated in distinctly different intention-based models, and show discrete findings when explaining physical activity motives.

  1. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering. Progress report on research and development work in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Institute of Neutron Physics and Reactor Engineering is concerned with research work in the field of nuclear engineering related to the safety of thermal reactors as well as with specific problems of fusion reactor technology. Under the project of nuclear safety research, the Institute works on concepts designed to drastically improve reactor safety. Apart from that, methods to estimate and minimize the radiological consequences of reactor accidents are developed. Under the fusion technology project, the Institute deals with neutron physics and technological questions of the breeding blanket. Basic research covers technico-physical questions of the interaction between light ion radiation of a high energy density and matter. In addition and to a small extent, questions of employing hydrogen in the transport area are studied. (orig.) [de

  2. Retention of young female post-doc physics researchers in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelegg, Elizabeth

    2004-03-01

    The talk will describe the results of a research project to investigate the problems young women physics researchers encountered during early stages of their careers and their perceptions of the longer-term difficulties they anticipated were they to pursue a career in physics research. The project examined quantitative data from a large sample of female members of the UK Institute of Physics (IOP) and qualitative data from intensive interviews with 27 young female doctoral and post-doctoral researchers at an early stage in their careers. In the survey of women PhD members of the IOP, only 15% of the younger women (aged under 30) said they had encountered gender barriers compared with 45% of older women. However, within a few years of completing their PhDs only 25% of the young women remained in physics research although they had previously aspired to work in this area. The reasons given for leaving physics included a dislike of the male culture or atmosphere in research labs, the fact that few of the young women thought that they would ever attain a senior physics post, concerns about balancing a research career with raising a young family and anticipating a need to relocate to match a partners career moves. These are clearly gender-related barriers and constraints although these young women often did not perceive them in this way. This research examines the notion of direct and indirect gender barriers. It addresses the idea of subtle discrimination by examining both institutional employment practices and the prevalent male culture or atmosphere in physics research, which contribute to the leaky pipeline in womens physics employment in the UK.

  3. Device-based monitoring in physical activity and public health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, David R

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity is important, given the vital role of this behavior in physical and mental health. Over the past quarter of a century, the use of small, non-invasive, wearable monitors to assess physical activity has become commonplace. This review is divided into three sections. In the first section, a brief history of physical activity monitoring is provided, along with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of different devices. In the second section, recent applications of physical activity monitoring in physical activity and public health research are discussed. Wearable monitors are being used to conduct surveillance, and to determine the extent and distribution of physical activity and sedentary behaviors in populations around the world. They have been used to help clarify the dose–response relation between physical activity and health. Wearable monitors that provide feedback to users have also been used in longitudinal interventions to motivate research participants and to assess their compliance with program goals. In the third section, future directions for research in physical activity monitoring are discussed. It is likely that new developments in wearable monitors will lead to greater accuracy and improved ease-of-use. (paper)

  4. [A research program in neutrino physics, cosmic rays and elementary particles: Tasks A, B, C, D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobel, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    A Summary of the DOE Supported High Energy Physics Research at The University of California, Irvine. Physics interests of the group are focused primarily on tests of conservation laws and studies of fundamental interactions between particles. There is also a significant interest in astrophysics and cosmic rays. The DOE support has been divided into four tasks briefly describes in this paper

  5. IV International Conference on Computer Algebra in Physical Research. Collection of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostovtsev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The abstracts of the reports made on IV International conference on computer algebra in physical research are presented. The capabilities of application of computers for algebraic computations in high energy physics and quantum field theory are discussed. Particular attention is paid to a software for the REDUCE computer algebra system

  6. Using a Disciplinary Literacy Framework to Teach High School Physics: An Action Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Brian P.; Henry, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    This action research study investigated the impact of teaching physics using a disciplinary literacy framework for instruction across all units in one academic year. Through a suite of vocabulary strategies and lessons that encourage students to write, speak, draw, mathematically translate, and design experiments, students learn to do physics by…

  7. Physical Education PLC: Neoliberalism, Curriculum and Governance. New Directions for PESP Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John; Davies, Brian

    2014-01-01

    How might Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy (PESP) communities in the UK, Europe, Australasia and elsewhere go about researching the implications of neoliberalism and increasing privatisation of Education for the entitlements of young people to a common, comprehensive, high quality, equitable Physical Education (PE)? Our analyses suggest that…

  8. CMS Young Researchers Award 2013 and Fundamental Physics Scholars Award from the CMS Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, Marzena

    2014-01-01

    Photo 2: CMS Fundamental Physics Scholars (FPSs) 1st prize: Joosep Pata, from Estonian National Institue of Chemical Physics and Biophysics / Photo 1 and 3: CMS Young Researchers Award. From left to right: Guido Tonelli, Colin Bernet, Andre David, Oliver Gutsche, Dmytro Kovalskyi, Andrea Petrucci, Joe Incandela and Jim Virdee

  9. Research Projects in Physics: A Mechanism for Teaching Ill-Structured Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbourne, Jeff; Bennett, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Physics education research has a tradition of studying problem solving, exploring themes such as physical intuition and differences between expert and novice problem solvers. However, most of this work has focused on traditional, or well-structured, problems, similar to what might appear in a textbook. Less work has been done with open-ended, or…

  10. Kirkham’s legacy and contemporary challenges in soil physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper, written by the winners of the Don and Betty Kirkham Award in Soil Physics, is dedicated to the legacy of Don Kirkham. It describes eight longstanding or emerging research areas in soil physics that contain key unsolved problems. All are field-oriented with applications to a number of imp...

  11. Integrating research evidence and physical activity policy making-REPOPA project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aro, A.R.; Bertram, M.; Hamalainen, R.-M.; van de Goor, L.A.M.; Skovgaard, T.; Valente, A.; Castellani, T.; Chereches, R.; Edwards, N.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that regular physical activity is enhanced by supporting environment. Studies are needed to integrate research evidence into health enhancing, cross-sector physical activity (HEPA) policy making. This article presents the rationale, study design, measurement procedures and the initial

  12. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A.; Crespi, Matthew; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-06-01

    There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  13. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  14. Algorithm for research of mathematical physics equations symmetries. Symmetries of the free Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotel'nikov, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm id proposed for research the symmetries of mathematical physics equation. The application of this algorithm to the Schroedinger equation permitted to establish, that in addition to the known symmetry the Schroedinger equation possesses also the relativistic symmetry

  15. [High energy physics research]: Annual performance report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Block, M.; Buchholz, D.; Gobbi, B.; Schellman, H.; Buchholz, D.; Rosen, J.; Miller, D.; Braaten, E. Chang, D.; Oakes, R.; Schellman, H.

    1992-01-01

    The various segments of the Northwestern University high energy physics research program are reviewed. Work is centered around experimental studies done primarily at FNAL; associated theoretical efforts are included

  16. Technical progress report. Theoretical high-energy-physics research at the University of Chicago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    Research activities are briefly reported. Topics include grand unified models, gluonic bound states, radiative decays of quarkonium, composite quarks and leptons, supersymmetry, magnetic monopoles in grand unified theories, and accelerator physics

  17. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, October 1979-September 1980: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Research is reported on the physics and chemistry of atoms, ions, and molecules, especially their interactions with external agents such as photons and electrons. Individual items from the report were prepared separately for the data base

  18. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumberidze, A

    2013-01-01

    The new international accelerator Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) which is currently under construction in Darmstadt has key features that offer a wide range of exciting new opportunities in the field of atomic physics and related fields. The facility will provide highest intensities of relativistic beams of both stable and unstable heavy nuclei, in combination with the strong electromagnetic fields generated by high-power lasers, thus allowing to widen atomic physics research into completely new domains. In the current contribution, a short overview of the SPARC (Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration) research programme at the FAIR facility is given. Furthermore, we present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned SPARC physics programme at the modularized start version of the FAIR facility. (paper)

  19. [High energy physics research]: Annual performance report, December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992. [Northwestern Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, J; Block, M; Buchholz, D; Gobbi, B; Schellman, H; Buchholz, D; Rosen, J; Miller, D; Braaten, E; Chang, D; Oakes, R; Schellman, H

    1992-01-01

    The various segments of the Northwestern University high energy physics research program are reviewed. Work is centered around experimental studies done primarily at FNAL; associated theoretical efforts are included.

  20. Reflecting about the “gender trouble” in Brazil: contributions to research in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Moraes e Silva Marcelo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop a reflection about how the so-called "gender trouble" can contribute to the researches in the Brazilian Physical Education. To accomplish such a task, there was introduced a dialogue among epistemological definitions that permeate this field of study. In conclusion, the essay shows that it is possible to work with performative notions and also to use the binomial sex / gender, especially when working with certain objects of research in the area of Physical Education.

  1. Research in high energy elementary particle physics: Annual progress report, [March 1, 1986-February 29, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.; Ramond, P.; Thorn, C.; Avery, P.; Walker, J.; Tanner, D.; Sikivie, P.; Sullivan, N.; Majeswki, S.

    1988-01-01

    This is a progress report covering the period March 1, 1986 through February 29, 1988 for the High Energy Physics program at the University of Florida (DOE Florida Demonstration Project grant FG05-86-ER40272). Our research program covers a braod range of topics in theoretical and experimental physics and includes detector development and an Axion search. Included in this report is a summary of our program and a discussion of the research progress

  2. Research and development activities of High Pressure Physics Division (October 1993 - March 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Gangrade, B K [eds.; High Pressure Physics Div., Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1996-07-01

    The research and development activities of the High Pressure Physics Division during the period October 1993-March 1996 are reported in the form of collection of papers presented in journals, conference proceedings and abstracts in conferences and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) technical reports. The report is organised in two sections: (A) High Pressure Physics Division, and (B) Seismology Section. A list of staff members is enclosed at the end.

  3. Research and development activities of High Pressure Physics Division (October 1993 - March 1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyanchandani, Jyoti; Gangrade, B.K.

    1996-07-01

    The research and development activities of the High Pressure Physics Division during the period October 1993-March 1996 are reported in the form of collection of papers presented in journals, conference proceedings and abstracts in conferences and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) technical reports. The report is organised in two sections: (A) High Pressure Physics Division, and (B) Seismology Section. A list of staff members is enclosed at the end

  4. A review on the “Modern and Contemporary Physics at High School” research area

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Antonio Moreira; Fernanda Ostermann

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the literature regarding the subject “Modern and Contemporary Physics (MCP) at secondary school level” based on research papers, textbooks, master’s and doctoral’s dissertations, curriculum projects, and internet papers, approaching this topic. This review focus on publications targeting the teaching of physics and includes the first studies in this line of research published in the late seventies. Six large categories of studies were identified. Among them, it...

  5. Heidelberg physicists report. Vol. 2. Reviews of research in physics and astronomy. Fundamental contributions to the physics of the atomic nuclei and the star atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, Immo; Dubbers, Dirk; Siebig, Hans-Georg; Winnacker, Albrecht

    2018-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: 50 years theoretical astrophysics, nuclear physics after the discovery of the shell model, from the small van de Graaf to the large HERA, from ''chamber physics'' to big research, reminiscences on physical research in Heidelberg. (HSI)

  6. Physical activity of pregnant women in the light of scientific research - a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sass

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical activity during pregnancy is very important due to health benefits for women and fetus. Undoubtedly, physical activity should be adapted to the current psychophysical abilities of pregnant women. During that time, the physical effort should be taken by appropriate intensity, also the forms of physical activity should be general aimed in current pregnancy state. Undoubtedly the simplest form of physical activity for pregnant women is walk, as well as swimming, gymnastics, yoga and pilates. Exercises should have wide impact on her body and muscles. The aim of the study is to identify the physical activity of pregnant women in available scientific publications. Further goal is the assessment of the knowledge about the physical activity of pregnant women based on the current review of the literature. Research Methods: The following databases and scientific browsers were used and tracked for the purpose of the research objective: Pub Med, Retina Medical Search, Medline Plus, Europe PMC, POPLINE, Google Scholar. During searching for a results the keywords phrases were written in English: physical activity in pregnancy, pregnancy exercises, fitness, yoga, pilates, swimming and pelvic floor exercises during pregnancy. Conclusions: The current researches among the population of pregnant women are methodologically differentiated and not coherent in the subject. The implication of unexplored issues about pregnant women is the differentiation in directions of researches about the physical activity of pregnant women. It seems that is important to design and program an prospective research by using objective techniques to explore the pregnant women’s behavior, lifestyle and physical activity.

  7. Theoretical-research summer: For a new generation of experts on high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Sánchez, Saúl

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the need to strengthen the comprehensive training of young Mexican physicists interested in theoretical high energy physics, the Theoretical-research summer on high energy physics program was conceived. This program, that celebrates its sixth anniversary, consists in a yearly, nationwide challenging contest in which a board of experts identify the best undergraduate contestants to support them during short research stays in high-energy- theory groups of prestigious international institutions. Out of 80 contestants, the eight awarded students have demonstrated their skills, producing highly advanced (and publicly available) reviews on particle physics, field theory, cosmology and string theory, and a published paper. (paper)

  8. Educational Research Centre of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and students training on the 'Medical Physics' speciality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.P.; )

    2005-01-01

    The Educational Research Centre (ERC) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research is the place of joint activity of the JINR, Moscow State University (MSU) and Moscow Engineering Physical Institute (MEFI) on students training by a broadened circle of specialities with introduction of new educational forms. Active application of medical accelerator beams of the JINR Laboratory of Nuclear Beams becomes a reason for implementation of a new training chair in the MEFI on the JINR base - the Physical methods in applied studies in the medicine chair. For the 'medical physics' trend development in 2003 the workshop on discussion both curricula and teaching methodic by the speciality was held. One the Educational Research Centre main activities is both organization and conducting an international scientific schools and training courses. The International student School 'Nuclear-Physical Methods and Accelerators is the most popular and traditional. The principal aim of these schools and courses is familiarization of students and postgraduates with last achievement and and contemporary problems of applied medical physics. The school audience is a students and postgraduates of ERC, MSU, MEFI, and an institutes of Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, France, Czech and Bulgaria

  9. The Impact of NSF-funded Physics Education Research at the University of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Paula

    2015-03-01

    It is now well known that many students who complete introductory physics courses are unable to apply fundamental concepts in situations that involve qualitative reasoning. Systematic investigations have helped researchers understand why so many students fail to develop robust and coherent conceptual frameworks, and have led to the development of new teaching practices and materials that are far more effective than conventional ones. The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has played a leading role in raising awareness of the need to improve instruction, and in supporting physics faculty in their efforts to do so. With support from the National Science Foundation, the group has helped build a research base that instructors can draw on, and has produced practical, flexible instructional materials that promote deeper learning in physics classrooms. Both ``Tutorials in Introductory Physics'' (Pearson, 2002) and ``Physics by Inquiry'' (Wiley, 1996) have been developed in an iterative process in which ongoing assessment of student learning plays an integral role. These materials have had a widespread and significant impact on physics teaching and on student learning from kindergarten through graduate school. In this talk I will describe the role of research in curriculum development, and speculate on the next generation of tools and resources to support physics teaching and learning.

  10. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  11. A summary of research-based assessment of students' beliefs about the nature of experimental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    Within the undergraduate physics curriculum, students' primary exposure to experimental physics comes from laboratory courses. Thus, as experimentation is a core component of physics as a discipline, lab courses can be gateways in terms of both recruiting and retaining students within the physics major. Physics lab courses have a wide variety of explicit and/or implicit goals for lab courses, including helping students to develop expert-like beliefs about the nature and importance of experimental physics. To assess students' beliefs, attitudes, and expectations about the nature of experimental physics, there is currently one research-based assessment instrument available—the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Since its development, the E-CLASS has been the subject of multiple research studies aimed at understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of various laboratory learning environments. This paper presents a description of the E-CLASS assessment and a summary of the research that has been done using E-CLASS data with a particular emphasis on the aspects of this work that are most relevant for instructors.

  12. HEPAP Subpanel on the US High Energy Physics Research Program for the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The entire community of high energy physicists looks expectantly to the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) era. The SSC is the highest priority in the US high energy physics (HEP) program, and physics at the SSC will increasingly become its focus. In this report, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) Subpanel on the US High Energy Physics Research Program for the 1990's examines how the National HEP program can go forward vigorously in the period of preparation for the SSC. The Subpanel concluded early that a viable and productive physics research program in the next decade on a range of promising fronts is essential for this field to continue to attract and educate scientists of great creativity. The Subpanel found that such a program requires both exploiting existing opportunities and undertaking some new initiatives. The recommendations are based on the ''constant budget scenario,'' which the Subpanel interprets as averaging the FY 1991 budget level over the next decade

  13. Investigating the Place and Meaning of "Physical Education" to Preschool Children: Methodological Lessons from a Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvilly, Nollaig

    2015-01-01

    Preschool physical education has not been extensively researched. Furthermore, research in physical activity and physical education rarely seeks young children's perspectives. The current paper focuses on one aspect of a post-structural study concerned with investigating the place and meaning of "physical education" to practitioners and…

  14. Selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhixiang

    2002-01-01

    38 theses are presented in this selected works of basic research on the physics and technology of accelerator driven clean nuclear power system. It includes reactor physics and experiment, accelerators physics and technology, nuclear physics, material research and partitioning. 13 abstracts, which has been presented on magazines home and abroad, are collected in the appendix

  15. Averting Uncertainty: A Practical Guide to Physical Activity Research in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachele, Jerome N.; Cuddihy, Thomas F.; Washington, Tracy L.; McPhail, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Preventative health has become central to contemporary health care, identifying youth physical activity as a key factor in determining health and functioning. Schools offer a unique research setting due to distinctive methodological circumstances. However, school-based researchers face several obstacles in their endeavour to complete successful…

  16. Research for the physics and structure of earth's crust in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitulescu, T.P.; Popescu, M.N.

    1987-10-01

    Systematic research for the deciphering of the physic and structure of Earth's crust in our country by geophysical methods were performed in the frame of Romanian Geological Institute since 1925. We put into evidence the principle achievements obtained by the geological and geophysical research for the mineral resources existing in the Romanian earth's crust. (authors)

  17. Neutron physics and nuclear data measurements with accelerators and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The report contains a collection of lectures devoted to the latest theoretical and experimental developments in the field of fast neutron physics and nuclear data measurements. The possibilities offered by particle accelerators and research reactors for research and technological applications in these fields are pointed out. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Physical Activity of Youth with Intellectual Disability: Review and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Georgia C.; Stanish, Heidi I.; Temple, Viviene A.

    2008-01-01

    This review characterizes physical activity behavior in youth with intellectual disability (ID) and identifies limitations in the published research. Keyword searches were used to identify articles from MEDLINE, EBSCOhost Research Databases, Psych Articles, Health Source, and SPORT Discus, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses up to June 2007.…

  19. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1971. Vol. III. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    The ultimate goal of controlled nuclear fusion research is to make a new energy source available to mankind, a source that will be virtually unlimited and that gives promise of being environmentally cleaner than the sources currently exploited. This goal has stimulated research in plasma physics over the past two decades, leading to significant advances in the understanding of matter in its most common state as well as to progress in the confinement and heating of plasma. An indication of this progress is that in several countries considerable effort is being devoted to design studies of fusion reactors and to the technological problems that will be encountered in realizing these reactors. This range of research, from plasma physics to fusion reactor engineering, is shown in the present three-volume publication of the Proceedings of the Fourth Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research. The Conference was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency and was held in Madison, Wisconsin, USA from 17 to 23 June 1971. The enthusiastic co-operation of the University of Wisconsin and of the United States Atomic Energy Commission in the organization of the Conference is gratefully acknowledged. The Conference was attended by over 500 scientists from 24 countries and 3 international organizations, and 143 papers were presented. These papers are published here in the original language; English translations of the Russian papers will be published in a Special Supplement to the journal Nuclear Fusion. The series of conferences on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research has become a major international forum for the presentation and discussion of results in this important and challenging field. In addition to sponsoring these conferences, the International Atomic Energy Agency supports controlled nuclear fusion research by publishing the journal Nuclear Fusion, and has recently established an International Fusion Research Council

  20. Review of the National Research Council report: Physics through the 1990's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    The report of the National Research Council (NRC), Physics through the 1990s, highlights past developments and research opportunities in the various subfields of physics and addresses general issues concerning the present state of the discipline in the United States. At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) reviewed this report and identified the areas that relate to the programs and objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE). The present report provides the conclusions of this review and the recommendations for the Department's actions

  1. Atomic physics at the future facility for antiproton and ion research: status report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumberidze, A; Stöhlker, Th; Litvinov, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, a brief overview of the Stored Particle Atomic physics Research Collaboration scientific program at the upcoming Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is given. The program comprises a very broad range of research topics addressing atomic structure and dynamics in hitherto unexplored regimes, light–matter interactions, lepton pair production phenomena, precision tests of quantum electrodynamics and standard model in the regime of extreme fields and many more. We also present the current strategy for the realization of the envisioned physics program within the modularized start version (MSV) of FAIR. (paper)

  2. Research in theoretical nuclear physics. Progress report and research proposal, 1980-1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayman, B.F.; Ellis, P.J.; Tang, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research performed during 1980 (and proposed for 1981) is summarized briefly in this administrative report. The main theme of the research is the mechanisms of light- and heavy-ion nuclear reactions and the relation between microscopic theories and phenomenological models. A publication list and budget are included

  3. Budget projections - 1991 through 1996 for research in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This research program in high energy physics is carried out under the general supervision of a committee which is composed of G.W. Brandenburg, G.J. Feldman, M.E. Franklin, R.J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, F.M. Pipkin, K. Strauch, R. Wilson, and H. Yamamoto. Professor G.J. Feldman currently serves as chair of this committee. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. In the fall of 1991 S. Mishra will join this committee. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard's educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education, where they are currently supporting thirteen research students. In addition, undergraduate students work in projects at HEPL during the academic year and over summers. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The open-quotes umbrellaclose quotes nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared proportionally by the experimental groups. Harvard financially supports this high energy physics research program in many ways

  4. European Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR): the new international center for fundamental physics and its research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Sharkov, Boris Yu; Stöker, H

    2012-01-01

    The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) accelerator center at Darmstadt, Germany, will provide the international scientific community with unique experimental opportunities of a scope and scale out of reach for any other large-scale facility in the world. With its staff of over 2500, it is expected to fundamentally expand our knowledge of hadron, nuclear, and atomic physics and their application to cosmology, astrophysics, and technology. In this review, the design details of the accelerator complex are discussed and the experimental research program for FAIR is presented. Particular attention is paid to experiments on the extreme state of matter arising from the isochoric heating of a material by heavy-ion beams. One of the largest facilities of its kind in Europe, FAIR is a part of the strategic development roadmap for the European Strategic Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). (physics of our days)

  5. Collection and analysis of Health Physics Research Reactor operational and use data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, C.S.

    1985-04-01

    The Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) is the primary research tool at the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Facility. In addition to use by the DOSAR staff, the HPRR is used by a wide segment of the scientific community for a variety of experimental purposes. This report is a compilation and analysis of data concerning HPRR uses, users, and operations through the end of FY 1984. 17 refs., 12 tabs.,

  6. Outline of scientific and research activities of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncar, G.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is presented of scientific and research activities carried out in the departments of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. The first section lists the principal results achieved in the course of the 6th Five-Year Plan in Physical Electronics, Solid State Engineering, Materials Structure and Properties, Nuclear Physics, Theory and Technology of Nuclear Reactors, Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry. The second part gives a summary of scientific and research work carried out in the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering in the 7th Five-Year Plan in all branches of science represented. The Faculty's achievements in international scientific cooperation are assessed. (author)

  7. Description of research design of articles published in four Brazilian physical therapy journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragiotto, Bruno T; Costa, Lucíola C M; Oliveira, Ronaldo F; Lopes, Alexandre D; Moseley, Anne M; Costa, Leonardo O P

    2014-01-01

    While the research design of articles published in medical journals and in some physical therapy journals has already been evaluated, this has not been investigated in Brazilian physical therapy journals. Objective : To describe the research design used in all articles published in Brazilian scientific journals that are freely available, have high Qualis rankings, and are relevant to physical therapy over a 7-year period. We extracted the bibliometric data, research design, research type (human or animal), and clinical area for all articles published. The articles were grouped into their level of evidence, and descriptive analyses were performed. We calculated the frequency, proportions of articles, and 95% confidence interval of these proportions with each research design in each journal. We cross-tabulated the clinical areas with research designs (expressed as number and percentages). A total of 1,458 articles from four Brazilian journals were found: Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia, Revista Fisioterapia em Movimento, Revista Fisioterapia e Pesquisa, and Revista Acta Fisiátrica. The majority of articles were classified as level II of evidence (60%), followed by level III (29%) and level I (10%). The most prevalent research designs were cross-sectional studies (38%), single-case or case-series studies, and narrative reviews. Most articles reported human research and were in the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiothoracic areas. Most of the research published in Brazilian physical therapy journals used levels II and III of evidence. Increasing the publication rate of systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials would provide more high-quality evidence to guide evidence-based physical therapy practice.

  8. Research in theoretical elementary-particle physics. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Thorn, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The first two years of operation of the Theoretical Particle Physics group at the University of Florida are discussed. At present our group consists of three full professors, one assistant professor, one DOE Outstanding Junior Instructor, three post-docs and one graduate student. The group has been very productive during the first two years of its existence resulting in the publication of over 30 papers covering a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics. In addition, members of our group have traveled and given important talks at national and international physics conferences. The research we have accomplished in such subjects as quantum field theory, quantum chromodynamics, and grand unified theories has increased mankind's understanding of elementary particle physics. It is the intention of our group to continue to actively participate in the further development of high energy physics

  9. Does social desirability compromise self-reports of physical activity in web-based research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göritz Anja S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated the relation between social desirability and self-reported physical activity in web-based research. Findings A longitudinal study (N = 5,495, 54% women was conducted on a representative sample of the Dutch population using the Marlowe-Crowne Scale as social desirability measure and the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Social desirability was not associated with self-reported physical activity (in MET-minutes/week, nor with its sub-behaviors (i.e., walking, moderate-intensity activity, vigorous-intensity activity, and sedentary behavior. Socio-demographics (i.e., age, sex, income, and education did not moderate the effect of social desirability on self-reported physical activity and its sub-behaviors. Conclusions This study does not throw doubt on the usefulness of the Internet as a medium to collect self-reports on physical activity.

  10. Budget projections 1990, 1991, and 1992 for research in high energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    Research programs in experimental high energy physics are carried out at Harvard under the general supervision of a departmental faculty committee on high energy physics. The committee members are: G.W. Brandenburg, M. Franklin, S. Geer, R. J. Glauber, K. Kinoshita, F. M. Pipkin, R. F. Schwitters, K. Strauch, M. E. Law, and R. Wilson. Of these individuals, Professors R.J. Glauber, F.M. Pipkin, R.F.Schwitters, K. Strauch, and R. Wilson are the principal investigators with whom a number of junior faculty members and post-doctoral research fellows are associated. Dr. Brandenburg is the Director of the High Energy Physics Laboratory and administers the DOE high energy physics contract. Professor Schwitters is currently on leave of absence as Director of the Superconducting Super Collider project. In the fall of 1990 Professor G. Feldman, who is currently at SLAC, will join the Harvard faculty and become a principal investigator. Harvard is planning to make one or two additional senior faculty appointments in experimental high energy physics over the next two years. The principal goals of the work described here are to carry out forefront programs in high energy physics research and to provide first rate educational opportunities for students. The experimental program supported through HEPL is carried out at the major accelerator centers in the world and addresses some of the most important questions in high energy physics. Harvard's educational efforts are concentrated in graduate education. These budget projections cover all of the Harvard based high energy physics experimental activities. The open-quotes umbrellaclose quotes nature of this contract greatly simplifies support of essential central technical and computer services and helps the group to take advantage of new physics opportunities and to respond to unexpected needs. The funding for the operation of the HEPL facility is shared equally by the experimental groups

  11. Understanding physical activity in spinal cord injury rehabilitation: translating and communicating research through stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brett; Papathomas, Anthony; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop an evidence-based resource for knowing and communicating the complexities involved for both males and females in implementing and sustaining a physically active lifestyle shortly after spinal cord injury (SCI). Synthesizing a set of qualitative and quantitative studies with over 500 spinal cord injured people, the article represents research utilizing the genre of ethnographic creative non-fiction. This genre of representation holds enormous potential for researchers in terms of disseminating their findings to diverse audiences beyond the academy, and having real impact. The ethnographic creative non-fictions show together for the first time the barriers, determinants, benefits, trajectories, emotions, fears, preferred methods and messengers for delivering important physical activity information to men and women with a SCI. The article contributes to knowledge by showing the embodied complexities involved when in rehabilitation for both males and females in implementing and sustaining a physically active lifestyle shortly after SCI. It also makes a contribution to practice by providing researchers, health care professionals and disability user-groups with a theory and evidence based resource to assist in informing, teaching and enabling people living with SCI to initiate and maintain a physically active lifestyle. Stories may be a highly effective tool to communicate with and to influence spinal cord injured people's activity. The findings of this research showed the many benefits and barriers to developing and sustaining a physically active lifestyle shortly after spinal cord injury. The preferred methods and messengers for delivering physical activity information as well as the activity types, intensities and durations of physical activity for men and women were also shown. Within rehabilitation, spinal cord injured people need to be offered accessible knowledge about how to implement and sustain a physically active

  12. Accelerating science and innovation societal benefits of European research in Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Radford, Tim; Jakobsson, Camilla; Marsollier, Arnaud; Mexner, Vanessa; O'Connor, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The story so far. Collaborative research in particle physics. The lesson for Europe: co-operation pays. Medicine and life sciences. The body of knowledge: particles harnessed for health. Energy and the environment. Think big: save energy and clean up the planet. Communication and new technologies. The powerhouse of invention. Society and skills. Power to the people. The European Strategy for Particle Physics. Update 2013.

  13. Research in atomic and applied physics using a 6-GeV synchrotron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.

    1985-12-01

    The Division of Atomic and Applied Physics in the Department of Applied Science at Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts a broad program of research using ion beams and synchrotron radiation for experiments in atomic physics and nuclear analytical techniques and applications. Many of the experiments would benefit greatly from the use of high energy, high intensity photon beams from a 6-GeV synchrotron source. A survey of some of the specific scientific possibilities is presented

  14. Design of a Website on Nutrition and Physical Activity for Adolescents: Results From Formative Research

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Debbe; Cullen, Karen Weber; Boushey, Carol; Konzelmann, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Background Teens do not meet guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity. The Internet may be an effective method for delivering programs that help them adopt healthy behaviors. Objective To collect information to design content and structure for a teen-friendly website promoting healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. Methods Qualitative research, encompassing both focus group and interview techniques, were used to design the website. Participants were 12-17 year olds in Hous...

  15. Progress report on reactor physics research program, January 1963 - February 1964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-02-01

    This progress report is a part of the annual report of the department of reactor physics prepared for the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences. It is a review of research activities in the field of theoretical and experimental reactor physics in the year 1973. A part of this program was included in the NPY Cooperative program in reactor physics. The topics covered by this report are as follows: Calculations of the thermal neutron distribution and reaction rate in a reactor cell and comparison with experiments; buckling measurements; thermalization and slowing down of neutrons; pulsed neutron source techniques; and reactor kinetics

  16. The past, present, and future of test and research reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Reactor physics calculations have been performed on research reactors since the first one was built 50 yr ago under the University of Chicago stadium. Since then, reactor physics calculations have evolved from Fermi-age theory calculations performed with slide rules to three-dimensional, continuous-energy, coupled neutron-photon Monte Carlo computations performed with supercomputers and workstations. Such enormous progress in reactor physics leads us to believe that the next 50 year will be just as exciting. This paper reviews this transition from the past to the future

  17. Research in Theoretical High-Energy Physics at Southern Methodist University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, Fredrick; Nadolsky, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The SMU Theory group has developed a strong expertise in QCD, PDFs, and incisive comparisons between collider data and theory. The group pursues realistic phenomenological calculations for high-energy processes, the highly demanded research area driven by the LHC physics. Our field has seen major discoveries in recent years from a variety of experiments, large and small, including a number recognized by Nobel Prizes. There is a wealth of novel QCD data to explore. The SMU theory group develops the most advanced and innovative tools for comprehensive analysis in applications ranging from Higgs physics and new physics searches to nuclear scattering.

  18. Progress report on reactor physics research program, January 1963 - February 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-02-15

    This progress report is a part of the annual report of the department of reactor physics prepared for the Boris Kidric Institute of nuclear sciences. It is a review of research activities in the field of theoretical and experimental reactor physics in the year 1973. A part of this program was included in the NPY Cooperative program in reactor physics. The topics covered by this report are as follows: Calculations of the thermal neutron distribution and reaction rate in a reactor cell and comparison with experiments; buckling measurements; thermalization and slowing down of neutrons; pulsed neutron source techniques; and reactor kinetics.

  19. Research in Theoretical High-Energy Physics at Southern Methodist University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olness, Fredrick [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Nadolsky, Pavel [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-08-05

    The SMU Theory group has developed a strong expertise in QCD, PDFs, and incisive comparisons between collider data and theory. The group pursues realistic phenomenological calculations for high-energy processes, the highly demanded research area driven by the LHC physics. Our field has seen major discoveries in recent years from a variety of experiments, large and small, including a number recognized by Nobel Prizes. There is a wealth of novel QCD data to explore. The SMU theory group develops the most advanced and innovative tools for comprehensive analysis in applications ranging from Higgs physics and new physics searches to nuclear scattering.

  20. University of Uppsala, Sweden. International seminar for research and education in physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-01-15

    A one-year course will be held at the Institute of Physics, Uppsala. It is being sponsored by the Swedish Agency for International Assistance, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. The course will start on 1 September 1964 and finish about 1 July 1965. A. The aim of the International Seminar is: To provide possibilities for individual participation in qualified experimental research work in one of various fields of physics (e.g. solid state physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, etc.) under the guidance of experienced scientists. An introductory course in the operation of, and the coding for, a modern computer, IBM 1620, will be given; To inform the participants of the organization of research projects, physics laboratories and teaching of graduate and undergraduate students; To demonstrate to the participants how Sweden and some other European countries have organized schools, universities, other scientific institutions and industrial laboratories. The Seminar will be open to non-European students and scientists, mainly from developing countries, who are interested in the above mentioned combination of subjects and who are connected with the teaching and/or research of a university or national laboratory

  1. University of Uppsala, Sweden. International seminar for research and education in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    A one-year course will be held at the Institute of Physics, Uppsala. It is being sponsored by the Swedish Agency for International Assistance, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. The course will start on 1 September 1964 and finish about 1 July 1965. A. The aim of the International Seminar is: To provide possibilities for individual participation in qualified experimental research work in one of various fields of physics (e.g. solid state physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, etc.) under the guidance of experienced scientists. An introductory course in the operation of, and the coding for, a modern computer, IBM 1620, will be given; To inform the participants of the organization of research projects, physics laboratories and teaching of graduate and undergraduate students; To demonstrate to the participants how Sweden and some other European countries have organized schools, universities, other scientific institutions and industrial laboratories. The Seminar will be open to non-European students and scientists, mainly from developing countries, who are interested in the above mentioned combination of subjects and who are connected with the teaching and/or research of a university or national laboratory

  2. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, RHIC Spin Physics V, Volume 32, February 21, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; SAITO, N.; VIGDOR, S.; ROSER, T.; SPINKA, H.; ENYO, H.; BLAND, L.C.; GURYN, W.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998

  3. The impact of regulations, safety considerations and physical limitations on research progress at maximum biocontainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Amy C; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S; Bavari, Sina

    2012-12-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.

  4. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Patterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4 containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review.

  5. Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

  6. The Impact of Regulations, Safety Considerations and Physical Limitations on Research Progress at Maximum Biocontainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurtleff, Amy C.; Garza, Nicole; Lackemeyer, Matthew; Carrion, Ricardo; Griffiths, Anthony; Patterson, Jean; Edwin, Samuel S.; Bavari, Sina

    2012-01-01

    We describe herein, limitations on research at biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment laboratories, with regard to biosecurity regulations, safety considerations, research space limitations, and physical constraints in executing experimental procedures. These limitations can severely impact the number of collaborations and size of research projects investigating microbial pathogens of biodefense concern. Acquisition, use, storage, and transfer of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT) are highly regulated due to their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. All federal, state, city, and local regulations must be followed to obtain and maintain registration for the institution to conduct research involving BSAT. These include initial screening and continuous monitoring of personnel, controlled access to containment laboratories, accurate and current BSAT inventory records. Safety considerations are paramount in BSL-4 containment laboratories while considering the types of research tools, workflow and time required for conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments in limited space. Required use of a positive-pressure encapsulating suit imposes tremendous physical limitations on the researcher. Successful mitigation of these constraints requires additional time, effort, good communication, and creative solutions. Test and evaluation of novel vaccines and therapeutics conducted under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions for FDA approval are prioritized and frequently share the same physical space with important ongoing basic research studies. The possibilities and limitations of biomedical research involving microbial pathogens of biodefense concern in BSL-4 containment laboratories are explored in this review. PMID:23342380

  7. Characteristics of urban parks associated with park use and physical activity: a review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Gavin R; Rock, Melanie; Toohey, Ann M; Hignell, Danica

    2010-07-01

    Given that recent literature reviews on physical activity in urban parks deliberately excluded qualitative findings, we reviewed qualitative research on this topic informed by a published classification scheme based on quantitative research. Twenty-one studies met our inclusion criteria. These studies relied mainly on semi-structured interviews with individuals or in focus groups; only five studies involved in situ observation. Our synthesis aligns with previous quantitative research showing that attributes including safety, aesthetics, amenities, maintenance, and proximity are important for encouraging park use. Furthermore, our synthesis of qualitative research suggests that perceptions of the social environment entwine inextricably with perceptions of the physical environment. If so, physical attributes of parks as well as perceptions of these attributes (formed in relation to broader social contexts) may influence physical activity patterns. Both qualitative and quantitative methods provide useful information for interpreting such patterns, and in particular, when designing and assessing interventions intended to improve the amount and intensity of physical activity. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 17th International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research (ACAT 2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Preface The 2016 version of the International Workshop on Advanced Computing and Analysis Techniques in Physics Research took place on January 18-22, 2016, at the Universidad Técnica Federico Santa Maria -UTFSM- in Valparaiso, Chile. The present volume of IOP Conference Series is devoted to the selected scientific contributions presented at the workshop. In order to guarantee the scientific quality of the Proceedings all papers were thoroughly peer-reviewed by an ad-hoc Editorial Committee with the help of many careful reviewers. The ACAT Workshop series has a long tradition starting in 1990 (Lyon, France), and takes place in intervals of a year and a half. Formerly these workshops were known under the name AIHENP (Artificial Intelligence for High Energy and Nuclear Physics). Each edition brings together experimental and theoretical physicists and computer scientists/experts, from particle and nuclear physics, astronomy and astrophysics in order to exchange knowledge and experience in computing and data analysis in physics. Three tracks cover the main topics: Computing technology: languages and system architectures. Data analysis: algorithms and tools. Theoretical Physics: techniques and methods. Although most contributions and discussions are related to particle physics and computing, other fields like condensed matter physics, earth physics, biophysics are often addressed in the hope to share our approaches and visions. It created a forum for exchanging ideas among fields, exploring and promoting cutting-edge computing technologies and debating hot topics. (paper)

  9. Exploring the use of research evidence in health-enhancing physical activity policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hämäläinen, Riitta-Maija; Aro, Arja R.; van de Goor, Ien

    2015-01-01

    informed by research evidence compared to others. The aims of the present article are to explore the use of research evidence in health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) policies, identify when research evidence was used, and find what other types of evidence were employed in HEPA policymaking. Methods......Background The gaps observed between the use of research evidence and policy have been reported to be based on the different methods of using research evidence in policymaking by researchers and actual policymakers. Some policies and policymaking processes may therefore be particularly well...... Multidisciplinary teams from six EU member states analysed the use of research evidence and other kinds of evidence in 21 HEPA policies and interviewed 86 key policymakers involved in the policies. Qualitative content analysis was conducted on both policy documents and interview data. Results Research evidence...

  10. Why combine diet and physical activity in the same international research society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski Tom

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research in diet and physical activity in the U.S. started in very different traditions, with behavioral science input being uneven in their development. Investigators and policy makers in Europe have recognized the complementarity of diet and physical activity and incorporated them both under the label Public Health Nutrition. Joining these disciplines internationally offers the opportunity to benefit all, since the problems addressed are human, not specific to any one country. In regard to why combine diet and physical activity, at the biological level, there is reason to believe that diet and physical activity working in concert can remodel physiological structures and processes toward healthful ends. The diet and physical activity behaviors themselves vary in characteristics and are similar in others. The behavioral science components of these two disciplines face similar problems, and can learn from the advances made by the other, in the areas of measurement, correlates and intervention. By working together, knowledge will be enhanced from uncovering complementary and interactive relationships between diet and physical activity, and in relation to disease risks, that may result in designing more effective and efficient interventions and policies. Since the behavioral sciences are at a disadvantage in comparison to the biological sciences in terms of scientific advances and thereby capturing the popular imagination for solutions to health problems, we must redouble our efforts to enhance funding for behavioral research in regard to diet and physical activity and to make the research advances necessary to prevent the medicalizing of essentially social and behavioral problems. Nutrition and physical activity should most effectively do this together.

  11. An Overview of Thematic Evolution of Physical Therapy Research Area From 1951 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Moral-Munoz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical Therapy is a profession which development and conceptual framework have been performed in the twentieth century. One of the major challenges of Physical Therapy in the twenty-first century is to identify the intellectual basis of its scientific domain. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the evolution of Physical Therapy research throughout scientific literature published in Web of Science (WoS and Scopus databases. In order to perform the analysis, WoS and Scopus bibliographic databases were used to download all records. A set of journals with overall topics in Physical Therapy discipline with the largest history in the Journal Citation Report were selected: Physiotherapy, Physical Therapy, and Australian Journal of Physiotherapy/Journal of Physiotherapy. The bibliometric tool SciMAT was employed to perform a science mapping analysis in order to detect and visualize the research themes and their evolution across three periods: 1951–1984, 1985–2000, and 2001–2013. The analysis carried out shows that Physical Therapy research field is mainly divided into nine thematic areas: Middle-Aged People, Muscle Function Alterations and Recovery, Health Education, Gait and Biomechanics, Central Nervous System, Heart Rate and Exercise, Diagnosis, Low Back Pain, and Animals. In conclusion, Physical Therapy citations and production are primarily focused on two large thematic areas, diseases that involve middle-aged population and muscle function and its alterations. Results can be used to provide a historical perspective on research conducted in this emerging field and to provide a scientific evidence-based practice model on which future studies can be built.

  12. Report of the HEPAP [High Energy Physics Advisory Panel] Subpanel on Future Modes of Experimental Research in High Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Particle physics is the study of matter and its interaction on the most microscopic of scales. Since mid-century, our view of the most elementary forms of matter has shifted from the neutrons, protons, and electrons that make up atoms to the more pointlike quarks and leptons. Although open questions and challenges abound, a comprehensive picture that successfully describes these entities and their interactions on a scale down to at least 10 -16 cm has been forged through the intellectual efforts of experimental and theoretical physicists alike. The strides taken have been aided by accelerators of ever increasing energy and, correspondingly, ever increasing physical size. The nature of experimental research has gradually changed over the years from individual and small group efforts to large team projects involving hundreds of physicists. Among other things, it is our purpose in this report to examine how one can continue this research, which is now often on a massive scale, in ways that best preserve the qualities of individual, intellectual input. 1 fig., 5 tabs

  13. Crocodile years: the traditional image of science and physical scientists' participation in weapons research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crews, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis examines one dimension of the relationship between science and the arms race. More specifically, it develops and empirically examines a theoretical model of the relationship between the social demand for defense-related and weapons research, traditional scientific values related to the worldview of classical physics, and differential participation by physical scientists in such research. The theoretical model suggests that an antiquated traditional image of science exists, and that it may explain, in part, participation by physical scientists in defense-related or weapons research. Two major hypotheses are suggested by the model: first, that a constellation of values representing a traditional image of science obtains today among young physical scientists; and second, that those who currently engage (or are willing to engage) in defense-related or weapons research are more likely to agree with the values implicit in the traditional image of science than those who do not (or would not) engage in such research. The theoretical model is located within the sociologies of knowledge and science. This study includes chapters that provide an overview of the literature of these subdisciplines. This investigation concludes with an empirical examination of the model and hypotheses.

  14. Haunted thoughts of the careful experimentalist: psychical research and the troubles of experimental physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noakes, Richard

    2014-12-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between the 'elusive' science of psychical research and experimental physics in the period approximately, 1870-1930. Most studies of the relationship between psychical research and the established sciences have examined the ways in which psychical researchers used theories in the established sciences to give greater plausibility to their interpretations of such puzzling phenomena as telepathy, telekinesis and ectoplasm. A smaller literature has examined the use of laboratory instruments to produce scientific evidence for these phenomena. This paper argues that the cultures of experiment in the established science of physics could matter to psychical research in a different way: it suggests that experience of capricious effects, recalcitrant instruments and other problems of the physical laboratory made British physicists especially sympathetic towards the difficulties of the spiritualistic séance and other sites of psychical enquiry. In the wake of widely-reported claims that the mediums they had investigated had been exposed as frauds, these scientific practitioners were eventually persuaded by the merits of an older argument that human psychic subjects could not be treated like laboratory hardware. However, well into the twentieth century, they maintained that experimental physics had important lessons for psychical researchers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Experimental research in high energy physics: Final technical progress report, 1986--1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the closeout report for DOE supported research in high energy physics for the period 1986--1992, under contract award AT03-86ER40249 at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP) at U.C. Santa Cruz. The research during this period consisted primarily of the following: Data taking with the MARK II detector at the SLC at SLAC and construction of a silicon vertex detector for the MARK II. This effort included substantial work on commissioning of the SLC accelerator. Preparation of the SLD experiment for the SLC, and initial data taking with this experiment. Participation in the ALEPH physics program at LEP at CERN in Geneva, with an emphasis on its silicon vertex detector. Analysis of data collected with the MARK III experiment at the SPEAR accelerator at SLAC. Electronics development for the leading proton spectrometer for the ZEUS experiment at DESY in Hamburg. Design, testing and physics studies for a silicon tracker for the SSC. Theoretical physics program emphasizing phenomenology, Higgs physics, supersymmetry, and some issues in cosmology

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities. Semi-annual progress report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Bajt, D.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1996-10-01

    This report describes the research conducted in the High Energy Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory during the period July 1, 1995 - December 31, 1995. Topics covered here include experimental and theoretical particle physics, advanced accelerator physics, detector development, and experimental facilities research. Lists of division publications and colloquia are included

  17. Health by Stealth--Exploring the Sociocultural Dimensions of Salutogenesis for Sport, Health and Physical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, Louise; Quennerstedt, Mikael

    2018-01-01

    Sport, health and physical education (SHPE) researchers have increasingly embraced the salutogenic model of health devised by Aaron Antonvosky, to re-understand and problematise the relation between movement, physical activity or physical education on one hand, and health on the other. However, contemporary research employing Antonovsky's theories…

  18. Annual report of the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, for fiscal 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In this annual report, the summary of the researches carried out in the Institute in 1979, and the reports of the researches published as the achievements of the Institute are described, being classified into every laboratory. In addition, the summary of specific researches, special researches and the researches made with subsidies, entrusted researches and the list of patents acquired in 1979 are written. The gists of the lectures given in international conferences and the symposia in the Institute held in 1979 are also included at the end. The laboratories are divided into those concerned with atomic nuclei, material science, applied physics, fundamental technologies, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry and agricultural chemicals, the research group on laser science, and eight other facilities. The specific researches are related to laser science, solar light energy, mathematical formula treating system and biology. The special researches are integrated researches, important researches, industrialization researches, and the researches on cosmic ray, agricultural chemicals and atomic energy. 31 subjects from 20 companies were entrusted, and 70 researchers were accepted from 48 companies, in 1979. The eight facilities are those of organic microanalysis, inorganic analysis, electronic computer, helium liquefaction, beam analysis, animal test, safety control and workmanship. (Kako, I.)

  19. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  20. Photon Physics and Plasma Research, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. This paper is the third part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Photon Physics and Plasma Research. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments ...