WorldWideScience

Sample records for research institute medical

  1. Research Institute for Medical Biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynchank, S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ionising and non-ionising radiation on rodent tumours and normal tissue were studied in terms of cellular repair and the relevant biochemical and biophysical changes following radiation. Rodent tumours investigated in vivo were the CaNT adenocarcinoma and a chemically induced transplantable rhabdomyosarcoma. Radiations used were 100KVp of X-Rays, neutron beams, various magnetic fields, and microwave radiation of 2450MHz. The biochemical parameters measured were, inter alia, levels of adenosine-5'-triphoshate (ATP) and the specific activity of hexokinase (HK). Metabolic changes in ATP levels and the activity of HK were observed in tumour and normal tissues following ionising and non-ionising radiation in normoxia and hypoxia. The observation that the effect of radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment of some tumours may be size dependent can possibly now be explained by the variation of ATP content with tumour size. The enhanced tumour HK specific activity implies increased metabolism, possibly a consequence of cellular requirements to maintain homeostasis during repair processes. Other research projects of the Research Institute for Medical Biophysics involved, inter alia, gastroesophageal scintigraphies to evaluate the results of new forms of therapy. 1 ill

  2. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute (RAMSRI) is the fourth Research and Development Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC), undertaking research in human health and nutrition. This annual report covers the major activities undertaken by RAMSRI for the year 2015. The activities are grouped under the following headings: Establishment; Personnel and Organisation; Major Activities of Centres; Ongoing IAEA TC Projects; Human Resource Development; IAEA Coordinated Meetings Hosted; Publications; Achievements; Challenges; Projections for the Year 2016; and Recommendations.

  3. Measuring research impact in medical research institutes: a qualitative study of the attitudes and opinions of Australian medical research institutes towards research impact assessment frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Simon; Reeves, Penny; Ramanathan, Shanthi; Attia, John; Nilsson, Michael; Searles, Andrew

    2018-03-16

    The question of how to measure, assess and optimise the returns from investment in health and medical research (HMR) is a highly policy-relevant issue. Research Impact Assessment Frameworks (RIAFs) provide a conceptual measurement framework to assess the impact from HMR. The aims of this study were (1) to elicit the views of Medical Research Institutes (MRIs) regarding objectives, definitions, methods, barriers, potential scope and attitudes towards RIAFs, and (2) to investigate whether an assessment framework should represent a retrospective reflection of research impact or a prospective approach integrated into the research process. The wider objective was to inform the development of a draft RIAF for Australia's MRIs. Purposive sampling to derive a heterogeneous sample of Australian MRIs was used alongside semi-structured interviews with senior executives responsible for research translation or senior researchers affected by research impact initiatives. Thematic analysis of the interview transcriptions using the framework approach was then performed. Interviews were conducted with senior representatives from 15 MRIs. Participants understood the need for greater research translation/impact, but varied in their comprehension and implementation of RIAFs. Common concerns included the time lag to the generation of societal impacts from basic or discovery science, and whether impact reflected a narrow commercialisation agenda. Broad support emerged for the use of metrics, case study and economic methods. Support was also provided for the rationale of both standardised and customised metrics. Engendering cultural change in the approach to research translation was acknowledged as both a barrier to greater impact and a critical objective for the assessment process. Participants perceived that the existing research environment incentivised the generation of academic publications and track records, and often conflicted with the generation of wider impacts. The potential to

  4. Radiation safety in educational, medical and research institutions. Regulatory guide G-121

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    This regulatory guide is intended to help educational, medical and research institutions design and implement radiation protection programs that meed regulatory requirements. This guide applied to educational, medical or research institutions that require a licence from the CNSC to posses or use radioactive materials. It describes programs to assure that radioactive materials are used safely during licensed activities. (author)

  5. Effect of two Howard Hughes Medical Institute research training programs for medical students on the likelihood of pursuing research careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Di; Meyer, Roger E

    2003-12-01

    To assess the effect of Howard Hughes Medical Institute's (HHMI) two one-year research training programs for medical students on the awardees' research careers. Awardees of the HHMI Cloister Program who graduated between 1987 and 1995 and awardees of the HHMI Medical Fellows Program who graduated between 1991 and 1995 were compared with unsuccessful applicants to the programs and MD-PhD students who graduated during the same periods. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess research career outcomes while controlling for academic and demographic variables that could affect selection to the programs. Participation in both HHMI programs increased the likelihood of receiving National Institutes of Health postdoctoral support. Participation in the Cloister Program also increased the likelihood of receiving a faculty appointment with research responsibility at a medical school. In addition, awardees of the Medical Fellows Program were not significantly less likely than Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) and non-MSTP MD-PhD program participants to receive a National Institutes of Health postdoctoral award, and awardees of the Cloister Program were not significantly less likely than non-MSTP MD-PhD students to receive a faculty appointment with research responsibility. Women and underrepresented minority students were proportionally represented among awardees of the two HHMI programs whereas they were relatively underrepresented in MD-PhD programs. The one-year intensive research training supported by the HHMI training programs appears to provide an effective imprinting experience on medical students' research careers and to be an attractive strategy for training physician-scientists.

  6. Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute was established in 2009, as the forth research institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. This Annual Report provides an overview of the major activities of the Institutes in the year 2014. Major items covered in the report include: Strategic objectives; Collaborations; Personnel and Organisational Structure; Facilities and Technical Services; Summary of Research and Development Projects; Human Resource Development; Publications and Technical Reports.

  7. The financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: findings from six institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, William T

    2006-06-01

    To explore three questions surrounding the financial management of research centers and institutes at U.S. medical schools: How do medical schools allocate institutional funds to centers and institutes? How and by whom are those decisions made? What are the implications of these decision-making models on the future of the academic biomedical research enterprise? Using a qualitative research design, the author and associates interviewed over 150 faculty members and administrators at six medical schools and their parent universities in 2004. Interview data were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. This methodology generated rich descriptions and explanations of the six medical schools, which can produce extrapolations to, but not necessarily generalizable findings to, other institutions and settings. An examination of four dimensions of financial decision-making-funding timing, process, structure, and culture-produces two essential models of how medical schools approach the financial management of research centers. In the first, a "charity" model, center directors make hat-in-hand appeals directly to the dean, the result of which may depend on individual negotiation skills and personal relationships. In the second, a "planned-giving" model, the process for obtaining and renewing funds is institutionalized, agreed upon, and monitored. The ways in which deans, administrators, department chairs, and center directors attend to, decide upon, and carry out financial decisions can influence how people throughout the medical school think about interdisciplinary and collaborative activities marshalled though centers and institutes.

  8. Challenges of the health research system in a medical research institute in Iran: a qualitative content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Momeni, Khalil; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammazdeh, Khalil; Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Mehrabi Tavana, Ali

    2014-08-14

    Medical research institute is the main basis for knowledge production through conducting research, and paying attention to the research is one of the most important things in the scientific communities. At present, there is a large gap between knowledge production in Iran compared to that in other countries. This study aimed to identify the challenge of research system in a research institute of medical sciences in Iran. This was a descriptive and qualitative study conducted in the first 6 months of 2013. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on 16 heads of research centers in a research institute of medical sciences. The required data were gathered using semi-structured interviews. The collected data were analyzed using MAXQDA 10.0 software. Six themes identified as challenges of research system. The themes included barriers related to the design and development, and approval of research projects, the implementation of research projects, the administrative and managerial issues in the field of research, the personal problems, publishing articles, and guidelines and recommendations. Based on the results of the present study, the following suggestions can be offered: pushing the research towards solving the problems of society, employing the strong executive and scientific research directors in the field of research, providing training courses for researchers on how to write proposals, implementing administrative reforms in the Deputy of Research and Technology, accelerating the approval of the projects through automating the administrative and peer-reviewing processes.

  9. Health research barriers in the faculties of two medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamdari A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A Alamdari,1 S Venkatesh,2 A Roozbehi,3 AT Kannan41Research Center of Factors Affecting Health, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 2National AIDS Control Organization, Janpath Road, Chandralok Building, New Delhi, India; 3Education Development Office, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran; 4Department of Community Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences and Guru Tegh Bahadur Hospital, Delhi, IndiaBackground: Health policy formation refers to the design of a conceptual framework to find possibilities, facilitate feasibilities, and identify strong and weak points, as well as insufficiencies, by research. Doing research should clarify qualities and standards for policy and decision-making to enable the success of development of health care in a country. Evaluation of the impact of health interventions is particularly poorly represented in public health research. This study attempted to identify barriers and facilitators of health research among faculty members in two major institutions in India, ie, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS and the University College of Medical Sciences (UCMS and Guru Tegh Bahadur (GTB Hospital in Delhi.Methods: The participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire that canvassed individual characteristics, ie, years of experience, place of work, academic rank, final educational qualification, work setting, educational group, primary activity, and number of publications in the previous 5 years. Barriers and facilitators were categorized into personal, resources, access, and administration groups. The data were processed using SPSS version 16, independent t-tests, Chi-square tests, and multivariate logistic regression.Results: The total number of faculty members at both institutions was 599, 456 (76% of whom participated in this study. The primary activities reported by faculty at UCMS (teaching and Faculty at AIIMS reported

  10. Characteristics and Causes for Non-Accrued Clinical Research (NACR) at an Academic Medical Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Debra G; Carroll, Kelly A; Bhatt, Karishma H; Belknap, Steven M; Mai, David; Gipson, Heather J; West, Dennis P

    2013-06-01

    The impact of non-accrued clinical research (NACR) represents an important economic burden that is under consideration as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services looks into reforming the regulations governing IRB review. NACR refers to clinical research projects that fail to enroll subjects. A delineation of the issues surrounding NACR is expected to enhance subject accrual and to minimize occurrence of NACR. The authors assessed demographics, characteristics, and reasons for NACR at an academic medical center, including time trends, funding source, research team (principal investigator, department), IRB resource utilization (IRB level of review, number of required IRB reviews, initial IRB turn-around time, and duration of NACR). The authors analyzed data from 848 clinical research study closures during 2010 and 2011 to determine proportion, incidence, and characteristics of NACR. Studies with subject enrollment during the same time period were used as a comparative measure. Data from 704 (83.0%) study closures reported enrollment of 1 or more subjects while 144 (17.0 %) reported NACR (zero enrollment). PI-reported reasons for NACR included: 32 (22.2%) contract or funding issues; 43 (30.0%) insufficient study-dedicated resources; 41 (28.4%) recruitment issues; 17 (11.8%) sponsor-initiated study closure and 11 (7.6%) were "other/reason unreported". NACR is not uncommon, affecting about one in six clinical research projects in the study population and reported to be more common in some other institutions. The complex and fluid nature of research conduct, non-realistic enrollment goals, and delays in both the approval and/or accrual processes contribute to NACR. Results suggest some simple strategies that investigators and institutions may use to reduce NACR, including careful feasibility assessment, reduction of institutional delays, and prompt initiation of subject accrual for multi-center studies using competitive enrollment. Institutional action to

  11. Educational Research Centre of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research and students training on the 'Medical Physics' speciality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.P.; )

    2005-01-01

    The Educational Research Centre (ERC) of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research is the place of joint activity of the JINR, Moscow State University (MSU) and Moscow Engineering Physical Institute (MEFI) on students training by a broadened circle of specialities with introduction of new educational forms. Active application of medical accelerator beams of the JINR Laboratory of Nuclear Beams becomes a reason for implementation of a new training chair in the MEFI on the JINR base - the Physical methods in applied studies in the medicine chair. For the 'medical physics' trend development in 2003 the workshop on discussion both curricula and teaching methodic by the speciality was held. One the Educational Research Centre main activities is both organization and conducting an international scientific schools and training courses. The International student School 'Nuclear-Physical Methods and Accelerators is the most popular and traditional. The principal aim of these schools and courses is familiarization of students and postgraduates with last achievement and and contemporary problems of applied medical physics. The school audience is a students and postgraduates of ERC, MSU, MEFI, and an institutes of Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, France, Czech and Bulgaria

  12. Analysis of overexposure cases for female radiation workers in medical and research institutions in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahajan, J.M.; Massand, O.P.; Venkataraman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Protection Services Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre conducts country wide personnel monitoring service for 40,000 radiation workers, of which about 22,000 radiation workers are from industrial, medical and research institutions. The number of female radiation workers constitute about 5% of the total radiation workers monitored. Basis for control of occupational exposures of women are same as that for men except for pregnant women (foetus). Equivalent dose above 10 mSv in a service period is investigated as to the causes of exposure whether the exposure was really received by the worker (genuine) or only the monitoring badge received the exposure due to other reasons (non-genuine) and necessary remedial actions are taken. Analysis of overexposure cases in female radiation workers as a group has been done for the period of four years (1990-1993) and the conclusions are presented. (author). 2 refs., 4 tabs

  13. A model of sustainable development of scientific research health institutions, providing high-tech medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Yu. Bedoreva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of sustainability is relevant for all types of businesses and organizations. Long-term development has always been and remains one of the most difficult tasks faced by organizations. The implementation the provisions of international standards ISO series 9000 has proven to be effective. The ISO standards are concentrated on the global experience for sustainable success of organizations. The standards incorporated all the rational that has been accumulated in this field of knowledge and practice. These standards not only eliminate technical barriers in collaboration and have established standardized approaches, but also serve as a valuable source of international experience and ready management solutions. They became a practical guide for the creation of management systems for sustainable development in organizations of different spheres of activity.Problem and purpose. The article presents the author’s approach to the problem of sustainable development health of the organization. The purpose of this article is to examine the approaches to management for sustainable success of organizations and to describe a model of sustainable development applied in research healthcare institutions providing high-tech medical care.Methodology. The study used general scientific methods of empirical and theoretical knowledge, general logical methods and techniques and methods of system analysis, comparison, analogy, generalization, the materials research for the development of medical organizations.The main results of our work are to first develop the technique of complex estimation of activity of the scientific-research institutions of health and deploy key elements of the management system that allows the level of maturity of the management system of the institution to be set in order to identify its strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas for improvements and innovation, and to set priorities for determining the sequence of action when

  14. The Use of E-journals by Health Researchers: A Case Study of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olayemi, Olalekan Moses

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the use of e-journals by health researchers in the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR. A descriptive survey method was adopted for the study and a questionnaire was used for data collection. The study population was comprised of fifty-four (54 respondents who are health researchers in the institute. The data collected were presented and analyzed using tables, frequency distribution, simple percentages, and charts. The result of the study revealed that all the respondents are aware of the availability of e-journals and attest to making use of them. The study revealed that electronic journals were mostly used for the purpose of conducting research work and the PDF format was preferred for downloading e-journals. However, it was observed that low Internet connectivity and intermittent electricity supply constitute a major obstacle to the use of e-journals. The study, therefore, recommended that the institute's management invest more resources on network connectivity, particularly its bandwidth, and ensure reliable power supply.

  15. [Development of sanitary microbiology researches at the A. N. Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology, Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, A M; Surmasheva, E V; Korchak, G I

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the main stages of development of sanitary bacteriological studies at the leading hygiene research institute of Ukraine--the A. N Marzeyev Institute for Hygiene and Medical Ecology. These researches have made a substantial contribution to the formation and development of hygiene science in the former Soviet Union. The current and promising areas in sanitary microbiology in Ukraine are considered.

  16. The Medical Research Council (UK)/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS--'25 years of research through partnerships'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleebu, P; Kamali, A; Seeley, J; Elliott, A M; Katongole-Mbidde, E

    2015-02-01

    For the past 25 years, the Medical Research Council/Uganda Virus Research Institute Uganda Research Unit on AIDS has conducted research on HIV-1, coinfections and, more recently, on non-communicable diseases. Working with various partners, the research findings of the Unit have contributed to the understanding and control of the HIV epidemic both in Uganda and globally, and informed the future development of biomedical HIV interventions, health policy and practice. In this report, as we celebrate our silver jubilee, we describe some of these achievements and the Unit's multidisciplinary approach to research. We also discuss the future direction of the Unit; an exemplar of a partnership that has been largely funded from the north but led in the south. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Relationship between National Institutes of Health research awards to US medical schools and managed care market penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, E; Mazzaschi, A J; Levin, R J; Blake, D A; Griner, P F

    1997-07-16

    Medical research conducted in academic medical centers is often dependent on support from clinical revenues generated in these institutions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that managed care has the potential to affect research conducted in academic medical centers by challenging these clinical revenues. To examine whether empirical evidence supports a relationship between managed care and the ability of US medical schools to sustain biomedical research. Data on annual extramural research grants awarded to US medical schools by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from fiscal years 1986 to 1995 were obtained, and each medical school was matched to a market for which information about health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration in 1995 was available. Growth in total NIH awards, traditional research project (R01) awards, R01 awards to clinical and basic science departments, and changes in institutional ranking by NIH awards were compared among schools located in markets with low, medium, and high managed care penetration. Medical schools in all markets had comparable rates of growth in NIH awards from 1986 to 1990. Thereafter, medical schools in markets with high managed care penetration had slower growth in the dollar amounts and numbers of NIH awards compared with schools in markets with low or medium managed care penetration. This slower growth for schools in high managed care markets was associated with loss of share of NIH awards, equal to $98 million in 1995, and lower institutional ranking by NIH awards. Much of this revenue loss can be explained by the slower growth of R01 awards to clinical departments in medical schools in high managed care markets. These findings provide evidence of an inverse relationship between growth in NIH awards during the past decade and managed care penetration among US medical schools. Whether this association is causal remains to be determined.

  18. Ethical dilemma of mandated contraception in pharmaceutical research at catholic medical institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; O'Brien, Richard; Rendell, Marc; Salzman, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The Catholic Church proscribes methods of birth control other than sexual abstinence. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognizes abstinence as an acceptable method of birth control in research studies, some pharmaceutical companies mandate the use of artificial contraceptive techniques to avoid pregnancy as a condition for participation in their studies. These requirements are unacceptable at Catholic health care institutions, leading to conflicts among institutional review boards, clinical investigators, and sponsors. Subjects may feel coerced by such mandates to adopt contraceptive techniques inconsistent with their personal situation and beliefs; women committed to celibacy or who engage exclusively in non-heterosexual activities are negatively impacted. We propose principles to insure informed consent to safeguard the rights of research subjects at Catholic institutions while mitigating this ethical conflict. At the same time, our proposal respects the interests of pharmaceutical research agencies and Catholic moral precepts, and fully abides by regulatory guidance.

  19. Improving readability of informed consents for research at an academic medical institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadden, Kristie B; Prince, Latrina Y; Moore, Tina D; James, Laura P; Holland, Jennifer R; Trudeau, Christopher R

    2017-12-01

    The final rule for the protection of human subjects requires that informed consent be "in language understandable to the subject" and mandates that "the informed consent must be organized in such a way that facilitates comprehension." This study assessed the readability of Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent forms at our institution, implemented an intervention to improve the readability of consent forms, and measured the first year impact of the intervention. Readability assessment was conducted on a sample of 217 Institutional Review Board-approved informed consents from 2013 to 2015. A plain language informed consent template was developed and implemented and readability was assessed again after 1 year. The mean readability of the baseline sample was 10th grade. The mean readability of the post-intervention sample (n=82) was seventh grade. Providing investigators with a plain language informed consent template and training can promote improved readability of informed consents for research.

  20. The themes, institutions, and people of medical education research 1988-2010: content analysis of abstracts from six journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I

    2012-10-01

    The present study aimed at providing an overview of the most common themes of research into medical education. Changes in frequency of occurrence of these themes over time and differences between US and European journals were studied. The most productive institutions and researchers in the field were examined. A content analysis was carried out on 10,168 abstracts extracted from the six most influential journals in medical education published since 1988. Twenty-nine major themes were identified, of which student assessment, clinical and communication skills, clinical clerkships, and problem-based learning were the most prominent ones. Some of these themes, such as multiple-choice examinations or computer-assisted instruction seemed to have had their day, whereas other topics, such as the study of clinical clerkships, clinical reasoning, and scholarship in education were on their way up. Medical education research turned out to be a thoroughly international affair to which both US and European research centers contribute. The medical education literature shows an overwhelming emphasis on the preparation of medical students for professional practice. Moreover, the emphasis is very much on the individual student; most research seems to have been conducted with a psychological perspective in mind. It is argued that medical education research would profit from broadening its scope, including sociological, economical, ecological, and system perspectives. These perspectives might bring answers to new questions relevant to the quality of medical education. It is suggested that medical education is in need of moving beyond the conventional effectiveness-driven research approach to a more theory- and discovery-driven approach.

  1. The quality of reports of medical and public health research from Palestinian institutions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarqouni, Loai; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen Me; Elessi, Khamis; Obeidallah, Mohammad; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, Iain

    2017-06-09

    Over the past decade, there has been an increase in reports of health research from Palestine, but no assessment of their quality. We have assessed the quality of reports of Palestinian health research and factors associated with it. This is a systematic review. We searched Medline and Scopus for reports of original research relevant to human health or healthcare authored by researchers affiliated with Palestinian institutions and published between January 2000 and August 2015 inclusive. We used international guidelines to assess report quality, classifying as adequate those with ≥50% of items completely addressed. Of 2383 reports identified, 497 met our inclusion criteria. Just over half (264; 55%) of these were published after 2010. 354 (71%) of first authors were affiliated with Palestinian institutions; 261 (53%) reports had coauthors from outside Palestine. The majority of the reports in our study were inadequately reported (342; 69%), and none had adequately reported all items. Of 439 observational studies, 11 (2.5%) reports provided adequate descriptions of eligibility criteria and selection procedures; 35 (8%) reported efforts to address potential sources of bias; 50 (11.4%) reported the basis for the study sample size; and funding sources were mentioned in 74 reports (17%). Higher reporting quality was associated with international affiliation of the first author (prevalence ratio (PR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.1)), international collaboration (PR 2.9 (95% CI 1.7 to 5.0)), international funding (PR 1.9 (95% CI1.5 to 2.5)), publication after 2005 (PR 3.9 (95% CI 1.8 to 8.5)) and four or more coauthors (PR 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.1)). Although the quality of reports of Palestinian research has improved in recent years, it remains well below an acceptable standard. International reporting guidelines should be used to guide research design and improve the quality of reports of research. The systematic review protocol was registered in the International Prospective

  2. Diary of an endocrine resident: Recollections from Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambit Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrinology is a relatively newer field in medicine but it has gained tremendous progress in the recent past and is currently one of the most cherished and sought after superspecialty subject. The journey is long and an average of 12 years is spent to complete a superspecialty training starting from Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery career. To get a seat in endocrinology in institutes like PGIMER, Chandigarh is difficult, the training is grueling and the final exit is tough but the vast clinical experience, research oriented teaching and the team work of the closely knit family of faculty members and resident colleagues had made these 3 years of our life as the most enjoyable years to be remembered forever.

  3. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS Feature Slides View All Slides ...

  4. Bioassay requirements for 125I and 131I in medical, teaching and research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The more widespread use of radioactive isotopes of iodine (collectively referred to as radioiodines) as a research tool, coupled with their diagnostic and therapeutic uses in nuclear medicine, has resulted in an increased number of personnel who are exposed to these radioisotopes and who therefore should be monitored for internal radioiodine contamination. This document describes the minimum acceptable features of a bioassay programme which the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) requires to be available in institutions holding a prescribed substance licence authorising the use of significant quantities of 125 I or 131 I or both. A licensee may submit details of his own proposed bioassay programme to the AECB for approval. If such a programme fails to be approved, the programme described below shall be adhered to. This document does not deal with individuals who are likely to maintain a significant chronic thyroid burden of radioiodine. It is assumed that the radioiodine taken into the body is in a soluble, inorganic form (I 2 , iodide or iodate) or in an organic form (e.g. methyl iodide) which is metabolised in the body with a resultant release of iodide. Radioiodinated organic compounds which are not catabolised to iodide in the body to any significant degree are not the subject of this document, since the metabolism of the radioiodine will be dictated by the metabolism of the compound. This means that individuals whose only exposure to radioiodine is in the form of prepared radioiodinated compounds such as antigens and antibodies (e.g. individuals using radio immuno assay kits in which the antigen or antibody is supplied as radioiodinated material) are not required to participate in this bioassay programme for radioiodine

  5. WORK EXPERIENCE OF THE OPERA TIVE INFORMATION SUPPORT SERVICE FOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH A T THE MEDICAL RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH CENTER NAMED AFTER A.F . TSYB – BRANCH OF THE FEDERAL STATE BUDGET INSTITUTION "NATIONAL MEDICAL RESEARCH RADIOLOGICAL CENTER” OF T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Savina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The Operative Information Support Service for Scientific Research of the Medical Radiological Research Center named after A. F. Tsyb — Branch of the FSBI «National Medical Research Radiological Center” of the RF Health Ministry presented a report on providing off-budget support for scientific activities over the period from 1993 to 2014 using domestic and foreign information resources. The dynamics of employee activities in institutional sectors with aim to receive financial support for fundamental and applied scientific research on a competitive and non-competitive basis was given. The analysis of the obtained data indicated that a multi-channeling in off-budget funding was formed. It also showed to some extent a situation at the open market of grants in the field of medical radiology, radiobiology, and radiation epidemiology among leading investors in intellectual products.

  6. Characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer policies at universities and public institutions in medical research--protocol for a systematic review of the qualitative research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Rosa; Müller, Olaf; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2015-08-19

    Universities, public institutions, and the transfer of knowledge to the private sector play a major role in the development of medical technologies. The decisions of universities and public institutions regarding the transfer of knowledge impact the accessibility of the final product, making it easier or more difficult for consumers to access these products. In the case of medical research, these products are pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or medical procedures. The ethical dimension of access to these potentially lifesaving products is apparent and distinguishes the transfer of medical knowledge from the transfer of knowledge in other areas. While the general field of technology transfer from academic and public to private actors is attracting an increasing amount of scholarly attention, the specifications of knowledge transfer in the medical field are not as well explored. This review seeks to provide a systematic overview and analysis of the qualitative literature on the characteristics and determinants of knowledge transfer in medical research and development. The review systematically searches the literature for qualitative studies that focus on knowledge transfer characteristics and determinants at medical academic and public research institutions. It aims at identifying and analyzing the literature on the content and context of knowledge transfer policies, decision-making processes, and actors at academic and public institutions. The search strategy includes the databases PubMed, Web of Science, ProQuest, and DiVa. These databases will be searched based on pre-specified search terms. The studies selected for inclusion in the review will be critically assessed for their quality utilizing the Qualitative Research Checklist developed by the Clinical Appraisal Skills Programme. Data extraction and synthesis will be based on the meta-ethnographic approach. This review seeks to further the understanding of the kinds of transfer pathways that exist in medical

  7. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  8. Danish Space Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The present report presents a description of the activities and finances of the Danish Space Reserach Institute during 1989 and 1990. The research deals with infrared astronomy (ISOPHOT), X-ray astronomy (EXPECT/SODART), hard X-ray astronomy (WATCH), satellite projects and sounding rocket experiments. (CLS)

  9. Student-centred learning in Community Medicine: An experience from Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S S; Premarajan, K C; L, Subitha; Archana, R; Iswarya, S; A, Sujiv

    2014-01-01

    Student-centred learning (SCL) places the student at the centre of policies, practices and decision-making in the teaching-learning process. SCL methodology also advocates active involvement of students in the curriculum planning, selection of teaching-learning methods and assessment process. We planned an education innovation project to assess the perception of fifth semester undergraduate medical students towards implementation of an SCL methodology. The study was done among 87 fifth semester undergraduate medical students (batch of 2010-11) in the noncommunicable disease epidemiology section of Community Medicine at the Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Puducherry. The students divided themselves into seven groups and developed the learning objectives, selected teaching-learning methods and assessment process for each session. The facilitators had 3-5 rounds of interaction with each group before the session. Qualitative analysis of feedback collected from students and external faculty after each session was done. The effect of implementing the SCL methodology was assessed by the reaction level of Kirkpatrick's training evaluation model by using a rating scale Results. Of the 87 eligible students, 73 (83.9%) returned the forms for evaluation. All seven groups were able to formulate the learning objectives. Most of the groups had used PowerPoint slides and videos as a teaching-learning tool. Innovative assessment methods such as crosswords and 'chocopati' were used by some groups. In general, the perception of students was favourable towards SCL compared to conventional methods and they felt that this methodology should be adopted more often. Time management and organization of sessions were the main problems encountered by the students. The mean (SD) score for the items 'sessions were useful', 'sessions were enjoyable' and 'sessions improved my knowledge' were 6.2 (1.8), 7.1 (1.8) and 6.3 (1.9), respectively. The

  10. [Integration of fundamental and applied medical and technical research made at the department of the biomedical systems, Moscow State Institute of Electronic Engineering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selishchev, S V

    2004-01-01

    The integration results of fundamental and applied medical-and-technical research made at the chair of biomedical systems, Moscow state institute of electronic engineering (technical university--MSIEE), are described in the paper. The chair is guided in its research activity by the traditions of higher education in Russia in the field of biomedical electronics and biomedical engineering. Its activities are based on the extrapolation of methods of electronic tools, computer technologies, physics, biology and medicine with due respect being paid to the requirements of practical medicine and to topical issues of research and design.

  11. Report of the CIRRPC Executive Committee regarding EPA NESHAP regulations on radionuclides for medical research institutions and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-06-01

    There appears to be no compelling public health protection reason for EPA`s promulgation of NESHAP regulations to control air emissions of radioactive materials from NRC-licensed facilities engaged in activities associated with the practice and development of nuclear medicine. The NRC`s existing regulations provide the necessary controls for protection and EPA`s regulations would only add burdensome reporting requirements at substantial cost to medical treatment and diagnosis. Availability of nuclear medicine practice could be impacted and advancements through research delayed.

  12. Institutional Support : Ethiopian Development Research Institute ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI) was established in 1999 and became operational in 2003 as a semi-autonomous organization accountable to ... International Water Resources Association, in close collaboration with IDRC, is holding a webinar titled “Climate change and adaptive water management: ...

  13. A perspective on 10-years HTS experience at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research - eighteen million assays and counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackovic, Kurt; Lessene, Guillaume; Falk, Hendrik; Leuchowius, Karl-Johan; Baell, Jonathan; Street, Ian

    2014-03-01

    The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) is Australia's longest serving medical research institute. WEHI's High Throughput Screening (HTS) Facility was established in 2003 with $5 million of infrastructure funds invested by WEHI, and the Victorian State Government's Strategic Technology Initiative through Bio21 Australia Ltd. The Facility was Australia's first truly academic HTS facility and was one of only a handful operating in publicly funded institutions worldwide at that time. The objectives were to provide access to enabling HTS technologies, such as assay design, liquid handling automation, compound libraries and expertise to promote translation of basic research in a national setting that has a relatively young biotech sector and does not have a big Pharma research presence. Ten years on and the WEHI HTS Facility has participated in over 92 collaborative projects, generated over 18 million data points, and most importantly, projects that began in the Facility have been commercialized successfully (due to strong ties with Business Development and emphasis on intellectual property management) and now have molecules progressing in clinical trials.

  14. Scientific events of the Turner Scientific And Research Institute for children’s orthopedics as a form of continuous medical education for pediatric traumatologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S. Solovyova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children's Orthopedics in educational activities for improvement of the professional knowledge of pediatric physicians was represented. The target audience of the continuous medical education include traumatologists, pediatric surgeons, and doctors of related specialties of Russia that are involved in diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of children with injuries, congenital and acquired diseases of the musculoskeletal system. Since 1986, the Institute has organized 28 all-Russian scientific and practical conferences on topical issues of traumatology and orthopedics of pediatric age in 22 different cities across the country. In the interest of the institute, the school of pediatric orthopedists is constantly working for district orthopedists of children's polyclinics of St. Petersburg, and regular monothematic seminars are performed with the participation of leading Russian experts and visiting lecturers from abroad. These scientific and practical activities improve the professional skills of doctors and help them improve the provision of specialized care to children.

  15. Highland Medical Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the Highland Medical Research Journal is to publish scientific research in various fields of medical science and to communicate such research findings to the larger world community. It aims to promote cooperation and understanding amoungst workers in various fields of medical science.

  16. Medical Research for All Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... we want to offer you and your family good, helpful health information that is based on the very best medical research conducted by and for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This issue focuses on several topics in which NIH-funded research continues to make ...

  17. Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Video Be Part of the Cure Commitment to Stem Cell Research Exercise + Drug Therapy Tibi Creates Garment to Benefit ... Million Brenda Novak's Online Auction Cord Blood-Derived Stem ... Highlights DRI Research Diamond Ball 2009 DRI/DRIF Press Releases Historic ...

  18. Understanding Medical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you hear about the results of a new medical research study. Sometimes the results of one study ... when reading or listening to reports of new medical findings. Some questions that can help you evaluate ...

  19. Peralta Cancer Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The investigators in the cell biology program at PCRI have pioneered in the development of techniques for culturing human epithelial cells. The cancer diagnosis program has been concerned with researching new techniques for early diagnosis of breast cancer in women. The cancer treatment program has been concerned with applying cell biology and biochemistry advances to improve cancer management

  20. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews...... of articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  1. 2004-05 Performance Year Ratings Impacting Fiscal Year 2005-06. Medical University of South Carolina. Sector: Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This series of documents contains performance scoring information for 2004-2005 for individual institutions of higher education in South Carolina. This information is used in establishing 2005-2006 fiscal year allocations. Data includes: (1) Degrees Awarded; (2) Enrollment; (3) Average SAT score; (4) Faculty; (5) Tuition; and (6) Financial…

  2. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  3. Low-level radioactive waste management handbook series: Low-level radioactive waste management in medical and biomedical research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    Development of this handbook began in 1982 at the request of the Radhealth Branch of the California Department of Health Services. California Assembly Bill 1513 directed the DHS to ''evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of (1) reducing the volume, reactivity, and chemical and radioactive hazard of (low-level radioactive) waste and (2) substituting nonradioactive or short-lived radioactive materials for those radionuclides which require long-term isolation from the environment. A contract awarded to the University of California at Irvine-UCI (California Std. Agreement 79902), to develop a document focusing on methods for decreasing low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generation in institutions was a result of that directive. In early 1985, the US Department of Energy, through EG and G Idaho, Inc., contracted with UCI to expand, update, and revise the California text for national release

  4. THE MUTIFACTORIAL PATTERN OF OSTEOPOROSIS: A REVIEW OF THE RESEARCHES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF THERAPY, INSTITUTE OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION, YAROSLAVL STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Ershova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis (OP is one of the most common diseases and is characterized by serious clinical manifestations such as low-energy bone fractures that cause severe social consequences. In this connection, OP is now receiving much attention worldwide. In Yaroslavl, the Department of Therapy (Head, Professor N.I. Korshunov, MD, Institute of Postgraduate Education, Yaroslavl State Medical University (Chancellor, Prof. A.V. Pavlov, MD, has been intensively conducting researches into different aspects of OP for more than 20 years. The main areas of the investigations performed are the issues of the epidemiology and outcomes of osteoporotic fractures, the relationship of OP to different diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular diseases, as well as the specific features of the development of OP in fertile men and women and the problem of calcium and vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women. 

  5. Retooling Institutional Support Infrastructure for Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Denise C.; Brouwer, Rebecca N.; Ennis, Cory L.; Spangler, Lindsey L.; Ainsworth, Terry L.; Budinger, Susan; Mullen, Catherine; Hawley, Jeffrey; Uhlenbrauck, Gina; Stacy, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research activities at academic medical centers are challenging to oversee. Without effective research administration, a continually evolving set of regulatory and institutional requirements can detract investigator and study team attention away from a focus on scientific gain, study conduct, and patient safety. However, even when the need for research administration is recognized, there can be struggles over what form it should take. Central research administration may be viewed negatively, with individual groups preferring to maintain autonomy over processes. Conversely, a proliferation of individualized approaches across an institution can create inefficiencies or invite risk. This article describes experiences establishing a unified research support office at the Duke University School of Medicine based on a framework of customer support. The Duke Office of Clinical Research was formed in 2012 with a vision that research administration at academic medical centers should help clinical investigators navigate the complex research environment and operationalize research ideas. The office provides an array of services that have received high satisfaction ratings. The authors describe the ongoing culture change necessary for success of the unified research support office. Lessons learned from implementation of the Duke Office of Clinical Research may serve as a model for other institutions undergoing a transition to unified research support. PMID:27125563

  6. OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium: Linking a Clinical and Translational Science Institute With a Community-Based Distributive Medical Education Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Elizabeth; Hurt, Myra; Hogan, William; Carrasquillo, Olveen; Smith, Steven; Brickman, Andrew; Nelson, David

    2018-03-01

    Developing a national pragmatic clinical trial infrastructure is central to understanding the effectiveness of interventions applied under usual conditions and where people receive health care. To address this challenge, three Florida universities-the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Florida State University (with its community-based distributive medical education model), and the University of Miami-created (2010-2013) a statewide consortium, the OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium, to support the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials and provide mentored research experiences for medical and graduate students in real-world practice settings. OneFlorida has four programs, which report to a steering committee with membership from each partner, community members, and the state Medicaid agency and Department of Health to ensure shared governance. The Clinical Research Program provides support to conduct research in the network and uses champions to engage community clinicians. The Citizen Scientist Program has community members who provide input on health topics of importance to them, study design, recruitment and retention strategies, and the interpretation of findings. The Data Trust Program contains electronic health record and health care claims data for 10.6 million Floridians. The Minority Education Program, in collaboration with three historically black colleges and universities, offers minority junior faculty mentoring in pragmatic clinical trials and implementation science. OneFlorida has implemented 27 studies with diverse patient populations and in diverse community practice settings. To identify evidence-based best practices from the clinical trials conducted in the network, foster their implementation, and expand research training opportunities.

  7. Howard Hughes Medical Institute dose assessment survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.L.; McDougall, M.M.; Barkley, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Biomedical science researchers often express frustration that health physics practices vary widely between individual institutions. A survey examining both internal and external dose assessment practices was devised and mailed to fifty institutions supporting biomedical science research. The results indicate that health physics dose assessment practices and policies are highly variable. Factors which may contribute to the degree of variation are discussed. 2 tabs

  8. The P50 Research Center in Perioperative Sciences: How the investment by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences in team science has reduced postburn mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Capek, Karel D; Voigt, Charles; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Porter, Craig; Sousse, Linda E; El Ayadi, Amina; Zapata-Sirvent, Ramon; Guillory, Ashley N; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N

    2017-09-01

    Since the inception of the P50 Research Center in Injury and Peri-operative Sciences (RCIPS) funding mechanism, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences has supported a team approach to science. Many advances in critical care, particularly burns, have been driven by RCIPS teams. In fact, burns that were fatal in the early 1970s, prior to the inception of the P50 RCIPS program, are now routinely survived as a result of the P50-funded research. The advances in clinical care that led to the reduction in postburn death were made by optimizing resuscitation, incorporating early excision and grafting, bolstering acute care including support for inhalation injury, modulating the hypermetabolic response, augmenting the immune response, incorporating aerobic exercise, and developing antiscarring strategies. The work of the Burn RCIPS programs advanced our understanding of the pathophysiologic response to burn injury. As a result, the effects of a large burn on all organ systems have been studied, leading to the discovery of persistent dysfunction, elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanisms, and identification of potential therapeutic targets. Survival and subsequent patient satisfaction with quality of life have increased. In this review article, we describe the contributions of the Galveston P50 RCIPS that have changed postburn care and have considerably reduced postburn mortality.

  9. Digital Repository of Research Institutes – RCIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Kaczyńska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the project of Digital Repository of Scientific Institutes RCIN and presents opportunities for promoting science by digitization and sharing them on the Internet. The Repository has been created by the 16 Scientific Institutes in Warsaw, Krakow and Bialowieza to modernize the science-research and IT infrastructure, to increase digital resources of mathematical, technical, natural and medical sciences, and to popularize and promote of Polish science. That dissemination and popularization of science affects its development and competitiveness in the international arena and it allows transfer of research results to the economy. In addition, Institutes of RCIN providing contemporary and archival materials of science, support the intellectual capital of Polish science and raise awareness of professional literature of search on the Internet. Project RCIN is implemented in the years 2010–2014 and financing is provided by the funds of the European Fund of Regional Development.

  10. Astronomical Research Institute Photometric Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Tyler R.; Sampson, Ryan; Holmes, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Astronomical Research Institute (ARI) conducts astrometric and photometric studies of asteroids with a concentration on near-Earth objects (NEOs). A 0.76-m autoscope was used for photometric studies of seven asteroids of which two were main-belt targets and five were NEOs, including one potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA). These objects are: 3122 Florence, 3960 Chaliubieju, 5143 Heracles, (6455) 1992 HE, (36284) 2000 DM8, (62128) 2000 SO1, and 2010 LF86.

  11. [se-atlas - the health service information platform for people with rare diseases : Supporting research on medical care institutions and support groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Johanna; Wagner, Thomas O F; Storf, Holger

    2017-05-01

    se-atlas - the health service information platform for rare diseases - is part of the German National Action Plan for People with Rare Diseases and is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Health. The objective of se-atlas as a web-based platform is to illustrate those medical care institutions that are linked to rare diseases, in a transparent and user-friendly way. The website provides an overview of medical care institutions and support groups focusing on rare diseases in Germany. The primary target groups of se-atlas are affected patients, their relatives and physicians but can also include non-medical professionals and the general public. In order to make it easier to look up medical care institutions or support groups and optimize the search results displayed, various strategies are being developed and evaluated. Hence, the allocation of diseases to appropriate medical care institutions and support groups is currently a main focus. Since its launch in 2015, se-atlas has grown continuously and now incorporates five times more entries than were included 20 months prior. Among this data are the current rare diseases centres in Germany, which play a major role in providing patient-centred healthcare by acting as primary contact points for people with rare diseases. Further expansion and maintenance of the data base raises several organisational and software-related challenges. For one, the data should be completed by adding more high-quality information, while not neglecting the existing entries and maintaining their high level of quality in the long term.

  12. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed.

  13. Recognition of higher medical institutions in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyanova, L; Lazarev, A

    2005-08-01

    The Russian Federation of higher medical institutions get State accreditation, if their activity conforms to criteria determined by the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Education of the Russian Federation. Kursk State Medical University (KSMU) has a confirmed to requirement of accreditation by the Russian Federation, to conduct annually training of about 5000 students at 12 faculties. KSMU carries out pre-medical undergraduate and postgraduate training in the specialty "Doctor of medicine". For the first time in Russia KSMU was allowed to conduct a 6-year medical training with the use of English as an intermediary language by the Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Education. In this relation programmes of training teachers for conducting instruction with the use of an intermediary language (English) and training students Russian with the level necessary for free communication with Russian patients and staff of the clinics have been developed and realized.

  14. Pediatrics Department of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuous Professional Education and Moscow Research Clinical Institute of Pediatry and Children Surgery – half century hand in hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The long-term cooperation of the two scientific institutions contributing to the professional development of pediatricians is based on the long-term scientific relations of the Department of Pediatrics of the Russian Medical Academy of Continuing Professional Education and the Moscow Research Institute of Pediatrics and Pediatric Surgery (now the Research Institute of Pediatrics named after Academician Yu.E.Veltischev. The role of remarkable pediatric scientists – G.N. Speransky, Yu.E. Veltstschev, M.S. Ignatova, N.A. Korovina in the development of these links and pediatric science in Russia. 

  15. Research Institute for Technical Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Ronald L.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA research grant to Wilberforce University enabled us to establish the Research Institute for Technical Careers (RITC) in order to improve the teaching of science and engineering at Wilberforce. The major components of the research grant are infrastructure development, establishment of the Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE), and Joint Research Collaborations with NASA Scientists. (A) Infrastructure Development. The NASA grant has enabled us to improve the standard of our chemistry laboratory and establish the electronics, design, and robotics laboratories. These laboratories have significantly improved the level of instruction at Wilberforce University. (B) Wilberforce Intensive Summer Experience (WISE). The WISE program is a science and engineering bridge program for prefreshman students. It is an intensive academic experience designed to strengthen students' knowledge in mathematics, science, engineering, computing skills, and writing. (C) Joint Collaboration. Another feature of the grant is research collaborations between NASA Scientists and Wilberforce University Scientists. These collaborations have enabled our faculty and students to conduct research at NASA Lewis during the summer and publish research findings in various journals and scientific proceedings.

  16. [Biological research and security institutes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsie, G; Falczuk, A J; Bergmann, I E

    2006-04-01

    The threat of using biological material for ago-bioterrorist ends has risen in recent years, which means that research and diagnostic laboratories, biological agent banks and other institutions authorised to carry out scientific activities have had to implement biosafety and biosecurity measures to counter the threat, while carrying out activities to help prevent and monitor the accidental or intentional introduction of exotic animal diseases. This article briefly sets outthe basic components of biosafety and biosecurity, as well as recommendations on organisational strategies to consider in laboratories that support agro-bioterrorist surveillance and prevention programs.

  17. The United Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, D.

    1978-01-01

    The UNRI, the only common institute of the socialist countries was founded in 1956 in Dubna. The scientists of small countries have the opportunity to take part in fundamental research with very expensive devices which are usually not available for them. There are six research laboratories and one department in the UNRI namely: the theoretical physical laboratory; the laboratory of high energies - there is a synchrophasotron of 1a GeV there; the laboratory of nuclear problems - there is a synchrocyclotron of 680 MeV there; the laboratory of nuclear reactions with the cyclotron U-300 which can accelerate heavy ions; the neutronphysical laboratory with the impulse reactor IBM-30; the laboratory of computation and automatization with two big computers; the department of new acceleration methods. The main results obtained by Hungarian scientist in Dubna are described. (V.N.)

  18. Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) is dedicated to understanding the problems of global climate change and their potential solutions. The Institute...

  19. Institutional Repositories in Indian Universities and Research Institutes: A Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Kemparaju, T. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study of the institutional repositories (IRs) in use in Indian universities and research institutes. Design/methodology/approach: Repositories in various institutions in India were accessed and described in a standardised way. Findings: The 20 repositories studied covered collections of diverse…

  20. Institutional failures and transaction costs of Bulgarian private research institutes

    OpenAIRE

    Nozharov, Shteryo

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses the reasons for poor performance of private research institutes in Bulgaria. In this regard the Institutional Economics methods are used. A connection between smart growth policy goals and Bulgarian membership in EU is made. The gaps in the institutional environment are identified as well as measures for their elimination are proposed. The main accent of the study is put on the identification of transaction costs, arisen as a result of the failures of the institutional envi...

  1. Institutional Support : Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In 2006 the Government of Kenya passed an Act of Parliament making the Kenya Institute for Public Policy Research and Analysis (KIPPRA) the government's lead socioeconomic research institute. The Act exerts enormous demands on KIPPRA at a time when it is trying to recover from the senior staff turnover suffered in ...

  2. 78 FR 66947 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Person: Robert Horowits, Ph.D., Senior Investigator, National Institute of General Medical Sciences..., Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology...

  3. Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Harish-Chandra Research Institute (known as the Mehta Research Institute of Math- ematics and Mathematical Physics until October 2000) came into existence in 1975, with a donation of some land and Rs. 40 lakhs from the B S Mehta Trust in Calcutta. With the aim of converting it into a top-class research Institute in ...

  4. Gas Research Institute wetland research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Isaacson, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    As part of three ongoing research projects, the Gas Research Institute (GRI) is studying the natural gas industry's impacts on wetlands and how to manage operations so that impacts can be minimized or eliminated. The objective of the first project is to gain a better understanding of the causes and processes of wetland loss in the Louisiana deltaic plain and what role gas pipeline canals play in wetland loss. On the basis of information gathered from the first projects, management and mitigation implications for pipeline construction and maintenance will be evaluated. The objective of the second project is to assess the floral and faunal communities on existing rights-of-way (ROWs) that pass through numerous types of wetlands across the United States. The emphasis of the project is on pipelines that were installed within the past five years. The objective of the third project is to evaluate the administrative, jurisdictional, technical, and economic issues of wetland mitigation banking. This paper discusses these projects, their backgrounds, some of the results to date, and the deliverables

  5. Growth Disparity between Medical Research and Medical Services ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Institutions started in late 19th and early 20th century included Plague laboratory, Nutrition Research Lab at Coonoor; Malaria Research Institute in Delhi; King Institute, Guindy; Central Research Institute, Kasauli; AIIH & PH at Kolkata.

  6. National Institute of Nursing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine at NINR Research Highlights Data Science and Nursing Research Spotlight on End-of-Life and Palliative Care Research Spotlight on Symptom Management Research Spotlight on Pain Research The Science of Compassion: Future Directions in ...

  7. Auditing as Institutional Research: A Qualitative Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Internal institutional auditing can improve effectiveness and efficiency and protect an institution's assets. Many of the concepts and techniques used to analyze higher education institutions are qualitative in nature and suited to institutional research, including fiscal, operational, data-processing, investigative, management consulting,…

  8. Regression methods for medical research

    CERN Document Server

    Tai, Bee Choo

    2013-01-01

    Regression Methods for Medical Research provides medical researchers with the skills they need to critically read and interpret research using more advanced statistical methods. The statistical requirements of interpreting and publishing in medical journals, together with rapid changes in science and technology, increasingly demands an understanding of more complex and sophisticated analytic procedures.The text explains the application of statistical models to a wide variety of practical medical investigative studies and clinical trials. Regression methods are used to appropriately answer the

  9. Medical education research in GCC countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Hassan, Asim; Aqil, Mansoor; Usmani, Adnan Mahmood

    2015-02-01

    Medical education is an essential domain to produce physicians with high standards of medical knowledge, skills and professionalism in medical practice. This study aimed to investigate the research progress and prospects of GCC countries in medical education during the period 1996-2013. In this study, the research papers published in various global scientific journals during the period 1996-2013 were accessed. We recorded the total number of research documents having an affiliation with GCC Countries including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Oman. The main source for information was Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, Thomson Reuters. In ISI-Web of Science, Saudi Arabia contributed 40797 research papers, Kuwait 1666, United Arab Emirates 3045, Qatar 4265, Bahrain 1666 and Oman 4848 research papers. However, in Medical Education only Saudi Arabia contributed 323 (0.79%) research papers, Kuwait 52 (0.03%), United Arab Emirates 41(0.01%), Qatar 37(0.008%), Bahrain 28 (0.06%) and Oman 22 (0.45%) research papers in in ISI indexed journals. In medical education the Hirsch index (h-index) of Saudi Arabia is 14, United Arab Emirates 14, Kuwait 11, Qatar 8, Bahrain 8 and Oman 5. GCC countries produced very little research in medical education during the period 1996-2013. They must improve their research outcomes in medical education to produce better physicians to enhance the standards in medical practice in the region.

  10. Research and Evaluation in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Helena A.; Collins, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of medical education is continuously evolving, as are the needs of the learner. The appropriate use of research and evaluation is key when assessing the need for change and instituting one's innovative endeavours. This paper demonstrates how research seeks to generate new knowledge, whereas evaluation uses information acquired from…

  11. Using institutional theory in enterprise systems research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per

    2013-01-01

    This paper sets out to examine the use of institutional theory as a conceptually rich lens to study social issues of enterprise systems (ES) research. More precisely, the purpose is to categorize current ES research using institutional theory to develop a conceptual model that advances ES research...... model that advocates multi-level and multi-theory approaches and applies newer institutional aspects such as institutional logics. The findings show that institutional theory in ES research is in its infancy and adopts mainly traditional institutional aspects like isomorphism, with the organization....... Key institutional features are presented such as isomorphism, rationalized myths, and bridging macro and micro structures, and institutional logics and their implications for ES research are discussed. Through a literature review of 181 articles, of which 18 papers are selected, we build a conceptual...

  12. Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-06-30

    This is a second quarter 1194 progress report on the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Included is symposium activity; staff activity; document analysis program; text retrieval program; institute activity; and goals.

  13. Fraud and deceit in medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Sarwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Publication of medical research is the cornerstone for the propagation and dissemination of medical knowledge, culminating in significant effects on the health of the world′s population. However, instances of individuals and institutions subverting the ethos of honesty and integrity on which medical research is built in order to advance personal ambitions have been well documented. Many definitions to describe this unethical behavior have been postulated, although the most descriptive is the "FFP" (fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism model put forward by the United States′ Office of Research Integrity. Research misconduct has many ramifications of which the world′s media are all too keen to demonstrate. Many high-profile cases the world over have demonstrated this lack of ethics when performing medical research. Many esteemed professionals and highly regarded world institutions have succumbed to the ambitions of a few, who for personal gains, have behaved unethically in pursuit of their own ideals. Although institutions have been set up to directly confront these issues, it would appear that a lot more is still required on the part of journals and their editors to combat this behavioral pattern. Individuals starting out at very junior positions in medical research ought to be taught the basics of medical research ethics so that populations are not failed by the very people they are turning to for assistance at times of need. This article provides a review of many of the issues of research misconduct and allows the reader to reflect and think through their own experiences of research. This hopefully will allow individuals to start asking questions on, what is an often, a poorly discussed topic in medical research.

  14. Low Vision Research at the Schepens Eye Research Institute

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amore, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    This research proposal, Low Vision at the Schepens Eye Research Institute, is a collaborative effort on the part of four Investigators at the Institute whose goal is to advance the studies on low vision...

  15. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Genomic Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for ...

  16. Establishment of a cohort for the long-term clinical follow-up with dose reconstruction under the joint medical research project conducted by Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (Japan) and the Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene (Russia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, Y.O.; Bruk, G.Y.; Ershov, E.B.

    2000-01-01

    The cohort of children in the western districts of the Bryansk Region of Russia exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl accident is described in this paper. The cohort was selected under the Joint Medical Research Project on Dosimetry Associated with the Chernobyl Accident conducted by Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation (SMHF, Japan) and the Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene (RIRH, Russia). The subjects of the Research Project are those people residing in the most contaminated areas of Russia who was 0 to 10 years old at the time of exposure. At the moment the cohort comprises 1210 subjects, though this number may slightly decrease in course of a follow-up in view of migration of population. Most of cohort subjects were examined on their health status within the framework of the Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project (CSHMCP) from 1991-1996. In view of the main findings of studies in CSHMCP were thyroid abnormalities, selection of subjects was conducted on the basis of the credible estimates of thyroid dose. Preference for subjects to be included into the cohort was defined by the availability of health examination data from previous study (1991-1996) and individual dosimetry, environmental and social data that may prove useful for reconstruction of individual dose. The primary data analyzed for subjects selection are measurements of iodine-131 in the thyroid in May-June 1986, questionnaire data on individual food habits and early measurements of radiocesium in the body of subjects made by RIRH from May to September 1986. Plausible analytical models were applied to calculate thyroid dose from available data. Previously worked out methods of thyroid dose reconstruction using early measurement data of radiocesium content in the body and questionnaire data on individual consumption of locally produced milk were reevaluated. Basing on these analytical procedures, the individual thyroid dose was ascribed to each member of the cohort. The

  17. National Nuclear Research Institute Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The report highlights the activities of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013, grouped under the following headings: Centres under the institute namely Nuclear Reactors Research Centre (NRRC); Accelerator Research Centre (ARC); Engineering Services Centre (ESC); National Radioactive Waste Management Centre (NRWMC); Nuclear Chemistry and Environmental Research Centre (NCERC); Nuclear Applications Centre (NAC) and National Data Centre (NDC). (A. B.)

  18. [Marketing as a tool in the medical institution management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, N G; Balokhina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary social economic conditions dictate the necessity to change tactics and strategy of functioning of medical institutions of different property forms. Marketing, alongside with management is to become a leading concept of administration of medical institutions. It should be a framework for systematic collection, registration and analysis of data relevant to the medical services market. The issues of the implementation of marketing concept in the practical everyday activities of commercial medical organization providing cosmetology services to population of metropolis.

  19. [German research institute/Max-Planck Institute for psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploog, D

    1999-12-01

    The Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Psychiatrie (DFA, German Institute for Psychiatric Research) in Munich was founded in 1917 bel Emil Kraepelin. For a long time it was the only institution in Germany entirely devoted to psychiatric research. Because of its strictly science-oriented and multidisciplinary approach it also became a model for institutions elsewhere. Kraepelin's ideas have certainly had a strong influence on psychiatry in the twentieth century. The fascinating and instructive history of the DFA reflects the central issues and determinants of psychiatric research. First, talented individuals are needed to conduct such research, and there was no lack in this regard. Second, the various topics chosen are dependent on the available methods and resources. And finally, the issues addressed and the ethical standards of the researchers are heavily dependent on the zeitgeist, as is evident in the three epochs of research at the DFA, from 1917 to 1933, from 1933 to 1945, and from the postwar period to the present. With the introduction of molecular biology and neuroimaging techniques into psychiatric research a change in paradigm took place and a new phase of the current epoch began.

  20. Contamination monitoring of Na 131 I levels in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences by indirect method (Wipe test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beiki, D.; Shahhosseini, S.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Fard-Esfahani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Contamination with radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine centres in addition to being a health concern requires time consuming decontamination efforts. According to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Contamination should be monitored in nuclear medicine centers where radiopharmaceuticals are prepared and administrated at the end of each working session; otherwise, contamination spread to other areas not only equipment but also personnel and other people will be expected. The wipe test for the presence of radioactivity is accomplished by wiping the surface over an area approximately 100 cm 2 with an absorbent paper, then counting it in an appropriate radiation detector. In this study, contamination monitoring of patient's rooms (4 rooms), entrance corridor, patient's corridor, waiting room, control room (nursing station), radiopharmaceutical storage room in therapy unit of Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Shariati hospital was performed by indirect method. Based on the results, some areas including storage room were contaminated. There was also a direct relationship between dose administrated and levels of contamination in patient's rooms. Regarding high uptake of iodine by thyroid gland and damaging effects of Na 131 I, weekly wipe tests are required to determine the level of contamination. Patient's rooms after discharging the patients and before re hospitalization specially should be checked. If these tests reveal contamination over standard levels, appropriate decontamination procedures should be carried out immediately

  1. Institutional Support : Institute for Research on Political Economy in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Institut de recherche empirique en économie politique (IREEP) is an independent nonprofit organization established in 2004 with a view to contributing to the education of the next generation of teachers and researchers in political economy in Bénin and West Africa. IREEP has successfully integrated academic training ...

  2. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87. (DWL)

  3. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87

  4. Central Institute for Nuclear Research (1956 - 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flach, G.; Bonitz, M.

    1979-12-01

    The Central Institute for Nuclear Research (ZfK) of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR is presented. This first overall survey covers the development of the ZfK since 1956, the main research activities and results, a description of the departments responsible for the complex implementation of nuclear research, the social services for staff and the activities of different organizations in the largest central institute of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR. (author)

  5. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    As a response to a low quality of reporting of medical research, guidelines for several different types of study design have been developed to secure accurate reporting and transparency for reviewers and readers from the scientific community. Herein, we review and discuss the six most widely...... accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent...... reporting of medical research findings....

  6. [Globalization in medical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehni, H-J; Wiesing, U

    2018-03-01

    The globalization of clinical research is gaining momentum. In particular, emerging countries, such as Brazil, India, Russia and South Africa show a significant increase in clinical trials. This trend is generating various ethical problems, which are examined in the present article. Sometimes, generally accepted ethical rules, such as the evaluation of clinical trials by ethics commissions are not respected and sometimes conflicts are generated which are difficult to resolve. For instance, it is controversial which standard of care researchers and sponsors have to provide in an international study. These conflicts are exacerbated by a fundamental dilemma: more research on diseases prevalent in developing and emerging countries is necessary. At the same time, the protection of study participants in those countries creates particular challenges. In recent years, international commissions and guidelines have achieved significant progress in solving these conflicts; however, the further development has to be analyzed very carefully. Incentives for better research on neglected diseases have to be created. Undesirable developments and abuse have to be prevented by appropriate international ethical standards.

  7. MEDICAL SERVICES OR MEDICAL CARE – AN URGENT ISSUE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Pesennikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To consider the relationship between the concepts of “medical service” and “medical care” in the work of public medical institutions, based on the analysis of normative legal documents of the modern period.Materials and methods. In the course of the research, more than 18 legal and regulatory documents that were published during the period from 1990 to 2017 were analyzed, an analysis of judicial practice and related literature sources (periodicals was carried out.Results. The analysis made it possible to distinguish the stages in the development of the organizational and legal framework for the provision of paid medical services in the Russian Federation and the dynamics of the relationship between the terms “medical care” and “medical service”. It was revealed that the concept of “medical services” appeared much later and was associated with the development of paid medical services and the need to establish legal aspects of health care. The provision of medical assistance is regulated mainly by public law, and the provision of medical services is governed by private law. The term “medical care” is broader than the “medical service” from the standpoint of the social aspect. At the same time, the concept of “medical service” can be considered more widely than medical care in cases when it is not only about measures aimed at treating the patient, but also about providing additional services to the patient in the process of receiving medical care.Conclusion. Thus, we concluded that the categories of medical care and medical services should not be identified, but also not completely different concepts, but rather enter into a partial intersection relationship. The need to distinguish between the concepts of “medical care” and “medical service” is dictated not only by the category relations or opinion of the population and the medical community, but also by the need for legal support for the process of

  8. Institutional Research's Role in Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Institutions that have organized and centralized their data enjoy an obvious advantage in grappling with strategic planning and other issues. As the drumbeat for accountability, planning, and demonstrating effectiveness to internal and external stakeholders intensifies, the stature and importance of institutional research offices on most campuses…

  9. Analysis of occupational doses of radiation workers in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanaye, S.S.; Baburajan, Sujatha; Joshi, V.D.; Pawar, S.G.; Nalawade, S.K.; Raman, N.V.; Kher, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Routine monitoring of occupational radiation workers is done for controlling the doses to the individuals and to demonstrate the compliance with occupational dose limits. One of the objective of personnel monitoring program is the assessment of the radiation safety of working area and trends of exposure histories of individuals or group of workers. Computerised dose registry of all monitored radiation workers along with their personnel data helps in analyzing these trends. This in turn helps the institutions in management of their radiation safety programs. In India, annual and life time occupational dose records are maintained as National Dose Registry in the Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. This paper presents analysis of occupational dose data of monitored radiation workers in medical institutions in India during last five years (i.e. 2002-2006)

  10. Research at the Paul Scherrer Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) is a multidisciplinary research institute for natural sciences and technology. In national and international collaboration with universities, other research institutes and industry, PSI is active in elementary particle physics, life sciences, solid-state physics, material sciences, nuclear and non-nuclear energy research, and energy-related ecology. PSI's priorities lie in research fields which are relevant to sustainable development, serve educational needs and are beyond the possibilities of a single university department. PSI develops and operates complex research installations open of the world's most powerful cyclotron, allowing to operate high intensity secondary pion and muon beams, a neutron spallation source and various applications in medicine and materials research. A short review on research at PSI is presented, with special concentration on particle physics experiments. (author)

  11. Statistical problems in medical research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... medical research, there are some common problems in using statistical methodology which may result ... optimal combination of diagnostic tests for osteoporosis .... randomization used include stratification and minimize-.

  12. Japan's contribution to nuclear medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.; Sakamoto, Junichi; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the degree of Japan's contribution to the nuclear medical research in the last decade. Articles published in 1991-2000 in highly reputed nuclear medical journals were accessed through the MEDLINE database. The number of articles having affiliation with a Japanese institution was counted along with publication year. In addition, shares of top-ranking countries were determined along with their trends over time. Of the total number of articles (7,788), Japan's share of articles in selected nuclear medical journals was 11.4% (889 articles) and ranked 2nd in the world after the USA (2,645 articles). The recent increase in the share was statistically significant for Japan (p=0.02, test for trend). Japan's share in nuclear medical research output is much higher than that in other biomedical fields. (author)

  13. Computer-based literature search in medical institutions in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita Jayantee

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the use of computer-based literature search and its application in clinical training and patient care as a surrogate marker of evidence-based medicine. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire comprising of questions on purpose (presentation, patient management, research, realm (site accessed, nature and frequency of search, effect, infrastructure, formal training in computer based literature search and suggestions for further improvement were sent to residents and faculty of a Postgraduate Medical Institute (PGI and a Medical College. The responses were compared amongst different subgroups of respondents. Results: Out of 300 subjects approached 194 responded; of whom 103 were from PGI and 91 from Medical College. There were 97 specialty residents, 58 super-specialty residents and 39 faculty members. Computer-based literature search was done at least once a month by 89% though there was marked variability in frequency and extent. The motivation for computer-based literature search was for presentation in 90%, research in 65% and patient management in 60.3%. The benefit of search was acknowledged in learning and teaching by 80%, research by 65% and patient care by 64.4% of respondents. Formal training in computer based literature search was received by 41% of whom 80% were residents. Residents from PGI did more frequent and more extensive computer-based literature search, which was attributed to better infrastructure and training. Conclusion: Training and infrastructure both are crucial for computer-based literature search, which may translate into evidence based medicine.

  14. Teaching and Research at Undergraduate Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shila

    2006-03-01

    My own career path has been non-traditional and I ended up at a primarily undergraduate institution by pure accident. However, teaching at a small college has been extremely rewarding to me, since I get to know and interact with my students, have an opportunity to work with them one-on-one and promote their intellectual growth and sense of social responsibility. One of the growing trends at undergraduate institutions in the past decade has been the crucial role of undergraduate research as part of the teaching process and the training of future scientists. There are several liberal arts institutions that expect research-active Faculty who can mentor undergraduate research activities. Often faculty members at these institutions consider their roles as teacher-scholars with no boundary between these two primary activities. A researcher who is in touch with the developments in his/her own field and contributes to new knowledge in the field is likely to be a more exciting teacher in the classroom and share the excitement of discovery with the students. At undergraduate institutions, there is generally very good support available for faculty development projects in both teaching and research. Often, there is a generous research leave program as well. For those who like advising and mentoring undergraduates and a teaching and learning centered paradigm, I will recommend a career at an undergraduate institution. In my presentation, I will talk about how one can prepare for such a career.

  15. Environmental health and safety issues related to the use of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) at hospitals and medical research institutions and compliance determination with the Clean Air Act standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasinathan, R.; Kanchan, A.

    1995-01-01

    Currently, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has standards for procedures, performance activities and technical specifications on storage of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) under 10 CFR Part 20. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is proposing environmental standards for the management, storage and disposal of LLRW. The proposed standards, which will become 40 CFR part 193 when finalized, limits the committed effective dose to members of the public from the management and storage of LLRW, committed effective doses resulting from LLRW disposal and levels of radiological contamination of underground sources of drinking water as a result of the activities subject to management, storage and disposal of LLRW. Further, under Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments, radionuclides are required to be inventoried for all generators. For hospitals and medical research institutions, quantities of LLRW are often below the concentrations required under reporting and record keeping requirements of 10 CFR 20. However, in many instances, the facility may require NRC permits and compliance with air quality dispersion modeling requirements. This paper presents the typical radionuclides used in hospitals and medical research institutions, and strategies to evaluate their usage and steps to achieve compliance. Air quality dispersion modeling by use of the COMPLY model is demonstrated to evaluate the fate of radionuclides released from on-site incineration of LLRW. The paper concludes that no significant threat is posed from the incineration of LLRW

  16. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suo-Wei; Chen, Tong; Pan, Qi; Wei, Liang-Yu; Wang, Qin; Li, Chao; Song, Jing-Chen; Luo, Ji

    2018-06-05

    The development and application of medical technologies reflect the medical quality and clinical capacity of a hospital. It is also an effective approach in upgrading medical service and core competitiveness among medical institutions. This study aimed to build a quantitative medical technology evaluation system through questionnaire survey within medical institutions to perform an assessment to medical technologies more objectively and accurately, and promote the management of medical quality technologies and ensure the medical safety of various operations among the hospitals. A two-leveled quantitative medical technology evaluation system was built through a two-round questionnaire survey of chosen experts. The Delphi method was applied in identifying the structure of evaluation system and indicators. The judgment of the experts on the indicators was adopted in building the matrix so that the weight coefficient and maximum eigenvalue (λ max), consistency index (CI), and random consistency ratio (CR) could be obtained and collected. The results were verified through consistency tests, and the index weight coefficient of each indicator was conducted and calculated through analytical hierarchy process. Twenty-six experts of different medical fields were involved in the questionnaire survey, 25 of whom successfully responded to the two-round research. Altogether, 4 primary indicators (safety, effectiveness, innovativeness, and benefits), as well as 13 secondary indicators, were included in the evaluation system. The matrix is built to conduct the λ max, CI, and CR of each expert in the survey, and the index weight coefficients of primary indicators were 0.33, 0.28, 0.27, and 0.12, respectively, and the index weight coefficients of secondary indicators were conducted and calculated accordingly. As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the

  17. Institutional Researchers' Use of Qualitative Research Methods for Institutional Accountability at Two Year Colleges in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Bishar M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined institutional researchers' use of qualitative methods to document institutional accountability and effectiveness at two-year colleges in Texas. Participants were Institutional Research and Effectiveness personnel. Data were collected through a survey consisting of closed and open ended questions which was administered…

  18. Cyclotrons at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    In this article the destruction by American forces, during World War II, of the Japanese cyclotrons and the subsequent construction of new cyclotrons at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Japan is described. Their use for biological and medical radiation chemistry studies is summarized. (UK)

  19. Booklet of the Research Institute of Clinical Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todua, F.; Jgamadze, N.; Todua, N.; Beriashvili, Z.; Chelishvili, M.; Todua, I.; Chovelidze, Sh. et al.

    2012-01-01

    Research Institute of Clinical Medicine is one of the biggest university diagnostic and treatment centre in Georgia with unique modern diagnostic and treatment apparatus. The institute is acknowledged as a leader in various trends of radiology and surgery. The Research Institute of Clinical Medicine was founded in 1991. It is the leading scientific establishment in the field of medicine. The scientific-research work of the Institute is coordinated by the National Academy of Sciences of Georgia. The main scientific trend of the Institute is the Early Complex Diagnostics and Treatment. The scientific activity of the Institute is led by the Scientific Council. Institute achieved remarkable success since its foundation: It has been defended 56 theses for Candidate of Medical Sciences and 16 for Doctor of Medical Sciences; About 30 post-graduate students and more than 200 radiologists have taken training courses in radiology. Nowadays they work in different regions of Georgia, 21 inventions took out patents. It has been published 2000 scientific works and 9 monographs. (authors)

  20. Radiation protection in medical and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuente Puch, A.E. de la

    2013-01-01

    The human exposure to ionizing radiation in the context of medical and biomedical research raises specific ethical challenges whose resolution approaches should be based on scientific, legal and procedural matters. Joint Resolution MINSAP CITMA-Regulation 'Basic Standards of Radiation Safety' of 30 November 2001 (hereafter NBS) provides for the first time in Cuba legislation specifically designed to protect patients and healthy people who participate in research programs medical and biomedical and exposed to radiation. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the need to develop specific requirements for radiation protection in medical and biomedical research, as well as to identify all the institutions involved in this in order to establish the necessary cooperation to ensure the protection of persons participating in the investigation

  1. Tropical Journal of Medical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Medical Research publishes original research work, review articles, important case report, short communications, and innovations in medicine and related fields. Vol 16, No 2 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles ...

  2. Final Report: Performance Engineering Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellor-Crummey, John [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-10-27

    This document is a final report about the work performed for cooperative agreement DE-FC02-06ER25764, the Rice University effort of Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI). PERI was an Enabling Technologies Institute of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-2) program supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. The PERI effort at Rice University focused on (1) research and development of tools for measurement and analysis of application program performance, and (2) engagement with SciDAC-2 application teams.

  3. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  4. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo

    2009-06-29

    The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology.In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization supporting clinical trial recruitment

  5. Nuclear medicine. Medical technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, H.; Jigalin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Aim, method: the scientific publications in the 2003 and 2004 issues of the journal Nuklearmedizin were analyzed retrospectively with regard to the proportion of medical technology research. Results: out of a total of 73 articles examined, 9 (12%) were classified as medical technology research, that is, 8/15 of the original papers (16%) and one of the case reports (5%). Of these 9 articles, 44% (4/9) focused on the combination of molecular and morphological imaging with direct technical appliance or information technology solutions. Conclusion: medical technology research is limited in the journal's catchment area. The reason for this is related to the interdependency between divergent development dynamics in the medical technology industry's locations, the many years that the area of scintigraphic technology has been underrepresented, research policy particularly in discrepancies in the promotion of molecular imaging and a policy in which health is not perceived as a predominantly good and positive economic factor, but more as a curb to economic development. (orig.)

  6. Research in Institutional Economics in Management Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    This report maps research in institutional economics in management science in the European Union for the 1995 to 2002 period. The reports applies Internet search based on a university listing, search on journal databases, key informants and an internet-based survey. 195 researchers are identified....... In (sub-)disciplinary terms, organization, strategy, corporate governance, and international business are the major areas of application of institutional economics ideas. In terms of countries, the EU strongholds are Holland, Denmark, UK, and Germany. There is apparently no or very little relevant...... research in Ireland, Portugal, Luxembourg and Greece. Based on the findings of the report, it seems warranted to characterize the EU research effort in the field as being rather dispersed and uncoordinated. Thus, there are no specialized journals, associations or PhD courses. This state of affairs...

  7. Adapting Institutional Research to Changing Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    Institutional research (IR) in community/junior colleges in past years has been limited to gathering data for external agencies, concentrating on raw demographic data and student flow studies. IR should be directed toward providing data for administrative decisions and for successful maintenance of college operations. In spite of the heavy demands…

  8. Water Resources Research Institute | Mississippi State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcome The Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute provides a statewide center of expertise in water and associated land-use and serves as a repository of knowledge for use in education private interests in the conservation, development, and use of water resources; to provide training

  9. Research-oriented medical education for graduate medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Madhav G

    2013-01-01

    In most parts of the world, medical education is predominantly geared to create service personnel for medical and health services. Training in research is ignored, which is a major handicap for students who are motivated to do research. The main objective of this study was to develop, for such students, a cost-effective 'in-study' research training module that could be adopted even by medical colleges, which have a modest research infrastructure, in different regions of India. Short-duration workshops on the clinical and laboratory medicine research methods including clinical protocol development were held in different parts of India to facilitate participation of students from various regions. Nine workshops covering the entire country were conducted between July 2010 and December 2011. Participation was voluntary and by invitation only to the recipients of the Indian Council of Medical Research-Short-term Studentship programme (ICMR- STS), which was taken as an index of students' research motivation. Faculty was drawn from the medical institutions in the region. All expenses on students, including their travel, and that of the faculty were borne by the academy. Impact of the workshop was judged by the performance of the participants in pre- and post-workshop tests with multiple-choice questions (MCQs) containing the same set of questions. There was no negative marking. Anonymous student feedback was obtained using a questionnaire. Forty-one per cent of the 1009 invited students attended the workshops. These workshops had a positive impact on the participants. Only 20% students could pass and just 2.3% scored >80% marks in the pre-workshop test. There was a three-fold increase in the pass percentage and over 20% of the participants scored >80% marks (A grade) in the post-workshop test. The difference between the pre- and post- workshop performance was statistically significant at all the centres. In the feedback from participants, the workshop received an average

  10. Multi-Institutional Collaborative Astronomy Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2011-09-01

    ASP, AAS, APS, and AAPT advocate that scientists should be engaged and acknowledged for successfully engaging in astronomy and physics education research and the scholarship of teaching because these efforts serve to improve pedagogical techniques and the evaluation of teaching. However, scientists have had the opportunity to pursue formal training in how to meaningfully engage in astronomy education research as an important scholarly endeavor. This special interest session for college and university physics and astronomy faculty, post-docs, and graduate students provided a forum to discuss the motivations, strategies, methodology, and publication routes for improving astronomy education through conducting rigorous science education research. Topics for discussion targeted the value of various education research questions, strengths and weaknesses of several different research design methodologies, strategies to successfully obtain Institutional Review Board approval to conduct education research on human subjects, and become more aware of how education research articles are created for publication in journals such as the Astronomy Education Review.

  11. The Knowledge Management Research of Agricultural Scientific Research Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Based on the perception of knowledge management from experts specializing in different fields,and experts at home and abroad,the knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution can build new platform,offer new approach for realization of explicit or tacit knowledge,and promote resilience and innovative ability of scientific research institution.The thesis has introduced functions of knowledge management research of agricultural science.First,it can transform the tacit knowledge into explicit knowledge.Second,it can make all the scientific personnel share knowledge.Third,it is beneficial to the development of prototype system of knowledge management.Fourth,it mainly researches the realization of knowledge management system.Fifth,it can manage the external knowledge via competitive intelligence.Sixth,it can foster talents of knowledge management for agricultural scientific research institution.Seventh,it offers the decision-making service for leaders to manage scientific program.The thesis also discusses the content of knowledge management of agricultural scientific research institution as follows:production and innovation of knowledge;attainment and organizing of knowledge;dissemination and share of knowledge;management of human resources and the construction and management of infrastructure.We have put forward corresponding countermeasures to further reinforce the knowledge management research of agricultural scientific research institution.

  12. 75 FR 65363 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  13. 75 FR 63843 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Review of Minority Biomedical Research Neuro Grant Applications. Date... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, Room 3AN18J, Bethesda...

  14. Do Research Participants Trust Researchers or Their Institution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemin, Marilys; Barnard, Emma; Allen, Anton; Stewart, Paul; Walker, Hannah; Rosenthal, Doreen; Gillam, Lynn

    2018-07-01

    Relationships of trust between research participants and researchers are often considered paramount to successful research; however, we know little about participants' perspectives. We examined whom research participants trusted when taking part in research. Using a qualitative approach, we interviewed 36 research participants, including eight Indigenous participants. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. This article focuses on findings related to non-Indigenous participants. In contrast to Indigenous participants, non-Indigenous participants placed their trust in research institutions because of their systems of research ethics, their reputation and prestige. Researchers working in non-Indigenous contexts need to be cognizant that the trust that participants place in them is closely connected with the trust that participants have in the institution.

  15. Institute for Safety Research. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Boehmert, J.

    1993-11-01

    The Institute is concerned with evaluating the design based safety and increasing the operational safety of technical systems which include serious sources of danger. It is further occupied with methods of mitigating the effects of incidents and accidents. For all these goals the institute does research work in the following fields: modelling and simulation of thermofluid dynamics and neutron kinetics in cases of accidents; two-phase measuring techniques; safety-related analyses and characterizing of mechanical behaviours of material; measurements and calculations of radiation fields; process and plant diagnostics; development and application of methods of decision analysis. This annual report gives a survey of projects and scientific contributions (e.g. Single rod burst tests with ZrNb1 cladding), lists publications, institute seminars and workshops, names the personal staff and describes the organizational structure. (orig./HP)

  16. Alligator Rivers Regions Research Institute research report 1983-84

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Institute undertakes and coordinates research required to ensure the protection of the environment in the Alligator Rivers Region from any consequences resulting from the mining and processing of uranium ore. Research projects outlined are in aquatic biology, terrestrial ecology, analytical chemistry, environmental radioactivity and geomorphology

  17. Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2011-01-01

    By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

  18. The Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research SIN

    CERN Document Server

    Pritzker, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This book tells the story of the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN). The institute was founded in 1968 and became part of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in 1988. Its founding occurred at a time when physics was generally considered the key discipline for technological and social development. This step was unusual for a small country like Switzerland and showed courage and foresight. Equally unusual were the accomplishments of SIN, compared with similar institutes in the rest of the world, as well as its influence on Swiss, and partially also on international politics of science. That this story is now available in a widely understandable form is due to the efforts of some physicists, who took the initiative as long as contemporary witnesses could still be questioned. As is usually the case, official documents always show just an excerpt of what really happened. An intimate portrayal of people who contributed to success requires personal memories. This text relies on both sources. In addition, the e...

  19. Research misconduct definitions adopted by U.S. research institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B; Neal, Talicia; Raymond, Austin; Kissling, Grace E

    2015-01-01

    In 2000, the U.S. federal government adopted a uniform definition of research misconduct as fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism (FFP), which became effective in 2001. Institutions must apply this definition of misconduct to federally-funded research to receive funding. While institutions are free to adopt definitions of misconduct that go beyond the federal standard, it is not known how many do. We analyzed misconduct policies from 183 U.S. research institutions and coded them according to thirteen different types of behavior mentioned in the misconduct definition. We also obtained data on the institution's total research funding and public vs. private status, and the year it adopted the definition. We found that more than half (59%) of the institutions in our sample had misconduct policies that went beyond the federal standard. Other than FFP, the most common behaviors included in definitions were "other serious deviations" (45.4%), "significant or material violations of regulations" (23.0%), "misuse of confidential information" (15.8%), "misconduct related to misconduct" (14.8%), "unethical authorship other than plagiarism" (14.2%), "other deception involving data manipulation" (13.1%), and "misappropriation of property/theft" (10.4%). Significantly more definitions adopted in 2001 or later went beyond the federal standard than those adopted before 2001 (73.2% vs. 26.8%), and significantly more definitions adopted by institutions in the lower quartile of total research funding went beyond the federal standard than those adopted by institutions in the upper quartiles. Public vs. private status was not significantly associated with going beyond the federal standard.

  20. Institutional research and development, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory's Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) Program was established in 1984 to foster exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to support our national defense and energy missions. In FY 1988, the IR and D Program was funded by a 2% assessment on the Laboratory's operating budget. Our policy is to use these funds for researching innovative ideas in LLNL's areas of expertise and for developing new areas of expertise that we perceive to be in the national interest. The technical and scientific accomplishments of each project and of each institute funded this year are presented in this report. The projects were selected because they are expected to advance research in important areas that are too basic or too time consuming to be funded by the developmental programs or because they are somewhat risky projects that have the promise of high payoff. We are continually reappraising the IR and D Program. In particular, we seek new candidates for the Director's Initiatives, and we constantly reassess the work in progress. Each year, we make adjustments to further the Laboratory's policy of using the IR and D Program to fund innovative ideas with high potential for enhancing programmatic activities of national importance

  1. Institutional research and development, FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory's Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) Program was established in 1984 to foster exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to support our national defense and energy missions. In FY 1988, the IR and D Program was funded by a 2% assessment on the Laboratory's operating budget. Our policy is to use these funds for researching innovative ideas in LLNL's areas of expertise and for developing new areas of expertise that we perceive to be in the national interest. The technical and scientific accomplishments of each project and of each institute funded this year are presented in this report. The projects were selected because they are expected to advance research in important areas that are too basic or too time consuming to be funded by the developmental programs or because they are somewhat risky projects that have the promise of high payoff. We are continually reappraising the IR and D Program. In particular, we seek new candidates for the Director's Initiatives, and we constantly reassess the work in progress. Each year, we make adjustments to further the Laboratory's policy of using the IR and D Program to fund innovative ideas with high potential for enhancing programmatic activities of national importance.

  2. 76 FR 11765 - Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Education Research and Special Education Research Grant Programs; Institute of Education Sciences; Overview Information; Education Research and Special Education Research.... SUMMARY: The Director of the Institute of Education Sciences (Institute) announces the Institute's FY 2012...

  3. Preliminary thoughts on research in medical humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiaojing; Guo, Jiawei; Qian, Haihong

    2017-05-23

    Medical humanities (MH) is an interdisciplinary field of medicine which includes the humanities (literature, philosophy, ethics, history, and religion), social sciences (anthropology, cultural studies, psychology, sociology, and health geography), and the arts (literature, theater, film, and visual arts) and their application to medical education and practice. Studies of MH should not be limited to theoretical discussions. Research results must be translated into use of methodologies to formulate medical policies, guide clinical practices, and help resolve physical or mental problems. MH has a critical role in addressing medicine-related issues, such as human cloning legislation and the treatment of Ebola virus infection. Recently, MH has also been included in the "Healthy China 2030" project, indicating that MH has garnered more attention in China. Medical colleges, research institutes, and non-profit organizations are focusing on MH studies. Over the past few years, financial support for MH studies has also increased. Although the development of MH currently lags behind medicine and health sciences, MH has promise.

  4. Time-bound promotions in Indian medical institutes: a mirage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhlecha, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Incentives, pay hikes and timely promotions enhance the job performance of an employee. In medical institutes, too, satisfied teachers would train students in a better way leading to better equipped doctors and ultimately, greater patient satisfaction. A study in Malaysia links high levels of satisfaction of employees with good salary, promotions, and incentives.

  5. [A Swiss medical-social institution and the Snoezelen concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Terrail, Caroline; Kemken, Lucie Marigo; Makamwe, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In collaboration with six student nurses from the Geneva Haute École de Santé, the Les Franchises medical-social institution in Geneva has launched an innovative project: the integration of the Snoezelen concept into its care programme, which will benefit residents with moderate or advanced dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Gas Research Institute research program summary: Goals and accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Gas Research Institute's research and development programs pursue technologies that maximize the value of gas energy services while minimizing the cost of supplying and delivering gaseous fuels. Four program areas, Supply Options, End Use, Gas Operations, and Crosscutting Research, are described in the report, together with related project titles and numbers. Also included are summaries of 1990 research results, research collaboration and supported work, and patents and licensing agreements. Glossaries of budget and program terms and of acronyms and abbreviations often used in the GRI literature are added

  7. Organizational Creativity in Japanese National Research Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Kato-Nitta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of environmental or individual internal factors on organizational creativity are well documented, but the mediating mechanisms of intrinsic motivation that explain the linkages between such effects remain unclear. Questionnaires completed by scientists at Japanese national research institutions were statistically analyzed by using structural equation modeling for teams (n = 65 and individuals (n = 420, and the results showed that the two variables associated with intrinsic motivation mediated the work environment and creative performance at both the individual and team levels. In revealing the similarities and differences between the team and individual measurements, the results showed that the psychological aspects of intrinsic motivation (job satisfaction, supervision, and communication are relatively significant for teams and that the behavioral aspects of intrinsic motivation (research activity, communication, and involvement are key for individuals. Furthermore, both levels of analysis showed that “Western-style” meetings are detractors for intrinsic motivation. The implications for organizational creativity theory and research management are ultimately discussed.

  8. Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Jonathan F.; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L.; Malec, James F.; Mueller, Michael J.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Tansey, Keith E.; Thompson, Aiko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the American With Disabilities Act, the NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, a total of 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Dr Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference under the title “Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward.” This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. This article is being published almost simultaneously in the following six journals: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Physical Therapy, and Rehabilitation Psychology. Citation information is as follows: Frontera WR, Bean JF, Damiano D, et al. Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;97(4):393–403. PMID:28499004

  9. Forgotten research institute makes money from ideas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobinkovic, B.

    2008-01-01

    Robots that stack magnets weighing several tons in the world's biggest nuclear laboratory with a millimetre precision. Small machines that can destroy bombs, detect bombs in trains, planes or cars. A leading position in an expert group that, with NATO funds, tests how robotic systems can be used in the fight against terrorism. This summary indicates that ideas are an integral part of the work done at the ZTS Vyskumno-vyvojovy ustav (ZTS VVU) research institute in Kosice. This is nothing special for a research institute. But this is a joint stock company. And so it needed one additional vision: producing goods that sell from the research. ZTS VVU has delivered robotic system for accurate positioning of cryo-magnets for the CERN. Cryo-magnet is 16 m long and weights 34 tonnes. For the CERN five robotic systems were delivered. The value of the contract with the CERN was about 60 millions slovak crowns (≅ 2 million EUR). Transport containers, manipulators for decontamination and manipulators with radioactive wastes were manufactured for the Bohunicke spracovatelske centrum (Bohunice Radioactive Waste Processing Center). (authors)

  10. Growth Disparity between Medical Research and Medical Services ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Growth Disparity between Medical Research and Medical Services in India. British rulers opened hospitals for modern medicine; medical colleges; nurses schools etc. in the 19th century to the joyous welcome of natives. During the same period, they set up Indian Research Fund Association two years ahead of the MRC of ...

  11. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  12. The function of a medical director in healthcare institutions: a master or a servant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossaify, Antoine; Rasputin, Boris; Lahoud, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms "medical director" and "director", and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  13. The Function of a Medical Director in Healthcare Institutions: A Master or a Servant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Kossaify

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The function of a medical director is presented along with features of efficiency and deficiencies from the perspective of healthcare system improvement. A MEDLINE/Pubmed research was performed using the terms “medical director” and “director”, and 50 relevant articles were selected. Institutional healthcare quality is closely related to the medical director efficiency and deficiency, and a critical discussion of his or her function is presented along with a focus on the institutional policies, protocols, and procedures. The relationship between the medical director and the executive director is essential in order to implement a successful healthcare program, particularly in private facilities. Issues related to professionalism, fairness, medical records, quality of care, patient satisfaction, medical teaching, and malpractice are discussed from the perspective of institutional development and improvement strategies. In summary, the medical director must be a servant to the institutional constitution and to his or her job description; when his or her function is fully implemented, he or she may represent a local health governor or master, ensuring supervision and improvement of the institutional healthcare system.

  14. Perspectives from the Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: The Wildland Research institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Bowker; H. Ken Cordell; Neelam C. Poudyal

    2014-01-01

    The Wildland Research Institute (WRi) at the University of Leeds (UK) came into being in October 2009. Its origins go back to a United Kingdom research councilfunded seminar series called Wilderness Britain? which ran between 1998 and 2000 and was coordinated from the University of Leeds. This opened up the wider debate on wilderness and rewilding in the UK and later...

  15. International Interdisciplinary Research Institute Project in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Paul

    2010-02-01

    The project of an interdisciplinary research institute in Senegal was initiated in 1993 in Senegal (West Africa) and became a template for a similar project in the US in 1999. Since then, numerous meetings and presentations have been held at various national and international institutions, workshops and conferences. The current development of this partnership includes drafts for a full design of all systems at each facility, as well as the physics, applied health and educational programs to be implemented. The Senegal facility was conceived for scientific capacity building and equally to act as a focal point aimed at using the local scientific expertise. An anticipated outcome would be a contribution to the reduction of an ever-growing brain drain process suffered by the country, and the African continent in general. The development of the project led also to a strong African orientation of the facility: built for international collaboration, it is to be a pan-African endeavor and to serve primarily African countries. The facility received a presidential approval in a 2003 meeting and will develop an interdisciplinary program centered on a strong materials science research which will also allow for the establishment of an advanced analytical (physical chemistry) laboratory. A central part of the facility will be linked to state-of-the art accelerator mass spectrometry, cyclotron and low energy electromagnetic accelerator systems. )

  16. Institutional Support : Institute for Research on Political Economy in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Institut de recherche empirique en économie politique (IREEP) is an independent nonprofit organization established in 2004 with a view to contributing to the ... International Water Resources Association, in close collaboration with IDRC, is holding a webinar titled “Climate change and adaptive water management: ...

  17. A Proposed Framework of Institutional Research Development Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Anita; Taylor, John

    2011-01-01

    Globally, research has become a key driver for the achievement of status and the procurement of funding for higher education institutions. Although there is mounting pressure on institutions to become research active, many institutions are rooted in a strong tradition of teaching. These institutions find it challenging to develop research capacity…

  18. Medical issues and research activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orecchia, R.; Solcia, E.; Fossati, P.

    2006-01-01

    We want to report on the CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) Foundation activity aiming to create the clinical conditions that will enable CNAO to work in the most advantageous way. CNAO Foundation is taking care to inform the population, patients and medical community on the existence, potentiality and limits of hadrontherapy. To achieve this goal it has created a website that gives general information on hadrontherapy and a medical service that advises on specific clinical cases; it has moreover promoted seminars and courses for residents and specialists. Disease specific working groups have been created to define protocols on patients selection criteria, indications, dose and fractionation and to design clinical trials that will be carried out at CNAO. These protocols and trials are a working tool that will permit a more rational clinical activity. CNAO Foundation is promoting training of personnel that will work at CNAO and in the next few months physicians and physicists will be send abroad to learn the practical aspects of hadrontherapy in foreign facilities where hadrons are already in clinical use. CNAO Foundation is sponsoring research activity in the fields of precision patient positioning, organ motion management, in vivo dosimetry with in room positron emission tomography (PET) scan and radiobiology. These activities will help to take full advantage of the facility under construction and to better define the role of hadrontherapy in cancer care. (author)

  19. Overview of research potential of Institute for Nuclear Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, Marin

    2007-01-01

    The main organizations involved in nuclear power production in Romania, under supervision of Presidency, Prime Minister and Parliament are: CNCAN (National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control), Nuclear Agency, Ministry of Economy and Commerce, ANDRAD (Waste Management Agency), SNN (Nuclearelectrica National Society), RAAN (Romanian Authority for Nuclear Activities), ICN (Institute for Nuclear Research - Pitesti), SITON (Center of Design and Engineering for Nuclear Projects- Bucharest); ROMAG-PROD (Heavy Water Plant), CNE-PROD (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant - Production Unit), CNE-INVEST (Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant -Investments Unit), FCN (Nuclear Fuel Factory). The Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti INR, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti is endowed with a TRIGA Reactor, Hot Cells, Materials Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety Laboratories, Nuclear Fuel, Nuclear Safety. Waste management. Other research centers and laboratories implied in nuclear activities are: ICIT, National Institute for cryogenics and isotope technologies at Rm Valcea Valcea. with R and D activity devoted to heavy water technologies, IFIN, Institute for nuclear physics and engineering, Bucharest, as well as the educational institutions involved in atomic energy applications and University research, Politechnical University Bucharest, University of Bucharest, University of Pitesti, etc. The INR activity outlined, i.e. the nuclear power research as a scientific and technical support for the Romanian nuclear power programme, mainly dedicated to the existing NPP in the country (CANDU). Focused with priority are: - Nuclear Safety (behavior of plant materials, components, installations during accident conditions and integrity investigations); - Radioactive Waste Management Radioactive; - Radioprotection; Product and services supply for NPP. INR Staff numbers 320 R and D qualified and experienced staff, 240 personnel in devices and prototype workshops and site support

  20. NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alison Davis NIH's National Institute of General Medical Sciences celebrates 45 years of Discovery for Health The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) is the NIH institute that primarily supports ...

  1. Overview of Gas Research Institute environmental research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is a private not-for-profit membership organization of natural gas pipelines, distribution companies and natural gas producers. GRI's purpose is to plan, to manage and to develop financing for a gas-related research and development (R and D) program on behalf of its members and their customers. GRI does not do any research itself. GRI's R and D program is designed to provide advanced technologies for natural gas supply, transport, storage, distribution and end-use applications in all markets. In addition, basic research is conducted for GRI in these areas to build a foundation for future technology breakthroughs. Work in the Environment and Safety Research Department includes sections interested in: supply related research, air quality research, end use equipment safety research, gas operations safety research, and gas operations environmental research. The Natural Gas Supply Program has research ongoing in such areas as: restoration of pipeline right-of-ways; cleaning up town gas manufacturing sites; the development of methanogenic bacteria for soil and groundwater cleanup; development of biological fluidized carbon units for rapid destruction of carbonaceous compounds; research on liquid redox sulfur recovery for sulfur removal from natural gas; research on produced water and production wastes generated by the natural gas industry; environmental effects of coalbed methane production; and subsurface effects of natural gas operations. The western coalbed methane and ground water programs are described

  2. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients.

  3. STRATEGIC PROJECT MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES, PROGRAMS AND PORTFOLIOS OF THE MEDICAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Борисовна ДАНЧЕНКО

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of the latest research in the direction of the use of the project-based approach to the management of medical institutions. It is shown that medicine today is a project-oriented area, and modern scientific studies suggest the use of not only the project management approach and portfolio management. The various scientific sources proposed the classification of projects of medical institutions, mechanisms of formation of projects portfolios of such institutions. The concept of integrated management of medical institutions, which includes strategic, project, portfolio, program management approach (S3P-concept, is offered. According to this concept, the process of S3P-management of the medical institution will include four stages, which are closely interrelated. For the first time, the pair principles of S3P-management are formulated. The proposed concept and principles of S3P-management of medical institution require further development and creating of models, methods and integrated management tools, as well as the development of a system of indicators verify compliance with the organization's strategy of its projects, projects portfolios and programs. This concept and the proposed integrated management principles are universal and can be applied to any project-oriented area.

  4. [Who finances medical research in Chile?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H; Kauffmann, R; Goic, A

    1995-10-01

    To identify those institutions granting medical research in Chile, every issue of Revista Médica de Chile published between 1987 and 1994 was reviewed, under the assumption that a vast majority (over 70%) of papers released by Chilean authors in topics of internal medicine and related subspecialties would have been submitted for publication in this journal. This assumption was based in the solid prestige of Revista Médica de Chile among Chilean physicians and investigators: it is one of the oldest medical journals in the world (founded in 1872) and its inclusion in the most important international indexes (e.g. Index Medicus, Current Contents) qualifies it in the "mainstream literature". Papers classified as "Original Articles", "Clinical Experiences", "Review Articles", "Public Health", "Case Reports", "Clinical Laboratory", "Special Articles" and "Medical Education" were screened for acknowledgment of financial support beyond the resources needed for routine clinical work. Among 1,528 manuscripts published, 344 were "Original Articles" and 61.3% of them acknowledged special financial support. Five hundred and one manuscripts were "Clinical Experiences" and 21.5% of them received special financial support; similar proportions were detected in "Review Articles" and "Public Health" topics. The institution ranked as providing support most often was the "Fondo Nacional de Ciencias y Tecnología" (FONDECYT), a governmental fund that assigns resources to research in all areas of science and technology through a peer-reviewed nationwide annual contest. FONDECYT was identified as provider of financial support to 45.2% of the "Original Articles" and "Clinical Experiences"; Chilean universities were mentioned by 33.6% and other entities (including pharmaceutical companies, other national and foreign organizations) by 23.1%. The University of Chile was the main Chilean university mentioned in the acknowledgments. The proportion of papers receiving special financial support

  5. The irradiation of volunteers in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, S.

    1976-01-01

    Attempts to produce guidelines for use in medical research involving the irradiation of volunteers are surveyed. The recommendations of the British Institute of Radiology (Irradiation of Human Subjects for Medical Research, Bull. Brit. Radiology, 1975, vol.1, no.2, 4) are summarized. These recommendations, based on a preliminary working document produced by the World Health Organization, are considered in three parts, the selection of subjects, the categorisation and the approval of research projects. The importance of freely given and informed consent is emphasized. The suggested four categories of project are classified by the amount of total body radiation to be received by the subject in each project, and the necessary assessment and prior approval procedures are related to this classification. The imposition of a lifetime exposure limit is compared with occupational exposures which are assessed on an annual basis, and the ICRP's 'planned special exposures'. Repeated irradiation of the same subject, although permissible within the recommended limits, may create difficulties. The total lifetime accumulated dose may not always be immediately available if the subject has worked in a number of different establishments. The possibility of compiling an approved list of procedures to reduce some of the anticipated delays in processing applications is discussed. (author)

  6. Institutional Support : Institute for Policy Analysis and Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant from IDRC's Think Tank Initiative (TTI) will allow IPAR-Rwanda to strengthen its managerial and research capacity by means of a mentoring program for managers, researchers and support staff. This will include formulating a set of organizational goals and establishing a monitoring system to assess progress ...

  7. Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Academic Activities at the Institute. The aim of the Institute ... with perfectly free interactions between the faculty and the students. Box 2. ... standard model'. The only experimental motivation for this question is the fact that there are certain.

  8. Applied Research at Canadian Colleges and Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Canada has a national network of over 150 colleges and institutes in over 900 communities in all regions of the country. These institutions are mandated to support the socio-economic development of the communities and regions. Colleges and institutes develop education and training programs to meet employer needs with direct input from business,…

  9. Financial Support for Institutional Research, 1969-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, W. C., Jr.

    The Association for Institutional Research conducted a survey of all institutions of higher education in the U.S. and Canada in order to assess the number, size, and financial support of institutional research offices. Data were requested for the 1969-70 academic year. This report is based on the responses of 1,444 institutions that returned the…

  10. 78 FR 13097 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0038] Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic... Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)-1025287, ``Seismic Evaluation Guidance: Screening, Prioritization... guidance and clarification of an acceptable approach to assist nuclear power reactor licensees when...

  11. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic Policy Research Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic Policy Research Centre ... the Economic Policy Research Centre's (EPRC) role as a credible public policy institution in ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  12. Marketing aspects of development of medical waste management in health care institutions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inesa Gurinа

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of marketing approach to medical waste management in health care is suggested.The goal of research was to study the state of marketing activities of health care institutions on medical waste management and development trends of   resolution of outstanding issues.Methods. The methods, which were used in the research, are the methods of mathematical statistics, social studies and scientific knowledge.Results. Environmental marketing institutions of healthcare means perfectly safe for the environment provision of health services. The main directions of environmental marketing concept in health care institutions is the acceptance generally binding legal standards of Use Resources, strict control the formation and licensing of medical waste; economic incentives for workers, aimed at minimizing their interest in the volumes of medical waste; financing of R & D relative to the development of new waste and sound technologies; develop a system of taxes and penalties for polluting the environment and so on.Conclusions. As a result of the implementation of marketing strategies for managing medical waste of healthcare institutions are obtained strategic, social, environmental and economic benefits.

  13. Multi-Institution Research Centers: Planning and Management Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Catherine; Lavey, Lisa; Mukuka, Chilandu; Eames-Brown, Rosslyn

    2016-01-01

    Funding multi-institution centers of research excellence (CREs) has become a common means of supporting collaborative partnerships to address specific research topics. However, there is little guidance for those planning or managing a multi-institution CRE, which faces specific challenges not faced by single-institution research centers. We…

  14. Workshop: Creating Your Institutional Research Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Grenz, Daryl M.

    2016-11-08

    In 2002, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) proposed the concept of an institutional repository to simultaneously disrupt and enhance the state of scholarly communications in the academic world. Thirteen years later, thousands of universities and other institutions have answered this call, but many more have not due to gaps in budgets, awareness and, most of all, practical guidance on creating an institutional repository. This workshop provides you with an essential primer on what it takes to establish a fully-functioning institutional repository. Every aspect of the process will be covered, including policies, procedures, staffing guidelines, workflows and repository technologies.

  15. Astronomy Legacy Project - Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, Michael W.; Rottler, Lee; Cline, J. Donald

    2016-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) is a not-for-profit public foundation in North Carolina dedicated to providing hands-on educational and research opportunities for a broad cross-section of users in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. In November 2007 a Workshop on a National Plan for Preserving Astronomical Photographic Data (2009ASPC,410,33O, Osborn, W. & Robbins, L) was held at PARI. The result was the establishment of the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at PARI. In late 2013 PARI began ALP (Astronomy Legacy Project). ALP's purpose is to digitize an extensive set of twentieth century photographic astronomical data housed in APDA. Because of the wide range of types of plates, plate dimensions and emulsions found among the 40+ collections, plate digitization will require a versatile set of scanners and digitizing instruments. Internet crowdfunding was used to assist in the purchase of additional digitization equipment that were described at AstroPlate2014 Plate Preservation Workshop (www.astroplate.cz) held in Prague, CZ, March, 2014. Equipment purchased included an Epson Expression 11000XL scanner and two Nikon D800E cameras. These digital instruments will compliment a STScI GAMMA scanner now located in APDA. GAMMA will be adapted to use an electroluminescence light source and a digital camera with a telecentric lens to achieve high-speed high-resolution scanning. The 1μm precision XY stage of GAMMA will allow very precise positioning of the plate stage. Multiple overlapping CCD images of small sections of each plate, tiles, will be combined using a photo-mosaic process similar to one used in Harvard's DASCH project. Implementation of a software pipeline for the creation of a SQL database containing plate images and metadata will be based upon APPLAUSE as described by Tuvikene at AstroPlate2014 (www.astroplate.cz/programs/).

  16. Medical students as human subjects in educational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina L. Kalet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Special concerns often arise when medical students are themselves the subjects of education research. A recently completed large, multi-center randomized controlled trial of computer-assisted learning modules for surgical clerks provided the opportunity to explore the perceived level of risk of studies where medical students serve as human subjects by reporting on: 1 the response of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs at seven institutions to the same study protocol; and 2 the thoughts and feelings of students across study sites about being research subjects. Methods: From July 2009 to August 2010, all third-year medical students at seven collaborating institutions were eligible to participate. Patterns of IRB review of the same protocol were compared. Participation burden was calculated in terms of the time spent interacting with the modules. Focus groups were conducted with medical students at each site. Transcripts were coded by three independent reviewers and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Results: The IRBs at the seven participating institutions granted full (n=1, expedited (n=4, or exempt (n=2 review of the WISE Trial protocol. 995 (73% of those eligible consented to participate, and 207 (20% of these students completed all outcome measures. The average time to complete the computer modules and associated measures was 175 min. Common themes in focus groups with participant students included the desire to contribute to medical education research, the absence of coercion to consent, and the low-risk nature of the research. Discussion: Our findings demonstrate that risk assessment and the extent of review utilized for medical education research vary among IRBs. Despite variability in the perception of risk implied by differing IRB requirements, students themselves felt education research was low risk and did not consider themselves to be vulnerable. The vast majority of eligible medical students were willing to participate as research

  17. Establishment of a Quantitative Medical Technology Evaluation System and Indicators within Medical Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suo-Wei Wu

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: As the two-round questionnaire survey of experts and statistical analysis were performed and credibility of the results was verified through consistency evaluation test, the study established a quantitative medical technology evaluation system model and assessment indicators within medical institutions based on the Delphi method and analytical hierarchy process. Moreover, further verifications, adjustments, and optimizations of the system and indicators will be performed in follow-up studies.

  18. Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research is the official journal of the International Association of Medical and Biomedical Researchers (IAMBR) and the Society for Free Radical Research Africa (SFRR-Africa). It is an internationally peer reviewed, open access and multidisciplinary journal aimed at publishing original ...

  19. Comparative effectiveness research and medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Avolio, Leonard W; Farwell, Wildon R; Fiore, Louis D

    2010-12-01

    As is the case for environmental, ecological, astronomical, and other sciences, medical practice and research finds itself in a tsunami of data. This data deluge, due primarily to the introduction of digitalization in routine medical care and medical research, affords the opportunity for improved patient care and scientific discovery. Medical informatics is the subdiscipline of medicine created to make greater use of information in order to improve healthcare. The 4 areas of medical informatics research (information access, structure, analysis, and interaction) are used as a framework to discuss the overlap in information needs of comparative effectiveness research and potential contributions of medical informatics. Examples of progress from the medical informatics literature and the Veterans Affairs Healthcare System are provided. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Significance of COI disclosure in medical research in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Saburo

    2011-11-01

    In medical research, remarkable increase in collaboration with industry, public organizations such as universities, research institutions, and academic societies makes researchers to be more deeply involved with the activities of commercial entities. Activities of education and research, which are the responsibilities of academic institutions and societies, conflict with the interests of individuals associated with industrial-academic collaboration. Management of such conflict of interest (COI) is of much importance for academic institutions and societies to appropriately promote industrial-academic collaborative activities. Particularly, participation not only by healthy individuals, but also patients, is essential in the medical field as subjects of clinical research. For those involved in medical research, the deeper the level of COI with commercial entities, who are the financial or benefit provider, becomes serious, the more human rights of subjects could be violated, safety of life could be endangered, and research methods, data analysis and interpretation of results could be distorted. It is also possible that research may be unfairly evaluated or not published, even if the results are accurate, sometimes resulting in the ascertained effects of reporting bias included the overestimation of efficacy and the underestimation of safety risks of interventions. According to the COI management guideline of the Japanese Association of Medical Science (JAMS), significance of COI management is discussed.

  1. Supporting medical education research quality: the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical Education Research Certificate program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppen, Larry D; Yoder, Ernie; Frye, Ann; Perkowski, Linda C; Mavis, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The quality of the medical education research (MER) reported in the literature has been frequently criticized. Numerous reasons have been provided for these shortcomings, including the level of research training and experience of many medical school faculty. The faculty development required to improve MER can take various forms. This article describes the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program, a national faculty development program that focuses exclusively on MER. Sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and led by a committee of established medical education researchers from across the United States, the MERC program is built on a set of 11 interactive workshops offered at various times and places across the United States. MERC participants can customize the program by selecting six workshops from this set to fulfill requirements for certification. This article describes the history, operations, current organization, and evaluation of the program. Key elements of the program's success include alignment of program content and focus with needs identified by prospective users, flexibility in program organization and logistics to fit participant schedules, an emphasis on practical application of MER principles in the context of the participants' activities and interests, consistency in program content and format to ensure standards of quality, and a sustainable financial model. The relationship between the national MERC program and local faculty development initiatives is also described. The success of the MERC program suggests that it may be a possible model for nationally disseminated faculty development programs in other domains.

  2. Spacecraft computer technology at Southwest Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has developed and delivered spacecraft computers for a number of different near-Earth-orbit spacecraft including shuttle experiments and SDIO free-flyer experiments. We describe the evolution of the basic SwRI spacecraft computer design from those weighing in at 20 to 25 lb and using 20 to 30 W to newer models weighing less than 5 lb and using only about 5 W, yet delivering twice the processing throughput. Because of their reduced size, weight, and power, these newer designs are especially applicable to planetary instrument requirements. The basis of our design evolution has been the availability of more powerful processor chip sets and the development of higher density packaging technology, coupled with more aggressive design strategies in incorporating high-density FPGA technology and use of high-density memory chips. In addition to reductions in size, weight, and power, the newer designs also address the necessity of survival in the harsh radiation environment of space. Spurred by participation in such programs as MSTI, LACE, RME, Delta 181, Delta Star, and RADARSAT, our designs have evolved in response to program demands to be small, low-powered units, radiation tolerant enough to be suitable for both Earth-orbit microsats and for planetary instruments. Present designs already include MIL-STD-1750 and Multi-Chip Module (MCM) technology with near-term plans to include RISC processors and higher-density MCM's. Long term plans include development of whole-core processors on one or two MCM's.

  3. Medical applications in a nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Eggermont, G.

    2001-01-01

    In these days of public aversion to nuclear power, it can be important to point at the medical applications of ionising radiation. Not only the general public, but also the authorities and research centres have to be aware of these medical applications, which are not without risk for public health. Now that funding for nuclear research is declining, an opening to the medical world can give new opportunities to a nuclear research centre. A lot of research could be done where the tools developed for the nuclear power world are very useful. Even new applications for the research reactors like BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) can be envisaged for the near future. In this contribution an overview will be given of the different techniques used in the medical world with ionising radiation. The specific example of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre will be given where the mission statement was changed to include a certain number of medical research topics. (authors)

  4. The Undergraduate Research Resources at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), a former NASA tracking station located in western North Carolina, has been offering programs, campus, and instrument use for undergraduate research and learning experiences since 2000. Over these years, PARI has collaborated with universities and colleges in the Southeastern U.S. Sharing its campus with institutions of higher learning is a priority for PARI as part of its mission to "to providing hands-on educational and research opportunities for a broad cross-section of users in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines."PARI is a 200 acre campus for environmental, earth, geological, physical, and astronomical sciences. For example, the PARI 26-m and 4.6-m radio telescopes are excellent for teaching electromagnetic theory, spectroscopy, atomic and molecular emission processes, and general physics and astronomy concepts. The PARI campus has lab and office space, data centers with high speed internet, distance learning capabilities, radio and optical telescopes, earth science sensors, housing and cafeteria.Also, the campus is in an excellent spot for environmental and biological sciences lab and classroom experiences for students. The campus has the capability to put power and Internet access almost anywhere on its 200 acre campus so experiments can be set up in a protected area of a national forest. For example, Earthscope operates a Plate Boundary Observatory sensor on campus to measure plate tectonic motion. And, Clemson University has an instrument measuring winds and temperatures in the Thermsophere. The use of thePARI campus is limited only by the creativity faculty to provide a rich educational environment for their students. An overview of PARI will be presented along with a summary of programs, and a summary of undergraduate research experiences over the past 15 years. Access to PARI and collaboration possibilities will be presented.

  5. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  6. Workshop: Creating Your Institutional Research Repository

    KAUST Repository

    Grenz, Daryl M.; Baessa, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    In 2002, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) proposed the concept of an institutional repository to simultaneously disrupt and enhance the state of scholarly communications in the academic world. Thirteen years later

  7. The workplace satisfaction of Romania’s medical personnel in state and public institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghenu Cristina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the Romanian medical system is facing changes in terms of qualified personnel. Each year a great number of doctors decide to leave Romania in order to conduct practice in other countries with better working conditions. In this situation where doctors are no longer pleased to work in Romanian institutions, can we question the quality of their working environment? This study aims to determine the workplace satisfaction of Romania’s medical personnel currently working in private as well as state healthcare institutions. In this process, the study also discloses the inside image of Romanian medical units concerning the quality of the working environment, the quality of communications between subordinates belonging to the same section as well as their relations with their „direct superior”, „hierarchic superior” and „senior management”. To construct the current research, Romanian medical personnel completed a survey in order to determine their knowledge and judgment regarding their working environment. The research implied two phases: the first phase lasted one month and a half during which 100 medical personnel from a public hospital were selected to answer a survey; the second phase followed and it targeted the application of the same questions on 100 medical personnel working in a private institution. The survey comprised situations of everyday life in which any employee can be found. The results reveal the present situation of Romanian medical personnel, how often, despite of their unpleasant working conditions, they are forced to give their best in order to provide the quality medical treatment that any patient is entitled to. Therefore, the findings (1 reveal the inside image of Romanian hospital’s system and (2 offer an empirical foundation for subsequent research and improvement of working environments in Romanian hospitals.

  8. 25 years TNO Road-Vehicles Research Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    Since the founding of the TNO Road-Vehicles Research Institute 25years ago, the institute has managed to develop a leading position in automotive research in several disciplines. A steady growth of the institute during the first 20 years has turned into a strong growth during the last 5 years. A

  9. Implementation of the medical research curriculum in graduate medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwi Hwa; Kim, Tae-Hee; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of the medical research curriculum on the students' satisfaction and the research self-efficacy. The curriculum was implemented to 79 graduate medical school students who entered in 2007 and 2008. This curriculum is implemented through 3 years consisting of 5 different sub-courses: Research design, Research ethics, Medical statistics, Writing medical paper, and Presentation. The effect of this program was measured with 2 self-administered surveys to students: the course satisfaction survey and the self-efficacy inventories. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of 18 items from 4 categories: Research design, Research ethics, Data analysis, and Result presentation. The descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were implemented. The average point of satisfaction of the course was 2.74 out of 4, which told us that students generally satisfied with the course. The frequencies of tutoring for research course were 2 or 3 times on average and each session of tutorial lasted 1.5 to 2 hours. The research self-efficacy in three categories (Research design, Research ethics, and Result presentation) increased significantly (presearch paper writing at undergraduate level. The curriculum showed positive results in cultivating research self-efficacy of students. There is a need for improvement of the class of Statistical analysis as students reported that it was difficult.

  10. Distributed deep learning networks among institutions for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken; Balachandar, Niranjan; Lam, Carson; Yi, Darvin; Brown, James; Beers, Andrew; Rosen, Bruce; Rubin, Daniel L; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree

    2018-03-29

    Deep learning has become a promising approach for automated support for clinical diagnosis. When medical data samples are limited, collaboration among multiple institutions is necessary to achieve high algorithm performance. However, sharing patient data often has limitations due to technical, legal, or ethical concerns. In this study, we propose methods of distributing deep learning models as an attractive alternative to sharing patient data. We simulate the distribution of deep learning models across 4 institutions using various training heuristics and compare the results with a deep learning model trained on centrally hosted patient data. The training heuristics investigated include ensembling single institution models, single weight transfer, and cyclical weight transfer. We evaluated these approaches for image classification in 3 independent image collections (retinal fundus photos, mammography, and ImageNet). We find that cyclical weight transfer resulted in a performance that was comparable to that of centrally hosted patient data. We also found that there is an improvement in the performance of cyclical weight transfer heuristic with a high frequency of weight transfer. We show that distributing deep learning models is an effective alternative to sharing patient data. This finding has implications for any collaborative deep learning study.

  11. Data analysis in medical education research : a multilevel perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leppink, Jimmie

    A substantial part of medical education research focuses on learning in teams (e.g., departments, problem-based learning groups) or centres (e.g., clinics, institutions) that are followed over time. Individual students or employees sharing the same team or centre tend to be more similar in learning

  12. Improving Defense Health Program Medical Research Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    research , including a Business Cell; 87 Research Development, 88 Research Oversight, 89 and Research Compliance offices;90 and the Center...needed for DHP medical research , such as the Army’s Clinical and Translational Research Program Office, 38 the Navy’s Research Methods Training Program... research stated, “key infrastructure for a learning health system will encompass three core elements: data networks, methods , and workforce.” 221

  13. Undergraduate medical research: the student perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burgoyne, Louise N

    2010-01-01

    Research training is essential in a modern undergraduate medical curriculum. Our evaluation aimed to (a) gauge students\\' awareness of research activities, (b) compare students\\' perceptions of their transferable and research-specific skills competencies, (c) determine students\\' motivation for research and (d) obtain students\\' personal views on doing research.

  14. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity

  15. UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    This document summarizes the activities and progress for the 1994 Fall quarter for the UNLV Information Science Research Institute. Areas covered include: Symposium activity, Staff activity, Document analysis program, Text-retrieval program, and Institute activity.

  16. Institute for Advanced Learning and Research names new executive director

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Institute for Advanced Learning and Research has named Liam E. Leightley as executive director, effective Oct. 6, 2008, according to Mike Henderson, chair of the institute's board of trustees.

  17. Transition of Research into Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James D.; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process of transforming medical research into practical medicine for astronauts and for every day people. Several examples of medical practices that started in space medical research and then were proved useful in other settings: Actigraphy, bone density scanning, the use of Potassium Citrate as a countermeasure used to lessen the risk of kidney stone formation, and ultrasound uses in remote and telemedicine,

  18. Following the American Example? American Models for Hospital Medicine and Research: The Case of the Kerckhoff Institute in Bad Nauheim

    OpenAIRE

    Timmermann, C

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines how and why American models were applied in the reorganization of West German hospitals and medical research centers in the post-war period. After discussing why American clinical medical centers turned into model institutions over the last century or so, a case study is discussed in some detail: the Kerckhoff Institute for cardiovascular research in Bad Nauheim, since 1951 an institute within the Max Planck Society with its own research clinic (which was unusual for Max P...

  19. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  20. Cracking the Code: Assessing Institutional Compliance with the Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Suzanne E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of institutional authorship policies as required by the "Australian Code for the Responsible Conduct of Research" (the "Code") (National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), the Australian Research Council (ARC) & Universities Australia (UA) 2007), and assesses them for Code compliance.…

  1. Information Science Research Institute quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nartker, T.A.

    1995-09-30

    Subjects studied include optical character recognition (OCR), text retrieval, and document analysis. This report discusses the OCR test system and the text retrieval program. Staff and institute activities are given. Appendices give the ISRI methodology for preparing ground-truth test data and the test of OCR systems using DOE documents.

  2. Transforming Welfare Institutions through Action Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika......Abstract til ALARA 9th Action Learning Action Research and 13th Participatory Action Research World Congress, South Africa from 4 – 7 November 2015 Pretoria, Sydafrika...

  3. THE INFORMATION CONFIDENTIALITY AND CYBER SECURITY IN MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABAU-POPA CLAUDIA DIANA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The information confidentiality and cyber security risk affects the right to confidentiality and privacy of the patient, as regulated in Romania by the Law 46/2002. The manifestation of the cyber security risk event affects the reputation of the healthcare institution and is becoming more and more complex and often due to the: development of network technology, the medical equipment connected to wifi and the electronic databases. The databases containing medical records were implemented due to automation. Thus, transforming data into medical knowledge contribute to a better understanding of the disease. Due to these factors, the measures taken by the hospital management for this type of risk are adapted to the cyber changes. The hospital objectives aim: the implementation of a robust information system, the early threats identifications and the incident reporting. Neglecting this type of risk can generate financial loss, inability to continue providing health care services for a certain period of time, providing an erroneous diagnosis, medical equipment errors etc. Thus, in a digital age the appropriate risk management for the information security and cyber risk represent a necessity. The main concern of hospitals worldwide is to align with international requirements and obtain credentials in terms of data security from the International Organisation for Standardization, which regulates the management of this type of risk. Romania is at the beginning in terms of concerns regarding the management, avoidance and mitigation of information security, the health system being most highly exposed to its manifestation. The present paper examines the concerns of the health system to the confidentiality of information and cyber security risk and its management arrangements. Thus, a set of key risk indicators is implemented and monitored for 2011-2013, using a user interface, a Dashboard, which acts as an early warning system of the manifestation of the

  4. Medical research at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issifou, Saadou; Adegnika, Ayola A; Lell, Bertrand

    2010-03-01

    Built in 1981, the Medical Research Unit is located at the campus of the Albert Schweitzer Hospital. The main scientific activities of this research unit lie on clinical research focusing on antimalarial drugs and vaccines, and basic studies on pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Since 2002 the Medical Research Unit has experience in organising and hosting high quality training in clinical research in collaboration with the Vienna School of Clinical Research and other partners. For the future, this unit is involved as a key partner in the Central African Network on Tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and Malaria (CANTAM) consortium playing a central role for the excellence in clinical research in Central Africa.

  5. Medical Robots: Current Systems and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Beasley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First used medically in 1985, robots now make an impact in laparoscopy, neurosurgery, orthopedic surgery, emergency response, and various other medical disciplines. This paper provides a review of medical robot history and surveys the capabilities of current medical robot systems, primarily focusing on commercially available systems while covering a few prominent research projects. By examining robotic systems across time and disciplines, trends are discernible that imply future capabilities of medical robots, for example, increased usage of intraoperative images, improved robot arm design, and haptic feedback to guide the surgeon.

  6. Grounded Theory in Medical Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Mohsen; Torabi, Sima; Akbar Zeinaloo, Ali

    2006-12-01

    The grounded theory method provides a systematic way to generate theoretical constructs or concepts that illuminate psychosocial processes common to individual who have a similar experience of the phenomenon under investigation. There has been an increase in the number of published research reports that use the grounded theory method. However, there has been less medical education research, which is based on the grounded theory tradition. The purpose of this paper is to introduce basic tenants of qualitative research paradigm with specific reference to ground theory. The paper aims to encourage readers to think how they might possibly use the grounded theory method in medical education research and to apply such a method to their own areas of interest. The important features of a grounded theory as well as its implications for medical education research are explored. Data collection and analysis are also discussed. It seems to be reasonable to incorporate knowledge of this kind in medical education research.

  7. Institutional Support : Centre for Research and Technology ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya. The Centre focuses on science and technology research to influence both national policies and development practices at the community level. Currently ...

  8. Institutional Support : Research on Poverty Alleviation (REPOA ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    -established and well-managed independent policy research organization with a record of producing high-quality, policy-relevant research results. REPOA is experiencing rapid growth in the demand for its services. This grant from IDRC's ...

  9. Funds Utilization and its Impact on Research Institute Libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess funds utilization and it impact on research institute libraries in Kaduna State. Twelve research institutes in Kaduna State with the exception of one which did not have a library were used for the study. The survey research design was adopted for the study, and questionnaire was used as ...

  10. Water and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific - University of Guam Skip to main entered the website of the Water and Environmental Research Institute of the Western Pacific (WERI) at the CNMI and the FSM. Research Programs Weather and Climate Surface Water & Watersheds Groundwater &

  11. Biomedical Research Institute, Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana, Shreveport, Louisiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0789, evaluating the environmental impacts of construction and operation of a Biomedical Research Institute (BRI) at the Louisiana State University (LSU) Medical Center, Shreveport, Louisiana. The purpose of the BRI is to accelerate the development of biomedical research in cardiovascular disease, molecular biology, and neurobiology. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required

  12. Regenstrief Institute's Medical Gopher: a next-generation homegrown electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jon D; Morea, Justin; Mamlin, Burke; Martin, Douglas K; Simonaitis, Linas; Takesue, Blaine Y; Dixon, Brian E; Dexter, Paul R

    2014-03-01

    Regenstrief Institute developed one of the seminal computerized order entry systems, the Medical Gopher, for implementation at Wishard Hospital nearly three decades ago. Wishard Hospital and Regenstrief remain committed to homegrown software development, and over the past 4 years we have fully rebuilt Gopher with an emphasis on usability, safety, leveraging open source technologies, and the advancement of biomedical informatics research. Our objective in this paper is to summarize the functionality of this new system and highlight its novel features. Applying a user-centered design process, the new Gopher was built upon a rich-internet application framework using an agile development process. The system incorporates order entry, clinical documentation, result viewing, decision support, and clinical workflow. We have customized its use for the outpatient, inpatient, and emergency department settings. The new Gopher is now in use by over 1100 users a day, including an average of 433 physicians caring for over 3600 patients daily. The system includes a wizard-like clinical workflow, dynamic multimedia alerts, and a familiar 'e-commerce'-based interface for order entry. Clinical documentation is enhanced by real-time natural language processing and data review is supported by a rapid chart search feature. As one of the few remaining academically developed order entry systems, the Gopher has been designed both to improve patient care and to support next-generation informatics research. It has achieved rapid adoption within our health system and suggests continued viability for homegrown systems in settings of close collaboration between developers and providers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Information Security Issues in Higher Education and Institutional Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Information security threats to educational institutions and their data assets have worsened significantly over the past few years. The rich data stores of institutional research are especially vulnerable, and threats from security breaches represent no small risk. New genres of threat require new kinds of controls if the institution is to prevent…

  14. Implementation of radiation safety program in a medical institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanca, Elena D.

    1999-01-01

    A medical institution that utilizes radiation for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of malignancies develops and implements a radiation safety program to keep occupational exposures of radiation workers and exposures of non-radiation workers and the public to the achievable and a more achievable minimum, to optimize the use of radiation, and to prevent misadministration. The hospital radiation safety program is established by a core medical radiation committee composed of trained radiation safety officers and head of authorized users of radioactive materials and radiation machines from the different departments. The radiation safety program sets up procedural guidelines of the safe use of radioactive material and of radiation equipment. It offers regular training to radiation workers and radiation safety awareness courses to hospital staff. The program has a comprehensive radiation safety information system or radsis that circularizes the radiation safety program in the hospital. The radsis keeps the drafted and updated records of safety guides and policies, radioactive material and equipment inventory, personnel dosimetry reports, administrative, regulatory and licensing activity document, laboratory procedures, emergency procedures, quality assurance and quality control program process, physics and dosimetry procedures and reports, personnel and hospital staff training program. The medical radiation protection committee is tasked to oversee the actual implementation of the radiation safety guidelines in the different radiation facilities in the hospital, to review personnel exposures, incident reports and ALARA actions, operating procedures, facility inspections and audit reports, to evaluate the existing radiation safety procedures, to make necessary changes to these procedures, and make modifications of course content of the training program. The effective implementation of the radiation safety program provides increased confidence that the physician and

  15. Comparative effectiveness research: Challenges for medical journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovey David

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Editors from a number of medical journals lay out principles for journals considering publication of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER. In order to encourage dissemination of this editorial, this article is freely available in PLoS Medicine and will be also published in Medical Decision Making, Croatian Medical Journal, The Cochrane Library, Trials, The American Journal of Managed Care, and Journal of Clinical Epidemiology.

  16. Medical technology advances from space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  17. Institutional Support : Applied and Theoretical Economic Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant from IDRC's Think Tank Initiative will allow GREAT to recruit fulltime research staff, enhance researcher training, formulate a strategic plan, upgrade the information infrastructure, and put ... IDRC is pleased to announce the results of its 2017 call for proposals to establish Cyber Policy Centres in the Global South.

  18. Stimulating medical education research in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, Debbie; Scherpbier, Albert; Van Der Vleuten, Cees; Ten Cate, Olle

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1970s, the Dutch have been active innovators and researchers in the medical education domain. With regards to the quantity of publications in the medical education literature, the Netherlands rank second among countries in Europe and fourth worldwide over the past years,

  19. Medical Research Volunteer Program (MRVP): innovative program promoting undergraduate research in the medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Michael M; Atieh, Jessica A; Soubra, Marwa K; Khoury, Samia J; Tamim, Hani; Kaafarani, Bilal R

    2016-06-06

    Most educational institutions lack a structured system that provides undergraduate students with research exposure in the medical field. The objective of this paper is to describe the structure of the Medical Research Volunteer Program (MRVP) which was established at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, as well as to assess the success of the program. The MRVP is a program that targets undergraduate students interested in becoming involved in the medical research field early on in their academic career. It provides students with an active experience and the opportunity to learn from and support physicians, clinical researchers, basic science researchers and other health professionals. Through this program, students are assigned to researchers and become part of a research team where they observe and aid on a volunteer basis. This paper presents the MRVP's four major pillars: the students, the faculty members, the MRVP committee, and the online portal. Moreover, details of the MRVP process are provided. The success of the program was assessed by carrying out analyses using information gathered from the MRVP participants (both students and faculty). Satisfaction with the program was assessed using a set of questions rated on a Likert scale, ranging from 1 (lowest satisfaction) to 5 (highest satisfaction). A total of 211 students applied to the program with a total of 164 matches being completed. Since the beginning of the program, three students have each co-authored a publication in peer-reviewed journals with their respective faculty members. The majority of the students rated the program positively. Of the total number of students who completed the program period, 35.1 % rated the effectiveness of the program with a 5, 54.8 % rated 4, and 8.6 % rated 3. A small number of students gave lower ratings of 2 and 1 (1.1 % and 0.4 %, respectively). The MRVP is a program that provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to learn about research firsthand

  20. The future of national research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, M.

    1992-01-01

    In Germany, the national research centers have prepared, accompanied and stabilized the development of nuclear technology. In the present, political, situation, they are no longer able to make a comparably constructive contribution to the future perspective of nuclear technology. The accompanying scientific services rendered nuclear technology by the national research centers also in the future include the cultivation of qualified expertise. In this way, the link between national research centers and nuclear technology is maintained, albeit at a different level. Cases in point are nuclear fusion or the development of new, advanced reactor lines. (orig.) [de

  1. Harnessing biodiversity: the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heys Jennifer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biopiracy – the use of a people’s long-established medical knowledge without acknowledgement or compensation – has been a disturbing historical reality and exacerbates the global rich-poor divide. Bioprospecting, however, describes the commercialization of indigenous medicines in a manner acceptable to the local populace. Challenges facing bioprospectors seeking to develop traditional medicines in a quality-controlled manner include a lack of skilled labor and high-tech infrastructure, adapting Northern R&D protocols to Southern settings, keeping products affordable for the local population, and managing the threat of biopiracy. The Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA has employed bioprospecting to develop new health treatments for conditions such as diabetes and burns. Because of its integration of Western science and Malagasy cultural traditions, IMRA may provide a useful example for African and other organizations interested in bioprospecting. Discussion IMRA’s approach to drug development and commercialization was adapted from the outset to Malagasy culture and Southern economic landscapes. It achieved a balance between employing Northern R&D practices and following local cultural norms through four guiding principles. First, IMRA’s researchers understood and respected local practices, and sought to use rather than resist them. Second, IMRA engaged the local community early in the drug development process, and ensured that local people had a stake in its success. Third, IMRA actively collaborated with local and international partners to increase its credibility and research capacity. Fourth, IMRA obtained foreign research funds targeting the “diseases of civilization” to cross-fund the development of drugs for conditions that affect the Malagasy population. These principles are illustrated in the development of IMRA products like Madeglucyl, a treatment for diabetes management that was developed

  2. Harnessing biodiversity: the Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Manveen; Masum, Hassan; Heys, Jennifer; Singer, Peter A

    2010-12-13

    Biopiracy - the use of a people's long-established medical knowledge without acknowledgement or compensation - has been a disturbing historical reality and exacerbates the global rich-poor divide. Bioprospecting, however, describes the commercialization of indigenous medicines in a manner acceptable to the local populace. Challenges facing bioprospectors seeking to develop traditional medicines in a quality-controlled manner include a lack of skilled labor and high-tech infrastructure, adapting Northern R&D protocols to Southern settings, keeping products affordable for the local population, and managing the threat of biopiracy. The Malagasy Institute of Applied Research (IMRA) has employed bioprospecting to develop new health treatments for conditions such as diabetes and burns. Because of its integration of Western science and Malagasy cultural traditions, IMRA may provide a useful example for African and other organizations interested in bioprospecting. IMRA's approach to drug development and commercialization was adapted from the outset to Malagasy culture and Southern economic landscapes. It achieved a balance between employing Northern R&D practices and following local cultural norms through four guiding principles. First, IMRA's researchers understood and respected local practices, and sought to use rather than resist them. Second, IMRA engaged the local community early in the drug development process, and ensured that local people had a stake in its success. Third, IMRA actively collaborated with local and international partners to increase its credibility and research capacity. Fourth, IMRA obtained foreign research funds targeting the "diseases of civilization" to cross-fund the development of drugs for conditions that affect the Malagasy population. These principles are illustrated in the development of IMRA products like Madeglucyl, a treatment for diabetes management that was developed from a traditional remedy. By combining local and international

  3. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Rindelhardt, U.

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Safety Research (ISR) is one of the six Research Institutes of Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR e.V.) which is a member institution of the Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (Leibniz Association). Together with the Institute of Radiochemistry, ISR constitutes the research programme ''Safety and Environment'' which is one from three scientific programmes of FZR. In the framework of this research programme, the institute is responsible for the two subprogrammes ''Plant and Reactor Safety'' and ''Thermal Fluid Dynamics'', respectively. We also provide minor contributions to the sub-programme ''Radio-Ecology''. Moreover, with the development of a pulsed photo-neutron source at the radiation source ELBE (Electron linear accelerator for beams of high brilliance and low emittance), we are involved in a networking project carried out by the FZR Institute of Nuclear and Hadron Physics, the Physics Department of TU Dresden, and ISR. (orig.)

  4. Guidelines for an environmental code of ethics for research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardusi, Claudia; Aquino, Afonso Rodrigues de

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to reflect about actions that may contribute to the creation of mechanisms to protect the environment in the development of research projects at research institutions, specifically the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN. A brief review of part of the ethical values applied to the process of scientific development during the old, medieval and modern periods is presented, showing the split of the nature ethical principles. It is also reported an overview of the creation of codes of ethics applied to research institutions. Moreover, criteria are presented to settle guidelines to protect the environment during the development of research projects. (author)

  5. Offshore Wind Farm Research at the NWO Institutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.S. Witteveen (Jeroen)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractFundamental scientific research is essential to take the necessary next step in offshore wind farm innovation. The NWO scientific research institutes play a central role in the Dutch knowledge infrastructure for disseminating scientific discoveries into industrial innovations. Multiple

  6. Academic research at a South African higher education institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... The investigation involved an ethnographic case study of the research culture at one college at the institution. ... programmes and travel opportunities to interact with other researchers.

  7. Policy research institutions and the health SDGs: Open data ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Policy research institutions and the health SDGs: Open data platforms for ... This exercise will provide the opportunity to raise awareness of the SGDs and the ... IDRC is supporting research that studies the most effective ways to empower ...

  8. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    RI) US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT. Colonel/John Jr DTIC JUL 1 5 1980; A USL &MY MEDICAL BIOENGINEERING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT...pollutants in water or soil . Pollutant by-products and breakdown products in water, air or soil will be isolated, characterized, and quantified. Where...determination of selected low-level pollutants io soil and water. Degradation products and secondary pollutants arising from munitions manufacture or pest

  9. Research Review of the Institute of African Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Please note: As of 2013 the Research Review of the Institute of African Studies is now publishing under the title Contemporary Journal of African Studies. You can view the CJAS pages on AJOL here: http://www.ajol.info/index.php/contjas/index. The Research Review of the Institute of African Studies at the University of ...

  10. Open Access Publishing in Indian Premier Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mohammad Hanief

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Publishing research findings in open access journals is a means of enhancing visibility and consequently increasing the impact of publications. This study provides an overview of open access publishing in premier research institutes of India. Method: The publication output of each institution from 2003 to 2007 was ascertained through…

  11. THE CONTRIBUTION OF RESEARCH INSTITUTES IN EUREKA PROJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANROSSUM, W; CABO, PG

    1995-01-01

    Technological cooperation between industrial firms and research institutes is studied at the project level. The various forms of cooperation, and the instances in which they are advantageous, are discussed. The authors then focus on situations in which the research institute acts as 'knowledge

  12. Research Productivity and Its Policy Implications in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimbo, Maria Ana T.; Sulabo, Evangeline C.

    2014-01-01

    Responding to the Commission on Higher Education's development plan of enhancing research culture among higher education institutions, this study was conducted to analyze the research productivity of selected higher education institutions. It covered five state universities in the Philippines where a total of 377 randomly selected faculty members…

  13. Productivity through Innovation: Applied Research at Canada's Colleges and Institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Applied research at Canada's colleges and institutes has expanded rapidly over the last five years. This report provides an overview of the current context and positions colleges and institutes as key players in Canada's innovation system. The report builds upon findings of previous research and reports on the results of the 2009-2010…

  14. National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 report of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) lists various programmes undertaken by the Institute under the following headings: Water resources programme, Energy Research programme, Environmental and Health Safety Programme, Digital Instrumentation programme, Nuclear Applications and Materals programme and Radiation Occupational safety programme. Also, included are abstracts of publications and technical reports.

  15. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiation in Jordanian medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shakhrah, A. I; Hilow, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    This research survey analyses occupational radiation data 214 Jordanian medical workers during the five-year time period 1990-1994 with the objective of identifying any time dose trend and to determine if annual dose variations exist with regard to sex and job or work status. Comparison of radiation status in Joedanian medical field with that of other countries is a second objective of this study. Biological effects of radiation will, however, not be studied in this research. The statistical analysis of the collected data has shown existence of a decreasing annual dose time trend during the five-year period. This year-to-year variation amy indicate that Jordanian radiation workers are becoming more aware of radiation hazards and they have benefited reasonably from the radiation protection training programmes that were held during that period. These workers are then becoming well abiders by the regulations of the Jordanian radiation authorities. analysis of variance has shown as well that the three factors, which are working status, qualifications and sex, contribute significantly to explaining the variability in annual radiation dose. (authors). 10 refs 4 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Japanese Research Institutes Funded by Private Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    makeup for market in the fall of 1980. The Food Department of the company commercialized nonfried instant noodles for the first time in the industry...This type of instant noodles is most popular. The research and development costs of the company in 1980 amounted to 1.5% of the total sales. 188

  17. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P; Gschwend, B [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B.

    1996-01-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs

  19. Radiant Research. Institute for Energy Technology 1948-98

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njoelstad, Olav

    1999-01-01

    Institutt for Atomenergi (IFA), or Institute for Atomic Energy, at Kjeller, Norway, was founded in 1948. The history of the institute as given in this book was published in 1999 on the occasion of the institute's 50th anniversary. The scope of the institute was to do research and development as a foundation for peaceful application of nuclear energy and radioactive substances in Norway. The book tells the story of how Norway in 1951 became the first country after the four superpowers and Canada to have its own research reactor. After the completion of the reactor, the institute experienced a long and successful period and became the biggest scientific and technological research institute in Norway. Three more reactors were built, one in Halden and two at Kjeller. Plans were developed to build nuclear powered ships and nuclear power stations. It became clear, however, in the 1970s, that there was no longer political support for nuclear power in Norway, and it was necessary for the institute to change its research profile. In 1980, the institute changed its name to Institutt for energiteknikk (IFE), or Institute for energy technology, to signal the broadened scope. The book describes this painful but successful readjustment and shows how IFE in the 1980s and 1990s succeeded in using its special competence from the nuclear field to establish special competence in new research fields with great commercial potential

  20. Crowdsourced 'R&D' and medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Christian William

    2015-09-01

    Crowdsourced R&D, a research methodology increasingly applied to medical research, has properties well suited to large-scale medical data collection and analysis, as well as enabling rapid research responses to crises such as disease outbreaks. Multidisciplinary literature offers diverse perspectives of crowdsourced R&D as a useful large-scale medical data collection and research problem-solving methodology. Crowdsourced R&D has demonstrated 'proof of concept' in a host of different biomedical research applications. A wide range of quality and ethical issues relate to crowdsourced R&D. The rapid growth in applications of crowdsourced R&D in medical research is predicted by an increasing body of multidisciplinary theory. Further research in areas such as artificial intelligence may allow better coordination and management of the high volumes of medical data and problem-solving inputs generated by the crowdsourced R&D process. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Deciding medical problems in radiation protection for thirty years in the Boris Kidric Institute - Experimental and epidemiological experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovic, D; Milivojevic, K; Trajkovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1989-07-01

    This paper deals with some research work carried out in the Medical Protection Laboratory of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca. Four research fields have been chosen: the analysis of contribution of collaborators Medical Protection Laboratory on symposium Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association (IRPA); from 1963 to 1989 years; the appearance on the meeting IAEA, International seminars, symposium and Congress, including European and international congress IRPA with presentation the most important obtained results; the activity in the frame research projects and contribution for solving important problems in the field of medical aspects of radiation protection in developing and applicable research; the survey current and practical trends in the future (author)

  2. Deciding medical problems in radiation protection for thirty years in the Boris Kidric Institute - Experimental and epidemiological experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovic, D.; Milivojevic, K.; Trajkovic, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with some research work carried out in the Medical Protection Laboratory of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca. Four research fields have been chosen: the analysis of contribution of collaborators Medical Protection Laboratory on symposium Yugoslav Radiation Protection Association (IRPA); from 1963 to 1989 years; the appearance on the meeting IAEA, International seminars, symposium and Congress, including European and international congress IRPA with presentation the most important obtained results; the activity in the frame research projects and contribution for solving important problems in the field of medical aspects of radiation protection in developing and applicable research; the survey current and practical trends in the future (author)

  3. Gas Research Institute, Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Technology is playing a major role in helping the gas industry meet the challenge of change, and as the focal point for gas industry R ampersand D, the authors at GRI are focusing their efforts on the real-world problems facing our member companies. They haven't forsaken longer range research, but they must stress the development and deployment of technology that can be put to work in the near term or they will fail in their mission. The pages that follow show how they put R ampersand D to work to meet the five key gas industry needs that will dominate the future: Developing new markets and new opportunities; Competing with electricity in selected markets; Tackling new regulations; Controlling the cost of gas delivery; Providing reliable and cost-competitive supplies of natural gas that allow reasonable returns to producers

  4. Chinese TEFL Academics' Perceptions about Research: An Institutional Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China, as across the world. However, Chinese TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) academics' research capacity has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This…

  5. Sudanese Medical Students and Scientific Research | Mohamed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 14.7% knew the engines used for finding medical literature. Conclusion: The low knowledge score is due to lack of application of research in the academic curriculum; however, the students have a fairly positive attitude. The knowledge is expected to improve with the intended policy to include practical research in the ...

  6. How institutional change and individual researchers helped advance clinical guidelines in American health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Amit

    2013-06-01

    Clinical guidelines are important tools for managing health care quality. Research on the origins of guidelines primarily focuses on the institutional causes of their emergence and growth. Individual medical researchers, however, have played important roles. This paper develops knowledge of the role of individual medical researchers in advancing guidelines, and of how researchers' efforts were enabled or constrained by broader institutional changes. Drawing on an analytical case study focused on the role of Kerr White, John Wennberg, and Robert Brook, it shows that guidelines were a product of the interplay between institutional change in the medical field and actions by individual researchers, acting as institutional entrepreneurs. Increased government involvement in the health care field triggered the involvement of a range of new actors in health care. These new organizations created a context that allowed individual researchers to advance guidelines by creating job opportunities, providing research funding, and creating opportunities for researchers to engage with the policy process. Individual researchers availed of this context to both advance their ideas, and to draw new actors into the field. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Materials and corrosion programs sponsored by the Gas Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals briefly with the Gas Research Institute and its research in materials and corrosion. As a not-for-profit organization, the Gas Research Institute plans, finances, and manages applied and basic research and technological development programs associated with gaseous fuels. These programs are in the general areas of production, transportation, storage, utilization and conservation of natural and manufactured gases and related products. Research results, whether experimental or analytical, are evaluated and publicly disseminated. Materials and corrosion research is concentrated in the SNG from Coal and Non-fossil Hydrogen subprograms

  8. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Act for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been promulgated anew. Contents are the following : general rules, officials, advisors and personnel, duties, financial affairs and accounts, supervision, miscellaneous rules, penal provisions, and additional rules. (In the additional rules, the merger into JAERI of Japan Nuclear Ship Research and Development Agency is treated.) Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute conducts research etc. for the development of atomic energy comprehensively and efficiently, thereby contributing to the promotion of atomic energy research, development and utilization, according to the Atomic Energy Fundamental Act. Duties are atomic energy basic and application research, reactor relation, training of the personnel, RIs relation, etc. (Mori, K.)

  9. A multifaceted program to encourage medical students' research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zier, K; Stagnaro-Green, A

    2001-07-01

    Clinician-scientists are important members of a research community that has more opportunities than ever before to solve problems important to patients. Nevertheless, the number of physicians applying for and receiving grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has dropped. Introducing medical students to research and relevant support mechanisms early in their education may help to reverse this trend. In 1995, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine created its Office of Student Research Opportunities (OSRO) to stimulate students to engage in research. It also appointed a new dean to direct the OSRO; the person who filled this new position was a senior faculty member involved in patient-oriented research. The OSRO advises students, identifies faculty who want to mentor students, sponsors the Distinction in Research program, organizes an annual research day, helps fund summer and full-time research, and has created an endowment to support student travel to national meetings. Between 1997 and 2000 the number of students who participated in the research day increased from 18 to 74, and the number of publications by the graduating classes increased from 34 to 58 between 1997 and 1999. Participants have presented both basic and clinical projects. The authors' experience has shown that medical students can be motivated to carry out research with appropriate encouragement from the administration and the faculty, something that may help to reverse a troubling national trend. Based upon these early successes, Mount Sinai is developing a novel five-year program to provide medical students with research training.

  10. Medical Informatics Education & Research in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvarda, I; Maglaveras, N

    2015-08-13

    This paper aims to present an overview of the medical informatics landscape in Greece, to describe the Greek ehealth background and to highlight the main education and research axes in medical informatics, along with activities, achievements and pitfalls. With respect to research and education, formal and informal sources were investigated and information was collected and presented in a qualitative manner, including also quantitative indicators when possible. Greece has adopted and applied medical informatics education in various ways, including undergraduate courses in health sciences schools as well as multidisciplinary postgraduate courses. There is a continuous research effort, and large participation in EU-wide initiatives, in all the spectrum of medical informatics research, with notable scientific contributions, although technology maturation is not without barriers. Wide-scale deployment of eHealth is anticipated in the healthcare system in the near future. While ePrescription deployment has been an important step, ICT for integrated care and telehealth have a lot of room for further deployment. Greece is a valuable contributor in the European medical informatics arena, and has the potential to offer more as long as the barriers of research and innovation fragmentation are addressed and alleviated.

  11. PROGER - Management program for radioactive wastes in research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rubemar S.; Costa, Maria Regina Ferro; Ramos Junior, Anthenor C.; Esposito, Irapoan; Vaz, Solange dos Reis e; Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida

    1997-01-01

    This article demonstrates the feasibility of a program, denominated PROGER, and aimed at the improvement of radioactive waste management activities in research institutions in Brazil. This program involves implementation, correction and updating of waste management techniques in those institutions that already possess a waste management system or its full set-up for the institutions where it is non-existent. Partial results are presented, concerning characteristics and quantities of wastes, and the methodology utilized by PROGER discussed

  12. Biological research work within the Association of the Government-Sponsored Research Institutions (AGF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Six of the thirteen government-sponsored research institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany carry out research work for the protection of the population against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Their activities in this field concentrate on the following four points of main interest: analysis of radiation-induced processes resulting in biological radiation injury; description and analysis of complex radiation effects on man; medical applications of ionizing radiation for diagnosis and therapy; concepts and methods for radiological protection. The work reported reviews the main problems encountered in the above-mentioned subject fields and presents examples of significant results, with illustrations. The original research papers and their authors are listed separately under the four points of main interest. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Qualitative research methods for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Janice L; Balmer, Dorene F; Giardino, Angelo P

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a primer for qualitative research in medical education. Our aim is to equip readers with a basic understanding of qualitative research and prepare them to judge the goodness of fit between qualitative research and their own research questions. We provide an overview of the reasons for choosing a qualitative research approach and potential benefits of using these methods for systematic investigation. We discuss developing qualitative research questions, grounding research in a philosophical framework, and applying rigorous methods of data collection, sampling, and analysis. We also address methods to establish the trustworthiness of a qualitative study and introduce the reader to ethical concerns that warrant special attention when planning qualitative research. We conclude with a worksheet that readers may use for designing a qualitative study. Medical educators ask many questions that carefully designed qualitative research would address effectively. Careful attention to the design of qualitative studies will help to ensure credible answers that will illuminate many of the issues, challenges, and quandaries that arise while doing the work of medical education. Copyright © 2011 Academic Pediatric Association. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving medical students’ participation in research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon R

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Menon, Vishnou Mourougavelou, Arjun MenonFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the review by Siddaiah-Subramanya et al1 regarding the difficulty for medical students to participate in research, in developing countries. From our own experience as medical students, we agree that organizational factors, adequacy of knowledge, and variability in “attitudes” may all contribute to difficulty in participating in research. Nevertheless, we propose that the introduction of research projects, which may be part of an intercalated degree, could help improve medical students’ involvement in research.Author's replyManjunath Siddaiah-Subramanya,1,2 Harveen Singh,3 Kor Woi Tiang1,21Department of Surgery, Logan Hospital, Meadowbrook, 2Department of Medicine, Griffith University, Nathan, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia We would like to thank Menon et al for the letter in response to our article.1 We note that an overarching theme in the letter is the situation in countries where research at medical school could be improved. In the letter, Menon et al have brought out a couple of important issues: one is that the problem is multifactorial, and the other is the fact that opportunities and encouragement need to be provided to the students so that they could get more involved in research.View the original paper by Siddaiah-Subramanya and colleagues.

  15. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this reporting period, the NRC promoted research opportunities at AMRMC institutes through a... productivity of these Associates is listed in the technical report. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Associateship program, post-doc, awards 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...following activities in support of the subject contract: Outreach and Promotion The promotional schedule to advertise the NRC Research Associateship

  16. The Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute: a national wilderness research program in support of wilderness management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita Wright

    2000-01-01

    The Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute strives to provide scientific leadership in developing and applying the knowledge necessary to sustain wilderness ecosystems and values. Since its 1993 dedication, researchers at this federal, interagency Institute have collaborated with researchers and managers from other federal, academic and private institutions to...

  17. Radiotoxicology analysis in Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN/SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, C.L.; Gaburo, J.C.; Bellintani, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The radiotoxicology laboratory of Nuclear and Energetic Research Institute (IPEN) has the objective of control the internal contamination of workers that handle radioactive materials, in industrial and medical sectors. This control is made through radiochemical analysis of excreta. Nowadays in this laboratory are realized occupational controls on individual, exposure to uranium, tritium, iodine, fluorine, lead compounds, for workers of IPEN and for external institutions, when solicited. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R.; Bean, Jonathan F.; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L.; Malec, James F.; Mueller, Michael J.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Tansey, Keith E.; Thompson, Aiko

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, “Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward.” This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. PMID:28422639

  19. Evaluation of the state water-resources research institutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertel, M.O.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources research institutes, as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242), are located in each state and in the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico , and the Virgin Islands. Public Law 98-242 mandated an onsite evaluation of each of these institutes to determine whether ' . . .the quality and relevance of its water resources research and its effectiveness as an institution for planning, conducting, and arranging for research warrant its continued support in the national interest. ' The results of these evaluations, which were conducted between September 1985 and June 1987, are summarized. The evaluation teams found that all 54 institutes are meeting the basic objectives of the authorizing legislation in that they: (1) use the grant funds to support research that addresses water problems of state and regional concern; (2) provide opportunities for training of water scientists through student involvement on research projects; and (3) promote the application of research results through preparation of technical reports and contributions to the technical literature. The differences among institutes relate primarily to degrees of effectiveness, and most often are determined by the financial, political, and geographical contexts in which the institutes function and by the quality of their leadership. (Lantz-PTT)

  20. Nazi Medical Research in Neuroscience: Medical Procedures, Victims, and Perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenau, Aleksandra; Weindling, Paul J

    Issues relating to the euthanasia killings of the mentally ill, the medical research conducted on collected body parts, and the clinical investigations on living victims under National Socialism are among the best-known abuses in medical history. But to date, there have been no statistics compiled regarding the extent and number of the victims and perpetrators, or regarding their identities in terms of age, nationality, and gender. "Victims of Unethical Human Experiments and Coerced Research under National Socialism," a research project based at Oxford Brookes University, has established an evidence-based documentation of the overall numbers of victims and perpetrators through specific record linkages of the evidence from the period of National Socialism, as well as from post-WWII trials and other records. This article examines the level and extent of these unethical medical procedures as they relate to the field of neuroscience. It presents statistical information regarding the victims, as well as detailing the involvement of the perpetrators and Nazi physicians with respect to their post-war activities and subsequent court trials.

  1. Economic management model of nuclear power plant research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, O.

    1993-01-01

    Brief information about the development of economic management and processing of economic information in the Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute Trnava is given in the paper. The existing economic management model of the Institute impacts positively the fulfillment of economic indicators. When applying this model, activities of individual divisions are emphasized and presentation of the Institute as a global professional capacity is suppressed. With regards to this influence, it will be necessary to look for such system elements that will impact the integrity of the Institute in the future period positively

  2. Medical Science and Research in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Ebadifar, Asghar; Baradaran Eftekhari, Monir; Falahat, Katayoun

    2017-11-01

    During the last 3 decades, Iran has experienced a rapid population growth and at the same time the health of Iranian people has improved greatly. This achievement was mainly due to training and availability of health manpower, well organized public health network and medical science and research improvement. In this article, we aimed to report the relevant data about the medical science and research situation in Iran and compare them with other countries. In this study, after reviewing science development and research indicators in medical sciences with participation of key stakeholders, we selected 3 main hybrid indexes consisting of "Research and Development (R&D) expenditures," "Personnel in Science and Technology sector" and "knowledge generation" for evaluation of medical science and research situation. Data was extracted from reliable databases. Over the past decade, Iran has achieved significant success in medical sciences and for the first time in 2015 based on Scopus index, Iran ranked first in the number of published scientific papers and number of citations in the region and among all Islamic countries. Also, 2% of the world's publications belong to Iran. Regarding innovation, the number of Iranian patents submitted to the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) was 3 and 43 in 2008 and 2013, respectively. In these years, the number of personnel in science and technology sectors including post graduate students, researchers and academic members in universities of medical sciences (UMSs) have increased. The female students in medical sciences field account for about twothirds of all students. Also, women comprise about one-third of faculty members. Since 5 years ago, Iran has had growth in science and technology parks. These achievements were attained in spite of the fact that research spending in Iran was still very low (0.5% of gross domestic product [GDP]) due to economic hardships and sanctions. Medical science and research development has

  3. Authorship in "College & Research Libraries" Revisited: Gender, Institutional Affiliation, Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, James L.

    1996-01-01

    Updates earlier studies on the characteristics of authorship of articles published in "College & Research Libraries", focusing on gender, institutional affiliation, and extent of collaboration. Results show representation by academic librarians and authors affiliated with library schools increased, collaboration predominated, and…

  4. Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) at a glance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) was established in 1993 as one of the research, development and technology transfer institutes of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). This was to help the GAEC to expand its research and development in the area of biotechnology and nuclear agriculture, which have been found to have a major impact on the agricultural development in countries involved in peaceful application of nuclear energy. The main objective of the Institute is to explore and exploit the application of isotopes, ionizing radiation and biotechnologies for increased agricultural and economic development of Ghana and to help the Country attain self-sufficiency in food and agriculture in order to alleviate malnutrition, hunger and poverty. This brochure describes the organizational structure; research facilities and programmes; services of the various departments of the Institute as well as achievements

  5. The OpenAIRE Guide for Research Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gültekin Gürdal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This text is transcript of OpenAIRE Guide which is prepared in order to help research institutions was released on 13.04.2011and translated with the cooperation of ANKOS Open Access and Institutional Repositories Grup members and OpenAIREplus project team of Turkey which is coordinated from Izmir Institute of Technology Library. OpenAIRE Project aims to support researchers in complying with the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme Open Access Pilot through a European Helpdesk System; support researchers in depositing their research publications in an institutional or disciplinary repository; build up an OpenAIRE portal and e-infrastructure for repository networks. The project will work in tadem with OpeanAIREplus Project which has the principal goal of creating a robust, participatory service for the cross-linking of peer-reviewed scientific publications and associated datasets.

  6. USAF Institute for National Security Studies 1998 Research Results Conference

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The USAF Institute for National Security Studies (INSS), in cooperation with HQ USAF Nuclear and Counterproliferation Directorate, sponsored its 6th annual Research Results Conference on 19 - 20 November 1998...

  7. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Centre for Policy Research | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CPR is an independent, non-partisan research institute focused on improving policy-making and management, and promoting national development in India. CPR's research covers ... For CPR, this project will help enhance its research quality, organizational performance, and policy engagement. Policy influence in India

  8. Institutional Support to South Asian Policy Research Organizations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    There are very few policy research organizations in South Asia outside India. Those that exist are fragile due to little demand for policy research, limited if no funding from local sources, and an often insecure political climate. This grant will strengthen the ability of the seven selected research institutions in Bangladesh, Nepal ...

  9. Institutional Support to Latin American Policy Research Organizations

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will strengthen the ability of the 12 selected research institutions to provide, disseminate and communicate high-quality research. This will be achieved through measures aimed at enhancing the ability of staff to conduct sound research, improving organizational governance, and communicating with policymakers.

  10. Institute of fundamental research: forty years of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This document is aimed at illustration of forty years of fundamental research at CEA. It has not been conceived to give an exhaustive view of current research at IRF, but to give an illustration of these researches to non-specialists, and even to non-scientifists [fr

  11. Annual Research Progress Report Letterman Army Institute of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-30

    occurs in the human oral cavity following trauma °r -J J« "^ an important defense mechanism in the highly infected oral environment ^d...antiseptic to temporarily reduce the bacterial population of the oral cavity . A collaborative study between Letterman Army Medical Center and...penicillin resistant strains of bacteria are frequently- observed components of the microbiota of oral and maxlllofacial in- fections surveyed at Letterman

  12. Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE) of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences is the leading Bulgarian Institute for scientific investigations and applications of nuclear science. The main Institute's activities in the field of elementary particles and nuclear physics, high energy physics and nuclear energy, radiochemistry, radioecology, radioactive wastes treatment, monitoring of the environment, nuclear instruments development ect. are briefly described. Several examples for: environmental radiation monitoring; monitoring of the radioactivity and heavy metals in aerosols, 99m Tc clinical use, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application of IRT-2000 Research Reactor, neutron fluence for reactor vessel embrittlement, NPP safety analysis, nuclear fuel modelling are also presented

  13. Grounded Theory in Medical Education Research

    OpenAIRE

    Tavakol, Mohsen; Torabi, Sima; Akbar Zeinaloo, Ali

    2009-01-01

    The grounded theory method provides a systematic way to generate theoretical constructs or concepts that illuminate psychosocial processes common to individual who have a similar expe­rience of the phenomenon under investigation. There has been an increase in the number of pub­lished research reports that use the grounded theory method. However, there has been less medical education research, which is based on the grounded theory tradition. The purpose of this paper is to introduce basic tena...

  14. Naval Medical Research and Development Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    the strategic planning program for action. The pros and cons of the current NMR&D organization structure, management support funding, and officer...Distribution List D-4 Naval Medical Research and Development Strategic Plan March 2008 SWE Naval Surface Warfare Enterprise SWOT Strengths

  15. Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. INFORMATION FOR CONTRIBUTORS This information can also be accessed at http://www.iambr.info/AMBR/author_guidelines.html Articles to Archives of Medical and Biomedical Research are submitted under the condition that the work described has not been published or is not being considered for ...

  16. Building Research Cyberinfrastructure at Small/Medium Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Anne; Rowe, Theresa; Woo, Melissa; Woods, David

    2010-01-01

    A 2006 ECAR study defined cyberinfrastructure as the coordinated aggregate of "hardware, software, communications, services, facilities, and personnel that enable researchers to conduct advanced computational, collaborative, and data-intensive research." While cyberinfrastructure was initially seen as support for scientific and…

  17. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rebecca S Y; Siow, Heng Loke; Kumarasamy, Vinoth; Shaherah Fadhlullah Suhaimi, Nazrila

    2017-10-01

    The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, inter-institutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi), University of Malaya (UM) and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR). It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry) were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean+standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05). This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  18. Institutional radioactive waste management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarik, P.; Svoboda, K.; Podlaha, J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear research institute Rez, plc. (mentioned below as NRI) has had a dominant position in the area of the nuclear research and development in the Czech Republic, the Central and the Eastern Europe. Naturally, the radioactive waste management is an integral part of the nuclear industry, research and development. For that reason, there is Centre of the radioactive waste management (mentioned below as Centre) in the NRI. This Centre is engaged in the radioactive waste treatment, decontamination, characterisation, decommissioning and other relevant activities. This paper describes the system of technology and other information about institutional radioactive waste management in the NRI. (authors)

  19. Ethics and the ethnography of medical research in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, Sassy; Geissler, P. Wenzel

    2008-01-01

    The ethics of medical research have grown as an area of expertise and debate in recent years, with two broad approaches emerging in relation to transnational research: (1) the refinement of guidelines and strengthening of review, processes primarily to protect the right of individual research participants and strengthen interpersonal relations at the micro-level; and (2) considering more centrally, as crucial ethical concerns, the wider interests of whole populations, the functioning of research institutions, the processes of collaboration, and the ethics of inequitable international relations. We see the two areas of debate and action as complementary, and believe that social science conducted in and around transnational medical research environments can bring these two perspectives together in a more ‘situated ethics’ of research. To explore this idea for medical research in Africa, we organized a conference in December 2005 in Kilifi, Kenya. In this introduction we outline the two emerging approaches to medical ethics, summarise each of seven papers selected from the conference for inclusion in this special issue on ethics and ethnography, and finally highlight two areas of lively debate at the conference itself: the appropriateness and value of ethics guidelines and review boards for medical research; and the ethical review of social science research. Together, the papers and debates point to the importance of focusing on the ethics of relationships and on justice in both biomedicine and social science research, and on giving greater voice and visibility to the field staff who often play a crucial and under-supported role in ‘doing ethics’ in the field. They also point to the potential value of social science research on the range of relationships operating at different levels and time scales in medical research, including those surrounding community engagement activities, and the role and functioning of ethics review boards. We conclude by highlighting

  20. Survey of preventable disaster death at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: a retrospective preliminary investigation of medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Tsuruwa, Miho; Ueki, Yuzuru; Kohayagawa, Yoshitaka; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2015-04-01

    The 2011, magnitude (M) 9, Great East Japan Earthquake and massive tsunami caused widespread devastation and left approximately 18,500 people dead or missing. The incidence of preventable disaster death (PDD) during the Great East Japan Earthquake remains to be clarified; the present study investigated PDD at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake in order to improve disaster medical systems. A total of 25 hospitals in Miyagi Prefecture (Japan) that were disaster base hospitals (DBHs), or had at least 20 patient deaths between March 11, 2011 and April 1, 2011, were selected to participate based on the results of a previous study. A database was created using the medical records of all patient deaths (n=868), and PDD was determined from discussion with 10 disaster health care professionals. A total of 102 cases of PDD were identified at the participating hospitals. The rate of PDD was higher at coastal hospitals compared to inland hospitals (62/327, 19.0% vs 40/541, 7.4%; Pdeath at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred mainly at coastal hospitals. Insufficient resources (at GHs), environmental factors (at coastal hospitals), and delayed medical intervention (at all hospitals) constituted the major potential contributing factors. Further investigation of all medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture, including those with fewer than 20 patient deaths, is required in order to obtain a complete picture of the details of PDD at medical institutions in the disaster area.

  1. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user's Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions' tweets by content. We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties.

  2. [Training of institutional research networks as a strategy of improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel

    2017-01-01

    The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) through the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud (Health Research Council) has promoted a strong link between the generation of scientific knowledge and the clinical care through the program Redes Institucionales de Investigación (Institutional Research Network Program), whose main aim is to promote and generate collaborative research between clinical, basic, epidemiologic, educational, economic and health services researchers, seeking direct benefits for patients, as well as to generate a positive impact on institutional processes. All of these research lines have focused on high-priority health issues in Mexico. The IMSS internal structure, as well as the sufficient health services coverage, allows the integration of researchers at the three levels of health care into these networks. A few years after their creation, these networks have already generated significant results, and these are currently applied in the institutional regulations in diseases that represent a high burden to health care. Two examples are the National Health Care Program for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction "Código Infarto", and the Early Detection Program on Chronic Kidney Disease; another result is the generation of multiple scientific publications, and the promotion of training of human resources in research from the same members of our Research Networks. There is no doubt that the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud advances steadily implementing the translational research, which will keep being fruitful to the benefit of our patients, and of our own institution.

  3. Dissemination research: the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Patrick L; Moberg, D Paul; Booske, Bridget C; Ceraso, Marion; Friedsam, Donna; Kindig, David A

    2009-08-01

    Despite significant accomplishments in basic, clinical, and population health research, a wide gap persists between research discoveries (ie, what we know) and actual practice (ie, what we do). The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute (Institute) researchers study the process and outcomes of disseminating evidence-based public health programs and policies into practice. This paper briefly describes the approach and experience of the Institute's programs in population health assessment, health policy, program evaluation, and education and training. An essential component of this dissemination research program is the active engagement of the practitioners and policymakers. Each of the Institute's programs conducts data collection, analysis, education, and dialogue with practitioners that is closely tied to the planning, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies. Our approach involves a reciprocal exchange of knowledge with non-academic partners, such that research informs practice and practice informs research. Dissemination research serves an important role along the continuum of research and is increasingly recognized as an important way to improve population health by accelerating the translation of research into practice.

  4. Medical ethics research between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, H A; Lelie, A

    1998-06-01

    The main object of criticism of present-day medical ethics is the standard view of the relationship between theory and practice. Medical ethics is more than the application of moral theories and principles, and health care is more than the domain of application of moral theories. Moral theories and principles are necessarily abstract, and therefore fail to take account of the sometimes idiosyncratic reality of clinical work and the actual experiences of practitioners. Suggestions to remedy the illness of contemporary medical ethics focus on re-establishing the connection between the internal and external morality of medicine. This article discusses the question how to develop a theoretical perspective on medical ethical issues that connects philosophical reflection with the everyday realities of medical practice. Four steps in a comprehensive approach of medical ethics research are distinguished: (1) examine health care contexts in order to obtain a better understanding of the internal morality of these practices; this requires empirical research; (2) analyze and interpret the external morality governing health care practices; sociological study of prevalent values, norms, and attitudes concerning medical-ethical issues is required; (3) creation of new theoretical perspectives on health care practices; Jensen's theory of healthcare practices will be useful here; (4) develop a new conception of bioethics that illuminates and clarifies the complex interaction between the internal and external morality of health care practices. Hermeneutical ethics can be helpful for integrating the experiences disclosed in the empirical ethical studies, as well as utilizing the insights gained from describing the value-contexts of health care practices. For a critical and normative perspective, hermeneutical ethics has to examine and explain the moral experiences uncovered, in order to understand what they tell us.

  5. INTRODUCTION OF SHANGHAI INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL QUALITY(SIMQ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    SIMQ is a non-profit and independent organization,funded by Shanghai Medical Innovation&Development Foundation,to support medical organizations to to develop guidelines and quality standards for disease management,improve hospital management efficiency using business intelligence for hospitals and therefore to improve patient satisfaction.Together with its partners,SIMQ commissions and provides the access

  6. The peculiarities of scientific research whithin old institutionalism of the political-institutional paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Bashtannyk

    2016-10-01

    The presence of internal evolution in the analysis’s research strategy of the classical institutional theory is justified. First, the principle of normativity (borrowed from political philosophy was gradually transformed from requirements of accordance to moral and value criteria till declaration the paramount of legal framework for regulation the functioning of the political institutions. Second, understanding of the state as a legally holistic phenomenon of the highest status to the system of government (borrowed from legal positivism and historical school of law was modified to consideration of the state as one among other political institutions of society, though very influential.

  7. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Major nuclear research institutes in Japan are the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), National Research Institute of Radiological Science (NIRS), and the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN). In the 50s and 60s JAERI concentrated on the introduction of nuclear technology from overseas. Energy security issues led to the development of a strong nuclear power programme in the next two decades resulting in Japan having 50 light water cooled nuclear power plants in operation. Japan also worked on other reactor concepts. The current emphasis of JAERI is on advanced reactors and nuclear fusion. Its budget of 270 million US$ supports five research establishments. JAERI has strong collaboration with industry and university system on nuclear and other advanced research topics (neutron science, photon science). In many areas Japan has strong international links. JAERI has also been transferring know-how on radioisotope and radiation applications to the developing countries particularly through IAEA-RCA mechanisms. (author)

  8. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, F.P.; Rindelhardt, U. (eds.)

    2005-07-01

    The Institute of Safety Research (ISR) is one of the six Research Institutes of Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. (FZR e.V.) which is a member institution of the Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (Leibniz Association). Together with the Institute of Radiochemistry, ISR constitutes the research programme ''Safety and Environment'' which is one from three scientific programmes of FZR. In the framework of this research programme, the institute is responsible for the two subprogrammes ''Plant and Reactor Safety'' and ''Thermal Fluid Dynamics'', respectively. We also provide minor contributions to the sub-programme ''Radio-Ecology''. Moreover, with the development of a pulsed photo-neutron source at the radiation source ELBE (Electron linear accelerator for beams of high brilliance and low emittance), we are involved in a networking project carried out by the FZR Institute of Nuclear and Hadron Physics, the Physics Department of TU Dresden, and ISR. (orig.)

  9. Main directions of Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretic Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazhibaeva, I.L.

    1997-01-01

    The characteristic of main directions of the Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretic Physics (RIETF) activity is given in the paper. It is noted, that Institute is headquarters organisation in 4 following scientific programs of Ministry of Science - Academy of Science of Republic of Kazakhstan: Physics and mechanics of gases, plasma and liquid; Theoretical physics; Nonlinear processes and structural self-organization of substance; Research works Comet. Since 1994 RIETF is one of executors on interstate scientific program ITER. There are following priorities in activity of the institute: - actual problems of relativity theory, gravitation and quantum mechanics; - research on combustion problems and heat-mass-transfer; - physics of gases, plasma and liquid; physics non-equilibrium processes in plasma an in plasma-similar media; - solid state physics and material testing problems; modification of materials properties; electrophysical, optical and structural researches of substance; - interactions of nuclear, electromagnet radiation and accelerated particles with substance; - theoretical and experimental nuclear physics and physics of cosmic rays

  10. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Program Directory, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.

    This directory lists all projects funded by the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) during the 1999 fiscal year. It includes summaries, funding data, and contact information for a broad range of programs. Programs are grouped into the following research priorities: (1) employment outcomes; (2) health and function;…

  11. 78 FR 29159 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0038] Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic... U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing an endorsement letter of Electric Power Research... Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Enclosure 1 to the 50.54(f) letter requests licensees...

  12. Institutional Research in Australasia: Coming of Age or Coming Unstuck?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Martin; Rothery, Michael; Daldy, Rob

    2011-01-01

    The scope of institutional research (IR) undertaken in Australasian universities is progressively expanding. A traditional focus on student life cycle elements such as enrolment, retention and satisfaction has been complemented for some years now by other areas of focus including research performance and community engagement. More recently,…

  13. 1991 annual report of the Karlsruhe Federal Food Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Federal Food Research Institute does research in the field of nutrition, food and household sciences as well as in related special fields. Among its working priorities are the determination of foreign matter and radionuclides in food as well as food preservation by means of irradiation including dosimetry. The results of those priorities are represented. (orig./MG) [de

  14. A Ten Year Citation Analysis of Major Australian Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Robin J.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of the Excellence in Research for Australia scheme has heightened debate amongst research institutions over the use of metrics such as citations, especially given the ready availability of citation data. An analysis is presented of the citation performance of nine Australian universities and the Commonwealth Scientific, Industrial…

  15. Key Institutions in Business and Management Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaciari, Charles J.; Arbaugh, J. B.; Asarta, Carlos J.; Bento, Regina F.; Hwang, Alvin; Lund Dean, Kathy

    2017-01-01

    The authors investigate institutional productivity in business and management education (BME) research based on the analysis of 4,464 articles published by 7,210 authors across 17 BME journals over a 10-year period, involving approximately 1,900 schools worldwide. Departing from traditional disciplinary silos, they examine the BME research field…

  16. Institutional review boards' attitudes towards remuneration in paediatric research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flege, Marius M; Thomsen, Simon F

    2017-01-01

    Remuneration in paediatric research poses an ethical dilemma. Too large a sum might cause parents to enrol their children in research projects with no benefit for the child, whereas too modest a sum might hamper recruitment. The institutional review boards have the responsibility to only approve ...

  17. Institutional Support: Centre for Economic and Social Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Institutional Support: Centre for Economic and Social Research, Education and Documentation (Burkina Faso). The Centre d'études de documentation et de ... innovations to improve lives and livelihoods. Five world-class research teams are working to develop vaccines for neglected livestock diseases in the Global South.

  18. Challenges in Education Research in Taiwan: Research Institutes and Organizations, Research Policies, and Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, many education researchers and policy makers worldwide have reviewed education research to attempt to provide strategies to improve the quality of such research in their countries. Taiwan’s government has launched policies and funded support to set the benchmark for Taiwan’s leading universities in international academic competition. The external environment of global competition based on research policy influences the ecosystem of social science research production. To assure the quality of education policy, peer review from within the education community is one approach to supplementing the government’s governance, including the establishment of research institutes, promotion, rewards, and research value. This study tracked the mode of academic research and provides an overview of the status of academic education research in Taiwan. Because education research is part of the humanities and social sciences fields, this study identified the challenges in educational research by examining the trend of social science research and by analyzing research organizations, policy, and the evaluation of research performance. Due to the environment of education research in Taiwan is not friendly to education researcher to accumulate papers in SSCI or international journal, additional concerns entail how education research communities can develop and agree on its quality.

  19. Research and investigation on medical usage of cyclotrons as a special research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, the special research project ''Research and investigation on the medical usage of cyclotrons'' had been carried out in the three years program from fiscal 1976 to 1978. Its purpose was to establish the methods of therapy using particle beam such as fast neutrons and the methods of diagnosis using short-lived radioisotopes and positron-emitting radioisotopes. The works were conducted comprehensively in cooperation of the personnel both in and outside the NIRS. Consequently, the purpose was able to be fulfilled satisfactorily. Following on this project, a new special research project ''Research and investigation on the medical usage of particle accelerators'' was started in fiscal 1979. These results are described on the effects of the therapy, diagnostic utilizations, and the medical usage of heavy ion accelerators. (J.P.N.)

  20. The current situation and development of medical device testing institutes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofang; Mu, Ruihong; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Chunren; Li, Deyu

    2017-04-01

    This article analyses the current situation and development of Chinese medical device testing institutes from the perspectives of the two most important functions - testing functions and medical device standardization functions. Areas Covered: The objective of the Chinese government regulations for medical device industry is to ensure the safety and effectiveness of medical devices for Chinese patients. To support the regulation system, the Chinese government has established medical device testing institutes at different levels for example, the national, provincial, and municipal levels. These testing institutes also play an important role in technical support during medical device premarket registration and post market surveillance, they are also the vital practitioners of Chinese medical device standardization. Expert Commentary: Chinese medical device testing institutes are technical departments established by government, and serve the regulatory functions of government agency. In recent years, with the rapid development of medical device industry as well as constantly increasing international and domestic medical device market, the importance of medical device testing institute is more prominent, However, there are still some problems unsolved, such as their overall capacity remains to be improved, construction of standardization is to be strengthened, etc.

  1. Assessing the impact of biomedical research in academic institutions of disparate sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzakis Angelos

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evaluation of academic research performance is nowadays a priority issue. Bibliometric indicators such as the number of publications, total citation counts and h-index are an indispensable tool in this task but their inherent association with the size of the research output may result in rewarding high production when evaluating institutions of disparate sizes. The aim of this study is to propose an indicator that may facilitate the comparison of institutions of disparate sizes. Methods The Modified Impact Index (MII was defined as the ratio of the observed h-index (h of an institution over the h-index anticipated for that institution on average, given the number of publications (N it produces i.e. (α and β denote the intercept and the slope, respectively, of the line describing the dependence of the h-index on the number of publications in log10 scale. MII values higher than 1 indicate that an institution performs better than the average, in terms of its h-index. Data on scientific papers published during 2002–2006 and within 36 medical fields for 219 Academic Medical Institutions from 16 European countries were used to estimate α and β and to calculate the MII of their total and field-specific production. Results From our biomedical research data, the slope β governing the dependence of h-index on the number of publications in biomedical research was found to be similar to that estimated in other disciplines (≈0.4. The MII was positively associated with the average number of citations/publication (r = 0.653, p Conclusion The MII should complement the use of h-index when comparing the research output of institutions of disparate sizes. It has a conceptual interpretation and, with the data provided here, can be computed for the total research output as well as for field-specific publication sets of institutions in biomedicine.

  2. Research on patient safety: falls and medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Sandra Dawn; Kogan, Polina

    2009-10-01

    Below you will find summaries of published research describing investigations into patient safety issues related to falls and medications. The first summary provides details on the incidence of falls associated with the use of walkers and canes. This is followed by a summary of a fall-prevention intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of widespread dissemination of evidence-based strategies in a community in Connecticut. The third write up provides information on three classes of medications that are associated with a significant number of emergency room visits. The last summary describes a pharmacist-managed medication reconciliation intervention pilot program. For additional details about the study findings and interventions, we encourage readers to review the original articles.

  3. Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf 25 years old

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmuth, K.; Kaun, K.H.; Schmidt, A.; Hennig, K.; Brinckmann, H.F.; Lehmann, E.; Rossbander, W.; Bitterlich, H.; Weibrecht, R.; Fuelle, R.; Nebel, D.; Reetz, T.; Beyer, G.J.; Muenze, R.

    1981-12-01

    A colloquium dedicated the 25th anniversary of the foundation of the Central Institute for Nuclear Research of the GDR Academy of Sciences was held on January, 21st, '81. 13 papers were given which dealt with aspects of the institute's history as well as with modern trends in nuclear and solid state physics, nuclear energy and chemistry, radioisotope production, radiation protection and nuclear information. (author)

  4. Challenges facing the marketing of scientific and research institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Sojkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the challenges that scientific research institutions face in terms of their marketing, which have been divided into two groups of those associated with internal marketing and those linked to external marketing. The most significant and important determinants that constitute challenges to both internal and external marketing were described. The key aspects of each of the identified challenges were indicated, as was their impact on the implementation of the marketing policy at institutions.

  5. Customer Relationship Management in scientific and research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromir Matulewicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the example of a scientific institute, this article shows: – potential areas in which CRM philosophy, procedures and tools could be applied – purpose of applying CRM – outcomes to expect from CRM application The article shows the Customer Relationship Management idea exclusively, along with areas of its use in scientific and research institutions and also a proposal to determine a group of clients for these institutions. The summary of the article consists of information regarding sources of knowledge about CRM philosophy and procedures (mainly bibliographical and also about IT systems which support CRM.

  6. Radiation processing project at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.M.; Fu, Y.K.; Yang, Y.H.; Chen, Y.T.; Wei, Y.H.; Lee, K.P.; Wang, Y.K.

    1981-01-01

    The utilization of scientific approach to preserve and sterilize the agricultural products has long been studied since 1954 and was adopted by several countries gradually since 1958. Starting from July 1977 this Institute began to study the preservation of potatoes and onions with reference to sprout inhibition which is discussed and its economical aspect is evaluated. The design concept of a megacurie 60 Co irradiator at this Institute is illustrated. The progress of construction work for the irradiator and the safety device in particular are reported. Current research project on the preservation of agricultural products in this Institute is presented. (author)

  7. Academic Libraries’ Role in Improving Institutions Research Impact

    KAUST Repository

    Tamarkin, Molly; Vijayakumar, J.K.; Baessa, Mohamed A.; Grenz, Daryl M.

    2015-01-01

    In the changing landscape of scientific research and scholarly communication, importance of “quality in research”, “reviewed research” and “reviewed publications” in qualifying for the ratings and rankings are widely discussed. While publishing the research pieces in peer-reviewed and highly ranked journals are increasingly important, there are different methods and tools to be in place at Institutional level to increase researchers’ profile and the ranking of the institutions. As a young research based university created in 2009, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) focuses on the bibliometrics and altemetrics tools, author affiliations, author naming and plug-ins to different search engines, research evaluation systems as well as to research repositories. The University has launched an institutional repository in September 2012 as a home for the intellectual outputs of KAUST researchers, and then adopted the first institutional open access mandate in the Arab region effective June 31, 2014. Integration with ORCID became a key element in this process and the best way to ensure data quality for researcher’s scientific contributions systematically. We will present the inclusion and creation of ORCID identifiers in the existing systems as an institutional member to ORCID, and the creation of dedicated integration tools with Current Research Information System (CRIS) as a standardized common resource to monitor KAUST research outputs. We will also present our experiences in awareness programs, trainings, outreach, implementation of systems and tools like PlumX, as well as our approach in improving the research impact and profiling our Institution’s research to the world.

  8. Academic Libraries’ Role in Improving Institutions Research Impact

    KAUST Repository

    Tamarkin, Molly

    2015-11-11

    In the changing landscape of scientific research and scholarly communication, importance of “quality in research”, “reviewed research” and “reviewed publications” in qualifying for the ratings and rankings are widely discussed. While publishing the research pieces in peer-reviewed and highly ranked journals are increasingly important, there are different methods and tools to be in place at Institutional level to increase researchers’ profile and the ranking of the institutions. As a young research based university created in 2009, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) focuses on the bibliometrics and altemetrics tools, author affiliations, author naming and plug-ins to different search engines, research evaluation systems as well as to research repositories. The University has launched an institutional repository in September 2012 as a home for the intellectual outputs of KAUST researchers, and then adopted the first institutional open access mandate in the Arab region effective June 31, 2014. Integration with ORCID became a key element in this process and the best way to ensure data quality for researcher’s scientific contributions systematically. We will present the inclusion and creation of ORCID identifiers in the existing systems as an institutional member to ORCID, and the creation of dedicated integration tools with Current Research Information System (CRIS) as a standardized common resource to monitor KAUST research outputs. We will also present our experiences in awareness programs, trainings, outreach, implementation of systems and tools like PlumX, as well as our approach in improving the research impact and profiling our Institution’s research to the world.

  9. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). Conclusion: There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting.

  10. Infectious waste management in Japan: A revised regulation and a management process in medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, M.; Une, H.

    2005-01-01

    In Japan, the waste management practice is carried out in accordance with the Waste Disposal Law of 1970. The first rule of infectious waste management was regulated in 1992, and infectious wastes are defined as the waste materials generated in medical institutions as a result of medical care or research which contain pathogens that have the potential to transmit infectious diseases. Revised criteria for infectious waste management were promulgated by the Ministry of Environment in 2004. Infectious waste materials are divided into three categories: the form of waste; the place of waste generation; the kind of infectious diseases. A reduction of infectious waste is expected. We introduce a summary of the revised regulation of infectious waste management in this article

  11. Differences in the use of outsourcing in public and private institutions providing medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerw, Aleksandra I; Kowalska, Mariola; Religioni, Urszula

    2014-06-29

    The costs of health care in Poland are continuously increasing. Thus, almost every institution providing medical services aims at their limitation. One of the costs rationalisation methods in the health care sector is outsourcing. The study was conducted in 153 randomly selected institutions providing medical activities. The tool was a questionnaire, available via a web browser. Over 30% of public institutions identified the need for financial savings, as the main reason for outsourcing the cleaning function. Among private institutions, the dominant reason for this is too high maintenance cost of the cleaning staff (less than 40% of responses). The huge number of medical institutions use the services of an external company for laundering. Over 30% of public institutions identified as the most common reason for separation of functions laundering lack of resources to upgrade and modernize facilities. Less than 27% of public institutions indicate too high costs of kitchen staff as the main reason for ordering function of feeding. Another reason is the need for financial savings (22% response rate). Some institutions indicate a desire to focus on key areas (20% of responses) and lack of financial resources to upgrade and modernize the kitchen (20% response rate). Public and private institutions exercise control over the quality and method performed by an external service (71% of public institutions and 59% of private institutions). Private institutions often informally exercise external control (difference confirmed - Fisher's exact test). Less than 90% of public institutions indicated satisfaction with the services provided by external companies. The adaptation of outsourcing in medical facilities leads to financial efficiency improvement. Through the separation of some medical functions and entrusting their realisation to external companies, medical institutions can focus on their basic activity that is the provision of health services.

  12. Beyond Research Productivity: Matching Productivity Measures to Institutional Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bartholomew

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a unified methodology inclusive of the three primary areas of faculty responsibility (teaching, research, and service to calculate departmental productivity that fills the gap in methodological bench-marking tools for overall faculty productivity. Background:\tA disproportionate number of departmental and faculty productivity indices in higher education rely solely on research. Productivity in other areas of faculty workload areas, like teaching and institutional and community service, are either measured separately or ignored all together – even when those activities are institutionally mandated. This does a disservice to those who work in those institutions and skews incentives. Methodology: This paper utilizes a unified methodology inclusive of the three primary areas of faculty responsibility (teaching, research, and service to calculate depart-mental productivity in five disparate departments (English, Biology, Mathematics, Sociology, and Computer Science common to two universities with differing missions (teaching and service. Findings: The results reveal the bias inherent in relying solely on research as a proxy for overall productivity in institutions that have differing missions. Recommendations for Practitioners: Utilizing better metrics informs higher education administrators, promotes better decision-making, and allows incentives to re-align with desired outcomes. Recommendation for Researchers: This paper recommends combing all aspects of faculty workload into a single benchmark index to better measure departmental productivity. Future Research: Further research into improving this simple index is warranted and would include how to account for quality and other facets of productivity.

  13. Evaluation acting: the experience of a public research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Regia Ruth Ramirez; Ferreira, Hudson Rubio; Filgueiras, Sergio A. Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Innovation and knowledge management are central questions of the modern world economy where the incorporation of new knowledge is determining for competition. In this context, there is a movement of pression under public research institutions for a more dynamic participation on the local innovation system. The institutions of C and T should prepare to help the companies to insert in the context of open economies and also to compete in the global market. The modernity requires flexibility and organizational changes in the research institutions. Redefinitions of their practices in relation to other aspects such as: financing sources; partnership with other organizations; definition and planning of the objectives; evaluation, diffusion and valorization of the results and the establishing of a measuring system and performance indicators. Aiming at having an effective institutional insertion on the national and regional systems of innovation, the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN reformulated its strategical planning, incorporating the view of the researchers of the Center and external experts. As part of the evaluation process, CDTN organizes an annual seminar for evaluating its projects, focused on presenting the results and also on the analysis of the performance indicators. The result of this pairs review are widely informed to the Institution and is an important tool for the critical analysis of the institutional performance and for corrections to be made by the high direction. This paper presents the methodology for evaluating the results, as well as the difficulties and improvements incorporated to the process, which has been applied for three years. (author)

  14. An Analysis of Canadian Institute for Health Research Funding for Research on Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Deonandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined patterns of Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR funding on autism spectrum disorder (ASD research. From 1999 to 2013, CIHR funded 190 ASD grants worth $48 million. Biomedical research received 43% of grants (46% of dollars, clinical research 27% (41%, health services 10% (7%, and population health research 8% (3%. The greatest number of grants was given in 2009, but 2003 saw the greatest amount. Funding is clustered in a handful of provinces and institutions, favouring biomedical research and disfavouring behavioural interventions, adaptation, and institutional response. Preference for biomedical research may be due to the detriment of clinical research.

  15. Medical student storytelling on an institutional blog: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Katherine A; Freberg, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Despite the proclivity and proliferation of blogs on the Internet, the use of blogs at medical institutions is not well documented. In examining the structured stories that medical students share with the digital community, we may better understand how students use institutional blogs to discuss their medical school experiences while maintaining their role as a medical student ambassador for the program. We conducted a case study to analyze the stories within 309 medical student blogs from one medical institution in the United States. In an attempt to communicate their experiences to different benefactors, student bloggers engaged in structured and personal storytelling. Structured stories offered medical school advice to prospective students, while personal stories embodied features of a personal diary where students recounted significant milestones, talked about personal relationships and engaged in emotional reflection and disclosure. Institutional blogs may provide social marketing for medical institutions, as students strategically framed their experiences to reflect a positive attitude about the medical institution and focused on providing advice to prospective students. Although these structured stories limit complete disclosure, students may still achieve benefits by engaging in emotional disclosure and personal reflection.

  16. Medical Genetics at McGill: The History of a Pioneering Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Christopher; Weisz, George; Tone, Andrea; Cambrosio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The McGill Group in Medical Genetics was formed in 1972, supported by the Medical Research Council and successor Canadian Institutes for Health Research until September 2009, making it the longest active biomedical research group in the history of Canada. We document the history of the McGill Group and situate its research within a broader history of medical genetics. Drawing on original oral histories with the Group's members, surviving documents, and archival materials, we explore how the Group's development was structured around epistemological trends in medical genetics, policy choices made by research agencies, and the development of genetics at McGill University and its hospitals.

  17. Creating a medical education enterprise: leveling the playing fields of medical education vs. medical science research within core missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammasitboon, Satid; Ligon, B Lee; Singhal, Geeta; Schutze, Gordon E; Turner, Teri L

    2017-01-01

    Unlike publications of medical science research that are more readily rewarded, clinician-educators' scholarly achievements are more nebulous and under-recognized. Create an education enterprise that empowers clinician-educators to engage in a broad range of scholarly activities and produce educational scholarship using strategic approaches to level the playing fields within an organization. The authors analyzed the advantages and disadvantages experienced by medical science researchers vs. clinician educators using Bolman and Deal's (B&D) four frames of organization (structural, human resource, political, symbolic). The authors then identified organizational approaches and activities that align with each B&D frame and proposed practical strategies to empower clinician-educators in their scholarly endeavors. Our medical education enterprise enhanced the structural frame by creating a decentralized medical education unit, incorporated the human resource component with an endowed chair to support faculty development, leveraged the political model by providing grant supports and expanding venues for scholarship, and enhanced the symbolic frame by endorsing the value of education and public recognition from leaderships. In five years, we saw an increased number of faculty interested in becoming clinician-educators, had an increased number of faculty winning Educational Awards for Excellence and delivering conference presentations, and received 12 of the 15 college-wide awards for educational scholarship. These satisfactory trends reflect early success of our educational enterprise. B&D's organizational frames can be used to identify strategies for addressing the pressing need to promote and recognize clinician-educators' scholarship. We realize that our situation is unique in several respects, but this approach is flexible within an institution and transferable to any other institution and its medical education program. B&D: Bolman and Deal; CRIS: Center for Research

  18. Medical Institutions and Twitter: A Novel Tool for Public Communication in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Yuya; Tsuya, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Fukao, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Background Twitter is a free social networking and microblogging service on the Internet. Medical professionals and patients have started to use Twitter in medicine. Twitter use by medical institutions can interactively and efficiently provide public health information and education for laypeople. Objective This study examined Twitter usage by medical institutions. Methods We reviewed all Japanese user accounts in which the names of medical institutions were described in the user’s Twitter profile. We then classified medical institutions’ tweets by content. Results We extracted 168 accounts for medical institutions with ≥500 followers. The medical specialties of those accounts were dentistry and oral surgery (n=73), dermatology (n=12), cosmetic surgery (n=10), internal medicine (n=10), ophthalmology (n=6), obstetrics and gynecology (n=5), plastic surgery (n=2), and others (n=50). Of these, 21 accounts tweeted medical knowledge and 45 accounts tweeted guidance about medical practice and consultation hours, including advertisements. In the dentistry and oral surgery accounts, individual behavior or thinking was the most frequent (22/71, 31%) content. On the other hand, consultation including advertisements was the most frequent (14/23, 61%) in cosmetic surgery, plastic surgery, and dermatology. Conclusions Some medical specialties used Twitter for disseminating medical knowledge or guidance including advertisements. This indicates that Twitter potentially can be used for various purposes by different medical specialties. PMID:27227154

  19. Survey of Preventable Disaster Deaths at Medical Institutions in Areas Affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: Retrospective Survey of Medical Institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Mase, Tomohiko; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-10-01

    Introduction In 2015, the authors reported the results of a preliminary investigation of preventable disaster deaths (PDDs) at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake (2011). This initial survey considered only disaster base hospitals (DBHs) and hospitals that had experienced at least 20 patient deaths in Miyagi Prefecture (Japan); therefore, hospitals that experienced fewer than 20 patient deaths were not investigated. This was an additional study to the previous survey to better reflect PDD at hospitals across the entire prefecture. Of the 147 hospitals in Miyagi Prefecture, the 14 DBHs and 82 non-DBHs that agreed to participate were included in an on-site survey. A database was created based on the medical records of 1,243 patient deaths that occurred between March 11, 2011 and April 1, 2011, followed by determination of their status as PDDs. A total of 125 cases of PDD were identified among the patients surveyed. The rate of PDD was significantly higher at coastal hospitals than inland hospitals (17.3% versus 6.3%; Pdisaster deaths in non-DBHs were most numerous in facilities with few general beds, especially among patients hospitalized before the disaster in hospitals with fewer than 100 beds. Categorized by area, the most frequent causes of PDD were: insufficient medical resources, disrupted lifelines, delayed medical intervention, and deteriorated environmental conditions in homes and emergency shelters in coastal areas; and were delayed medical intervention and disrupted lifelines in inland areas. Categorized by hospital function, the most frequent causes were: delayed medical intervention, deteriorated environmental conditions in homes and emergency shelters, and insufficient medical resources at DBHs; while those at non-DBHs were disrupted lifelines, insufficient medical resources, delayed medical intervention, and lack of capacity for transport within the area. Preventable disaster death at medical institutions in areas

  20. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf. Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Rindelhardt, U.

    1999-07-01

    The Institute of Safety Research is one of the five scientific institutes of Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf is a member of the 'Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz' und is funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and by the Saxon Ministry of Science and Arts with 50% each. The research work of the institute aims at the assessment and increase of the safety and environmental sustainability of technical plants. The emphasis is put on the development and validation of mathematical and physical models for process and plant analysis, and of techniques for process and components monitoring. Subject of investigations are equally nuclear plants and installations of process industries. (orig.)

  1. 1994 - 1995 annual report of the NRC Biotechnology Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    One of the roles of the Biotechnology Research Institute is to promote leading edge research and development in biotechnology and molecular biology as they relate to industries in the natural resource sectors. To this end, researchers work with industry to develop less polluting, more efficient and economic processes and to solve environmental problems. Scientific studies undertaken in 1994 and 1995 included new analytical techniques and biosensors, bioprocesses for waste and ground water treatment, biopesticides, biodegradation of toxic compounds, biodesulfurization of bitumen, solvent- less sample preparation techniques to analyze environmental pollutants in soils and waste water, protocol for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons, gene probes and their applications, biodegradation of energetic compounds, and biofiltration of air emissions. These, and other noteworthy projects undertaken by the Institute, were reviewed and presented ,combined with institutional data. 2 tabs.

  2. Utilization of research reactors in universities and their medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, Keiji.

    1983-01-01

    In Japan, five research reactors and a critical assembly are operated by the universities. They are opened to all university researchers, the system of which is financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Japanese government. Usually KUR is operated eight cycles per year. One cycle consists of the following four week operation: 1. Mainly for researchers from other universities; 2. Mainly for researchers in the institute; 3. Mainly for beam experiment; 4. Sort time experiment. In the weeks of 1 ∼ 3 the KUR is operated continously from Tuesday morning to Friday evening. The experiment include studies on physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, engineering etc. Recently the medical application of research reactors has become popular in Japan. The new technique of the boron neutron capture thereby has been successfully applied to brain tumors and will be to melanoma (skin cancer) in near future. (author)

  3. Noise diagnostics research at the Institute for Electric Power Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voeroess, L.

    1983-01-01

    The main goal of recent research is the designing of a diagnostic system for the Paks nuclear power plant. It includes the designing of measuring cascades for measuring mechanical vibrations caused by flow and pressure fluctuations in the primary coolant circuit, the arrangement of measuring cascades for measuring turbine bearing vibrations in the secondary coolant circuit, and the development, manufacturing and commissioning of a central data acquisition and processing unit for the whole diagnostic system. Simultaneously computer models are developed for improving the interpretation. Moreover, it is planned to develop methods for estimating residual lifetime and the status of plant components. (author)

  4. Applying the institutional review board data repository approach to manage ethical considerations in evaluating and studying medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Erin K; Rathkey, Daniel; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Palmer, Ryan; Mejicano, George C; Pusic, Martin; Kalet, Adina; Gillespie, Colleen; Carney, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Medical educators and educational researchers continue to improve their processes for managing medical student and program evaluation data using sound ethical principles. This is becoming even more important as curricular innovations are occurring across undergraduate and graduate medical education. Dissemination of findings from this work is critical, and peer-reviewed journals often require an institutional review board (IRB) determination. IRB data repositories, originally designed for the longitudinal study of biological specimens, can be applied to medical education research. The benefits of such an approach include obtaining expedited review for multiple related studies within a single IRB application and allowing for more flexibility when conducting complex longitudinal studies involving large datasets from multiple data sources and/or institutions. In this paper, we inform educators and educational researchers on our analysis of the use of the IRB data repository approach to manage ethical considerations as part of best practices for amassing, pooling, and sharing data for educational research, evaluation, and improvement purposes. Fostering multi-institutional studies while following sound ethical principles in the study of medical education is needed, and the IRB data repository approach has many benefits, especially for longitudinal assessment of complex multi-site data.

  5. Research on and in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panter, Michaela S

    2011-09-01

    Dr. George Lister of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center delivered the Lee E. Farr Lecture on Student Research Day on May 9, 2011. This day focused on the dissertation work of Yale School of Medicine MD students, whose research opportunities for prospective physicians were recently examined and critiqued by Yale's Committee to Promote Student Interest in Careers as Physician Scientists. Lister's talk served to highlight the importance of communication between the laboratory and the clinic in optimizing diagnostics and treatments, effectively affirming the validity of the Committee's objectives. Copyright © 2011.

  6. Radiation protection code of practice in academic and research institutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdalla, A. A. M.

    2010-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to establish a code of practice on radiation protection for safe control of radiation sources used in academic and research institutes, another aim of this study was to assess the current situation of radiation protection in some of the academic and research institutes.To achieve the aims of this study, a draft of a code of practice has been developed which is based on international and local relevant recommendation. The developed code includes the following main issues: regulatory responsibilities, radiation protection program and design of radiation installations. The second aim had been accomplished by conducting inspection visits to five (A, B, C, D and E) academic and to four (F, G, H and I ) research institutes. Eight of such institutes are located in Khartoum State and the ninth one is in Madani city (Aljazeera State). The inspection activities have been carried out using a standard inspection check list developed by the regulatory authority of the Sudan. The inspection missions to the above mentioned institutes involved also evaluation of radiation levels around the premises and storage areas of radiation sources. The dose rate measurement around radiation sources locations were found to be quite low. This mainly is due to the fact that the activities of most radionuclides that are used in these institutes are quite low ( in the range of micro curies). Also ,most the x-ray machines that were found in use for scientific academic and research purposes work at low k Vp of maximum 60 k Vp. None of the radiation workers in the inspected institutes has a personal radiation monitoring device, therefor staff dose levels have not been assessed. However it was noted that in most of the academic/ research studies radiation workers are only exposed to very low levels of radiation and for a very short time that dose not exceed 1 minute, therefore the expected occupational exposure of the staff is very low. Radiation measurement in public

  7. [Following the American example? American models for hospital medicine and research: the case of the Kerckhoff Institute in Bad Nauheim].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    This essay examines how and why American models were applied in the reorganization of West German hospitals and medical research centers in the post-war period. After discussing why American clinical medical centers turned into model institutions over the last century or so, a case study is discussed in some detail: the Kerckhoff Institute for cardiovascular research in Bad Nauheim, since 1951 an institute within the Max Planck Society with its own research clinic (which was unusual for Max Planck Institutes). The history of this institution illustrates which local and specific considerations drove historical actors to embrace American models. German academic and administrative realities, however, imposed tight constraints on the implementation of US institutional models.

  8. The essential role of mentors in medical institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arez Mohamed, Elena Antoni University College London Medical School, University College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the papers written by Al Qahtani¹ and Banu et al.² The former explored the motivation of medical students to engage in mentoring in a place where this was a scarce phenomenon and the other analyzed how mentoring could be successfully implemented and enhance acquisition of knowledge among mentees.  View original paper by Al QahtaniView original paper by Banu et al 

  9. The U.S. Public's Investment in Medical Research: An Evolving Social Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Stephen J; Dev, Anurupa; Bonham, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Medical researchers and their institutions are operating under extraordinary financial stress. More than a decade after completion of the 5-year doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget, the medical research community must confront a significant loss in National Institutes of Health purchasing power and downward pressures in federal discretionary spending. In part, this trend results from a federal budget stalemate over the growth in entitlement programs, particularly spending on medical care. This article considers the changing nature of the federal investment in medical research and the potential for medical researchers and institutions conducting the full spectrum of research to improve health system performance and health equity. In our view, continued federal investments reflect an evolving social contract for research serving the public good; the term contract is used metaphorically to represent a figurative, implicit agreement between the scientific community and the public's representatives in government. Under this conceptual contract, the American people--who are ultimately the funders of research, research training and infrastructure--expect outcomes that lead to better health, security or other benefits. The evolving contract includes expectations for more accountability, transparency, sharing of results and resources, and better integration of research systems and cultures that used to take pride in boundaries and distinctions. We outline here some of the major movements of organizations realigning to social support, which are increasingly essential to sustain public investment in medical research. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The institute is established under the atomic energy basic law to make effectively research of development of atomic energy in general and help to promote investigation, development and utilization of it. The institute is a legal person and has its main office in Tokyo. Its capital is the amount of yen 2,500 million plus contributions by persons other than the government. The government invests the said yen 2,500 million at the time of its establishment. The articles of the institute shall prescribe matters, such as: capital, contributions and assets; officer and meeting; business and its execution; accounting, etc. The officers are consisted of a chief director, a deputy chief director and less than 7 directors and less than 2 auditors. The chief director is appointed by the Prime Minister with the consent of the atomic energy commission. The term of the chief director, the deputy chief director and directors is 4 years and that of auditors is 2 years. Functions of the institute include basic and application research of atomic energy, planning, building and operation of reactors, training of researchers and engineers of atomic energy, etc. The budget, the business program and the financial project shall be prepared each business year and authorized by the Prime Minister. The institute is subject to the supervision of the Prime Minister. (Okada, K.)

  11. Mobilisation for public engagement: Benchmarking the practices of research institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entradas, Marta; Bauer, Martin M

    2017-10-01

    Studies on scientists' practices of public engagement have pointed to variations between disciplines. If variations at the individual level are reflected at the institutional level, then research institutes in Social Sciences (and Humanities) should perform higher in public engagement and be more involved in dialogue with the public. Using a nearly complete sample of research institutes in Portugal 2014 ( n = 234, 61% response rate), we investigate how public engagement varies in intensity, type of activities and target audiences across scientific areas. Three benchmark findings emerge. First, the Social Sciences and the Humanities profile differently in public engagement highlighting the importance of distinguishing between these two scientific areas often conflated in public engagement studies. Second, the Social Sciences overall perform more public engagement activities, but the Natural Sciences mobilise more effort for public engagement. Third, while the Social Sciences play a greater role in civic public engagement, the Natural Sciences are more likely to perform educational activities. Finally, this study shows that the overall size of research institutes, available public engagement funding and public engagement staffing make a difference in institutes' public engagement.

  12. The law for the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The law establishes the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in accordance with the Basic Act on Atomic Energy as a government corporation for the purpose of promoting R and D and utilizations of atomic energy (first chapter). The second chapter concerns the directors, advisers and personnel of the institute, namely a chairman of the board of directors, a vice-chairman, directors not more than seven persons, and auditors not more than two persons. The chairman represents and supervises the intitute, whom the prime minister appoints with the agreement of Atomic Energy Commission. The vice-chairman and other directors are nominated by the chairman with the approval of the prime minister, while the auditors are appointed by the prime minister with the advice of the Atomic Energy Commission. Their terms of office are 4 years for directors and 2 years for auditors. The third chapter defines the scope of activities of the institute as follows: basic and applied researches on atomic energy; design, construction and operation of nuclear reactors; training of researchers and technicians; and import, production and distribution of radioisotopes. Those activities should be done in accordance with the basic development and utilization plans of atomic energy established by the prime minister with the determination of Atomic Energy Commission. The fourth chapter provides for the finance and accounting of the institute, and the fifth chapter requires the supervision of the institute by the prime minister. (Matsushima, A.)

  13. Research Training, Institutional Support, and Self-Efficacy: Their Impact on Research Activity of Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thomas Lynch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While the expectations for social work practitioners to do research have increased, their involvement is still limited. We know little about what factors influence involvement in research. The present study proposes a theoretical model that hypothesizes research training and institutional support for research as the exogenous variables, research self-efficacy as an intervening variable, and research activity as the endogenous variable. The study tests the model using data collected from a random sample of social workers. To a large degree the data support the model. Research self-efficacy has a significant effect on research activity. It is also an important mediating variable for the effect of institutional support on research activity. Although institutional support for research has no direct effect, it has an indirect effect via self-efficacy on research activity. However, research training has no effect on research activity and self-efficacy in research. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. 75 FR 8374 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health...

  15. 77 FR 71604 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635...

  16. An Institutional Approach to Developing Research Data Management Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. J. Wilson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines the work that the University of Oxford is undertaking to implement a coordinated data management infrastructure. The rationale for the approach being taken by Oxford is presented, with particular attention paid to the role of each service division. This is followed by a consideration of the relative advantages and disadvantages of institutional data repositories, as opposed to national or international data centres. The article then focuses on two ongoing JISC-funded projects, ‘Embedding Institutional Data Curation Services in Research’ (Eidcsr and ‘Supporting Data Management Infrastructure for the Humanities’ (Sudamih. Both projects are intra-institutional collaborations and involve working with researchers to develop particular aspects of infrastructure, including: University policy, systems for the preservation and documentation of research data, training and support, software tools for the visualisation of large images, and creating and sharing databases via the Web (Database as a Service.

  17. Irradiation Facilities of the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kurashima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews this unique accelerator complex in detail from the viewpoint of its configuration, accelerator specification, typical accelerator, or irradiation technologies and ion beam applications. The institute has also irradiation facilities for electron beams and 60Co gamma-rays and has been leading research and development of radiation chemistry for industrial applications in Japan with the facilities since its establishment. The configuration and utilization of those facilities are outlined as well.

  18. Radioactive Materials in Medical Institutions as a Potential Threat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radalj, Z.

    2007-01-01

    In numerous health institutions ionizing sources are used in everyday practice. Most of these sources are Roentgen machines and accelerators which produce radiation only when in use. However, there are many institutions, e.g., Nuclear medicine units, where radioactive materials are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This institutions store a significant amount of radioactive materials in form of open and closed sources of radiation. Overall activity of open radiation sources can reach over a few hundred GBq. Open sources of radiation are usually so called short-living isotopes. Since they are used on daily basis, a need for a continuous supply of the radioactive materials exists (on weekly basis). Transportation phase is probably the most sensitive phase because of possible accidents or sabotage. Radiological terrorism is a new term. Legislation in the area of radiological safety is considered complete and well defined, and based on the present regulatory mechanism, work safety with radiation sources is considered relatively high. However, from time to time smaller accidents do happen due to mishandling, loose of material (possible stealing), etc. Lately, the safety issue of ionizing sources is becoming more important. In this matter we can expect activities in two directions, one which is going towards stealing and 'smuggling' of radioactive materials, and the other which would work or provoke accidents at the location where the radiation sources are.(author)

  19. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Efficiency of Manufacturing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, C; French, D

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (A.R. 1.) on "the efficiency of Manufacturing Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programm~ Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international co-operation. Advanced Research Institutes are organised for the purpose of bringing together experts in a particular field of interest to identify and make known the present state of knowledge in that area and, through informed debate, to make recommendations for directions for future research that would benefit the community at large. To this end two kinds of contribution were obtained by invitation. There were those papers which were about the current state of work in the area of manufacturing systems and its organisation; in addition three theme papers were presented to provide a stimulus to the discussion in terms of ways of thinking, both about the area and about the kind of research needed.

  20. Fraunhofer Institute for Atmospheric Environmental Research. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This progress report submitted by Fraunhofer Institut fuer Atmosphaerische Umweltforschung, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, reviews the institute's scientific and technical atmospheric environmental research activities of 1990. Emphasis was on research into the atmospheric circulation of CH 4 and N 2 O, the determination of the distribution and of the time characteristics of trace substances of environmental relevance, and on studies of the effects of pollutants on the vegetation. Major efforts went into the development of instruments and the modeling of the atmosphere in support of the experimental work. The FhG activities advance the research into the chemical behavior of the atmosphere, the possible effects of man-made changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere on the greenhouse effect, the regional pollutant loads, and the effects of ground-level UV-B radiation. The activities are part of international and national joint research projects, e.g. EUROTRAC, IGAC, and ICAT. (orig./KW) [de

  1. Interdisciplinary and inter-institutional differences in learning preferences among Malaysian medical and health sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REBECCA S.Y. WONG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The learner-centred approach in medical and health sciences education makes the study of learning preferences relevant and important. This study aimed to investigate the interdisciplinary, interinstitutional, gender and racial differences in the preferred learning styles among Malaysian medical and health sciences students in three Malaysian universities, namely SEGi University (SEGi, University of Malaya (UM and Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR. It also investigated the differences in the preferred learning styles of these students between high achievers and non-high achievers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on medical and health sciences students from three Malaysian universities following the approval of the Research and Ethics Committee, SEGi University. Purposive sampling was used and the preferred learning styles were assessed using the VARK questionnaire. The questionnaire was validated prior to its use. Three disciplines (medicine, pharmacy and dentistry were chosen based on their entry criteria and some similarities in their course structure. The three participating universities were Malaysian universities with a home-grown undergraduate entry medical program and students from a diverse cultural and socioeconomic background. The data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software, version 22. VARK subscale scores were expressed as mean±standard deviation. Comparisons of the means were carried out using t-test or ANOVA. A p value of 0.05. Conclusion: This study gives an insight into the learner characteristics of more than one medical school in Malaysia. Such multi-institutional studies are lacking in the published literature and this study gives a better representation of the current situation in the learning preferences among medical students in Malaysia.

  2. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research | SCP at a glance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    The Netherlands Institute for Social Research supplies central government with information on the Dutch welfare state. For more than 30 years, the SCP has been charting developments in the daily lives of the Dutch population: work, income, health, education, social security, housing, culture, how

  3. The African Languages Research Institute: A Milestone in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruthven

    African Languages Research Institute (ALRI) gedoen het in die ontwikkeling van die ... church literature and educational books to create literature for their new con- verts. .... tive impact on the process of raising the status of Shona and Ndebele. .... from naturally occurring language in use by mother-tongue speakers of the.

  4. Proposal to Establish an International Solar Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1974-01-01

    This report was written by E. Broda and it is about a proposal to establish an international solar research institute. Broda emphasizes solar energy as the most important energy source alternatively to nuclear energy and he points out the advantages of solar energy over nuclear energy. This report was written for a symposium for science and peace in February 1974. (nowak)

  5. Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) Requirements Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurawski, Jason, W; Mace, Kathryn, P

    2016-08-11

    In August 2016 The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Colorado State University (CSU) organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) located on the campus of Colorado State University. Several key findings highlighting the results from the review were discovered, with benefits to improve the overall scientific process for CIRA and CSU.

  6. The National Institute of Dental Research Clinical Dental Staff Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Bruce J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A program in one of the National Institutes of Health offers clinical training fellowships as a means of training potential dental school faculty by providing both unique clinical skills and high-quality research experience. The program was developed in response to a perceived need for change in academic dentistry. (MSE)

  7. The Gatekeepers of Business Education Research: An Institutional Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbancic, Frank R.

    2011-01-01

    The author ranked the academic standing of universities based on faculty representation to the editorial boards of business education journals. Previous studies that ranked institutions for editorial board representation focused on journals that primarily favor publication of basic and applied research contributions. As a result, prior research…

  8. Aging in France: Population Trends, Policy Issues, and Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, Daniel; Durandal, Jean-Philippe Viriot

    2013-01-01

    Like in other advanced industrial countries, in France, demographic aging has become a widely debated research and policy topic. This article offers a brief overview of major aging-related trends in France. The article describes France's demographics of aging, explores key policy matters, maps the institutional field of French social gerontology…

  9. Guides to Pollution Prevention: Research and Educational Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Office of Research and Development.

    This guide provides an overview of waste generating processes and operations that occur in educational or research institutions and presents options for minimizing waste generation through source reduction and recycling. A broad spectrum of waste chemicals in laboratories, art studios, print shops, maintenance, and other operations can be…

  10. Item Response Theory: Overview, Applications, and Promise for Institutional Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Nicholas A.; Herzog, Serge; Sharkness, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Item Response Theory (IRT) is a measurement theory that is ideal for scale and test development in institutional research, but it is not without its drawbacks. This chapter provides an overview of IRT, describes an example of its use, and highlights the pros and cons of using IRT in applied settings.

  11. Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2004-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its first annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2004. During this period, fourteen PNNL scientists hosted sixteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the sixteen participants, fourteen were graduate students; one was transitioning to graduate school; and one was a university faculty member.

  12. Institutional and Departmental Cultures: The Relationship Between Teaching and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ann E.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of institutional and departmental cultures on the relationship between college teaching and research is discussed, and suggestions for assessing these factors and nurturing a positive relationship between them are made. Approaches include making reward systems more equitable, strengthening administrative leadership, encouraging…

  13. Research Review of the Institute of African Studies: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Prof. M.E. Kropp Dakubu Editor-in-Chief University of Ghana. Research Review. Institute of African Studies. P.O.Box LG73 Legon, Ghana. Phone: 211-24-4764006. Fax: 233-21-500512. Email: medakubu@ug.edu.gh. Support Contact. Dr Stephen Acheampong Phone: 211-24-4979233

  14. Physical protection of radioactive materials in a University Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.

    1998-01-01

    Although nuclear research centers attached to universities usually do not keep large inventories of radioactive or special nuclear material, the mentioned material has still to be under strict surveillance and safeguards if applicable. One problem in such research centers is the large and frequent fluctuation of persons - mainly students, scientists or visiting guest scientists - using such materials for basic or applied research. In the present paper an overview of protective actions in such a research institute will be given and experience of more than 36 years will be presented. (author)

  15. Knowledge synthesis and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Ian D

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR is Canada's premier health-research funding agency. We fund nearly 14,000 researchers and trainees in four theme areas: biomedical, clinical, health services, and population and public-health research. Our mandate is 'to excel according to international standards of scientific excellence, in the creation of new knowledge and its translation into improved health for Canadians, more effective health services and products and a strengthened Canadian health care system'. Knowledge synthesis is a key element of the knowledge-translation objectives of CIHR, as outlined in our definition of knowledge-translation.

  16. Developing institutional repository at National Institute for Materials Science : Researchers directory service “SAMURAI” and Research Collection Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Masao; Tanifuji, Mikiko

    National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) has developed an institutional repository “NIMS eSciDoc” since 2008. eSciDoc is an open source repository software made in Germany, and provides E-Science infrastructures through its flexible data model and rich Web APIs. NIMS eScidoc makes use of eSciDoc functions to benefit for NIMS situations. This article also focuses on researchers directory service “SAMURAI” in addition to NIMS eSciDoc. Successfully launched in October 2010, SAMURAI provides approximately 500 researchers' profile and publication information.

  17. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, whose activities are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states and of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  18. Joint Institute for Nuclear Research Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The JOINT INSTITUTE FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH, JINR, was established by its founding countries in 1956 with the purpose of joining together the scientific and material potential of Member States in studies of the fundamental properties of matter. JINR is an international inter-governmental scientific research organization, the activities of which are based on the principles of openness for participation to all interested states of their equal, mutually beneficial collaboration.

  19. KFK. Institut fuer Radiochemie research and development activities in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The Institute for Radiochemistry (IRCH, Director: Proj. D. Ache) is concerned with research and development programmes within two framework of the following projects: Reprocessing and Waste Processing; Fast Breeder; Nuclear Safeguards; and Nuclear Material Surveillance. Fundamental problems in the field of instrumental analysis (in particular surface chemistry, surface structure analysis and radiochemistry) are studied within the priority work programme 'Solids and Materials Research'. Water technology studies at the IRCH are included in the joint priority programmes 'Technology - Man - Environment'. (orig./RB) [de

  20. Systematic analysis of funding awarded to institutions in the United Kingdom for infectious disease research, 1997-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Michael G; Fitchett, Joseph R; Moore, David Aj; Atun, Rifat

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the research investments made to UK institutions for all infectious disease research and identify the direction of spend by institution. Systematic analysis. Databases and websites were systematically searched for information on relevant studies funded for the period 1997-2010. UK institutions carrying out infectious disease research. None. Twenty academic institutions receiving greatest sum investments across infection are included here, also NHS sites, Sanger Institute, Health Protection Agency and the Medical Research Council. We measured total funding, median award size, disease areas and position of research along the R&D value chain. Included institutions accounted for £2.1 billion across 5003 studies. Imperial College and University of Oxford received the most investment. Imperial College led the most studies. The Liverpool and London Schools of Tropical Medicine had highest median award size, whereas the NHS sites combined had many smaller studies. Sum NHS funding appears to be declining over time, whilst university income is relatively stable. Several institutions concentrate almost exclusively on pre-clinical research. In some areas, there is clearly a leading institution, e.g. Aberdeen and mycology research or UCL and antimicrobial resistance. UK institutions carry out research across a wide range of infectious disease areas. This analysis can identify centres of excellence and help inform future resource allocation for research priorities. Institutions can use this analysis for establishing expertise within their groups, identifying external collaborators and informing local research strategy.

  1. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniyam, C A; Agaba, P A; Agaba, E I

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4(th) to 6(th) year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of elucidating information regarding sexual practices and condom utilization. Safe sex practice was defined as the use of condoms and being in a monogamous relationship. Of a total of 400 questionnaires distributed, 365 respondents (249 males and 116 females) had adequate data for analysis. A large proportion (62%) of our students have never had sex before and less than 30% of them are sexually active. Only 6.1% had multiple sexual partners and homosexuality was uncommon (1.9%). Condom utilization amongst the sexually active was high (65%) and similar among male and female students (71.3% vs. 51.9% respectively, p = 0.08). There exists safe sexual practice among medical students in our setting. This group could be recruited as peer educators in the war against HIV/AIDS.

  2. A platform for quality management in research institutes (part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klembalska Agnieszka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years there has been a particularly strong pressure on changing old structures and management models in research institutes. Contemporary research institutes are scientific units which are commercial in character – almost 80% of funds come from companies and contractual research activity and services. They are the basic sector of science aiming at cooperation with the economy, applied and innovative research. In order to maintain the current and start new cooperation it is necessary to pay particular attention to maintaining, improving and exposing high level of quality of conducted activity. Taking into consideration the necessity of carrying out ever more complex research projects, conducting activity requiring fast reaction to change, risk analysis, which is assessed every year by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education – it seems that it is necessary to apply tools supporting the assessment of quality. In the proposed three-aspect perspective the following scopes of activity are emphasized: implemented quality management systems, area of scientific information and the sphere of cooperation with the client. This article constitutes the continuation of the subjects discussed in the first part – an extension of issues associated with the scope of responsibilities of particular Sections of the proposed Quality Management Platform in research institutes.

  3. Annual report 1988-89: Tata Institute of Fundamental Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isloor, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The annual report surveys the work of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Bombay, during the fiscal year 1988-89. Most of the research activities are organised and carried out in two schools of the Institute, namely, the School of Mathematics and the School of Physics. In the School of Mathematics, active research is carried out in almost every branch of pure mathematics. The School of Physics is engaged in research activities of both theoretical and experimental nature in high energy physics, astrophysics, cosmic rays, space physics, astronomy, nuclear and atomic physics, condensed matter physics, molecular biology, computer science and communication and microwave engineering. TIFR has a Basic Dental Research Unit which carries out intervention studies on oral cancer and precancerous lesions. Its Homi Bhabha Centre for Science Education (HBCSE) carries out programmes for improvement of science education at all levels in the country. TIFR outstation units are: (1) TIFR Centre at Bangalore which in collaboration with the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore has a programme in Applications of Mathematics (2) Radio Astronomy Centre, Ooty, (3) Baloon Facility, Hyderabad and (4) National Image Processing Facility, Ooty. The academic and research activities of the schools, new technique and instruments and experimental facilities developed and fabricated by various units of TIFR are briefly described. Faculty and section wise list of staff members is given. Lists of publications by the members and other activities such as colloquia, seminars, conferences etc. are also given. (M.G.B.)

  4. National Institutes of Health Funding to Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery at U.S. Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Ahn, Jaimo; Levin, L Scott

    2017-01-18

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the U.S., yet its contribution to orthopaedic research is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the portfolio of NIH funding to departments of orthopaedic surgery at U.S. medical schools. The NIH RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database was queried for NIH grants awarded to departments of orthopaedic surgery in 2014. Funding totals were determined for award mechanisms and NIH institutes. Trends in NIH funding were determined for 2005 to 2014 and compared with total NIH extramural research funding. Funding awarded to orthopaedic surgery departments was compared with that awarded to departments of other surgical specialties in 2014. Characteristics of NIH-funded principal investigators were obtained from department web sites. In 2014, 183 grants were awarded to 132 investigators at 44 departments of orthopaedic surgery. From 2005 to 2014, NIH funding increased 24.3%, to $54,608,264 (p = 0.030), but the rates of increase seen did not differ significantly from those of NIH extramural research funding as a whole (p = 0.141). Most (72.6%) of the NIH funding was awarded through the R01 mechanism, with a median annual award of $343,980 (interquartile range [IQR], $38,372). The majority (51.1%) of the total funds supported basic science research, followed by translational (33.0%), clinical (10.0%), and educational (5.9%) research. NIH-funded orthopaedic principal investigators were predominately scientists whose degree was a PhD (71.1%) and who were male (79.5%). Eleven NIH institutes were represented, with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) providing the preponderance (74.2%) of the funding. In 2014, orthopaedic surgery ranked below the surgical departments of general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, and urology in terms of NIH funding received. The percentage increase of NIH

  5. [The work of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in own medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, K V

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the medical activities of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in curative and educational institutions organized by the communities themselves. The social ministration of communities on the territory of Moscow is considered.

  6. PROGER - radioactive waste management in Brazilian research institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontedeiro, E.; Ramos, A.C.; Reis e Vaz, S.; Ferreira, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    This article demonstrates the feasibility of a programme, called PROGER, which is aimed at improving the radioactive waste management activities of research institutions in Brazil. PROGER involves the implementation, correction and updating of waste management techniques in those institutions where a waste management system is already being carried out or the introduction and full deployment of such a system in those where a system does not exist. The methodology utilized by the PROGER programme is discussed, and partial results are presented bearing in mind the characteristics and quantities of wastes. (author)

  7. The African Languages Research Institute: A Milestone in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruthven

    lect or another and also to be based on short-term research programmes. How- ever, most ... as well as a general medium-sized Ndebele monolingual dictionary, Isichaza- .... medical terms, Duramazwi reUrapi neUtano (Mpofu et al. 2004) ...

  8. Research Institute ITAL. Association EURATOM ITAL. Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Research Institute ITAL is one of the institutes of the Division for Agricultural Research of the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. For certain aspects of its programme it is also a partner in the Association EURATOM-ITAL with the Commission of the European Community. This annual report deals with: molecular genetic methods for plant breeding; biotechnical production of valuable compounds by means of (plant) cell cultures and microorganisms; soil biology including the rhizosphere; radioactive contamination of the environment and its public health risks; the synergistic interaction between radiation and other mutagenic agents; a new approach in malaria control by means of radiation genetic research on insects; genetic sexing in the Mediterranean fruitfly, Ceratitis capitata; food irradiation (activities within the contract of the Dutch Government with the IAEA in Vienna and the FAO in Rome on food irradiation technology for developing countries). (Auth.)

  9. Metrics-based assessments of research: incentives for 'institutional plagiarism'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Colin

    2013-06-01

    The issue of plagiarism--claiming credit for work that is not one's own, rightly, continues to cause concern in the academic community. An analysis is presented that shows the effects that may arise from metrics-based assessments of research, when credit for an author's outputs (chiefly publications) is given to an institution that did not support the research but which subsequently employs the author. The incentives for what is termed here "institutional plagiarism" are demonstrated with reference to the UK Research Assessment Exercise in which submitting units of assessment are shown in some instances to derive around twice the credit for papers produced elsewhere by new recruits, compared to papers produced 'in-house'.

  10. Snake oil and venoms for medical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolpert, H. D.

    2011-04-01

    Some think that using derivatives of snake venom for medical purposes is the modern version of snake oil but they are seriously misjudging the research potentials of some of these toxins in medicines of the 2000's. Medical trials, using some of the compounds has proven their usefulness. Several venoms have shown the possibilities that could lead to anticoagulants, helpful in heart disease. The blood clotting protein from the taipan snake has been shown to rapidly stop excessive bleeding. The venom from the copperhead may hold an answer to breast cancer. The Malaysian pit viper shows promise in breaking blood clots. Cobra venom may hold keys to finding cures for Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. Rattlesnake proteins from certain species have produced blood pressure medicines. Besides snake venoms, venom from the South American dart frog, mollusks (i.e. Cone Shell Snail), lizards (i.e. Gila Monster & Komodo Dragon), some species of spiders and tarantulas, Cephalopods, mammals (i.e. Platypus & Shrews), fish (i.e. sting rays, stone fish, puffer fish, blue bottle fish & box jelly fish), intertidal marine animals (echinoderms)(i.e. Crown of Thorn Star Fish & Flower Urchin) and the Honeybee are being investigated for potential medical benefits.

  11. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-01-01

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ''gold standards'' to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications

  12. Medical Students' Perspectives on Implementing Curriculum Change at One Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Baker, Courtney E; Lomis, And Kimberly D

    2017-04-01

    Training physicians to be effective practitioners throughout their careers begins in undergraduate medical education with particular focus on self-directed inquiry, professional and interprofessional development, and competency-based assessment. A select number of medical schools are restructuring their curricula by placing the student at the center of content delivery to enhance the learning experience. While this restructuring may benefit the adult learner, administrators often make assumptions about how students will perceive and respond to such innovative and unfamiliar educational concepts. This can create a disconnect between students and their curriculum. Administrative mindfulness of student experiences is needed to ensure successful implementation of curricular change, facilitate the transition from old to new modalities, and train competent physician graduates.Vanderbilt University School of Medicine (VUSM) recently completed a curriculum update, and student representatives have been essential participants in the transition, from the earliest stages in preplanning to rapid-cycle feedback as the curriculum runs. Two of the authors are members of VUSM's Student Curriculum Committee, which facilitates gathering and relaying student feedback to the administration. Drawing from their experiences, five specific considerations to address and manage when implementing student-centered curricular change are presented: (1) Communicate the rationale, (2) acknowledge anxiety, (3) adjust extracurricular leadership roles, (4) manage "The Bulge" of learners in the clinical environment, and (5) foster ongoing collaboration of students and administrators. For each consideration, examples and proposed solutions are provided.

  13. Review of research institute library activity through the contributed papers. The case of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Habara, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Masashi; Itabashi, Keizo; Yonezawa, Minoru

    2007-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) Library had contributed 312 papers through the library activities in half-century. We made the bibliography of these papers as well as categorized them into general', 'library functions', 'management and promotion of research results' and 'international exchange of information' and explained them under the four categories. A subject index, an author index of these papers and chronology of JAERI library activities were also compiled for reference. (author)

  14. Skoda Concern's cooperation with State Machinery Design Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valchar, J.; Kuhn, L.

    1988-01-01

    The main areas are presented of cooperation between the Skoda Plzen Concern and the State Machinery Design Research Institute in Prague-Bechovice. This is mainly the development of steam turbines, from 50 MW turbines to the present 1000 MW saturated steam turbines designed for nuclear power plants. Main attention is centred on conditions of the boiling crisis in the steam turbine circuit, and its consequences. This study is served by the experimental equipment of the institute and its computer. The cooperation of the two institutions in the field of testing and diagnostic equipment is centred on measuring natural oscillations of turbine blades, the diagnostics of vibrations of steam turbines, the measurement of the humidity of saturated steam, optical measurements of the parameters of saturated steam, ultrasound diagnostics and the measurement of turbine blade deformation caused by hydraulic effects. (Z.M.). 8 figs

  15. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Bionic Man Meet the Bionic Man Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents The ... medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research The National Institute of Biomedical ...

  16. Institutional Research and Development: [Annual report], FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strack, B.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) program was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Director in October 1984. The IR and D program fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology; disciplinary research to create varied, innovative approaches to selected scientific fields; and long-term research in support of the defense and energy missions at LLNL. Each project in the IR and D program was selected after personal interviews by the Director and his delegates and was deemed to show unusual promise. These projects include research in the following fields: chemistry and materials science, computation, earth sciences, engineering, nuclear chemistry, biotechnology, environmental consequences of nuclear war, geophysics and planetary physics, and supercomputer research and development. A separate section of the report is devoted to research projects receiving individual awards

  17. Institutional Research and Development: (Annual report), FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strack, B. (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) program was established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Director in October 1984. The IR and D program fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology; disciplinary research to create varied, innovative approaches to selected scientific fields; and long-term research in support of the defense and energy missions at LLNL. Each project in the IR and D program was selected after personal interviews by the Director and his delegates and was deemed to show unusual promise. These projects include research in the following fields: chemistry and materials science, computation, earth sciences, engineering, nuclear chemistry, biotechnology, environmental consequences of nuclear war, geophysics and planetary physics, and supercomputer research and development. A separate section of the report is devoted to research projects receiving individual awards.

  18. Phenomenography: A Missed Method in Medical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assarroudi Abdolghader

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research is an approach with which human beings can attempt to answer questions and discover the unknowns. Research methodology is something that is determined by the researcher’s attitude toward the universe as well as by the question he is trying to answer. Some essential questions regarding the research process are: “What is the nature of reality?”, “What is the nature of the relationship between the scholar and the subject of interest?”, and “How can one understand the subject, and what are the methods?”. Research approaches can be categorized as quantitative and qualitative. In the former, measurement, prediction, and control are the bases, while in the latter, exploring, describing, and explaining the phenomena are fundamental. Among qualitative research methods, phenomenography is one of the newest methods. However, in spite of proving to be useful in various disciplines, it has yet to become popular, and many scholars mistake it for phenomenology. The focus of phenomenography is on what is known as the second-order perspective and the different ways that people can experience the same phenomenon, while phenomenology primarily emphasizes the first-order perspective and the similar essences that are derived from various experiences. This article aims to provide a better understanding of phenomenography through explaining it and comparing it with phenomenology in order to facilitate its proper and timely application in medical studies.

  19. Radioimmunoassay for medical diagnosis and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, R A; Vavrejn, B [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Life Sciences

    1982-12-01

    Health and disease in living systems depend on the dynamic interplay of thousands of biochemical substances occurring in living systems in concentrations ranging from parts per hundred to parts per billion or trillion. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a highly specific and sensitive technique for measuring the concentration of such biochemical substances. It represents one of the most dramatically expanding areas of medical diagnosis and research. Reviewed here is the recent progress on RIA, with emphasis on methodology and on its adaptation and application in developing countries. The number of biological substances (ligands) being assayed by RIA continues to expand. RIA is central to diagnosis, epidemiology and research. It has been successfully applied in the study of parasitic and infectious diseases. Introduction of RIA into developing countries, for which the Agency's help is sought and given, presents numerous problems: personnel, equipment, adaptability of techniques to local needs, and public support.

  20. Introducing NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Yvonne

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and the moons of Mars. Comprised of competitively selected teams across the U.S., a growing number of international partnerships around the world, and a small central office located at NASA Ames Research Center, the institute advances collaborative research to bridge science and exploration goals. As a virtual institute, SSERVI brings unique skills and collaborative technologies for enhancing collaborative research between geographically disparate teams. SSERVI is jointly funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate and the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. Current U.S. teams include: Dr. Jennifer L. Heldmann, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA; Dr. William Farrell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; Prof. Carlé Pieters, Brown University, Providence, RI; Prof. Daniel Britt, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; Prof. Timothy Glotch, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY; Dr. Mihaly Horanyi, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Dr. Ben Bussey, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD; Dr. David A. Kring, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX; and Dr. William Bottke, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO. Interested in becoming part of SSERVI? SSERVI Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) awards are staggered every 2.5-3yrs, with award periods of five-years per team. SSERVI encourages those who wish to join the institute in the future to engage current teams and international partners regarding potential collaboration, and to participate in focus groups or current team activities now. Joining hand in hand with international partners is a winning strategy for raising the tide of Solar System science around the world. Non-U.S. science organizations can propose to become either Associate or Affiliate members on a no-exchange-of-funds basis. Current international partners

  1. Understanding the debate on medical education research: a sociological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mathieu

    2004-10-01

    Since the mid-1990s, a debate has taken place among medical education scholars regarding the forms that research should take and the roles it should play. Editors of major journals in medical education and prominent researchers in the domain have repeatedly addressed the issue and have attempted to define what medical education research should be. The goal of this article is to look at the debate from a sociological perspective and to outline the social factors shaping it. An analysis of the texts published since 1990 addressing the issue shows that the debates can be deconstructed in four topics: epistemology, methodology, the primary purpose of medical education research, and the "quality" of the projects carried out in the domain. However, the debates can also be amalgamated and synthesized using the concept of "field" as developed by sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. A "field" refers to the configuration of power relations among individuals, social groups, or institutions within a domain of activities. Scientific fields are typically structured around a "bipolar" opposition pattern. At one pole stand those individuals who promote greater collaboration with nonscientists as well as research aimed at responding to practical needs. At the opposite pole stand those individuals who aspire to achieve independence of the field from such external constraints. The use of the concept of "field" allows us to understand the debate from a larger perspective and to establish parallels with similar debates in other scientific fields. In doing so, we will have the opportunity to learn from the experience of these other fields and be more reflective about the debate in which we engage.

  2. Research Equity: A Capacity Building Workshop of Research Methodology for Medical Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Bhardwaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research is a cornerstone for knowledge generation, which in turns requires capacity building for its tools and techniques. Despite having a vast infrastructure in India the research in medical science has been carried out in limited and focused institutions. In order to build the capacity in carrying out research activities a five-day planning workshop was conducted at state run medical college. Total 22 medical faculty members participated in the workshop with average public health experience of 12 years (range: 5–25 years. The knowledge was assessed objectively by multiple-choice questionnaire. The mean score increased from 6.7 to 7.9 from pre- to posttest. About seventy-percent participants showed improvement, whereas 21.0% showed deterioration in the knowledge and the rest showed the same score. Apart from knowledge skills also showed improvement as total 12 research projects were generated and eight were approved for funding by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR, New Delhi. It can be concluded that a supportive environment for research can be built with the technical assistance.

  3. How is Funding Medical Research Better for Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Zwicker

    2015-08-01

    only provincial health research funding agency at the time. However in recent years, Alberta’s rate of decrease in MPAC has occurred at a rate slower than the other provinces (British Columbia, Ontario or Quebec with provincial medical research funding. This is striking at a population level, where Alberta’s failure to achieve a reduction in age standardized rates of MTC comparable to British Columbia, Ontario or Quebec after 1985 represents 240 unnecessary deaths in 2011 and 48,250 Potential Life Years Lost worth around $4.8 billion. The findings from our study suggest that some of the divergence in the rates of reduction in MPAC between provinces may be due to beneficial changes in institutional structure and human capital, resulting in differences across provinces in the capacity to adopt new effective healthcare innovations. While health indicators such as MPAC are the result of complex interactions between the patient, treatment and the healthcare system, as well as socioeconomic and demographic factors, this analysis suggests that a different capacity for health research within the provinces impacts health outcomes. The findings from this analysis are limited by the lack of data related to research funding and the health research workforces within provinces. This analysis has important implications for health research policy and funding allocations, suggesting that decision makers should consider the long-term impact provincial funding for health research has on health outcomes. This study also highlights the lack of longitudinal public data available for provincial health research funding. This information is critical to inform future health research policy.

  4. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauderly, J.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Bechtold, W.E.; Sun, J.D.; Coons, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breath. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes adn to estimate the risk they pose by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them. This report contains brief research papers that reflect the scope and recent findings of the Institute's research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, principally through the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The papers are divided into topical sections. The first section, Characterization of Airborne Materials and Generation of Experimental Exposure Atmospheres, reflects the Institute's capabilities for fundamental aerosol research and the application of that expertise to toxicological studies. The second

  5. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauderly, J L; Mewhinney, J A; Bechtold, W E; Sun, J D; Coons, T A [eds.

    1988-12-01

    The mission of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute is to investigate the magnitude of human health effects that result from the inhalation of airborne materials at home, in the work place, or in the general environment. Diseases of the respiratory tract are major causes of suffering and death, and many of these diseases are directly related to the materials that people breath. The Institute's research is directed toward obtaining a better understanding of the basic biology of the respiratory tract and the mechanisms by which inhaled materials produce respiratory disease. Special attention is focused on studying the airborne materials released by various energy technologies, as well as those associated with national defense activities. The research uses a wide-ranging, comprehensive array of investigative approaches that are directed toward characterizing the source of the airborne material, following the material through its potential transformation in the air, identifying the mechanisms that govern its inhalation and deposition in the respiratory tract, and determining the fate of these inhaled materials in the body and the health effects they produce. The ultimate objectives are to determine the roles played by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes adn to estimate the risk they pose by inhaled materials in the development of disease processes and to estimate the risk they pose to humans who may be exposed to them. This report contains brief research papers that reflect the scope and recent findings of the Institute's research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, principally through the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The papers are divided into topical sections. The first section, Characterization of Airborne Materials and Generation of Experimental Exposure Atmospheres, reflects the Institute's capabilities for fundamental aerosol research and the application of that expertise to toxicological studies. The second

  6. The 2017 Nonlinear Mechanics and Dynamics Research Institute.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuether, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allensworth, Brooke Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peebles, Diane E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The 2017 Nonlinear Mechanics and Dynamics (NOMAD) Research Institute was successfully held from June 19 to July 28, 2017. NOMAD seeks to bring together participants with diverse tec hnical backgrounds to work in small teams to utilize an interactive approach to cultivate new ideas and approaches in engineering . NOMAD provides an opportunity for researchers - especially early career researchers - to develop lasting collaborations that go beyond what can be established from the limited interactions at their institutions or at annual conferences. A total of 17 students from around the world came to Albuquerque, New Mexico to participate in the six - week long program held at the University of New Mexico campus. The students collaborated on one of six research projects that were developed by various mentors from Sandia National Laboratories, academia, and other government laboratories. In addition to the research activities, the students atte nded weekly technical seminars, toured the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History, and socialized at various off - hour events including an Albuquerque Isotopes baseball game. At the end of the summer, the students gave a final technical presentation o n their research findings that was broadcast via Skype. Many of the research discoveries made at NOMAD are published as proceedings at t echnical conference s and have direct alignment with the critical mission work performed at Sandia.

  7. 76 FR 19104 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of General Medical Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; 2011 NIH Director's Pioneer Awards. Date: May 2-4, 2011. Time: 7:45 a.m...

  8. System of institutional radioactive waste management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlaha, J.; Burian, P.

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc (NRI) is a leading institution in the area of nuclear Research and Development in the Czech Republic. The NRI has had a dominant position in the nuclear programme since it was established in 1955 as a state-owned research organization and it has developed to its current status. In December 1992 the NRI has been transformed into a joint-stock company. The NRI's activity encompasses nuclear physics, chemistry, nuclear power, experiments at the research reactor and many other topics. Main issues addressed in the NRI in the past decades were concentrated on research, development and services provided to the nuclear power plants operating WWER reactors, development of chemical technologies for fuel cycle and irradiation services to research and development in the industrial sector, agriculture, food processing and medicine. At present the research activities are mainly targeted to assist the State Office for Nuclear Safety -the nuclear safety regulating body, power plant operator and nuclear facilities contractors. Significant attention is also paid to the use of nuclear technology outside the nuclear power sector, providing a wide range of services to industry , medicine and the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. NRI operates two research nuclear reactors and another facilities such as a hot cell facility , research laboratories, technology for radioactive waste (RAW) management, 60 Co irradiators, an electron accelerator, etc. In this paper the Centre of RAW management, system of RAW management, facilities for RAW management as well as decontamination and decommissioning activities of the NRI are presented. The NRI provides complex services in the area of RAW management and has gained many experience and full qualification not only in this area but also in the area of decontamination and decommissioning and spent fuel management. The NRI guarantees safe RAW and spent fuel management. (authors)

  9. Medical education and research environment in Qatar: a new epoch for translational research in the Middle East

    OpenAIRE

    Chouchane, Lotfi; Mamtani, Ravinder; Al-Thani, Mohammed H; Al-Thani, Al-Anoud M; Ameduri, Marco; Sheikh, Javaid I

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in medical technology and key discoveries in biomedical research have the potential to improve human health in an unprecedented fashion. As a result, many of the Arab Gulf countries, particularly Qatar are devoting increasing resources toward establishing centers of excellence in biomedical research. However, there are challenges that must be overcome. The low profile of private medical institutions and their negligible endowments in the region are examples of such ch...

  10. Collaborative Oceanographic Research Opportunities with Schmidt Ocean Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Schmidt Ocean Institute (http://www.schmidtocean.org/) was founded by Dr. Eric Schmidt and Wendy Schmidt in 2009 to support frontier oceanographic research and exploration to expand the understanding of the world's oceans through technological advancement, intelligent, data-rich observation and analysis, and open sharing of information. Schmidt Ocean Institute operates a state-of-the-art globally capable research vessel Falkor (http://www.schmidtocean.org/story/show/47). After two years of scientific operations in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, Eastern and Central Pacific, R/V Falkor is now preparing to support research in the Western Pacific and Eastern Indian Oceans in 2015 and 2016. As part of the long term research program development for Schmidt Ocean Institute, we aim to identify initiatives and projects that demonstrate strong alignment with our strategic interests. We focus on scientific opportunities that highlight effective use of innovative technologies to better understand the oceans, such as, for example, research enabled with remotely operated and autonomous vehicles, acoustics, in-situ sensing, telepresence, etc. Our technology-first approach to ocean science gave rise to infrastructure development initiatives, such as the development of a new full ocean depth Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle, new 6000m scientific Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, live HD video streaming from the ship to YouTube, shipboard high performance supercomputing, etc. We also support projects focusing on oceanographic technology research and development onboard R/V Falkor. We provide our collaborators with access to all of R/V Falkor's facilities and instrumentation in exchange for a commitment to make the resulting scientific data openly available to the international oceanographic community. This presentation aims to expand awareness about the interests and capabilities of Schmidt Ocean Institute and R/V Falkor among our scientific audiences and further

  11. The DSM and Professional Practice: Research, Clinical, and Institutional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Michael

    2016-06-01

    How mental illnesses are defined has significant ramifications, given the substantial social and individual repercussions of these conditions. Using actor-network theory, I analyze how mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in their work. Drawing on observations of a neuropsychological laboratory and interviews with 27 professionals (i.e., psychiatrists, psychologists), I investigate how the DSM is used in research, clinical, and institutional work. In research, the DSM influences study design and exclusion/inclusion criteria. In the clinic, the DSM influences how disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed. Institutionally, the DSM aligns the patient-professional encounter to insurance and pharmaceutical interests. I conclude that the DSM operates as multiple, context-specific taxonomies that pervasively influence professional practices, such that all possible actions must orient to DSM criteria, with professionals both a source and an object of institutionalized gaze. © American Sociological Association 2016.

  12. The National Institute for Health Research Leadership Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Molly Morgan; Wamae, Watu; Fry, Caroline Viola; Kennie, Tom; Chataway, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract RAND Europe evaluated the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leadership Programme in an effort to help the English Department of Health consider the extent to which the programme has helped to foster NIHR's aims, extract lessons for the future, and develop plans for the next phase of the leadership programme. Successful delivery of high-quality health research requires not only an effective research base, but also a system of leadership supporting it. However, research leaders are not often given the opportunity, nor do they have the time, to attend formal leadership or management training programmes. This is unfortunate because research has shown that leadership training can have a hugely beneficial effect on an organisation. Therefore, the evaluation has a particular interest in understanding the role of the programme as a science policy intervention and will use its expertise in science policy analysis to consider this element alongside other, more traditional, measures of evaluation. PMID:28083231

  13. Institutional Infrastructure for Broader Impacts Engagement - Showcasing Effective Strategies and Approaches from a Large Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A. U.; Sullivan, S. B.; Smith, L. K.; Lynds, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    The need for robust scientific and especially climate literacy is increasing. Funding agencies mandate that scientists make their findings and data publically available. Ideally, this mandate is achieved by scientists and educators working together to translate research findings into common knowledge. The Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) is the largest research institute at the University of Colorado and home institute to over 500 scientists. CIRES provides an effective organizational infrastructure to support its scientists in broadening their research impact. Education specialists provide the necessary experience, connections, logistical support, and evaluation expertise to develop and conduct impactful education and outreach efforts. Outreach efforts are tailored to the project needs and the scientists' interests. They span from deep engagement efforts with a high time commitment by the scientist thus a high dosage to short presentations by the scientists that reach many people without stimulating a deep engagement and have therefore a low dosage. We use three examples of current successful programs to showcase these different engagement levels and report on their impact: i) deep transformative and time-intensive engagement through a Research Experience for Community College students program, ii) direct engagement during a teacher professional development workshop centered around a newly developed curriculum bringing authentic climate data into secondary classrooms, iii) short-time engagement through a virtual panel discussion about the state of recent climate science topics, the recordings of which were repurposed in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). In this presentation, we discuss the challenges and opportunities of broader impacts work. We discuss successful strategies that we developed, stress the importance of robust impact evaluation, and summarize different avenues of funding outreach efforts.

  14. How EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute] helps utilities save money

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    A number of case studies are presented which illustrate how the work of the Electric Power Research Institute in the USA has enabled nuclear utilities to save money. The areas covered by the examples are: steam generator tube repair; streamlining of reliability centred maintenance; cost effective instrumentation and control maintenance; reducing the frequency of instrument calibration; optimising the engineering change process; detecting and reducing fuel failure; extending the qualified life of equipment. (U.K.)

  15. Governance and Institutions: Proposals for a Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Valdés Ugalde

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the difference between the concepts of governability and governance in economics and political science. The main focus is to address basic principles of neoclassical theory in order to explore alternative research approaches for the analysis of governance in institutional building and agent relationships to rules. With this purpose, the article assesses the adequacy of explanations of citizens decision making in democracies with sharp inequalities and heterogeneous preferences.

  16. Challenges facing the marketing of scientific and research institutes

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan Sojkin

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the challenges that scientific research institutions face in terms of their marketing, which have been divided into two groups of those associated with internal marketing and those linked to external marketing. The most significant and important determinants that constitute challenges to both internal and external marketing were described. The key aspects of each of the identified challenges were indicated, as was their impact on the implementation of the marketing polic...

  17. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute for Safety Research. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Rindelhardt, U.

    1996-09-01

    The scientific work of the Institute of Safety Research covers a wide range of safety related investigations. During 1995 important results on thermo-fluid dynamic single effects, thermalhydraulics and neutron kinetics for accident analysis, materials safety, simulation of radiation and particle transport, mechanical integrity of technical systems and process monitoring, risk management for waste deposits, magneto-hydrodynamics of conductive fluids, and of renewable energies were reached. The annual report presents also lists of publications, conference contributions, meetings, and workshops. (DG)

  18. Shanghai institute of nuclear research, academia sinica annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Annual Report is a comprehensive review of achievements made by Shanghai Institute of Nuclear Research (SINR), Academia Sinica in 1991, Which concerns nuclear physics (theories, experimentation, and application), nuclear chemistry (radiochemistry, radiopharmaceuticals, labelled compounds, analytical chemistry), radiation chemistry, accelerator physics and technology, nuclear detectors, computer application and maintenance, laboratory engineering, radiation protection and waste treatment. The maintenance, reconstruction and operation of its major facilities are also described

  19. Factors affecting choice of sponsoring institution for residency among medical students in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chew Lip; Liu, Xuan Dao; Murali Govind, Renuka; Tan, Jonathan Wei Jian; Ooi, Shirley Beng Suat; Archuleta, Sophia

    2018-03-16

    Postgraduate medical education in Singapore underwent major transition recently, from a British-style system and accreditation to a competency-based residency programme modelled after the American system. We aimed to identify the relative importance of factors influencing the choice of residency sponsoring institutions (SIs) among medical students during this transition period. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of Singaporean undergraduate medical students across all years of study was performed in 2011. Participants rated 45 factors (including research, academia and education, marketing, reputation of faculty, working conditions, posting experience and influence by peers/seniors) for degree of importance to their choice of SIs on a five-point Likert scale. Differences with respect to gender and seniority were compared. 705 of 1,274 students completed the survey (response rate 55.3%). The top five influencing factors were guidance by mentor (4.48 ± 0.74), reputation for good teaching (4.46 ± 0.76), personal overall experience in SIs (4.41 ± 0.88), quality of mentorship and supervision (4.41 ± 0.75), and quality and quantity of teaching (4.37 ± 0.78). The five lowest-rated factors were social networking (2.91 ± 1.00), SI security (3.01 ± 1.07), open house impact (3.15 ± 0.96), advertising paraphernalia (3.17 ± 0.95) and research publications (3.21 ± 1.00). Female students attributed more importance to security and positive work environment. Preclinical students rated research and marketing aspects more highly while clinical students valued positive work environment more. Quality of education, mentorship, experiences during clerkship and positive working environment were the most important factors influencing the choice of SIs.

  20. rising to the challenges ofscientific medical research and publication

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest

    The aim of this presentation is to review the logical steps in scientific medical research, discuss ..... Despite the critical role of Scientific Medical .... association of resident doctors (ard); july 2004. ... Wilson Jr. E. B. Graduate Research: A guide.

  1. How to do human-subjects research if you do not have an institutional review board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Todd W

    2008-10-01

    Biomedical research with human subjects has expanded outside of traditional medical centers and hospitals into other health care entities, such as rehabilitation facilities, free-standing out-patient treatment centers, and even home-health agencies. Regardless of the location, federal regulations mandate that all human-subjects research must be overseen by an institutional review board (IRB) or ethics committee to ensure the research abide by the Code of Federal Regulations. Consequently, all human-subjects research must be reviewed and approved by an IRB prior to initiation of any research procedures. Unfortunately, many of these nontraditional research facilities do not have easy access to an IRB. This does not render such research exempt from federal oversight. Clinicians at these facilities have viable options for obtaining IRB approval and legally conducting such research. This paper outlines the available options and their pros and cons.

  2. Confronting conflict: addressing institutional conflicts of interest in academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bryan A; Mackey, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Individual conflicts of interest are rife in healthcare, and substantial attention has been given to address them. Yet a more substantive concern-institutional conflicts of interest ("ICOIs") in academic medical centers ("AMCs") engaged in research and clinical care-have yet to garner sufficient attention, despite their higher stakes for patient safety and welfare. ICOIs are standard in AMCs, are virtually unregulated, and have led to patient deaths. Upon review of ICOIs, we find a clear absence of substantive efforts to confront these conflicts. We also assess the Jesse Gelsinger case, which resulted in the death of a study participant exemplifying a deep-seated culture of institutional indifference and complicity in unmanaged conflicts. Federal policy, particularly the Bayh-Dole Act, also creates and promotes ICOIs. Efforts to address ICOIs are narrow or abstract, and do not provide for a systemic infrastructure with effective enforcement mechanisms. Hence, in this paper, we provide a comprehensive proposal to address ICOIs utilizing a "Centralized System" model that would proactively review, manage, approve, and conduct assessments of conflicts, and would have independent power to evaluate and enforce any violations via sanctions. It would also manage any industry funds and pharmaceutical samples and be a condition of participation in public healthcare reimbursement and federal grant funding. The ICOI policy itself would provide for disclosure requirements, separate management of commercial enterprise units from academic units, voluntary remediation of conflicts, and education on ICOIs. Finally, we propose a new model of medical education-academic detailing-in place of current marketing-focused "education." Using such a system, AMCs can wean themselves from industry reliance and promote a culture of accountability and independence from industry influence. By doing so, clinical research and treatment can return to a focus on patient care, not profits.

  3. 30 years of Central Institute for Nuclear Research at Rossendorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, W.; Flach, G.; Hennig, K.; Collatz, S.; Muenze, R.; Baldeweg, F.

    1986-10-01

    A celebration and a scientific colloquium dedicated the 30th anniversary of the foundation of the Central Institute for Nuclear Research (CINR) of the GDR Academy of Sciences were held on January, 23rd and 24th, '86 at Rossendorf. The speaches and lectures given by the president of the GDR Academy of Sciences and by scientists of the CINR dealt with problems of policy of science, history of the CINR, nuclear methods, microelectronics, nuclear energy research, development and production of radioisotopes and scientific instruments. (author)

  4. Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  5. Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

    2006-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

  6. Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

    2008-04-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

  7. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research: Computer simulation -climate impact research. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Climate impact assessment is a new field of research which, owing to international and national efforts to understand and cope with the impending global climate changes on a global, regional and local level, has rapidly become a central field of research of the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. In contrast to other countries, Germany had no research facilities and infrastructure that could be used. The Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research was to provide the infrastructure basis for climate impact research in Germany. The Institute was founded by the BMFT and the Land of Brandenburg. (orig.) [de

  8. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  9. Final report of the group research. Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging Research. 1996-2000 FY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    This report involves the organization of the research groups (4 units of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiotracer and radiopharmacology, clinical imaging, and molecular informative research), 5 research reports and 38 published research papers. The research reports concern Fundamental researches on the availability and production of PET radiopharmaceuticals using the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) cyclotron, Design and evaluation of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals for PET measurement (kinetics and metabolism in small animals and primates), Fundamental studies on development of technique radiation measurement, Clinical application of medical imaging technology in the fields of neuroscience, cardiovascular, cancer diagnosis and others, and A study to establish and evaluate a lung cancer screening system using spiral CT units which is in pilot-progress in Kanto and Kansai regions. (N.I.)

  10. [Tissue repositories for research at Sheba Medical Center(SMC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yehudit; Barshack, Iris; Onn, Amir

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is the number one cause of death in both genders. Breakthroughs in the understanding of cancer biology, the identification of prognostic factors, and the development of new treatments are increasingly dependent on access to human cancer tissues with linked clinicopathological data. Access to human tumor samples and a large investment in translational research are needed to advance this research. The SMC tissue repositories provide researchers with biological materials, which are essential tools for cancer research. SMC tissue repositories for research aim to collect, document and preserve human biospecimens from patients with cancerous diseases. This is in order to provide the highest quality and well annotated biological biospecimens, used as essential tools to achieve the growing demands of scientific research needs. Such repositories are partners in acceLerating biomedical research and medical product development through clinical resources, in order to apply best options to the patients. Following Institutional Review Board approval and signing an Informed Consent Form, the tumor and tumor-free specimens are coLLected by a designated pathologist at the operating room only when there is a sufficient amount of the tumor, in excess of the routine needs. Blood samples are collected prior to the procedure. Other types of specimens collected include ascites fluid, pleural effusion, tissues for Optimal Cutting Temperature [OCT] and primary culture etc. Demographic, clinical, pathologicaL, and follow-up data are collected in a designated database. SMC has already established several organ or disease-specific tissue repositories within different departments. The foundation of tissue repositories requires the concentrated effort of a multidisciplinary team composed of paramedical, medical and scientific professionals. Research projects using these specimens facilitate the development of 'targeted therapy', accelerate basic research aimed at clarifying molecular

  11. Termination of past nuclear activities at the nuclear research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    Many countries, particularly in Europe, started with nuclear programs in the fifties of the last century. As a consequence nuclear research institutes were established, among them also the Institute Jozef Stefan (IJS) in Slovenia. The nuclear activities at the IJS were related to the development of uranium ore processing technology and technologies comprising uranium oxide and hexafluoride. After very intensive period of nuclear activities the decline began step by step due to different reasons. Various approaches of the termination and decommissioning of facilities were used. The inspectors of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), the responsible authority, started intensive activities at the IJS at the end of 2004. All together 22 research laboratories or research units were included in the inspection program and around 50 researchers of the IJS were involved into the inspection procedures. The inspection was very intensive in the laboratories and storages where past nuclear activities took place and were later on abandoned. As a result several contaminated equipments and sites in addition to around 200 unregistered sources were found. The majority of these sources is related to past nuclear activities. The inspection program related to the terminated research activities is still in progress. The IJS immediately started with the remediation activities including the development of methodology related to decontamination of radioactive liquids. The decontamination of two nuclear laboratories and three different storages of radioactive waste at its sites is in progress. Sixty of the above mentioned sources have been already stored in the Central Interim Storage for Radioactive Waste. (author)

  12. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-04-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) was inaugurated on October 1st, 2005. Works for the operation and maintenance of various research facilities as well as safety management, radiation protection, and radioactive wastes management, which have been undertaken by departments in Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), were inherited by newly established departments of Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI). The NSRI is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY 2005 summarizes the activities of NSRI and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of organization and administrative activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories, (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the

  13. Annual report 1978. From the Research Institute of Physics, Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    This report covers the activities in 1978 at the Research Institute of Physics, Stockholm, Sweden. During this year the construction work on the caves for nuclear physics research in the new experimental hall has been completed. The cyclotron has been started up again after a shut-down of about 15 months. A new mini-computer system has been bought and installed at the institute which will be used for on-line data aquisition as well as for off-line computations and analysis. The experimental nuclear physics program has naturally been hampered by the shut-down of the cyclotron. During the main part of the year, experiments with participation of nuclear physicists from the institute have been carried out at laboratories in Uppsala, Aabo, Risoe, Darmstadt and Orsay. The collaboration with the CERN group studying exotic atoms has continued. The activities of the group working in the field of atomic physics at the 400kV accelerator show a clear trend towards the studies of reaction phenomena occuring in collisions of ions with solids and gases. The construction of the new high-power electron accelerator for research in time-resolved precision spectroscopy of atoms and molecules has been completed. The fusion-related experimental program of the surface physics group has continued with an emphasis on the work done in collaboration with the Institut fur Plasmaphysik, KFA, Julich. In order to be able to perform in situ sputtering and thin film migration studies, a new ultra-high-vacuum chamber is being connected simultaneously to the new 100V-10kV low-energy accelerator and the 2MV Van de Graaff accelerator. (E.R.)

  14. Research Networking Systems: The State of Adoption at Institutions Aiming to Augment Translational Research Infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Jihad S; Johnson, Layne M; Stallings, Sarah; Eichmann, David

    Fostering collaborations across multiple disciplines within and across institutional boundaries is becoming increasingly important with the growing emphasis on translational research. As a result, Research Networking Systems that facilitate discovery of potential collaborators have received significant attention by institutions aiming to augment their research infrastructure. We have conducted a survey to assess the state of adoption of these new tools at the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) funded institutions. Survey results demonstrate that most CTSA funded institutions have either already adopted or were planning to adopt one of several available research networking systems. Moreover a good number of these institutions have exposed or plan to expose the data on research expertise using linked open data, an established approach to semantic web services. Preliminary exploration of these publically-available data shows promising utility in assessing cross-institutional collaborations. Further adoption of these technologies and analysis of the data are needed, however, before their impact on cross-institutional collaboration in research can be appreciated and measured.

  15. Annual report of Nuclear Science Research Institute, JFY2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear Science Research Institute (NSRI) is composed of Planning and Coordination Office and seven departments such as Department of Operational Safety Administration, Department of Radiation Protection, Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, Department of Hot Laboratories and Facilities, Department of Criticality and Fuel Cycle Research Facilities, Department of Decommissioning and Waste Management, and Engineering Services Department. This annual report of JFY2006 summarizes the activities of NSRI, the R and D activities of the Research and Development Directorates and human resources development at site, and is expected to be referred to and utilized by R and D departments and project promotion sectors at NSRI site for the enhancement of their own research and management activities to attain their goals according to 'Middle-term Plan' successfully and effectively. In chapter 1, outline of JFY2006 activities of NSRI is described. In chapter 2, the following activities made by the departments in NSRI are summarized, i.e., (1) operation and maintenance of research reactors (JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR), criticality assemblies (STACY, TRACY, FCA, TCA), hot laboratories (BECKY, Reactor Fuel Examination Facility, WASTEF, Research Laboratory 4, Plutonium Research Laboratory 1, Tokai Hot Laboratory, etc), and large-scale facilities (Tandem accelerator, LSTF, THYNC, TPTF, etc), and (2) safety management, radiation protection, management of radioactive wastes, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, engineering services, utilities and maintenance, etc, all of which are indispensable for the stable and safe operation and utilization of the research facilities. The technical developments for the advancement of the related technologies are also summarized. In chapter 3, the R and D and human resources development activities are described including the topics of the research works and projects performed by the Research and Development Directorates at site, such as

  16. Environmental monitoring program of a nuclear research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peixoto, Claudia Marques; Jacomino, Vanusa Maria Feliciano; Dias, Fabiana F.

    2009-01-01

    The main activities of the CDTN Research Institute are concentrated in the areas of reactors, materials, process engineering, the environment, health, radioprotection, radioactive waste, and applied physics. Its Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) began in 1985 with the objective of evaluating and controlling its installations' operating conditions as well as the impact on the neighboring environment caused by release of stable and radioactive elements. EMP's adequate planning and management resulted in obtaining an unique database that has generated information which have contributed to improving the credibility of nuclear and non-nuclear activities developed by the Center with the local community. Besides this, the data collection, study and continuous and systematic follow-up processes of environmental variables allowed the Center to be one of the Nation's pioneering research institutions in obtaining an Environmental Operating License from the Brazilian Environment and Natural Resources Institute (IBAMA). The objective of the present work is to present the experience acquired during the years, including a discussion about methodologies employed as well as the importance of using statistical evaluation tools in evaluating, interpreting, and controlling the quality of the results. Liquid effluent control and surface water monitoring results are also presented. (author)

  17. Study of sleep habits and sleep problems among medical students of pravara institute of medical sciences loni, Western maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Pa; Baviskar, Mp; Phalke, Db

    2013-01-01

    Good quality sleep and adequate amount of sleep are important in order to have better cognitive performance and avoid health problems and psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to describe sleep habits and sleep problems in a population of undergraduates, interns and postgraduate students of Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. Sleep habits and problems were investigated using a convenience sample of students from Pravara Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University), Loni, Maharashtra, India. The study was carried out during Oct. to Dec. 2011 with population consisted of total 150 medical students. A self-administered questionnaire developed based on Epworth Daytime Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used. Data was analyzed by using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS) version 16.0. In this study, out of 150 medical students, 26/150 (17.3%) students had abnormal levels of daytime sleepiness while 20/150 (13.3%) were border line. Sleep quality in females was better than the male. Disorders related to poor sleep qualities are significant problems among medical students in our institution. Caffeine and alcohol ingestion affected sleep and there was high level of daytime sleepiness. Sleep difficulties resulted in irritability and affected lifestyle and interpersonal relationships.

  18. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed

  19. Basic research on cancer related to radiation associated medical researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong In; Hwang, Dae Yong; Bang, Ho Yoon [and others

    2000-12-01

    Basic Research on Cancer related to Radiation Associated Medical Researches including 1. Establishment of animal model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis and measurement of angiogenesis, 2. Tissue expression of Tie-1 and Tie-2 in human colorectal cancer, 3. Enhancement of G2/Mphase Cell Fraction by Adenovirus-mediated p53 Gene Transfer in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines, 4. Clinical Characteristics of the patients with Non-B Non-C Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Frequency of HBV, HCV and TTV Viremia in these Patients, 5. Significance of serum iron and ferritin in patients with stomach cancer, 6. Telomerase assay for early detection of lung cancer, 7. Study on the Usefulness of Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 Genotyping for Risk Group of Alcohol-related Cancer Screening, 8. Gene therapy using hepatoma specific promoter, 9. Study on the Influence of DNA repair gene, XRCC1 Genotypes on the Risk of Head and Neck Cancer were performed.

  20. A gender gap in the next generation of physician-scientists: medical student interest and participation in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelich, Jill M; Singer, Burton H; Castro, Marcia C; Rosenberg, Leon E

    2002-11-01

    For 2 decades, the number of physician-scientists has not kept pace with the overall growth of the medical research community. Concomitantly, the number of women entering medical schools has increased markedly. We have explored the effect of the changing gender composition of medical schools on the present and future pipeline of young physician-scientists. We analyzed data obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the National Institutes of Health, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute pertaining to the expressed research intentions or research participation of male and female medical students in the United States. A statistically significant decline in the percentage of matriculating and graduating medical students--both men and women-who expressed strong research career intentions occurred during the decade between 1987 and 1997. Moreover, matriculating and graduating women were significantly less likely than men to indicate strong research career intentions. Each of these trends has been observed for medical schools overall and for research-intensive ones. Cohort data obtained by tracking individuals from matriculation to graduation revealed that women who expressed strong research career intentions upon matriculation were more likely than men to decrease their research career intentions during medical school. Medical student participation in research supported the gender gap identified by assessing research intentions. Female medical student participation in the Medical Scientist Training Program and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute/National Institutes of Health-sponsored Cloisters Program has increased but lags far behind the growth in the female population in medical schools. Three worrisome trends in the research career intentions and participation of the nation's medical students (a decade-long decline for both men and women, a large and persistent gender gap, and a negative effect of the medical school experience for women) presage a

  1. Analysis of Forensic Autopsy in 120 Cases of Medical Disputes Among Different Levels of Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin-Sheng; Ye, Guang-Hua; Fan, Yan-Yan; Li, Xing-Biao; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Han, Jun-Ge; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Deng, Miao-Wu; Li, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medical science, the causes of death can sometimes only be determined by pathologists after a complete autopsy. Few studies have investigated the importance of forensic autopsy in medically disputed cases among different levels of institutional settings. Our study aimed to analyze forensic autopsy in 120 cases of medical disputes among five levels of institutional settings between 2001 and 2012 in Wenzhou, China. The results showed an overall concordance rate of 55%. Of the 39% of clinically missed diagnosis, cardiovascular pathology comprises 55.32%, while respiratory pathology accounts for the remaining 44. 68%. Factors that increase the likelihood of missed diagnoses were private clinics, community settings, and county hospitals. These results support that autopsy remains an important tool in establishing causes of death in medically disputed case, which may directly determine or exclude the fault of medical care and therefore in helping in resolving these cases. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. 77 FR 5035 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health...

  3. 78 FR 64222 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301...

  4. 76 FR 28056 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated... National Human Genome Research Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and...

  5. 76 FR 17930 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Special... Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane...

  6. 78 FR 107 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3rd Floor Conference Room....D., Scientific Review Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute...

  7. 76 FR 58023 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National...

  8. 77 FR 28888 - National Human Genome Research Institute Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research Institute Initial...: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 3635...

  9. 78 FR 70063 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated... NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE, including consideration of personnel qualifications and...

  10. 76 FR 5390 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute Special Emphasis... Officer, Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076...

  11. 75 FR 13558 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Counselors, National Human Genome Research Institute. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated... National Human Genome Research Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and...

  12. 76 FR 29772 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Human Genome Research... of Scientific Review, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health...

  13. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  14. Institute for Fusion Research and Large Helical Device program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, Atsuo

    1989-01-01

    In the research on nuclear fusion, the final objective is to materialize nuclear fusion reactors, and for the purpose, it is necessary to cause nuclear combustion by making the plasma of higher than 100 million deg and confine it for a certain time. So far in various universities, the researches on diversified fusion processes have been advanced, but in February, 1986, the Science Council issued the report 'Nuclear fusion research in universities hereafter'. As the next large scale device, an external conductor system helical device was decided, and it is desirable to found the organization for joint utilization by national universities to promote the project. The researches on the other processes are continued by utilizing the existing facilitie. The reason of selecting a helical device is the data base of the researches carried out so far can be utilized sufficiently, it is sufficiently novel even after 10 years from now, and many researchers can be collected. The place of the research is Toki City, Gifu Prefecture, where the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University, is to be moved. The basic concept of the superconducting helical device project, the trend of nuclear fusion development in the world, the physical research using a helical system and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol Koo; Hwang, Chul Hwan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions

  16. An analysis of the awareness and performance of radiation workers' radiation/radioactivity protection in medical institutions : Focused on Busan regional medical institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Koo [Dept. of Radiological Science, Graduate School of Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Chul Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate safety management awareness and behavioral investigation of radiation/radioactivity performance defenses of radiation workers' in medical institutions. Data collection consisted of 267 radiation workers working in medical institutions using structured questionnaires. As a result, it was analyzed that radiation safety management awareness and performance were high in 40s, 50s group and higher education group. The analysis according to the radiation safety management knowledge was analyzed that the 'Know very well' group had higher scores on awareness and performance scores. The analysis according to the degree of safety management effort showed the high awareness scale and the performance scale in the group 'Receiving various education or studying the safety management contents through book'. The correlations between the sub-factors showed the highest positive correlation between perceived practician and personal perspective and perceived by patient and patient's caretaker perspective. Therefore, radiation safety management for workers, patients, and patient's caretaker should be conducted through continuous education of radiation safety management through various routes of radiation workers working at medical institutions.

  17. Decommissioning of the research reactors at the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoy, N.N.; Ryantsev, E.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Kucharkin, N.E.; Melkov, E.S.; Gorlinsky, Yu.E.; Kyznetsova, T.I.; Bulkin, B.K.

    2002-01-01

    The Kurchatov Institute is the largest research center of Russia in the field of nuclear science and engineering. It comprises more than 10 research institutes and scientific-technological complexes carrying out research work in the field of safe development of atomic engineering, controlled thermonuclear fusion, and plasma physics, nuclear physics and elementary particle physics, research reactors, radiation materials technology, solid state physics and superconductivity, molecular and chemical physics, and also perspective know-how's, information science and ecology. This report is basically devoted to the decommissioning of the research reactor installations, in particular to the reactor MR because of the volume and complexity of actions involved. (author)

  18. The emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.; Huerlimann, T.

    1977-01-01

    The organization and means of the emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR), the eldest and largest nuclear installation in Switzerland, are described. It consists of a central command group and the following emergency teams: fire brigade, radiation protection, first aid, control, operating teams (reactors, hot laboratory etc.). The radiation protection team is formed by the Health Physics Division and is discussed in detail. A description of the alarm system and the first actions to be taken in case of an emergency is given. The importance of frequent and well-planned exercises and of radio communication between the teams and the command group is stressed and the emergency training programme of the EIR School for Radiation Protection, operated by the Health Physics Division, is presented. A fortunate lack of incidents at EIR is partly compensated for by experience gained from emergency team assistance operations during incidents outside the Institute. (author)

  19. NATO Advanced Research Institute on Search Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Lawrence

    1980-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Research Institute on Search Theory and Appli­ cations was held at the Hotel Algarve in Praia Da Rocha, Portugal, from March 26 through March 30, 1979, and was sponsored by the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science. There were forty-one participants representing a wide range of backgrounds and interests. The purpose of the institute was to bring together people working in search theory and applications with potential users of search techniques to stimulate the increased application of recent­ ly developed search technology to civilian problems such as search and rescue, mineral exploration, surveillance, and fishing. Con­ versely, it was felt that by exposing search analysts to potential applications and new problems, they would be stimulated to develop new techniques for these applications and problems. The exchange of ideas and problems necessary to accomplish these goals was provided in the meeting workshops. There were three workshops, Search and Rescue, Exploration, and Sur...

  20. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is volume 28, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1987 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation measurement and process analysis in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; the research on the prevention of injuries; and the basic researches on materials and acessment and reduction of irradiation risk. (J.P.N.)

  1. Medical research with radioisotopes in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcher, E H [Post-graduate Medical School, Hammersmith, London (United Kingdom)

    1961-07-15

    An important program of research into the nature and causes of congenital haemolytic anaemias, notably the disease known as Mediterranean anaemia or Thalassaemia, which is a serious medical problem in the Mediterranean countries, is at present being carried out in the Department of Clinical Therapeutics of the University of Athens under a research contract awarded by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This program is concerned with diseases in which there is an inherited defect or abnormality in the production of haemoglobin, the iron-containing pigment of the red blood cells which is responsible for the carriage of oxygen in the blood. Two techniques have been widely used in the studies at the University of Athens. In the first of these, a radioisotope of iron, iron-59, is used to follow iron metabolism and haemoglobin production. Iron metabolism in the body is concerned largely with the synthesis and breakdown of haemoglobin, which consists of a protein, globin, linked to an iron containing substance, haeme. The second technique makes use of a radioisotope of chromium, chromium-51, to study the fate of the red cells in the blood. By performing simultaneous studies with iron- 59 and chromium-51, a detailed picture of haemoglobin synthesis and red cell production and destruction can be built up. Such investigations have been invaluable in establishing the characteristic patterns of different congenital haemolytic anaemias.

  2. 78 FR 35758 - Final Priority; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Rehabilitation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research--Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers AGENCY... for the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program administered by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). Specifically, we announce a priority...

  3. Institut fuer Materialforschung. Research and development activities in 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The IMF consists of three institutes with different tasks: IMF I works mainly on the development of metals, nonmetals and composite materials and on problems concerning the structure and properties of interfaces and protective layers. IMF II works on component reliablility, failure mechanisms and damage analysis. IMF III works on problems of process engineering in the production of ceramic powders and ceramic, metallic and polymeric microstructures, as well as on the design of nuclear components and the optimisation of corrosive materials. The IMF supports the research activities of Karlsruhe Research Center, especially in nuclear fusion research, microsystems engineering, nuclear safety, superconductivity, and low-pollution and low-waste processes. Materials and strength problems are investigated for future fusion reactors, high-performance microsystems, and safety problems in nuclear engineering. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Norwegian Institute for Air Research Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The foundation Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) conducts research and assessment of technical, economic, hygienic and other environmental issues related to air pollution and cleaning of polluted air. NILU serves the national market for research and development within the field of air pollution. The main purpose of the subsidiary company NILU Products Ltd., established in 1996, is to manage the strategic owner interests of the parent company as well as market products and systems developed by NILU. Among the projects in which NILU participated in 2001 are a number of EU projects under the fifth framework programme. The main topics with NILU participation are related to ozone layer- and ultraviolet changes, pollution and climate change, satellite validation, changes in atmospheric chemistry, particulate matter in air, discharges from aircraft, regional and global dispersion of environmental toxins, standardization and monitoring methods, electronic distribution of environmental data and environmental influence on building materials.

  5. [Hospital biomedical research through the satisfaction of a Health Research Institute professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, C; Plá, R; Bellón, J M; Bardinet, T; Buño, I; Bañares, R

    2015-01-01

    A Health Research Institute is a powerful strategic commitment to promote biomedical research in hospitals. To assess user satisfaction is an essential quality requirement. The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional satisfaction in a Health Research Institute, a hospital biomedical research centre par excellence. Observational study was conducted using a satisfaction questionnaire on Health Research Institute researchers. The explored dimensions were derived from the services offered by the Institute to researchers, and are structured around 4 axes of a five-year Strategic Plan. A descriptive and analytical study was performed depending on adjustment variables. Internal consistency was also calculated. The questionnaire was completed by 108 researchers (15% response). The most valued strategic aspect was the structuring Areas and Research Groups and political communication and dissemination. The overall rating was 7.25 out of 10. Suggestions for improvement refer to the need for help in recruitment, and research infrastructures. High internal consistency was found in the questionnaire (Cronbach alpha of 0.9). So far research policies in health and biomedical environment have not been sufficiently evaluated by professionals in our field. Systematic evaluations of satisfaction and expectations of key stakeholders is an essential tool for analysis, participation in continuous improvement and advancing excellence in health research. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Undergraduate Research: Three Institutions' Success Stories. Research Corporation Annual Report, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Corp., Tucson, AZ.

    This annual report describes the 1999 activities of Research Corporation, a foundation that supports research programs at colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. It focuses on three primarily undergraduate institutions, two private and one public, that are active producers of published research and students going into the…

  7. Toward ethical norms and institutions for climate engineering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, David R; Kopp, Robert E; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses beyond computer modeling. The Principle of Respect requires that the scientific community secure the global public's consent, voiced through their governmental representatives, before beginning any empirical research. The Principle of Beneficence and Justice requires that researchers strive for a favorable risk-benefit ratio and a fair distribution of risks and anticipated benefits, all while protecting the basic rights of affected individuals. Finally, the Minimization Principle requires that researchers minimize the extent and intensity of each experiment by ensuring that no experiments last longer, cover a greater geographical extent, or have a greater impact on the climate, ecosystem, or human welfare than is necessary to test the specific hypotheses in question. Field experiments that might affect humans or ecosystems in significant ways should not proceed until a full discussion of the ethics of CE research occurs and appropriate institutions for regulating such experiments are established.

  8. Engineering and Statistical Research Institute contract reports to May, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuns, A; Morrison, B A

    1983-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide information on certain Canadian agricultural research contracts which are completed, published and available for loan. These contracts reports are documentation of research contracted out to non-federal government agencies, universities or individuals. Reports on contracts under the control of the Engineering and Statistical Research Institute are written by the contractor, and are reviewed by the scientific authority. Some reports date back to 1973, when the initial contracting program began. The first program was called DREAM (Development, Research, and Evaluation in Agricultural Mechanization). In 1977-78, projects under the Energy in Agriculture program were added. This was the beginning of the AERD (Agricultural Enginering Research and Development) program. In 1981, energy research had expanded and came under a separate progam called ERDAF (Energy Research and Development in Agriculture and Food). The remaining contract work stayed with the AERD program. This publication lists only contracts completed having final reports, and available contract reports with separate listings sorted by contract file number, title, author or subject.

  9. Toward ethical norms and institutions for climate engineering research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, David R.; Kopp, Robert E.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses beyond computer modeling. The Principle of Respect requires that the scientific community secure the global public's consent, voiced through their governmental representatives, before beginning any empirical research. The Principle of Beneficence and Justice requires that researchers strive for a favorable risk-benefit ratio and a fair distribution of risks and anticipated benefits, all while protecting the basic rights of affected individuals. Finally, the Minimization Principle requires that researchers minimize the extent and intensity of each experiment by ensuring that no experiments last longer, cover a greater geographical extent, or have a greater impact on the climate, ecosystem, or human welfare than is necessary to test the specific hypotheses in question. Field experiments that might affect humans or ecosystems in significant ways should not proceed until a full discussion of the ethics of CE research occurs and appropriate institutions for regulating such experiments are established.

  10. Selective dissemination of information of library in scientific research institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenping

    2010-01-01

    Selective Dissemination of Information (SDI) Service, which is an important component of intelligence, is the intelligence researcher to select key subjects and major issues and key technology or innovation goals under the actual needs of scientific research personnel issues, using network communication technology and database technology and information retrieval technologies, sustained and in a timely manner to track all kinds of literature for the front-line services, until the completion of research topics or key problem-solving. Library of China Institute of Atomic Energy is struggling to meet the diverse needs of customers, targeted to provide a lot of useful information for scientific researchers to use less time as possible to obtain as much intelligence information, and to research workers and leading to the successful completion of research tasks, and various decisions. The implementation of SDI services to identify clients and scope, to format SDI service team, to determine the SDI service principles and service mode. SDI services Selective demand intelligence researchers have been asked to improve their quality, to improve their interpersonal communication skills. (author)

  11. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  12. 78 FR 70566 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    .... Dunbar, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General..., and Biological Chemistry Research; 93.862, Genetics and Developmental Biology Research; 93.88...

  13. Facilities for Research and Development of Medical Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Byung Chul; Choung, Won Myung; Park, Jin Ho

    2003-03-01

    This study is carried out by KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to construct the basic facilities for development and production of medical radioisotope. For the characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals, the facilities should be complied with the radiation shield and GMP(Good Manufacturing Practice) guideline. The KAERI, which has carried out the research and development of the radiopharmaceuticals, made a design of these facilities and built them in the HANARO Center and opened the technique and facilities to the public to give a foundation for research and development of the radiopharmaceuticals. In the facilities, radiation shielding utilities and GMP instruments were set up and their operating manuals were documented. Every utilities and instruments were performed the test to confirm their efficiency and the approval for use of the facilities will be achieved from MOST(Ministry of Science and Technology). It is expected to be applied in development of therapeutic radioisotope such as Re-188 generator and Ho-166, as well as Tc-99m generator and Sr-89 chloride for medical use. And it also looks forward to the contribution to the related industry through the development of product in high demand and value

  14. Medical tourism market trends - an exploratory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ile Florența Larisa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical tourism is a modern concept, but not a new tourism practice. Even there is still no international consent on the definitions and measurement of this trend, its importance in the development of a tourism destination started to be taken into consideration. In accordance with tourism segment classification depending on journey reasons recommended by World Tourism Organization, one of the main groups is for “medical treatment/health”. Being part of health tourism, medical tourism is often called medical travel because it includes the act of travelling to different countries for medical reasons. An increasing significant element in medical service trade is patient circulation at cross-border level with a view to obtaining necessary health services; this circulation generated a new phenomenon, namely medical tourism. Studying the scientific literature we find new medical tourism trends in connection with globalization and liberalization. The countries that decided to promote this niche tourism are aware of the huge economic benefits brought by this. Analyzing published data by tourism medical organizations associated to indicators of economic development, we find two aspects: the success of a medical tourism destination is influenced by the economical level of the receiving countries, but, at the same time, it is also a growth factor for developing economies if it is included in their national strategy. We intend to find the answer of several questions: trends in medical tourism development are involving only medical service trade, or a combination of specific activities of many sectors? Is the medical tourism acting in favor of developing economies? This study aims to notice the development trends of the medical tourism based on the published figures and on the experience of major destinations and to highlight the importance of the medical tourism for the developing economies.

  15. [Managing a health research institute: towards research excellence through continuous improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Carmen; Buño, Ismael; Plá, Rosa; Lomba, Irene; Bardinet, Thierry; Bañares, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Health research institutes are a strategic commitment considered the ideal environment to develop excellence in translational research. Achieving quality research requires not only a powerful scientific and research structure but also the quality and integrity of management systems that support it. The essential instruments in our institution were solid strategic planning integrated into and consistent with the system of quality management, systematic evaluation through periodic indicators, measurement of key user satisfaction and internal audits, and implementation of an innovative information management tool. The implemented management tools have provided a strategic thrust to our institute while ensuring a level of quality and efficiency in the development and management of research that allows progress towards excellence in biomedical research. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in a rural medical institute of central Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consumer satisfaction is recognized as an important parameter for assessing the quality of patient care services. Satisfaction regarding the attitude of providers toward these services is expected to affect treatment outcome and prognosis. Out Patient Departments (OPDs need to monitor the quality of care and patient satisfaction for continuous quality improvement. A major component of quality of health care is patient satisfaction. Present study has been conducted to assess consumer satisfaction with regard to clinical care in the Out Patient Department of Rural Medical Institute of Central Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: The present study was an Outpatient- based cross sectional study conducted in Out Patient Department of UP Rural Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Saifai, Etawah (UP between January- June, 2013. A total of 600 patients were selected at random for exit interviews during Out Patients Department hours. Results: The socio-demographic profile of study subjects showed that 57.17% respondents were male and mostly were Hindu (79.67%. A total of 65% were in the age group between 15-59 years. Respondents were patients themselves (86.17% and accompanying relatives for pediatric patients younger than 15 years old (13.83%. Forty percent of respondents were house wife by occupation. For most of the patients (58.83% waiting time for consultation was between 15-30 minutes, in 55.17% patients, doctor spent only 5-10 minutes for consultation. A total of 98.67% of the respondents were satisfied with the outpatient department timings.

  17. Rehabilitation research at the National Institutes of Health moving the field forward (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R; Bean, Jonathan F; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L; Malec, James F; Mueller, Michael J; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Tansey, Keith E; Thompson, Aiko

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, "Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward." This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Rehabilitation Research at the National Institutes of Health: Moving the Field Forward (Executive Summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Walter R; Bean, Jonathan F; Damiano, Diane; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Jette, Alan; Jung, Ranu; Lieber, Rick L; Malec, James F; Mueller, Michael J; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Tansey, Keith E; Thompson, Aiko

    Approximately 53 million Americans live with a disability. For decades, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has been conducting and supporting research to discover new ways to minimize disability and enhance the quality of life of people with disabilities. After the passage of the Americans With Disabilities Act, NIH established the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, with the goal of developing and implementing a rehabilitation research agenda. Currently, 17 institutes and centers at NIH invest more than $500 million per year in rehabilitation research. Recently, the director of NIH, Francis Collins, appointed a Blue Ribbon Panel to evaluate the status of rehabilitation research across institutes and centers. As a follow-up to the work of that panel, NIH recently organized a conference, "Rehabilitation Research at NIH: Moving the Field Forward." This report is a summary of the discussions and proposals that will help guide rehabilitation research at NIH in the near future. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  19. NATO Advanced Research Institute on Health Services Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Werff, Albert; Hirsch, Gary; Barnard, Keith

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute on "Health Services Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. A special word is said in this respect supra by Pro­ fessor Checkland, Chairman of the Systems Science Panel. The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) was organized for the purpose of bringing together senior scientists to seek a consensus on the assessment of the present state of knowledge on the specific topic of "health services systems" and to present views and recom­ mendations for future health services research directions, which should be of value to both the scientific community and the people in charge of reorienting health services. The conference was structured so as to permit the assembly of a variety of complementary viewpoints through intensive group discussions to be the basis of this final report. Invitees were selected fr...

  20. Malaysian researchers talk about the influence of culture on research misconduct in higher learning institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Angelina P; Amin, Latifah; Mahadi, Zurina

    2017-01-01

    Based on a previous survey by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in the USA, a considerable number of foreign research scientists have been found guilty of research misconduct. However, it remains unclear as to whether or not cultural factors really contribute to research misconduct. This study is based on a series of interviews with Malaysian researchers from the local universities regarding their own professional experiences involving working with researchers or research students from different countries or of different nationalities. Most of the researchers interviewed agreed that cultures do shape individual character, which influences the way that such individuals conduct research, their decision-making, and their style of academic writing. Our findings also showed that working culture within the institution also influences research practices, as well as faculty mentorship of the younger generation of researchers. Given the fact such misconduct might be due to a lack of understanding of research or working cultures or practices within the institution, the impact on the scientific community and on society could be destructive. Therefore, it is suggested that the institution has an important role to play in orienting foreign researchers through training, mentoring, and discussion with regard to the "does" and "don'ts" related to research, and to provide them with an awareness of the importance of ethics when it comes to conducting research.

  1. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, F P; Rindelhardt, U [eds.

    1998-10-01

    The research work of the institute aims at the assessment and increase of the safety of technical facilities. Subject of the investigation are equally nuclear plants and installations of process industries. To analyse thermo-fluiddynamic phenomena of accident scenarios physical models and computer codes are developed as well for multi-phase and multi-component flows as for the time and space dependent power release (neutron kinetics in light water reactors, reaction kinetics of exothermic chemical reactions). Emphasis is put on the description of spatial flows and the transient evolution of flow patterns. (orig.)

  2. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Scientific interests of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences have evolved from classical biochemistry, biophysics and physiological chemistry to up-to-date molecular biology. Research interests are focussed on replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA; regulation of gene expression at various levels; biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins; gene sequencing and functional analysis of open reading frames; structure, function and regulation of enzymes; conformation of proteins and peptides; modelling of structures and prediction of functions of proteins; mechanisms of electron transfer in polypeptides

  3. Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Research Report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Scientific interests of the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences have evolved from classical biochemistry, biophysics and physiological chemistry to up-to-date molecular biology. Research interests are focussed on replication, mutagenesis and repair of DNA; regulation of gene expression at various levels; biosynthesis and post-translational modifications of proteins; gene sequencing and functional analysis of open reading frames; structure, function and regulation of enzymes; conformation of proteins and peptides; modelling of structures and prediction of functions of proteins; mechanisms of electron transfer in polypeptides.

  4. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is volume 27, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1986 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation chemistry and radiation measurement in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; and the research on the prevention of injuries. (Kako, I.)

  5. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The test and research regarding the utilization of atomic energy carried out in national institutions have produced many valuable results in diverse fields so far, such as nuclear fusion, safety research, food irradiation and medicine, since the budget had been appropriated for the first time in 1956. It has accomplished large role in the promotion of atomic energy utilization in Japan. This report is Volume 25, in which the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization carried out by national institutions in fiscal year 1984 are summarized. It is hoped that the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization is further promoted by this report. The contents of this report are nuclear fusion; the research on engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety; food irradiation; the countermeasures against cancer; fertilized soil, the improvement of quality, the protection of plants and the improvement of breeding in agriculture and fishery fields; diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene and the application to physiology and pathology in medical field; radiation chemistry and radiation measurement in mining and industry fields; nuclear reactor materials and nuclear-powered ships; civil engineering; radioactivation analysis; and the research on the prevention of injuries. (Kako, I.)

  6. The First Report on Evaluating the Thoracic Radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jeong; Chu, Sang Deok; Park, So Young; Choi, Byung Soon; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Sung Jin; Ko, Kyung Sun

    2010-01-01

    The pnuemoconiotic findings on chest radiograph for pneumoconiosis are affected by the technique, the equipment and the reading environment. We report here on the results of evaluating the thoracic radiology of the Medical Institutions for Pneumoconiosis (MIPs). For the first time, we visited the MIPs to evaluate the thoracic radiography that is used to treat patients with pneumoconiotic complications, and this included evaluating the equipment and the technical parameters for thoracic radiography, the computed tomography, the education for quality assurance health care and the reading environment. We used the guideline published by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI). Ten images were randomly picked from the MIPs for evaluating the image quality, and then these were rated by two experienced chest radiologists for pneumoconiosis according to the criteria of the OSHRI. Of the 33 institutions, the failed group (mean<60) scored 36.4% for radiological technique (RT), 30.3% for image quality (IQ) and 21.2% for the reading environment (RE). There were statistically significantly differences between the passed and failed groups for RT (75.8 ± 9.1 vs. 40.8 ± 13.6, p<0.001), for IQ (68.3 ± 5.8 vs. 47.8 ± 9.4, p<0.001) and for RE (78.3 ± 15.8 vs. 18.3 ± 21.9, p<0.001). The group that received education was significantly higher for the RT (68.7 vs. 53.2, p=0.032), the IQ (65.3 vs. 56.6, p=0.039) and the RE (76.2 vs. 47.0, p=0.005) than that for the group that didn't receive education. The MIPs need surveillance and education for improving the quality assurance health care in thoracic radiography for treating patients with pneumoconiosis and who have complications

  7. Build-up forces at Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology for emergency medical response to some eventualities of radiological accidents - some suggestions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Van Cu; Nguyen Huu Nghia

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of various nuclear sources in some fields of the life has brought many practical advantages in general; especially in the next several years, our country will begin construction of the first nuclear plant. However, if there were user carelessness or objective disadvantageous factors (earthquake, tsunami, etc.), that disadvantages could lead to a radiation accident or nuclear accident which causes damages not only for economy but also for public health. Therefore, the emergency response to radiation accident, especially the emergency medical response that has a great important position. To satisfy this real demand, in 1996, Vietnam Ministry of Defence made the decision to establish Center for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Protecting (now becomes Military Institute of Medical Radiology and Oncology) with the main missions are research, applying radiation protecting methods and organizing treatments to radiation injured victims. To fulfill above main missions, with the help of Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI), Vietnam Agency for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (VARANS), the doctors and staffs of our Institute have been participated in the international training courses and workshops that organized in Vietnam or in regional countries about emergency medical response to radiation accidents, they get valuable information, knowledge and documents from these courses and workshops. Depending on the principles of radiation emergency medical response to nuclear/ radiation accidents that International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) guided, and with the experience learned from other countries in Asia region, our Institute have been gradually improving on organization and curing processes for the radiation victims and also setting the preparedness for emergency medical response to radiation accidents if maybe they could occur. (author)

  8. Research and managing institutions in Ukraine concerning the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasvit, O.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents temporal changes of the national organizations in managing the Chernobyl accident and its activities. The National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine started its activity from the first days after the accident. In 1990 a special executive body, the State committee of Chernobyl Affairs was established in Ukraine to manage the whole activity to overcome the Chernobyl problems. In 1991 it was rearranged into the Ministry of Chernobyl Affairs. In 1996 a new Ministry of Ukraine on Emergences and Affairs of Population Protection from the Consequences of Chernobyl Catastrophe(MEA) was founded on the basis of the Min. Chernobyl and Headquarters Staff of Civil Defence. The National Commission on Radiological Protection of Ukraine (NCRPU) belongs to the Parliament structure. NCRPU is responsible for approval of radiological safety standards and derived regulations. Very often the regulation approved are stricter than the international recommendations. There is an essential lack of attention within the Parliament to the activity of NCRPU. Ministry of Health is responsible for all kinds of medical care for the people suffering from the Chernobyl Catastrophe. In order to provide permanent medical service, a nation-wide scheme has been worked out. Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine is the leading scientific institute of the Academy of Medical Sciences. The State scientific Center of Environmental Radio geochemistry was created in 1996 on the basis of the two departments of the Institute of Geochemistry. The Center was created in order to improve coordination and managing of scientific researches on the behavior of artificial and natural radionuclides and chemical substances in the environment etc.. The Chernobyl Scientific-Technical center for International Research was created in March,1996. The Ukrainian Scientific Hygienic Center of Ministry of Health was created in 1989 and included two institutions. The subjects, the direction of research works

  9. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... members from biological threats. Our specialized capabilities include Biosafety Level 3 and Level 4 laboratories, world-class ... for the Department of Defense, we set the standard for identification of biological agents. Our customers in ...

  10. Time required for institutional review board review at one Veterans Affairs medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Daniel E; Hanusa, Barbara H; Stone, Roslyn A; Ling, Bruce S; Arnold, Robert M

    2015-02-01

    Despite growing concern that institutional review boards (IRBs) impose burdensome delays on research, little is known about the time required for IRB review across different types of research. To measure the overall and incremental process times for IRB review as a process of quality improvement. After developing a detailed process flowchart of the IRB review process, 2 analysts abstracted temporal data from the records pertaining to all 103 protocols newly submitted to the IRB at a large urban Veterans Affairs medical center from June 1, 2009, through May 31, 2011. Disagreements were reviewed with the principal investigator to reach consensus. We then compared the review times across review types using analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffé tests after achieving normally distributed data through logarithmic transformation. Calendar days from initial submission to final approval of research protocols. Initial IRB review took 2 to 4 months, with expedited and exempt reviews requiring less time (median [range], 85 [23-631] and 82 [16-437] days, respectively) than full board reviews (median [range], 131 [64-296] days; P = .008). The median time required for credentialing of investigators was 1 day (range, 0-74 days), and review by the research and development committee took a median of 15 days (range, 0-184 days). There were no significant differences in credentialing or research and development times across review types (exempt, expedited, or full board). Of the extreme delays in IRB review, 80.0% were due to investigators' slow responses to requested changes. There were no systematic delays attributable to the information security officer, privacy officer, or IRB chair. Measuring and analyzing review times is a critical first step in establishing a culture and process of continuous quality improvement among IRBs that govern research programs. The review times observed at this IRB are substantially longer than the 60-day target recommended by expert panels

  11. Research data management in academic institutions: A scoping review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Perrier

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe the volume, topics, and methodological nature of the existing research literature on research data management in academic institutions.We conducted a scoping review by searching forty literature databases encompassing a broad range of disciplines from inception to April 2016. We included all study types and data extracted on study design, discipline, data collection tools, and phase of the research data lifecycle.We included 301 articles plus 10 companion reports after screening 13,002 titles and abstracts and 654 full-text articles. Most articles (85% were published from 2010 onwards and conducted within the sciences (86%. More than three-quarters of the articles (78% reported methods that included interviews, cross-sectional, or case studies. Most articles (68% included the Giving Access to Data phase of the UK Data Archive Research Data Lifecycle that examines activities such as sharing data. When studies were grouped into five dominant groupings (Stakeholder, Data, Library, Tool/Device, and Publication, data quality emerged as an integral element.Most studies relied on self-reports (interviews, surveys or accounts from an observer (case studies and we found few studies that collected empirical evidence on activities amongst data producers, particularly those examining the impact of research data management interventions. As well, fewer studies examined research data management at the early phases of research projects. The quality of all research outputs needs attention, from the application of best practices in research data management studies, to data producers depositing data in repositories for long-term use.

  12. Integrating consumer engagement in health and medical research - an Australian framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Caroline L; Mott, Kathy; Cousins, Michael; Miller, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Lawson, Tony; Wesselingh, Steve

    2017-02-10

    Quality practice of consumer engagement is still in its infancy in many sectors of medical research. The South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) identified, early in its development, the opportunity to integrate evidence-driven consumer and community engagement into its operations. SAHMRI partnered with Health Consumers Alliance and consumers in evidence generation. A Partnership Steering Committee of researchers and consumers was formed for the project. An iterative mixed-method qualitative process was used to generate a framework for consumer engagement. This process included a literature review followed by semi-structured interviews with experts in consumer engagement and lead medical researchers, group discussions and a consensus workshop with the Partnership Steering Committee, facilitated by Health Consumer Alliance. The literature revealed a dearth of evidence about effective consumer engagement methodologies. Four organisational dimensions are reported to contribute to success, namely governance, infrastructure, capacity and advocacy. Key themes identified through the stakeholder interviews included sustained leadership, tangible benefits, engagement strategies should be varied, resourcing, a moral dimension, and challenges. The consensus workshop produced a framework and tangible strategies. Comprehensive examples of consumer participation in health and medical research are limited. There are few documented studies of what techniques are effective. This evidence-driven framework, developed in collaboration with consumers, is being integrated in a health and medical research institute with diverse programs of research. This framework is offered as a contribution to the evidence base around meaningful consumer engagement and as a template for other research institutions to utilise.

  13. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  14. Magnetic particles in medical research - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic (or magnetizable) particles have assumed increasing importance in medical and biological research since 1966 when the effect of a magnetic field on the movement of suspended particles was initially studied. In fields like haematology, cell biology, microbiology, biochemistry and immunoassays, they currently provide the basis for separation techniques, which previously relied on gravitational forces. The body cells (e.g., blood cells) can be made magnetic by incubating them in a medium containing several Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ particles, which are adsorbed to the membrane surfaces. Some bacteria (also called magnetostatic bacteria) respond to externally applied magnetic lines of force due to their intracellular magnetic particles. These properties are useful in the isolation of these cells/bacteria. In biochemistry magnetic particles are used to immobilize enzymes without any loss of enzyme activity. The immobilized enzymes can facilitate the separation of end products without extensive instrumentation. In immunoassays the antibodies are covalently linked to polymer coated iron oxide particles. An electromagnet is used to sediment these particles after reaction. This excludes the use of centrifuge to separate antigen-antibody complexes. In pharmacy and pharmacology the magnetic particles are important in drug transport. In techniques like ferrography, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI), spectroscopic studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the magnetic particles serve as contrast agents and give clinically important spatial resolution. Magnetic particles also find extensive applications in cancer therapy, genetic engineering, pneumology, nuclear medicine, radiology and many other fields. This article reviews these applications. (author)

  15. Public support for medical research in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P M

    2000-01-01

    Key public policies that have contributed to the rise of modern medical research in the 20th Century are reviewed, focusing especially on the United States and the post-World War II period. Drawing on this history, the question is posed: "Are these policies sufficient to insure vigorous medical research in the 21st Century?" Although radical policy changes are not needed, several proposals for policy and medical research portfolio redirection are offered, including a rebalancing of public supported research in all fields of science that contribute to medical advances. Medical research must also invest in a national and international information infrastructure that will allow the linking of researchers, clinical experimenters, practicing physicians, and the public in ways heretofore not imagined. Medical researchers must be leaders and advocates for the whole research enterprise in the 21st Century.

  16. International human cooperation in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Kaieda, Keisuke; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1997-01-01

    Rearing of talented persons in the area of nuclear energy is one of the important works in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this report, the present situations and future schedules of international human cooperation in this area wsere summarized. First, the recent activities of International Nuclear Technology Center were outlined in respect of international human cooperation. A study and training course which was started in cooperation with JICA and IAEA from the middle of eighties and the international nuclear safety seminar aiming at advancing the nuclear safety level of the world are now being put into practice. In addition, a study and training for rearing talented persons was started from 1996 to improve the nuclear safety level of the neighbouring countries. The activities of the nuclear research interchange system by Science and Technology Agency established in 1985 and Bilateral Co-operation Agreement from 1984 were explained and also various difficulties in the international cooperation were pointed out. (M.N.)

  17. Medical tourism market trends - an exploratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Ile Florența Larisa; Țigu Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Medical tourism is a modern concept, but not a new tourism practice. Even there is still no international consent on the definitions and measurement of this trend, its importance in the development of a tourism destination started to be taken into consideration. In accordance with tourism segment classification depending on journey reasons recommended by World Tourism Organization, one of the main groups is for “medical treatment/health”. Being part of health tourism, medical tourism is often...

  18. Quality Research in Higher Education Institutions in Oman: Some Views of Teacher Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali Saleh Al Ajmi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Academic research remains a prime source of knowledge and innovation for higher education institutions (HEIs that strive to grow, expand and develop their academic reputations and standards. Yet, research informs teaching practices, shapes social changes and it has financial outcomes for HEIs. Therefore, it is imperative to develop institutional policies and strategies for promoting and sustaining quality research in HEIs in Oman. There are a number of international frameworks and models which have been developed to measure research quality in HEIs around the world. For example, bibliometrics were used to assess research quality in HEIs in the UK because bibliometric data can provide a number of component variables. An appropriate bibliometric model may include components such as output volume, diversity of outputs, citation volume, journal impact factor and average citations per publication, etc. Moreover, other popular examples of models for assessing research quality are Multidimensional Research Assessment Matrix (MRAM used in Europe and the UK’s Research Assessment Exercise (RAE. However, neither of the above mentioned models is adopted by HEIs in Oman. Thus, the current study is an attempt to explore some institutional, international, logistic and pragmatic factors that impact academic research and publication quality, review popular international research quality assessment models and explore the possibility of applying them in the Omani context. To achieve the study objectives, 20 teacher researchers were surveyed and the findings and recommendations were presented. Keywords: Quality Research, HEIs in Oman, International Models, Factors, Teacher Researchers' Views

  19. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, F P; Rindelhardt, U [eds.

    1997-08-01

    The research of the institute aims at the safety assessment of the design of nuclear and chemical facilities, the development of accident management procedures, and the increase of operational safety by improved plant surveillance. Physical models and computer codes are developed for multiphase/multicomponent flows and for the space and time dependent power release in nuclear and chemical reactors to be able to analyse the thermo-fluiddynamic phenomena during assumed accident scenarios. Emphasis is particulary focussed on spatial flow phenomena and the time dependent change of flow patterns. Sustainable void fraction probes and tomographic systems are developed to measure those parameters of two phase flows that characterize the exchange of pulse, energy and mass between the phases and components. The research related to materials safety is directed to the behaviour of components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation. The susceptibility to irradiation induced embrittlement and the behaviour of annealed material during reirradiation are investigated by fracture mechanical methods in dependence on the materials composition. The work on process and plant diagnostics makes available basic methods for early failure detection and operational monitoring which are important means of accident prevention. Recent initiatives of the institute are concerned with the transport of pollutants in the geosphere. Particularly, codes are developed for the simulation of physical and chemical processes during the transport of pollutants in unsaturated zones of the soil. (orig.)

  20. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Safety Research. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, F.P.; Rindelhardt, U.

    1997-08-01

    The research of the institute aims at the safety assessment of the design of nuclear and chemical facilities, the development of accident management procedures, and the increase of operational safety by improved plant surveillance. Physical models and computer codes are developed for multiphase/multicomponent flows and for the space and time dependent power release in nuclear and chemical reactors to be able to analyse the thermo-fluiddynamic phenomena during assumed accident scenarios. Emphasis is particularly focussed on spatial flow phenomena and the time dependent change of flow patterns. Sustainable void fraction probes and tomographic systems are developed to measure those parameters of two phase flows that characterize the exchange of pulse, energy and mass between the phases and components. The research related to materials safety is directed to the behaviour of components exposed to neutron and gamma radiation. The susceptibility to irradiation induced embrittlement and the behaviour of annealed material during reirradiation are investigated by fracture mechanical methods in dependence on the materials composition. The work on process and plant diagnostics makes available basic methods for early failure detection and operational monitoring which are important means of accident prevention. Recent initiatives of the institute are concerned with the transport of pollutants in the geosphere. Particularly, codes are developed for the simulation of physical and chemical processes during the transport of pollutants in unsaturated zones of the soil. (orig.)

  1. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research School of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    The diverse activities currently in progress in the School of Physics at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay are reported in detail. The activities involving theoretical and experimental research are grouped under the following areas: (1) pure physics (2) astronomy and space science (3) chemical and biological studies and (4) applied research. In pure physics, studies are in progress in nuclear physics, high energy physics and solid state physics. In astronomy and space science, the fields of investigation comprise: cosmic ray physics, theoretical astrophysics and radio-astronomy. In chemical physics, structure of a variety of systems have been investigated using NMR and Moessbauer techniques. In molecular biology, basic biological processes have been studied in terms of structure and properties of biomolecules. In addition to these areas of pure research, considerable advances have been made in computer science and technology, solid state electronics, microwave engineering and hydrogy. The work done in each one of these areas is briefly summarized. A number of supporting research facilities are mentioned. A brief mention has also been made on the existing education and training programmes. (A.K.)

  2. Only for "purely scientific" institutions: the Medical Library Association's Exchange, 1898-1950s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennifer J

    2011-04-01

    Centralized exchanges of scientific materials existed by the late nineteenth century, but they did not include medical publications. North American medical leaders therefore formed an association of institutions to run their own exchange: the Medical Library Association (MLA). After providing background to the exchange concept and the importance of institutional members for MLA, this article examines archival MLA correspondence to consider the role of its Exchange in the association's professional development before the 1950s. MLA's membership policy admitted only libraries open to the medical profession with a large number of volumes. But the correspondence of the MLA Executive Committee reveals that the committee constantly adjusted the definition of library membership: personal, public, sectarian, commercial, allied science, and the then-termed "colored" medical school libraries all were denied membership. Study of these decisions, using commercial and sectarian libraries as a focus, uncovers the primary justification for membership exclusions: a goal of operating a scientific exchange. Also, it shows that in this way, MLA shadowed policies and actions of the American Medical Association. Finally, the study suggests that the medical profession enforced its policies of exclusion through MLA, despite a proclaimed altruistic sharing of medical literature.

  3. Only for “purely scientific” institutions: the Medical Library Association's Exchange, 1898–1950s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Jennifer J

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Centralized exchanges of scientific materials existed by the late nineteenth century, but they did not include medical publications. North American medical leaders therefore formed an association of institutions to run their own exchange: the Medical Library Association (MLA). After providing background to the exchange concept and the importance of institutional members for MLA, this article examines archival MLA correspondence to consider the role of its Exchange in the association's professional development before the 1950s. Results: MLA's membership policy admitted only libraries open to the medical profession with a large number of volumes. But the correspondence of the MLA Executive Committee reveals that the committee constantly adjusted the definition of library membership: personal, public, sectarian, commercial, allied science, and the then-termed “colored” medical school libraries all were denied membership. Conclusion: Study of these decisions, using commercial and sectarian libraries as a focus, uncovers the primary justification for membership exclusions: a goal of operating a scientific exchange. Also, it shows that in this way, MLA shadowed policies and actions of the American Medical Association. Finally, the study suggests that the medical profession enforced its policies of exclusion through MLA, despite a proclaimed altruistic sharing of medical literature. PMID:21464849

  4. Photo-medical valley. 'Photo medical research center'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Shunichi; Daido, Hiroyuki; Tajima, Toshiki

    2008-01-01

    To develop a much more compact cancer diagnosis and therapeutic instrument using high intensity laser technology, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has successfully proposed this novel effort to the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) program as the creation of a 'photo-medical industrial valley' base in 2007 fiscal year. In this report, a new laser techniques to drive controlled ion beams is described. It is very important approach to realize a laser-driven ion accelerator. (author)

  5. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  6. Seeing is believing: good graphic design principles for medical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Susan P; Bancken, Fabrice; Crowe, Brenda; Soukup, Mat; Botsis, Taxiarchis; Forshee, Richard

    2015-09-30

    Have you noticed when you browse a book, journal, study report, or product label how your eye is drawn to figures more than to words and tables? Statistical graphs are powerful ways to transparently and succinctly communicate the key points of medical research. Furthermore, the graphic design itself adds to the clarity of the messages in the data. The goal of this paper is to provide a mechanism for selecting the appropriate graph to thoughtfully construct quality deliverables using good graphic design principles. Examples are motivated by the efforts of a Safety Graphics Working Group that consisted of scientists from the pharmaceutical industry, Food and Drug Administration, and academic institutions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Annual report of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for fiscal 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has promoted the research on high temperature engineering, the research and development of nuclear fusion, the research on radiation utilization and the research and development of nuclear powered ships as the advanced project researches which bring about the breakthrough of atomic energy technology as well as the research on the safety, following the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization which was decided in 1987, as the general research institute in Japanese atomic energy field. The progress of the above mentioned researches in fiscal 1992 is reported. The operation of JRR-2, JRR-3M, JRR-4 and JMTR was carried out as scheduled. 9 cases of the medical irradiation on brain tumors were performed at JRR-2. As to the practical test of the disassembling of JPDR, the machinery and equipment in the reactor containment vessel were removed, and the development of a high performance decontamination testing device and others was advanced. The efficient operation of the large computer system, the production and sales of radioisotopes and radioactive waste business were continued. (K.I.)

  8. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal covers technical and clinical studies related to health, ethical and social issues in field of all aspects of medicine (Basic and Clinical), Health Sciences, Nursing, Medical Laboratory Sciences, Medical Radiography and Rehabilitation, Pharmacy, Biomedical Engineering, etc. Articles with clinical interest and ...

  9. Physicians' acceptance of electronic medical records exchange: an extension of the decomposed TPB model with institutional trust and perceived risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pi-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) exchange improves clinical quality and reduces medical costs. However, few studies address the antecedent factors of physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange. Based on institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed theory of planned behavior (TPB) model, we propose a theoretical model to explain the intention of physicians to use an EMR exchange system. We conducted a field survey in Taiwan to collect data from physicians who had experience using the EMR exchange systems. A valid sample of 191 responses was collected for data analysis. To test the proposed research model, we employed structural equation modeling using the partial least squares method. The study findings show that the following five factors have a significant influence on the physicians' intentions to use EMR exchange systems: (a) attitude; (b) subjective norm; (c) perceived behavior control; (d) institutional trust; and (e) perceived risk. These five factors are predictable by perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and compatibility, interpersonal and governmental influence, facilitating conditions and self-efficacy, situational normality and structural assurance, and institutional trust, respectively. The results also indicate that institutional trust and perceived risk integrated with the decomposed TPB model improve the prediction of physician's intentions to use EMR exchange. The results of this study indicate that our research model effectively predicts the intention of physicians to use EMR exchange, and provides valuable implications for academics and practitioners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transparency When Things Go Wrong: Physician Attitudes About Reporting Medical Errors to Patients, Peers, and Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Sigall K; White, Andrew A; Yi, Jean C; Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2017-12-01

    Transparent communication after medical error includes disclosing the mistake to the patient, discussing the event with colleagues, and reporting to the institution. Little is known about whether attitudes about these transparency practices are related. Understanding these relationships could inform educational and organizational strategies to promote transparency. We analyzed responses of 3038 US and Canadian physicians to a medical error communication survey. We used bivariate correlations, principal components analysis, and linear regression to determine whether and how physician attitudes about transparent communication with patients, peers, and the institution after error were related. Physician attitudes about disclosing errors to patients, peers, and institutions were correlated (all P's transparent communication with patients and peers/institution included female sex, US (vs Canadian) doctors, academic (vs private) practice, the belief that disclosure decreased likelihood of litigation, and the belief that system changes occur after error reporting. In addition, younger physicians, surgeons, and those with previous experience disclosing a serious error were more likely to agree with disclosure to patients. In comparison, doctors who believed that disclosure would decrease patient trust were less likely to agree with error disclosure to patients. Previous disclosure education was associated with attitudes supporting greater transparency with peers/institution. Physician attitudes about discussing errors with patients, colleagues, and institutions are related. Several predictors of transparency affect all 3 practices and are potentially modifiable by educational and institutional strategies.

  11. Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute: annual research summary 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Alligator Rivers Region Research Institute (ARRRI) research activities are associated with an assessment of environmental effect of mining in the region. While emphasis on baseline research is now much reduced, some projects are still necessary because of significant changes in the Magela Creek system, because new areas of proposed mining have been identified (e.g. Coronation Hill) and because the emphasis now being placed on rehabilitation research requires a sound knowledge of the Region's flora. The ARRRI rehabilitation research program has concentrated on the Ranger mine site, principally because it is at a critical planning stage where detailed research information is required. With regard to the development of techniques, research at the Institute has led to the development of specific analytical methods or protocols that can be used in assessing environmental impact. 39 tabs., 42 figs

  12. Automatic generation of investigator bibliographies for institutional research networking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B; Bales, Michael E; Dine, Daniel; Bakken, Suzanne; Albert, Paul J; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-10-01

    Publications are a key data source for investigator profiles and research networking systems. We developed ReCiter, an algorithm that automatically extracts bibliographies from PubMed using institutional information about the target investigators. ReCiter executes a broad query against PubMed, groups the results into clusters that appear to constitute distinct author identities and selects the cluster that best matches the target investigator. Using information about investigators from one of our institutions, we compared ReCiter results to queries based on author name and institution and to citations extracted manually from the Scopus database. Five judges created a gold standard using citations of a random sample of 200 investigators. About half of the 10,471 potential investigators had no matching citations in PubMed, and about 45% had fewer than 70 citations. Interrater agreement (Fleiss' kappa) for the gold standard was 0.81. Scopus achieved the best recall (sensitivity) of 0.81, while name-based queries had 0.78 and ReCiter had 0.69. ReCiter attained the best precision (positive predictive value) of 0.93 while Scopus had 0.85 and name-based queries had 0.31. ReCiter accesses the most current citation data, uses limited computational resources and minimizes manual entry by investigators. Generation of bibliographies using named-based queries will not yield high accuracy. Proprietary databases can perform well but requite manual effort. Automated generation with higher recall is possible but requires additional knowledge about investigators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Using mixed methods research in medical education: basic guidelines for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E; Reed, Virginia A

    2009-07-01

    Mixed methods research involves the collection, analysis and integration of both qualitative and quantitative data in a single study. The benefits of a mixed methods approach are particularly evident when studying new questions or complex initiatives and interactions, which is often the case in medical education research. Basic guidelines for when to use mixed methods research and how to design a mixed methods study in medical education research are not readily available. The purpose of this paper is to remedy that situation by providing an overview of mixed methods research, research design models relevant for medical education research, examples of each research design model in medical education research, and basic guidelines for medical education researchers interested in mixed methods research. Mixed methods may prove superior in increasing the integrity and applicability of findings when studying new or complex initiatives and interactions in medical education research. They deserve an increased presence and recognition in medical education research.

  14. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  15. Relationship between type of medical institutions according to the equipment list and inspection fee computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Joo, Yeong Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates holding condition of CT by medical institution classification and by season, and examination fee in Korea currently to quantitatively understand frequency of examination region by change of CT equipment, domestic growing trend and change of distribution and using rate. Recent 10 years of CT holding condition by medical institution classification (Tertiary hospital, General hospital, Hospital, Clinic, Dental hospital, Dental clinic, Hospitalized health center) and by year (2003-2012), and CT examination fee of distribution of medical institution by year is surveyed. The holding ratio of Tertiary hospital level and General hospital level is 32.7% in 2003 and 33.0% in 2012. Whereas, Hospital and Clinic level is 74.2% in 2003 and 66.8% in 2012, which takes approximately 70%. Based on data in 2012, it is 82.2% of total examination fee in Tertiary hospital and General hospital, while 17.5% in hospital and clinic. CT holding rate of Hospital level is increasing, while Clinic level is decreasing. Approximately 80% of CT examination fee is claimed by Tertiary hospital and General hospital. Therefore, there is a significant correlation between CT holding condition of medical institution classification and examination fee. Particularly, correlation between CT holding number of Tertiary hospital and examination fee is significant (p< .001). The more CT holding number, the higher the amount claimed examination fee

  16. Relationship between type of medical institutions according to the equipment list and inspection fee computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Lim, Cheong Hwan; Joo, Yeong Cheol [Dept. of Dept. of Health Care, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study demonstrates holding condition of CT by medical institution classification and by season, and examination fee in Korea currently to quantitatively understand frequency of examination region by change of CT equipment, domestic growing trend and change of distribution and using rate. Recent 10 years of CT holding condition by medical institution classification (Tertiary hospital, General hospital, Hospital, Clinic, Dental hospital, Dental clinic, Hospitalized health center) and by year (2003-2012), and CT examination fee of distribution of medical institution by year is surveyed. The holding ratio of Tertiary hospital level and General hospital level is 32.7% in 2003 and 33.0% in 2012. Whereas, Hospital and Clinic level is 74.2% in 2003 and 66.8% in 2012, which takes approximately 70%. Based on data in 2012, it is 82.2% of total examination fee in Tertiary hospital and General hospital, while 17.5% in hospital and clinic. CT holding rate of Hospital level is increasing, while Clinic level is decreasing. Approximately 80% of CT examination fee is claimed by Tertiary hospital and General hospital. Therefore, there is a significant correlation between CT holding condition of medical institution classification and examination fee. Particularly, correlation between CT holding number of Tertiary hospital and examination fee is significant (p< .001). The more CT holding number, the higher the amount claimed examination fee.

  17. [Investigation of non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in 16 medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia-xi; Zhou, Wei; Qiu, Hai-li; Yang, Guang-tao

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions and to explore feasible control measures for occupational diseases. On-site measurement and assessment of ultra-high-frequency radiation, high-frequency electromagnetic field, microwave radiation, and laser radiation were carried out in 16 medical institutions using the methods in the Measurement of Physical Agents in Workplace (GBZ/T189-2007). All the investigated medical institutions failed to take effective protective measures against non-ionizing radiation. Of the 17 ultra-short wave therapy apparatus, 70.6%, 47.1%, and 17.64% had a safe intensity of ultra-high-frequency radiation on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. Of the 4 external high-frequency thermotherapy apparatus, 100%, 75%, and 75%had a safe intensity of high-frequency electromagnetic field on the head, chest, and abdomen, respectively. In addition, the intensities of microwave radiation and laser radiation produced by the 18 microwave therapy apparatus and 12 laser therapeutic apparatus met national health standards. There are non-ionizing radiation hazards from physiotherapy equipment in medical institutions, and effective prevention and control measures are necessary.

  18. Pulsed power research at the institute of fluid physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jianjun; Shi Jinshui; Cao Kefeng; Xie Weiping; Zhang Linwen; Wang Meng

    2009-01-01

    The Institute of Fluid Physics was the earliest institution in China to engage in pulsed power research, covering areas such as the development of high power switches, linear induction accelerators, facilities for Z-pinch studies, pulsed X-ray machines, explosive magnetic compression technology, rep-rate pulsed power generation, time resolved diagnostic technology, and so on. The newly built Dragon-I facility (20 MeV, 2.5kA, 80 ns), currently the most advanced linear induction accelerator in the world, is described. The status of the Primary Test Stand (PTS, 8-10 MA, 130ns) for Z-pinch studies that is still under construction is also reported. The PTS consists of 24 modules based on the Marx generator-water PFL (pulse forming line) technology. The single module prototype has been tested successfully. Other progress on the rep-rate pulsed power generator, linear transfer driver, and time resolved diagnostic technology is also presented. (authors)

  19. Maximizing Institutional Research Impact through Building Relationships and Collaborating within the Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Yvonne Kochera; Floyd, Nancy D.

    2015-01-01

    Building and maintaining relationships within the institution with shared goals for preserving compliance and presenting an accurate portrait of the institution is critical for effective external reporting. It can also provide immeasurable internal benefit to information stakeholders.

  20. Institutional Variation in the Promotion of Racial/Ethnic Minority Faculty at US Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarleglio, Maria M.; Sandoval-Schaefer, Teresa; Elumn, Johanna; Castillo-Page, Laura; Peduzzi, Peter; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We compared faculty promotion rates by race/ethnicity across US academic medical centers. Methods. We used the Association of American Medical College's 1983 through 2000 faculty roster data to estimate median institution-specific promotion rates for assistant professor to associate professor and for associate professor to full professor. In unadjusted analyses, we compared medians for Hispanic and Black with White faculty using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. We compared institution-specific promotion rates between racial/ethnic groups with data stratified by institutional characteristic (institution size, proportion racial/ethnic minority faculty, and proportion women faculty) using the χ2 test. Our sample included 128 academic medical centers and 88 432 unique faculty. Results. The median institution-specific promotion rates for White, Hispanic, and Black faculty, respectively, were 30.2%, 23.5%, and 18.8% (P climates that support the successful development of racial/ethnic minority trainees, ultimately improving healthcare access and quality for all patients. PMID:22420820

  1. Medical Research Pays Off for All Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the "March of Dimes." It helped develop two vaccines. The first, by Dr. Jonas Salk at the University of Pittsburgh, in 1955, and the second, in 1962, by Dr. Albert Sabin, at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center – have ...

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Psychiatric genetic research at the National Institute of Mental Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, K.; Mullican, C.; Maestri, N. [NIMH/NIH, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-15

    For some time it has been known through the results of family, twin, and adoption studies that hereditary appears to play a significant casual role in many mental disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and other mood disorders, Alzheimer`s Disease, panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism, dyslexia, and Tourette`s syndrome. The precise patterns of inheritance of these complex disorders have not been determined, nor have the relevant genes been localized or cloned. Because the genetics are complex and because there is also clearly an environmental contribution to behavior, we expect the analysis of the genetics of mental illness to be arduous and not quickly resolved. There are several compelling reasons to continue to focus our attention on uncovering the genetic factors for severe mental illness. Prominent among these are the implications for better treatment of mental disorders. The National Institute of Mental Health supports a wide range of studies on psychiatric genetic research. 16 refs.

  4. Research activities at nuclear research institute in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Research activities at Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) are presented. They are based on former heavy water reactor program and now on pressurized reactors VVER types which are operated on Czech republic. There is LVR-15 research reactor operated in NRI. The reactor and its experimental facilities is utilized for water chemistry and corrosion studies. NRI services for power plants involve water chemistry optimalization, radioactivity build-up, fuel corrosion and structural materials corrosion tests. (author)

  5. Procedures for the medical application of research reactors (Appendix)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishihara, H.; Kanda, K.

    2004-01-01

    The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is one of the four research reactors in Japan that are currently licensed for medical application, in addition to other research purposes. Taking the KUR as an example, legal and other procedures for using research reactors for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are described, which are practiced in accordance with the 'Provisional Guideline Pertaining to Medical Irradiation by Accelerators and/or Reactors, other than defined by the Medical Service Act' of the Science Council of Japan

  6. THE EXPERIENCE OF THE AUTOMATION OF THE STATISTICAL REPORTING FORMATION ON WAGES IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY MEDICAL INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Karpov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the description of the experience of automation of the processes of statistical reporting on salaries in Federal State Budgetary Institution «NationalPirogovMedicalSurgicalCenter» of Ministry of Health of theRussian Federationwith the use of information systems.According to the current legislation of theRussian Federation, within the framework of the successful implementation of the «Road Map» on a national scale, statistical information about salaries of employees of social institutions is collected in various sections of data reporting. It became necessary to develop a tool to promptly collect, process and analyze data on salaries to provide statistical information to social institutions.The purpose of this article is to familiarize oneself with the concept of multidimensional data representation and to structure information on multidimensional analytical reports within the framework of practical application for solving economic problems related to the formation of statistical reporting on salaries. The algorithm and the procedure for the formation of multidimensional analytical reports are described, both from the methodological and from the practical point of view. As a material for this study, the normative and legal acts of the Russian Federation, statistical and analytical materials of the section «Salaries of certain categories of workers in the social sphere and science» of the Federal State Statistics Service of the Russian Federation, scientific publications and articles of the periodical press, as well as the results of their own research were used.To facilitate the perception, special attention is given to the description of the basic concepts of multidimensional analytical reporting: measure, performance variables, value. The authors not only gave a definition of multidimensional analytical reporting, but also demonstrated a visual representation of the multidimensional information space of

  7. Report of test and research results on atomic energy obtained in national institutes in fiscal 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    As for the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy in national institutes, the budget was appropriated for the first time in fiscal year 1956, and since then, the many valuable results of research have been obtained so far in the diversified fields of nuclear fusion, safety research, the irradiation of foods, medicine and others, thus the test and research accomplished the large role for promoting the utilization of atomic energy in Japan. In this report, the gists of the results of the test and research on the utilization of atomic energy carried out by national institutes in fiscal year 1985 are collected. No.1 of this report was published in 1960, and this is No.26. It is desired to increase the understanding about the recent trend and the results of the test and research on atomic energy utilization with this book. The researches on nuclear fusion, engineering safety and environmental radioactivity safety, the irradiation of foods, the countermeasures against cancer, fertilized soil, the quality improvement of brewing and farm products, the protection of farm products and the improvement of breeding, diagnosis and medical treatment, pharmaceuticals, environmental hygiene, the application to physiology and pathology, radiochemistry, radiation measurement, process analysis, nuclear reactor materials, nuclear powered ships, civil engineering, radioactivation analysis and injury prevention are reported. (Kako, I.)

  8. Medical Applications of Non-Medical Research: Applications Derived from BES-Supported Research and Research at BES Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This publication contains stories that illustrate how the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) research and major user facilities have impacted the medical sciences in the selected topical areas of disease diagnosis, treatment (including drug development, radiation therapy, and surgery), understanding, and prevention.

  9. 78 FR 21382 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, Suite 4076, 5635 Fisher's Lane, Bethesda, MD..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4075...

  10. 77 FR 8268 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... applications. Place: National Human Genome Research Institute, 5635 Fisher's Lane, Room 4076, Rockville, MD..., CIDR, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite...

  11. 77 FR 74676 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4075, Bethesda.... 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: December 11, 2012. David...

  12. 76 FR 10909 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS). Dated: February 18, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth...

  13. 77 FR 35991 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4075, Bethesda.... 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 8, 2012. Jennifer S...

  14. 75 FR 8977 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome..., National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane, Suite 4076, MSC..., Human Genome Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 18, 2010. Jennifer Spaeth...

  15. 75 FR 53703 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome..., Scientific Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635.... (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of...

  16. 75 FR 67380 - National Human Genome Research Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Human Genome... Review Branch, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 5635 Fishers Lane.... (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.172, Human Genome Research, National Institutes of...

  17. Medical marijuana: the state of the research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirken, B

    1996-10-18

    Recent raids on buyers' clubs in San Francisco have focused attention on medicinal uses of marijuana. The Clinton administration's policy is that there is no scientific evidence that smoked marijuana is useful in treating pain and nausea in AIDS and cancer patients. However, mainstream medical literature has supported the use of cannabis in managing symptoms of diseases such as glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. Well designed, controlled studies of marijuana are needed to determine the effective medical uses of the drug and break the political stalemate on this issue.

  18. Recent fusion research in the National Institute for Fusion Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Sakakibara, Satoru; Sagara, Akio; Horiuchi, Ritoku; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), which was established in 1989, promotes academic approaches toward the exploration of fusion science for steady-state helical reactor and realizes the establishment of a comprehensive understanding of toroidal plasmas as an inter-university research organization and a key center of worldwide fusion research. The Large Helical Device (LHD) Project, the Numerical Simulation Science Project, and the Fusion Engineering Project are organized for early realization of net current free fusion reactor, and their recent activities are described in this paper. The LHD has been producing high-performance plasmas comparable to those of large tokamaks, and several new findings with regard to plasma physics have been obtained. The numerical simulation science project contributes understanding and systemization of the physical mechanisms of plasma confinement in fusion plasmas and explores complexity science of a plasma for realization of the numerical test reactor. In the fusion engineering project, the design of the helical fusion reactor has progressed based on the development of superconducting coils, the blanket, fusion materials and tritium handling. (author)

  19. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supports medical education and research at institutions in 12 ... (CBE). CapacityPlus, led by IntraHealth International, is the USAID-funded ... acquire public health, clinical, and/or research skills, usually through applied learning in a .... If students were evaluated, indicate the type of student (i.e. medical, dental, nursing, etc.) ...

  20. The national institute of radiation hygiene and the medical application of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper gives a review of the rules and regulations concerning medical application of radiation in Norway. It discusses the intention of the regulations, the way in which the regulations is applied and how the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene as the competent authority assures the application of the regulations. The paper furthermore gives an indication of the areas of radiation application in medicine and the number of location of X-ray equipment, nuclear medical laboratories, radiation therapy equipment, etc. The number of X-ray examinations in Norway per year are also given, together with their distribution among the various types of examinations. Summary results of a quality assurance investigation of nuclear medical laboratories are given, as well as the results of inspections of the various types of equipment used in medical diagnostics