WorldWideScience

Sample records for research field emerging

  1. Sociology of International Education--An Emerging Field of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This article points to international education in elementary and post-elementary schools as an emerging and promising field of enquiry. It describes the state of art of this new field and sets out the nature of the research. The rapid development of international networks in recent decades; the contribution of international education policies to…

  2. Measuring scientific research in emerging nano-energy field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiancheng; Liu, Na

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to comprehensively explore scientific research profiles in the field of emerging nano-energy during 1991-2012 based on bibliometrics and social network analysis. We investigate the growth pattern of research output, and then carry out across countries/regions comparisons on research performances. Furthermore, we examine scientific collaboration across countries/regions by analyzing collaborative intensity and networks in 3- to 4-year intervals. Results indicate with an impressively exponential growth pattern of nano-energy articles, the world share of scientific "giants," such as the USA, Germany, England, France and Japan, display decreasing research trends, especially in the USA. Emerging economies, including China, South Korea and India, exhibit a rise in terms of the world share, illustrating strong development momentum of these countries in nano-energy research. Strikingly, China displays a remarkable rise in scientific influence rivaling Germany, Japan, France, and England in the last few years. Finally, the scientific collaborative network in nano-energy research has expanded steadily. Although the USA and several major European countries play significantly roles on scientific collaboration, China and South Korea exert great influence on scientific collaboration in recent years. The findings imply that emerging economies can earn competitive advantages in some emerging fields by properly engaging a catch-up strategy.

  3. Women's mental health research: the emergence of a biomedical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehar, Mary C

    2006-01-01

    This review surveys the field of women's mental health, with particular emphasis on its evolution into a distinct area of biomedical research. The field employs a biomedical disease model but it also emphasizes social and cultural influences on health outcomes. In recent years, its scope has expanded beyond studies of disorders occurring in women at times of reproductive transitions and it now encompasses a broader study of sex and gender differences. Historical and conceptual influences on the field are discussed. The review also surveys gender differences in the prevalence and clinical manifestations of mental disorders. Epidemiological findings have provided a rich resource for theory development, but without research tools to test theories adequately, findings of gender differences have begged the question of their biological, social, and cultural origins. Clinical depression is used to exemplify the usefulness of a sex/gender perspective in understanding mental illness; and major theories proposed to account for gender differences are critically evaluated. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the primary federal funding source for biomedical women's mental health research. The review surveys areas of emphasis in women's mental health research at the NIH as well as some collaborative activities that represent efforts to translate research findings into the public health and services arenas. As new analytic methods become available, it is anticipated that a more fundamental understanding of the biological and behavioral mechanisms underlying sex and gender differences in mental illness will emerge. Nonetheless, it is also likely that integration of findings predicated on different conceptual models of the nature and causes of mental illness will remain a challenge. These issues are discussed with reference to their impact on the field of women's mental health research.

  4. Research in Corporate Communication: An Overview of an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, Cees B. M.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. Gives three key concepts in such research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orchestration of communication. Advocates an interdisciplinary approach…

  5. Sustainability transitions : an emerging field of research and its prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markard, J.; Raven, R.P.J.M.; Truffer, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sustainability oriented innovation and technology studies have received increasing attention over the past 10–15 years. In particular, a new field dealing with "sustainability transitions" has gained ground and reached an output of 60–100 academic papers per year. In this article, we aim to identify

  6. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    OpenAIRE

    Riel, Cees

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis commentary is intended as an amendment to Argenti's (1996) viewpoint, published in Volume 10, Issue 1, of Management Communication Quarterly. Van Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature in both communication and business school disciplines. In the author's opinion, there are three key concepts in corporate communication research: corporate identity, corporate reputation, and orch...

  7. Higher Education Research Community in Taiwan: An Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Ju; Chan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the evolution and characteristics of the higher education research community in Taiwan. In echoing the development of the East Asian region, Taiwan has made substantial progress during the past two decades. The massification of higher education itself has played a major role in promoting the academic differentiation or…

  8. Research in corporate communication: An overview of an emerging field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThis commentary is intended as an amendment to Argenti's (1996) viewpoint, published in Volume 10, Issue 1, of Management Communication Quarterly. Van Riel provides an overview of research in corporate communication, focusing on achievements found in the international academic literature

  9. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  10. Port economics, policy and management : review of an emerging research field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallis, A.A.; Vitsounis, T.K.; Langen, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews research in port economics, policy and management during the period 1997-2008. In an increasingly international economy, research interest in ports is gradually emerging. This paper examines the developments, themes and characteristics of this research, by reviewing a

  11. The Emerging Strategic Entrepreneurship Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lyngsie, Jacob

    The field of strategic entrepreneurship is a fairly recent one. Its central idea is that opportunity-seeking and advantage-seeking — the former the central subject of the entrepreneurship field, the latter the central subject of the strategic management field — are processes that need...... to be considered jointly. The purpose of this brief chapter is to explain the emergence of SE theory field in terms of a response to research gaps in the neighboring fields of entrepreneurship and strategic management; describe the main tenets of SE theory; discuss its relations to neighboring fields; and finally...

  12. Contact research strategy for emerging molybdenum disulfide and other two-dimensional field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Du

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Layered two-dimensional (2D semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs have been widely isolated, synthesized, and characterized recently. Numerous 2D materials are identified as the potential candidates as channel materials for future thin film technology due to their high mobility and the exhibiting bandgaps. While many TMD filed-effect transistors (FETs have been widely demonstrated along with a significant progress to clearly understand the device physics, large contact resistance at metal/semiconductor interface still remain a challenge. From 2D device research point of view, how to minimize the Schottky barrier effects on contacts thus reduce the contact resistance of metals on 2D materials is very critical for the further development of the field. Here, we present a review of contact research on molybdenum disulfide and other TMD FETs from the fundamental understanding of metal-semiconductor interfaces on 2D materials. A clear contact research strategy on 2D semiconducting materials is developed for future high-performance 2D FETs with aggressively scaled dimensions.

  13. Circular Business Models: Defining a Concept and Framing an Emerging Research Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. K. Nußholz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To aid companies in transitioning towards a circular economy and adopting strategies such as reuse, repair, and remanufacturing, the concept of circular business models has been developed. Although the concept draws on contributions from various academic disciplines, and despite its increasingly frequent use, few scholars clearly define what a circular business model is. Understanding about what makes a business model circular is diverse, hampering the theoretical development and practical application of circular business models. This study aims to help frame the field of circular business model research, by clarifying the fundamentals of the concept from the perspectives of resource efficiency and business model innovation. Expanding on these findings, a review of how the concept is used in recent academic literature is provided. It shows that a coherent view is lacking on which resource efficiency strategies classify a business model as circular. This study clarifies which resource efficiency strategies can be deemed as relevant key strategies for circular business models, and suggests a new definition of the concept. With the definition grounded in analysis of the fundamentals in terms of resource efficiency and business models, the study contributes to theoretical advancement and effective implementation of circular business models.

  14. Review of an emerging research field 'spin-orbit torques'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurebayashi, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    This Review will provide a landscape of the recent development of one of spintronics sub-fields, so-called 'spin orbit torques'. This new class of spin torques, arising from the relativistic spin-orbit interaction in solid states, has gained a great deal of academic interest from relevant scientists and technologists. (author)

  15. Community-Based Research Networks: Development and Lessons Learned in an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy; Ambler, Susan H.; Cutforth, Nick; Donohue, Patrick; Dougherty, Dan; Marullo, Sam; Nelson, Kris S.; Stutts, Nancy B.

    2003-01-01

    Compares seven multi-institutional community-based research networks in Appalachia; Colorado; District of Columbia; Minneapolis-St. Paul; Philadelphia; Richmond, Virginia; and Trenton, New Jersey. After reviewing the histories of the networks, conducts a comparative SWOT analysis, showing their common and unique strengths, weaknesses,…

  16. The Emerging Field of Neuroepigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Sweatt, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years the broad field of epigenetics, and over the past decade in particular the emerging field of neuroepigenetics, have begun to have tremendous impact in the areas of learned behavior, neurotoxicology, CNS development, cognition, addiction, and psychopathology. However, epigenetics is such a new field that in most of these areas the impact is more in the category of fascinating implications as opposed to established facts. In this brief commentary I will attempt to address...

  17. The emerging field of neuroepigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweatt, J David

    2013-10-30

    Over the past 25 years, the broad field of epigenetics and, over the past decade in particular, the emerging field of neuroepigenetics have begun to have tremendous impact in the areas of learned behavior, neurotoxicology, CNS development, cognition, addiction, and psychopathology. However, epigenetics is such a new field that in most of these areas the impact is more in the category of fascinating implications as opposed to established facts. In this brief commentary, I will attempt to address and delineate some of the open questions and areas of opportunity that discoveries in epigenetics are providing to the discipline of neuroscience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergency braking : research summary.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlösser, L.H.M.

    1976-01-01

    This report deals with an investigation concerning braking capacity of trucks if somewhere a failure occurs in the normal service brake. Purpose of research was to get an insight in various secondary braking systems for trucks. It is shown that with almost all of the secondary braking system it was

  19. Growing an Emerging Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  20. Field Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Field Research Facility (FRF) located in Duck, N.C. was established in 1977 to support the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' coastal engineering mission. The FRF is...

  1. Virtual Reality Exercise for Anxiety and Depression: A Preliminary Review of Current Research in an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Nan; Pope, Zachary; Lee, Jung Eun; Gao, Zan

    2018-03-04

    Although current evidence supports the use of virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of mental disorders, it is unknown whether VR exercise would be beneficial to mental health. This review synthesized literature concerning the effect of VR exercise on anxiety and depression among various populations. Ten electronic databases were searched for studies on this topic from January 2000 through October 2017. Studies were eligible if the article: (1) was peer-reviewed; (2) was published in English; and (3) used quantitative measures in assessing anxiety- and depression-related outcomes. A total of five empirical studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies included two randomized clinical trials, one control trial, and two cross-sectional studies. Four studies reported significant improvements in anxiety- and depression-related measures following VR exercise, including reduced tiredness and tension, in addition to increased energy and enjoyment. Nonetheless, one study failed to support the effectiveness of VR exercise over traditional exercise alone on depressive symptoms. Findings favor VR exercise in alleviating anxiety and depression symptomology. However, existing evidence is insufficient to support the advantages of VR exercise as a standalone treatment over traditional therapy in the alleviation of anxiety and depression given the paucity of studies, small sample sizes, and lack of high-quality research designs. Future studies may build upon these limitations to discern the optimal manner by which to employ VR exercise in clinical settings.

  2. Virtual Reality Exercise for Anxiety and Depression: A Preliminary Review of Current Research in an Emerging Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zeng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although current evidence supports the use of virtual reality (VR in the treatment of mental disorders, it is unknown whether VR exercise would be beneficial to mental health. This review synthesized literature concerning the effect of VR exercise on anxiety and depression among various populations. Methods: Ten electronic databases were searched for studies on this topic from January 2000 through October 2017. Studies were eligible if the article: (1 was peer-reviewed; (2 was published in English; and (3 used quantitative measures in assessing anxiety- and depression-related outcomes. Results: A total of five empirical studies met the eligibility criteria. These studies included two randomized clinical trials, one control trial, and two cross-sectional studies. Four studies reported significant improvements in anxiety- and depression-related measures following VR exercise, including reduced tiredness and tension, in addition to increased energy and enjoyment. Nonetheless, one study failed to support the effectiveness of VR exercise over traditional exercise alone on depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Findings favor VR exercise in alleviating anxiety and depression symptomology. However, existing evidence is insufficient to support the advantages of VR exercise as a standalone treatment over traditional therapy in the alleviation of anxiety and depression given the paucity of studies, small sample sizes, and lack of high-quality research designs. Future studies may build upon these limitations to discern the optimal manner by which to employ VR exercise in clinical settings.

  3. Operational Research during the Ebola Emergency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Operational research aims to identify interventions, strategies, or tools that can enhance the quality, effectiveness, or coverage of programs where the research is taking place. Médecins Sans Frontières admitted ≈5,200 patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and from the beginning nested operational research within its emergency response. This research covered critical areas, such as understanding how the virus spreads, clinical trials, community perceptions, challenges within Ebola treatment centers, and negative effects on non-Ebola healthcare. Importantly, operational research questions were decided to a large extent by returning volunteers who had first-hand knowledge of the immediate issues facing teams in the field. Such a method is appropriate for an emergency medical organization. Many challenges were also identified while carrying out operational research across 3 different countries, including the basic need for collecting data in standardized format to enable comparison of findings among treatment centers.

  4. Emerging Technologies for Gut Microbiome Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jason W.; Roach, Jeffrey; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the importance of the gut microbiome on modulation of host health has become a subject of great interest for researchers across disciplines. As an intrinsically multidisciplinary field, microbiome research has been able to reap the benefits of technological advancements in systems and synthetic biology, biomaterials engineering, and traditional microbiology. Gut microbiome research has been revolutionized by high-throughput sequencing technology, permitting compositional and functional analyses that were previously an unrealistic undertaking. Emerging technologies including engineered organoids derived from human stem cells, high-throughput culturing, and microfluidics assays allowing for the introduction of novel approaches will improve the efficiency and quality of microbiome research. Here, we will discuss emerging technologies and their potential impact on gut microbiome studies. PMID:27426971

  5. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  6. Using principles from emergency management to improve emergency response plans for research animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelweid, Catherine M

    2013-10-01

    Animal research regulatory agencies have issued updated requirements for emergency response planning by regulated research institutions. A thorough emergency response plan is an essential component of an institution's animal care and use program, but developing an effective plan can be a daunting task. The author provides basic information drawn from the field of emergency management about best practices for developing emergency response plans. Planners should use the basic principles of emergency management to develop a common-sense approach to managing emergencies in their facilities.

  7. From an Analytical Framework for Understanding the Innovation Process in Higher Education to an Emerging Research Field of Innovations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuzhuo

    2017-01-01

    While studies dealing with issues related to innovations in higher education proliferate, there has been little consensus on key concepts and central issues for research. To respond to the challenges, this paper calls for developing a new research field--studies on innovations in higher education, by integrating two disciplines, namely innovation…

  8. Emergent Gauge Fields in Holographic Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Domènech, Oriol; Pomarol, Alex; Salvio, Alberto; Silva, Pedro J

    2010-01-01

    Holographic superconductors have been studied so far in the absence of dynamical electromagnetic fields, namely in the limit in which they coincide with holographic superfluids. It is possible, however, to introduce dynamical gauge fields if a Neumann-type boundary condition is imposed on the AdS-boundary. In 3+1 dimensions, the dual theory is a 2+1 dimensional CFT whose spectrum contains a massless gauge field, signaling the emergence of a gauge symmetry. We study the impact of a dynamical gauge field in vortex configurations where it is known to significantly affect the energetics and phase transitions. We calculate the critical magnetic fields H_c1 and H_c2, obtaining that holographic superconductors are of Type II (H_c1 < H_c2). We extend the study to 4+1 dimensions where the gauge field does not appear as an emergent phenomena, but can be introduced, by a proper renormalization, as an external dynamical field. We also compare our predictions with those arising from a Ginzburg-Landau theory and identif...

  9. Priorities for emergency department syncope research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Benjamin C.; Costantino, Giorgio; Barbic, Franca; Bossi, Ilaria; Casazza, Giovanni; Dipaola, Franca; McDermott, Daniel; Quinn, James; Reed, Matthew; Sheldon, Robert S.; Solbiati, Monica; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Krahn, Andrew D.; Beach, Daniel; Bodemer, Nicolai; Brignole, Michele; Casagranda, Ivo; Duca, Piergiorgio; Falavigna, Greta; Ippoliti, Roberto; Montano, Nicola; Olshansky, Brian; Raj, Satish R.; Ruwald, Martin H.; Shen, Win-Kuang; Stiell, Ian; Ungar, Andrea; van Dijk, J. Gert; van Dijk, Nynke; Wieling, Wouter; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-01-01

    There is limited evidence to guide the emergency department (ED) evaluation and management of syncope. The First International Workshop on Syncope Risk Stratification in the Emergency Department identified key research questions and methodological standards essential to advancing the science of

  10. Nation branding as an emerging field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkelsen, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    2016-01-01

    presents itself as a theoretical possibility and a practical necessity. We propose that what made a travel possible from product branding via corporate branding to nation branding was the semantic flexibility of the brand concept. We argue that the brand concept is almost void of meaning......Nation branding is a remarkable phenomenon. In less than two decades, it has established itself as the preferred framework for interstate strategic communication and as an emerging academic field. The paper describes how this extraordinary expansion was possible by showing how nation branding...... and that this feature has been an indispensable requisite for establishing nation branding as a field of practice and as an academic field. Despite the indisputable academic productivity that is a result of the vagueness of the brand concept, we suggest that to reach a normal science-like situation in the field...

  11. Distributed academic leadership in emergent research organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokkeler, Bernardus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis “distributed academic leadership in emergent research organizations" that Ben Kokkeler on October 29th 2014 successfully defended at the University of Twente, shows that a specific type of academic leadership developes, deep in the heart of the university, in emerging research institutes.

  12. Qualitative Research on Emergency Medicine Physicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paltved, Charlotte; Musaeus, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to systematically review the qualitative research studying Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians in Emergency Departments (ED). Background: Qualitative research aims to study complex social phenomena. EM is a highly complex medical and social environment that can be investigated...... with qualitative research. Methods: Electronic databases of English peer-reviewed articles were searched from 1971 to 2012 using Medline through PubMed and PsychINFO. This search was supplemented with hand-searches of Academic Emergency Medicine and Emergency Medicine Journal from 1999 to 2012 and cross references...... and training, communication, professional roles, and organizational factors, and into 12 sub-themes. Conclusion: The strength of qualitative research is its ability to grasp and operationalize complex relations within EM. Although qualitative research methodologies have gained in rigour in recent years and few...

  13. Deliberative ecological economics: emergence and research issues

    OpenAIRE

    Zografos, Christos; Howarth, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the recent emergence of "deliberative ecological economics", a field that highlights the potential of deliberation for improving environmental governance. We locate the emergence of this literature in the long concern in ecological economics over the policy implications of limited views of human action and its encounter with deliberative democracy scholarship and the model of communicative rationality as an alternative to utilitarianism. Considering criticisms over methods used and...

  14. Deliberative ecological economics : emergence and research issues

    OpenAIRE

    Zografos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the recent emergence of "deliberative ecological economics", a field that highlights the potential of deliberation for improving environmental governance. We locate the emergence of this literature in the long concern in ecological economics over the policy implications of limited views of human action and its encounter with deliberative democracy scholarship and the model of communicative rationality as an alternative to utilitarianism. Considering criticisms over methods used and...

  15. Emerging Economies Research Dialogue | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations to bridge the gap by organizing two research dialogues in the form of international conferences for emerging economy professionals, academics and policymakers on issues of contemporary relevance to the global economy and polity.

  16. Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, R.P.

    1989-04-01

    The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

  17. Emergence of Nordic nursing research: no position is an Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kristian; Adamsen, Lis

    2009-01-01

    . The interview agenda explored the participants' research activities and knowledge production. Our conclusion is that one cannot speak of nursing research in the Nordic countries as a fully developed and autonomous field. Yet we see the outlines of an emerging nursing research field with a common doxa. At least...... three distinct positions operate in Nordic nursing research: a clinical and applied oriented position, a profession and knowledge oriented position and a theoretical and concept oriented position. Epistemologically speaking the positions are of a 'spontaneous', 'cyclical' and 'break' character...

  18. Analysis of Emergency Information Management Research Hotspots Based on Bibliometric and Co-occurrence Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Qingyun

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available [Purpose/significance] Emergency information management is an interdisciplinary field of emergency management and information management. Summarizing the major research output is helpful to strengthen the effective utilization of information resources in emergency management research, and to provide references for the follow-up development and practical exploration of emergency information management research. [Method/process] By retrieving concerned literature from CNKI, this paper used the bibliometric and co-word clustering analysis methods to analyze the domestic emergency management research output. [Result/conclusion] Domestic emergency information management research mainly focuses on five hot topics: disaster emergency information management, crisis information disclosure, emergency information management system, emergency response, wisdom emergency management. China should strengthen the emergency management information base for future theoretical research, and build the emergency information management theoretical framework.

  19. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Köhler, Gottfried; Knapp, Martin; Gaubitzer, Erwin; Puchinger, Martin; Edetsberger, Michael

    2009-11-26

    There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Emerging applications of fluorescence spectroscopy in medical microbiology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaubitzer Erwin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are many diagnostic techniques and methods available for diagnosis of medically important microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. But, almost all these techniques and methods have some limitations or inconvenience. Most of these techniques are laborious, time consuming and with chances of false positive or false negative results. It warrants the need of a diagnostic technique which can overcome these limitations and problems. At present, there is emerging trend to use Fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic as well as research tool in many fields of medical sciences. Here, we will critically discuss research studies which propose that Fluorescence spectroscopy may be an excellent diagnostic as well as excellent research tool in medical microbiology field with high sensitivity and specificity.

  1. 78 FR 40098 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including...

  2. Emerging themes in international business research

    OpenAIRE

    David A Griffith; Salih Tamer Cavusgil; Shichun Xu

    2008-01-01

    This study is motivated by two research questions: (1) Which recent contributions have been driving the research agenda in international business? (2) Which emerging themes in the literature are likely to set the stage for future work? To examine these questions, the study examined scholarly work in international business over the time period 1996–2006 in six leading international business journals (Journal of International Business Studies, Management International Review, Journal of World B...

  3. e-Learning research: emerging issues?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Beetham

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available e-Learning research is an expanding and diversifying field of study. Specialist research units and departments proliferate. Postgraduate courses recruit well in the UK and overseas, with an increasing focus on critical and research-based aspects of the field, as well as the more obvious professional development requirements. Following this year's launch of a National e-Learning Research Centre, it is timely to debate what the field of study should be prioritising for the future. This discussion piece suggests that the focus should fall on questions that are both clear and tractable for researchers, and likely to have a real impact on learners and practitioners. Suggested questions are based on early findings from a series of JISC-funded projects on e-learning and pedagogy.

  4. Emergent Abelian Gauge Fields from Noncommutative Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Stern

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We construct exact solutions to noncommutative gravity following the formulation of Chamseddine and show that they are in general accompanied by Abelian gauge fields which are first order in the noncommutative scale. This provides a mechanism for generating cosmological electromagnetic fields in an expanding space-time background, and also leads to multipole-like fields surrounding black holes. Exact solutions to noncommutative Einstein-Maxwell theory can give rise to first order corrections to the metric tensor, as well as to the electromagnetic fields. This leads to first order shifts in the horizons of charged black holes.

  5. Research on environmental impacts of nuclear power and emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.

    1994-01-01

    The future needs of nuclear energy research in Finland have been recently reviewed by an expert group. Concerning the research on environmental impacts and emergency preparedness, the group recommended the establishment of a common coordination group for the different projects in this field. The main objectives in this field include efficient accident management and mitigation of off-site consequences with appropriate countermeasures and more reliable real time prediction tools for atmospheric dispersion and radiation dose evaluations as well as efficient and fast real time surveillance and measurement systems. (orig.)

  6. Information field for historical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sviatets, Yu. A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the main information collision of historical knowledge, which consists in physical inaccessibility of events and phenomena of the past as an object of historical science for a historian as an investigator. The aim of the research is to formulate and discuss a working hypothesis about the information field of historical science. The article provides an analytical background on the main ideas and approaches in the field of modern information field theory. The author carries out the projection of the main provisions of the information field theory on historical research. It is shown that the information field is a really existing information carrier that provides its acquisition, transportation, storage and visualization, as well as provides information and knowledge recorded in various forms, realizes cultural communications. One of the manifestations of such a culture is the sign systems, which determine certain contexts. Signs are characterized by polysemy. Despite artificial origin, semiotic reality is objective. Simultaneously, signs provide intellectual activity of people. Mental signs in the historical process of use by society acquire additional meanings, generating new symbols. Polysemy shapes the problem of epistemological uncertainty of two stages – identifying the problem and solving it. Historians as researchers resort to cognitive models, which, thanks to the translational function, ensure the transfer of information from the known to the unknown. One of the explanations of polysemy is the theory of conceptual integration, according to which the structures of the original mental spaces are projected onto a new, constructed, mental space – blend. This is the result of a personʼs intellectual ability to create new meanings on the basis of the available ones. Since signs and symbols are multi-valued, they form a multiplicity of retrospective scenarios of historical research at the stage of problem formulation

  7. Emerging research trends in medical textiles

    CERN Document Server

    Gokarneshan, N; Rajendran, V; Lavanya, B; Ghoshal, Arundhathi

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of the significant researches reported during the recent years in the field of medical textiles. It also highlights the use of new types of fibres in developing medical textile products and their promising role in the respective areas of application. Considerable developments have taken place in the development of medical textiles for varied applications.

  8. CRNL research reactor retrofit Emergency Filtration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of NRX and NRU research reactor effluent air treatment systems before describing the selection and design of an appropriate retrofit Emergency Filtration System (EFS) to serve these reactors and the future MX-10 isotope production reactor. The conceptual design of the EFS began in 1984. A standby concrete shielding filter-adsorber system, sized to serve the reactor with the largest exhaust flow, was selected. The standby system, bypassed under normal operating conditions, is equipped with normal exhaust stream shutoff and diversion valves to be activated manually when an emergency is anticipated, or automatically when emergency levels of gamma radiation are detected in the exhaust stream. The first phase of the EFS installation, that is the construction of the EFS and the connection of NRU to the system, was completed in 1987. The second phase of construction, which includes the connection of NRX and provisions for the future connection of MX-10, is to be completed in 1990

  9. RNAi: An emerging field of molecular research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... structure and genome integrity (Hannon, 2002; Grewal and Moazed ... function. COMPONENTS OF RNAi. Among the components of gene silencing process, some serve as .... PTGS technology has many advantages: It is.

  10. Mixed methods research: a design for emergency care research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon; Porter, Jo; Endacott, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    This paper follows previous publications on generic qualitative approaches, qualitative designs and action research in emergency care by this group of authors. Contemporary views on mixed methods approaches are considered, with a particular focus on the design choice and the amalgamation of qualitative and quantitative data emphasising the timing of data collection for each approach, their relative 'weight' and how they will be mixed. Mixed methods studies in emergency care are reviewed before the variety of methodological approaches and best practice considerations are presented. The use of mixed methods in clinical studies is increasing, aiming to answer questions such as 'how many' and 'why' in the same study, and as such are an important and useful approach to many key questions in emergency care.

  11. Commentary on: Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research. Can the emerging domain of behavioral addictions bring a new reflection for the field of addictions, by stressing the issue of the context of addiction development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Timary, Philippe; Philippot, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    This paper is a commentary to the article entitled: "Are we overpathologizing everyday life? A tenable blueprint for behavioral addiction research", by Billieux, Schimmenti, Khazaal, Maurage and Heeren (2015). In this manuscript, we commented on two aspects developed by the authors. Billieux et al. (2015) propose that the recent development of propositions of behavioral addiction is driven by an unwise application of an addiction model to excessive behaviors and rests on a confirmatory research strategy that does not question the psychological processes underlying the development of the conduct. They also show that applying a process driven strategy leads to a more appropriate description of the reality of the behavior and conduct, in particular by describing a variety of motivations for the excessive behavior, which is central to understanding the nature of the conduct. We believe that this new approach, which is fruitful to the emerging domain of behavioral addictions, could also apply to the domain of addictions in general. The latter is characterized by the application of a generic biological model, largely influenced by animal models, focusing on neurophysiological determinants of addiction. This approach may have decreased the attention paid to dimensions of addictions that are more specifically human. We will firstly briefly argue on the limitation of this neurophysiological addiction model for the field of excessive behavioral conducts. Secondly, we will argue for an approach centered on the differentiation of motivations and on the adaptive dimension of the behavior when it first developed and on the evocation of a transition where the conduct became independent of its original function. The emerging domain of behavioral addictions, where no animal model has been developed so far, may bring a new reflection that may apply to the domain of addictions in general, with a specific attention to human questions.

  12. Information Science Roles in the Emerging Field of Data Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Marchionini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses how data science emerges from information science,statistics, computer science, and knowledge domain. Schools of information stand as meaningful and substantive entities that are critical to the education of scholars and practitioners who work across a wide range of enterprises. Data science is but one emerging field that will benefit from information school engagement.

  13. Transnational entrepreneurship : An emergent field of study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drori, Israel; Honig, Benson; Wright, Mike

    This article introduces the reader to the scope, boundaries, variation, and theoretical lenses of transnational entrepreneurship (TE) research. We discuss issues concerning why, how, and when individuals and/or organizations pursue new business ventures, often in far less attractive environments,

  14. Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part I: Research Principles and Common Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. This article, Part I of a two-article series, provides an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field, including observation, individual interviews, and focus groups. In Part II of this series, we will outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. quantification of emergency action levels for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongwang; Qu Jingyuan; Liu Yuanzhong; Xi Shuren

    2000-01-01

    Emergency action level (EAL) technical criteria or parameters for emergency conditions classes. Reference methodology for development of EAL in foreign countries, in process of developed and reviewed emergency plan of home several research reactors, the author thought that should be taken initiating conditions which result in emergency conditions quantified some instrumental readings or alarm thresholds, in order to distinguish and confirm emergency conditions and provide technical bases for emergency response actions. Then based on this principle, revised or developed emergency plans of INET Tsinghua University, promote development of work for emergency plan of research reactors

  16. Marine molecular biology: an emerging field of biological sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Narsinh L; Jain, Roopesh; Natalio, Filipe; Hamer, Bojan; Thakur, Archana N; Müller, Werner E G

    2008-01-01

    An appreciation of the potential applications of molecular biology is of growing importance in many areas of life sciences, including marine biology. During the past two decades, the development of sophisticated molecular technologies and instruments for biomedical research has resulted in significant advances in the biological sciences. However, the value of molecular techniques for addressing problems in marine biology has only recently begun to be cherished. It has been proven that the exploitation of molecular biological techniques will allow difficult research questions about marine organisms and ocean processes to be addressed. Marine molecular biology is a discipline, which strives to define and solve the problems regarding the sustainable exploration of marine life for human health and welfare, through the cooperation between scientists working in marine biology, molecular biology, microbiology and chemistry disciplines. Several success stories of the applications of molecular techniques in the field of marine biology are guiding further research in this area. In this review different molecular techniques are discussed, which have application in marine microbiology, marine invertebrate biology, marine ecology, marine natural products, material sciences, fisheries, conservation and bio-invasion etc. In summary, if marine biologists and molecular biologists continue to work towards strong partnership during the next decade and recognize intellectual and technological advantages and benefits of such partnership, an exciting new frontier of marine molecular biology will emerge in the future.

  17. Tutorials on emerging methodologies and applications in operations research

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Operations Research emerged as a quantitative approach to problem-solving in World War II. Its founders, who were physicists, mathematicians, and engineers, quickly found peace-time uses for this new field. Moreover, we can say that Operations Research (OR) was born in the same incubator as computer science, and through the years, it has spawned many new disciplines, including systems engineering, health care management, and transportation science. Fundamentally, Operations Research crosses discipline domains to seek solutions on a range of problems and benefits diverse disciplines from finance to bioengineering. Many disciplines routinely use OR methods. Many scientific researchers, engineers, and others will find the methodological presentations in this book useful and helpful in their problem-solving efforts. OR’s strengths are modeling, analysis, and algorithm design. It provides a quantitative foundation for a broad spectrum of problems, from economics to medicine, from environmental control to sports,...

  18. Mapping the Landscape of Emerging Research Topics in Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Andreas; Handfield, Robert B.; Durach, Christian F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify research topics that are emerging in the field of supply chain management [SCM]. The analysis is based on survey data collected from leading SCM researchers. It is found that big data analytics, sustainability, risk management, health care, emerging mark...

  19. International health law : an emerging field of public international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, Brigit

    This article discusses the nature and scope of international health law as an emerging field of public international law. It is argued that the protection of health reflects a pressing social need that should now be spoken of in the vocabulary of international law. Furthermore, there is an urgent

  20. The research reactor radiation emergency countermeasure system in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Reyoung; Choi, Geun-Sik; Lee, Wanno; Chung, Kun Ho; Kang, Mun Ja; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2010-01-01

    A disaster prevention system was established for a radiation emergency from an operation of a research reactor with a thermal power of 30 MW th in Korea. A national radiation disaster countermeasure organization was set up to cope with the radiation emergency classified into three cases whose effective doses were more than 1 mSv/h inside the nuclear facility, inside the site boundary and outside the site boundary. Its role consists of the proclamation and consequent withdrawal of a disaster, a general assessment, an emergency medical service, a field control, radiation protection, resident protection implement, an accident analysis, a security plan, a radiation environmental investigation plan and probe, a radiation environmental effect assessment, and others. The emergency planning zone (EPZ) was settled to be within a radius of 800 m, the average distance between the site boundary and the center of a research reactor in operation, as a quick and effective early countermeasure from the result of the radiation environmental effect assessment. The environmental probing zone was chosen to extend to a radius of 2 km from a research reactor according to the moving path of the radioactive cloud so that a densely populated area could be considered and would be extended to 10 km according to the radiation level of the research reactor and atmospheric diffusion. Practically, the environmental probing is implemented at 22 points inside the site and eight points outside the site considering the geography, population and the wind direction. The gamma radiation dose and atmospheric radioactivity are analyzed during an effluence, and the radioactivity of a ground surface deposit and an environmental sample are analyzed after an effluence. The environmental laboratory covers the analysis of the gamma radioisotopes, tritium, strontium, uranium, gross alpha and beta. It is estimated that the habitability can be recovered when the radiation dose rate is less than 1 mSv/h inside the

  1. Research Opportunities from Emerging Atmospheric Observing and Modeling Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabberdt, Walter F.; Schlatter, Thomas W.

    1996-02-01

    The Second Prospectus Development Team (PDT-2) of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged with identifying research opportunities that are best matched to emerging operational and experimental measurement and modeling methods. The overarching recommendation of PDT-2 is that inputs for weather forecast models can best be obtained through the use of composite observing systems together with adaptive (or targeted) observing strategies employing both in situ and remote sensing. Optimal observing systems and strategies are best determined through a three-part process: observing system simulation experiments, pilot field measurement programs, and model-assisted data sensitivity experiments. Furthermore, the mesoscale research community needs easy and timely access to the new operational and research datasets in a form that can readily be reformatted into existing software packages for analysis and display. The value of these data is diminished to the extent that they remain inaccessible.The composite observing system of the future must combine synoptic observations, routine mobile observations, and targeted observations, as the current or forecast situation dictates. High costs demand fuller exploitation of commercial aircraft, meteorological and navigation [Global Positioning System (GPS)] satellites, and Doppler radar. Single observing systems must be assessed in the context of a composite system that provides complementary information. Maintenance of the current North American rawinsonde network is critical for progress in both research-oriented and operational weather forecasting.Adaptive sampling strategies are designed to improve large-scale and regional weather prediction but they will also improve diagnosis and prediction of flash flooding, air pollution, forest fire management, and other environmental emergencies. Adaptive measurements can be made by piloted or unpiloted aircraft. Rawinsondes can be launched and satellites can be programmed to make

  2. Emergent Themes from Recent Research Syntheses in Science Education and Their Implications for Research Design, Replication, and Reporting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph; Furtak, Erin; Kowalski, Susan; Martinez, Alina; Slavin, Robert; Stuhlsatz, Molly; Wilson, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    This article draws upon the experiences of four recent efforts to synthesize the findings of quantitative studies in science education research. After establishing the need for research syntheses in advancing generalizable knowledge and causal effects research in our field, we identify a set themes that emerged in the process of conducting these…

  3. Emerging Education Technologies and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Two recent publications report the emerging technologies that are likely to have a significant impact on learning and instruction: (a) New Media Consortium's "2011 Horizon Report" (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011), and (b) "A Roadmap for Education Technology" funded by the National Science Foundation in…

  4. Guidelines for Field Research Reports

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Your Award Grant Agreement specifies the number of reports required throughout your tenure as well as the due dates for such reports. The form of your report will vary, depending on the nature of your research, your methodological approach, and your participation in related activities such as conferences, etc. However ...

  5. Doing "halfie" research in en emerging context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the unique position of ‘halfie’ researchers in terms of challenges and contributions to meaningful knowledge. By using a case study of a halfie researcher travelling through her doctoral research process where she was confronted with the challenges of multiple identification ...

  6. Problems emerging from practicing research methodologies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The on-going debates and conflicts between defenders of the quantitative research approach and advocates of the qualitative approach to research tends to leave the post graduate students in a dilemma and disillusioned as to which approach to use in their research process. However, the advent of mixed method as the ...

  7. Emerging interdisciplinary fields in the coming intelligence/convergence era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2012-09-01

    Dramatic advances are in the horizon resulting from rapid pace of development of several technologies, including, computing, communication, mobile, robotic, and interactive technologies. These advances, along with the trend towards convergence of traditional engineering disciplines with physical, life and other science disciplines will result in the development of new interdisciplinary fields, as well as in new paradigms for engineering practice in the coming intelligence/convergence era (post-information age). The interdisciplinary fields include Cyber Engineering, Living Systems Engineering, Biomechatronics/Robotics Engineering, Knowledge Engineering, Emergent/Complexity Engineering, and Multiscale Systems engineering. The paper identifies some of the characteristics of the intelligence/convergence era, gives broad definition of convergence, describes some of the emerging interdisciplinary fields, and lists some of the academic and other organizations working in these disciplines. The need is described for establishing a Hierarchical Cyber-Physical Ecosystem for facilitating interdisciplinary collaborations, and accelerating development of skilled workforce in the new fields. The major components of the ecosystem are listed. The new interdisciplinary fields will yield critical advances in engineering practice, and help in addressing future challenges in broad array of sectors, from manufacturing to energy, transportation, climate, and healthcare. They will also enable building large future complex adaptive systems-of-systems, such as intelligent multimodal transportation systems, optimized multi-energy systems, intelligent disaster prevention systems, and smart cities.

  8. Serious Games as Experiments for Emergency Management Research : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ruijven, T.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    Serious games and virtual environments are increasingly used for emergency management training and research. The development of these technologies seems to contribute to a solution to some problems in the existing literature on emergency management which is mainly based on case study research.

  9. ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE RESEARCH FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana RADAN UNGUREANU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The World is in a continuous change at the level of all its components including entrepreneurship, the most dynamic element of the business activity. Another direction of change comes from technologies called “key enabling technologies” and represents a revolution in using raw materials and shapes the entire industrial process, obtaining competitive advantages. This paper tries to find a realistic answer to the question: is it possible to follow the global trend of technologies and to foster them in Romania? A realistic picture supplied by statistical data correlated with elements of the national plan of research and development offers a more theoretical approach since practical examples are almost non-existent, but the potential to apply these ideas through entrepreneurship is promising. Meeting recommended goals from this paper, through cooperation between private companies, state and academies, creativity and innovation will boost new ideas for a better life in a healthier Romania.

  10. International entrepreneurship research in emerging economies : A critical review and research agenda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.N.; Danis, W.D.; Cavusgil, S.T.

    This article systematically reviews and critically examines international entrepreneurship research in emerging economies (IEEE research), and articulates its importance, timeliness and relevance in consideration of the growing influence of emerging markets in the global economy. A systematic

  11. An Emerging Strategy of "Direct" Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzberg, Henry

    1979-01-01

    Discusses seven basic themes that underlie the author's "direct research" activities. These themes include reliance on research based on description and induction instead of prescription and deduction, and the measurement of many elements in real settings, supported by anecdote, instead of few variables in perceptual terms from a…

  12. A bibliometric model for identifying emerging research topics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    –1843, 2015), the most serious problems are the lack of an acknowledged definition of emergence and incomplete elaboration of the linkages between the definitions that are used and the indicators that are created. With these issues in mind, this study first adjusts the definition of an emerging technology...... that Rotolo et al. (2015) have proposed to accommodate the analysis. Next, a set of criteria for the identification of emerging topics is proposed according to the adjusted definition and attributes of emergence. Using two sets of parameter values, several emerging research topics are identified. Finally...

  13. Neuroleadership: Themes and limitations of an emerging interdisciplinary field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Naila; Kadgien, Chelsie A

    2018-05-01

    The relationship between brain and behaviour has perplexed philosophers and scientists since the time of the ancient Greeks. Recent technological advances have allowed neuroscience to flourish, alongside growing romanticism that reductionist studies will allow us to understand complex interpersonal behaviours. Organizational cognitive neuroscience and neuroleadership are newly established interdisciplinary fields that use neuroscientific techniques to answer questions about behaviours within organizations. Neuroleadership aims to discover screening tools for good leaders, to improve leadership skills, and to identify unconscious factors affecting behaviour in hopes of improving management and leadership practices. Although proponents of neuroleadership are optimistic, if we know anything about the functions of the human brain and our interpersonal behaviours, it is that they are exquisitely complex and context dependant. Here, we briefly discuss the major themes emerging in the new field of neuroleadership and the limitations and potential consequences of applying findings from the field prematurely and with blind optimism.

  14. Linking Emerging Infectious Diseases Research and Policy ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In China and Southeast Asia, the lack of policy or regulation enforcements means that the use of antibiotics ... Building on past research on avian influenza and ongoing ... Chinese Academy of Sciences. Pays d' institution. China. Site internet.

  15. The re-emergence of hallucinogenic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begola, Matthew J; Dowben, Jonathan S

    2018-02-20

    Due to the intractability, at times, in the treatment of PTSD, clinicians and researchers continue to explore different options for treatment. This article discusses the renewed interest in hallucinogens for such treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reducing the ecological impact of field research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezanson, Michelle; Stowe, Rochelle; Watts, Sean M

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and students at biological field stations, especially in remote areas, are subject to leaving "footprints," as we conduct research, work, and live in sensitive ecosystems. These footprints include travel, personal trash and waste, and field equipment (e.g. flagging, tree markers, plot markers, trail markers, monitoring devices, etc.). In this commentary, we argue that the field of primatology's commitment to minimum impact research should be more explicitly and visibly integrated into our ethical protocols with regard to field research and instruction in sensitive environments. We review current ethical codes and potential solutions to reducing our "researcher footprints" while conducting fieldwork. Using Costa Rica as an example, we address how sustainable fieldwork differs among varying cultural contexts and argue that researchers should be made responsible and accountable for how our presence, research, and teaching might impact the environment. We conclude by recommending a set of guidelines to be added to ethical protocols regarding research design, station policies, and the conduct of research and teaching in the field. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. What is Financial Therapy? Discovering Mechanisms and Aspects of an Emerging Field

    OpenAIRE

    Kristy L. Archuleta; Emily A. Burr; Anita K. Dale; Anthony Canale; Dan Danford; Erika Rasure; Jeff Nelson; Kelley Williams; Kurt Schindler; Brett Coffman; Ed Horwitz

    2012-01-01

    Very little research currently exists specifically on the topic of financial therapy. In this emerging field, it is important to lay the groundwork for future practice and study. The purpose of this study was to answer the question, “What are the mechanisms and aspects of financial therapy?” Using qualitative methods, eighteen members of the Financial Therapy Association were interviewed by members of the research team. The participants included six financial professi...

  18. Emerging Raman Applications and Techniques in Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    The book presents the latest technological advances in Raman spectroscopy that are presently redrawing the landscape of many fields of biomedical and pharmaceutical R&D. Numerous examples are given to illustrate the application of the new methods and compared with established and related techniques. The book is suitable for both new researchers and practitioners in this area as well as for those familiar with the Raman technique but seeking to keep abreast of the latest dramatic advances in this field.

  19. Radiation breeding researches in gamma field. Results of researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Abstract of radiation breeding researches and outline of gamma field in IRB (Institute of Radiation Breeding) are described. The gamma field is a circular field of 100 m radius with 88.8TBqCo-60 source at the center. The field is surrounded by a shielding dike of 8 m in height. The effects of gamma irradiation on the growing plants, mutant by gamma radiation and plant molecular biological researches using mutant varieties obtained by the gamma field are explained. For examples, Japanese pear, chrysanthemum, Cytisus, Eustoma grandiflorum, Manila grass, tea and rose are reported. The mutant varieties in the gamma field, nine mutant varieties of flower colors in chrysanthemum, evergreen mutant lines in Manila grass, selection of self-compatible mutants in tea plant, and the plants of the gamma field recently are shown. (S.Y.)

  20. Wormholes, emergent gauge fields, and the weak gravity conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlow, Daniel [Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Physics Department, Harvard University,Cambridge MA, 02138 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    This paper revisits the question of reconstructing bulk gauge fields as boundary operators in AdS/CFT. In the presence of the wormhole dual to the thermofield double state of two CFTs, the existence of bulk gauge fields is in some tension with the microscopic tensor factorization of the Hilbert space. I explain how this tension can be resolved by splitting the gauge field into charged constituents, and I argue that this leads to a new argument for the “principle of completeness”, which states that the charge lattice of a gauge theory coupled to gravity must be fully populated. I also claim that it leads to a new motivation for (and a clarification of) the “weak gravity conjecture”, which I interpret as a strengthening of this principle. This setup gives a simple example of a situation where describing low-energy bulk physics in CFT language requires knowledge of high-energy bulk physics. This contradicts to some extent the notion of “effective conformal field theory”, but in fact is an expected feature of the resolution of the black hole information problem. An analogous factorization issue exists also for the gravitational field, and I comment on several of its implications for reconstructing black hole interiors and the emergence of spacetime more generally.

  1. Tumor-Treating Fields: Nursing Implications for an Emerging Technology
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alice

    2017-06-01

    Tumor-treating fields (TTFields) are a new technology used for cancer treatment consisting of battery-powered, insulated electromagnetic transducers that are placed on the scalp. This wearable, adhesive device is a certified physician-prescribed therapy for patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a type of primary brain cancer. TTFields are being used concomitantly with temozolomide (Temodar®) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and as a monotherapy in patients with recurrent glioblastoma after radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Nursing professionals caring for patients using this emerging technology should be able to educate patients regarding proper use of TTFields and monitor for side effects.
.

  2. Emergency planning and preparedness of the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, B.V.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of measures taken in case of accident or emergency to protect the site personnel, the general public and the environment will depend heavily on the adequacy of the emergency plan prepared in advance. For this reason, an emergency plan of the operating organization shall cover all activities planned to be carried out in the event of an emergency, allow for determining the level of the emergency and corresponding level of response according to the severity of the accident condition, and be based on the accidents analysed in the SAR as well as those additionally postulated for emergency planning purposes. The purpose of this paper is to present the practice of the emergency planning and preparedness in the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute (DNRI) for responding to accidents/incidents that may occur at the DNRI. The DNRI emergency plan and emergency procedures developed by the DNRI will be discussed. The information in the DNRI emergency plan such as the emergency organization, classification and identification of emergencies; intervention measures; the co-ordination with off-site organizations; and emergency training and drills will be described in detail. The emergency procedures in the form of documents and instructions for responding to accidents/incidents such as accidents in the reactor, accidents out of the reactor but with significant radioactive contamination, and fire and explosion accidents will be mentioned briefly. As analysed in the Safety Analysis Report for the DNRI, only the in-site actions are presented in the paper and no off-site emergency measures are required. (author)

  3. Evacuation in emergencies: An annotated guide to research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, B.M.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1987-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to explore the relevant sources of knowledge regarding evacuation related issues among recent work published in the social sciences and emergency planning fields. In organizing the material, we looked primarily for articles that included either a theoretical or empirical basis for the findings. By empirical, we mean that the findings were based on data taken from actual research gained through surveys, questionnaires, interviews or a combination of these, and the use of secondary sources. The theoretical material consisted of work that built on past research or which explored the use of models. Some conceptual work, raising issues not covered by the general format, were included if they attempted to synthesize aspects of the literature now segmented or which asked additional questions about topics related to but not necessarily within the strict realm of research studies. The material was divided as to the emphasis placed on the individual or the organizational level of behavior. Empirically the individual, family or household response is easier to assess because of the bias that may intrude when individuals of organizations or agencies involved in the evacuation process are interviewed regarding their official status. The annotations of the literature as well as the specific key findings from each study, where appropriate, are organized by hazard type. An author index is provided.

  4. Relativistic quantum chaos-An emergent interdisciplinary field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Xu, Hong-Ya; Huang, Liang; Grebogi, Celso

    2018-05-01

    Quantum chaos is referred to as the study of quantum manifestations or fingerprints of classical chaos. A vast majority of the studies were for nonrelativistic quantum systems described by the Schrödinger equation. Recent years have witnessed a rapid development of Dirac materials such as graphene and topological insulators, which are described by the Dirac equation in relativistic quantum mechanics. A new field has thus emerged: relativistic quantum chaos. This Tutorial aims to introduce this field to the scientific community. Topics covered include scarring, chaotic scattering and transport, chaos regularized resonant tunneling, superpersistent currents, and energy level statistics-all in the relativistic quantum regime. As Dirac materials have the potential to revolutionize solid-state electronic and spintronic devices, a good understanding of the interplay between chaos and relativistic quantum mechanics may lead to novel design principles and methodologies to enhance device performance.

  5. Relativistic quantum chaos—An emergent interdisciplinary field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Cheng; Xu, Hong-Ya; Huang, Liang; Grebogi, Celso

    2018-05-01

    Quantum chaos is referred to as the study of quantum manifestations or fingerprints of classical chaos. A vast majority of the studies were for nonrelativistic quantum systems described by the Schrödinger equation. Recent years have witnessed a rapid development of Dirac materials such as graphene and topological insulators, which are described by the Dirac equation in relativistic quantum mechanics. A new field has thus emerged: relativistic quantum chaos. This Tutorial aims to introduce this field to the scientific community. Topics covered include scarring, chaotic scattering and transport, chaos regularized resonant tunneling, superpersistent currents, and energy level statistics—all in the relativistic quantum regime. As Dirac materials have the potential to revolutionize solid-state electronic and spintronic devices, a good understanding of the interplay between chaos and relativistic quantum mechanics may lead to novel design principles and methodologies to enhance device performance.

  6. Research on environment monitoring of radiation emergency

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Y; Otani, N

    2003-01-01

    In a case of a nuclear accident at nuclear facilities, strong radiation such as g-rays and neutrons might radiate at a burst in the initial stage. For the establishment of dose estimation system for such accidents, the experiments were done using the He sup + sup 2 beam accelerated by Tandem in the W-MAST. The following results were obtained. 1) Neutron measurements using a rem counter yielded that dose equivalent was about 9.4 mSv/h at a position 100 cm from the Be target when the beam current of 15 MeV He sup 2 sup + was 0.8 mu A. Neutron measurement by means of Au and In foil activation method and by use of TLD element revealed that dose equivalents were to be 16-27 mu Sv/h for thermal neutron, and 30-41 mu Sv/h for sub-fast neutron (20 keV). Therefore, it was concluded that neutron field was mainly composed by fast neutron. 2) Linearity of the rem-counter out put vs neutron flux was valid under the condition that the count rate of the rem-counter was less than 10 kcps. 3) Computer simulation using NRESP c...

  7. Data Friction Meets Social Friction: Challenges for standardization in emerging fields of geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    Many interdisciplinary endeavors in the geosciences occur in emergent scientific fields. These fields are often characterized by heterogeneity of methods for production and collection of data, and by data scarcity. This paper presents findings about processes of methods standardization from a long-term case study of an emergent, data-scarce field, the deep subseafloor biosphere. Researchers come from many physical and life science backgrounds to study interactions between microbial life in the seafloor and the physical environment they inhabit. Standardization of methods for collecting data promises multiple benefits to this field, including: Addressing data scarcity through enabling greater data reuse and promoting better interoperability with large scale infrastructures; Fostering stronger collaborative links between researchers distributed across institutions and backgrounds. Ongoing standardization efforts in the field do not only involve scientific judgments about which among a range of methods is most efficient, least biased, or most reliable. Instead, these efforts also encounter multiple difficult social challenges, including: Lack of agreed upon criteria about how to judge competing methods: should efficiency, bias, or reliability take priority?; Lack of resources to carry out the work necessary to determine standards, particularly acute in emergent fields; Concerns that standardization is premature in such a new field, foreclosing the possibility of better methods being developed in the future; Concerns that standardization could prematurely shut down important scientific debates; Concerns among some researchers that their own work may become obsolete should the methods chosen as standard be different from their own. The success of these standardization efforts will depend on addressing both scientific and social dimensions, to ensure widespread acceptance among researchers in the field.

  8. Ethical considerations for field research on fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhett H. Bennett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Collection of data from animals for research purposes can negatively impact target or by-catch species if suitable animal ethics practices are not followed. This study aimed to assess the ethical requirements of peer-reviewed scientific journals that publish primary literature on fishes, and review the ethical considerations and animal care guidelines of national and international documents on the ethical treatment of animals for research, to provide an overview of the general ethical considerations for field research on fishes. A review of 250 peer-reviewed, ISI-rated journals publishing primary research on fishes revealed that nearly half (46% had no mention of ethics, treatment of animals or ethical requirements for publication in their author guidelines or publication policies. However, 18% of the journals reviewed identify a specific set of ethical guidelines to be followed before publishing research involving animals. Ethical considerations for investigators undertaking field research on fishes, common to most animal care policies, legislation and guiding documents, include adhering to relevant legislation, minimising sample sizes, reducing or mitigating pain and distress, employing the most appropriate and least invasive techniques and accurately reporting methods and findings. This information will provide potential investigators with a useful starting point for designing and conducting ethical field research. Application of ethical best practices in field sampling studies will improve the welfare of study animals and the conservation of rare and endangered species. Conservation implications: This article provides a list of ethical considerations for designing and conducting field research on fishes. By reviewing sampling techniques and processes that are frequently used in field research on fishes and by highlighting the potential negative impacts of these sampling techniques, this article is intended to assist researchers in planning

  9. Research on sever accident emergency simulation system for CPR1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhifei; Liao Yehong; Liang Manchun; Li Ke; Yang Jie; Chen Yali

    2015-01-01

    The enhanced capability to nuclear power plant (NPP) severe accident management and emergency response depends heavily on exercises. Since the exercise scene is usually monotonous and not realistic, and conduct of exercise has a high cost, the effect of enhancing the capability is limited. Thus, the development of a Sever Accident Emergency Simulation System (SAESS) is necessary. SAESS is able to connect NPP simulator, and simulates the process of severe accident management, personnel evacuation, the dispersion of radioactive plume, and emergency response of emergency organizations. The system helps to design several of exercise scenes and optimize the disposal strategy in different severe accidents. In addition, the system reduces the cost of emergency exercise by computer simulation, benefits the research of exercise, increases the efficiency of exercise and enhances the emergency decision-making capability. This paper introduces the design and application of SAESS. (author)

  10. 3rd International Conference on "Emerging Research in Computing, Information, Communication and Applications"

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, NH; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings volume covers the proceedings of ERCICA 2015. ERCICA provides an interdisciplinary forum for researchers, professional engineers and scientists, educators, and technologists to discuss, debate and promote research and technology in the upcoming areas of  Computing, Information, Communication and their Applications. The contents of this book cover emerging research areas in fields of Computing, Information, Communication and Applications. This will prove useful to both researchers and practicing engineers.

  11. Refining the Enrolment Process in Emergency Medicine Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, Kate M; Channon, Keith M; Choudhury, Robin P; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Lee, Regent; Sheehan, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Research in the emergency setting involving patients with acute clinical conditions is needed if there are to be advances in diagnosis and treatment. But research in these areas poses ethical and practical challenges. One of these is the general inability to obtain informed consent due to the patient's lack of mental capacity and insufficient time to contact legal representatives. Regulatory frameworks which allow this research to proceed with a consent 'waiver', provided patients lack mental capacity, miss important ethical subtleties. One of these is the varying nature of mental capacity among emergency medicine patients. Not only is their capacity variable and often unclear, but some patients are also likely to be able to engage with the researcher and the context to varying degrees. In this paper we describe the key elements of a novel enrolment process for emergency medicine research that refines the consent waiver and fully engages with the ethical rationale for consent and, in this context, its waiver. The process is verbal but independently documented during the 'emergent' stages of the research. It provides appropriate engagement with the patient, is context-sensitive and better addresses ethical subtleties. In line with regulation, full written consent for on-going participation in the research is obtained once the emergency is passed.

  12. What is Financial Therapy? Discovering Mechanisms and Aspects of an Emerging Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy L. Archuleta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Very little research currently exists specifically on the topic of financial therapy. In this emerging field, it is important to lay the groundwork for future practice and study. The purpose of this study was to answer the question, “What are the mechanisms and aspects of financial therapy?” Using qualitative methods, eighteen members of the Financial Therapy Association were interviewed by members of the research team. The participants included six financial professionals, six mental health professions, and six researchers/educators all engaged in financial therapy. Six categories emerged from the analysis of data, including: (a integration, (b complexity, (c help seeker issues, (d helper issues, (e process, and (f research. The analysis resulted in a conceptual framework and ten theoretical assumptions of financial therapy.

  13. The emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.; Huerlimann, T.

    1977-01-01

    The organization and means of the emergency organization of the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR), the eldest and largest nuclear installation in Switzerland, are described. It consists of a central command group and the following emergency teams: fire brigade, radiation protection, first aid, control, operating teams (reactors, hot laboratory etc.). The radiation protection team is formed by the Health Physics Division and is discussed in detail. A description of the alarm system and the first actions to be taken in case of an emergency is given. The importance of frequent and well-planned exercises and of radio communication between the teams and the command group is stressed and the emergency training programme of the EIR School for Radiation Protection, operated by the Health Physics Division, is presented. A fortunate lack of incidents at EIR is partly compensated for by experience gained from emergency team assistance operations during incidents outside the Institute. (author)

  14. A Review of the Emerging Field of Underwater Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Chua

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mass spectrometers are versatile sensor systems, owing to their high sensitivity and ability to simultaneously measure multiple chemical species. Over the last two decades, traditional laboratory-based membrane inlet mass spectrometers have been adapted for underwater use. Underwater mass spectrometry has drastically improved our capability to monitor a broad suite of gaseous compounds (e.g., dissolved atmospheric gases, light hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds in the aquatic environment. Here we provide an overview of the progress made in the field of underwater mass spectrometry since its inception in the 1990s to the present. In particular, we discuss the approaches undertaken by various research groups in developing in situ mass spectrometers. We also provide examples to illustrate how underwater mass spectrometers have been used in the field. Finally, we present future trends in the field of in situ mass spectrometry. Most of these efforts are aimed at improving the quality and spatial and temporal scales of chemical measurements in the ocean. By providing up-to-date information on underwater mass spectrometry, this review offers guidance for researchers interested in adapting this technology as well as goals for future progress in the field.

  15. Higher Education as a Field of Study and Research in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehm, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the emergence of higher education as a field of research, scholarship and study. In the first part, the meaning of higher education as a field of research is defined contrasting Europe and the US. Then, the institutional basis of higher education research in Europe is analysed (learned societies, institutes and centres,…

  16. Revised radiation emergency procedures at Pakistan research reactor PINSTECH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orfi, S.D.; Javed, M.; Ahmad, S.; Akhtar, K.M.; Mubarak, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Necessary procedures have been laid down in this report to meet the radiation emergency at Pakistan Research Reactor PINSTECH. The Nuclear Safety Committee PINSTECH (NSCP) had also recommended a number of improvements in the existing procedures. Revision of the procedures was also considered necessary to incorporate into it new radiation units/limits and new emergency equipment available. Radiation emergency preparedness programme is of continuous nature. Latest developments else-where and local experience contribute to the improvement of the existing arrangements under this programme. (A.B.)

  17. Across the Arctic Teachers Experience Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Wiggins, H. V.; Marshall, S. A.; Darby, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    From studying snow geese on the North Slope of Alaska to sediment coring aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic Ocean, K-12 teachers embark on scientific expeditions as part of a program that strives to make science in the Arctic a "virtual" reality. In the past two years, seventeen K-12 teachers have participated in Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (TREC), a program that pairs teachers with researchers to improve science education through arctic field experiences. TREC builds on the scientific and cultural opportunities of the Arctic, linking research and education through topics that naturally engage students and the wider public. TREC includes expeditions as diverse as studying plants at Toolik Field Station, a research facility located 150 miles above the Arctic Circle; climate change studies in Norway's Svalbard archipelago; studying rivers in Siberia; or a trans-arctic expedition aboard the USCGC Healy collecting an integrated geophysical data set. Funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs, TREC offers educators experiences in scientific inquiry while encouraging the public and students to become active participants in the scientific inquiry by engaging them virtually in arctic research. TREC uses online outreach elements to convey the research experience to a broad audience. While in remote field locations, teachers and researchers interact with students and the public through online seminars and live calls from the field, online journals with accompanying photos, and online bulletin boards. Since the program's inception in 2004, numerous visitors have posted questions or interacted with teachers, researchers, and students through the TREC website (http://www.arcus.org/trec). TREC teachers are required to transfer their experience of research and current science into their classroom through the development of relevant activities and resources. Teachers and researchers are encouraged to participate

  18. Psychosomatic plasticity: An "emergent property" of personality research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawer, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Psychosomatic plasticity, defined as an extreme capacity to turn suggestions into bodily realities, is as phenomenon well worth investigating because it challenges mainstream conceptions about the relationship between mind and body in health as well as illness. The field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) offers a framework within which to understand this phenomenon because PNI makes a compelling case for the biological unity of self. Hartmann's Boundaries concept is particularly applicable because it suggests that the minds of "thin-boundary" persons are relatively fluid and able to make numerous connections. Wilson and Barber's identification of the fantasy prone person and Thalbourne's transliminality concept are similarly relevant. Taking these explorations a step further, this author proposes that the flow of feeling within individuals represents the key to psychosomatic plasticity. Blushing, psoriasis, and immune reactions are offered as examples, as are more anomalous reports such as those provided by heart transplantation recipients and cases said to be indicative of reincarnation. In each instance, persons who are highly sensitive (ie, have a speedier and more direct flow of feeling) are more likely to evidence physical reactions. Psychosomatic plasticity represents an emerging area of interest in personality research, one that clearly merits further investigation.

  19. Walnut tissue culture: research and field applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Vitrotech Biotecnologia Vegetal began researching propagating Juglans regia (English walnut) and various Juglans hybrids by tissue culture in 1993 and has operated on a commercial scale since 1996. Since this time, more than one and a half million walnuts of different species have been propagated and field planted. Tissue cultured...

  20. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  1. International Conference on Emerging Research in Electronics, Computer Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sheshadri, Holalu; Padma, M

    2014-01-01

    PES College of Engineering is organizing an International Conference on Emerging Research in Electronics, Computer Science and Technology (ICERECT-12) in Mandya and merging the event with Golden Jubilee of the Institute. The Proceedings of the Conference presents high quality, peer reviewed articles from the field of Electronics, Computer Science and Technology. The book is a compilation of research papers from the cutting-edge technologies and it is targeted towards the scientific community actively involved in research activities.

  2. Future Research on Cyber-Physical Emergency Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Jing Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-physical systems that include human beings and vehicles in a built environment, such as a building or a city, together with sensor networks and decision support systems have attracted much attention. In emergencies, which also include mobile searchers and rescuers, the interactions among civilians and the environment become much more diverse, and the complexity of the emergency response also becomes much greater. This paper surveys current research on sensor-assisted evacuation and rescue systems and discusses the related research issues concerning communication protocols for sensor networks, as well as several other important issues, such as the integrated asynchronous control of large-scale emergency response systems, knowledge discovery for rescue and prototyping platforms. Then, we suggest directions for further research.

  3. High-magnetic-field research collaborations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goettee, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop collaborations with the academic community to exploit scientific research potential of the pulsed magnetic fields that might be possible with electrically pulsed devices, as well as magneto-cumulative generators. The author started with a campaign of experiments using high-explosive-driven flux compression generators. The campaign's objective was to explore completely novel ideas in condensed-matter physics and chemistry. The initiative was very successful in pulling together top researchers from around the world

  4. Field Tests of a Tractor Rollover Detection and Emergency Notification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Koc, A B

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this research was to assess the feasibility of a rollover detection and emergency notification system for farm tractors using field tests. The emergency notification system was developed based on a tractor stability model and implemented on a mobile electronic device with the iOS operating system. A complementary filter was implemented to combine the data from the accelerometer and gyroscope sensors to improve their accuracies in calculating the roll and pitch angles and the roll and pitch rates. The system estimates a stability index value during tractor operation, displays feedback messages when the stability index is lower than a preset threshold value, and transmits emergency notification messages when an overturn happens. Ten tractor rollover tests were conducted on a field track. The developed system successfully monitored the stability of the tractor during all of the tests. The iOS application was able to detect rollover accidents and transmit emergency notifications in the form of a phone call and email when an accident was detected. The system can be a useful tool for training and education in safe tractor operation. The system also has potential for stability monitoring and emergency notification of other on-road and off-road motorized vehicles.

  5. Emergent Gauge Fields and Their Nonperturbative Effects in Correlated Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Seok; Tanaka, Akihiro

    The history of modern condensed matter physics may be regarded as the competition and reconciliation between Stoner's and Anderson's physical pictures, where the former is based on momentum-space descriptions focusing on long wave-length fluctuations while the latter is based on real-space physics emphasizing emergent localized excitations. In particular, these two view points compete with each other in various nonperturbative phenomena, which range from the problem of high Tc superconductivity, quantum spin liquids in organic materials and frustrated spin systems, heavy-fermion quantum criticality, metal-insulator transitions in correlated electron systems such as doped silicons and two-dimensional electron systems, the fractional quantum Hall effect, to the recently discussed Fe-based superconductors. An approach to reconcile these competing frameworks is to introduce topologically nontrivial excitations into the Stoner's description, which appear to be localized in either space or time and sometimes both, where scattering between itinerant electrons and topological excitations such as skyrmions, vortices, various forms of instantons, emergent magnetic monopoles, and etc. may catch nonperturbative local physics beyond the Stoner's paradigm. In this review article we discuss nonperturbative effects of topological excitations on dynamics of correlated electrons. First, we focus on the problem of scattering between itinerant fermions and topological excitations in antiferromagnetic doped Mott insulators, expected to be relevant for the pseudogap phase of high Tc cuprates. We propose that nonperturbative effects of topological excitations can be incorporated within the perturbative framework, where an enhanced global symmetry with a topological term plays an essential role. In the second part, we go on to discuss the subject of symmetry protected topological states in a largely similar light. While we do not introduce itinerant fermions here, the nonperturbative

  6. Research on evacuation planning as nuclear emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-10-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has introduced new concepts of precautionary action zone (PAZ) and urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) in 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency' (GS-R-2 (2002)), in order to reduce substantially the risk of severe deterministic health effects. Open literature based research was made to reveal problems on evacuation planning and the preparedness for nuclear emergency arising from introduction of PAZ into Japan that has applied the emergency planning zone (EPZ) concept currently. In regard to application of PAZ, it should be noted that the requirements for preparedness and response for a nuclear or radiological emergency are not only dimensional but also timely. The principal issue is implementation of evacuation of precautionary decided area within several hours. The logic of evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency and the methods of advance public education and information in the U.S. is effective for even prompt evacuation to the outside of the EPZ. As concerns evacuation planning for a nuclear emergency in Japan, several important issues to be considered were found, that is, selection of public reception centers which are outside area of the EPZ, an unique reception center assigned to each emergency response planning area, public education and information of practical details about the evacuation plan in advance, and necessity of the evacuation time estimates. To establish a practical evacuation planning guide for nuclear emergencies, further researches on application of traffic simulation technology to evacuation time estimates and on knowledge of actual evacuation experience in natural disasters and chemical plant accidents are required. (author)

  7. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Twyla L. Salm

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of qualitative interviews. The field advisors primary concern was the level of professional competency achieved by practicum students. Related to competency were themes concerned with the field advisor's role in being accountable and protecting the reputation of his/her profession as well as the reputation of the professional program affiliated with the practicum student's professional education. The final theme – teacher-student relationship –emerged from the data, both as a stand-alone and global or umbrella theme. As an umbrella theme, teacher-student relationship permeated each of the other themes as the participants interpreted their experiences of the process of assessment through the mentor relationships. A theoretical model was derived from these findings and the description of the model is presented. Cet article décrit une étude de cas qualitative qui explore comment vingt-trois conseillers de stages, représentant trois professions de services sociaux comprenant l’éducation, les soins infirmiers et le travail social, ont vécu l’expérience du processus d’évaluation avec des étudiants qui ont des difficultés à acquérir les compétences minimales durant les stages. Cinq thèmes ont été identifiés lors de l’analyse des entrevues qualitatives. La préoccupation principale des conseillers de stages était le niveau de compétence professionnelle acquis par les stagiaires. Les thèmes liés à la compétence étaient le rôle des conseillers de stages dans leur responsabilité pour protéger la réputation de leur profession ainsi que la réputation d’un programme professionnel

  8. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. 76 FR 10004 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  10. 76 FR 54734 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  11. 76 FR 30647 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  12. 75 FR 72792 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  13. 77 FR 70140 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related to deemed...

  14. 75 FR 41439 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities...

  15. 75 FR 5952 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  16. 76 FR 72902 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  17. 75 FR 62508 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  18. 78 FR 21346 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC... Office of the Assistant Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research...

  19. Usage patterns and attitudes towards emergency contraception: the International Emergency Contraception Research Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovics, Miklós; Virágh, Gabriella

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the survey was to gain understanding of women's usage patterns and attitudes towards emergency contraception (i.e., the 'morning after pill') and to gain insight into the role and attitudes of pharmacists as providers of emergency contraception. As part of the International Emergency Contraception Research Initiative, approximately 6500 women (15-49 years) and nearly 500 pharmacists from 14 countries in Western, Central and Eastern Europe, and Central Asia completed questionnaires via web-based interrogation or computer-assisted/paper-assisted personal interviews. Common to almost all countries and cultures was that, while awareness of emergency contraception was high (≥84% of respondents, except in Kazakhstan), usage was generally low (4-18%). In Austria, the Czech Republic, Spain, and the UK, better underlying protection with hormonal contraceptives or male condoms would have meant less need for emergency contraception. In Bulgaria, Lithuania, Romania, and Russia, greater dependence on less reliable contraceptive methods such as calendar + withdrawal was associated with higher use of the emergency contraceptive pill (11-18%) but also with higher abortion rates (19-21%). Overt rejection of emergency contraception in the event of an accident was low, except in countries (e.g., Austria, Poland) where the misperception that it acts as an abortifacient was common. Except for Bulgaria, pharmacists elsewhere tended to have limited knowledge and moralistic attitudes towards emergency contraception. Improved educational efforts, probably country-specific, are required to increase the use of highly effective methods of regular contraception and overcome barriers to acceptance of emergency contraception as a suitable postcoital solution to avoid unwanted pregnancy or abortion.

  20. Stem cell research ethics: consensus statement on emerging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Timothy; Ogbogu, Ubaka; Nelson, Erin; Einsiedel, Edna; Knoppers, Bartha; McDonald, Michael; Brunger, Fern; Downey, Robin; Fernando, Kanchana; Galipeau, Jacques; Geransar, Rose; Griener, Glenn; Grenier, Glenn; Hyun, Insoo; Isasi, Rosario; Kardel, Melanie; Knowles, Lori; Kucic, Terrence; Lotjonen, Salla; Lyall, Drew; Magnus, David; Mathews, Debra J H; Nisbet, Matthew; Nisker, Jeffrey; Pare, Guillaume; Pattinson, Shaun; Pullman, Daryl; Rudnicki, Michael; Williams-Jones, Bryn; Zimmerman, Susan

    2007-10-01

    This article is a consensus statement by an international interdisciplinary group of academic experts and Canadian policy-makers on emerging ethical, legal and social issues in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) research in Canada. The process of researching consensus included consultations with key stakeholders in hESC research (regulations, stem cell researchers, and research ethics experts), preparation and distribution of background papers, and an international workshop held in Montreal in February 2007 to discuss the papers and debate recommendations. The recommendations provided in the consensus statement focus on issues of immediate relevance to Canadian policy-makers, including informed consent to hESC research, the use of fresh embryos in research, management of conflicts of interest, and the relevance of public opinion research to policy-making.

  1. An Emergency Medicine Research Priority Setting Partnership to establish the top 10 research priorities in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason; Keating, Liza; Flowerdew, Lynsey; O'Brien, Rachel; McIntyre, Sam; Morley, Richard; Carley, Simon

    2017-07-01

    Defining research priorities in a specialty as broad as emergency medicine is a significant challenge. In order to fund and complete the most important research projects, it is imperative that we identify topics that are important to all clinicians, society and to our patients. We have undertaken a priority setting partnership to establish the most important questions facing emergency medicine. The top 10 questions reached through a consensus process are discussed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. TPACK: An Emerging Research and Development Tool for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Evrim; Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Thompson, Ann

    2011-01-01

    TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge) has emerged as a clear and useful construct for researchers working to understand technology integration in learning and teaching. Whereas first generation TPACK work focused upon explaining and interpreting the construct, TPACK has now entered a second generation where the focus is upon using…

  3. Fostering Sustained Learning among Undergraduate Students: Emerging Research and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemosit, Caroline; Rugutt, John; Rugutt, Joseph K.

    2017-01-01

    Keeping students engaged and receptive to learning can, at times, be a challenge. However, by the implementation of new methods and pedagogies, instructors can strengthen the drive to learn among their students. "Fostering Sustained Learning Among Undergraduate Students: Emerging Research and Opportunities" is an essential publication…

  4. Highlights in emergency medicine medical education research: 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Susan E; Coates, Wendy C; Khun, Gloria J; Fisher, Jonathan; Shayne, Philip; Lin, Michelle

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to highlight medical education research studies published in 2008 that were methodologically superior and whose outcomes were pertinent to teaching and education in emergency medicine. Through a PubMed search of the English language literature in 2008, 30 medical education research studies were independently identified as hypothesis-testing investigations and measurements of educational interventions. Six reviewers independently rated and scored all articles based on eight anchors, four of which related to methodologic criteria. Articles were ranked according to their total rating score. A ranking agreement among the reviewers of 83% was established a priori as a minimum for highlighting articles in this review. Five medical education research studies met the a priori criteria for inclusion and are reviewed and summarized here. Four of these employed experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Although technology was not a component of the structured literature search employed to identify the candidate articles for this review, 14 of the articles identified, including four of the five highlighted articles, employed or studied technology as a focus of the educational research. Overall, 36% of the reviewed studies were supported by funding; three of the highlighted articles were funded studies. This review highlights quality medical education research studies published in 2008, with outcomes of relevance to teaching and education in emergency medicine. It focuses on research methodology, notes current trends in the use of technology for learning in emergency medicine, and suggests future avenues for continued rigorous study in education.

  5. Research field of fire technology in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loikkanen, P.; Holm, C.

    1987-02-01

    The goal of the study is to give an overview of the whole diversified research field of fire technology and its problems. For this reason the research subjects have been grouped so that the responsibilities of different authorities, the legislation and specifications, various fields of technology, areas of industry, and groups of products could all be found as clearly as possible. The field has been divided into nine sub-areas. They are: general grounds, fire physics and chemistry, structural fire prevention, textiles and furnishings, devices for heating and other use, detection, fire fighting and rescue, quality control, and special problems. The sub-areas have been divided into 34 main subjects and these, excluding those of special problems, further into as many as 117 subject groups. Characteristics and problems of the sub-areas and the main subjects have been described. The subject groups have been characterized by key words and concepts which outline the projects. No concrete research projects and programs have, however, been directly suggested because their extent and contents depend essentially on financing and other available resources.

  6. The emerging educator as leader and action researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Ryan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The 320 pre-service educators in this inquiry were viewed as emerging classroom teachers who were leading while grappling with new personal experiences which informed and guided each during the pre-service year. The written account evidence supported our resulting inferences, discussion and conclusions and demonstrated the leadership required within pre-service. It was the analysis and synthesis of practicum reflections that illuminated core beliefs, attitudes and needs of emerging action researchers as they developed a professional and personal understanding of leadership, teaching and self

  7. The emerging educator as leader and action researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. RYAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The 320 pre-service educators in this inquiry were viewed as emerging classroom teacherswho were leading while grappling with new personal experiences which informed andguided each during the pre-service year. The written account evidence supported ourresulting inferences, discussion and conclusions and demonstrated the leadership requiredwithin pre-service. It was the analysis and synthesis of practicum reflections thatilluminated core beliefs, attitudes and needs of emerging action researchers as theydeveloped a professional and personal understanding of leadership, teaching and self.

  8. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A. J.; Walsh, S. T.

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate

  9. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Arend J.; Walsh, Steven Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate

  10. Can emergency medicine research benefit from adaptive design clinical trials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, Laura; Julious, Steven A; Goodacre, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Adaptive design clinical trials use preplanned interim analyses to determine whether studies should be stopped or modified before recruitment is complete. Emergency medicine trials are well suited to these designs as many have a short time to primary outcome relative to the length of recruitment. We hypothesised that the majority of published emergency medicine trials have the potential to use a simple adaptive trial design. We reviewed clinical trials published in three emergency medicine journals between January 2003 and December 2013. We determined the proportion that used an adaptive design as well as the proportion that could have used a simple adaptive design based on the time to primary outcome and length of recruitment. Only 19 of 188 trials included in the review were considered to have used an adaptive trial design. A total of 154/165 trials that were fixed in design had the potential to use an adaptive design. Currently, there seems to be limited uptake in the use of adaptive trial designs in emergency medicine despite their potential benefits to save time and resources. Failing to take advantage of adaptive designs could be costly to patients and research. It is recommended that where practical and logistical considerations allow, adaptive designs should be used for all emergency medicine clinical trials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Interview-Based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L.; Meisel, Zachary; Choo, Esther K.; Garro, Aris; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. PMID:26284572

  12. The relation between open-field and emergence tests in a hyperactive mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2009-12-01

    The relation between open-field and emergence tests was examined in mice with idiopathic hypertension. Spontaneous hypertensive mice (SHM) crossed more segments and reared more often in the open-field than normotensive controls at both age levels. In contrast, grooming episodes decreased only in the older SHM cohort. While young SHM emerged more quickly from a toy object only partially, complete emergence was faster only in the older SHM cohort. In the entire series, open-field segments were inversely correlated with 2- and 4-paw emergence latencies. There was also an inverse correlation between rears and 2-paw emergence but a positive correlation between grooming episodes and both types of emergence. In view of its association with open-field activity, the emergence test may have value in screening potential ADHD therapies.

  13. Strategic research field no.4, industrial innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Chisachi

    2011-01-01

    'Kei'-supercomputer is planned to start its full-scale operation in about one year and a half. With this, High Performance Computing (HPC) is most likely to contribute not only to further progress in basic and applied sciences, but also to bringing about innovations in various fields of industries. It is expected to substantially shorten design time, drastically improve performance and/or liability of various industrial products, and greatly enhance safety of large-scale power plants. In this particle, six research themes, which are currently being prepared in this strategic research field, 'industrial innovations' so as to use 'Kei'-supercomputer as soon as it starts operations, will be briefly described regarding their specific goals and break-through that they are expected to bring about in industries. It is also explained how we have determined these themes. We are also planning several measures in order to promote widespread use of HPC including 'Kei'-supercomputer in industries, which will also be elaborated in this article. (author)

  14. A quantum field theory of simplicial geometry and the emergence of spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriti, Daniele [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Minnaert Building, Leuvenlaan 4, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2007-05-15

    We present the case for a fundamentally discrete quantum spacetime and for Group Field Theories as a candidate consistent description of it, briefly reviewing the key properties of the GFT formalism. We then argue that the outstanding problem of the emergence of a continuum spacetime and of General Relativity from fundamentally discrete quantum structures should be tackled from a condensed matter perspective and using purely QFT methods, adapted to the GFT context. We outline the picture of continuum spacetime as a condensed phase of a GFT and a research programme aimed at realizing this picture in concrete terms.

  15. Emergency planning and management in health care: priority research topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Alan; Chambers, Naomi; French, Simon; Shaw, Duncan; King, Russell; Whitehead, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Many major incidents have significant impacts on people's health, placing additional demands on health-care organisations. The main aim of this paper is to suggest a prioritised agenda for organisational and management research on emergency planning and management relevant to U.K. health care, based on a scoping study. A secondary aim is to enhance knowledge and understanding of health-care emergency planning among the wider research community, by highlighting key issues and perspectives on the subject and presenting a conceptual model. The study findings have much in common with those of previous U.S.-focused scoping reviews, and with a recent U.K.-based review, confirming the relative paucity of U.K.-based research. No individual research topic scored highly on all of the key measures identified, with communities and organisations appearing to differ about which topics are the most important. Four broad research priorities are suggested: the affected public; inter- and intra-organisational collaboration; preparing responders and their organisations; and prioritisation and decision making.

  16. Emerging Science and Research Opportunities for Metals and Metallic Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handwerker, Carol A.; Pollock, Tresa M.

    2014-07-01

    During the next decade, fundamental research on metals and metallic nanostructures (MMNs) has the potential to continue transforming metals science into innovative materials, devices, and systems. A workshop to identify emerging and potentially transformative research areas in MMNs was held June 13 and 14, 2012, at the University of California Santa Barbara. There were 47 attendees at the workshop (listed in the Acknowledgements section), representing a broad range of academic institutions, industry, and government laboratories. The metals and metallic nanostructures (MMNs) workshop aimed to identify significant research trends, scientific fundamentals, and recent breakthroughs that can enable new or enhanced MMN performance, either alone or in a more complex materials system, for a wide range of applications. Additionally, the role that MMN research can play in high-priority research and development (R&D) areas such as the U.S. Materials Genome Initiative, the National Nanotechnology Initiative, the Advanced Manufacturing Initiative, and other similar initiatives that exist internationally was assessed. The workshop also addressed critical issues related to materials research instrumentation and the cyberinfrastructure for materials science research and education, as well as science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce development, with emphasis on the United States but with an appreciation that similar challenges and opportunities for the materials community exist internationally. A central theme of the workshop was that research in MMNs has provided and will continue to provide societal benefits through the integration of experiment, theory, and simulation to link atomistic, nanoscale, microscale, and mesoscale phenomena across time scales for an ever-widening range of applications. Within this overarching theme, the workshop participants identified emerging research opportunities that are categorized and described in more detail in the

  17. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research Project BOK-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.

    2002-01-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, “Nuclear Emergency Preparedness”, was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects:Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.......1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurements and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in theNordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project...

  18. Establishing research priorities for patient safety in emergency medicine: a multidisciplinary consensus panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plint, Amy C; Stang, Antonia S; Calder, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety in the context of emergency medicine is a relatively new field of study. To date, no broad research agenda for patient safety in emergency medicine has been established. The objective of this study was to establish patient safety-related research priorities for emergency medicine. These priorities would provide a foundation for high-quality research, important direction to both researchers and health-care funders, and an essential step in improving health-care safety and patient outcomes in the high-risk emergency department (ED) setting. A four-phase consensus procedure with a multidisciplinary expert panel was organized to identify, assess, and agree on research priorities for patient safety in emergency medicine. The 19-member panel consisted of clinicians, administrators, and researchers from adult and pediatric emergency medicine, patient safety, pharmacy, and mental health; as well as representatives from patient safety organizations. In phase 1, we developed an initial list of potential research priorities by electronically surveying a purposeful and convenience sample of patient safety experts, ED clinicians, administrators, and researchers from across North America using contact lists from multiple organizations. We used simple content analysis to remove duplication and categorize the research priorities identified by survey respondents. Our expert panel reached consensus on a final list of research priorities through an in-person meeting (phase 3) and two rounds of a modified Delphi process (phases 2 and 4). After phases 1 and 2, 66 unique research priorities were identified for expert panel review. At the end of phase 4, consensus was reached for 15 research priorities. These priorities represent four themes: (1) methods to identify patient safety issues (five priorities), (2) understanding human and environmental factors related to patient safety (four priorities), (3) the patient perspective (one priority), and (4) interventions for

  19. Emergent Paradigm: Critical Realism and Transformative Research in Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbo, Benedicta

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the prospects of using critical realism as a guiding philosophy for critical inquiry in the field of educational administration. A relatively recent philosophy in the social sciences, critical realism offers an alternative framework for researchers engaged in empirical work that is aimed at transforming undesirable social…

  20. Seed vigour tests for predicting field emergence of maize under severe conditions

    OpenAIRE

    García de Yzaguirre, Álvaro; Lasa Dolhagaray, José Manuel

    1989-01-01

    [EN] With 40 to 50 different seed vigour tests available, appropiate procedures for choosing the best single test or combination the best predictors of seedling emergence of maize (Zea Mays L.) under severe conditions. Thirteen vigour tests and various field emergence trials were performed on six inbred lines and two commercial hybrids. The best single predictors of field emergence were identified by calculating simple correlation coefficients. The calculation of the geometric mean of the res...

  1. Emerging Trends on the Topic of Information Technology in the Field of Educational Sciences: A Bibliometric Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Valiente, Carlos Luis

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a bibliometric analysis on the topic of Information Technology (IT) in the field of Educational Sciences, aimed at envisioning the research emerging trends. The ERIC database is used as a consultation source; the results were subjected to productivity by authors, journals, and term co-occurrence analysis indicators for the…

  2. Team knowledge research: emerging trends and critical needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildman, Jessica L; Thayer, Amanda L; Pavlas, Davin; Salas, Eduardo; Stewart, John E; Howse, William R

    2012-02-01

    This article provides a systematic review of the team knowledge literature and guidance for further research. Recent research has called attention to the need for the improved study and understanding of team knowledge. Team knowledge refers to the higher level knowledge structures that emerge from the interactions of individual team members. We conducted a systematic review of the team knowledge literature, focusing on empirical work that involves the measurement of team knowledge constructs. For each study, we extracted author degree area, study design type, study setting, participant type, task type, construct type, elicitation method, aggregation method, measurement timeline, and criterion domain. Our analyses demonstrate that many of the methodological characteristics of team knowledge research can be linked back to the academic training of the primary author and that there are considerable gaps in our knowledge with regard to the relationships between team knowledge constructs, the mediating mechanisms between team knowledge and performance, and relationships with criteria outside of team performance, among others. We also identify categories of team knowledge not yet examined based on an organizing framework derived from a synthesis of the literature. There are clear opportunities for expansion in the study of team knowledge; the science of team knowledge would benefit from a more holistic theoretical approach. Human factors researchers are increasingly involved in the study of teams. This review and the resulting organizing framework provide researchers with a summary of team knowledge research over the past 10 years and directions for improving further research.

  3. Environmental Justice Research: Contemporary Issues and Emerging Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayajit Chakraborty

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental justice (EJ research seeks to document and redress the disproportionate environmental burdens and benefits associated with social inequalities. Although its initial focus was on disparities in exposure to anthropogenic pollution, the scope of EJ research has expanded. In the context of intensifying social inequalities and environmental problems, there is a need to further strengthen the EJ research framework and diversify its application. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH incorporates 19 articles that broaden EJ research by considering emerging topics such as energy, food, drinking water, flooding, sustainability, and gender dynamics, including issues in Canada, the UK, and Eastern Europe. Additionally, the articles contribute to three research themes: (1 documenting connections between unjust environmental exposures and health impacts by examining unsafe infrastructure, substance use, and children’s obesity and academic performance; (2 promoting and achieving EJ by implementing interventions to improve environmental knowledge and health, identifying avenues for sustainable community change, and incorporating EJ metrics in government programs; and (3 clarifying stakeholder perceptions of EJ issues to extend research beyond the documentation of unjust conditions and processes. Collectively, the articles highlight potentially compounding injustices and an array of approaches being employed to achieve EJ.

  4. Environmental Justice Research: Contemporary Issues and Emerging Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Jayajit; Collins, Timothy W; Grineski, Sara E

    2016-11-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research seeks to document and redress the disproportionate environmental burdens and benefits associated with social inequalities. Although its initial focus was on disparities in exposure to anthropogenic pollution, the scope of EJ research has expanded. In the context of intensifying social inequalities and environmental problems, there is a need to further strengthen the EJ research framework and diversify its application. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) incorporates 19 articles that broaden EJ research by considering emerging topics such as energy, food, drinking water, flooding, sustainability, and gender dynamics, including issues in Canada, the UK, and Eastern Europe. Additionally, the articles contribute to three research themes: (1) documenting connections between unjust environmental exposures and health impacts by examining unsafe infrastructure, substance use, and children's obesity and academic performance; (2) promoting and achieving EJ by implementing interventions to improve environmental knowledge and health, identifying avenues for sustainable community change, and incorporating EJ metrics in government programs; and (3) clarifying stakeholder perceptions of EJ issues to extend research beyond the documentation of unjust conditions and processes. Collectively, the articles highlight potentially compounding injustices and an array of approaches being employed to achieve EJ.

  5. Cultural adaptation in translational research: field experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dévieux, Jessy G; Malow, Robert M; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Jean-Gilles, Michèle; Samuels, Deanne; Ergon-Pérez, Emma; Jacobs, Robin

    2005-06-01

    The increase in the incidence of HIV/AIDS among minorities in the United States and in certain developing nations has prompted new intervention priorities, stressing the adaptation of efficacious interventions for diverse and marginalized groups. The experiences of Florida International University's AIDS Prevention Program in translating HIV primary and secondary prevention interventions among these multicultural populations provide insight into the process of cultural adaptations and address the new scientific emphasis on ecological validity. An iterative process involving forward and backward translation, a cultural linguistic committee, focus group discussions, documentation of project procedures, and consultations with other researchers in the field was used to modify interventions. This article presents strategies used to ensure fidelity in implementing the efficacious core components of evidence-based interventions for reducing HIV transmission and drug use behaviors and the challenges posed by making cultural adaptation for participants with low literacy. This experience demonstrates the importance of integrating culturally relevant material in the translation process with intense focus on language and nuance. The process must ensure that the level of intervention is appropriate for the educational level of participants. Furthermore, the rights of participants must be protected during consenting procedures by instituting policies that recognize the socioeconomic, educational, and systemic pressures to participate in research.

  6. Anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as an emerging threat to wildlife orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2015-06-15

    The rate of scientific activity regarding the effects of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency (RF) range on animals and plants has been small despite the fact that this topic is relevant to the fields of experimental biology, ecology and conservation due to its remarkable expansion over the past 20 years. Current evidence indicates that exposure at levels that are found in the environment (in urban areas and near base stations) may particularly alter the receptor organs to orient in the magnetic field of the earth. These results could have important implications for migratory birds and insects, especially in urban areas, but could also apply to birds and insects in natural and protected areas where there are powerful base station emitters of radiofrequencies. Therefore, more research on the effects of electromagnetic radiation in nature is needed to investigate this emerging threat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Valuing Professional Development Components for Emerging Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, I.

    2015-12-01

    In 2004 the Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) at Oregon State University (OSU) established a Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program to engage undergraduate students in hands-on research training in the marine sciences. The program offers students the opportunity to conduct research focused on biological and ecological topics, chemical and physical oceanography, marine geology, and atmospheric science. In partnership with state and federal government agencies, this ten-week summer program has grown to include 20+ students annually. Participants obtain a background in the academic discipline, professional development training, and research experience to make informed decisions about careers and advanced degrees in marine and earth system sciences. Professional development components of the program are designed to support students in their research experience, explore career goals and develop skills necessary to becoming a successful young marine scientist. These components generally include seminars, discussions, workshops, lab tours, and standards of conduct. These componentscontribute to achieving the following professional development objectives for the overall success of new emerging undergraduate researchers: Forming a fellowship of undergraduate students pursuing marine research Stimulating student interest and understanding of marine research science Learning about research opportunities at Oregon State University "Cross-Training" - broadening the hands-on research experience Exploring and learning about marine science careers and pathways Developing science communication and presentation skills Cultivating a sense of belonging in the sciences Exposure to federal and state agencies in marine and estuarine science Academic and career planning Retention of talented students in the marine science Standards of conduct in science Details of this program's components, objectives and best practices will be discussed.

  8. Simulation study of solar plasma eruptions caused by interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Takafumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the triggering mechanisms of plasma eruptions in the solar atmosphere due to interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields by using two-dimensional MHD simulations. We perform parameter surveys with respect to arcade field height, magnetic field strength, and emerging flux location. Our results show that two possible mechanisms exist, and which mechanism is dominant depends mostly on emerging flux location. One mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is close to the polarity inversion line (PIL) of an arcade field. This mechanism requires reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field, as pointed out by previous studies. The other mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is around the edge of an arcade field. This mechanism does not require reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field but does demand reconnection in the arcade field above the PIL. Furthermore, we found that the eruptive condition for this mechanism can be represented by a simple formula.

  9. Effect of hybrid, storage conditions and seed protection on sunflower field emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrđa Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed emergence under field conditions decisively and directly determines the number of plants per hectare, which is one of three basic components of yield in the plant world. Influence of chemical treatment on field emergence of three commercial sunflower hybrids stored in different conditions was tested in 2007 and 2008 on experimental field of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. On average, hybrid H1 had the highest value of field emergence (88.79% and for chemical treatment fl udioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid (87.71%. Seed kept in common storage had the highest emergence value in fi eld (87.92%. Seed treated with fl udioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid and stored for one year in common storage had the highest field emergence (90.18%. Considering interaction between storage conditions and genotype, hybrid H1 seed sown after chemical treatment had the highest field emergence (91.82% and seed kept in common storage (90.48%. Hybrid H1 seed compared with other two had the highest field emergence treated with fludioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid (91.84%.

  10. Research in an emerging 'big science' discipline. The case of neutron scattering in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borja Gonzalez-Albo; Maria Bordons; Pedro Gorria

    2010-01-01

    Neutron scattering (NS) is a 'big science' discipline whose research spans over a wide spectrum of fields, from fundamental or basic science to technological applications. The objective of this paper is to track the evolution of Spanish research in NS from a bibliometric perspective and to place it in the international context. Scientific publications of Spanish authors included in the Web of Science (WoS 1970-2006) are analysed with respect to five relevant dimensions: volume of research output, impact, disciplinary diversity, structural field features and internationalisation. NS emerges as a highly internationalised fast-growing field whose research is firmly rooted in Physics, Chemistry and Engineering, but with applications in a wide range of fields. International collaboration links -present in around 70% of the documents- and national links have largely contributed to mould the existing structure of research in the area, which evolves around major neutron scattering facilities abroad. The construction of a new European neutron source (ESS) would contribute to the consolidation of the field within the EU, since it will strengthen research and improve current activity. (author)

  11. Health professional-patient communication practices in East Asia: An integrative review of an emerging field of research and practice in Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and Mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Jack K H; Chan, E Angela; Wang, Sophie; Slade, Diana

    2018-01-31

    To provide an integrative review of literature on health communication in East Asia and detail culturally-specific influences. Using PRISMA model, search of PubMed, PsychInfo, Web of Knowledge, ERIC and CINAHL databases were conducted for studies between January 2000 and March 2017, using the terms 'clinician/health professional-patient', 'nurse/doctor-patient, 'communication' and 'Asia'. 38 studies were included: Mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. The existing body of research on clinician patient communication in East Asia can be classified: 1) understanding the roles and expectations of the nurse, clinician, patient, and family in clinician-patient consultations: a) nurse-patient communication; b) doctor-patient communication; c) the role of family member; and 2) factors affecting quality of care: d) cultural attitudes towards death and terminal illnesses; e) communication preferences affecting trust, decision-making and patient satisfaction; f) the extent to which patient centred care is being implemented in practice; and g) communication practices in multilingual/multi-disciplinary environments. The review detailed the complexity and heterogeneity of clinician-patient communication across East Asia. The studies reviewed indicate that research in East Asia is starting to move beyond a preference for Western-based communication practices. There is a need to consider local culture in understanding and interpreting medical encounters in East Asia. The paper highlights the need for a specific culturally-appropriate model of health communication in East Asia which may significantly improve relationships between clinicians and patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Emergency Status Management in Energetic Field . Risk Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gherasim Solovestru DOMIDE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of emergency in the energy sector generates technical problems such as: disruption in the operation of machinery and equipment, replacement of equipment or others needs. Besides the technical problems which appear, also intervene economic and financial issues that generate costs for the replacement of machines, equipment and installations and expenses of compensation to third parties who have suffered losses by disconnecting the power supply or lack of electricity over a longer or shorter period. Modern methods of risk management include also economic solutions. Some of these solutions will be treated in this paper.

  13. Corporate Foresight: An Emerging Field with a Rich Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Battistella, Cinzia; Huizingh, Eelko

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this introductory article to the Special Issue on Corporate Foresight is to provide an overview of the state of the art, major challenges and to identify development trajectories. We define corporate foresight as an ability that permits an organization to lay the foundation for a future...... of them on corporate foresight. Based on these articles and those in this Special Issue, we identify four main themes. Two more mature themes, namely ‘organizing corporate foresight’, and ‘individual and collective cognition’, and two emerging themes ‘corporate foresight in networked organizations...

  14. Medical research in emergency research in the European Union member states: tensions between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanje, Erwin J O; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2014-04-01

    In almost all of the European Union member states, prior consent by a legal representative is used as a substitute for informed patient consent for non-urgent medical research. Deferred (patient and/or proxy) consent is accepted as a substitute in acute emergency research in approximately half of the member states. In 12 European Union member states emergency research is not mentioned in national law. Medical research in the European Union is covered by the Clinical Trial Directive 2001/20/EC. A proposal for a regulation by the European Commission is currently being examined by the European Parliament and the Council and will replace Directive 2001/20/EC. Deferred patient and/or proxy consent is allowed in the proposed regulation, but does not fit completely in the practice of emergency research. For example, deferred consent is only possible when legal representatives are not available. This criterion will delay inclusion of patients in acute life-threatening conditions in short time frames. As the regulation shall be binding in its entirety in all member states, emergency research in acute situations is still not possible as it should be.

  15. Advancing cancer control research in an emerging news media environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Katherine C; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Blake, Kelly D; Cappella, Joseph N

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is both highly feared and highly newsworthy, and there is a robust body of research documenting the content and effects of cancer news coverage on health behaviors and policy. Recent years have witnessed ongoing, transformative shifts in American journalism alongside rapid advances in communication technology and the public information environment. These changes create a pressing need to consider a new set of research questions, sampling strategies, measurement techniques, and theories of media effects to ensure continued relevance and adaptation of communication research to address critical cancer control concerns. This paper begins by briefly reviewing what we know about the role of cancer news in shaping cancer-related beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, and policies. We then outline challenges and opportunities, both theoretical and methodological, posed by the rapidly changing news media environment and the nature of audience engagement. We organize our discussion around three major shifts associated with the emerging news media environment as it relates to health communication: 1) speed and dynamism of news diffusion, 2) increased narrowcasting of media content for specialized audiences, and 3) broadened participation in shaping media content. In so doing, we articulate a set of questions for future theory and research, in an effort to catalyze innovative communication scholarship to improve cancer prevention and control.

  16. 75 FR 18484 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... Emerging Technologies Analysis. 2. ETRAC Panel on Emerging Technologies. 3. History of the Laser. 4... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) [[Page...

  17. Summary of NIH Medical-Surgical Emergency Research Roundtable held on April 30 to May 1, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Amy H; Lewis, Roger J; Beavers-May, Tony; Berg, Robert; Bulger, Eileen; Cairns, Charles; Callaway, Clifton; Camargo, Carlos A; Carcillo, Joseph; DeBiasi, Roberta; Diaz, Tania; Ducharme, Francine; Glickman, Seth; Heilpern, Katherine; Hickey, Robert; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Hollander, Judd; Janson, Susan; Jurkovich, Gregory; Kellermann, Arthur; Kingsmore, Stephen; Kline, Jeffrey; Kuppermann, Nathan; Lowe, Robert; McLario, David; Nathanson, Larry; Nichol, Graham; Peitzman, Andrew; Richardson, Lynne; Sanders, Arthur; Shah, Manish; Shapiro, Nathan; Silverman, Robert; Than, Martin; Wilber, Scott; Yealy, Donald M

    2010-11-01

    In 2003, the Institute of Medicine Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System convened and identified a crisis in emergency care in the United States, including a need to enhance the research base for emergency care. As a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) formed an NIH Task Force on Research in Emergency Medicine to enhance NIH support for emergency care research. Members of the NIH Task Force and academic leaders in emergency care participated in 3 roundtable discussions to prioritize current opportunities for enhancing and conducting emergency care research. The objectives of these discussions were to identify key research questions essential to advancing the scientific underpinnings of emergency care and to discuss the barriers and best means to advance research by exploring the role of research networks and collaboration between the NIH and the emergency care community. The Medical-Surgical Research Roundtable was convened on April 30 to May 1, 2009. Before the roundtable, the emergency care domains to be discussed were selected and experts in each of the fields were invited to participate in the roundtable. Domain experts were asked to identify research priorities and challenges and separate them into mechanistic, translational, and clinical categories. After the conference, the lists were circulated among the participants and revised to reach a consensus. Emergency care research is characterized by focus on the timing, sequence, and time sensitivity of disease processes and treatment effects. Rapidly identifying the phenotype and genotype of patients manifesting a specific disease process and the mechanistic reasons for heterogeneity in outcome are important challenges in emergency care research. Other research priorities include the need to elucidate the timing, sequence, and duration of causal molecular and cellular events involved in time-critical illnesses and injuries, and the development of treatments

  18. Seedling Emergence and Phenotypic Response of Common Bean Germplasm to Different Temperatures under Controlled Conditions and in Open Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. DE RON

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and uniform seed germination and seedling emergence under diverse environmental conditions is a desirable characteristic for crops. Common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L. differ in their low temperature tolerance regarding growth and yield. Cultivars tolerant to low temperature during the germination and emergence stages and carriers of the grain quality standards demanded by consumers are needed for the success of the bean crop. The objectives of this study were i to screen the seedling emergence and the phenotypic response of bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled chamber and field conditions to display stress-tolerant genotypes with good agronomic performances and yield potential, and ii to compare the emergence of bean seedlings under controlled environment and in open field conditions to assess the efficiency of genebanks standard germination tests for predicting the performance of the seeds in the field. Three trials were conducted with 28 dry bean genotypes in open field and in growth chamber under low, moderate and warm temperature. Morpho-agronomic data were used to evaluate the phenotypic performance of the different genotypes. Cool temperatures resulted in a reduction of the rate of emergence in the bean genotypes, however, emergence and early growth of bean could be under different genetic control and these processes need further research to be suitably modeled. Nine groups arose from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA representing variation in emergence time and proportion of emergence in the controlled chamber and in the open field indicating a trend to lower emergence in large and extra-large seeded genotypes. Screening of seedling emergence and phenotypic response of the bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled growth chambers and under field conditions showed several genotypes, as landraces 272, 501, 593 and the cultivar Borlotto, with stress-tolerance at emergence and high

  19. Seedling Emergence and Phenotypic Response of Common Bean Germplasm to Different Temperatures under Controlled Conditions and in Open Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ron, Antonio M; Rodiño, Ana P; Santalla, Marta; González, Ana M; Lema, María J; Martín, Isaura; Kigel, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and uniform seed germination and seedling emergence under diverse environmental conditions is a desirable characteristic for crops. Common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) differ in their low temperature tolerance regarding growth and yield. Cultivars tolerant to low temperature during the germination and emergence stages and carriers of the grain quality standards demanded by consumers are needed for the success of the bean crop. The objectives of this study were (i) to screen the seedling emergence and the phenotypic response of bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled chamber and field conditions to display stress-tolerant genotypes with good agronomic performances and yield potential, and (ii) to compare the emergence of bean seedlings under controlled environment and in open field conditions to assess the efficiency of genebanks standard germination tests for predicting the performance of the seeds in the field. Three trials were conducted with 28 dry bean genotypes in open field and in growth chamber under low, moderate, and warm temperature. Morpho-agronomic data were used to evaluate the phenotypic performance of the different genotypes. Cool temperatures resulted in a reduction of the rate of emergence in the bean genotypes, however, emergence and early growth of bean could be under different genetic control and these processes need further research to be suitably modeled. Nine groups arose from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) representing variation in emergence time and proportion of emergence in the controlled chamber and in the open field indicating a trend to lower emergence in large and extra-large seeded genotypes. Screening of seedling emergence and phenotypic response of the bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled growth chambers and under field conditions showed several genotypes, as landraces 272, 501, 593, and the cultivar Borlotto, with stress-tolerance at emergence, and high yield

  20. Anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as an emerging threat to wildlife orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmori, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The rate of scientific activity regarding the effects of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency (RF) range on animals and plants has been small despite the fact that this topic is relevant to the fields of experimental biology, ecology and conservation due to its remarkable expansion over the past 20 years. Current evidence indicates that exposure at levels that are found in the environment (in urban areas and near base stations) may particularly alter the receptor organs to orient in the magnetic field of the earth. These results could have important implications for migratory birds and insects, especially in urban areas, but could also apply to birds and insects in natural and protected areas where there are powerful base station emitters of radiofrequencies. Therefore, more research on the effects of electromagnetic radiation in nature is needed to investigate this emerging threat. - Highlights: • The growth of wireless telecommunication technologies causes increased electrosmog. • Radio frequency fields in the MHz range disrupt insect and bird orientation. • Radio frequency noise interferes with the primary process of magnetoreception. • Existing guidelines do not adequately protect wildlife. • Further research in this area is urgent

  1. Anthropogenic radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as an emerging threat to wildlife orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmori, Alfonso, E-mail: balmaral@jcyl.es

    2015-06-15

    The rate of scientific activity regarding the effects of anthropogenic electromagnetic radiation in the radiofrequency (RF) range on animals and plants has been small despite the fact that this topic is relevant to the fields of experimental biology, ecology and conservation due to its remarkable expansion over the past 20 years. Current evidence indicates that exposure at levels that are found in the environment (in urban areas and near base stations) may particularly alter the receptor organs to orient in the magnetic field of the earth. These results could have important implications for migratory birds and insects, especially in urban areas, but could also apply to birds and insects in natural and protected areas where there are powerful base station emitters of radiofrequencies. Therefore, more research on the effects of electromagnetic radiation in nature is needed to investigate this emerging threat. - Highlights: • The growth of wireless telecommunication technologies causes increased electrosmog. • Radio frequency fields in the MHz range disrupt insect and bird orientation. • Radio frequency noise interferes with the primary process of magnetoreception. • Existing guidelines do not adequately protect wildlife. • Further research in this area is urgent.

  2. Emerging imaging tools for use with traumatic brain injury research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jill V; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Tong, Karen A; Holshouser, Barbara A

    2012-03-01

    This article identifies emerging neuroimaging measures considered by the inter-agency Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Neuroimaging Workgroup. This article attempts to address some of the potential uses of more advanced forms of imaging in TBI as well as highlight some of the current considerations and unresolved challenges of using them. We summarize emerging elements likely to gain more widespread use in the coming years, because of 1) their utility in diagnosis, prognosis, and understanding the natural course of degeneration or recovery following TBI, and potential for evaluating treatment strategies; 2) the ability of many centers to acquire these data with scanners and equipment that are readily available in existing clinical and research settings; and 3) advances in software that provide more automated, readily available, and cost-effective analysis methods for large scale data image analysis. These include multi-slice CT, volumetric MRI analysis, susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), arterial spin tag labeling (ASL), functional MRI (fMRI), including resting state and connectivity MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS), and hyperpolarization scanning. However, we also include brief introductions to other specialized forms of advanced imaging that currently do require specialized equipment, for example, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), encephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG)/magnetic source imaging (MSI). Finally, we identify some of the challenges that users of the emerging imaging CDEs may wish to consider, including quality control, performing multi-site and longitudinal imaging studies, and MR scanning in infants and children.

  3. Media and Democratisation: Challenges for an Emerging Sub-field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nael Jebril

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to compile an empirically-based understanding of the role of media in countries in transition. The study focuses on the processes of political socialization, behaviour and accountability, and gives examples from three regions: Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East/North Africa region. We draw on some of the major works relevant to the study of mass media in these transitional contexts with the aim of discerning emergent theories available to the study of media and democratisation. While aware of the limitations posed by the nature and scope of the sample of the studies reviewed, we do identify and discuss some of the potentially key obstacles to theory-building and propose some alternative paths of enquiry.

  4. Challenges and Emerging Technologies within the Field of Pediatric Actigraphy

    OpenAIRE

    Galland, Barbara; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Terrill, Philip; Taylor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep–wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography) is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement). Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep–wake summaries usually ...

  5. Use of Near Field Communication in emergency Rescue situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    Near Field Communication (NFC) where the placement of two devices in close proximity of each other makes it possible for two devices to exhange and share information, opens up for a variety of transparent and intuitive interaction possibilities. However, as we have identified in the palcom project...... [1], instant and appropriate feedback regarding state of the connection and identification of which devices are connected to each other, is crucial for use....

  6. Practical methods for generating alternating magnetic fields for biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Michael G.; Howe, Christina M.; Bono, David C.; Perreault, David J.; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-08-01

    Alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) cause magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to dissipate heat while leaving surrounding tissue unharmed, a mechanism that serves as the basis for a variety of emerging biomedical technologies. Unfortunately, the challenges and costs of developing experimental setups commonly used to produce AMFs with suitable field amplitudes and frequencies present a barrier to researchers. This paper first presents a simple, cost-effective, and robust alternative for small AMF working volumes that uses soft ferromagnetic cores to focus the flux into a gap. As the experimental length scale increases to accommodate animal models (working volumes of 100s of cm3 or greater), poor thermal conductivity and volumetrically scaled core losses render that strategy ineffective. Comparatively feasible strategies for these larger volumes instead use low loss resonant tank circuits to generate circulating currents of 1 kA or greater in order to produce the comparable field amplitudes. These principles can be extended to the problem of identifying practical routes for scaling AMF setups to humans, an infrequently acknowledged challenge that influences the extent to which many applications of MNPs may ever become clinically relevant.

  7. RNAi: An emerging field of molecular research | Kabir | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a specific technique using only a few double stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules to stop the expression which has made it one of the important areas in molecular biology. By introducing a gene into the host genome which is highly homologous to an endogenous gene, the RNA silencing is ...

  8. The Emerging Field of Executive and Organizational Coaching: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    In recent years coaching has become an increasingly popular intervention used in both personal and professional development spheres. This chapter draws on industry research from scholars as well as professional organizations to map the history, definitions, and trends of executive and organizational coaching to provide clarity on a complex and…

  9. Borderline personality disorder and the emerging field of developmental neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E; Kaufman, Erin A

    2016-10-01

    Over the past 2 decades there has been a dramatic shift in understanding of personality disorders, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). What was historically viewed as an entrenched pattern of antagonistic, interpersonally dependent, and uncorrectable conduct is now seen as the outcome of complex-yet modifiable-developmental processes. The borderline label, which once inspired such harsh opprobrium in clinical communities that early diagnosis was considered taboo, is now increasingly applied to adolescents who are receiving effective treatment and desisting from a borderline trajectory. Research examining the developmental origins and early manifestations of BPD is increasing rapidly, making it an appropriate time to take stock of current developmental research and articulate an agenda for the future. We identify 4 challenges that continue to impede innovative research on borderline personality development: (a) inadequate attention to continuity and discontinuity across development, (b) medical and diagnostic systems that localize personality pathology within the individual, (c) the lingering belief that biological research is antithetical to contextual/interpersonal understandings of psychopathology (and vice versa), and (d) reluctance to reach across disciplinary and developmental boundaries to identify creative paradigms and foster innovative discovery. In order to overcome these challenges, we propose an approach to future research on adolescent borderline pathology that integrates developmental psychopathology, social and affective neuroscience, and personality theory perspectives. This intersection-the developmental neuroscience of personality pathology-offers theoretical and methodological advantages over disciplinary isolation and is fertile ground for generating novel hypotheses on the development and prevention of BPD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs

  11. Challenges and Emerging Technologies within the Field of Pediatric Actigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Terrill, Philip; Taylor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep–wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography) is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement). Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep–wake summaries usually require prior entry from daily logs of sleep–wake periods and artifact-related information (e.g., non-wear time), involving significant parent co-operation. Scoring criteria for daytime naps remains an unexplored area. Many of the problems facing accuracy of measurement are inherent within the field of actigraphy itself, particularly where sleep periods containing significant movements are erroneously classified as wake, and within quiet wakefulness when no movements are detected, erroneously classified as sleep. We discuss the challenges of actigraphy for pediatric sleep, briefly describe the technical basis and consider a number of technological approaches that may facilitate improved classification of errors in sleep–wake discrimination. PMID:25191278

  12. Systematic Analysis of Theses in the Field of Emergency Medicine in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem CEVIK

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the theses in the field of emergency medicine in Turkey and to determine whether they were published as a scientific paper. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study. Theses in the field of emergency medicine between 1998 and 2013 were browsed from the internet database of National Thesis Center (Council of Higher Education. Study type, both if it was in the field of emergency, or if it was published and the journal's scope of published studies were assessed and recorded in the study chart. Results: 579 theses were included in the study. 27.1% of them were published and 14.9% of them were published in SCI/SCI-E journals. Advisors of theses were emergency medicine specialists in 67.6% of theses and 493 (85.1% of them were in the field of emergency medicine. 77.4% of theses were observational and 20.9% were experimental study. Most of the experimental studies (72.7%, n=88 were animal studies. Conclusions: It was concluded that very few theses in the field of emergency medicine were published in journals that were indexed in SCI/SCI-E. Key words: Emergency medicine, systematic analysis, theses

  13. CORRELATION BETWEEN SEED TESTS AND FIELD EMERGENCE OF TWO MAIZE HYBRIDS (SC704 AND SC500)

    OpenAIRE

    A.A. ALILOO; B. SHOKATI

    2011-01-01

    Early emergence and stand establishment of maize (Zea mays L.) are considered to be the most important yield-contributing factors. The influence of seed vigor on these factors is vital. Therefore, five laboratory tests and field experiment were conducted on basis of a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with five replications in 2011, to evaluate the correlation among the seed vigor tests and field emergence of two maize hybrids (SC704 and SC500). In laboratory tests, differences between ...

  14. DOE research and development and field facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-06-01

    This report describes the roles of DOE's headquarters, field offices, major multiprogram laboratories, Energy Technology and Mining Operations Centers, and other government-owned, contractor-operated facilities which are located in all regions of the United States. It gives brief descriptions of resources, activities, and capabilities of each field facility (sections III through V). These represent a cumulative capital investment of $12 billion and involve a work force of approximately 12,000 government (field) employees and approximately 100,000 contractor employees.

  15. Emergency field water supply system using natural filtration elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikneswaran, M.; Yahya, Muhamad Azani; Yusof, Mohammed Alias; Ismail, Siti Nor Kamariah

    2018-02-01

    Water is the most important resource in times of emergency and during military missions. In addition, if there is a war in a country, sources of clean water are essential for life. But, the safety and cleanliness of the river water for the campers and hikers still uncertain. Usually, polluted and contaminated river water is not safe to be directly consumed by human. However, this problem can be partly resolved by using water filter where the river water can be consumed directly after the filtration process. In respect of that, this study was conducted to design the filter media for personal water purification system. Hence, the objective of this work also is to develop a personal, portable dual purpose handy water filter to provide an easier way to get safe, clean and healthy drinking water for human wherever they go. The water quality of samples collected before and after filtration were analyzed. Water samples were taken from a waterfall near Lestari Block and Lake beside Marine Centre UPNM Campus. The experimental results were analyzed based on the assessment of water quality parameters. Overall, the analysis of the results showed that the water filter was designed with basic mix tabs aqua filter water purification tablets is showing a better result where it achieve the class I of water quality index (WQI). In details, the water sample taken from waterfall near Lestari Block shown the WQI around 93 which is higher than WQI of water sample from Lake near Marine Centre UPNM which is 86, class II A which can be used for external purpose only.

  16. 78 FR 70917 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  17. 77 FR 39209 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  18. 77 FR 59374 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Open Meeting The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee (ETRAC) will meet... Secretary for Export Administration on emerging technology and research activities, including those related...

  19. Population Aging: An Emerging Research Agenda for Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Kudo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, population aging has been recognized as an emerging challenge in many parts of the world. Earlier studies discussed its impacts on the sustainability of social security systems and national economic growth; however, they tended to focus on the issues at the national level and were limited to developed countries. With the knowledge that population aging will be a predominant trend in both developed and developing countries, this paper aims to: (i describe the global population aging trend and its regional demography; (ii provide a structural review of population aging challenges at the national, communal and individual levels; and (iii elaborate future research topics on population aging with a particular emphasis on developing countries. Several indicators suggest rapid population aging in the coming decades, especially in Asia, Latin America and Africa. The structural review presents the diverse challenges that affect both young and older population groups. Finally, the need for linking population aging with the sustainable development concept and the possible rural decline caused by rapid urbanization are suggested as future research topics. Further studies to establish a body of knowledge on population aging in developing countries are required to place population aging on the agenda of future sustainable development discussions.

  20. Rehabilitation exoskeletal robotics. The promise of an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, José L

    2010-01-01

    Exoskeletons are wearable robots exhibiting a close cognitive and physical interaction with the human user. These are rigid robotic exoskeletal structures that typically operate alongside human limbs. Scientific and technological work on exoskeletons began in the early 1960s but have only recently been applied to rehabilitation and functional substitution in patients suffering from motor disorders. Key topics for further development of exoskeletons in rehabilitation scenarios include the need for robust human-robot multimodal cognitive interaction, safe and dependable physical interaction, true wearability and portability, and user aspects such as acceptance and usability. This discussion provides an overview of these aspects and draws conclusions regarding potential future research directions in robotic exoskeletons.

  1. Research on the organization of equipment of nuclear emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoming; Yang Jun

    2012-01-01

    The emergency rescue operation on major accident of nuclear facilities contains four kinds of abilities that are command and control, radiation protection, radiation monitoring and radioactive decontamination, so it needs to organize some equipment of nuclear emergency to enhance the efficiency of nuclear emergency operation. The organization of equipment of nuclear emergency should accord to the reality of the development in our country. It should have extractive structure, brief variety and advance capability, and also should be convenient, useful and adequate. The method of organization can first accord to the organization of group and organize the facilities accord to the organization of group of the emergency rescue force. (authors)

  2. Towards an integrated approach to emergency management: interdisciplinary challenges for research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Webersik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an interdisciplinary vision for large-scale integrated emergency management that has been inspired by the transition from platform centric to inte-grated operations in the oil and gas fields, which uses remote emergency control centres collaborating virtually with local responders. The article discusses some of the most salient research challenges for integrated emergency management, including the role of mobile technology, human-centred sensing, citizen participation and social media, and the socio-cultural determinants of disaster management. The purpose of this article is to frame an integrated emergency management approach that adopts a multi-disciplinary approach, including human computer interaction, information systems, computer science, development studies and organization science employing different methodologies.Most importantly, we need to better understand the socio-cultural determinants of how people prepare to, respond and perceive disasters, in order to evaluate whether and what kind of information and communication technology (ICT support is appropriate. There is need for more research as to why in some regions local people ignore official orders to evacuate, and rather follow the advice of local leaders, elders or religious leaders. In other instances, disasters are seen as 'acts of God' thus shaping disaster preparedness and response.

  3. Light robotics: a new field of research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engay, Einstom; Chouliara, Manto; Bañas, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    After years of working on light-driven trapping and manipulation, we can see that a confluence of developments is now ripe for the emergence of a new area that can contribute to nanobiophotonics - Light Robotics - which combines advances in microfabrication and optical micromanipulation together...... with intelligent control ideas from robotics, wavefront engineering and information optics. In the Summer 2017 we are publishing a 482 pages edited Elsevier book volume covering the fundamental aspects needed for Light Robotics including optical trapping systems, microfabrication and microassembly as well...... as underlying theoretical principles and experimental illustrations for optimizing optical forces and torques for Light Robotics...

  4. Regional long-term co-operation in the field of nuclear and radiation emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladek, V.; Metke, E.; Janko, K.; Hohenberg, J. K.; Hofer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally covered by methodical and coordinative activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Member States of the IAEA and by the European Commission (EC) in EU Member and EU Accession Countries. However, the regional harmonisation of emergency arrangements is an important trend of emergency preparedness. The present paper gives a couple of illustrative examples for a regional co-operation in the field of emergency preparedness in Central Europe and an overview on international exercises in this region. The penultimate section contains an outlook on future activities regarding regional co-operation in Central Europe. The following topics have been suggested inter alia: the harmonisation of intervention criteria and countermeasures, co-ordination in the field of information of the public, comprehensive bi lateral and multilateral exercises, exchange of experts between the national nuclear emergency centres and inter-comparison calculations of the computer codes. (authors)

  5. Systematic Analysis of Theses in the Field of Emergency Medicine in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Erdem; Karakus Yilmaz, Banu; Acar, Yahya Ayhan; Dokur, Mehmet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the theses in the field of emergency medicine in Turkey and to determine whether they were published as a scientific paper. This is a retrospective observational study. Theses in the field of emergency medicine between 1998 and 2013 were browsed from the internet database of National Thesis Center (Council of Higher Education). Study type, both if it was in the field of emergency, or if it was published and the journal's scope of published studies were assessed and recorded in the study chart. 579 theses were included in the study. 27.1% of them were published and 14.9% of them were published in SCI/SCI-E journals. Advisors of theses were emergency medicine specialists in 67.6% of theses and 493 (85.1%) of them were in the field of emergency medicine. 77.4% of theses were observational and 20.9% were experimental study. Most of the experimental studies (72.7%, n=88) were animal studies. It was concluded that very few theses in the field of emergency medicine were published in journals that were indexed in SCI/SCI-E.

  6. Risk - a new field of research?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechmann, G.

    1993-01-01

    Risk research is a research activity that hitherto has failed to come up with a standard concept of risk, or theory of risk. The contribution explains three major approaches and basic orientations, which represent a formal and law-oriented approach, a psychological and cognitive approach, and the approach starting from cultural and sociological aspects. (DG) [de

  7. Field Systems Research: Sport Pedagogy Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Lawrence F.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    These articles contain responses from several scholars on the issue of field systems analysis (FSA). The scholars offer critiques from their sport pedagogy perspectives, a reaction relating FSA to personal examinations of teaching expertise, and a discussion of how computer simulation informs the study of expert teachers. (SM)

  8. Emergence of the Politics of Education Field: Making Sense of the Messy Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Jay D.; Maxcy, Brendan; Aleman, Enrique

    2003-01-01

    Places the evolution of politics of education field in historical context and introduces a framework for understanding how three theoretical streams--micropolitics, political culture, and neoinstitutionalism--emerged as the behavioralist movement receded. Argues that the field has been advancing by means of integrative and aggregative drives that…

  9. How Standards Enable the Emergence of Sustainable Construction as a New Organizational Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Georg, Susse; Reijonen, Satu

    This paper examines the role of standards in the emergence of new fields. We analyzed the current formation of sustainable construction as a new field within the Danish construction sector. Data were derived from four qualitative studies on mandatory and voluntary standards pertaining to sustaina...

  10. Research in the field of narratology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksić Slađana M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new theoretical discipline, narratology, deals with the problems of organizing text at a narrative level. The beginnings of narratology are related to the eighth issue of the journal "Communication" (1966, devoted to research stories. Mieke Bal wrote the first book that contains the word "Narratology" in its title (1979. The beginnings of narratological research can be found in Aristotle's Poetics, where he dealt with the problem of organizing the narration of a text with the action and the characters, and with the qualification of the elements of narrative text. The paper highlights the ontology of contemporary narratological landscape through semiotic research.

  11. Magneto-inertial Fusion: An Emerging Concept for Inertial Fusion and Dense Plasmas in Ultrahigh Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thio, Francis Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the U.S. program in magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) is given in terms of its technical rationale, scientific goals, vision, research plans, needs, and the research facilities currently available in support of the program. Magneto-inertial fusion is an emerging concept for inertial fusion and a pathway to the study of dense plasmas in ultrahigh magnetic fields (magnetic fields in excess of 500 T). The presence of magnetic field in an inertial fusion target suppresses cross-field thermal transport and potentially could enable more attractive inertial fusion energy systems. A vigorous program in magnetized high energy density laboratory plasmas (HED-LP) addressing the scientific basis of magneto-inertial fusion has been initiated by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy involving a number of universities, government laboratories and private institutions.

  12. Conditions for Emergence, Stability and Change in New Organizations in the Field of Citizens Climate Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, Maria Josefina

    Climate change represents a crisis of tangible measure and the emergence of a field of action within which acting today needs to be motivated for what can contribute to benefit climate and transform society into a low carbon tomorrow. With the breadth and scope of citizen action on climate change....... This contribution is concerned with the latter. It proposes that using field analysis it is possible to understand conditions of emergence, stability and change in citizen engagement in climate action. The present contribution offers only a preliminary exploration of possibilities for how using field theory can...

  13. Research on erroneous judgement and operation of human at emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Huang Shudong; Li Xianyi; Chen Jianhua

    2001-01-01

    The behavior characteristic of human at emergency is analysed, and the root causes and the influencing factors are discussed, which result in erroneous judgement and operation. With experiment on erroneous judgement and operation of human at emergency, the error characteristic values are obtained, then the mathematical models are established. Comparing to foreign data, it is known that there are no marked differences between Chinese and foreigners in percent of erroneous judgement and operation at emergency

  14. Emotion theory and research: highlights, unanswered questions, and emerging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Carroll E

    2009-01-01

    Emotion feeling is a phase of neurobiological activity, the key component of emotions and emotion-cognition interactions. Emotion schemas, the most frequently occurring emotion experiences, are dynamic emotion-cognition interactions that may consist of momentary/situational responding or enduring traits of personality that emerge over developmental time. Emotions play a critical role in the evolution of consciousness and the operations of all mental processes. Types of emotion relate differentially to types or levels of consciousness. Unbridled imagination and the ability for sympathetic regulation of empathy may represent both potential gains and losses from the evolution and ontogeny of emotion processes and consciousness. Unresolved issues include psychology's neglect of levels of consciousness that are distinct from access or reflective consciousness and use of the term "unconscious mind" as a dumpster for all mental processes that are considered unreportable. The relation of memes and the mirror neuron system to empathy, sympathy, and cultural influences on the development of socioemotional skills are unresolved issues destined to attract future research.

  15. Attending to scalar ethical issues in emerging approaches to environmental health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Chris G; Smith, Maxwell; Silva, Diego S

    2018-06-04

    Accelerated changes to the planet have created novel spaces to re-imagine the boundaries and foci of environmental health research. Climate change, mass species extinction, ocean acidification, biogeochemical disturbance, and other emergent environmental issues have precipitated new population health perspectives, including, but not limited to, one health, ecohealth, and planetary health. These perspectives, while nuanced, all attempt to reconcile broad global challenges with localized health impacts by attending to the reciprocal relationships between the health of ecosystems, animals, and humans. While such innovation is to be encouraged, we argue that a more comprehensive engagement with the ethics of these emerging fields of inquiry will add value in terms of the significance and impact of associated interventions. In this contribution, we highlight how the concept of spatial and temporal scale can be usefully deployed to shed light on a variety of ethical issues common to emerging environmental health perspectives, and that the potential of scalar analysis implicit to van Potter's conceptualization of bioethics has yet to be fully appreciated. Specifically, we identify how scale interacts with key ethical issues that require consideration and clarification by one health, ecohealth, and planetary health researchers and practitioners to enhance the effectiveness of research and practice, including justice and governance.

  16. Generic qualitative research: a design for qualitative research in emergency care?

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, S; Endacott, R

    2007-01-01

    The frequency of qualitative studies in the Emergency Medicine Journal, while still low, has increased over the last few years. All take a generic approach and rarely conform to established qualitative approaches such as phenomenology, ethnography and grounded theory. This generic approach is no doubt selected for pragmatic reasons but can be weakened by a lack of rigor and understanding of qualitative research. This paper explores qualitative approaches and then focuses on “best practice” fo...

  17. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, Bent [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  18. Nuclear emergency preparedness. Final report of the Nordic nuclear safety research project BOK-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, Bent

    2002-02-01

    Final report of the Nordic Nuclear Safety Research project BOK-1. The BOK-1 project, 'Nuclear Emergency Preparedness', was carried out in 1998-2001 with participants from the Nordic and Baltic Sea regions. The project consists of six sub-projects: Laboratory measurements and quality assurance (BOK-1.1); Mobile measurements and measurement strategies (BOK-1.2); Field measurement and data assimilation (BOK-1.3); Countermeasures in agriculture and forestry (BOK-1.4); Emergency monitoring in the Nordic and Baltic Sea countries (BOK-1.5); and Nuclear exercises (BOK-1.6). For each sub-project, the project outline, objectives and organization are described and main results presented. (au)

  19. Assembling the ‘Field’: Conducting Research in Indonesia’s Emerging Green Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachery R. Anderson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available New forms of environmental governance, such as the green economy, premise reconfigurations of social relations and rearticulations of scale, which raise myriad questions for field researchers, not least of all, what actually constitutes ‘the field’, and where it is to be found. These questions – practical, methodological, political, and personal – are integral to research itself and can tell us much about the dynamic forms that social organization and emerging governance structures take in practice. This contribution discusses the methodological challenges associated with ‘doing fieldwork’ in the amorphous networks of an emerging environmental governance assemblage – the green economy. Drawing on my fieldwork in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, I argue that by interrogating the positionality of different actors in relation to this assemblage, while remaining critically reflexive about one’s own role in this production, field researchers can capture something of the rich embodied practices through which knowledge is produced and exchanged. Moreover, this relational focus on networks of knowledge, actors, and policy can help us to explore the processes of translation and negotiation that underlie the implementation of new forms of environmental governance.

  20. Occurrence, fate and transformation of emerging contaminants in water: An overarching review of the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John; Hooda, Peter S; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen; Swinden, Julian

    2017-12-01

    Many of the products and drugs used commonly contain chemical components which may persist through sewage treatment works (STW) and eventually enter the aquatic environment as parent compounds, metabolites, or transformation products. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and other emerging contaminants (ECs) have been detected in waters (typically ng/L) as well as more recently bound to sediment and plastic particles (typically ng/g). Despite significant advancement of knowledge since the late 1990s, the fate of these contaminants/transformation products once introduced into the aquatic environment remains relatively unresolved. This review provides a unique focus on the fate of seven major groups of PPCPs/ECs in the aquatic environment, which is frequently not found in similar works which are often compound or topic-specific and limited in background knowledge. Key findings include: a) some replacements for regulation precluded/banned chemicals may be similarly persistent in the environment as those they replace, b) the adsorption of potentially bioactive chemicals to micro- and nanoplastics is a significant topic with risks to aquatic organisms potentially greater than previously thought, and c) micro-/nanoplastics are likely to remain of significant concern for centuries after regulatory limitations on their use become active due to the slow degradation of macro-plastics into smaller components. An interdisciplinary perspective on recent advances in the field is presented here in a unique way which highlights both the principle science and direction of research needed to elucidate the fate and transport patterns of aquatic PPCPs/ECs. Unlike similar reviews, which are often topic-specific, here we aim to present an overarching review of the field with focus on the occurrence, transformation and fate of emerging contaminants. Environmental presence of seven major classes of contaminants (analygesics, antibiotics, antineoplastics, beta

  1. Transformative consumer research: Its origins and possible enrichment of the field of consumer research in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona M. Ungerer

    2014-06-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the principles underlying transformative consumer research, including how it differs from traditional research methods and pointing out some established research areas in this field. Motivation for the study: Apart from pointing to a lack of literature, this article highlights the relevance of this approach for emerging countries by investigating the principles and practices embedded in transformative consumer research. It provides some indication of how an investigation of these areas may contribute to enhancing the relevance of consumer research to its various stakeholders. Research design, approach and method: The author used a literature review to conduct the study. Main findings: It appears that consumer research currently lacks external and internal relevance. A transformative consumer-research approach may address some of the fundamental problems in the way consumer psychologists plan and conduct their research, contributing to this lack of relevance. Practical/managerial implications: Most stages of the traditional research approach may need to be adapted for transformative research purposes. Some approaches appear particularly suited to transformative consumer research, including revelatory, incendiary, policy, participatory and coalition research. Contribution/value-add: This study’s primary contribution stems from suggesting a rather novel additional approach to enhance the relevance of consumer research in South Africa, pointing out some established practices in the field of transformative consumer research and suggesting how they may augment consumer research in South Africa.

  2. Design research through practice : from the lab, field, and showroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koskinen, I.; Zimmerman, J.; Binder, T.; Redström, J.; Wensveen, S.A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Businesses and the HCI and Interaction Design communities have embraced design and design research. Design research as a field blends methodologies from several disciplines - sociology, engineering, software, philosophy, industrial design, HCI/interaction design -- so designers can learn from past

  3. A Review of the Emerging Markets Literature: Context, Concepts and Future Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik B.; Hannibal, Martin; Larsen, Nathalie Nørregaard

    Emerging Markets (EM) has been the focus of numerous studies. Even though the EM category has been heavily debated and has been the focus of a substantial and ever-growing body of research, the elements used to define and characterize EMs are still found to be inconsistent. Through a systematic...... of the existing EM literature, which is currently dominated by studies involving China and India. Secondly, we identify the seminal contributions based on cross-references in the EM field and citations in international business literature in general. Thirdly, we elaborate on the definitional elements of the most...... dominant definitions and characterizations in the extant EM literature. As a final step these are used to develop an organizing framework for future research. Finally, based on our findings we suggest avenues of future research and managerial implications are presented....

  4. Emergence of complex space-temporal order in nonlinear field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of time-dependent nonperturbative configurations during the evolution of nonlinear scalar field models with symmetric and asymmetric double-well potentials. Complex space-temporal behavior emerges as the system seeks to establish equipartition after a fast quench. We show that fast quenches may dramatically modify the decay rate of metastable states in first order phase transitions. We discuss possible applications in condensed matter systems and in inflationary cosmology. (author)

  5. Emergence of Complex Spatio-Temporal Behavior in Nonlinear Field Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Howell, Rafael C.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of time-dependent nonperturbative configurations during the evolution of nonlinear scalar field models with symmetric and asymmetric double-well potentials. Complex spatio-temporal behavior emerges as the system seeks to establish equipartition after a fast quench. We show that fast quenches may dramatically modify the decay rate of metastable states in first order phase transitions. We discuss possible applications in condensed matter systems and early universe cosmology

  6. The FIFA medical emergency bag and FIFA 11 steps to prevent sudden cardiac death: setting a global standard and promoting consistent football field emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Jiri; Kramer, Efraim B; Schmied, Christian M; Drezner, Jonathan A; Zideman, David; Patricios, Jon; Correia, Luis; Pedrinelli, André; Mandelbaum, Bert

    2013-12-01

    Life-threatening medical emergencies are an infrequent but regular occurrence on the football field. Proper prevention strategies, emergency medical planning and timely access to emergency equipment are required to prevent catastrophic outcomes. In a continuing commitment to player safety during football, this paper presents the FIFA Medical Emergency Bag and FIFA 11 Steps to prevent sudden cardiac death. These recommendations are intended to create a global standard for emergency preparedness and the medical response to serious or catastrophic on-field injuries in football.

  7. Conducting Field Research on Terrorism: a Brief Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dolnik

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the practical aspects of field research on terrorism. Firstly, it  outlines some issues involved in the process of attaining a human research ethics/institutional review board clearance in order to be able to even begin the field research. It suggests some ways in which researchers can positively influence this review process in their favor. Secondly, the article focuses on the real and perceived dangers of field research, identifying practical steps and preparatory activities that can help researchers manage and reduce the risks involved. The article also covers the formalities and dilemmas involved in gaining access to the field. It then provides some insights into the topic of operating in conflict zones, followed by a section covering the ways of gaining access to sources, effective communication skills and influence techniques and addresses key issues involved in interviewing sources in the field. The final section focuses on identifying biases and interfering factors which researchers need to take into account when interpreting the data acquired through interviews. This article is a modest attempt to fill a gap in the literature on terrorism research by outlining some of the key issues involved in the process of doing field research. It incorporates insights from diverse disciplines as well as the author’s personal experiences of conducting field research on terrorism in places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Colombia, Mindanao, Uganda, Indonesia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, and India.

  8. Ecohealth Emerging Infectious Diseases Research Initiative (EcoEID)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Southeast Asia is the current hotspot of disease emergence due to high population and animal densities, on the one hand, ... Centre for Malaria Control of the Government of Cambodia ... Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

  9. The emerging educator as leader and action researcher

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas G. Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The 320 pre-service educators in this inquiry were viewed as emerging classroom teachers who were leading while grappling with new personal experiences which informed and guided each during the pre-service year. The written account evidence supported our resulting inferences, discussion and conclusions and demonstrated the leadership required within pre-service. It was the analysis and synthesis of practicum reflections that illuminated core beliefs, attitudes and needs of emerging action res...

  10. The emergence and evolution of the research fronts in HIV/AIDS research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fajardo-Ortiz

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have identified and analyzed the emergence, structure and dynamics of the paradigmatic research fronts that established the fundamentals of the biomedical knowledge on HIV/AIDS. A search of papers with the identifiers "HIV/AIDS", "Human Immunodeficiency Virus", "HIV-1" and "Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome" in the Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, was carried out. A citation network of those papers was constructed. Then, a sub-network of the papers with the highest number of inter-citations (with a minimal in-degree of 28 was selected to perform a combination of network clustering and text mining to identify the paradigmatic research fronts and analyze their dynamics. Thirteen research fronts were identified in this sub-network. The biggest and oldest front is related to the clinical knowledge on the disease in the patient. Nine of the fronts are related to the study of specific molecular structures and mechanisms and two of these fronts are related to the development of drugs. The rest of the fronts are related to the study of the disease at the cellular level. Interestingly, the emergence of these fronts occurred in successive "waves" over the time which suggest a transition in the paradigmatic focus. The emergence and evolution of the biomedical fronts in HIV/AIDS research is explained not just by the partition of the problem in elements and interactions leading to increasingly specialized communities, but also by changes in the technological context of this health problem and the dramatic changes in the epidemiological reality of HIV/AIDS that occurred between 1993 and 1995.

  11. Occurrence, fate and transformation of emerging contaminants in water: An overarching review of the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, John; Hooda, Peter S.; Barker, James; Barton, Stephen; Swinden, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Many of the products and drugs used commonly contain chemical components which may persist through sewage treatment works (STW) and eventually enter the aquatic environment as parent compounds, metabolites, or transformation products. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and other emerging contaminants (ECs) have been detected in waters (typically ng/L) as well as more recently bound to sediment and plastic particles (typically ng/g). Despite significant advancement of knowledge since the late 1990s, the fate of these contaminants/transformation products once introduced into the aquatic environment remains relatively unresolved. This review provides a unique focus on the fate of seven major groups of PPCPs/ECs in the aquatic environment, which is frequently not found in similar works which are often compound or topic-specific and limited in background knowledge. Key findings include: a) some replacements for regulation precluded/banned chemicals may be similarly persistent in the environment as those they replace, b) the adsorption of potentially bioactive chemicals to micro- and nanoplastics is a significant topic with risks to aquatic organisms potentially greater than previously thought, and c) micro-/nanoplastics are likely to remain of significant concern for centuries after regulatory limitations on their use become active due to the slow degradation of macro-plastics into smaller components. An interdisciplinary perspective on recent advances in the field is presented here in a unique way which highlights both the principle science and direction of research needed to elucidate the fate and transport patterns of aquatic PPCPs/ECs. Unlike similar reviews, which are often topic-specific, here we aim to present an overarching review of the field with focus on the occurrence, transformation and fate of emerging contaminants. Environmental presence of seven major classes of contaminants (analygesics, antibiotics, antineoplastics, beta

  12. Interdisciplinarity of Nano Research Fields : A Keyword Mining Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Notten, A.; Surpatean, A.

    2012-01-01

    Using a keyword mining approach, this paper explores the interdisciplinary and integrative dynamics in five nano research fields. We argue that the general trend of integration in nano research fields is converging in the long run, although the degree of this convergence depends greatly on the

  13. CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: "How to make research succeed in your emergency department: How to develop and train career researchers in emergency medicine".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jeffrey J; Snider, Carolyn E; Artz, Jennifer D; Stiell, Ian G; Shaeri, Sedigheh; McLeod, Shelley; Le Sage, Natalie; Hohl, Corinne; Calder, Lisa A; Vaillancourt, Christian; Holroyd, Brian; Hollander, Judd E; Morrison, Laurie J

    2015-05-01

    We sought to 1) identify best practices for training and mentoring clinician researchers, 2) characterize facilitators and barriers for Canadian emergency medicine researchers, and 3) develop pragmatic recommendations to improve and standardize emergency medicine postgraduate research training programs to build research capacity. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase using search terms relevant to emergency medicine research fellowship/graduate training. We conducted an email survey of all Canadian emergency physician researchers. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) research fellowship program was analysed, and other similar international programs were sought. An expert panel reviewed these data and presented recommendations at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) 2014 Academic Symposium. We refined our recommendations based on feedback received. Of 1,246 potentially relevant citations, we included 10 articles. We identified five key themes: 1) creating training opportunities; 2) ensuring adequate protected time; 3) salary support; 4) infrastructure; and 5) mentorship. Our survey achieved a 72% (67/93) response rate. From these responses, 42 (63%) consider themselves clinical researchers (i.e., spend a significant proportion of their career conducting research). The single largest constraint to conducting research was funding. Factors felt to be positive contributors to a clinical research career included salary support, research training (including an advanced graduate degree), mentorship, and infrastructure. The SAEM research fellowship was the only emergency medicine research fellowship program identified. This 2-year program requires approval of both the teaching centre and each applying fellow. This program requires training in 15 core competencies, manuscript preparation, and submission of a large grant to a national peer-review funding organization. We recommend that the CAEP Academic Section create a

  14. The Emerging Role of the Chief Research Informatics Officer in Academic Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Pinto, L Nelson; Mosa, Abu S M; Fultz-Hollis, Kate; Tachinardi, Umberto; Barnett, William K; Embi, Peter J

    2017-08-16

    The role of the Chief Research Informatics Officer (CRIO) is emerging in academic health centers to address the challenges clinical researchers face in the increasingly digitalized, data-intensive healthcare system. Most current CRIOs are the first officers in their institutions to hold that role. To date there is very little published information about this role and the individuals who serve it. To increase our understanding of the CRIO role, the leaders who serve it, and the factors associated with their success in their organizations. The Clinical Research Informatics Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) conducted a national survey of CRIOs in the United States and convened an expert panel of CRIOs to discuss their experience during the 2016 AMIA Annual Symposium. CRIOs come from diverse academic backgrounds. Most have advance training and extensive experience in biomedical informatics but the majority have been CRIOs for less than three years. CRIOs identify funding, data governance, and advancing data analytics as their major challenges. CRIOs play an important role in helping shape the future of clinical research, innovation, and data analytics in healthcare in their organizations. They share many of the same challenges and see the same opportunities for the future of the field. Better understanding the background and experience of current CRIOs can help define and develop the role in other organizations and enhance their influence in the field of research informatics.

  15. Depth of Field: Discursive design research through film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Arnall

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is about the role of film in interaction and product design research with technology, and the use of film in exploring and explaining emerging technologies in multiple contexts. We have engaged in a reflective design research process that uses graphical, audiovisual, and time-based media as a tool, a material and a communicative artefact that enables us to approach complex, obscure and often invisible emerging technologies. We give a discursive account of how film has played an intricate role in our design research practice, from revealing the materiality of invisible wireless technology, to explaining complex technical prototypes, to communicating to a public audience through online films that may fold broader social and cultural discourses back into our design research process. We conclude by elaborating on discursive design approaches to research that use film as a reflective and communicative medium that allows for design research to operate within a social and cultural frame.

  16. Near-field tsunami early warning and emergency planning in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerassimos A. Papadopoulos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The new European project Near-field Tsunami Early Warning and Emergency Planning in the Mediterranean Sea (NEARTOWARN faces the need to develop operational tsunami early warning systems in near-field (local conditions where the travel time of the first tsunami wave is very short, that is less than 30 min, which is a typical case in the North East Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea region but also elsewhere around the globe. The operational condition that should be fulfilled is that the time of tsunami detection, plus the time of warning transmitting, plus the time of evacuation should not exceed the travel time of the first tsunami wave from its source to the closest evacuation zone. To this goal the time to detect of the causative earthquake should be compressed at the very minimum. In this context the core of the proposed system is a network of seismic early warning devices, which activate and send alert in a few seconds after the generation of a near-field earthquake, when a seismic ground motion exceeding a prescribed threshold is detected. Then civil protection mobilizes to manage the earthquake crisis but also to detect and manage a possible tsunami through a geographical risk management system. For the tsunami detection the system is supported by tide-gauges of radar type, a database of presimulated tsunami scenarios, and a local tsunami decision matrix. The island of Rhodes in the eastern termination of the Hellenic Arc and Trench has been selected for a pilot and operational development of the local tsunami warning system given that the island is a highly popular tourist destination, historically it was hit by large tsunamigenic earthquakes and was recently the master test-site for the pan-European FP6 tsunami research project Tsunami Risk ANd Strategies For the European Region (TRANSFER.

  17. Research in the fields of medicine in Slovenia – research potential, funding, and publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojan Pečlin

    2012-09-01

    Conclusions: The size of the human research potential in the fields of medicine in Slovenia is modest. The majority of researchers are also engaged in medical practice and education. Consequently, funds from public sources for research per researcher are low. Research fields of medicine primarly require an increase in human research resources, which can then provide a basis for a rise in funding and the impact of its research results becoming comparable to the EU and world averages.

  18. Gender- and sex-specific sports-related injury research in emergency medicine: a consensus on future research direction and focused application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raukar, Neha P; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Kane, Kathleen; Davenport, Moira; Espinoza, Tamara R; Weiland, Jessica; Franco, Vanessa; Vaca, Federico E

    2014-12-01

    Title IX, the commercialization of sports, the social change in sports participation, and the response to the obesity epidemic have contributed to the rapid proliferation of participation in both competitive organized sports and nontraditional athletic events. As a consequence, emergency physicians are regularly involved in the acute diagnosis, management, disposition, and counseling of a broad range of sports-related pathology. Three important and highly publicized mechanisms of injury in sports relevant to emergency medicine (EM) include concussion, heat illness, and sudden cardiac death. In conjunction with the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a consensus group consisting of experts in EM, emergency neurology, sports medicine, and public health convened to deliberate and develop research questions that could ultimately advance the field of sports medicine and allow for meaningful application in the emergency department (ED) clinical setting. Sex differences in injury risk, diagnosis, ED treatment, and counseling are identified in each of these themes. This article presents the consensus-based priority research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. Development of a productive research culture in emergency medicine: Report of the outcomes of a research forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David McD; Cohen, Donna R; Epstein, Joseph; Freeman, Peter; Gosbell, Andrew D; Judkins, Simon; Mowatt, Elizabeth J M; O'Reilly, Gerard M; Vinen, John

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) has increasingly focused on the need for high-quality research in emergency medicine (EM). One important initiative was the establishment of the ACEM Foundation, which among other responsibilities, is required to support clinical research through the provision of research funding and other measures. In February 2015, the Foundation held a Research Forum that was attended by the leading EM researchers from Australasia. The Forum aimed to determine how a productive research culture could be developed within the ACEM. Nine key objectives were determined including that research should be a core business of the ACEM and a core activity of the EM workforce, and that EM research should be sustainable and adequately supported. This report describes the background and conduct of the Forum, its recommendations and the way in which they could be implemented. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  20. Researching virtual worlds methodologies for studying emergent practices

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents a wide range of methodological strategies that are designed to take into account the complex, emergent, and continually shifting character of virtual worlds. It interrogates how virtual worlds emerge as objects of study through the development and application of various methodological strategies. Virtual worlds are not considered objects that exist as entities with fixed attributes independent of our continuous engagement with them and interpretation of them. Instead, they are conceived of as complex ensembles of technology, humans, symbols, discourses, and economic structures, ensembles that emerge in ongoing practices and specific situations. A broad spectrum of perspectives and methodologies is presented: Actor-Network-Theory and post-Actor-Network-Theory, performativity theory, ethnography, discourse analysis, Sense-Making Methodology, visual ethnography, multi-sited ethnography, and Social Network Analysis.

  1. Research collaboration in groups and networks: differences across academic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Reymert, Ingvild

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a macro-picture of collaboration in research groups and networks across all academic fields in Norwegian research universities, and to examine the relative importance of membership in groups and networks for individual publication output. To our knowledge, this is a new approach, which may provide valuable information on collaborative patterns in a particular national system, but of clear relevance to other national university systems. At the system level, conducting research in groups and networks are equally important, but there are large differences between academic fields. The research group is clearly most important in the field of medicine and health, while undertaking research in an international network is most important in the natural sciences. Membership in a research group and active participation in international networks are likely to enhance publication productivity and the quality of research.

  2. A Comprehensive Literature Review of the ERP research field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    During the past decade ERP has attracted attention from both academic and industrial communities (Shehab, Sharp et al. 2004) and we feel that now is an opportune time for the ERP field to ask how the field has evolved and what its present state is (Chen and Hirschheim 2004). The purpose...... of this paper is to address these questions, which is done by providing an overview of the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) research field regardless of research discipline, research topic and research traditions. Abstracts from 723 peer-reviewed journal publications from 2000 up till 2007 have been analyzed...... according to journal, authors and year of publication, and further categorized into research discipline, research topic and methods used. The paper demonstrates that the body of academic knowledge about ERP systems has reached a certain level of maturity and several different research disciplines have...

  3. Ecohealth Emerging Infectious Diseases Research Initiative (EcoEID)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to understand the relationship between emerging infectious diseases of potentially pandemic proportions, and the agricultural, land utilization and ecosystem management practices that give rise to .... Disability weight of Clonorchis sinensis infection : captured from community study and model simulation ...

  4. Lessons learned from the second Federal Radiology Emergency Response Plan Field Exercise (FFE-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.; Weiss, B.H.; Wolff, W.F.; Adler, V.

    1988-01-01

    The FFE-2, held in 1987 at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, provided a large-scale, multiagency, field test of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). The FRERP provided workable guidance for coordinating the federal response efforts and effectively supplementing the states' resources. Needs for more training for responders and clarification in portions of the response were identified

  5. The Evolution of Public Health Emergency Management as a Field of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Dale A; Murthy, Shivani; Brooks, Jennifer; Bryant, Jeffrey

    2017-09-01

    The health impacts of recent global infectious disease outbreaks and other disasters have demonstrated the importance of strengthening public health systems to better protect communities from naturally occurring and human-caused threats. Public health emergency management (PHEM) is an emergent field of practice that draws on specific sets of knowledge, techniques, and organizing principles necessary for the effective management of complex health events. We highlight how the nascent field of PHEM has evolved in recent years. We explore this development by first examining multiple sites of intersection between the fields of public health and emergency management. We then analyze 2 of the principal pillars on which PHEM was built: organizational and programmatic (i.e., industry) standards and the incident management system. This is followed by a sketch of the key domains, or functional areas, of PHEM and their application to the emergency management cycle. We conclude with some observations about PHEM in a global context and discuss how the field might continue to evolve.

  6. A Comprehensive Literature Review of the ERP research field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    be used in future studies about how research fields with interest in an empirical phenomenon, e.g. CRM and ITIL, evolve and as a guide for researchers providing them with insight into what has been published, where to publish ERP-related research and how to study it. Contribution of figures and numbers...

  7. Wanted: studies on mortality estimation methods for humanitarian emergencies, suggestions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Measuring rates and circumstances of population mortality (in particular crude and under-5 year mortality rates is essential to evidence-based humanitarian relief interventions. Because prospective vital event registration is absent or deteriorates in nearly all crisis-affected populations, retrospective household surveys are often used to estimate and describe patterns of mortality. Originally designed for measuring vaccination coverage, the two-stage cluster survey methodology is frequently employed to measure mortality retrospectively due to limited time and resources during humanitarian emergencies. The method tends to be followed without considering alternatives, and there is a need for expert advice to guide health workers measuring mortality in the field. In a workshop in France in June 2006, we deliberated the problems inherent in this method when applied to measure outcomes other than vaccine coverage and acute malnutrition (specifically, mortality, and considered recommendations for improvement. Here we describe these recommendations and outline outstanding issues in three main problem areas in emergency mortality assessment discussed during the workshop: sampling, household data collection issues, and cause of death ascertainment. We urge greater research on these issues. As humanitarian emergencies become ever more complex, all agencies should benefit from the most recently tried and tested survey tools.

  8. Clinical Research Informatics: Challenges, Opportunities and Definition for an Emerging Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embi, Peter J.; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Clinical Research Informatics, an emerging sub-domain of Biomedical Informatics, is currently not well defined. A formal description of CRI including major challenges and opportunities is needed to direct progress in the field. Design Given the early stage of CRI knowledge and activity, we engaged in a series of qualitative studies with key stakeholders and opinion leaders to determine the range of challenges and opportunities facing CRI. These phases employed complimentary methods to triangulate upon our findings. Measurements Study phases included: 1) a group interview with key stakeholders, 2) an email follow-up survey with a larger group of self-identified CRI professionals, and 3) validation of our results via electronic peer-debriefing and member-checking with a group of CRI-related opinion leaders. Data were collected, transcribed, and organized for formal, independent content analyses by experienced qualitative investigators, followed by an iterative process to identify emergent categorizations and thematic descriptions of the data. Results We identified a range of challenges and opportunities facing the CRI domain. These included 13 distinct themes spanning academic, practical, and organizational aspects of CRI. These findings also informed the development of a formal definition of CRI and supported further representations that illustrate areas of emphasis critical to advancing the domain. Conclusions CRI has emerged as a distinct discipline that faces multiple challenges and opportunities. The findings presented summarize those challenges and opportunities and provide a framework that should help inform next steps to advance this important new discipline. PMID:19261934

  9. The emergency of concept global health: perspectives for the field of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Roberto Cavalcante Sampaio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, we have witnessed the emergence of new terms in the academic and political debate of public health, such as ‘’global health’’, ‘’global public goods’’, ‘’global health governance’’, ‘’global public health’’, ‘’health diplomacy’’, 'international cooperation’’. In this study, we aimed to analyze the historical development of the concept of ‘global health’, as well as the prospects of this new concept in the research and public health practice. A comprehensive literature review was performed in Pubmed, Scielo, Scopus, and BVS. We also analyzed documents obtained from the websites of international health organizations. 514 publications were retrieved and 36 were selected for this study. In general, the concept of "global health" refers to health as a transnational phenomenon linked to globalization, which has as main challenge to think public health beyond international relations between countries. International health organizations are particularly important in the development of the concept of "global health" and its new application prospects in the field of public health are health diplomacy, international cooperation and global health governance.

  10. Rapid qualitative research methods during complex health emergencies: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger A; Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia

    2017-09-01

    The 2013-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted both the successes and limitations of social science contributions to emergency response operations. An important limitation was the rapid and effective communication of study findings. A systematic review was carried out to explore how rapid qualitative methods have been used during global heath emergencies to understand which methods are commonly used, how they are applied, and the difficulties faced by social science researchers in the field. We also asses their value and benefit for health emergencies. The review findings are used to propose recommendations for qualitative research in this context. Peer-reviewed articles and grey literature were identified through six online databases. An initial search was carried out in July 2016 and updated in February 2017. The PRISMA checklist was used to guide the reporting of methods and findings. The articles were assessed for quality using the MMAT and AACODS checklist. From an initial search yielding 1444 articles, 22 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Thirteen of the articles were qualitative studies and nine used a mixed-methods design. The purpose of the rapid studies included: the identification of causes of the outbreak, and assessment of infrastructure, control strategies, health needs and health facility use. The studies varied in duration (from 4 days to 1 month). The main limitations identified by the authors were: the low quality of the collected data, small sample sizes, and little time for cross-checking facts with other data sources to reduce bias. Rapid qualitative methods were seen as beneficial in highlighting context-specific issues that need to be addressed locally, population-level behaviors influencing health service use, and organizational challenges in response planning and implementation. Recommendations for carrying out rapid qualitative research in this context included the early designation of community leaders as a point of

  11. Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physical Measurement Profile at Gilgel Gibe Field Research Center, ... hip circumference in under 35 years and body mass index in under 45 year age groups were ... Comparison with findings in other parts of the world showed that Ethiopians ...

  12. Research note : field control of asphalt concrete paving mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop information and evaluate new methods for controlling quality of the AC mixture in the mat. Specifically, this research project evaluated a gyratory compactor in the field laboratory to determine mix quality. Spec...

  13. Measuring methods, registration and signal processing for magnetic field research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagiello, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Some measuring methods and signal processing systems based on analogue and digital technics, which have been applied in magnetic field research using magnetometers with ferromagnetic transducers, are presented. (author)

  14. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network: a history of multicenter collaboration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimenatos, Leah; Kim, Emily; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we review the history and progress of a large multicenter research network pertaining to emergency medical services for children. We describe the history, organization, infrastructure, and research agenda of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network and highlight some of the important accomplishments since its inception. We also describe the network's strategy to grow its research portfolio, train new investigators, and study how to translate new evidence into practice. This strategy ensures not only the sustainability of the network in the future but the growth of research in emergency medical services for children in general.

  15. Shaping markets : A neoinstitutional analysis of the emerging organizational field of renewable energy in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeyrup Christensen, N.

    2013-02-01

    Today, China is the world leading investor in renewable energy. At the heart of this effort lies China's ability to shape markets through industrial policies. Through a neoinstitutional theoretical perspective this dissertation views China's efforts within renewable energy as the emergence of a new organizational field. Despite the importance of organizational fields as a key concept in the neoinstitutional literature, there is a lack of studies on exactly how they emerge. Throughout four articles this dissertation scrutinizes therefore the emergence of the field of renewable energy in China and the mechanisms driving this emergence. Firstly, the relation between state and market is examined, and it is argued that Chinese state interventions in markets, for instance through subsidies, are based in deeply rooted historic grounds. Thus, the article explains the general context in which the Party-state handles subsidized markets, like renewable energy. Secondly, the specific development of the idea of sustainable development, and how it evolves into an institutional logic of its own, is analysed. It is around this institutional logic that renewable energy emerges as a field. The key mechanism in play is the idea work of the Party state by which sustainable development is positioned in the Partystate discourse. Thirdly, subsidization of renewable energy in China is examined as an important feature of the increasing institutionalization of the organizational field. It is shown how negotiation between companies and Party-state is the vital mechanism by which subsidies are determined. Fourthly, it is analysed how the institutional entrepreneurship of one single company resulted in an official recognition of biomass power production as a source of renewable energy, and thereby an expansion of the organizational field. Again, the main mechanism was the company's idea work, through which a crucial link between biomass and sustainable development was

  16. NIH Roundtable on Opportunities to Advance Research on Neurologic and Psychiatric Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Gail; Jauch, Edward; Jagoda, Andrew; Allen, Michael H; Anglin, Deirdre; Barsan, William G; Berger, Rachel P; Bobrow, Bentley J; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Bushnell, Cheryl; Chan, Yu-Feng; Currier, Glenn; Eggly, Susan; Ichord, Rebecca; Larkin, Gregory L; Laskowitz, Daniel; Neumar, Robert W; Newman-Toker, David E; Quinn, James; Shear, Katherine; Todd, Knox H; Zatzick, Douglas

    2010-11-01

    The Institute of Medicine Committee on the Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System (2003) identified a need to enhance the research base for emergency care. As a result, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Task Force on Research in Emergency Medicine was formed to enhance NIH support for emergency care research. Members of the NIH Task Force and academic leaders in emergency care participated in 3 Roundtable discussions to prioritize current opportunities for enhancing and conducting emergency care research. We identify key research questions essential to advancing the science of emergency care and discuss the barriers and strategies to advance research by exploring the collaboration between NIH and the emergency care community. Experts from emergency medicine, neurology, psychiatry, and public health assembled to review critical areas in need of investigation, current gaps in knowledge, barriers, and opportunities. Neurologic emergencies included cerebral resuscitation, pain, stroke, syncope, traumatic brain injury, and pregnancy. Mental health topics included suicide, agitation and delirium, substances, posttraumatic stress, violence, and bereavement. Presentations and group discussion firmly established the need for translational research to bring basic science concepts into the clinical arena. A coordinated continuum of the health care system that ensures rapid identification and stabilization and extends through discharge is necessary to maximize overall patient outcomes. There is a paucity of well-designed, focused research on diagnostic testing, clinical decisionmaking, and treatments in the emergency setting. Barriers include the limited number of experienced researchers in emergency medicine, limited dedicated research funding, and difficulties of conducting research in chaotic emergency environments stressed by crowding and limited resources. Several themes emerged during the course of the roundtable discussion, including the need

  17. Climate change alters seedling emergence and establishment in an old-field ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimée T Classen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecological succession drives large-scale changes in ecosystem composition over time, but the mechanisms whereby climatic change might alter succession remain unresolved. Here, we asked if the effects of atmospheric and climatic change would alter tree seedling emergence and establishment in an old-field ecosystem, recognizing that small shifts in rates of seedling emergence and establishment of different species may have long-term repercussions on the transition of fields to forests in the future.We introduced seeds from three early successional tree species into constructed old-field plant communities that had been subjected for 4 years to altered temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric CO(2 regimes in an experimental facility. Our experiment revealed that different combinations of atmospheric CO(2 concentration, air temperature, and soil moisture altered seedling emergence and establishment. Treatments directly and indirectly affected soil moisture, which was the best predictor of seedling establishment, though treatment effects differed among species.The observed impacts, coupled with variations in the timing of seed arrival, are demonstrated as predictors of seedling emergence and establishment in ecosystems under global change.

  18. Biological field stations: research legacies and sites for serendipity

    Science.gov (United States)

    William K. Michener; Keith L. Bildstein; Arthur McKee; Robert R. Parmenter; William W. Hargrove; Deedra McClearn; Mark Stromberg

    2009-01-01

    Biological field stations are distributed throughout North America, capturing much of the ecological variability present at the continental scale and encompassing many unique habitats. In addition to their role in supporting research and education, field stations offer legacies of data, specimens, and accumulated knowledge. Such legacies often provide the only...

  19. Introducing Field-Based Geologic Research Using Soil Geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppes, Martha Cary

    2009-01-01

    A field-based study of soils and the factors that influence their development is a strong, broad introduction to geologic concepts and research. A course blueprint is detailed where students design and complete a semester-long field-based soil geomorphology project. Students are first taught basic soil concepts and to describe soil, sediment and…

  20. Recent progress in the research field of neuropharmacology in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin

    2008-02-01

    In recent years, Chinese neuropharmacologists have done a lot of basic and practical work in neuropharmacology, especially in the fields of pain, drug dependence, depression, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, having obtained some exciting results that are of great significance for the development of neuropharmacology. Here I would like to review recent progress in the research fields of neuropharmacology in China.

  1. Field Research in Political Science Practices and Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravier, Magali

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Kapiszewski (Diana), Maclean (Lauren M.), Read (Benjamin L.) ­ Field Research in Political Science. Practices and Principles. ­ Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2015 (Strategies for Social Inquiry). XIV + 456 p. Figures. Annexe. Bibliogr. Index.......Book review of: Kapiszewski (Diana), Maclean (Lauren M.), Read (Benjamin L.) ­ Field Research in Political Science. Practices and Principles. ­ Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2015 (Strategies for Social Inquiry). XIV + 456 p. Figures. Annexe. Bibliogr. Index....

  2. 21 CFR 812.47 - Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. 812.47 Section 812.47 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....47 Emergency research under § 50.24 of this chapter. (a) The sponsor shall monitor the progress of...

  3. Standard review plan for the review and evaluation of emergency plans for research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document provides a Standard Review Plan to assure that complete and uniform reviews are made of research and test reactor radiological emergency plans. The report is organized under ten planning standards which correspond to the guidance criteria in American National Standard ANSI/ANS 15.16 - 1982 as endorsed by Revision 1 to Regulatory Guide 2.6. The applicability of the items under each planning standard is indicated by subdivisions of the steady-state thermal power levels at which the reactors are licensed to operate. Standard emergency classes and example action levels for research and test reactors which should initiate these classes are given in an Appendix. The content of the emergency plan is as follows: the emergency plan addresses the necessary provisions for coping with radiological emergencies. Activation of the emergency plan is in response to the emergency action levels. In addition to addressing those severe emergencies that will fall within one of the standard emergency classes, the plan also discusses the necessary provisions to deal with radiological emergencies of lesser severity that can occur within the operations boundary. The emergency plan allows for emergency personnel to deviate from actions described in the plan for unusual or unanticipated conditions

  4. Astrobiology Field Research in Moon/Mars Analogue Environments: Preface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme environments on Earth often provide similar terrain conditions to landing/operation sites on Moon and Mars. Several field campaigns (EuroGeoMars2009 and DOMMEX/ILEWG EuroMoonMars from November 2009 to March 2010) were conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah. Some of the key astrobiology results are presented in this special issue on Astrobiology field research in Moon/Mars analogue environments relevant to investigate the link between geology, minerals, organics and biota. Preliminary results from a multidisciplinary field campaign at Rio Tinto in Spain are presented.

  5. Confronting Ethical and Regulatory Challenges of Emergency Care Research With Conscious Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickert, Neal W; Brown, Jeremy; Cairns, Charles B; Eaves-Leanos, Aaliyah; Goldkind, Sara F; Kim, Scott Y H; Nichol, Graham; O'Conor, Katie J; Scott, Jane D; Sinert, Richard; Wendler, David; Wright, David W; Silbergleit, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Barriers to informed consent are ubiquitous in the conduct of emergency care research across a wide range of conditions and clinical contexts. They are largely unavoidable; can be related to time constraints, physical symptoms, emotional stress, and cognitive impairment; and affect patients and surrogates. US regulations permit an exception from informed consent for certain clinical trials in emergency settings, but these regulations have generally been used to facilitate trials in which patients are unconscious and no surrogate is available. Most emergency care research, however, involves conscious patients, and surrogates are often available. Unfortunately, there is neither clear regulatory guidance nor established ethical standards in regard to consent in these settings. In this report-the result of a workshop convened by the National Institutes of Health Office of Emergency Care Research and Department of Bioethics to address ethical challenges in emergency care research-we clarify potential gaps in ethical understanding and federal regulations about research in emergency care in which limited involvement of patients or surrogates in enrollment decisions is possible. We propose a spectrum of approaches directed toward realistic ethical goals and a research and policy agenda for addressing these issues to facilitate clinical research necessary to improve emergency care. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Some Long-Standing and Emerging Research Lines in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpell, Robert; Marfo, Kofi

    2014-01-01

    Early research on child development in Africa was dominated by expatriates and was primarily addressed to the topics of testing the cross-cultural validity of theories developed "in the West," and the search for universals. After a brief review of the outcome of that research, we propose two additional types of motivation that seem…

  7. EcoHealth Student: Emerging Researcher Awards encourages ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-05-10

    May 10, 2011 ... ... who were paired with EcoHealth board members or journal editors to score ... Students' work was evaluated based on its contribution to science and ecohealth. ... Through her previous epidemiological and medical research, and ... Her research findings have been surprising and run counter to global ...

  8. Investigatory Trends in Emerging Facebook Research: Implications for Communication Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Christopher J.; Pitrowski, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Since the advent of Facebook, researchers across academic disciplines have examined the nature and scope of scholarship regarding this SNS. Based on a content analysis approach, Piotrowski (2012) reported that many popular issues in the media on the topic of Facebook are largely ignored by research investigators. Due to the proliferation of…

  9. How to emerge from the conservatism in clinical research methodology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecki, Nuria; Penel, Nicolas; Awada, Ahmad

    2017-09-01

    Despite recent changes in clinical research methodology, many challenges remain in drug development methodology. Advances in molecular biology and cancer treatments have changed the clinical research landscape. Thus, we moved from empirical clinical oncology to molecular and immunological therapeutic approaches. Along with this move, adapted dose-limiting toxicities definitions, endpoints, and dose escalation methods have been proposed. Moreover, the classical frontier between phase I, phase II, and phase III has become unclear in particular for immunological approaches. So, investigators are facing major challenges in drug development methodology. We propose to individualize clinical research using innovative approaches to significantly improve patient outcomes and targeting what is considered unmet need. Integrating high level of translational research and performing well designed biomarker studies with great potential for clinical practice are of utmost importance. This could be performed within new models of clinical research networks and by building a strong collaboration between academic, cooperative groups, on-site investigators, and pharma.

  10. Evolution of Decision Support Systems Research Field in Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SUDUC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific production in a certain field shows, in great extent, the research interests in that field. Decision Support Systems are a particular class of information systems which are gaining more popularity in various domains. In order to identify the evolution in time of the publications number, authors, subjects, publications in the Decision Support Systems (DSS field, and therefore the scientific world interest for this field, in November 2010 there have been organized a series of queries on three major international scientific databases: ScienceDirect, IEEE Xplore Digital Library and ACM Digital Library. The results presented in this paper shows that, even the decision support systems research field started in 1960s, the interests for this type of systems grew exponentially with each year in the last decades.

  11. Multi-Sited Ethnography and the Field of Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierides, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This paper responds to the challenge of how educational research might be practised in a contemporary world that is no longer necessarily organised by nearness and unity. Focusing on ethnography, it argues for what a multi-sited imaginary contributes to research in the field of education. By giving prominence to the notion of multi-sited…

  12. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  13. Emerging Methodologies in Pediatric Palliative Care Research: Six Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Nelson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the broad focus of pediatric palliative care (PPC on the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of children with potentially life-limiting illnesses and their families, PPC research requires creative methodological approaches. This manuscript, written by experienced PPC researchers, describes issues encountered in our own areas of research and the novel methods we have identified to target them. Specifically, we discuss potential approaches to: assessing symptoms among nonverbal children, evaluating medical interventions, identifying and treating problems related to polypharmacy, addressing missing data in longitudinal studies, evaluating longer-term efficacy of PPC interventions, and monitoring for inequities in PPC service delivery.

  14. Emerging Methodologies in Pediatric Palliative Care Research: Six Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Katherine E.; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rosenberg, Abby R.; Widger, Kimberley; Faerber, Jennifer A.; Feudtner, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Given the broad focus of pediatric palliative care (PPC) on the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of children with potentially life-limiting illnesses and their families, PPC research requires creative methodological approaches. This manuscript, written by experienced PPC researchers, describes issues encountered in our own areas of research and the novel methods we have identified to target them. Specifically, we discuss potential approaches to: assessing symptoms among nonverbal children, evaluating medical interventions, identifying and treating problems related to polypharmacy, addressing missing data in longitudinal studies, evaluating longer-term efficacy of PPC interventions, and monitoring for inequities in PPC service delivery. PMID:29495384

  15. Research on the Emergence Modeling of Equipment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the conditions of information, the network-centric system and the confrontation in the system has developed into a major combat style. But the traditional line of sexual assessment method is difficult to accurately assess the information equipment system combat capability. Therefore, this paper studies the effective evaluation method of the operational capability of the information equipment system from the perspective of emerge. Based on the simulation modeling and evaluation method, building the capability model of the weapon equipment system to evaluate the operational capability of the information weapon weaponry equipment. Through the example analysis, the validity of the simulation model and the practicability of the evaluation system is analyzed by analyzing the examples.

  16. Pediatric emergency in Brazil: the consolidation of an area in the pediatric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson P. Piva

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Pediatric emergency training will be a powerful stimulus to attract talented individuals, to establish them in this key area of medicine, where they can exercise their leadership by promoting care qualification, research, and teaching, as well as acting decisively in their management.

  17. Storytelling to support watershed research on emerging issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip Hellman

    2016-01-01

    Projections of budget deficits by the Congressional Budget Office imply ever-increasing pressure on federal spending for all purposes, including long-term watershed research. This presentation will argue that, since federal funding is ultimately a political decision, those responsible for maintaining long-term watershed research programs should not try to provide ...

  18. A framework to explore the knowledge structure of multidisciplinary research fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Shahadat; Khan, Arif; Baur, Louise A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding emerging areas of a multidisciplinary research field is crucial for researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders. For them a knowledge structure based on longitudinal bibliographic data can be an effective instrument. But with the vast amount of available online information it is often hard to understand the knowledge structure for data. In this paper, we present a novel approach for retrieving online bibliographic data and propose a framework for exploring knowledge structure. We also present several longitudinal analyses to interpret and visualize the last 20 years of published obesity research data.

  19. Entering the Field: Decisions of an Early Career Researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajeel Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classic grounded theory methodology is a much-debated topic in research, especially when novice researchers are selecting classic grounded theory for their research or theses. There is a constant need to justify and defend certain processes of grounded theory, which often challenge other research methods. As a novice researcher, I have often found myself juggling between the need to follow specific procedures and regulations of the university while opting to support the views of Glaser and the application of classic grounded theory for my research. To tackle such difficulties, specific decisions were used to support and justify key choices that favoured classic grounded theory and the requirements of the research institute and my research process. This article provides a reflection on the decisions taken at different stages of the research process to help readers make informed decisions before entering the field.

  20. Innovativeness as an emergent property: a new alignment of comparative and experimental research on animal innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Andrea S

    2016-03-19

    Innovation and creativity are key defining features of human societies. As we face the global challenges of the twenty-first century, they are also facets upon which we must become increasingly reliant. But what makes Homo sapiens so innovative and where does our high innovation propensity come from? Comparative research on innovativeness in non-human animals allows us to peer back through evolutionary time and investigate the ecological factors that drove the evolution of innovativeness, whereas experimental research identifies and manipulates underpinning creative processes. In commenting on the present theme issue, I highlight the controversies that have typified this research field and show how a paradigmatic shift in our thinking about innovativeness will contribute to resolving these tensions. In the past decade, innovativeness has been considered by many as a trait, a direct product of cognition, and a direct target of selection. The evidence I review here suggests that innovativeness will be hereon viewed as one component, or even an emergent property of a larger array of traits, which have evolved to deal with environmental variation. I illustrate how research should capitalize on taxonomic diversity to unravel the full range of psychological processes that underpin innovativeness in non-human animals. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Joint research and development on toxic-material emergency response between ENEA and LLNL. 1982 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudiksen, P.; Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.; Sullivan, T.; Rosen, L.; Walker, H.; Boeri, G.B.; Caracciolo, R.; Fiorenza, R.

    1982-11-01

    A summary is presented of current and future cooperative studies between ENEA and LLNL researchers designed to develop improved real-time emergency response capabilities for assessing the environmental consequences resulting from an accidental release of toxic materials into the atmosphere. These studies include development and evaluation of atmospheric transport and dispersion models, interfacing of data processing and communications systems, supporting meteorological field experiments, and integration of radiological measurements and model results into real-time assessments

  2. Global Knowledge Futures: Articulating the Emergence of a New Meta-level Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Gidley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I articulate a new meta-level field of studies that I call global knowledge futures—a field through which other emerging transdisciplinary fields can be integrated to cohere knowledge at a higher level. I contrast this with the current dominant knowledge paradigm of the global knowledge economy with its fragmentation, commodification and instrumentalism based on neoliberal knowledge capitalism. I take a big-picture, macrohistorical lens to the new thinking and new knowledge patterns that are emerging within the evolution of consciousness discourse. I explore three discourses: postformal studies, integral studies and planetary studies—using a fourth discourse, futures studies, to provide a macro-temporal framing. By extending the meta-fields of postformal, integral and planetary studies into a prospective future dimension, I locate areas of development where these leading-edge discourses can be brought into closer dialogue with each other. In this meeting point of four boundary-spanning discourses I identify the new meta-level field of global knowledge futures, grounded in human thinking capacities, such as creativity, imagination, dialogue and collaboration.

  3. On multiplying methods in the field of research evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, G.; Molas-Gallart, J.; De Rijcke, S.; Meijer, I.; Van der Weijden, I.; Wouters, P.

    2016-07-01

    This special session forms part of a larger program aimed at the multiplication and integration of methodological approaches in the research evaluation and innovation policy field. The session builds on previous initiatives by Gemma Derrick and colleagues at CWTS, INGENIO, the Rathenau Instituut and SPRU, exploring the advantages of qualitative methodological tools at the STI/ENID conference in Lugano, and an international workshop in London in October 2015. The program is highly topical: the research evaluation field is currently reconsidering its methodological foundations in light of new research questions arising from policy initiatives regarding a) the move toward open science; b) a reconceptualization of research excellence to include societal relevance; c) diversification of academic careers, and d) the search for indicators showcasing responsible research behavior and innovation. This new special session at STI2016 will advance and broaden the scope of previous initiatives by building bridges between cutting edge research involving quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methodological research designs. Bringing together leading experts and promising researchers with distinctive methodological skill-sets, the session will demonstrate the advantages of cross-fertilization between ‘core’ and ‘peripheral’ methodological approaches for the research evaluation and science indicators field. (Author)

  4. Emerging research methods and their application to road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarko, Andrew; Boyle, Linda Ng; Montella, Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    The study of road safety has seen great strides over the past few decades with advances in analytical methods and research tools that allow researchers to provide insights into the complex interactions of the driver, vehicle, and roadway. Data collection methods range from traditional traffic and roadway sensors to instrumented vehicles and driving simulators, capable of providing detailed data on both the normal driving conditions and the circumstances surrounding a safety critical event. In September 2011, the Third International Conference on Road Safety and Simulation was held in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, which was hosted by the Purdue University Center for Road Safety and sponsored by the Transportation Research Board and its three committees: ANB20 Safety Data, Analysis and Evaluation, AND30 Simulation and Measurement of Vehicle and Operator Performance, and ABJ95 Visualization in Transportation. The conference brought together two hundred researchers from all over the world demonstrating some of the latest research methods to quantify crash causality and associations, and model road safety. This special issue is a collection of 14 papers that were presented at the conference and then peer-reviewed through this journal. These papers showcase the types of analytical tools needed to examine various crash types, the use of naturalistic and on-road data to validate the use of surrogate measures of safety, and the value of driving simulators to examine high-risk situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-12-01

    Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies.

  6. Annual tendency of research papers used ICR mice as experimental animals in biomedical research fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, Jung Hoon; Cho, Joon Young; Kim, Kil Soo; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2017-06-01

    Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice have been widely used in various research fields including toxicology, oncology, pharmacology, and pharmaceutical product safety testing for decades. However, annual tendency of research papers involving ICR mice in various biomedical fields has not been previously analyzed. In this study, we examined the numbers of papers that used ICR mice as experimental animals in the social science, natural science, engineering, medicine-pharmacy, marine agriculture-fishery, and art-kinesiology fields by analyzing big data. Numbers of ICR mouse-used papers gradually increased from 1961 to 2014, but small decreases were observed in 2015 and 2016. The largest number of ICR-used papers were published in the medicine-pharmacy field, followed by natural science and art-kinesiology fields. There were no ICR mouse-used papers in other fields. Furthermore, ICR mice have been widely employed in cell biology studies within the natural science field as well as in biochemistry and pathology in the medicine-pharmacy field. Few ICR mouse-used papers were published in exercise biochemistry and exercise nutrition in the art-kinesiology field. Regardless in most fields, the total numbers of published papers involving ICR mice were higher in 2014 than in other years, although the numbers in some fields including dentistry, veterinary science, and dermatology were high in 2016. Taken together, the present study shows that various ICR stocks, including Korl:ICR mice, are widely employed as experimental animals in various biomedical research fields.

  7. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  8. Decomposing social and semantic networks in emerging "big data" research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, H.W.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the structural patterns of networks of internationally co-authored SCI papers in the domain of research driven by big data and provides an empirical analysis of semantic patterns of paper titles. The results based on data collected from the DVD version of the 2011 SCI database

  9. Personality disorders in older adults : Emerging research issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, S.P.J.; van Dijk, S.D.M.; Videler, A.C.; Rossi, G.; Dierckx, E.; Bouckaert, F.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research focusing on personality disorders (PDs) among older adults is mainly limited to studies on psychometric properties of age-specific personality tests, the age neutrality of specific items/scales, and validation of personality inventories for older adults. We identified only two

  10. Personality disorders in older adults : emerging research issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, S. P. J.; van Dijk, S. D. M.; Videler, A. C.; Rossi, G.; Dierckx, E.; Bouckaert, F.; Oude Voshaar, R. C.

    Empirical research focusing on personality disorders (PDs) among older adults is mainly limited to studies on psychometric properties of age-specific personality tests, the age neutrality of specific items/scales, and validation of personality inventories for older adults. We identified only two

  11. Emergent frameworks of research teaching and learning in a cohort ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... frameworks for doctoral pedagogies –“democratic teaching/learning participation”, “structured scaffolding”, “Ubuntu” and “serendipity”– as useful explanatory shaping influences which underpin and frame the model promoting a contextually relevant and appropriate doctoral research teaching and learning pedagogy.

  12. CFD analysis of the temperature field in emergency pump room in Loviisa NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rämä, Tommi, E-mail: tommi.rama@fortum.com [Fortum Power and Heat, P.O.B. 100, FI-00048 Fortum (Finland); Toppila, Timo, E-mail: timo.toppila@fortum.com [Fortum Power and Heat, P.O.B. 100, FI-00048 Fortum (Finland); Kelavirta, Teemu, E-mail: teemu.kelavirta@fortum.com [Fortum Power and Heat, Loviisa Power Plant, P.O.B. 23, FI-07901 Loviisa (Finland); Martin, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.martin@fortum.com [Fortum Power and Heat, Loviisa Power Plant, P.O.B. 23, FI-07901 Loviisa (Finland)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Laser scanned room geometry from Loviisa NPP was utilized for CFD simulation. • Uncertainty of CFD simulation was estimated using the Grid Convergence Index. • Measured temperature field of pump room was reproduced with CFD simulation. - Abstract: In the Loviisa Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) six emergency pumps belonging to the same redundancy are located in the same room. During a postulated accident the cooling of the room is needed as the engines of the emergency pumps generate heat. Cooling is performed with fans blowing air to the upper part of the room. Temperature limits have been given to the operating conditions of the main components in order to ensure their reliable operation. Therefore the temperature field of the room is important to know. Temperature measurements were made close to the most important components of the pump room to get a better understanding of the temperature field. For these measurements emergency pumps and cooling fan units were activated. To simulate conditions during a postulated accident additional warm-air heaters were used. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations were made to support plant measurements. For the CFD study one of the pump rooms of Loviisa NPP was scanned with a laser and this data converted to detailed 3-D geometry. Tetrahedral computation grid was created inside the geometry. Grid sensitivity studies were made, and the model was then validated against the power plant tests. With CFD the detailed temperature and flow fields of the whole room were produced. The used CFD model was able to reproduce the temperature field of the measurements. Two postulated accident cases were simulated. In the cases the operating cooling units were varied. The temperature profile of the room changes significantly depending on which units are cooling and which only circulating the air. The room average temperature stays approximately the same. The simulation results were used to ensure the acceptable operating

  13. Quantifying the Modern City: Emerging Technologies and Big Data for Active Living Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Adlakha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Opportunities and infrastructure for active living are an important aspect of a community’s design, livability, and health. Features of the built environment influence active living and population levels of physical activity, but objective study of the built environment influence on active living behaviors is challenging. The use of emerging technologies for active living research affords new and promising means to obtain objective data on physical activity behaviors and improve the precision and accuracy of measurements. This is significant for physical activity promotion because precise measurements can enable detailed examinations of where, when, and how physical activity behaviors actually occur, thus enabling more effective targeting of particular behavior settings and environments. The aim of this focused review is to provide an overview of trends in emerging technologies that can profoundly change our ability to understand environmental determinants of active living. It discusses novel technological approaches and big data applications to measure and track human behaviors that may have broad applications across the fields of urban planning, public health, and spatial epidemiology.

  14. On-site and off-site emergency planning at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soyberk, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    An emergency plan was prepared for minimizing the consequences of any unforeseen radiation accident in Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre (CNAEM) in Istanbul, Turkey. CNAEM is situated near Kucukcekmece Lake, which is about 30 km to the west of Istanbul. It includes two pool-type research reactors of 1 MW(th) and 5 MW(th). The population in the nearest inhabited areas varies from 1000 to 50,000. Accidents are classified, according to their severity, into three categories at CNAEM: (a) local emergency, (b) on-site emergency, (c) off-site emergency. During local emergency situations evacuation is not necessary. An on-site emergency situation requires the evacuation of personnel from the plant. Personnel hearing the emergency alarm should move directly to the preselected place as soon as possible. An off-site emergency is any accident that leads to widespread contamination outside the boundary. In this situation the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority and governmental authorities are notified immediately. The emergency organization group consists of: (a) Plant Superintendent, (b) Emergency Director, (c) Reactor Supervisor, (d) Senior Health Physicist, (e) Reactor Shift Operator, (f) Health Physicists. The administration building will be used as the Emergency Control Centre. The emergency teams working under the direction of the Emergency Director consist of: (a) Health Physics, (b) Fire and Rescue, (c) First Aid and Decontamination, (d) Transportation, (e) Security and Patrol. The emergency situation is evaluated in three phases at CNAEM. The first phase is the first few hours after the beginning of the accident. The second phase is between 8-10 hours or more following the first phase. The third phase is the recovery phase. The integrated doses over periods of two hours and two days are calculated according to the situation of the core, i.e. total or partial melting, and weather conditions. The results of the calculated parameters can be adapted to possible

  15. Field Research in the Teaching of Undergraduate Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Senturklu, Songul; Landblom, Douglas

    2015-04-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that undergraduate students benefit from research experiences. Benefits of undergraduate research include 1) personal and intellectual development, 2) more and closer contact with faculty, 3) the use of active learning techniques, 4) creation of high expectations, 5) development of creative and problem-solving skills, 6) greater independence and intrinsic motivation to learn, and 7) exposure to practical skills. The scientific discipline also benefits, as studies have shown that undergraduates who engage in research experiences are more likely to remain science majors and finish their degree program (Lopatto, 2007). Research experiences come as close as possible to allowing undergraduates to experience what it is like to be an academic or research member of their profession working to advance their discipline. Soils form in the field, therefore, field experiences are very important in developing a complete and holistic understanding of soil science. Combining undergraduate research with field experiences can provide extremely beneficial outcomes to the undergraduate student, including increased understanding of and appreciation for detailed descriptions and data analysis as well as an enhanced ability to see how various parts of their undergraduate education come together to understand a complex problem. The experiences of the authors in working with undergraduate students on field-based research projects will be discussed, along with examples of some of the undergraduate research projects that have been undertaken. In addition, student impressions of their research experiences will be presented. Reference Lopatto, D. 2007. Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning. CBE -- Life Sciences Education 6:297-306.

  16. Improvement of neutron irradiation field of research reactors for BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Otohiko

    1992-01-01

    The modification of research reactors for an improvement of the irradiation field for BNCT has been investigated in comparison with the field characteristics of the 'old' configuration at the Musashi reactor. The new point of this study is that the evaluation has been done by using an arrangement including both the facility structure and a whole-body phantom, and also by considering the whole-body absorbed dose. (author)

  17. Setting research strategy on electromagnetic-field pollution of Ecuador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becerra, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    General population and occupational groups are being exposed to electromagnetic field (EMF) nonionizing radiation that come from all electric or electronic equipment that work either with extremely low frequency (ELF) or radiofrequency (RF) fields. This preoccupation has generated research and regulation plans in some countries int he world, in order to set a clear configuration of bioeffects and other environmental implications derived from exposures to ELF/RF EMF

  18. Overview of CEA research in the field of radionuclides migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Trotignon, L.; Tevissen, E.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a synthetic status of the researches conducted within the Nuclear Energy Division (CEA/DEN) in the field of radionuclides migration in three specific areas which have been chosen for their representativeness and potential impact: the migration of RN in PWR reactors, the migration of RN from a deep geological repository and the migration processes in the surface environments. In addition, some status is given about more generic research which is conducted in the field of RN speciation in the aqueous phase and at the interfaces and regarding chemistry / transport couplings. Additional information about the human and technical means involved in these fields of research in CEA/DEN is finally given in the Appendix. (authors)

  19. Emerging trends in contract research industry in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabu, Sushma; Gupta, Alka; Bhadauria, Anupama

    2010-09-01

    A Contract Research Organization (CRO) is a service organization that provides support to the pharmaceutical industry and offers a wide range of "outsourced" pharmaceutical research services to aid in R&D process and is thus an essential tool for undertaking clinical trials in the present scenario when high stakes are involved in the drug discovery process. This industry also offers a safe option of investment as the industry is largely recession-proof, with a significant upscale growth. Presently India occupies a very small pie of the global market share in the Clinical Trials Industry but it is estimated to conduct nearly 5% of global clinical trials by 2012. The global CRO industry valued $18 bn in 2008 and the market is expected to grow at an annual rate of 14% between 2009 and 13. Top multinational pharmaceuticals companies are venturing into the Indian business, in collaboration with the Indian Drug Companies. According to a recent study by Mckinsey & Company, the Indian Clinical Research Industry can attract $1.5 bn of revenue from US and EU by 2010. Such an increase in outsourcing from the western countries has led the global pharma companies and Indian entrepreneurs to set up Contract Research Organizations (CROs) in India. To bring this into realization and fulfil the market demand, while simultaneously aiding in improving the country's economical standards and market position, joint and well-coordinated efforts on part of the government, industry, and working professionals are needed in terms of regulatory affairs, audits, transparency in work affairs, garnering patient confidence, and pharmacovigilance. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION AND RESEARCH: EMERGING TRENDS AND CONCERNS

    OpenAIRE

    Cordelia Mason

    2011-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has gained much prominence in both developed nations and developing nations and has thus created higher demand for entrepreneurship education. There is increasing emphasis on education as a way to eradicate poverty and entrepreneurship as a catalyst for economic development by many nations around the world. In tandem, entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship education have been the focus of researchers, educators as well as public and private bodies. This paper explores the init...

  1. 5G backhaul challenges and emerging research directions: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, Mona; Imran, Muhammad Ali; Tafazolli, Rahim; Tukmanov, Anvar

    2016-01-01

    5G is the next cellular generation and is expected to quench the growing thirst for taxing data rates and to enable the Internet of Things. Focused research and standardization work have been addressing the corresponding challenges from the radio perspective while employing advanced features, such as network densification, massive multiple-input-multiple-output antennae, coordinated multi-point processing, inter-cell interference mitigation techniques, carrier aggregation, and new spectrum ex...

  2. A review of research in the field of nanorobotics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Dannelle P.; Weir, Nathan A.; Jones, James Frank

    2005-10-01

    This report highlights the findings of an extensive review of the literature in the area of nanorobotics. The main goal of this midyear LDRD effort is to survey and identify accomplishments and advancements that have been made in this relatively new and emerging field. As a result, it may be determined what routes in the area of nanorobotics are scientifically plausible and technically useful so that the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center can position itself to play a role in the future development of nanotechnology.

  3. Emerging search regimes: measuring co-evolutions among research, science, and society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimeriks, G.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2012-01-01

    Scientometric data is used to investigate empirically the emergence of search regimes in biotechnology, genomics and nanotechnology. Complex regimes can emerge when three independent sources of variance interact. In our model, researchers can be considered as the nodes that carry the science system.

  4. Cities and Systemic Change for Sustainability: Prevailing Epistemologies and an Emerging Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Wolfram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cities are key for sustainability and the radical systemic changes required to enable equitable human development within planetary boundaries. Their particular role in this regard has become the subject of an emerging and highly interdisciplinary scientific debate. Drawing on a qualitative literature review, this paper identifies and scrutinizes the principal fields involved, asking for their respective normative orientation, interdisciplinary constitution, theories and methods used, and empirical basis to provide orientations for future research. It recognizes four salient research epistemologies, each focusing on a distinct combination of drivers of change: (A transforming urban metabolisms and political ecologies; (B configuring urban innovation systems for green economies; (C building adaptive urban communities and ecosystems; and (D empowering urban grassroots niches and social innovation. The findings suggest that future research directed at cities and systemic change towards sustainability should (1 explore interrelations between the above epistemologies, using relational geography and governance theory as boundary areas; (2 conceive of cities as places shaped by and shaping interactions between multiple socio-technical and social-ecological systems; (3 focus on agency across systems and drivers of change, and develop corresponding approaches for intervention and experimentation; and (4 rebalance the empirical basis and methods employed, strengthening transdisciplinarity in particular.

  5. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-20

    Mar 20, 2018 ... student health professionals in various institutions, both in South Africa. (SA) and internationally. ... field include dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in training, .... The College of Health Sciences at UKZN has four schools: clinical ..... Journal of Emerging Trends in Educational Research and Policy ...

  6. Emergent kink stability of a magnetized plasma jet injected into a transverse background magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott C.; Fisher, Dustin M.; Lynn, Alan G.

    2017-11-01

    We report experimental results on the injection of a magnetized plasma jet into a transverse background magnetic field in the HelCat linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico [M. Gilmore et al., J. Plasma Phys. 81(1), 345810104 (2015)]. After the plasma jet leaves the plasma-gun muzzle, a tension force arising from an increasing curvature of the background magnetic field induces in the jet a sheared axial-flow gradient above the theoretical kink-stabilization threshold. We observe that this emergent sheared axial flow stabilizes the n = 1 kink mode in the jet, whereas a kink instability is observed in the jet when there is no background magnetic field present.

  7. Emerging uses of patient generated health data in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A; Bennett, Antonia V; Basch, Ethan

    2015-05-01

    Recent advancements in consumer directed personal computing technology have led to the generation of biomedically-relevant data streams with potential health applications. This has catalyzed international interest in Patient Generated Health Data (PGHD), defined as "health-related data - including health history, symptoms, biometric data, treatment history, lifestyle choices, and other information-created, recorded, gathered, or inferred by or from patients or their designees (i.e. care partners or those who assist them) to help address a health concern."(Shapiro et al., 2012) PGHD offers several opportunities to improve the efficiency and output of clinical trials, particularly within oncology. These range from using PGHD to understand mechanisms of action of therapeutic strategies, to understanding and predicting treatment-related toxicity, to designing interventions to improve adherence and clinical outcomes. To facilitate the optimal use of PGHD, methodological research around considerations related to feasibility, validation, measure selection, and modeling of PGHD streams is needed. With successful integration, PGHD can catalyze the application of "big data" to cancer clinical research, creating both "n of 1" and population-level observations, and generating new insights into the nature of health and disease. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Emerging Geoscience Education Research at the University of British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F. M.; Harris, S.; Wieman, C.; Gilley, B.; Lane, E.; Caulkins, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience education research (GER) in UBC’s Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences (EOS) began due to a well funded 5-yr Faculty of Science project called the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative (CWSEI). This initiative takes an evidence-based, scientific approach to improving education by 1) establishing what students should learn; 2) scientifically measuring what students are learning; 3) adapting instruction and curricula using effective technologies and pedagogical research; and 4) disseminating and adopting what works. The presentation will discuss how this initiative has fostered a growing GER presence within our Department. CWSEI funding has enabled the EOS Department to hire 4 full-time Science Teaching and Learning Fellows (STLFs) who work directly with faculty to optimize courses and curricula. Much of the effort goes into developing active learning opportunities and rigorous ways to measure student learning and attitudes. Results serve as feedback for both students and instructors. Over 10 research projects have so far been initiated as a result of course and curriculum transformation. Examples include studies about: student attitudes towards Earth and Ocean Sciences; the effects of multiple instructors in courses; links between student in-class engagement and pedagogy; how certain instructional interventions promote metacognition; and others. Also, many modified courses use pre- and post-testing to measure learning gains. One undergraduate honors thesis, about assessing conceptual understanding of geological time, has been completed. Keys to fostering GER in our setting include: (1) faculty commitment to change, based on funding from CWSEI, (2) full-time Earth scientists (STLFs) who catalyze and support change, and (3) support from CWSEI science education experts. Specifically: - STLFs are trained Earth scientists but were not initially science education experts. Continuous support from CWSEI has been crucial for building expertise about how

  9. Annual tendency of research papers used ICR mice as experimental animals in biomedical research fields

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ji Eun; Nam, Jung Hoon; Cho, Joon Young; Kim, Kil Soo; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2017-01-01

    Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice have been widely used in various research fields including toxicology, oncology, pharmacology, and pharmaceutical product safety testing for decades. However, annual tendency of research papers involving ICR mice in various biomedical fields has not been previously analyzed. In this study, we examined the numbers of papers that used ICR mice as experimental animals in the social science, natural science, engineering, medicine-pharmacy, marine agricultur...

  10. Accelerated aging and seedling field emergence in soybean Envelhecimento acelerado e emergência de plântulas de soja em campo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Melo Torres

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Information regarding the relationship between laboratory seed vigor testing and seedling field emergence is very important to estimate seed performance after sowing and help producers adopt the best procedures to improve stand establishment. The objective of the present study was to relate accelerated aging (AA test results to soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] seedling field emergence results based on data obtained over three agricultural years. The following evaluations were made: seed water content, standard germination, accelerated aging, electrical conductivity, and seedling field emergence. There was a close association between planting environmental conditions, seed physiological quality and seedling field emergence. The most accurate predictions were obtained for AA values > 90%, when field emergence was higher than 80% (r² = 0.90. Based on the results it was concluded that the AA test provided an accurate estimate of field emergence of soybean seedlings. However, as seedbed environmental conditions became less favorable, the ability of the AA test to estimate field performance significantly decreased.Informações sobre a relação entre resultados de testes de vigor conduzidos em laboratório e da emergência de plântulas em campo são fundamentais para a tomada de decisões pelos produtores de sementes. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo verificar a associação entre os resultados do teste de envelhecimento acelerado e a emergência de plântulas de soja [Glycine max (L. Merrill] em campo, em diferentes safras agrícolas e épocas de semeadura. Assim, foram efetuadas as seguintes avaliações: determinação do grau de umidade das sementes; testes de germinação, de envelhecimento acelerado e de condutividade elétrica, bem como emergência de plântulas em campo. A estimativa mais precisa do desempenho das plântulas em campo foi verificada numa faixa de valores de envelhecimento acelerado > 90%, estimando emergência em campo

  11. Competitiveness in Emerging Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents a collection of interrelated research advances in the field of technological entrepreneurship from the perspective of competition in emerging markets. Featuring contributions by scholars from different fields of interest, it provides a mix of theoretical developments, insights...... and research methods used to uncover the unexplored aspects of competitiveness in emerging markets in an age characterized by disruptive technologies....

  12. Gender inequality in the field of science and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Poczatková

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on gender inequality in the field of science and research in the Czech Republic. The authors of this article present an unbiased view on women in science and research and they also point out that gender inequality still exists in Russia and the USA. Based on accessible statistical and information data (see references that have been elaborated by synthetic-analytical methods, this article authors state their opinion to this topic.

  13. Gender inequality in the field of science and research

    OpenAIRE

    Blanka Poczatková; Pavlína Křibíková

    2017-01-01

    The article focuses on gender inequality in the field of science and research in the Czech Republic. The authors of this article present an unbiased view on women in science and research and they also point out that gender inequality still exists in Russia and the USA. Based on accessible statistical and information data (see references) that have been elaborated by synthetic-analytical methods, this article authors state their opinion to this topic.

  14. Conceptualizing Policy Work as Activity and Field of Research

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kohoutek; Martin Nekola; Vilém Novotný

    2013-01-01

    The area of policy work and policy workers within government bureaucracies is encompassing a large field of activities and research. This article aims to provide a synthesised perspective on policy work in relating theoretical and empirical accounts of policy workers, identifying points of convergence and linking them to essential assumptions on research in policy work. We conceptualize policy work as activity within government bureaucracies from three interrelated perspectives: the professio...

  15. Research into Australian emergency services personnel mental health and wellbeing: An evidence map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varker, Tracey; Metcalf, Olivia; Forbes, David; Chisolm, Katherine; Harvey, Sam; Van Hooff, Miranda; McFarlane, Alexander; Bryant, Richard; Phelps, Andrea J

    2018-02-01

    Evidence maps are a method of systematically characterising the range of research activity in broad topic areas and are a tool for guiding research priorities. 'Evidence-mapping' methodology was used to quantify the nature and distribution of recent peer-reviewed research into the mental health and wellbeing of Australian emergency services personnel. A search of the PsycINFO, EMBASE and Cochrane Library databases was performed for primary research articles that were published between January 2011 and July 2016. In all, 43 studies of primary research were identified and mapped. The majority of the research focused on organisational and individual/social factors and how they relate to mental health problems/wellbeing. There were several areas of research where very few studies were detected through the mapping process, including suicide, personality, stigma and pre-employment factors that may contribute to mental health outcomes and the use of e-health. No studies were detected which examined the prevalence of self-harm and/or harm to others, bullying, alcohol/substance use, barriers to care or experience of families of emergency services personnel. In addition, there was no comprehensive national study that had investigated all sectors of emergency services personnel. This evidence map highlights the need for future research to address the current gaps in mental health and wellbeing research among Australian emergency services personnel. Improved understanding of the mental health and wellbeing of emergency services personnel, and the factors that contribute, should guide organisations' wellbeing policies and procedures.

  16. Research on Application of Internet of Things in the Disposal of Environmental Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yanju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of things is an important part of a new generation of information technology and also an important stage of Information Age. Application of Internet of things in the disposal of environmental emergency is an inevitable trend of application of Internet of things in the field of environmental protection. This paper summarizes the principle, process and application field of Internet of things, and focuses on the general frame-work of environmental emergency disposal system based on Internet of things and further analyses the factors of restricting application of Internet of things in the disposal of environmental emergency. At last, the suggestions and countermeasures to optimize environmental emergency disposal system are proposed.

  17. Educational Research Capacity Building in the European Union: A Critique of the Lived Experiences of Emerging Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallet, Fiona; Fidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the extent to which European Union (EU) policies impact upon the activities of associations such as the European Educational Research Association (EERA) and the experiences of emerging researchers aligned to such associations. In essence, the authors explore potential tensions between policy and the lived…

  18. Factors Related to the Adoption of IT Emerging Technologies by Research and Non-Research Based Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Then, Keri Ann; Amaria, Pesi

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the adoption of information technology (IT) emerging technology by higher education institutions with a focus on non-research and research based institutions categorized by Carnegie Mellon classifications that are members of EDUCAUSE, a higher education non-profit organization, whose mission is the use of IT in higher…

  19. Astrobiology field research in Moon/Mars Analogue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foing, B.H.; Stoker, C.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2011-01-01

    Extreme environments on Earth often provide similar terrain conditions to landing/operation sites on Moon and Mars. Several field campaigns (EuroGeoMars2009 and DOMMEX/ILEWG EuroMoonMars from November 2009 to March 2010) were conducted at the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) in Utah. Some of the

  20. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  1. Pulsed electric field (PEF)research at USDA, ARS, ERRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article summarizes the effects of pulsed electric fields on the microbiological safety and quality aspects of various liquid food matrices, obtained at USDA, ARS, Eastern Regional Research Center under CRIS Project No. 1935-41420-013-00D, Processing Intervention Technologies for Enhancing the S...

  2. Research fields, challenges and opportunities in European oilseed crops breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincourt Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the geographical specialization in oilseed world production, Europe has a major role to play in winter oilseed rape and sunflower breeding. Mainly based on the most recen t results, this review aims to identify the main research and breeding targets for these two crops, as seen through publications, with an attempt to suggest what are opportunities and challenges in these research fields. Growing a healthy and yielding crop remains the key driver for agronomic production. However sustainability and environmental profiles of the cultivar are now entering the field of play: The sustainability concern invested the field of resistance to diseases. Nitrogen use efficiency became an important target for Brassica napus, and crop resilience toward drought stresses is the way chosen in Helianthus annuus breeding for yield improvement. Significant advances are underway for quality traits, but the uncertainty on nutritional and industrial demand may explain why the product diversification remains low.

  3. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC) Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, D.B.

    2002-02-28

    The Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has established a Field Research Center (FRC) to support the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the DOE Headquarters Office of Biological and Environmental Research within the Office of Science.

  4. Invention profiles and uneven growth in the field of emerging nano-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Jiancheng; Liu, Na

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to synthetically investigate invention profiles and uneven growth of technological knowledge in the emerging nano-energy field, based on patents data extracted from the Derwent Innovation Index (DII) database during the time period 1991–2012. The trend analysis shows that invention in this field has experienced enormous growth and also diversification over the past 22 years. The co-occurrence network of burst technology domains reveals that technology domains constantly burst, and innovative progress in nanotechnology has tremendously contributed to energy production, storage, conversion and harvesting and so on. Nano-energy patented inventions mainly come from a combinatorial process with a very limited role of developing brand-new technological capabilities. Reusing existing technological capabilities including recombination reuse, recombination creation and single reuse is the primary source of inventions. For the impacts of technology networks' embeddedness, we find that network tie strength suppresses the growth of technological knowledge domains, and network status and convergence both facilitate the growth of technological knowledge domains. We expect that this study will provide some enlightenment for inventing or creating new knowledge in emerging fields in complex technological environment. - Highlights: • We define and utilize a unique dataset of nano-energy patents. • We identify and map the burst technological knowledge domains. • Quantitative argument is provided to prove the combinatorial invention. • Impacts of network embeddedness on growth of technology domain are examined. • Network characteristics affect the growth of technology domain

  5. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species.

  6. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID

  7. PROJECTS EDUCATION RESEARCH: PRACTICAL EXPERIENCED IN A SCHOOL IN / FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenilde Nogueira Paniago

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an investigation done with teachers of a public school, located on countryside, city of Água Boa, Mato Grosso, with a view to looking for new alternatives to the teaching practice on school, by means of using the collaborative realization of projects and researches as pedagogical alternatives. As qualitative approach, the investigation has developed by means of the study of benchmarks, that discuss the research on teaching formation, on teaching practice, education on/of the countryside and, of the projects’ realization of teaching and research with and by teachers. The work enabled to get closer relationship between school and community, to articulate the theoretical knowledge, studied on school, and the life of countryside students, showing the necessity of theoretico-methodological formation with collective engagement of teachers and public politics that propitiate the emergence of conditions to the new practices of teaching on school on/of the countryside by the bias of search.

  8. [Primary care: A definition of the field to develop research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verga-Gérard, A

    2018-03-01

    Research in the field of primary care has dramatically increased in France in recent years, especially since 2013 with the introduction of primary care as a thematic priority for research proposals launched by the Ministry of Health (Direction générale de l'offre de soins). The RECaP (Research in Clinical Epidemiology and Public Health) network is a French research network supported by Inserm, which recently implemented a specific working group focusing on research in primary care, based on a multidisciplinary approach. Researchers from different specialties participate in this group. The first aim of the group was to reach a common definition of the perimeter and of the panel of healthcare professionals and structures potentially involved in the field of primary care. For this purpose, a selection of different data sets of sources defining primary care was analyzed by the group, each participant collecting a set of sources, from which a synthesis was made and discussed. A definition of primary care at different levels (international, European and French) was summarized. A special attention was given to the French context in order to adapt the perimeter to the characteristics of the French healthcare system, notably by illustrating the different key elements of the definition with the inclusion of primary care actors and the type of practice premises. In conclusion, this work illustrates the diversity of primary care in France and the potential offered for research purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Tuskegee as Sacred Rhetoric: Focal Point for the Emergent Field of African American Religion and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Terri

    2018-02-01

    Scholars in African American religion engage the Tuskegee Syphilis Study as the focal point of the African American experience in institutional medicine. Seeking a way forward from this history and its intentional evil, the author proposes to position Tuskegee as a form of Lynch's culturally contextual sacred rhetoric to make use of its metaphoric value in the emerging field of African American religion and health. In this broader meaning-making frame, Tuskegee serves as a reminder that African American religious sensibility has long been an agential resource that counters abuse of the Black body. It also acknowledges the complex decisions facing African American clinical trial participants.

  10. Estimation of source term in radiation emergencies from field measurements: its potential and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hukkoo, R.K.; Bapat, V.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the 'early phase' of a radiation emergency the data on the nature and quantity of releases to asses the radiological impact may not be readily available thus delaying the initiation of necessary steps to contain the event and mitigate its effect. An iterative method based on the field measurements carried out at two concentric rings around the point of release is proposed to estimate the atmospheric release at the ground level and stack height. The program logic has been evaluated for internal consistency and its utility and limitations are discussed. (author). 8 figs., 4 tabs., 4 refs

  11. Gender-specific research for emergency diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease: proceedings from the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Cardiovascular Research Workgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Nagurney, John T; Anise, Ayodola; DeVon, Holli A; D'Onofrio, Gail; Hess, Erik P; Hollander, Judd E; Legato, Mariane J; McGregor, Alyson J; Scott, Jane; Tewelde, Semhar; Diercks, Deborah B

    2014-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of death for both men and women. However, over the years, emergency physicians, cardiologists, and other health care practitioners have observed varying outcomes in men and women with symptomatic CAD. Women in general are 10 to 15 years older than men when they develop CAD, but suffer worse postinfarction outcomes compared to age-matched men. This article was developed by the cardiovascular workgroup at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference to identify sex- and gender-specific gaps in the key themes and research questions related to emergency cardiac ischemia care. The workgroup had diverse stakeholder representation from emergency medicine, cardiology, critical care, nursing, emergency medical services, patients, and major policy-makers in government, academia, and patient care. We implemented the nominal group technique to identify and prioritize themes and research questions using electronic mail, monthly conference calls, in-person meetings, and Web-based surveys between June 2013 and May 2014. Through three rounds of nomination and refinement, followed by an in-person meeting on May 13, 2014, we achieved consensus on five priority themes and 30 research questions. The overarching themes were as follows: 1) the full spectrum of sex-specific risk as well as presentation of cardiac ischemia may not be captured by our standard definition of CAD and needs to incorporate other forms of ischemic heart disease (IHD); 2) diagnosis is further challenged by sex/gender differences in presentation and variable sensitivity of cardiac biomarkers, imaging, and risk scores; 3) sex-specific pathophysiology of cardiac ischemia extends beyond conventional obstructive CAD to include other causes such as microvascular dysfunction, takotsubo, and coronary artery dissection, better recognized as IHD; 4) treatment and prognosis are influenced by sex-specific variations in biology, as well as patient

  12. How are topics born? Understanding the research dynamics preceding the emergence of new areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo A. Salatino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to promptly recognise new research trends is strategic for many stakeholders, including universities, institutional funding bodies, academic publishers and companies. While the literature describes several approaches which aim to identify the emergence of new research topics early in their lifecycle, these rely on the assumption that the topic in question is already associated with a number of publications and consistently referred to by a community of researchers. Hence, detecting the emergence of a new research area at an embryonic stage, i.e., before the topic has been consistently labelled by a community of researchers and associated with a number of publications, is still an open challenge. In this paper, we begin to address this challenge by performing a study of the dynamics preceding the creation of new topics. This study indicates that the emergence of a new topic is anticipated by a significant increase in the pace of collaboration between relevant research areas, which can be seen as the ‘parents’ of the new topic. These initial findings (i confirm our hypothesis that it is possible in principle to detect the emergence of a new topic at the embryonic stage, (ii provide new empirical evidence supporting relevant theories in Philosophy of Science, and also (iii suggest that new topics tend to emerge in an environment in which weakly interconnected research areas begin to cross-fertilise.

  13. Weed emergence on long years’ not herbicide treated fields - duration of the after-effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In a long-term field trial plots were not treated with herbicides for 12 years (from 1996 to 2007. Two different crop rotations with 50% or 66% of cereals in the rotation were tested. At the same time in each crop rotation two different plant protection strategies were established. Since autumn 2007 the former controls not sprayed with any herbicide have been treated with herbicides. The crop rotation was unified. In that long-term field trial plots always treated with herbicides exist also. Weeds were counted by number and species before herbicide treatments. The comparison of these two different plots (treated and untreated shows what after-effect exists on the formerly untreated plots even after eight years. The emergence of weeds is still higher. Also the different crop rotations are still perceptible. For the plant protection strategy with the lower herbicide amounts the differences blur now.

  14. Emergence and legitimation of an expertise in the field of 'major industrial hazards'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallet, Benedicte

    1989-01-01

    A look at industrial safety management in France immediately points out to attempts at transferring safety concepts, methods and procedures from the nuclear field to chemical industry. Such transfer is being analyzed here from a sociological point of view, mainly as a strategy from some professional groups to consolidate and expand their area of competence, at a time when the issue of technological risks gains momentum. Nevertheless, such transfer implies some difficulties, due to structural differences between the two sectors as well as to the industrialists will to keep their prerogatives over their own field. Against this background, the relationships between industrialists, safety professionals and state engineers are examined to see how they influence the emergence of a new body of experts. (author)

  15. Applications of field-programmable gate arrays in scientific research

    CERN Document Server

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut F W

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on resource awareness in field-programmable gate array (FPGA) design, Applications of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays in Scientific Research covers the principle of FPGAs and their functionality. It explores a host of applications, ranging from small one-chip laboratory systems to large-scale applications in ""big science."" The book first describes various FPGA resources, including logic elements, RAM, multipliers, microprocessors, and content-addressable memory. It then presents principles and methods for controlling resources, such as process sequencing, location constraints, and in

  16. Personnel economics: A research field comes of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Christian; Bryson, Alex; Dur, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The application of economic theory and principles to firms’ human resource problems is commonplace today. Personnel economics has come a long way since its early days in the late 1970s and 1980s, when scholars developed its theoretical foundations. In this contribution and introduction...... to the Special Issue ‘Advances in personnel economics’ of the German Journal of Human Resource Management, we would like to illustrate the origins of the field, outline how personnel economics relates to other research areas, describe major developments in the field and address its future challenges....

  17. Culture Studies in the Field of International Business Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Verner; Li, Xin; Jakobsen, Michael

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of culture studies within the field of international business research, and to examine how two main paradigms – essentialism and social constructivism – relate to the discourse in this field. We analyze the main points of the two...... in this paper. Practical implications: We encourage practitioners to learn how to switch, both sequentially and spatially, between the two paradigms of culture (fundamentally incommensurable though they are). This involves taking a “both/or” approach to the two paradigms. Originality/Value: We show...

  18. Comparative Review of Endurance Development in Cadets and Students in Track-and-Field Classes and Training at Educational Institutions of State Emergency Service of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Жогло

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to provide a comparative review of the endurance development in cadets and students in track-and-field classes and training at educational institutions of the State Emergency Service of Ukraine. Research methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, pedagogical testing and methods of mathematical statistics of data reduction. Research results. The study resulted in a comparative analysis of the levels of endurance development in the cadets and the first-year students of the School of Psychology and the School of Emergency Rescue Forces of the National University of Civil Defence of Ukraine. Conclusions. The study results prove that the first-year students of the School of Psychology and the School of Emergency Rescue Forces have a low level of endurance (special and aerobic as compared to the cadets. In this regard, the physical training syllabus ought to include more exercises intended to develop special and aerobic endurance.

  19. 76 FR 76937 - Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting-Room Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Emerging Technology and Research Advisory Committee; Notice of Partially Closed Meeting--Room Change The Emerging Technology and Research Advisory... emerging technology and research activities, including those related to deemed exports. Agenda Wednesday...

  20. Exploring the use of storytelling in quantitative research fields using a multiple case study method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lori N. Hamlet

    The purpose of this study was to explore the emerging use of storytelling in quantitative research fields. The focus was not on examining storytelling in research, but rather how stories are used in various ways within the social context of quantitative research environments. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven professionals who had experience using storytelling in their work and my personal experience with the subject matter was also used as a source of data according to the notion of researcher-as-instrument. This study is qualitative in nature and is guided by two supporting theoretical frameworks, the sociological perspective and narrative inquiry. A multiple case study methodology was used to gain insight about why participants decided to use stories or storytelling in a quantitative research environment that may not be traditionally open to such methods. This study also attempted to identify how storytelling can strengthen or supplement existing research, as well as what value stories can provide to the practice of research in general. Five thematic findings emerged from the data and were grouped under two headings, "Experiencing Research" and "Story Work." The themes were found to be consistent with four main theoretical functions of storytelling identified in existing scholarly literature: (a) sense-making; (b) meaning-making; (c) culture; and (d) communal function. The five thematic themes that emerged from this study and were consistent with the existing literature include: (a) social context; (b) quantitative versus qualitative; (c) we think and learn in terms of stories; (d) stories tie experiences together; and (e) making sense and meaning. Recommendations are offered in the form of implications for various social contexts and topics for further research are presented as well.

  1. Current status of research on power-frequency electric and magnetic fields of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Recent scientific literature has suggested a number of possible human health effects which might be associated with exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields. Several authoritative reviews of this subject have been published. currently, the major uncertainty and the major research effort is directed to the issue of these fields and cancer. Therefore, this review will be limited to examining the evidence relating prolonged power-frequency electric and magnetic field exposure to cancer in human populations. This paper reports that the CIGRE expert Group has assessed the research literature in the following areas: epidemiological evidence, animal studies, cellular effects, knowledge of mechanisms

  2. DETECTION OF FLUX EMERGENCE, SPLITTING, MERGING, AND CANCELLATION OF NETWORK FIELD. I. SPLITTING AND MERGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Y.; Yokoyama, T. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hagenaar, H. J. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Org. ADBS, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    Frequencies of magnetic patch processes on the supergranule boundary, namely, flux emergence, splitting, merging, and cancellation, are investigated through automatic detection. We use a set of line-of-sight magnetograms taken by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board the Hinode satellite. We found 1636 positive patches and 1637 negative patches in the data set, whose time duration is 3.5 hr and field of view is 112'' Multiplication-Sign 112''. The total numbers of magnetic processes are as follows: 493 positive and 482 negative splittings, 536 positive and 535 negative mergings, 86 cancellations, and 3 emergences. The total numbers of emergence and cancellation are significantly smaller than those of splitting and merging. Further, the frequency dependence of the merging and splitting processes on the flux content are investigated. Merging has a weak dependence on the flux content with a power-law index of only 0.28. The timescale for splitting is found to be independent of the parent flux content before splitting, which corresponds to {approx}33 minutes. It is also found that patches split into any flux contents with the same probability. This splitting has a power-law distribution of the flux content with an index of -2 as a time-independent solution. These results support that the frequency distribution of the flux content in the analyzed flux range is rapidly maintained by merging and splitting, namely, surface processes. We suggest a model for frequency distributions of cancellation and emergence based on this idea.

  3. An Organizational Perspective to the Creation of the Research Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Mellini, Barbara; Camilli, Marco; Ventura, Stefano; Di Lucchio, Loredana

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the paper is to contribute to the definition and analysis of the "access to the field" (Feldman et al. 2003) through an inter-organizational perspective. The paper discusses a case study on the access of a researcher to a hospital department where both organizations and actors are shown as actively constructing the research site. Both researcher and participants are described in terms of work organizations originally engaged in parallel systems of activity. Dynamics of negotiation "tied" the different actors' activities in a new activity system where researcher and participants concur to the effectiveness of both organizations (i.e., the research and the hospital ward). An Activity Theory perspective (Leont'ev 1978) is used with the aim of focusing the analysis on the activities in charge to the different actors. The approach adopted introduces the idea that, from the outset, research is made possible by a process of co-construction that works through the development of a completely new and shared work space arising around the encounter between researchers and participants. It is the balance between improvised actions and the co-creation of "boundary objects" (Star and Griesemer 1989), which makes interlacement possible between the two activity systems. The concept of "knotworking" (Engeström 2007a) is adopted to interpret specific actions by both organizations and actors intended to build a knot of activities whereby the new research system takes place.

  4. Field research program for unsaturated flow and transport experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, V.C.; Rautman, C.A.; Glass, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, a field research program has been developed to refine and validate models for flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock. Validation of these models within the range of their application for performance assessment requires a more sophisticated understanding of the processes that govern flow and transport within fractured porous media than currently exists. In particular, our research is prioritized according to understanding and modeling processes that, if not accurately incorporated into performance assessment models, would adversely impact the project's ability to evaluate repository performance. For this reason, we have oriented our field program toward enhancing our understanding of scaling processes as they relate to effective media property modeling, as well as to the conceptual modeling of complex flow and transport phenomena

  5. Emerging Good Practice in Managing Research Data and Research Information within UK Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidson, Joy; Jones, Sarah; Molloy, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Sound data intensive science depends upon effective research data and information management. Efficient and interoperable research information systems will be crucial for enabling and exploiting data intensive research however it is equally important that a research ecosystem is cultivated within...... institutions prepare to meet funding body mandates relating to research data management and sharing and to engage fully in the digital agenda.......Sound data intensive science depends upon effective research data and information management. Efficient and interoperable research information systems will be crucial for enabling and exploiting data intensive research however it is equally important that a research ecosystem is cultivated within...... research-intensive institutions that foster sustainable communication, cooperation and support of a diverse range of research-related staff. Researchers, librarians, administrators, ethics advisors, and IT professionals all have a vital contribution to make in ensuring that research data and related...

  6. Public Health System Research in Public Health Emergency Preparedness in the United States (2009-2015): Actionable Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoia, Elena; Lin, Leesa; Bernard, Dottie; Klein, Noah; James, Lyndon P; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    communication barriers experienced by public health and health care personnel. Forty-eight studies provided evidence on how to create and sustain preparedness systems. Results included how to build social capital across organizations and citizens and how to develop sustainable and useful planning efforts that maintain flexibility and rely on available medical data. Twenty-six studies provided evidence on the usefulness of measurement efforts, such as community and organizational needs assessments, and new methods to learn from the response to critical incidents. In the United States, the field of public health emergency preparedness system research has been supported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since the release of the 2008 Institute of Medicine letter report. The first definition of public health emergency preparedness appeared in 2007, and before 2008 there was a lack of research and empirical evidence across all 4 research areas identified by the Institute of Medicine. This field can be considered relatively new compared with other research areas in public health; for example, tobacco control research can rely on more than 70 years of knowledge production. However, this review demonstrates that, during the past 7 years, public health emergency preparedness system research has evolved from generic inquiry to the analysis of specific interventions with more empirical studies. Public Health Implications: The results of this review provide an evidence base for public health practitioners responsible for enhancing key components of preparedness and response such as communication, training, and planning efforts.

  7. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Registry: A Multicenter Electronic Health Record Registry of Pediatric Emergency Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakyne Davies, Sara J; Grundmeier, Robert W; Campos, Diego A; Hayes, Katie L; Bell, Jamie; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Bajaj, Lalit; Chamberlain, James M; Gorelick, Marc H; Enriquez, Rene; Casper, T Charles; Scheid, Beth; Kittick, Marlena; Dean, J Michael; Alpern, Elizabeth R

    2018-04-01

     Electronic health record (EHR)-based registries allow for robust data to be derived directly from the patient clinical record and can provide important information about processes of care delivery and patient health outcomes.  A data dictionary, and subsequent data model, were developed describing EHR data sources to include all processes of care within the emergency department (ED). ED visit data were deidentified and XML files were created and submitted to a central data coordinating center for inclusion in the registry. Automated data quality control occurred prior to submission through an application created for this project. Data quality reports were created for manual data quality review.  The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) Registry, representing four hospital systems and seven EDs, demonstrates that ED data from disparate health systems and EHR vendors can be harmonized for use in a single registry with a common data model. The current PECARN Registry represents data from 2,019,461 pediatric ED visits, 894,503 distinct patients, more than 12.5 million narrative reports, and 12,469,754 laboratory tests and continues to accrue data monthly.  The Registry is a robust harmonized clinical registry that includes data from diverse patients, sites, and EHR vendors derived via data extraction, deidentification, and secure submission to a central data coordinating center. The data provided may be used for benchmarking, clinical quality improvement, and comparative effectiveness research. Schattauer.

  8. Valuing of research project in energy field with real options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Blasio, N.; Marzo, G.; Turatto, R.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an application of real options theory for valuing a research project in the field of stranded gas valorisation. After a presentation of the theory, the analysis addresses the use of real options evaluation for generating alternative pathways in order to add new value to the R D projects. It also shows how real option approach may be important for selecting among competitive projects, but also for providing a system for valorisation of decision-maker flexibility [it

  9. Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raven John

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I first list a number of areas in which recent research seems to reinforce the need to follow through on activities identified in Simonetta Magari’s article (Magari, Cavaleri 2009. A careful review of research in these areas would lead us into deeply mysterious psychological processes and underline the need to change the most fundamental assumptions on which modern psychology is built. Unfortunately, I am in no position to undertake this review.

  10. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The IAEA publishes the Emergency Preparedness and Response Series to fulfil that function. This publication is part of that series. IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, contains the following requirement: 'To ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene...'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(53)/RES/10, continues to encourage Member States '...to enhance, where necessary, their own preparedness and response capabilities for nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies, by improving capabilities to prevent accidents, to respond to emergencies and to mitigate any harmful consequences...'. This publication is intended to assist Member States meet the requirements of GS-R-2 and enhance their preparedness by providing guidance on the response by facility personnel to emergencies at research reactor facilities.

  11. Policy, Practice, and Research Agenda for Emergency Medical Services Oversight: A Systematic Review and Environmental Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymour, Rekar K; Abir, Mahshid; Chamberlin, Margaret; Dunne, Robert B; Lowell, Mark; Wahl, Kathy; Scott, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In a 2015 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM; Washington, DC USA), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM; Washington, DC USA), stated that the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) exhibits signs of fragmentation; an absence of system-wide coordination and planning; and a lack of federal, state, and local accountability. The NAM recommended clarifying what roles the federal government, state governments, and local communities play in the oversight and evaluation of EMS system performance, and how they may better work together to improve care. This systematic literature review and environmental scan addresses NAM's recommendations by answering two research questions: (1) what aspects of EMS systems are most measured in the peer-reviewed and grey literatures, and (2) what do these measures and studies suggest for high-quality EMS oversight? To answer these questions, a systematic literature review was conducted in the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA), SCOPUS (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands), and EMBASE (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands) databases for peer-reviewed literature and for grey literature; targeted web searches of 10 EMS-related government agencies and professional organizations were performed. Inclusion criteria required peer-reviewed literature to be published between 1966-2016 and grey literature to be published between 1996-2016. A total of 1,476 peer-reviewed titles were reviewed, 76 were retrieved for full-text review, and 58 were retained and coded in the qualitative software Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, California USA) using a codebook of themes. Categorizations of measure type and level of application were assigned to the extracted data. Targeted websites were systematically reviewed and 115 relevant grey literature documents were retrieved. A total of 58 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion

  12. The international emergency management society conference 1997. National and international issues concerning research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, V.; Hansen, V.

    1997-01-01

    The International Emergency Management Society (TIEMS) is a non-profit organisation that aims to bring together users, planners, researchers, managers, technicians, response personell, and other interested emergency management parties to learn, teach, and exchange experience, knowledge, and ideas about how information management tools can be used to avoid, mitigate, and recover from disasters and other emergencies; and consequently, how the use of information management methods and technologies may improve efficiency in emergency management. TIEMS'97 is the fourth conference in the sequence of conferences. The conferences emphasise the major goal of TIEMS: to bring together people with diverse backgrounds but who share a dedication to improve emergency management. In the discussions, formal and informal, at the conferences, nuclear scientists listen to psychologists, sociologists share ideas with engineers, and practitioners discuss emergency management issues with scientists. In recent years we have experienced a tremendous advancement in information and communication technologies and, consequently, increased the possibilities in coping with emergency situations. At the same time the management of emergency situations has typically become more complex due to the increased complexity of industrial plants which are often the sources of manmade catastrophes. Besides the aspects normally covered in the TIEMS conferences, such as decision support, modelling, handling of man-made or natural disasters, training, etc., this conference has been enhanced by including aspects involving medical car and economic constraints. (EG)

  13. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  14. Out of sight, out of mind: global connection, environmental discourse and the emerging field of sustainability education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joseph A.

    2015-09-01

    How might we understand the complex nature of our existence in the world, and what are the implications of such examination? Moreover, how might we go about engaging others in this practice and what are the complications of such an endeavor? Expanding on Quigley, Dogbey, Che and Hallo's findings, I consider the implications of human-environment connections and examine the difficulty of articulating such connections via photovoice methods in particular places. Further, I use a Foucauldian discourse lens to situate this connective process to larger political and social dynamics at work in their paper, and in environmental education in general. Implications for sustainability and sustainability education are then developed, along with suggestions for future research in this emerging field.

  15. Application of four-dimension criteria to assess rigour of qualitative research in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Roberto; Nahidi, Shizar; De Costa, Josephine; Mohsin, Mohammed; Fitzgerald, Gerry; Gibson, Nick; McCarthy, Sally; Aboagye-Sarfo, Patrick

    2018-02-17

    The main objective of this methodological manuscript was to illustrate the role of using qualitative research in emergency settings. We outline rigorous criteria applied to a qualitative study assessing perceptions and experiences of staff working in Australian emergency departments. We used an integrated mixed-methodology framework to identify different perspectives and experiences of emergency department staff during the implementation of a time target government policy. The qualitative study comprised interviews from 119 participants across 16 hospitals. The interviews were conducted in 2015-2016 and the data were managed using NVivo version 11. We conducted the analysis in three stages, namely: conceptual framework, comparison and contrast and hypothesis development. We concluded with the implementation of the four-dimension criteria (credibility, dependability, confirmability and transferability) to assess the robustness of the study, RESULTS: We adapted four-dimension criteria to assess the rigour of a large-scale qualitative research in the emergency department context. The criteria comprised strategies such as building the research team; preparing data collection guidelines; defining and obtaining adequate participation; reaching data saturation and ensuring high levels of consistency and inter-coder agreement. Based on the findings, the proposed framework satisfied the four-dimension criteria and generated potential qualitative research applications to emergency medicine research. We have added a methodological contribution to the ongoing debate about rigour in qualitative research which we hope will guide future studies in this topic in emergency care research. It also provided recommendations for conducting future mixed-methods studies. Future papers on this series will use the results from qualitative data and the empirical findings from longitudinal data linkage to further identify factors associated with ED performance; they will be reported

  16. Supply network science: Emergence of a new perspective on a classical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintrup, Alexandra; Ledwoch, Anna

    2018-03-01

    Supply networks emerge as companies procure goods from one another to produce their own products. Due to a chronic lack of data, studies on these emergent structures have long focussed on local neighbourhoods, assuming simple, chain-like structures. However, studies conducted since 2001 have shown that supply chains are indeed complex networks that exhibit similar organisational patterns to other network types. In this paper, we present a critical review of theoretical and model based studies which conceptualise supply chains from a network science perspective, showing that empirical data do not always support theoretical models that were developed, and argue that different industrial settings may present different characteristics. Consequently, a need that arises is the development and reconciliation of interpretation across different supply network layers such as contractual relations, material flow, financial links, and co-patenting, as these different projections tend to remain in disciplinary siloes. Other gaps include a lack of null models that show whether the observed properties are meaningful, a lack of dynamical models that can inform how layers evolve and adopt to changes, and a lack of studies that investigate how local decisions enable emergent outcomes. We conclude by asking the network science community to help bridge these gaps by engaging with this important area of research.

  17. Personalized medicine and the role of health economics and outcomes research: issues, applications, emerging trends, and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The decade since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome has witnessed significant advances in the incorporation of genomic information in diagnostic, treatment, and reimbursement practices. Indeed, as case in point, there are now several dozen commercially available genomic tests routinely applied across a wide range of disease states in predictive or prognostic applications. Moreover, many involved in the advancement of personalized medicine would view emerging approaches to stratify patients in meaningful ways beyond genomic information as a signal of the progress made. Yet despite these advances, there remains a general sense of dissatisfaction about the progress of personalized medicine in terms of its contribution to the drug development process, to the efficiency and effectiveness of health care delivery, and ultimately to the provision of the right treatment to the right patient at the right time. Academicians, payers, and manufacturers alike are struggling not only with how to embed the new insights that personalized medicine promises but also with the fundamental issues of application in early drug development, implications for health technology assessment, new demands on traditional health economic and outcomes research methods, and implications for reimbursement and access. In fact, seemingly prosaic issues such as the definition and composition of the term "personalized medicine" are still unresolved. Regardless of these issues, practitioners are increasingly compelled to find practical solutions to the challenges and opportunities presented by the evolving face of personalized medicine today. Accordingly, the articles comprising this Special Issue offer applied perspectives geared toward professionals and policymakers in the field grappling with developing, assessing, implementing, and reimbursing personalized medicine approaches. Starting with a framework with which to characterize personalized medicine, this Special Issue proceeds to

  18. Knowledge Translation Tools are Emerging to Move Neck Pain Research into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdermid, Joy C; Miller, Jordan; Gross, Anita R

    2013-01-01

    Development or synthesis of the best clinical research is in itself insufficient to change practice. Knowledge translation (KT) is an emerging field focused on moving knowledge into practice, which is a non-linear, dynamic process that involves knowledge synthesis, transfer, adoption, implementation, and sustained use. Successful implementation requires using KT strategies based on theory, evidence, and best practice, including tools and processes that engage knowledge developers and knowledge users. Tools can provide instrumental help in implementing evidence. A variety of theoretical frameworks underlie KT and provide guidance on how tools should be developed or implemented. A taxonomy that outlines different purposes for engaging in KT and target audiences can also be useful in developing or implementing tools. Theoretical frameworks that underlie KT typically take different perspectives on KT with differential focus on the characteristics of the knowledge, knowledge users, context/environment, or the cognitive and social processes that are involved in change. Knowledge users include consumers, clinicians, and policymakers. A variety of KT tools have supporting evidence, including: clinical practice guidelines, patient decision aids, and evidence summaries or toolkits. Exemplars are provided of two KT tools to implement best practice in management of neck pain-a clinician implementation guide (toolkit) and a patient decision aid. KT frameworks, taxonomies, clinical expertise, and evidence must be integrated to develop clinical tools that implement best evidence in the management of neck pain.

  19. Systems Biology-Based Platforms to Accelerate Research of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Soo Jin; Choi, Young Ki; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2018-03-01

    Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose a major threat to public health and security. Given the dynamic nature and significant impact of EIDs, the most effective way to prevent and protect against them is to develop vaccines in advance. Systems biology approaches provide an integrative way to understand the complex immune response to pathogens. They can lead to a greater understanding of EID pathogenesis and facilitate the evaluation of newly developed vaccine-induced immunity in a timely manner. In recent years, advances in high throughput technologies have enabled researchers to successfully apply systems biology methods to analyze immune responses to a variety of pathogens and vaccines. Despite recent advances, computational and biological challenges impede wider application of systems biology approaches. This review highlights recent advances in the fields of systems immunology and vaccinology, and presents ways that systems biology-based platforms can be applied to accelerate a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of immunity against EIDs. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018.

  20. Computer science security research and human subjects: emerging considerations for research ethics boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Elizabeth; Aycock, John; Dexter, Scott; Dittrich, David; Hvizdak, Erin

    2011-06-01

    This paper explores the growing concerns with computer science research, and in particular, computer security research and its relationship with the committees that review human subjects research. It offers cases that review boards are likely to confront, and provides a context for appropriate consideration of such research, as issues of bots, clouds, and worms enter the discourse of human subjects review.

  1. Kontexte qualitativer Sozialforschung: Arts-Based Research, Mixed Methods und Emergent Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Margrit

    2017-01-01

    In dem vorliegenden Beitrag werden drei Kontexte qualitativer Sozialforschung genauer dargestellt, die in den vergangenen Jahren zunehmend an Bedeutung gewonnen haben: Arts-Based Research, Mixed Methods und Emergent Methods. Es werden verschiedene Ansätze und Varianten von Arts-Informed und Arts-Based Research genauer beschrieben, und es wird argumentiert, dass Arts-Based Research eine eigenständige Forschungstradition darstellt, die der qualitativen Sozialforschung wichtige Impulse geben kan...

  2. Application of Emergency Action Levels from Potential Release at Research Reactor HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongsoo; Lee, Goan Yub; Lee, Hae Choi; Kim, Bong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Execution of the protective action promptly is possible that Emergency Action Levels (EALs) must be established for a radiological release from nuclear facility. The EALs for electric power reactor are already developed and applied to recognize an emergency situation rapidly. Recently the IAEA published the safety report including the EALs for research reactor. This paper describes the EALs to apply for a potential release pathway at the research reactor HANARO. The results of table 1 and 2 will be higher than actual because the weather condition in real situation is difference. However, the EALs applying the potential stack release, ground release and site can be useful for research reactor HANARO making the emergency declaration. The EALs at the site boundary of the table 3 can be applied to protect the off-site public

  3. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; Bly, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages - Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  4. Computer Based Procedures for Field Workers - FY16 Research Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bly, Aaron [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Computer-Based Procedure (CBP) research effort is a part of the Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. One area that could yield tremendous savings in increased efficiency and safety is in improving procedure use. A CBP provides the opportunity to incorporate context-driven job aids, such as drawings, photos, and just-in-time training. The presentation of information in CBPs can be much more flexible and tailored to the task, actual plant condition, and operation mode. The dynamic presentation of the procedure will guide the user down the path of relevant steps, thus minimizing time spent by the field worker to evaluate plant conditions and decisions related to the applicability of each step. This dynamic presentation of the procedure also minimizes the risk of conducting steps out of order and/or incorrectly assessed applicability of steps. This report provides a summary of the main research activities conducted in the Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers effort since 2012. The main focus of the report is on the research activities conducted in fiscal year 2016. The activities discussed are the Nuclear Electronic Work Packages – Enterprise Requirements initiative, the development of a design guidance for CBPs (which compiles all insights gained through the years of CBP research), the facilitation of vendor studies at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a pilot study for how to enhance the plant design modification work process, the collection of feedback from a field evaluation study at Plant Vogtle, and path forward to

  5. How Does National Scientific Funding Support Emerging Interdisciplinary Research: A Comparison Study of Big Data Research in the US and China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Youtie, Jan; Porter, Alan L.; Wang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    How do funding agencies ramp-up their capabilities to support research in a rapidly emerging area? This paper addresses this question through a comparison of research proposals awarded by the US National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) in the field of Big Data. Big data is characterized by its size and difficulties in capturing, curating, managing and processing it in reasonable periods of time. Although Big Data has its legacy in longstanding information technology research, the field grew very rapidly over a short period. We find that the extent of interdisciplinarity is a key aspect in how these funding agencies address the rise of Big Data. Our results show that both agencies have been able to marshal funding to support Big Data research in multiple areas, but the NSF relies to a greater extent on multi-program funding from different fields. We discuss how these interdisciplinary approaches reflect the research hot-spots and innovation pathways in these two countries. PMID:27219466

  6. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuculescu, C.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  7. Joint research and evaluation work in the field of fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, R.; Such, J.M.; Casselman, C. [CEA Cadarache, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Recherches en Securite, 13 - Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Laborde, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Prevention et d' Etudes des Accidents, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bertrand, R.; Blot, M.; Chaussard, M.; Lacoue, J.; Mattei, J.M. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Dept d' Evaluation de Surete, 92 (France)

    2001-07-01

    In general, any assessment concerning the safety of nuclear facilities is based on acquired scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, some areas related to safety remain still inadequately explored, knowledge in these areas needs to be further developed either through the results obtained from studies or from experimental research. With the aim of achieving an optimal safety level, one of IPSN's main tasks is to highlight these gags in current knowledge and point out to nuclear facility operators the need to fill them. These general considerations are pertinent to the particular field of fire. At IPSN, safety assessment activities and research are carried out side-by-side, thus facilitating the implementation of corresponding research programs. This ability to orient research with respect to safety assessment requirements, the contribution of research scientists to safety assessment or the formulation of safety problems, are today counted among the strong points of IPSN operation. This paper presents also the present main fire risk safety concerns for Nuclear Power Plants and the associated research carried out by IPSN (past, underway and future) to improve the scientific knowledge in the related areas. (authors)

  8. Joint research and evaluation work in the field of fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Such, J.M.; Casselman, C.; Laborde, J.C.; Bertrand, R.; Blot, M.; Chaussard, M.; Lacoue, J.; Mattei, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    In general, any assessment concerning the safety of nuclear facilities is based on acquired scientific knowledge. Nevertheless, some areas related to safety remain still inadequately explored, knowledge in these areas needs to be further developed either through the results obtained from studies or from experimental research. With the aim of achieving an optimal safety level, one of IPSN's main tasks is to highlight these gags in current knowledge and point out to nuclear facility operators the need to fill them. These general considerations are pertinent to the particular field of fire. At IPSN, safety assessment activities and research are carried out side-by-side, thus facilitating the implementation of corresponding research programs. This ability to orient research with respect to safety assessment requirements, the contribution of research scientists to safety assessment or the formulation of safety problems, are today counted among the strong points of IPSN operation. This paper presents also the present main fire risk safety concerns for Nuclear Power Plants and the associated research carried out by IPSN (past, underway and future) to improve the scientific knowledge in the related areas. (authors)

  9. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tsang, Chin-Fu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kneafsey, Timothy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Borglin, Sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nakagawa, Seiji [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nihei, Kurt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Doughty, Christine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reagan, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-19

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition’s (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  10. Deep Borehole Field Test Research Activities at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobson, Patrick; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Kneafsey, Timothy; Borglin, Sharon; Piceno, Yvette; Andersen, Gary; Nakagawa, Seiji; Nihei, Kurt; Rutqvist, Jonny; Doughty, Christine; Reagan, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition's (UFD) Deep Borehole Field Test is to drill two 5 km large-diameter boreholes: a characterization borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 8.5 inches and a field test borehole with a bottom-hole diameter of 17 inches. These boreholes will be used to demonstrate the ability to drill such holes in crystalline rocks, effectively characterize the bedrock repository system using geophysical, geochemical, and hydrological techniques, and emplace and retrieve test waste packages. These studies will be used to test the deep borehole disposal concept, which requires a hydrologically isolated environment characterized by low permeability, stable fluid density, reducing fluid chemistry conditions, and an effective borehole seal. During FY16, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists conducted a number of research studies to support the UFD Deep Borehole Field Test effort. This work included providing supporting data for the Los Alamos National Laboratory geologic framework model for the proposed deep borehole site, conducting an analog study using an extensive suite of geoscience data and samples from a deep (2.5 km) research borehole in Sweden, conducting laboratory experiments and coupled process modeling related to borehole seals, and developing a suite of potential techniques that could be applied to the characterization and monitoring of the deep borehole environment. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  11. Symposium on the research field of soft robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Albu-Schäffer, Alin; Brock, Oliver; Raatz, Annika; Soft Robotics : Transferring Theory to Application

    2015-01-01

    The research areas as well as the knowledge gained for the practical use of robots are growing and expanding beyond manufacturing and industrial automation, making inroads in sectors such as health care and terrain sensing, as well as general assistive systems working in close interaction with humans. In a situation like this, it is necessary for future robot systems to become less stiff and more specialized by taking inspiration from the mechanical compliance and versatility found in natural materials and organisms. At present, a new discipline is emerging in this area, called »Soft Robotics«. It particularly challenges the traditional thinking of engineers, as the confluence of technologies, ranging from new materials, sensors, actuators and production techniques to new design tools, will make it possible to create new systems whose structures are almost completely made of soft materials, which bring about entirely new functions and behaviors, similar in many ways to natural systems. These Proceedings foc...

  12. Effective field theory of emergent symmetry breaking in deformed atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papenbrock, T; Weidenmüller, H A

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking in non-relativistic quantum systems has previously been addressed in the framework of effective field theory. Low-lying excitations are constructed from Nambu–Goldstone modes using symmetry arguments only. We extend that approach to finite systems. The approach is very general. To be specific, however, we consider atomic nuclei with intrinsically deformed ground states. The emergent symmetry breaking in such systems requires the introduction of additional degrees of freedom on top of the Nambu–Goldstone modes. Symmetry arguments suffice to construct the low-lying states of the system. In deformed nuclei these are vibrational modes each of which serves as band head of a rotational band. (paper)

  13. Sex as a Biological Variable in Emergency Medicine Research and Clinical Practice: A Brief Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson J. McGregor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health recently highlighted the significant role of sex as a biological variable (SABV in research design, outcome and reproducibility, mandating that this variable be accounted for in all its funded research studies. This move has resulted in a rapidly increasing body of literature on SABV with important implications for changing the clinical practice of emergency medicine (EM. Translation of this new knowledge to the bedside requires an understanding of how sex-based research will ultimately impact patient care. We use three case-based scenarios in acute myocardial infarction, acute ischemic stroke and important considerations in pharmacologic therapy administration to highlight available data on SABV in evidence-based research to provide the EM community with an important foundation for future integration of patient sex in the delivery of emergency care as gaps in research are filled.

  14. Total connectivity speeds research and support of field operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himes, R.E.; Frost, K.I.; Henry, S.R.; Funkhouser, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that research and field support roles in the oilfield service industry have become increasingly complex in the last 15 years. Experimental apparatus are more dependent on the data-acquisition and processing capabilities of computers as the amount of data generated increases. Therefore, the need to network these computers for data transport has significantly increased. The type of network system selected depends on the goals to be achieved. Incorporation of existing equipment, communication between systems of different architectures, and future expandability are only a few of the necessary attributes. With these in mind, a computer network system was designed and is being implemented. The system combines local- and wide-area networks (LAN's or WAN's) of different protocols to acquire, process, and transport information worldwide. The result is faster development of new products and quicker response in support of field operations

  15. Germination characteristics of Rhinanthus minor influence field emergence, competitiveness and potential use in restoration projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, M; Laverack, G; Matthews, S; Powell, A A

    2018-02-10

    The facultative root hemi-parasite Rhinanthus minor is often used in grassland habitat restoration projects to regulate ecosystem structure and function. Its impact on community productivity and diversity as a function of resource supply, sward composition and management has been widely investigated. However, there is a lack of information about the possible influence of seed quality on the efficacy of the hemi-parasite. Ten seed lots from commercial sources were sown in the field and their germination characteristics were investigated in the laboratory. Seeds from four lots were also germinated and sown in pots alongside plants of two host species, Lotus corniculatus and Holcus lanatus. Plant establishment, height and flowering density were evaluated for the hemi-parasite, while plant biomass was measured for both R. minor and its host. Two aspects of seed quality influenced the field emergence of seed lots of R. minor, the radicle emergence (%) and the length of the lag period from the beginning of imbibition to germination (mean germination time), which indicates seed vigour. A longer lag period (lower vigour) was associated with higher levels of seedling mortality and lower plant vigour, in terms of plant height and biomass accumulation and was also reflected in the parasitic impact of the seed lots. Seed quality, specifically germination and vigour, can influence the establishment, survival, subsequent plant productivity and parasitic impact of R. minor in vegetation restoration projects. Seed quality is discussed as a key factor to consider when predicting the impact of the hemi-parasite on community productivity and diversity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost Effectiveness of Field Trauma Triage among Injured Adults Served by Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newgard, Craig D; Yang, Zhuo; Nishijima, Daniel; McConnell, K John; Trent, Stacy; Holmes, James F; Daya, Mohamud; Mann, N Clay; Hsia, Renee Y; Rea, Tom; Wang, N Ewen; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Delgado, M Kit

    2016-01-01

    Background The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma sets national targets for the accuracy of field trauma triage at ≥ 95% sensitivity and ≥ 65% specificity, yet the cost-effectiveness of realizing these goals is unknown. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of current field trauma triage practices compared to triage strategies consistent with the national targets. Study Design This was a cost-effectiveness analysis using data from 79,937 injured adults transported by 48 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies to 105 trauma and non-trauma hospitals in 6 regions of the Western U.S. from 2006 through 2008. Incremental differences in survival, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER; costs per QALY gained) were estimated for each triage strategy over a 1-year and lifetime horizon using a decision analytic Markov model. We considered an ICER threshold of less than $100,000 to be cost-effective. Results For these 6 regions, a high sensitivity triage strategy consistent with national trauma policy (sensitivity 98.6%, specificity 17.1%) would cost $1,317,333 per QALY gained, while current triage practices (sensitivity 87.2%, specificity 64.0%) cost $88,000 per QALY gained compared to a moderate sensitivity strategy (sensitivity 71.2%, specificity 66.5%). Refining EMS transport patterns by triage status improved cost-effectiveness. At the trauma system level, a high-sensitivity triage strategy would save 3.7 additional lives per year at a 1-year cost of $8.78 million, while a moderate sensitivity approach would cost 5.2 additional lives and save $781,616 each year. Conclusions A high-sensitivity approach to field triage consistent with national trauma policy is not cost effective. The most cost effective approach to field triage appears closely tied to triage specificity and adherence to triage-based EMS transport practices. PMID:27178369

  17. Research needs on the natural gas field in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutanen, V.

    1992-01-01

    This report deals with the research needs on natural gas sector in Finland during the next 5-10 years. 0n that ground it has also been drafted a proposal for organization of the research and on which fields the research should be directed. The basis and criterium in this study has been on the other hand, the improvement of the possibilities in international trade of finnish companies and on the other hand the improvement of the efficiency and the reduction of the environmental impacts of energy use and production in Finland. As a result of the study it is proposed that a research entireness, which will direct extensively towards the gaseous fuels (gasification of coal and biomass, natural gas, LPG, hydrogen), will be formed. The key topics of the research would be: Production of the gases (gasification), high-efficient power and heat generation with gaseous fuels, improvement of efficiency and reduction of environmental impacts of energy use in industry with direct use of gaseous fuels and gaseous fuels in vehicles

  18. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  19. [Field epidemiological study on news reports that related to public health emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shun-xiang; Li, Xue-mei; Luo, Nian-ci; Mei, Shu-jiang; Jiang, Li-juan

    2013-12-01

    All news reports (NR) that were related to public health emergency (PHE) were collected from the Southern Metropolis Daily (SMD) to explore the characteristics of epidemiology in the fields. Based on the theory of communication that including both case and text analysis, qualitative analysis on all the NR regarding PHE published in SMD from the years of 2008 to 2012, was carried out and input to database using the EpiData. Numbers of articles as indicators were compared to show the yearly change of different types of events. Various features of the NR including coverage, source of information, location of the incident, style and size of news, with or without editorials etc. were statistically analyzed by SPSS version 18.0. Among all the 998 reports related to PHE, higher proportion was found in the events of Infectious diseases (35.3%) and food safety (34.1%)respectively. Events on vaccines and drugs used for disease prevention and control (8.9%), environmental pollution caused incidents (8.0%)appeared to be less frequent. Events related to occupational disease, poisoning, bioterrorism and biochemical events were rare. Looking at the monthly distribution of reports, we noticed that the peaks occurred in 2008 and in 2009, which were caused by the Melamine-contamination events and the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Between 2010 and 2012, figures of monthly reports were smooth, including some critical events from the interests of the media. Most events took place in Guangdong province (34.3%) and other provinces (50.9%), with some were from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan regions (9.5%). However, international events (5.2%)were less seen. Extensive coverage accounted for 17.6% of all of reports, and 11.5% allotted the editorials or other forms of in-depth reports. Most of the source of reports on infectious diseases and food safety were from the official release, however. The main sources of occupational diseases and poisoning, vaccines and drug incidents, environmental pollution

  20. FAIMS Mobile: Flexible, open-source software for field research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballsun-Stanton, Brian; Ross, Shawn A.; Sobotkova, Adela; Crook, Penny

    2018-01-01

    FAIMS Mobile is a native Android application supported by an Ubuntu server facilitating human-mediated field research across disciplines. It consists of 'core' Java and Ruby software providing a platform for data capture, which can be deeply customised using 'definition packets' consisting of XML documents (data schema and UI) and Beanshell scripts (automation). Definition packets can also be generated using an XML-based domain-specific language, making customisation easier. FAIMS Mobile includes features allowing rich and efficient data capture tailored to the needs of fieldwork. It also promotes synthetic research and improves transparency and reproducibility through the production of comprehensive datasets that can be mapped to vocabularies or ontologies as they are created.

  1. A research agenda for gender and substance use disorders in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K; Beauchamp, Gillian; Beaudoin, Francesca L; Bernstein, Edward; Bernstein, Judith; Bernstein, Steven L; Broderick, Kerryann B; Cannon, Robert D; D'Onofrio, Gail; Greenberg, Marna R; Hawk, Kathryn; Hayes, Rashelle B; Jacquet, Gabrielle A; Lippmann, Melanie J; Rhodes, Karin V; Watts, Susan H; Boudreaux, Edwin D

    2014-12-01

    For many years, gender differences have been recognized as important factors in the etiology, pathophysiology, comorbidities, and treatment needs and outcomes associated with the use of alcohol, drugs, and tobacco. However, little is known about how these gender-specific differences affect ED utilization; responses to ED-based interventions; needs for substance use treatment and barriers to accessing care among patients in the ED; or outcomes after an alcohol-, drug-, or tobacco-related visit. As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," a breakout group convened to generate a research agenda on priority questions related to substance use disorders. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  2. Real Time Integration of Field Data Into a GIS Platform for the Management of Hydrological Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiameli, M.; Mussumeci, G.

    2013-01-01

    A wide series of events requires immediate availability of information and field data to be provided to decision-makers. An example is the necessity of quickly transferring the information acquired from monitoring and alerting sensors or the data of the reconnaissance of damage after a disastrous event to an Emergency Operations Center. To this purpose, we developed an integrated GIS and WebGIS system to dynamically create and populate via Web a database with spatial features. In particular, this work concerns the gathering and transmission of spatial data and related information to the desktop GIS so that they can be displayed and analyzed in real time to characterize the operational scenario and to decide the rescue interventions. As basic software, we used only free and open source: QuantumGIS and Grass as Desktop GIS, Map Server with PMapper application for the Web-Gis functionality and PostGreSQL/PostGIS as Data Base Management System (DBMS). The approach has been designed, developed and successfully tested in the management of GIS-based navigation of an autonomous robot, both to map its trajectories and to assign optimal paths. This paper presents the application of our system to a simulated hydrological event that could interest the province of Catania, in Sicily. In particular, assuming that more teams draw up an inventory of the damage, we highlight the benefits of real-time transmission of the information collected from the field to headquarters.

  3. REAL TIME INTEGRATION OF FIELD DATA INTO A GIS PLATFORM FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HYDROLOGICAL EMERGENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangiameli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide series of events requires immediate availability of information and field data to be provided to decision-makers. An example is the necessity of quickly transferring the information acquired from monitoring and alerting sensors or the data of the reconnaissance of damage after a disastrous event to an Emergency Operations Center. To this purpose, we developed an integrated GIS and WebGIS system to dynamically create and populate via Web a database with spatial features. In particular, this work concerns the gathering and transmission of spatial data and related information to the desktop GIS so that they can be displayed and analyzed in real time to characterize the operational scenario and to decide the rescue interventions. As basic software, we used only free and open source: QuantumGIS and Grass as Desktop GIS, Map Server with PMapper application for the Web-Gis functionality and PostGreSQL/PostGIS as Data Base Management System (DBMS. The approach has been designed, developed and successfully tested in the management of GIS-based navigation of an autonomous robot, both to map its trajectories and to assign optimal paths. This paper presents the application of our system to a simulated hydrological event that could interest the province of Catania, in Sicily. In particular, assuming that more teams draw up an inventory of the damage, we highlight the benefits of real-time transmission of the information collected from the field to headquarters.

  4. The Emerging Field of Quantitative Blood Metabolomics for Biomarker Discovery in Critical Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serkova, Natalie J.; Standiford, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics, a science of systems biology, is the global assessment of endogenous metabolites within a biologic system and represents a “snapshot” reading of gene function, enzyme activity, and the physiological landscape. Metabolite detection, either individual or grouped as a metabolomic profile, is usually performed in cells, tissues, or biofluids by either nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry followed by sophisticated multivariate data analysis. Because loss of metabolic homeostasis is common in critical illness, the metabolome could have many applications, including biomarker and drug target identification. Metabolomics could also significantly advance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of acute illnesses, such as sepsis and acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Despite this potential, the clinical community is largely unfamiliar with the field of metabolomics, including the methodologies involved, technical challenges, and, most importantly, clinical uses. Although there is evidence of successful preclinical applications, the clinical usefulness and application of metabolomics in critical illness is just beginning to emerge, the advancement of which hinges on linking metabolite data to known and validated clinically relevant indices. In addition, other important aspects, such as patient selection, sample collection, and processing, as well as the needed multivariate data analysis, have to be taken into consideration before this innovative approach to biomarker discovery can become a reliable tool in the intensive care unit. The purpose of this review is to begin to familiarize clinicians with the field of metabolomics and its application for biomarker discovery in critical illnesses such as sepsis. PMID:21680948

  5. An emergency computation model for the wind field and diffusion during accidental nuclear pollutants releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Kimura, F.; Koide, T.; Kurita, S.

    1990-01-01

    Since 1986, a simple computation model for a nuclear accident has been operating in the emergency information center of Japan Agency for Science and Technology. It was developed by introducing the variation method for wind and a random walk particle model for diffusion in 50-100 km scale. Furthermore, we developed a new model with dynamic equations and a diffusion equation to predict more accurately the wind and diffusion, including local thermal convection. The momentum equation and the continuity equation are solved numerically in nonhydrostatic and incompressible conditions, using a finite difference technique. Then, the equation of thermal energy preservation is solved for potential temperature in the predicted wind field of every time step. The diffusion of nuclear pollutants is computed numerically in the predicted wind field, using diffusion coefficients obtained from the predictive dynamic equations. These computations were verified with meteorological surveys and gas tracer diffusion experiments over flat land, along a sea shore and over a mountainous area. Horizontal circulations and vertical convections can be computed in any mesh size from several tens of meters to several kilometers, while small vertical convections less than 1 km or so cannot be represented with the former hydrostatic circulation models. (author)

  6. Focus on the emerging new fields of network physiology and network medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.

    2016-10-01

    Despite the vast progress and achievements in systems biology and integrative physiology in the last decades, there is still a significant gap in understanding the mechanisms through which (i) genomic, proteomic and metabolic factors and signaling pathways impact vertical processes across cells, tissues and organs leading to the expression of different disease phenotypes and influence the functional and clinical associations between diseases, and (ii) how diverse physiological systems and organs coordinate their functions over a broad range of space and time scales and horizontally integrate to generate distinct physiologic states at the organism level. Two emerging fields, network medicine and network physiology, aim to address these fundamental questions. Novel concepts and approaches derived from recent advances in network theory, coupled dynamical systems, statistical and computational physics show promise to provide new insights into the complexity of physiological structure and function in health and disease, bridging the genetic and sub-cellular level with inter-cellular interactions and communications among integrated organ systems and sub-systems. These advances form first building blocks in the methodological formalism and theoretical framework necessary to address fundamental problems and challenges in physiology and medicine. This ‘focus on’ issue contains 26 articles representing state-of-the-art contributions covering diverse systems from the sub-cellular to the organism level where physicists have key role in laying the foundations of these new fields.

  7. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  8. Energy Drinks: Topical Domain in the Emerging Literature and Neglected Areas of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Prevalence statistics indicate that consumption of Energy drinks (EDs), often in combination with alcohol, is quite popular in the younger generation and particularly with college students. As literature on this topic is advancing at a rapid pace, it seemed instructive to examine which topics are emphasized in emerging EDs research. To that end, a…

  9. Quantitative Methodology: A Guide for Emerging Physical Education and Adapted Physical Education Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging professionals, particularly senior-level undergraduate and graduate students in kinesiology who have an interest in physical education for individuals with and without disabilities, should understand the basic assumptions of the quantitative research paradigm. Knowledge of basic assumptions is critical for conducting, analyzing, and…

  10. Developing as Teachers and as Researchers: Emerging Professionals' Experiences with Cooperative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Cruz, Maria; Albaladejo, Cristina; Johnson, Arlette; Homa, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article details the second cycle of cooperative inquiry undertaken by emerging educators who self-identify as "other" because of gender, language, ethnicity, and/or sexual orientation. The current cycle focuses on the impact participation in cooperative inquiry had on researchers' teaching practices. Data sources include transcripts…

  11. Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan R.

    2017-01-01

    Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) has greatly enhanced the realm of online social interaction and behavior. In language classrooms, it allows the opportunity for students to enhance their learning experiences. "Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities" is an ideal…

  12. Education Student Research Paradigms and Emerging Scholar Identities: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Patrick D.; Croxton, Rebecca A.; Kirkman, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a mixed-methods approach, this study sought to understand a general sense of paradigm confidence and to see how this confidence relates to doctoral student identities as emerging scholars. Identity development was explored among 46 education doctoral students at a midsized public university in the Southeast. Researchers examined students'…

  13. Global health and emergency care: a resuscitation research agenda--part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufderheide, Tom P.; Nolan, Jerry P.; Jacobs, Ian G.; van Belle, Gerald; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Marshall, John; Finn, Judith; Becker, Lance B.; Bottiger, Bernd; Cameron, Peter; Drajer, Saul; Jung, Julianna J.; Kloeck, Walter; Koster, Rudolph W.; Huei-Ming Ma, Matthew; Shin, Sang Do; Sopko, George; Taira, Breena R.; Timerman, Sergio; Eng Hock Ong, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    At the 2013 Academic Emergency Medicine global health consensus conference, a breakout session on a resuscitation research agenda was held. Two articles focusing on cardiac arrest and trauma resuscitation are the result of that discussion. This article describes the burden of disease and outcomes,

  14. The Potential of Threshold Concepts: An Emerging Framework for Educational Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ursula; Mladenovic, Rosina

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of a "threshold concept" and discusses its possible implications for higher education research and practice. Using the case of introductory accounting as an illustration, it is argued that the idea of a threshold concept provides an emerging theoretical framework for a "re-view" of educational…

  15. Lessons in collaboration and effective field research from the Appalachian Headwaters Research Experience for Undergraduates Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. L.; Fox, J.; Wilder, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    In the summer of 2009, the authors launched year one of a three-year National Science Foundation-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates entitled "Carbon Storage and Headwater Health in the Appalachian Headwaters." Eight undergraduates selected from a nationally competitive field of more than 60 applicants participated in the ten-week field- and laboratory-based program along with three middle- and high-school teachers. Each student developed and completed an independent research project related to coal mining’s impact on soil organic carbon and sediment transport processes. Specifically, they used isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure the carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic signature of soils and sediments in the Appalachian headwater landscapes and first order streams of Kentucky's southeastern coalfields. Among the program's innovative features was its fundamentally collaborative nature--which was represented in several ways. First, the background of the three program leaders was very different: an environmental planner with an academic background in land use planning and administration (Jones); a civil engineer trained in biogeochemistry and watershed modeling (Fox); and an environmental educator experienced in both formal and nonformal educator training and certification (Wilder). The program was also a collaboration between a Carnegie 1 research-oriented institution and an undergraduate/ teaching -focused regional comprehensive university. Finally, the participants themselves represented a diversity of disciplines and institutional backgrounds--including biology, geology, chemistry, environmental science and civil engineering. The Research Experience for Teachers component was another innovative program element. The teachers participated in all field and laboratory research activities during the first six weeks, then developed a unit of study for their own classrooms to be implemented during the current school year. In addition to the six

  16. Latin American research and development in the energy field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    This report is divided into six main sections. The first outlines the conceptual framework and methodology stressing the limitations that impede greater depth of analysis. The second, on the types and directions of research and development (R and D) activities in Latin America, is divided into three subsections, covering New and Renewable Sources of Energy (NRSE); conventional energy (including nuclear energy); and integrated energy resource R and D (primarily energy conservation and substitution, as well as energy policy and planning studies). In each subsection, I endeavoured to describe and critically assess R and D activities, achievements, and failures within the context of the limitations. Conclusions and recommendations in each case are implicitly or explicitly made depending on the field. In the third section, the state of science and technology policy on energy resources is presented. The fourth section draws together the conclusions and recommendations on further work to be done. The fifth section is a bibliography of 64 annotated and 52 unannotated items and the sixth, an appendix, is a directory of people working in the field of energy research

  17. Qualitative evaluation of a deferred consent process in paediatric emergency research: a PREDICT study

    OpenAIRE

    Furyk, Jeremy; McBain-Rigg, Kristin; Watt, Kerrianne; Emeto, Theophilus I; Franklin, Richard C; Franklin, Donna; Schibler, Andreas; Dalziel, Stuart R; Babl, Franz E; Wilson, Catherine; Phillips, Natalie; Ray, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Background A challenge of conducting research in critically ill children is that the therapeutic window for the intervention may be too short to seek informed consent prior to enrolment. In specific circumstances, most international ethical guidelines allow for children to be enrolled in research with informed consent obtained later, termed deferred consent (DC) or retrospective consent. There is a paucity of data on the attitudes of parents to this method of enrolment in paediatric emergency...

  18. Balancing Academic Teaching, Research, and Service: a Paradigm Emerging from NSF-TUES Sponsored Project Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    As every academic administrator stresses in interviews with new faculty, the role of a professor today involves balancing three areas - teaching, research, and service. Few institutions can afford the old policy of promoting and tenuring faculty based solely on research output and grantsmanship, whilst ignoring poor teaching outcomes. Outreach activities involving parents and the extramural community are increasingly important as expensive universities and four-year colleges seek to demonstrate their relevance in the age of much less expensive community colleges and distance education. Nevertheless, many faculty complain that teaching and outreach duties compete for their valuable research time. Some fields of research have such broad impacts that they merit the dedicated time of our best scientists. However, other research projects constitute little more than publicly funded professorial hobbies. The challenge is to reliably identify and prioritize the research questions that merit investigation. IN ODU's geospatial visualization group, we instituted a policy requiring Ph.D. theses to include a component (at least one chapter) dedicated to the development and testing of learning resources. TAs test visualizations in their lab sections in tandem with their research studies. They must incorporate original geophysical mapping, modeling, and/or analysis in order to justify a degree in the Physics Department (the traditional home of Geophysics at our institution) rather than, say, the College of Education. Geospatial graduate students also train to offer planetarium presentations to the public using digital full-dome projection technology that can be used with a wide range of geoscience and planetary science topics. Thus they tackle the three aspects of academic work from the outset. In contrast, students in other programs frequently serve as TAs in their first and then switch to grant-supported RA work, resulting in a steady stream of new TAs with little or no

  19. Annual Report for 2003 Wild Horse Research and Field Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jason; Singer, Francis J.; Zeigenfuss, Linda C.

    2004-01-01

    As stated in the Wild Horse Fertility Control Field Trial Plan, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has an immediate need for a safe, effective contraceptive agent to assist in the management of the large number of wild horses on western rangelands. The BLM and the U.S. Geological Survey-Biological Resources Discipline (USGS/BRD) are testing the immunocontraceptive agent Porcine Zonae Pellucida (PZP) in field trials with three free-roaming herds of western wild horses. Extensive research has already been conducted on the safety, efficacy, and duration of PZP applications in both domestic and feral horses on eastern barrier islands and in some select trials I with wild horses in Nevada managed by the BLM. However, significant questions remain concerning the effects of I PZP application at the population level in the wild, as well as effects at the individual level on behavior, social structure, and harem dynamics of free-ranging animals. These questions are best answered with field trials on wild horse herds under a tight research protocol. The ultimate goal is to provide the BLM with the protocols and information necessary to begin using fertility control to regulate population growth rates in wild horse herds on a broader scale. Fertility control is intended to assist the conventional capture, removal, and adoption process as a I means of controlling excess numbers of wild horses and burros, and to greatly reduce the adoption costs and numbers of animals handled. Fertility control is not intended to totally replace the removal and adoption process.

  20. Screening and detection of elder abuse: Research opportunities and lessons learned from emergency geriatric care, intimate partner violence, and child abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Scott R; Carpenter, Christopher R; Rosen, Tony; Sharps, Phyllis; Gelles, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of elder abuse screening and detection methods for community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults, including general issues and challenges for the field. Then, discussions of applications in emergency geriatric care, intimate partner violence (IPV), and child abuse are presented to inform research opportunities in elder abuse screening. The article provides descriptions of emerging screening and detection methods and technologies from the emergency geriatric care and IPV fields. We also discuss the variety of potential barriers to effective screening and detection from the viewpoint of the older adult, caregivers, providers, and the health care system, and we highlight the potential harms and unintended negative consequences of increased screening and mandatory reporting. We argue that research should continue on the development of valid screening methods and tools, but that studies of perceived barriers and potential harms of elder abuse screening among key stakeholders should also be conducted.

  1. Emergence of Qualitative Research in Colombian Psychology: A Beginning that Still Does not End

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Larreamendy-Joerns

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the processes of emergence and evolution of qualitative research in psychology in Colombia. Two major arguments are advanced. First, these processes can only be fully understood in the light of the history of psychology in Colombia, and, at the same time, within the context of emergence and consolidation of the social sciences in Colombia. Second, the evolution of qualitative research in North American psychology coincides in some aspects with its corresponding path in Colombian psychology, even though the former exhibits some distinctive features. This article begins with a synthesis of some attempts to divide into historical periods the evolution of qualitative research in the United States. Then, it offers a historical view of psychology in Colombia. Finally, the article proposes three major historical periods to account for the emergence and evolution of qualitative research in our discipline. As a conclusion, the process of development of qualitative research in Colombia is compared to that in the United States and research challenges are proposed for Colombian scholars to address in the years to come. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0604317

  2. Perspectives on emerging zoonotic disease research and capacity building in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Craig; Artsob, Harvey; Bowie, William R; Drebot, Michael; Fraser, Erin; Leighton, Ted; Morshed, Muhammad; Ong, Corinne; Patrick, David

    2004-01-01

    Zoonoses are fundamental determinants of community health. Preventing, identifying and managing these infections must be a central public health focus. Most current zoonoses research focuses on the interface of the pathogen and the clinically ill person, emphasizing microbial detection, mechanisms of pathogenicity and clinical intervention strategies, rather than examining the causes of emergence, persistence and spread of new zoonoses. There are gaps in the understanding of the animal determinants of emergence and the capacity to train highly qualified individuals; these are major obstacles to preventing new disease threats. The ability to predict the emergence of zoonoses and their resulting public health and societal impacts are hindered when insufficient effort is devoted to understanding zoonotic disease epidemiology, and when zoonoses are not examined in a manner that yields fundamental insight into their origin and spread. Emerging infectious disease research should rest on four pillars: enhanced communications across disciplinary and agency boundaries; the assessment and development of surveillance and disease detection tools; the examination of linkages between animal health determinants of human health outcomes; and finally, cross-disciplinary training and research. A national strategy to predict, prevent and manage emerging diseases must have a prominent and explicit role for veterinary and biological researchers. An integrated health approach would provide decision makers with a firmer foundation from which to build evidence-based disease prevention and control plans that involve complex human/animal/environmental systems, and would serve as the foundation to train and support the new cadre of individuals ultimately needed to maintain and apply research capacity in this area. PMID:18159512

  3. Train operation in emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on train operation theories and methods in the context of emergencies. It examines and assesses a range of aspects—including the definition of a railway emergency, transport organization modes in emergencies, calculating railway transport capacity in emergencies, line planning in emergencies, train re-pathing in emergencies and train re-scheduling in emergencies—that are urgently needed in the railway transportation field, which faces the serious challenge of dealing with emergencies worldwide. The book highlights the latest research results in an integrated and systematic way, and the methodology presented is oriented on real-world problems, allowing it to be used not only directly in railway operational management, but also as the point of departure for further applications or theoretical research. As such, the book will be of considerable interest to graduate students and researchers in the field of traffic and transportation engineering.>.

  4. Does outcome feedback make you a better emergency physician? A systematic review and research framework proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Curtis F; Schachter, Howard; Stewart, Aviva T; McGowan, Jessie

    2009-11-01

    The organization of emergency medical care limits the ability of emergency physicians to know the outcomes of most of their patients after the patients leave the emergency department. This lack of outcome feedback may hinder the practice of emergency medicine (EM) by preventing "calibration" of the decision tools of practitioners. We sought to determine what is currently known about outcome feedback in EM, including its incidence, impact and modifiers. We searched the following databases: PreMEDLINE, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, DARE, Health Technology Assessment Database and AMED. We performed manual searches on abstract databases, reference lists, various health information and research websites, and nonindexed journals. Selection entailed a 2-step screening pro cess to exclude articles not pertaining to outcome feedback in EM. Our search yielded 1128 bibliographic records, from which screening identified 7 relevant reports: 5 surveys, 1 system level evaluation and 1 intervention trial. All studies were found to have "inadequate" or "unable to assess" reporting and study quality. Systems for outcome feedback to EM residents have been increasingly available since 1984, though they are perceived to be inadequate. Commonly used mechanisms for outcome feedback include automatic routing of discharge summaries, case conferences for admitted patients and telephone calls to patients or families for discharged patients. With respect to attending emergency physicians, no conclusions or clinical recommendations can be made given the level of available evidence. The potential importance of outcome feedback remains, at this time, underevaluated. We propose a research framework, and hypothesize that increasing outcome feedback would increase emergency physician diagnostic accuracy, therapeutic outcomes, clinical efficiency and job satisfaction. Future research in this area should include surveys and focus groups, as well as simulated or real-world intervention

  5. Research priorities for the influence of gender on diagnostic imaging choices in the emergency department setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashurst, John V; Cherney, Alan R; Evans, Elizabeth M; Kennedy Hall, Michael; Hess, Erik P; Kline, Jeffrey A; Mitchell, Alice M; Mills, Angela M; Weigner, Michael B; Moore, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging is a cornerstone of patient evaluation in the acute care setting, but little effort has been devoted to understanding the appropriate influence of sex and gender on imaging choices. This article provides background on this issue and a description of the working group and consensus findings reached during the diagnostic imaging breakout session at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Gender-specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes." Our goal was to determine research priorities for how sex and gender may (or should) affect imaging choices in the acute care setting. Prior to the conference, the working group identified five areas for discussion regarding the research agenda in sex- and gender-based imaging using literature review and expert consensus. The nominal group technique was used to identify areas for discussion for common presenting complaints to the emergency department where ionizing radiation is often used for diagnosis: suspected pulmonary embolism, suspected kidney stone, lower abdominal pain with a concern for appendicitis, and chest pain concerning for coronary artery disease. The role of sex- and gender-based shared decision-making in diagnostic imaging decisions is also raised. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. Understanding the value of mixed methods research: the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew; O'Brien, Kerth; Meckler, Garth; Chang, Anna Marie; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2016-07-01

    Mixed methods research has significant potential to broaden the scope of emergency care and specifically emergency medical services investigation. Mixed methods studies involve the coordinated use of qualitative and quantitative research approaches to gain a fuller understanding of practice. By combining what is learnt from multiple methods, these approaches can help to characterise complex healthcare systems, identify the mechanisms of complex problems such as medical errors and understand aspects of human interaction such as communication, behaviour and team performance. Mixed methods approaches may be particularly useful for out-of-hospital care researchers because care is provided in complex systems where equipment, interpersonal interactions, societal norms, environment and other factors influence patient outcomes. The overall objectives of this paper are to (1) introduce the fundamental concepts and approaches of mixed methods research and (2) describe the interrelation and complementary features of the quantitative and qualitative components of mixed methods studies using specific examples from the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services (CSI-EMS), a large National Institutes of Health-funded research project conducted in the USA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Qualitative evaluation of a deferred consent process in paediatric emergency research: a PREDICT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furyk, Jeremy; McBain-Rigg, Kristin; Watt, Kerrianne; Emeto, Theophilus I; Franklin, Richard C; Franklin, Donna; Schibler, Andreas; Dalziel, Stuart R; Babl, Franz E; Wilson, Catherine; Phillips, Natalie; Ray, Robin

    2017-11-15

    A challenge of conducting research in critically ill children is that the therapeutic window for the intervention may be too short to seek informed consent prior to enrolment. In specific circumstances, most international ethical guidelines allow for children to be enrolled in research with informed consent obtained later, termed deferred consent (DC) or retrospective consent. There is a paucity of data on the attitudes of parents to this method of enrolment in paediatric emergency research. To explore the attitudes of parents to the concept of DC and to expand the knowledge of the limitations to informed consent and DC in these situations. Children presenting with uncomplicated febrile seizures or bronchiolitis were identified from three separate hospital emergency department databases. Parents were invited to participate in a semistructured telephone interview exploring themes of limitations of prospective informed consent, acceptability of the DC process and the most appropriate time to seek DC. Transcripts underwent inductive thematic analysis with intercoder agreement, using Nvivo 11 software. A total of 39 interviews were conducted. Participants comprehended the limitations of informed consent under emergency circumstances and were generally supportive of DC. However, they frequently confused concepts of clinical care and research, and support for participation was commonly linked to their belief of personal benefit. Participants acknowledged the requirement for alternatives to prospective informed consent in emergency research, and were supportive of the concept of DC. Our results suggest that current research practice seems to align with community expectations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Collaborative field research and training in occupational health and ergonomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, K

    1998-01-01

    Networking collaborative research and training in Asian developing countries includes three types of joint activities: field studies of workplace potentials for better safety and health, intensive action training for improvement of working conditions in small enterprises, and action-oriented workshops on low-cost improvements for managers, workers, and farmers. These activities were aimed at identifying workable strategies for making locally adjusted improvements in occupational health and ergonomics. Many improvements have resulted as direct outcomes. Most these improvements were multifaceted, low-cost, and practicable using local skills. Three common features of these interactive processes seem important in facilitating realistic improvements: 1) voluntary approaches building on local achievements; 2) the use of practical methods for identifying multiple improvements; and 3) participatory steps for achieving low-cost results first. The effective use of group work tools is crucial. Stepwise training packages have thus proven useful for promoting local problem-solving interventions based on voluntary initiatives.

  9. Field-control, phase-transitions, and life’s emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi eMitra-Delmotte

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Instances of critical-like characteristics in living systems at each organizational level (bio-molecules to ecosystems as well as the spontaneous emergence of computation (Langton, do suggest the relevance of self-organized criticality (SOC. But extrapolating complex bio-systems to life’s origins, brings up a paradox: how could simple organics-- lacking the ‘soft matter’ response properties of today’s complex bio-molecules--have dissipated energy from primordial reactions (eventually reducing CO2 in a controlled manner for their ‘ordering’? Nevertheless, a causal link of life’s macroscopic irreversible dynamics to the microscopic reversible laws of statistical mechanics is indicated via the ‘functional-takeover’ of a soft magnetic scaffold by organics (c.f. Cairns-Smith’s crystal-scaffold. A field-controlled structure offers a mechanism for bootstrapping-- bottom-up assembly with top-down control: its super-paramagnetic colloidal components obey reversible dynamics, but its dissipation of magnetic (H-field energy for aggregation breaks time-reversal symmetry. The responsive adjustments of the controlled (host mineral system to environmental changes would bring about mutual coupling between random organic sets supported by it; here the generation of long-range correlations within organic (guest networks could include SOC-like mechanisms. And, such cooperative adjustments enable the selection of the functional configuration by altering the inorganic dipolar network’s capacity to assist a spontaneous process. A non-equilibrium dynamics could now drive the kinetically-oriented system (trimming the phase-space via sterically-coupled organics towards a series of phase-transitions with appropriate organic replacements taking-over its functions. Where available, experiments are cited in support of these speculations and for designing appropriate tests.

  10. Discriminating Between Legitimate and Predatory Open Access Journals: Report from the International Federation for Emergency Medicine Research Committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hansoti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Open access (OA medical publishing is growing rapidly. While subscription-based publishing does not charge the author, OA does. This opens the door for “predatory” publishers who take authors’ money but provide no substantial peer review or indexing to truly disseminate research findings. Discriminating between predatory and legitimate OA publishers is difficult. Methods: We searched a number of library indexing databases that were available to us through the University of California, Irvine Libraries for journals in the field of emergency medicine (EM. Using criteria from Jeffrey Beall, University of Colorado librarian and an expert on predatory publishing, and the Research Committee of the International Federation for EM, we categorized EM journals as legitimate or likely predatory. Results: We identified 150 journal titles related to EM from all sources, 55 of which met our criteria for OA (37%, the rest subscription based. Of these 55, 25 (45% were likely to be predatory. We present lists of clearly legitimate OA journals, and, conversely, likely predatory ones. We present criteria a researcher can use to discriminate between the two. We present the indexing profiles of legitimate EM OA journals, to inform the researcher about degree of dissemination of research findings by journal. Conclusion: OA journals are proliferating rapidly. About half in EM are legitimate. The rest take substantial money from unsuspecting, usually junior, researchers and provide no value for true dissemination of findings. Researchers should be educated and aware of scam journals.

  11. Citation Analysis for the Modern Instructor: An Integrated Review of Emerging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    While online instructors may be versed in conducting e-Research (Hung, 2012; Thelwall, 2009), today's faculty are probably less familiarized with the rapidly advancing fields of bibliometrics and informetrics. One key feature of research in these areas is Citation Analysis, a rather intricate operational feature available in modern indexes…

  12. The establishment of research ethics consultation services (RECS): an emerging research resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Jennifer B; Sharp, Richard R; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Reider, Carson R; Taylor, Holly A; Wilfond, Benjamin S

    2013-02-01

    Emphasis on translational research to facilitate progression from the laboratory into the community also creates a dynamic in which ethics and social policy questions and solutions are ever pressing. In response, academic institutions are creating Research Ethics Consultation Services (RECS). All Clinical Translational Science Award institutions were surveyed in early 2010 to determine which institutions have a RECS in operation and what is their composition and function. Of the 46 institutions surveyed, 33 (70%) have a RECS. Only 15 RECS have received any consult requests in the last year. Issues that are common among these relatively nascent services include relationships with institutional oversight committees, balancing requestor concerns about confidentiality with research integrity and human subjects protection priorities, tracking consult data and outcomes, and developing systems for internal evaluation. There is variability in how these issues are approached. It will be important to be attentive to the institutional context to develop an appropriate approach. Further data about the issues raised by requestors and the recommendations provided are necessary to build a community of scholars who can navigate and resolve ethical issues encountered along the translational research pathway. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Upper extremity transplantation: current concepts and challenges in an emerging field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, River M; Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2014-03-01

    Loss of an isolated upper limb is an emotionally and physically devastating event that results in significant impairment. Patients who lose both upper extremities experience profound disability that affects nearly every aspect of their lives. While prosthetics and surgery can eventually provide the single limb amputee with a suitable assisting hand, limited utility, minimal haptic feedback, weight, and discomfort are persistent problems with these techniques that contribute to high rates of prosthetic rejection. Moreover, despite ongoing advances in prosthetic technology, bilateral amputees continue to experience high levels of dependency, disability, and distress. Hand and upper extremity transplantation holds several advantages over prosthetic rehabilitation. The missing limb is replaced with one of similar skin color and size. Sensibility, voluntary motor control, and proprioception are restored to a greater degree, and afford better dexterity and function than prosthetics. The main shortcomings of transplantation include the hazards of immunosuppression, the complications of rejection and its treatment, and high cost. Hand and upper limb transplantation represents the most commonly performed surgery in the growing field of Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation (VCA). As upper limb transplantation and VCA have become more widespread, several important challenges and controversies have emerged. These include: refining indications for transplantation, optimizing immunosuppression, establishing reliable criteria for monitoring, diagnosing, and treating rejection, and standardizing outcome measures. This article will summarize the historical background of hand transplantation and review the current literature and concepts surrounding it.

  14. The emergent executive: a dynamic field theory of the development of executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Aaron T; Spencer, John P

    2014-06-01

    Executive function (EF) is a central aspect of cognition that undergoes significant changes in early childhood. Changes in EF in early childhood are robustly predictive of academic achievement and general quality of life measures later in adulthood. We present a dynamic neural field (DNF) model that provides a process-based account of behavior and developmental change in a key task used to probe the early development of executive function—the Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) task. In the DCCS, children must flexibly switch from sorting cards either by shape or color to sorting by the other dimension. Typically, 3-year-olds, but not 5-year-olds, lack the flexibility to do so and perseverate on the first set of rules when instructed to switch. Using the DNF model, we demonstrate how rule-use and behavioral flexibility come about through a form of dimensional attention. Further, developmental change is captured by increasing the robustness and precision of dimensional attention. Note that although this enables the model to effectively switch tasks, the dimensional attention system does not “know” the details of task-specific performance. Rather, correct performance emerges as a property of system–wide interactions. We show how this captures children’s behavior in quantitative detail across 14 versions of the DCCS task. Moreover, we successfully test a set of novel predictions with 3-year-old children from a version of the task not explained by other theories.

  15. Fellowship Training in the Emerging Fields of Fetal-Neonatal Neurology and Neonatal Neurocritical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyser, Christopher D; Tam, Emily W Y; Chang, Taeun; Soul, Janet S; Miller, Steven P; Glass, Hannah C

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal neurocritical care is a growing and rapidly evolving medical subspecialty, with increasing numbers of dedicated multidisciplinary clinical, educational, and research programs established at academic institutions. The growth of these programs has provided trainees in neurology, neonatology, and pediatrics with increased exposure to the field, sparking interest in dedicated fellowship training in fetal-neonatal neurology. To meet this rising demand, increasing numbers of training programs are being established to provide trainees with the requisite knowledge and skills to independently deliver care for infants with neurological injury or impairment from the fetal care center and neonatal intensive care unit to the outpatient clinic. This article provides an initial framework for standardization of training across these programs. Recommendations include goals and objectives for training in the field; core areas where clinical competency must be demonstrated; training activities and neuroimaging and neurodiagnostic modalities which require proficiency; and programmatic requirements necessary to support a comprehensive and well-rounded training program. With consistent implementation, the proposed model has the potential to establish recognized standards of professional excellence for training in the field, provide a pathway toward Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education certification for program graduates, and lead to continued improvements in medical and neurological care provided to patients in the neonatal intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  17. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-04-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  18. Children's views on research without prior consent in emergency situations: a UK qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Louise; Sherratt, Frances C; Young, Bridget; McNamara, Paul; Dawson, Angus; Appleton, Richard; Crawley, Esther; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Woolfall, Kerry

    2018-06-09

    We explored children's views on research without prior consent (RWPC) and sought to identify ways of involving children in research discussions. Qualitative interview study. Participants were recruited through a UK children's hospital and online advertising. 16 children aged 7-15 years with a diagnosis of asthma (n=14) or anaphylaxis (n=2) with recent (<12 months) experience of emergency care. Children were keen to be included in medical research and viewed RWPC as acceptable in emergency situations if trial interventions were judged safe. Children trusted that doctors would know about their trial participation and act in their best interests. All felt that children should be informed about the research following their recovery and involved in discussions with a clinician or their parent(s) about the use of data already collected as well as continued participation in the trial (if applicable). Participants suggested methods to inform children about their trial participation including an animation. Children supported, and were keen to be involved in, clinical trials in emergency situations. We present guidance and an animation that practitioners and parents might use to involve children in trial discussions following their recovery. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Importance of holographic light in the emerging field of mind-body healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Roberta

    2000-10-01

    Healing with color has been researched and documented worldwide for centuries. Every single part of the brain and every cell in the body is effected by light. Chinese and Russian scientists demonstrated that the acupuncture meridians transmit light. Dr. Peter Mandel, German chiropractic physician and acupuncturist, states that the acupuncture points are especially sensitive to electromagnetic waves within the spectrum of visible light and microwave energy, and all cells constantly emit and absorb small pockets of electromagnetic radiation or light, called biophotons. The harmony or disharmony of cells has been documented. Kirlian photography, to photography the aura was invented by Russians Semyon and Valentina Kirlian. Photo therapy and light research are being practiced worldwide. In the United States, Dr. Jacob Lieberman has written an influential book Light Medicine of the Future. In 1992 the first Light Years Ahead conference was held. (#5 1996) Dr. Brian Breiling and Dr. Lee Hartley brought together experts in the field to discuss the many potentials of light therapy. My present research in this area has focused on narrow band frequencies through the use of holography. Its therapeutic applications of color healing in this research are both critical and fundamental. My current work, The Chakras, seven reflection holograms on silver halide, relate to the wheels of light described in the earliest recorded Indian history. I will discus the chakras, this ancient metaphysical system under the new light of popular western metaphors and visionary art, how the chakras relate to the seven colors of the rainbow, the electromagnetic waves, and the connection to color holography in healing light therapy. I will be citing concurrent research in color healing, and the important areas of research that are necessary to have significant impact on future directions. Holography in the future will constitute a major frontier in discovery.

  20. Effects of Field Conditions on Emergence of Oilseed Rape Seed lots Grown in Khorasan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Yanegh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nineteen irrigated farms of canola from six cities of Khorasan selected to assess the seedling emergence one month after sowing in 2009. Soil texture of each farm determined using the Hydrometer method. The results showed that weather conditions of sowing areas had no significant effect on emergence of oilseed rape. With increasing the temperature (within the range of 19.5 to 21.5 ˚C emergence percentage was not increased significantly. Rainfall also caused no significant effect on seedling emergence. The percentage of emergence in machine-sowing and hand-sowing were 38.4% and 28%, respectively. Soils with loam silt, silt clay loam and loam texture had emergence of 27.2%, 31.2% and 47% respectively. It seems soil texture plays a great roll on the emergence of oilseed rape with epigeal seedlings.

  1. French research in the field of nuclear agronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin De Montgareuil, P.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents a survey of the most important work in the field of nuclear agronomy carried out in France since the second international conference, ranging from pure research to the most direct application. As the programmes develop, so to an ever decreasing degree does this differentiation cover the distinction made in the report between the biological radiations effects and the other uses of nuclear techniques. Thus research on agricultural radio-genetics is carried on in two directions: from the theoretical and methodological angle, with comparative studies of the action of various types of radiation, the influence of dose rate and temperature, the action of chemical mutation agents, the production of chimera by gamma irradiation; and on the practical side, leading to the creation of new, hardier or earlier varieties (rice, millet, ground-nuts). Problems of pest destruction (eradication) and the preservation of foodstuffs by irradiation are also tackled by widely varied means and for totally different purposes. One operation consisting of a simple irradiation (moist seeds, potatoes...) will sometimes be associated with original studies of a biochemical or microbiological nature (for example: decomposition of starch, glucide metabolism of irradiated tubers, radiation resistance of yeasts). The nuclear technique side is represented mainly by radioisotopes (carbon 14, phosphorus 32, sulphur 35, calcium 45, potassium 42, copper 64, gold 198) and stable isotopes analysed by mass spectrometer (nitrogen 15, oxygen 18) or by neutron activation (boron 10). The studies mentioned refer to problems on different levels concerning plant physiology, agrology, agricultural entomology and zootechny. Results obtained from measurements of the humidity (neutron thermalization) and density (gamma diffusion) of a soil are also given. Numerous organisations take part in these various research programmes, each according to its speciality: cooperative private enterprise

  2. Identifying and Prioritizing Information Needs and Research Priorities of Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Alexa L; Carbone, Eric G; Meit, Michael B; Kennedy, Mallory J; Yusuf, Hussain; Kahn, Emily B

    2017-10-01

    This study describes findings from an assessment conducted to identify perceived knowledge gaps, information needs, and research priorities among state, territorial, and local public health preparedness directors and coordinators related to public health emergency preparedness and response (PHPR). The goal of the study was to gather information that would be useful for ensuring that future funding for research and evaluation targets areas most critical for advancing public health practice. We implemented a mixed-methods approach to identify and prioritize PHPR research questions. A web survey was sent to all state, city, and territorial health agencies funded through the Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) Cooperative Agreement program and a sample of local health departments (LHDs). Three focus groups of state and local practitioners and subject matter experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were subsequently conducted, followed by 3 meetings of an expert panel of PHPR practitioners and CDC experts to prioritize and refine the research questions. We identified a final list of 44 research questions that were deemed by study participants as priority topics where future research can inform PHPR programs and practice. We identified differences in perceived research priorities between PHEP awardees and LHD survey respondents; the number of research questions rated as important was greater among LHDs than among PHEP awardees (75%, n=33, compared to 24%, n=15). The research questions identified provide insight into public health practitioners' perceived knowledge gaps and the types of information that would be most useful for informing and advancing PHPR practice. The study also points to a higher level of information need among LHDs than among PHEP awardees. These findings are important for CDC and the PHPR research community to ensure that future research studies are responsive to practitioners' needs and provide the information

  3. How Do Trend Researchers Conduct Research? The Production of Knowledge in a Controversial Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Pfadenhauer

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The planned research project described in this article focuses on the methods of trend research—not only in a narrow literal sense of techniques of data collection and data evaluation but also in a broader understanding of the logic of knowledge production in this controversial field. Initially trend research can be appointed between market research on the one hand and futurology on the other hand. Criticism regarding trend research as well as its innovative potential is also mentioned. Following the recent studies, trend research is conceived as application-oriented research in a broad sense. As far as the methodology is concerned, the proposed study promises to be an empirically-founded contribution by integrating analysis from sources such as explorative and focused conversations, observations and expert interviews. The study uses the example of trend research and asks the question how research is actually "done" and if it is application oriented or not. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0402366

  4. Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, David; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua; Parker, Jack; Brandt, Craig; Holladay, Susan; Wolfe, Amy; Bogle, Mary Anna; Lowe, Kenneth; Hyder, Kirk

    2006-01-01

    The Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge (Fig. 1), Tennessee supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) goal of understanding the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites for new solutions to environmental remediation and long-term stewardship. In particular, the FRC provides the opportunity for researchers to conduct studies that promote the understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of existing remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies. It offers a series of contaminated sites around the former S-3 Waste Disposal Ponds and uncontaminated sites in which investigators and students conduct field research or collect samples for laboratory analysis. FRC research also spurs the development of new and improved characterization and monitoring tools. Site specific knowledge gained from research conducted at the FRC also provides the DOE-Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM) the critical scientific knowledge needed to make cleanup decisions for the S-3 Ponds and other sites on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)

  5. General practices as emergent research organizations: a qualitative study into organizational development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Fraser; Shaw, Sara; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Carter, Yvonne H

    2005-06-01

    An increasing proportion of research in primary care is locally undertaken in designated research practices. Capacity building to support high quality research at these grass roots is urgently needed and is a government priority. There is little previously published research on the process by which GP practices develop as research organizations or on their specific support needs at organizational level. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with 28 key informants in 11 research practices across the UK, we explored their historical accounts of the development of research activity. We analysed the data with reference to contemporary theories of organizational development. Participants identified a number of key events and processes, which allowed us to produce a five-phase model of practice development in relation to research activity (creative energy, concrete planning, transformation/differentiation, consolidation and collaboration). Movement between these phases was not linear or continuous, but showed emergent and adaptive properties in which specific triggers and set-backs were often critical. This developmental model challenges previous categorical taxonomies of research practices. It forms a theory-driven framework for providing appropriate support at the grass roots of primary care research, based on the practice's phase of development and the nature of external triggers and potential setbacks. Our findings have important implications for the strategic development of practice-based research in the UK, and could serve as a model for the wider international community.

  6. Forum on Emerging Infectious Diseases Highlights Leading-Edge Research | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists and professionals from multiple governmental agencies recently gathered at NCI at Frederick for a forum on newly emerging infectious diseases, threats to public health, and ongoing efforts to study high-risk pathogens. During the one-day event, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research’s Scientific Interaction Subcommittee, nine speakers from four agencies shared their research and their agencies’ endeavors to address current and future biological threats.

  7. Situational awareness and information flow in prehospital emergency medical care from the perspective of paramedic field supervisors: a scenario-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norri-Sederholm, Teija; Paakkonen, Heikki; Kurola, Jouni; Saranto, Kaija

    2015-01-16

    In prehospital emergency medical services, one of the key factors in the successful delivery of appropriate care is the efficient management and supervision of the area's emergency medical services units. Paramedic field supervisors have an important role in this task. One of the key factors in the daily work of paramedic field supervisors is ensuring that they have enough of the right type of information when co-operating with other authorities and making decisions. However, a gap in information sharing still exists especially due to information overload. The aim of this study was to find out what type of critical information paramedic field supervisors need during multi-authority missions in order to manage their emergency medical services area successfully. The study also investigated both the flow of information, and interactions with the paramedic field supervisors and the differences that occur depending on the incident type. Ten paramedic field supervisors from four Finnish rescue departments participated in the study in January-March 2012. The data were collected using semi-structured interviews based on three progressive real-life scenarios and a questionnaire. Data were analysed using deductive content analysis. Data management and analysis were performed using Atlas.ti 7 software. Five critical information categories were formulated: Incident data, Mission status, Area status, Safety at work, and Tactics. Each category's importance varied depending on the incident and on whether it was about information needed or information delivered by the paramedic field supervisors. The main communication equipment used to receive information was the authority radio network (TETRA). However, when delivering information, mobile phones and TETRA were of equal importance. Paramedic field supervisors needed more information relating to area status. Paramedic field supervisors communicate actively with EMS units and other authorities such as Emergency Medical Dispatch

  8. A comparative study between nonlinear regression and artificial neural network approaches for modelling wild oat (Avena fatua) field emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-linear regression techniques are used widely to fit weed field emergence patterns to soil microclimatic indices using S-type functions. Artificial neural networks present interesting and alternative features for such modeling purposes. In this work, a univariate hydrothermal-time based Weibull m...

  9. Public-private implementation of integrated emergency response services: Case study of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Veena M; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-12-01

    Emergency medical services are important to the functioning of health systems, but these services tend to be neglected in low- and middle-income countries, such as India. In recent years, several models of pre-hospital emergency medical services have emerged in India. Research on these models holds important lessons for existing and future emergency medical service programs in low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive description of the organizational structure and service delivery model of a public-private partnership in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute, with a particular focus on its operations in Bengaluru. A case study methodology was used to explore systematically the organizational model of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka. Qualitative data were collected through an in-person site visit to GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute headquarters in Bengaluru in July 2013. Three sources were used: in-depth, semistructured interviews, document review, and nonparticipant observation. Data were analyzed according to the health system "building blocks" proposed by the World Health Organization. The organization follows a standardized model across the states and union territories where they have contractual arrangements, including Karnataka. Processes for fleet maintenance, information systems/information technology and training, and deployment were well structured at the organizational level. The public-private partnership appears pro-poor in orientation; however, further demand-side research is required on the perspective of patients. Our study reveals a functional structure at the organizational level, which provides a key service at no cost to users. Detailed analyses of this nature can help inform global efforts for the development and strengthening of emergency medical services systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physical Analytics: An emerging field with real-world applications and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    In the past most information on the internet has been originated by humans or computers. However with the emergence of cyber-physical systems, vast amount of data is now being created by sensors from devices, machines etc digitizing the physical world. While cyber-physical systems are subject to active research around the world, the vast amount of actual data generated from the physical world has attracted so far little attention from the engineering and physics community. In this presentation we use examples to highlight the opportunities in this new subject of ``Physical Analytics'' for highly inter-disciplinary research (including physics, engineering and computer science), which aims understanding real-world physical systems by leveraging cyber-physical technologies. More specifically, the convergence of the physical world with the digital domain allows applying physical principles to everyday problems in a much more effective and informed way than what was possible in the past. Very much like traditional applied physics and engineering has made enormous advances and changed our lives by making detailed measurements to understand the physics of an engineered device, we can now apply the same rigor and principles to understand large-scale physical systems. In the talk we first present a set of ``configurable'' enabling technologies for Physical Analytics including ultralow power sensing and communication technologies, physical big data management technologies, numerical modeling for physical systems, machine learning based physical model blending, and physical analytics based automation and control. Then we discuss in detail several concrete applications of Physical Analytics ranging from energy management in buildings and data centers, environmental sensing and controls, precision agriculture to renewable energy forecasting and management.

  11. Third cycle university studies in Europe in the field of agricultural engineering and in the emerging discipline of biosystems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuga, F; Briassoulis, D; Aguado, P; Farkas, I; Griepentrog, H; Lorencowicz, E

    2010-01-01

    The main objectives of European Thematic Network entitled 'Education and Research in Agricultural for Biosystems Engineering in Europe (ERABEE-TN)' is to initiate and contribute to the structural development and the assurance of the quality assessment of the emerging discipline of Biosystems Engineering in Europe. ERABEE is co-financed by the European Community in the framework of the LLP Programme. The partnership consists of 35 participants from 27 Erasmus countries, out of which 33 are Higher Education Area Institutions (EDU) and 2 are Student Associations (ASS). 13 Erasmus participants (e.g. Thematic Networks, Professional Associations, and Institutions from Brazil, Croatia, Russia and Serbia) are also involved in the Thematic Network through synergies. To date, very few Biosystems Engineering programs exist in Europe and those that are initiated are at a very primitive stage of development. The innovative and novel goal of the Thematic Network is to promote this critical transition, which requires major restructuring in Europe, exploiting along this direction the outcomes accomplished by its predecessor; the USAEE-TN (University Studies in Agricultural Engineering in Europe). It also aims at enhancing the compatibility among the new programmes of Biosystems Engineering, aiding their recognition and accreditation at European and International level and facilitating greater mobility of skilled personnel, researchers and students. One of the technical objectives of ERABEE is dealing with mapping and promoting the third cycle studies (including European PhDs) and supporting the integration of research at the 1st and 2nd cycle regarding European Biosystems Engineering university studies. During the winter 2008 - spring 2009 period, members of ERABEE conducted a survey on the contemporary status of doctoral studies in Europe, and on a possible scheme for promotion of cooperation and synergies in the framework of the third cycle of studies and the European Doctorate

  12. Science communication in the field of fundamental biomedical research (editorial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Sam; Prokop, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this special issue on science communication is to inspire and help scientists who are taking part or want to take part in science communication and engage with the wider public, clinicians, other scientists or policy makers. For this, some articles provide concise and accessible advice to individual scientists, science networks, or learned societies on how to communicate effectively; others share rationales, objectives and aims, experiences, implementation strategies and resources derived from existing long-term science communication initiatives. Although this issue is primarily addressing scientists working in the field of biomedical research, much of it similarly applies to scientists from other disciplines. Furthermore, we hope that this issue will also be used as a helpful resource by academic science communicators and social scientists, as a collection that highlights some of the major communication challenges that the biomedical sciences face, and which provides interesting case studies of initiatives that use a breadth of strategies to address these challenges. In this editorial, we first discuss why we should communicate our science and contemplate some of the different approaches, aspirations and definitions of science communication. We then address the specific challenges that researchers in the biomedical sciences are faced with when engaging with wider audiences. Finally, we explain the rationales and contents of the different articles in this issue and the various science communication initiatives and strategies discussed in each of them, whilst also providing some information on the wide range of further science communication activities in the biomedical sciences that could not all be covered here. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Research Ethics in Emerging Forms of Online Learning: Issues Arising from a Hypothetical Study on a MOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how research ethics is evolving along with emerging online research methods and settings. In particular, it focuses on ethics issues implied in a hypothetical virtual ethnography study aiming to gain insights on participants' experience in an emergent context of networked learning, namely a MOOC--Massive Online Open…

  14. The Rise of Computing Research in East Africa: The Relationship between Funding, Capacity and Research Community in a Nascent Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsh, Matthew; Bal, Ravtosh; Wetmore, Jameson; Zachary, G. Pascal; Holden, Kerry

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of vibrant research communities of computer scientists in Kenya and Uganda has occurred in the context of neoliberal privatization, commercialization, and transnational capital flows from donors and corporations. We explore how this funding environment configures research culture and research practices, which are conceptualized as…

  15. Application of field blanks in odour emission research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogink, Nico W.M.; Klarenbeek, Johannes V.

    2016-01-01

    In the Netherlands field blanks are mandatory when sampling odour emission. Field blanks are matrices that have negligible or unmeasurable amounts of the substance of interest. They are used to document possible contamination during sampling, transport and storage of samples. Although field

  16. Research on the development for emerging industries in Nantong under the national strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongnian; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Tianying; Wang, Qing

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, according to the relevant national strategic emerging industry planning and policy, conducted in-depth research on the development of emerging industries in Nantong, and believes that current economic social development in Nantong has been entered into a new normal period, in the new period to “innovation” as the core characteristics, strategic emerging industry opportunities and challenges facing the industry. Therefore, Nantong should persist in innovation driven, focus on the cultivation and development of new industries, to provide new impetus to Nantong’s economic vitality and development. According to the development and upgrading of traditional industries, and expand the advantages of industry, cultivate new industries, for each kind of industry to come up with specific development strategies and suggestions: Nantong municipal government will be the seven emerging industries four in the industry (i.e., new material industry, new energy industry, new information technology industry, high-end equipment manufacturing industry) as the development object, further “bigger and stronger”, and strive to enhance the industrial scale and the formation of local characteristics as soon as possible.

  17. Evolution of Attitudes in the Field of Human Research Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Escobar-Melo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The state of evolution of attitudes in a sample of 142 Medical Students at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogota (at the beginning, middle and ending of their studies in the field of Human Research Ethics (HRE is analytically described. A complex scale of attitudes was used, with three components: affective, beliefs-related and behavioral, further divided into three theoretical categories taken from Bioethics: Subject-End/means- Dignity, Benefit and Justice. The relationship between the current medical education process and the attitudes regarding HRE in the sample are analyzed.A small trend towards progress in all categories and in all components of attitudes throughout medical education is described; neither the Benefit nor the Subject-End/means/Dignity categories evolve in a significant way; some significant differences were observed in the Justice category (beliefs and behavioral and in the Subject-End/means-Dignity category (beliefs component. The results allow for asking about the role of formation and evolution of those attitudes throughout the academic process. In conclusion, attitudes seem to be progressing relatively, without a decisive evolution.

  18. Medical Research Volunteer Program (MRVP): innovative program promoting undergraduate research in the medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Michael M; Atieh, Jessica A; Soubra, Marwa K; Khoury, Samia J; Tamim, Hani; Kaafarani, Bilal R

    2016-06-06

    Most educational institutions lack a structured system that provides undergraduate students with research exposure in the medical field. The objective of this paper is to describe the structure of the Medical Research Volunteer Program (MRVP) which was established at the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, as well as to assess the success of the program. The MRVP is a program that targets undergraduate students interested in becoming involved in the medical research field early on in their academic career. It provides students with an active experience and the opportunity to learn from and support physicians, clinical researchers, basic science researchers and other health professionals. Through this program, students are assigned to researchers and become part of a research team where they observe and aid on a volunteer basis. This paper presents the MRVP's four major pillars: the students, the faculty members, the MRVP committee, and the online portal. Moreover, details of the MRVP process are provided. The success of the program was assessed by carrying out analyses using information gathered from the MRVP participants (both students and faculty). Satisfaction with the program was assessed using a set of questions rated on a Likert scale, ranging from 1 (lowest satisfaction) to 5 (highest satisfaction). A total of 211 students applied to the program with a total of 164 matches being completed. Since the beginning of the program, three students have each co-authored a publication in peer-reviewed journals with their respective faculty members. The majority of the students rated the program positively. Of the total number of students who completed the program period, 35.1 % rated the effectiveness of the program with a 5, 54.8 % rated 4, and 8.6 % rated 3. A small number of students gave lower ratings of 2 and 1 (1.1 % and 0.4 %, respectively). The MRVP is a program that provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to learn about research firsthand

  19. Predicting field weed emergence with empirical models and soft computing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedling emergence is the most important phenological process that influences the success of weed species; therefore, predicting weed emergence timing plays a critical role in scheduling weed management measures. Important efforts have been made in the attempt to develop models to predict seedling e...

  20. A state of emergency in crisis communication: An intercultural crisis communication research agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Diers-Lawson, AR

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to provide an evidence-based set of recommendations for the development of an intercultural crisis communication research agenda with three goals. First, to provide an advancement in our understanding of the state of crisis communication research in general. Second, to offer a grounded introduction to crisis communication for intercultural scholars who may not be as familiar with the field. Finally to identify three broad evidence-based areas for developing intercultural cr...

  1. Citation Analysis for the Modern Instructor: An Integrated Review of Emerging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Piotrowski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available While online instructors may be versed in conducting e-Research (Hung, 2012; Thelwall, 2009, today’s faculty are probably less familiarized with the rapidly advancing fields of bibliometrics and informetrics. One key feature of research in these areas is Citation Analysis, a rather intricate operational feature available in modern indexes such as Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar, and PsycINFO. This paper reviews the recent extant research on bibliometrics within the context of citation analysis. Particular focus is on empirical studies, review essays, and critical commentaries on citation-based metrics across interdisciplinary academic areas. Research that relates to the interface between citation analysis and applications in higher education is discussed. Some of the attributes and limitations of citation operations of contemporary databases that offer citation searching or cited reference data are presented. This review concludes that: a citation-based results can vary largely and contingent on academic discipline or specialty area, b databases, that offer citation options, rely on idiosyncratic methods, coverage, and transparency of functions, c despite initial concerns, research from open access journals is being cited in traditional periodicals, and d the field of bibliometrics is rather perplex with regard to functionality and research is advancing at an exponential pace. Based on these findings, online instructors would be well served to stay abreast of developments in the field.

  2. Applying Bourdieu’s Field Theory to Analyze the Changing Status of the Research Librarian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wien, Charlotte; Dorch, Bertil F.

    2018-01-01

    to how this demand can be met. We argue that changes that has taken place in the research library has also led to a loss of prestige for the research librarians. We use Bourdieu’s field theory to analyse the power struggles in the academic field and in the field of the research library and to identify...

  3. Novel Electrochemical Phenomena in Magnetic Fields(Research in High Magnetic Fields)

    OpenAIRE

    Mogi, Iwao; Kamiko, Masao

    1996-01-01

    Recent two topics are given of electrochemical studies in steady magnetic fields at the High Field Laboratory of Tohoku University. One is the magnetic-field-induced diffusion-limited-aggregation in the pattern formation of silver electrodeposits . The other is the magnetic field effect on the learning effect in a dopant-exchange process of an organic conducting polymer polypyrrole.

  4. Dualities among one-time field theories with spin, emerging from a unifying two-time field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bars, Itzhak; Quelin, Guillaume

    2008-01-01

    The relation between two-time physics (2T-physics) and the ordinary one-time formulation of physics (1T-physics) is similar to the relation between a 3-dimensional object moving in a room and its multiple shadows moving on walls when projected from different perspectives. The multiple shadows as seen by observers stuck on the wall are analogous to the effects of the 2T-universe as experienced in ordinary 1T spacetime. In this paper we develop some of the quantitative aspects of this 2T to 1T relationship in the context of field theory. We discuss 2T field theory in d+2 dimensions and its shadows in the form of 1T field theories when the theory contains Klein-Gordon, Dirac and Yang-Mills fields, such as the standard model of particles and forces. We show that the shadow 1T field theories must have hidden relations among themselves. These relations take the form of dualities and hidden spacetime symmetries. A subset of the shadows are 1T field theories in different gravitational backgrounds (different space-times) such as the flat Minkowski spacetime, the Robertson-Walker expanding universe, AdS d-k xS k , and others, including singular ones. We explicitly construct the duality transformations among this conformally flat subset, and build the generators of their hidden SO(d,2) symmetry. The existence of such hidden relations among 1T field theories, which can be tested by both theory and experiment in 1T-physics, is part of the evidence for the underlying d+2 dimensional spacetime and the unifying 2T-physics structure

  5. Generic Procedures for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency at Triga Research Reactors. Attachment 1 (2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The publication provides guidance for response to emergencies at TRIGA research reactors in Threat Category II and III. It contains information on the unique behaviour of TRIGA fuel during accident conditions; it describes design characteristics of TRIGA research reactors and provides specific symptom-based emergency classification for this type of research reactor. This publication covers the determination of the appropriate emergency class and protective actions for a nuclear or radiological emergency at TRIGA research reactors. It does not cover nuclear security at TRIGA research reactors. The term 'threat category' is used in this publication as described in Ref. [6] and for the purposes of emergency preparedness and response only; this usage does not imply that any threat, in the sense of an intention and capability to cause harm, has been made in relation to facilities, activities or sources. The threat category is determined by an analysis of potential nuclear and radiological emergencies and the associated radiation hazard that could arise as a consequence of those emergencies. STRUCTURE. The attachment consists of an introduction which defines the background, objective, scope and structure, two sections covering technical aspects and appendices. Section 2 describes the characteristics of TRIGA fuel in normal and accident conditions. Section 3 contains TRIGA research reactor specific emergency classification tables for Threat Category II and III. These tables should be used instead of the corresponding emergency classification tables presented in Ref. [1] while developing the emergency response arrangements at TRIGA research reactors. The appendices present some historical overview and typical general data for TRIGA research reactor projects and the list of TRIGA installations around the world. The terms used in this document are defined in the IAEA Safety Glossary and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors.

  6. The Virtual Learning Commons: Supporting the Fuzzy Front End of Scientific Research with Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D. D.; Gandara, A.; Gris, I.

    2012-12-01

    The Virtual Learning Commons (VLC), funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Cyberinfrastructure CI-Team Program, is a combination of Semantic Web, mash up, and social networking tools that supports knowledge sharing and innovation across scientific disciplines in research and education communities and networks. The explosion of scientific resources (data, models, algorithms, tools, and cyberinfrastructure) challenges the ability of researchers to be aware of resources that might benefit them. Even when aware, it can be difficult to understand enough about those resources to become potential adopters or re-users. Often scientific data and emerging technologies have little documentation, especially about the context of their use. The VLC tackles this challenge by providing mechanisms for individuals and groups of researchers to organize Web resources into virtual collections, and engage each other around those collections in order to a) learn about potentially relevant resources that are available; b) design research that leverages those resources; and c) develop initial work plans. The VLC aims to support the "fuzzy front end" of innovation, where novel ideas emerge and there is the greatest potential for impact on research design. It is during the fuzzy front end that conceptual collisions across disciplines and exposure to diverse perspectives provide opportunity for creative thinking that can lead to inventive outcomes. The VLC integrates Semantic Web functionality for structuring distributed information, mash up functionality for retrieving and displaying information, and social media for discussing/rating information. We are working to provide three views of information that support researchers in different ways: 1. Innovation Marketplace: supports users as they try to understand what research is being conducted, who is conducting it, where they are located, and who they collaborate with; 2. Conceptual Mapper: supports users as they organize their

  7. A research of virtual reality engineering for emergency response in radioactive materials transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Naoto; Hagiwara, Yutaka; Nakajima, Chikahito; Itoh, Norihiko

    2000-01-01

    As the result of typical nuclear accidents in last few years, people began to pay attention to the emergency response in nuclear accidents. CRIEPI developed the concept of support system for all of normal condition, emergency condition and education during transport, using Virtual Reality technique and other up-to-date engineering. This system consist of three subsystems, namely 'on-site' for normal condition, 'on-site support system' for emergency condition and 'education system' for transport workers training. Each subsystem contains computer, communication devices, display, video camera, various sensors, data base and control or analysis programs. This system needs the following characteristics; 1) Using Virtual Reality technique, it is practicable for users to produce the hypothetical accident scenes and to show data, graphs and text messages on a see-through type head-mounted display. 2) Each subsystem refers the common data bases for route soundings, accident probability estimation and environment impact assessment and so on. 3) In the case of accident, it can smoothly transfer from 'on-site support system' for normal condition to 'on-site support system' for emergency condition. 4) It is capable to communicate by digital full duplex communication between on-site and the control center. 5) Movie from video camera and observed data from on-site monitoring posts are transmitted to the control center, analyzed with the central computer, then returned to on-site transportation team for visualization on each head mounted displays of crew. Some technology, mainly in the field for communication, have been developed up to now, but the others are expected to realize in near future. CRIEPI will constantly make efforts for those development. (author)

  8. The history of sociology as a field of research and some recent trends in Brazilian social thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, João Marcelo Ehlert

    2017-01-01

    The article lays the foundation for a dialog between scholars of Brazilian social thought and historians of sociology as a discipline. In order to achieve this objective, I analyze recent developments in the field of the history of sociology, highlighting the incorporation of historiographic methods and the emergence of a transnational approach, which points toward a global history of the discipline. I criticize the Eurocentric limits of this field and argue that recent research trends in the area of Brazilian social thought can help overcome this limitation. Finally, I briefly analyze the obstacles that impede this dialog and indicate possible strategies for overcoming them.

  9. Interprofessionality as the field of interprofessional practice and interprofessional education: an emerging concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Danielle; Oandasan, Ivy

    2005-05-01

    This paper proposes a new concept and a frame of reference that should permit the development of a better understanding of a phenomenon that is the development of a cohesive and integrated health care practice among professionals in response to clients' needs. The concept is named "interprofessionality" and aims to draw a clear distinction with another concept, that of interdisciplinarity. The utilization of the concept of interdisciplinarity, which originally concerns the development of integrated knowledge in response to fragmented disciplinary knowledge, has caused some confusion. We need a concept that will specifically concern the development of a cohesive practice among different professionals from the same organization or from different organizations and the factors influencing it. There is no concept that focuses clearly on this field. Interprofessionality concerns the processes and determinants that influence interprofessional education initiatives as well as determinants and processes inherent to interprofessional collaboration. Interprofessionality also involves analysis of the linkages between these two spheres of activity. An attempt to bridge the gap between interprofessional education and interprofessional practice is long overdue; the two fields of inquiry need a common basis for analysis. To this end, we propose a frame of reference, an interprofessional education for collaborative patient-centred practice framework. The framework establishes linkages between the determinants and processes of collaboration at several levels, including links among learners, teachers and professionals (micro level), links at the organizational level between teaching and health organizations (meso level) and links among systems such as political, socio-economic and cultural systems (macro level). Research must play a key role in the development of interprofessionality in order to document these linkages and the results of initiatives as they are proposed and

  10. Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraji, H.; Othman, O. C.; Ngassapa, F. N.; Mureithi, E. W.

    2016-01-01

    The continuity for discovery and production of new chemicals, allied products, and uses has currently resulted into generation of recent form of contaminants known as Emerging Contaminants (ECs). Once in the aquatic environment ECs are carcinogenic and cause other threats to both human's and animals' health. Due to their effects this study was aimed at investigating research trends of ECs in Tanzania. Findings revealed that USA and EU countries were leading in ECs researches, little followed by Asia, South Africa, and then Zambia. Only few guidelines from USA-EPA, WHO, Canada, and Australia existed. Neither published guidelines nor regulations for ECs existed in Tanzania; rather only the occurrence of some disinfection by-products and antibiotics was, respectively, reported in Arusha and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. As these reports had a limited coverage of ECs, henceforth, these findings constitute the first-line reference materials for ECs research in Tanzania which shall be useful for future monitoring and regulation planning. PMID:26998381

  11. Leadership in MMOGs: A Field of Research on Virtual Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysirlaki, Sofia; Paraskeva, Fotini

    2012-01-01

    As our need for collaboration constantly grows, new tools have emerged to connect us in social networks, supporting the development of online communities, such as online games and virtual worlds. MMOGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Games) and MMORPGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games) are complex systems, in which players are…

  12. Educational Film Studies: A Burgeoning Field of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1890s early film pioneers used their cinematographic oeuvre for educational and informative purposes. As a result not only did film production companies regard schools as a lucrative emerging market, but progressive teachers also welcomed this new resource for teaching and learning. Soon a professional infrastructure was created and…

  13. [Analysis of projects received and funded in fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China during 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Kun; Wang, Linlin; Chen, Xulin; Cao, Yongqian; Xiang, Chuan; Xue, Lixiang; Yan, Zhangcai

    2014-01-01

    To summarized the projects received and funded in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) during 2010-2013, put forward the thinking and perspective of this future trend in these fields. The number of the funded project and total funding in the fields of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery from NSFC during 2010-2013 had been statistical analyzed, in the meantime, the overview situation of various branches in basic research and further preliminary analysis the research frontier and hot issues have been analyzed. (1) The number of funded project were 581 in H15 of NSFC during 2010-2013, total funding reached to 277.13 million RMB, including 117 projects in H1511 (emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery and other science issue), 96 projects in H1507 (wound healing and scar), 88 projects in H1502 (multi-organ failure), 71 projects in H1505 (burn), 61 projects in H1504 (trauma). (2) The top 10 working unit for project funding in the field of emergency and intensive care medicine/trauma/burns/plastic surgery present as Third Military Medical University (70), Shanghai Jiao tong University (69), Second Military Medical University (40), Chinese PLA General Hospital (36), Forth Military Medical University (35), Zhejiang University (22), Sun Yat-Sen University (18), Southern Medical University (14), China Medical University (11), Capital Medical University (11) respectively, the number of funded project positive correlated with funding. (3) The funded research field in H15 covered almost all important organs and system injury or repair research, our scientists reached a fairly high level in some research field, for example, sepsis, trauma, repair, et al. "Sepsis" was funded 112 projects in H15 for 4 years, the growth rate became rapid and stable comparing to shock, burns and cardiopulmonary resuscitation funded projects

  14. Collaboration and Team Science Field Guide - Center for Research Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaboration and Team Science: A Field Guide provides insight into the practices of conducting collaborative work. Since its 2010 publication, the authors have worked and learned from teams and organizations all over the world. Learn from these experiences in the second edition of the Team Science Field Guide.

  15. Researches carried out by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in the field of environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavakami, Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The results of works, accomplished by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute, related to evaluation of the nuclear facilities effect on the environmental medium, are considered. The analytical results of studies on the environmental radioactivity with an account of meteorological aspects, evaluation of the nuclear facilities impact on the environmental medium are presented. Studies on the radionuclide behavior in the environmental medium cover large range of problems: distribution of natural and artificial radionuclides in the surface medium and their migration; evaluation of the human radiation doses on the account of radionuclides; environmental medium protection and risk evaluation. The method for measuring the 90 Sr concentrations with application of ion-exchange tars and a simple method for determining the radon activity with application of liquid scintillators were developed in the process of the study on creation of the environmental medium monitoring. The studies, related to the content and behavior of tritium, Pu, 137 Cs, 247 Am, as well as mercury and other heavy metals in the environmental medium were carried out. The methods for evaluating the NPPs radiation effect on the population with an account of the radioactive substances releases both by normal operation and in the emergency situations, were developed. Attention is also paid to research programs and developed codes [ru

  16. Emerging medical informatics research trends detection based on MeSH terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Peng-Hui; Yao, Qiang; Mao, Jin; Zhang, Shi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the research trends of medical informatics over the last 12 years. A new method based on MeSH terms was proposed to identify emerging topics and trends of medical informatics research. Informetric methods and visualization technologies were applied to investigate research trends of medical informatics. The metric of perspective factor (PF) embedding MeSH terms was appropriately employed to assess the perspective quality for journals. The emerging MeSH terms have changed dramatically over the last 12 years, identifying two stages of medical informatics: the "medical imaging stage" and the "medical informatics stage". The focus of medical informatics has shifted from acquisition and storage of healthcare data by integrating computational, informational, cognitive and organizational sciences to semantic analysis for problem solving and clinical decision-making. About 30 core journals were determined by Bradford's Law in the last 3 years in this area. These journals, with high PF values, have relative high perspective quality and lead the trend of medical informatics.

  17. Future pulsed magnetic field applications in dynamic high pressure research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Hawke, R.S.; Burgess, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The generation of large pressures by magnetic fields to obtain equation of state information is of fairly recent origin. Magnetic fields used in compression experiments produce an almost isentropic sample compression. Axial magnetic field compression is discussed together with a few results chosen to show both advantages and limitations of the method. Magnetic compression with azimuthal fields is then considered. Although there are several potential pitfalls, the possibilities are encouraging for obtaining very large pressures. Next, improved diagnostic techniques are considered. An x-ray ''streaking camera'' is proposed for volume measurements and a more detailed discussion is given on the use of the shift of the ruby fluorescence lines for pressure measurements. Finally, some additional flux compression magnetic field sources are discussed briefly. 5 figures, 2 tables

  18. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  19. Team Resilience as a Second-Order Emergent State: A Theoretical Model and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint Bowers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Resilience has been recognized as an important phenomenon for understanding how individuals overcome difficult situations. However, it is not only individuals who face difficulties; it is not uncommon for teams to experience adversity. When they do, they must be able to overcome these challenges without performance decrements.This manuscript represents a theoretical model that might be helpful in conceptualizing this important construct. Specifically, it describes team resilience as a second-order emergent state. We also include research propositions that follow from the model.

  20. Ethnopharmacology—A Bibliometric Analysis of a Field of Research Meandering Between Medicine and Food Science?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Wai Kan Yeung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research into bioactive natural products of medicinal plants has a long tradition, but ethnopharmacology as a well-defined field of research has a relatively short history, only dating back 50 years.Aims: With the fast development of this field and its global importance especially in the fast developing economies of Asia it is timely to assess the most influential articles (as measured by citations and to identify important drivers and research trends in this field.Methods: Scopus was searched to identify relevant articles which were assessed by all three authors. The 100 most cited articles were identified and analyzed. Bibliometric software (VOSviewer was utilized to supplement the analysis and to generate a term map that visualized the citation patterns of the 100 articles containing different terms.Results: Forty-four of the 100 articles are reviews. On average, each of the 100 articles had 632 citations and since publication was cited 43 times annually. The four core journals were Journal of Ethnopharmacology (n = 17, Food Chemistry (n = 7, Life Sciences (n = 5, and Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (n = 4. Anti-oxidant effects appeared to be a recurring and highly cited topic, whereas the links into drug discovery and neuropharmacology seemed to be less strong. Numerous medicinal plants and functional foods were the foci of research, and the foci shifted when comparing pre-2000 and post-2000 publications (with the later involving a broader spectrum of plants and foods and a wider range of biological effects. Contributions largely came from Asia, and also from the Americas, Africa, and Oceania, besides Europe.Conclusion: We have identified and analyzed the 100 most-cited articles in ethnopharmacology. Within 50 years the field has gained a profile and while conventionally often linked to “traditional knowledge,” drug discovery and some areas of pharmacology, this analysis highlights its emerging importance in

  1. Ethnopharmacology-A Bibliometric Analysis of a Field of Research Meandering Between Medicine and Food Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Heinrich, Michael; Atanasov, Atanas G

    2018-01-01

    Background: The research into bioactive natural products of medicinal plants has a long tradition, but ethnopharmacology as a well-defined field of research has a relatively short history, only dating back 50 years. Aims: With the fast development of this field and its global importance especially in the fast developing economies of Asia it is timely to assess the most influential articles (as measured by citations) and to identify important drivers and research trends in this field. Methods: Scopus was searched to identify relevant articles which were assessed by all three authors. The 100 most cited articles were identified and analyzed. Bibliometric software (VOSviewer) was utilized to supplement the analysis and to generate a term map that visualized the citation patterns of the 100 articles containing different terms. Results: Forty-four of the 100 articles are reviews. On average, each of the 100 articles had 632 citations and since publication was cited 43 times annually. The four core journals were Journal of Ethnopharmacology ( n = 17), Food Chemistry ( n = 7), Life Sciences ( n = 5), and Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry ( n = 4). Anti-oxidant effects appeared to be a recurring and highly cited topic, whereas the links into drug discovery and neuropharmacology seemed to be less strong. Numerous medicinal plants and functional foods were the foci of research, and the foci shifted when comparing pre-2000 and post-2000 publications (with the later involving a broader spectrum of plants and foods and a wider range of biological effects). Contributions largely came from Asia, and also from the Americas, Africa, and Oceania, besides Europe. Conclusion: We have identified and analyzed the 100 most-cited articles in ethnopharmacology. Within 50 years the field has gained a profile and while conventionally often linked to "traditional knowledge," drug discovery and some areas of pharmacology, this analysis highlights its emerging importance in the context

  2. Radioprotective drugs: a synopsis of current research and a proposed research plan for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, R.; Anspaugh, L.

    1985-04-01

    FEMA has broad roles in the management of disasters potentially involving substantial amounts of radioactive contamination. These could be either peacetime or wartime disasters. A meeting was held in March 1985 to see if there are any research contributions that FEMA might reasonably make in the area of radioprotective drugs that would substantially enhance its ability to perform its mission. The other federal agencies presently sponsoring research in the field were represented at the meeting. A few selected researchers also participated to provide complementary viewpoints. Activities of a modest scale that FEMA might undertake were identified, as were larger scale activities that might be undertaken in the event of long-term, major funding-level increases for FEMA. 2 refs

  3. Neurophilia: Guiding Educational Research and the Educational Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyers, Paul

    2016-01-01

    For a decade or so there has been a new "hype" in educational research: it is called educational neuroscience or even neuroeducation (and neuroethics)--there are numerous publications, special journals, and an abundance of research projects together with the advertisement of many positions at renowned research centres worldwide. After a…

  4. Gender differences in neurological emergencies part II: a consensus summary and research agenda on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Espinoza, Tamara R; Merck, Lisa H; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Backster, Anika; Stein, Donald G

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. There is strong evidence that gender and sex play an important role across the spectrum of TBI, from pathophysiology to clinical care. In May 2014, Academic Emergency Medicine held a consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes." A TBI working group was formed to explore what was known about the influence of sex and gender on TBI and to identify gaps for future research. The findings resulted in four major recommendations to guide the TBI research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  5. Field Testing Research at the NWTC (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-02-01

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Laboratory (NREL) has extensive field testing capabilities that have been used in collaboration with the wind industry to accelerate wind technology development and deployment for more than 30 years.

  6. Influence of seed size and ecological factors on the germination and emergence of field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis)

    OpenAIRE

    Tanveer,A; Tasneem,M; Khaliq,A; Javaid,M.M; Chaudhry,M.N

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of seed germination ecology of weeds can assist in predicting their potential distribution and developing effective management strategies. Influence of environmental factors and seed size on germination and seedling emergence of Convolvulus arvensis (field bindweed) was studied in laboratory and greenhouse conditions. Germination occurred over a wide range of constant temperatures, between 15 and 40 ºC, with optimum germination between 20 and 25 ºC. Time to start germination,...

  7. Poor Access for African Researchers to African Emergency Care Publications: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijns, Stevan R; Maesela, Mmapeladi; Sinha, Suniti; Banner, Megan

    2017-10-01

    Based on relative population size and burden of disease, emergency care publication outputs from low- and middle-income regions are disproportionately lower than those of high-income regions. Ironically, outputs from regions with higher publication rates are often less relevant in the African context. As a result, the dissemination of and access to local research is essential to local researchers, but the cost of this access (actual and cost-wise) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to describe access to African emergency care publications in terms of publisher-based access (open access or subscription) and alternate access (self-archived or author provided), as well as the cost of access. We conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study using all emergency medicine publications included in Scopus between 2011 and 2015. A sequential search strategy described access to each article, and we calculated mean article charges against the purchasing power parity index (used to describe out-of-pocket expense). We included 666 publications from 49 journals, of which 395 (59.3%) were open access. For subscription-based articles, 106 (39.1%) were self-archived, 60 (22.1%) were author-provided, and 105 (38.8%) were inaccessible. Mean article access cost was $36.44, and mean processing charge was $2,319.34. Using the purchasing power parity index it was calculated that equivalent out-of-pocket expenditure for South African, Ghanaian and Tanzanian authors would respectively be $15.77, $10.44 and $13.04 for access, and $1,004.02, $664.36 and $830.27 for processing. Based on this, the corrected cost of a single-unit article access or process charge for South African, Ghanaian and Tanzanian authors, respectively, was 2.3, 3.5 and 2.8 times higher than the standard rate. One in six African emergency care publications are inaccessible outside institutional library subscriptions; additionally, the cost of access to publications in low- and middle-income countries appears

  8. Effective spacetime understanding emergence in effective field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the notion that quantum gravity may represent the "breakdown" of spacetime at extremely high energy scales. If spacetime does not exist at the fundamental level, then it has to be considered "emergent", in other words an effective structure, valid at low energy scales. The author develops a conception of emergence appropriate to effective theories in physics, and shows how it applies (or could apply) in various approaches to quantum gravity, including condensed matter approaches, discrete approaches, and loop quantum gravity.

  9. The perspectives of research in the construction field in Romania during the 2014-2020 period

    OpenAIRE

    Mihai VRABIE; Sergiu-Andrei BĂETU

    2013-01-01

    The construction field represents an important part of the Romanian economy (and of UE), with a strong social impact on the quality of citizen life. Naturally, the research from the construction field should be a priority in research and innovation activity. However, the research programs recently launched (Horizon 2020, from EU, and the Strategy of Research and Innovation 2014-2020 in Romania), don’t mention the construction field as an explicit priority. Under these conditions, we can speak...

  10. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire: psychometric properties, benchmarking data, and emerging research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyden James

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is widespread interest in measuring healthcare provider attitudes about issues relevant to patient safety (often called safety climate or safety culture. Here we report the psychometric properties, establish benchmarking data, and discuss emerging areas of research with the University of Texas Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Methods Six cross-sectional surveys of health care providers (n = 10,843 in 203 clinical areas (including critical care units, operating rooms, inpatient settings, and ambulatory clinics in three countries (USA, UK, New Zealand. Multilevel factor analyses yielded results at the clinical area level and the respondent nested within clinical area level. We report scale reliability, floor/ceiling effects, item factor loadings, inter-factor correlations, and percentage of respondents who agree with each item and scale. Results A six factor model of provider attitudes fit to the data at both the clinical area and respondent nested within clinical area levels. The factors were: Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Perceptions of Management, Job Satisfaction, Working Conditions, and Stress Recognition. Scale reliability was 0.9. Provider attitudes varied greatly both within and among organizations. Results are presented to allow benchmarking among organizations and emerging research is discussed. Conclusion The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire demonstrated good psychometric properties. Healthcare organizations can use the survey to measure caregiver attitudes about six patient safety-related domains, to compare themselves with other organizations, to prompt interventions to improve safety attitudes and to measure the effectiveness of these interventions.

  11. Application of quality improvement analytic methodology in emergency medicine research: A comparative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Bruce; Filiatrault, Lyne; Abu-Laban, Riyad B

    2018-05-30

    Quality improvement (QI) analytic methodology is rarely encountered in the emergency medicine literature. We sought to comparatively apply QI design and analysis techniques to an existing data set, and discuss these techniques as an alternative to standard research methodology for evaluating a change in a process of care. We used data from a previously published randomized controlled trial on triage-nurse initiated radiography using the Ottawa ankle rules (OAR). QI analytic tools were applied to the data set from this study and evaluated comparatively against the original standard research methodology. The original study concluded that triage nurse-initiated radiographs led to a statistically significant decrease in mean emergency department length of stay. Using QI analytic methodology, we applied control charts and interpreted the results using established methods that preserved the time sequence of the data. This analysis found a compelling signal of a positive treatment effect that would have been identified after the enrolment of 58% of the original study sample, and in the 6th month of this 11-month study. Our comparative analysis demonstrates some of the potential benefits of QI analytic methodology. We found that had this approach been used in the original study, insights regarding the benefits of nurse-initiated radiography using the OAR would have been achieved earlier, and thus potentially at a lower cost. In situations where the overarching aim is to accelerate implementation of practice improvement to benefit future patients, we believe that increased consideration should be given to the use of QI analytic methodology.

  12. Implementation of an Emergency Medicine Research Associates Program: Sharing 20 Years of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent DeRienzo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The use of research associates (RA programs to facilitate study enrollment in the emergency department was initiated during the mid-1990s. The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC was an early adopting site for this model, which has experienced considerable growth and development over the past 20 years. Methods: Our goal was to detail the Emergency Department Research Associates (EDRA program processes developed at the URMC that has led to our program’s sustainability and productivity. These processes, and the lessons learned during their development, can assist institutions seeking to establish an RA program or refine an existing program. Results: Defined procedures for selecting, training, and monitoring EDRAs have been created and refined with the goal of maximizing study enrollment and minimizing protocol deviations. Our EDRA program functions as a paid service center for investigators, and our EDRAs engage in a variety of study-related activities including screening and enrolling patients, administering surveys, collecting bio-specimens, and making follow-up calls. Over the past two years, our program has averaged 222 enrollments/month (standard deviation = 79.93, gathering roughly 25 participants per study per month. Conclusion: Our EDRA model has consistently resulted in some of the highest number of enrollments across a variety of recently funded, multi-center studies. Maintaining a high-quality EDRA program requires continual investment on the part of the leadership team, though the benefits to investigators within and outside the department outweigh these costs.

  13. Design of exposure systems for ELF electric field bioeffects research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Phillips, R.D.; Gillis, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    Two systems for exposure and sham-exposure of large numbers of rats and mice to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz electric fields have been constructed. The rat system contains four racks of four rectangular 1.0m x 2.2m exposure-electrodes that are stacked vertically with a separation between adjacent electrodes of 0.41 m. Any two of the four exposure racks may be energized to a maximum field strength of 150 kV/m. Each exposure electrode is equipped with 24 Lexan cages, each of which holds a single rat. The cage floor is a stainless steel screen that serves as one electrode. The system for watering animals is contained entirely within the electrode and does not protrude above the cage's floor, thereby preventing distortion of the exposure field and electrical shock or discharge as the animal drinks. The total capacity of the system is 288 rats. A similar system of two racks of five electrodes each is used to expose as many as 450 mice to fields at a maximum strength of 150 kV/m while sham exposing an equal number. Measurements of the electric field reveal an overall uniformity within 4% over the area to be occupied by experimental animals. The field inside a Lexan cage is reduced by about 3%. No corona-discharge has been detected. Measurements of ozone concentration in the rat and mouse exposure systems show no difference from background levels. Harmonic distortion has been eliminated by damping and filtering the high-voltage supply. Animals housed in close proximity are partially shielded from the electric field; the total body current in a rat model is reduced by 35 ± 5% when rats are placed in adjacent cages. (author)

  14. The Research of the Driver Attention Field Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Tao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For expanding the application scope of car-following, based on the basic idea of the noncontact interaction of the objects in physics, establish an attention field model to describe the driving behavior. Firstly, propose the time distance concept to describe the degree of driver perception to the front one-dimensional space and extend its application range to the two-dimensional space. Secondly, connect the point which has the same time distance to constitute the equipotential line of drivers’ attention field equipotent, and establish a model to describe it. Thirdly, define the effective range of the driver’s psychological field with the feature of the driver’s visual distance range increasing and the angle decreasing. Finally, design the calculation method to collect projection of the object in the psychological field scope and calculate the curve points to determine the object’s intensity of psychological field. Preliminarily build the driving behavior model and use the numerical simulation method to simulate the simple transport scenarios; initially verify the validity of the model.

  15. The Emerging Neuroscience of Intrinsic Motivation: A New Frontier in Self-Determination Research

    OpenAIRE

    Di Domenico, Stefano I.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic motivation refers to people?s spontaneous tendencies to be curious and interested, to seek out challenges and to exercise and develop their skills and knowledge, even in the absence of operationally separable rewards. Over the past four decades, experimental and field research guided by self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan and Deci, 2017) has found intrinsic motivation to predict enhanced learning, performance, creativity, optimal development and psychological wellness. Only recentl...

  16. Seed source may determine field-specific germination and emergence: the source by planting environment interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farm environmental characteristics and management practices can result in within-cultivar differences in seed quality. Transgenerational plasticity (effects of the farm environment on offspring, or TGP) can be important in germination and emergence dynamics. We chose two commonly-used cultivars (Lod...

  17. Los Alamos field-reversed configuration (FRC) research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.; Cochrane, J.C.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; McKenna, K.F.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.; Siemon, R.E.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results are discussed for a compact toroid produced by a field-reversed theta-pinch and containing purely poloidal magnetic fields. The confinement time is found to vary inversely with the ion gyro-radius and to be approximately independent of ion temperature for fixed gyro-radius. Within a coil of fixed radius, the plasmoid major radius R was varied by approx. 30% and the confinement appears to scale as R/sup 2/. A semi-empirical formation model has been formulated that predicts reasonably well the plasma parameters as magnetic field and fill pressure are varied in present experiments. The model is used to predict parameters in larger devices under construction.

  18. Los Alamos field-reversed configuration (FRC) research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, W.T.; Bartsch, R.R.; Cochrane, J.C.; Linford, R.K.; Lipson, J.; McKenna, K.F.; Platts, D.A.; Sherwood, E.G.; Siemon, R.E.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    Recent experimental results are discussed for a compact toroid produced by a field-reversed theta-pinch and containing purely poloidal magnetic fields. The confinement time is found to vary inversely with the ion gyro-radius and to be approximately independent of ion temperature for fixed gyro-radius. Within a coil of fixed radius, the plasmoid major radius R was varied by approx. 30% and the confinement appears to scale as R 2 . A semi-empirical formation model has been formulated that predicts reasonably well the plasma parameters as magnetic field and fill pressure are varied in present experiments. The model is used to predict parameters in larger devices under construction

  19. Emerging issues in paediatric health research consent forms in Canada: working towards best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, Edward S; Avard, Denise; Black, Lee; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-01-30

    Obtaining a research participant's voluntary and informed consent is the bedrock of sound ethics practice. Greater inclusion of children in research has led to questions about how paediatric consent operates in practice to accord with current and emerging legal and socio-ethical issues, norms, and requirements. Employing a qualitative thematic content analysis, we examined paediatric consent forms from major academic centres and public organisations across Canada dated from 2008-2011, which were purposively selected to reflect different types of research ethics boards, participants, and studies. The studies included biobanking, longitudinal studies, and gene-environment studies. Our purpose was to explore the following six emerging issues: (1) whether the scope of parental consent allows for a child's assent, dissent, or future consent; (2) whether the concepts of risk and benefit incorporate the child's psychological and social perspective; (3) whether a child's ability to withdraw is respected and to what extent withdrawal is permitted; (4) whether the return of research results includes individual results and/or incidental findings and the processes involved therein; (5) whether privacy and confidentiality concerns adequately address the child's perspective and whether standard data and/or sample identifiability nomenclature is used; and (6) whether retention of and access to paediatric biological samples and associated medical data are addressed. The review suggests gaps and variability in the consent forms with respect to addressing each of the six issues. Many forms did not discuss the possibility of returning research results, be they individual or general/aggregate results. Forms were also divided in terms of the scope of parental consent (specific versus broad), and none discussed a process for resolving disputes that can arise when either the parents or the child wishes to withdraw from the study. The analysis provides valuable insight and evidence into

  20. Emerging issues in paediatric health research consent forms in Canada: working towards best practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dove Edward S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining a research participant’s voluntary and informed consent is the bedrock of sound ethics practice. Greater inclusion of children in research has led to questions about how paediatric consent operates in practice to accord with current and emerging legal and socio-ethical issues, norms, and requirements. Methods Employing a qualitative thematic content analysis, we examined paediatric consent forms from major academic centres and public organisations across Canada dated from 2008–2011, which were purposively selected to reflect different types of research ethics boards, participants, and studies. The studies included biobanking, longitudinal studies, and gene-environment studies. Our purpose was to explore the following six emerging issues: (1 whether the scope of parental consent allows for a child’s assent, dissent, or future consent; (2 whether the concepts of risk and benefit incorporate the child’s psychological and social perspective; (3 whether a child’s ability to withdraw is respected and to what extent withdrawal is permitted; (4 whether the return of research results includes individual results and/or incidental findings and the processes involved therein; (5 whether privacy and confidentiality concerns adequately address the child’s perspective and whether standard data and/or sample identifiability nomenclature is used; and (6 whether retention of and access to paediatric biological samples and associated medical data are addressed. Results The review suggests gaps and variability in the consent forms with respect to addressing each of the six issues. Many forms did not discuss the possibility of returning research results, be they individual or general/aggregate results. Forms were also divided in terms of the scope of parental consent (specific versus broad, and none discussed a process for resolving disputes that can arise when either the parents or the child wishes to withdraw from the

  1. Emerging: An Art Field Placement's Impact on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averett, Paige; Spence, Christina Hall

    2018-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the experiences of 9 stakeholders in an art gallery field placement during their social work education. The study sought to understand how the nontraditional field placement prepared students for practice. In addition, personality traits of students that best fit the placement was examined. Findings suggest that…

  2. The emerging marijuana retail environment: Key lessons learned from tobacco and alcohol retail research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carla J; Henriksen, Lisa; Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Haardoerfer, Regine; Freisthler, Bridget

    2018-06-01

    The emerging retail market for recreational marijuana use warrants research and surveillance as such markets are established in more US states. This research can be informed by the existing literature regarding tobacco and alcohol, which highlights the impact of spatial access to tobacco and alcohol retailers and exposure to tobacco and alcohol marketing on smoking and drinking among youth and young adults. Prior research indicates that tobacco and alcohol retailers, as well as medical marijuana dispensaries, are disproportionately located in neighborhoods characterized by socioeconomic disadvantage and by higher proportions of racial/ethnic minorities and young adults. Moreover, retail marketing or point-of-sale practices may differentially target subpopulations and differ by neighborhood demography and local policy. This literature and the methods employed for studying the tobacco and alcohol market could inform research on the retail environment for marijuana, as current gaps exist. In particular, much of the existing literature involves cross-sectional research designs; longitudinal studies are needed. Moreover, standardized measures are needed for systematic monitoring of industry marketing practices and to conduct research examining neighborhood differences in exposure to retail marketing for marijuana and its contribution to use modality and frequency, alone and in combination with nicotine and alcohol. The use of standardized measures for tobacco and alcohol marketing have been critical to develop an evidence base from cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that document the impact of retail marketing on substance use by adolescents and adults. Similar research is needed to establish an evidence base to inform federal, state, and local regulations of marijuana. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of individual clinical outcomes on trial participants' perspectives on enrollment in emergency research without consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, Louisa W; Baren, Jill M; Biros, Michelle H; Fleischman, Ross J; Govindarajan, Prasanthi R; Jones, Elizabeth B; Pancioli, Arthur M; Pentz, Rebecca D; Scicluna, Victoria M; Wright, David W; Dickert, Neal W

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that patients are generally accepting of their enrollment in trials for emergency care conducted under exception from informed consent. It is unknown whether individuals with more severe initial injuries or worse clinical outcomes have different perspectives. Determining whether these differences exist may help to structure post-enrollment interactions. Primary clinical data from the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial were matched to interview data from the Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study. Answers to three key questions from Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study were analyzed in the context of enrolled patients' initial injury severity (initial Glasgow Coma Scale and Injury Severity Score) and principal clinical outcomes (Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale relative to initial injury severity). The three key questions from Patients' Experiences in Emergency Research-Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury study addressed participants' general attitude toward inclusion in the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial (general trial inclusion), their specific attitude toward being included in Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial under the exception from informed consent (personal exception from informed consent enrollment), and their attitude toward the use of exception from informed consent in the Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury trial in general (general exception from informed consent enrollment). Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts was performed to provide contextualization and to determine the extent to which respondents framed their attitudes in terms of clinical experience. Clinical data from Progesterone for the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

  4. The Historical Origins of Mass Communication Research in Our Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Samuel L.

    The seeds of mass communication research in broadcasting were extracurricular, not academic, inspired by experimental campus radio stations. Prior to the mid-1930s, radio research was scarce. Until World War II, radio speech was the most important topic, followed by articles on how to use radio for improving instruction. There are three…

  5. BIOREMEDIATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES - RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND FIELD EVALUATIONS - 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proceedings of the 1995 Symposium on Bioremediation of Hazardous Wastes, hosted by the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the EPA in Rye Brook, New York. he symposium was the eighth annual meeting for the presentation of research conducted by EPA's Biosystems Technol...

  6. New measurements of photospheric magnetic fields in late-type stars and emerging trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, S. H.; Linsky, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic fields of late-type stars are measured using the method of Saar et al. (1986). The method includes radiative transfer effects and compensation for line blending; the photospheric magnetic field parameters are derived by comparing observed and theoretical line profiles using an LTE code that includes line saturation and full Zeeman pattern. The preliminary mean active region magnetic field strengths (B) and surface area coverages for 20 stars are discussed. It is observed that there is a trend of increasing B towards the cooler dwarfs stars, and the linear correlation between B and the equipartition value of the magnetic field strength suggests that the photospheric gas pressure determines the photospheric magnetic field strengths. A tendency toward larger filling factors at larger stellar angular velocities is also detected.

  7. Magnetic field measurements on board of altitude-research rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theile, B.; Luehr, H.

    1976-01-01

    Electric currents within the Earth's magneto- and ionosphere can be probed by measuring their magnetic fields. Different payloads of the national sounding rocket programme will carry magnetometers of high resolution and dynamic range. Thorough test procedures are necessary to evaluate the instrument's properties and possible interference problems. (orig.) [de

  8. The international emergency management and engineering conference 1995: Proceedings. Globalization of emergency management and engineering: National and international issues concerning research and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.D. [ed.] [Optimal Systems, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Wybo, J.L. [ed.] [Ecole des Mines de Paris (France); Buisson, L. [ed.] [CEMAGREF, Saint-Martin d`Heres (France). Div. Nivologie

    1995-12-31

    This conference was held May 9--12, 1995 in Nice, France. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information to cope more effectively with emergencies. Attention is focused on advance technology from both a managerial and a scientific viewpoint. Interests include computers and communication systems as well as the social science and management aspects involved in emergency management and engineering. The major sections are: Management and Social Sciences; Training; Natural Disasters; Nuclear Hazards; Chemical Hazards; Research; and Applications. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  9. Design of emergency shutdown system for the Tehran Research Reactor; Part I: Neutronics investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarinia, M.; Faghihi, F.; Mirvakili, S.M.; Fakhraei, A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An emergency shutdown system for the TRR is carried out based on a heavy water tank. • The performance of the heavy water tank are carried out based on “first and equilibrium cores”. • Heavy water discharging flow rate is also studied in the current research. • Thermal flux in the radioisotope channel with and without the heavy water tank are studied. • A core with and without the heavy water tank for the cases of 5 × 6, 5 × 5, 5 × 4, and 4 × 4 fuel assemblies are investigated (for two types of fuel loading—first and equilibrium cores). - Abstract: In this paper, a neutronics design of the secondary (i.e., emergency) shutdown system for the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is carried out based on a heavy water tank design. The heavy water tank in a cylindrical shape is around the core, and calculations for the optimized radius and height of the tank are performed. The performance of the heavy water tank calculations are carried out based on two types of fuel loading, which are called the “first and equilibrium cores” of the TRR. For both cases, neutronics and standard safety analysis are taken into account, benchmarked, and described herein. Heavy water discharging flow rate is also studied in the current research, and the results are compared with the IAEA criteria. Moreover, thermal flux in the radioisotope channel with and without the heavy water tank (as the reflector) are studied herein. Specifically, a core with and without the heavy water tank for the cases of 5 × 6, 5 × 5, 5 × 4, and 4 × 4 fuel assemblies are investigated (for two types of fuel loading—first and equilibrium cores). Based on our optimization, the 5 × 5 fuel assembly, which is called “B configuration,” has better performance and efficiency than that of the other described layouts.

  10. Opening Digital Archives and Collections with Emerging Data Analytics Technology: A Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Elragal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the public sector, the EU legislation requires preservation and opening of increasing amounts of heterogeneous digital information that should be utilized by citizens and businesses. While technologies such as big data analytics (BDA have emerged, opening of digital archives and collections at a large scale is in its infancy. Opening archives and collections involve also particular requirements for recognizing and managing issues of privacy and digital rights. As well, ensuring the sustainability of the opened materials and economical appraisal of digital materials for preservation require robust digital preservation practices. We need to proceed beyond the state-of-the-art in opening digital archives and collections through the means of emerging big data analytics and validating a novel concept for analytics which then enables delivering of knowledge for citizens and the society. We set out an agenda for using BDA as our strategy for research and enquiry and for demonstrating the benefit of BDA for opening digital archives by civil servants and for citizens. That will – eventually - transform the preservation practices, and delivery and use opportunities of public digital archives. Our research agenda suggests a framework integrating four domains of inquiry, analytics-enhanced appraisal, analytics-prepared preservation, analytics-enhanced opening, and analytics-enhanced use, for utilizing the BDA technologies in the domain of digital archives and collections. The suggested framework and research agenda identifies initially particular BDA technologies to be utilized in each of the four domains, and contributes by highlighting a need for an integrated “public understanding of big data” in the domain of digital preservation.

  11. Organization, execution and evaluation of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care - an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R

    2014-12-01

    With the goal of reducing inequalities in patient care, the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," convened a diverse group of researchers, clinicians, health care providers, patients, and representatives of federal agencies and policy-makers in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014. The executive and steering committees identified seven clinical domains as key to gender-specific emergency care: cardiovascular, neurological, trauma/injury, substance abuse, pain, mental health, and diagnostic imaging. The main aims of the conference were to: 1) summarize and consolidate current data related to sex- and gender-specific research for acute care and identify critical gender-related gaps in knowledge to inform an EM research agenda; 2) create a consensus-driven research agenda that advances sex- and gender-specific research in the prevention, diagnosis, and management of acute diseases and identify strategies to investigate them; and 3) build a multinational interdisciplinary consortium to disseminate and study the sex and gender medicine of acute conditions. Over a 2-year period, this collaborative network of stakeholders identified key areas where sex- and gender-specific research is most likely to improve clinical care and ultimately patient outcomes. The iterative consensus process culminated in a daylong conference on May 13, 2014, with a total of 133 registrants, with the majority being between ages 31 and 50 years (57%), females (71%), and whites (79%). Content experts led the consensus-building workshops at the conference and used the nominal group technique to consolidate consensus recommendations for priority research. In addition, panel sessions addressed funding mechanisms for gender-specific research as well as gender-specific regulatory challenges to product development and approval. This special issue of AEM reports the

  12. Supporting Medical Students to Do International Field Research: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen; Parr, Jennifer; Ullah, Zafar; Omar, Maye

    2014-01-01

    Field research can benefit medical students' learning through experiential engagement with research and personal exposure to foreign health systems. However, the off-campus nature of the activity raises challenges for teachers. This article presents a case study that illustrates the benefits and challenges of organising a field research project…

  13. A research proposition for using high definition video in emergency medical services

    OpenAIRE

    Weerakkody, Vishanth; Molnar, Andreea; Irani, Zahir; El-Haddadeh, Ramzi

    2013-01-01

    In emergency situations, communication between the ambulance crew and an emergency department in the hospital can be crucial in determining the best decision for a patient's health. Currently, when an ambulance crew reports at an emergency, paramedics use voice communication from scene of emergency to the hospital. In critical life threatening situations, use of high quality visual images and live video streaming can allow paramedics on the scene of an emergency to take better informed decisi...

  14. Applications of the new program system UFOMOD in the field of emergency response planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.; Ehrhardt, J.; Hasemann, I.

    1988-01-01

    In addition to the main purpose of assessing the consequences of nuclear accidents, the new program system UFOMOD is designed to be a very flexible tool for investigation of alternatives in emergency response planning and emergency management, and for studies of the differences in collective exposure due to different response of parts of the population (disregard or misinterpretation of alarms, spontaneous evacuation etc.). After a brief summary of the main features of the countermeasures submodel, scope, flexibility and variety of results are demonstrated by means of calculations with both an early short and a slightly delayed longer lasting release. Risks and benefits of 3 types of evacuation, i.e. prophylactic, during release and after passage of the plume, are discussed by comparing CCFDs of early fatalities. The number of injuries and fatalities as well as areas and numbers of persons affected by countermeasures may depend considerably on the intervention levels applied. Correlations between these quantities obtained within a parameter study are presented

  15. Editorial: The developing field | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research in Hospitality Management. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Malaria control in humanitarian emergencies: An interagency field handbook, 2nd Edition

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, N; Clements-Hunt, A

    2013-01-01

    This second edition represents a thorough updating and revision of the first edition. The structure remains similar, but includes an additional chapter on humanitarian coordination. All chapters have been revised to reflect changes in best practices, improvements in technologies, availability of new tools, and changes in WHO recommendations. The interagency handbook was developed to set out effective malaria control responses in humanitarian emergencies, particularly during the acute phase wh...

  17. Paralympic sport: an emerging area for research and consultancy in sports biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L

    2011-09-01

    The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. The overall purpose of this paper is to highlight the role that the field of sports biomechanics specifically (and sports science in general) may play in improving performance in various summer Paralympic sports through research and consultancy. To achieve this broad aim, this review provides some history and background on the Summer Paralympic Games, discusses the eligibility and classification rules, describes the potential for the constraints-led approach of dynamical systems theory to inform practice and research in this area, and reviews selected studies examining the biomechanics of the primary forms of Paralympic locomotion. Some recommendations on how sports biomechanics can help facilitate improvements in Paralympic athletic performance through applied research and consultancy are provided, along with commentary on what may be some of the most important issues addressing Paralympic sport.

  18. Biological effects from electromagnetic fields: Research progress and exposure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauro, F.; Lovisolo, G.A.; Raganella, L.

    1992-01-01

    Although it is commonly accepted that exposure to high levels of electromagnetic, micro- and radiofrequency waves produces harmful effects to the health of man, the formulation of exposure limits is still an open process and dependent upon the evolving level of knowledge in this field. This paper surveys the current level of knowledge gained through 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' radiological and epidemiological studies on different types of electromagnetic radiation derived effects - chromosomal, mutagenic, carcinogenic. It then reviews efforts by international organizations, e. g., the International Radiation Protection Association, to establish exposure limits for radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Brief notes are given on the electromagnetic radiation monitoring campaign being performed by public health authorities in the Lazio Region of Italy

  19. IRIS Observations of Magnetic Interactions in the Solar Atmosphere between Preexisting and Emerging Magnetic Fields. I. Overall Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmino, Salvo L.; Zuccarello, Francesca; Young, Peter R.; Murabito, Mariarita; Romano, Paolo

    2018-04-01

    We report multiwavelength ultraviolet observations taken with the IRIS satellite, concerning the emergence phase in the upper chromosphere and transition region of an emerging flux region (EFR) embedded in the preexisting field of active region NOAA 12529 in the Sun. IRIS data are complemented by full-disk observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite, relevant to the photosphere and the corona. The photospheric configuration of the EFR is also analyzed by measurements taken with the spectropolarimeter on board the Hinode satellite, when the EFR was fully developed. Recurrent intense brightenings that resemble UV bursts, with counterparts in all coronal passbands, are identified at the edges of the EFR. Jet activity is also observed at chromospheric and coronal levels, near the observed brightenings. The analysis of the IRIS line profiles reveals the heating of dense plasma in the low solar atmosphere and the driving of bidirectional high-velocity flows with speed up to 100 km s‑1 at the same locations. Compared with previous observations and numerical models, these signatures suggest evidence of several long-lasting, small-scale magnetic reconnection episodes between the emerging bipole and the ambient field. This process leads to the cancellation of a preexisting photospheric flux concentration and appears to occur higher in the atmosphere than usually found in UV bursts, explaining the observed coronal counterparts.

  20. Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network head injuryprediction rules: on the basis of cost and effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökharman, Fatma Dilek; Aydın, Sonay; Fatihoğlu, Erdem; Koşar, Pınar Nercis

    2017-12-19

    Background/aim: Head injuries are commonly seen in the pediatric population. Noncontrast enhanced cranial CT is the method of choice to detect possible traumatic brain injury (TBI). Concerns about ionizing radiation exposure make the evaluation more challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) rules in predicting clinically important TBI and to determine the amount of medical resource waste and unnecessary radiation exposure.Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 1041 pediatric patients presented to the emergency department. The patients were divided into subgroups of "appropriate for cranial CT", "not appropriate for cranial CT" and "cranial CT/observation of patient; both are appropriate". To determine the effectiveness of the PECARN rules, data were analyzed according to the presence of pathological findings Results: "Appropriate for cranial CT" results can predict pathology presence 118,056-fold compared to the "not appropriate for cranial CT" results. With "cranial CT/observation of patient; both are appropriate" results, pathology presence was predicted 11,457-fold compared to "not appropriate for cranial CT" results.Conclusion: PECARN rules can predict pathology presence successfully in pediatric TBI. Using PECARN can decrease resource waste and exposure to ionizing radiation.

  1. Short presentation on some researches activities about near field earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donald, John

    2002-01-01

    The major hazard posed by earthquakes is often thought to be due to moderate to large magnitude events. However, there have been many cases where earthquakes of moderate and even small magnitude have caused very significant destruction when they have coincided with population centres. Even though the area of intense ground shaking caused by such events is generally small, the epicentral motions can be severe enough to cause damage even in well-engineered structures. Two issues are addressed here, the first being the identification of the minimum earthquake magnitude likely to cause damage to engineered structures and the limits of the near-field for small-to-moderate magnitude earthquakes. The second issue addressed is whether features of near-field ground motions such as directivity, which can significantly enhance the destructive potential, occur in small-to-moderate magnitude events. The accelerograms from the 1986 San Salvador (El Salvador) earthquake indicate that it may be non conservative to assume that near-field directivity effects only need to be considered for earthquakes of moment magnitude M 6.5 and greater. (author)

  2. Outline of the safety research results, in the power reactor field, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has promoted the safety research in fiscal year of 1996 according to the Fundamental Research on Safety Research (fiscal year 1996 to 2000) prepared on March, 1996. Here is described on the research results in fiscal year 1996, the first year of the 5 years programme, and whole outline of the fundamental research on safety research, on the power reactor field (whole problems on the new nuclear converter and the fast breeder reactor field and problems relating to the power reactor in the safety for earthquake and probability theoretical safety evaluation field). (G.K.)

  3. Applying Bourdieu’s Field Theory to Analyze the Changing Status of the Research Librarian

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wien, Charlotte; Dorch, Bertil F.

    2018-01-01

    Research librarians no longer need to perform as many of the traditional the chores of the research library. This is due to many factors like digitalization, changing research policies and changes in researchers’ behaviour. With these changes also comes a demand for new skills. We seek an answer...... to how this demand can be met. We argue that changes that has taken place in the research library has also led to a loss of prestige for the research librarians. We use Bourdieu’s field theory to analyse the power struggles in the academic field and in the field of the research library and to identify...

  4. EMERGE: Engineered Materials that Create Environments for ReGeneration via Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB...donor amniotic membrane, which is expensive, scarce in field hospitals , difficult to work with surgically, and can lead to host rejection. The...close to time of injury as possible. Sterile, dehydrated collagen implant packs with long shelf life could be available in field hospitals for almost

  5. Potencial fisiológico de sementes de soja e sua relação com a emergência das plântulas em campo = Soybean physiological seed potential and the relationship with seedlings emergence in field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Pelegrinello Schuab

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, nesse estudo, comparar os diferentes testes empregados na avaliação do vigor das sementes de soja e verificar a sua relação com a emergência das plântulas em campo. Assim, o vigor das sementes de soja de dez cultivares foi avaliado por meio dos seguintes testes: emergência das plântulas em campo; germinação; emergência dasplântulas em leito de areia; velocidade de emergência em areia; envelhecimento acelerado; frio modificado; tetrazólio (1-3 e 1-5 e condutividade elétrica. Foi possível observar que os testes de envelhecimento acelerado, germinação, tetrazólio e condutividade elétrica foram os que melhor se correlacionaram com a emergência em campo. Além disso, a interpretação dos resultados obtidos entre os testes de laboratório e de emergência em campo não deve considerar apenas a análise de correlação.The objective of this work was to compare different tests used to evaluate soybean seed vigour and to verify their relationship with seedlings emergence in field. Thus, the soybean seed vigour of ten cultivars was evaluated by the following tests: seedling emergence in field, standard germination, seedlings emergence in sand seedbed, speed of emergence in sand seedbed, accelerated aging, modified cold test, tetrazolium (1-3 and 1-5 and electrical conductivity. The accelerating aging, standard germination, tetrazolium and electrical conductivity tests showed higher correlations with field emergence. The results obtained from laboratory tests and seedlings emergence in field should not consider only the correlation analysis.

  6. Data cultures of mobile dating and hook-up apps: Emerging issues for critical social science research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kath Albury

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ethical and social implications of data mining, algorithmic curation and automation in the context of social media have been of heightened concern for a range of researchers with interests in digital media in recent years, with particular concerns about privacy arising in the context of mobile and locative media. Despite their wide adoption and economic importance, mobile dating apps have received little scholarly attention from this perspective – but they are intense sites of data generation, algorithmic processing, and cross-platform data-sharing; bound up with competing cultures of production, exploitation and use. In this paper, we describe the ways various forms of data are incorporated into, and emerge from, hook-up apps’ business logics, socio-technical arrangements, and cultures of use to produce multiple and intersecting data cultures . We propose a multi-layered research agenda for critical and empirical inquiry into this field, and suggest appropriate conceptual and methodological frameworks for exploring the social and political challenges of data cultures.

  7. Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Miraji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuity for discovery and production of new chemicals, allied products, and uses has currently resulted into generation of recent form of contaminants known as Emerging Contaminants (ECs. Once in the aquatic environment ECs are carcinogenic and cause other threats to both human’s and animals’ health. Due to their effects this study was aimed at investigating research trends of ECs in Tanzania. Findings revealed that USA and EU countries were leading in ECs researches, little followed by Asia, South Africa, and then Zambia. Only few guidelines from USA-EPA, WHO, Canada, and Australia existed. Neither published guidelines nor regulations for ECs existed in Tanzania; rather only the occurrence of some disinfection by-products and antibiotics was, respectively, reported in Arusha and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. As these reports had a limited coverage of ECs, henceforth, these findings constitute the first-line reference materials for ECs research in Tanzania which shall be useful for future monitoring and regulation planning.

  8. Exotic behavior of molecules in intense laser light fields. New research directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanouchi, Kaoru [Tokyo Univ., Department of Chemistry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    The recent investigation of the dynamical behavior of molecules and clusters in intense laser fields has afforded us invaluable opportunities to understand fundamentals of the interaction between molecular species and light fields as well as to manipulate molecules and their dynamical pathways by taking advantage of characteristics of coherent ultrashort laser light fields. In the present report, new directions of this rapidly growing interdisciplinary research fields called molecular science in intense laser fields are discussed by referring to our recent studies. (author)

  9. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission seismic regulations, research, and emerging trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chokshi, N C; Shao, L C [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research; Apostolakis, G

    1997-03-01

    Historically in the United States, seismic issues have played an important role in determining site suitability and, in some cases, have determined the ultimate fate of power plants. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, a seismic design philosophy evolved as the licensing of the earlier plants was in progress. Concepts such as the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) and the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) emerged and were codified into the federal regulations with the publication in December 1973 of Appendix A, `Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,` to 10 CFR Part 100, `Reactor Site Criteria.` Seismic considerations are also important in siting and design of other fuel cycle and waste facilities. In this paper, a brief overview of the current seismic siting and design regulations are described along with some recent and planned changes based on the past experience, advancement in the state-of-the-art, and research results. In particular, the recently revised siting rule and use of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in implementation of the rule will be described in more detail. The paper includes discussion of some recent seismic issues and research activities, including issues related to aging. Some emerging trends are highlighted. In particular, the paper focuses on use of `expert opinion` in the probabilistic analysis and risk informed regulations and their implications to the seismic design. An additional focus is on international cooperative programs and how to initiate such programs such that better use can be made of limited resources to resolve issues of common interest. (author)

  10. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission seismic regulations, research, and emerging trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.C.; Shao, L.C.; Apostolakis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Historically in the United States, seismic issues have played an important role in determining site suitability and, in some cases, have determined the ultimate fate of power plants. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, a seismic design philosophy evolved as the licensing of the earlier plants was in progress. Concepts such as the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) and the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) emerged and were codified into the federal regulations with the publication in December 1973 of Appendix A, 'Seismic and Geologic Siting Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,' to 10 CFR Part 100, 'Reactor Site Criteria.' Seismic considerations are also important in siting and design of other fuel cycle and waste facilities. In this paper, a brief overview of the current seismic siting and design regulations are described along with some recent and planned changes based on the past experience, advancement in the state-of-the-art, and research results. In particular, the recently revised siting rule and use of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis in implementation of the rule will be described in more detail. The paper includes discussion of some recent seismic issues and research activities, including issues related to aging. Some emerging trends are highlighted. In particular, the paper focuses on use of 'expert opinion' in the probabilistic analysis and risk informed regulations and their implications to the seismic design. An additional focus is on international cooperative programs and how to initiate such programs such that better use can be made of limited resources to resolve issues of common interest. (author)

  11. Using Facebook and participant information clips to recruit emergency nurses for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Rebekah Jay Howerton; Mentes, Janet C; Pavlish, Carol; Phillips, Linda R

    2014-07-01

    To examine the use of social networking sites in recruiting research participants. Workplace violence is an important issue for staff and patients. One workplace that reports the highest levels of violence is the emergency department. The ability to research issues such as workplace violence in real time is important in addressing them expeditiously, and social media can be used to advertise and recruit research subjects, implement studies and disseminate information. The experience of recruiting subjects through social networks, specifically Facebook, and the use of participant information clips (PICs) for advertising. A brief discussion of the history of advertising and communication using the internet is presented to provide an understanding of the trajectory of social media and implications for recruitment in general. The paper then focuses on the lead author's experience of recruiting subjects using Facebook, including its limitations and advantages, and her experience of using participant information clips. The low cost of advertising and recruiting participants this way, as well as the convenience provided to participants, resulted in almost half the study's total participants being obtained within 72 hours. Using Facebook to target a younger age range of nurses to participate in a study was successful and yielded a large number of completed responses in a short time period at little cost to the researcher. Recording the PIC was cheap, and posting it and a link to the site on pre-existing group pages was free, providing valuable viral marketing and snowball recruiting. Future researchers should not overlook using social network sites for recruitment if the demographics of the desired study population and subject matter permit it.

  12. Effects of marital conflict on children: recent advances and emerging themes in process-oriented research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, E Mark; Davies, Patrick T

    2002-01-01

    The effects of marital conflict on children's adjustment are well documented. For the past decade research has increasingly focused on advancing a process-level understanding of these effects, that is, accounting for the particular responses and patterns embedded within specific contexts, histories, and developmental periods that account for children's outcomes over time. As a vehicle for presenting an update, this review follows the framework for process-oriented research initially proposed by Cummings and Cummings (1988), concentrating on recent research developments, and also considering new and emerging themes in this area of research. In this regard, areas of advancement include (a) greater articulation of the effects of specific context/stimulus characteristics of marital conflict, (b) progress in identifying the psychological response processes in children (e.g., cognitive, emotional, social, physiological) that are affected and their possible role in accounting for relations between marital conflict and child outcomes, (c) greater understanding of the role of child characteristics, family history, and other contextual factors, including effects on children due to interrelations between marital conflict and parenting, and (d) advances in the conceptualization of children's outcomes, including that effects may be more productively viewed as dynamic processes of functioning rather than simply clinical diagnoses. Understanding of the impact of marital conflict on children as a function of time-related processes remains a gap in a process-oriented conceptualization of effects. Based on this review, a revised model for a process-oriented approach on the effects of marital discord on children is proposed and suggestions are made for future research directions.

  13. Research on Group Decision-Making Mechanism of Internet Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kefan; Chen, Gang; Qian, Wu; Shi, Zhao

    With the development of information technology, internet has become a popular term and internet emergency has an intensive influence on people's life. This article offers a short history of internet emergency management. It discusses the definition, characteristics, and factor of internet emergency management. A group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency is presented based on the discussion. The authors establish a so-called Rough Set Scenario Flow Graphs (RSSFG) of group decision-making mechanism of internet emergency management and make an empirical analysis based on the RSSFG approach. The experimental results confirm that this approach is effective in internet emergency decision-making.

  14. Exploration of geomagnetic field anomaly with balloon for geophysical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wen-Kui

    The use of a balloon to explore the geomagnetic field anomaly in the area east of Beijing is demonstrated. The present results are compared with those of aerial surveys. Descriptions are given of the fluxgate magnetometer, the sensor's attitude control and measurement, and data transmission and processing. At an altitude of about 30 km, a positive anomaly of the vertical component of about 100 nanoteslas was measured. The results suggest that, for this particular area, the shallow layer of a small-scale geological structure differs from the deep layer of a large-scale geological structure.

  15. Emergency preparedness of Research Center for Radiation medicine and its hospital to admit and treat the patients with signs of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyi, D. A.; Khomenko, V. I.; Bebeshko, V. G.

    2009-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the Research Center for Radiation Medicine (RCRM) was established in Kiev (Ukraine). Its main task was to maintain a high level of emergency preparedness and be ready to examine and treat patients who suffer as a result of hypothetical radiation accident. Based on the previous experience, this institution's specialists worked out new diagnostic criteria and drug treatment schemata for acute radiation sickness, created a database on 75 patients with this diagnosis and improved educational programmes for medical students and physicians working in the field of radiation medicine. RCRM collaborates fruitfully with western partners through the joint research projects and connects with the World Health Organisation's Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network centre. Collaboration with Kiev Center for Bone Marrow Transplantation allows RCRM to use aseptic wards having highly filtered air for the treatment of most severely irradiated patients. (authors)

  16. Labouring in the Knowledge Fields: Researching Knowledge in Globalising Workspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Lesley

    2006-01-01

    While research on globalisation can hardly be said to have ignored the phenomenon of the global corporation or the globally distributed supply chain, the focus has overwhelmingly been on "globalization from above"--on corporate structures and on the movement of global capital in global "knowledge economies". My focus in this…

  17. Field research opens new vistas in Vietnam | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Her research on understanding non-farm employment among ethnic minority groups threw Le Barbenchon's work a few initial curves. First, her permits were delayed, forcing her to consider different work. Then she discovered that national surveys had not properly captured migration of ethnic minorities and to find enough ...

  18. [Research programs on elementary particle and field theories and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuri, N.N.

    1992-01-01

    Research of staff members in theoretical physics is presented in the following areas: super string theory, a new approach to path integrals, new ideas on the renormalization group, nonperturbative chiral gauge theories, the standard model, K meson decays, and the CP problem. Work on high-T c superconductivity and protein folding is also related

  19. Bringing research to farmers' fields in Malawi: Lizzie Shumba ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-09

    Dec 9, 2010 ... By intercropping protein-rich legumes like pigeon pea, soybeans, and groundnuts that ... Legumes are now part of the diet in the area. ... Canadian researchers helped us understand why we had high rates of malnutrition and ...

  20. Information Sharing in the Field of Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilerot, Ola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports on an extensive research project which aimed at exploring information sharing activities in a scholarly context. The paper presents and synthesises findings from a literature review and three qualitative case studies. The empirical setting is a geographically distributed Nordic network of design scholars. Method:…