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Sample records for requires mtor kinase

  1. Skeletal myocyte hypertrophy requires mTOR kinase activity and S6K1

    Park, In-Hyun; Erbay, Ebru; Nuzzi, Paul; Chen Jie

    2005-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell proliferation and growth, with the ribosomal subunit S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) as one of the key downstream signaling effectors. A critical role of mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle differentiation has been identified recently, and an unusual regulatory mechanism independent of mTOR kinase activity and S6K1 is revealed. An mTOR pathway has also been reported to regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy, but the regulatory mechanism is not completely understood. Here, we report the investigation of mTOR's function in insulin growth factor I (IGF-I)-induced C2C12 myotube hypertrophy. Added at a later stage when rapamycin no longer had any effect on normal myocyte differentiation, rapamycin completely blocked myocyte hypertrophy as measured by myotube diameter. Importantly, a concerted increase of average myonuclei per myotube was observed in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes, which was also inhibited by rapamycin added at a time when it no longer affected normal differentiation. The mTOR protein level, its catalytic activity, its phosphorylation on Ser2448, and the activity of S6K1 were all found increased in IGF-I-stimulated myotubes compared to unstimulated myotubes. Using C2C12 cells stably expressing rapamycin-resistant forms of mTOR and S6K1, we provide genetic evidence for the requirement of mTOR and its downstream effector S6K1 in the regulation of myotube hypertrophy. Our results suggest distinct mTOR signaling mechanisms in different stages of skeletal muscle development: While mTOR regulates the initial myoblast differentiation in a kinase-independent and S6K1-independent manner, the hypertrophic function of mTOR requires its kinase activity and employs S6K1 as a downstream effector

  2. Autophagy suppresses RIP kinase-dependent necrosis enabling survival to mTOR inhibition.

    Kevin Bray

    Full Text Available mTOR inhibitors are used clinically to treat renal cancer but are not curative. Here we show that autophagy is a resistance mechanism of human renal cell carcinoma (RCC cell lines to mTOR inhibitors. RCC cell lines have high basal autophagy that is required for survival to mTOR inhibition. In RCC4 cells, inhibition of mTOR with CCI-779 stimulates autophagy and eliminates RIP kinases (RIPKs and this is blocked by autophagy inhibition, which induces RIPK- and ROS-dependent necroptosis in vitro and suppresses xenograft growth. Autophagy of mitochondria is required for cell survival since mTOR inhibition turns off Nrf2 antioxidant defense. Thus, coordinate mTOR and autophagy inhibition leads to an imbalance between ROS production and defense, causing necroptosis that may enhance cancer treatment efficacy.

  3. A kinase-dead knock-in mutation in mTOR leads to early embryonic lethality and is dispensable for the immune system in heterozygous mice

    Cavender Druie

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian target of rapamycin protein (mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved kinase that regulates protein synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation in response to various environmental cues. As a critical downstream mediator of PI3K signaling, mTOR is important for lymphocyte development and function of mature T and B-cells. Most studies of mTOR in immune responses have relied on the use of pharmacological inhibitors, such as rapamycin. Rapamycin-FKBP12 complex exerts its immunosuppressive and anti-proliferative effect by binding outside the kinase domain of mTOR, and subsequently inhibiting downstream mTOR signaling. Results To determine the requirement for mTOR kinase activity in the immune system function, we generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation (D2338 in the catalytic domain of mTOR. While homozygous mTOR kd/kd embryos died before embryonic day 6.5, heterozygous mTOR+/kd mice appeared entirely normal and are fertile. mTOR +/kd mice exhibited normal T and B cell development and unaltered proliferative responses of splenocytes to IL-2 and TCR/CD28. In addition, heterozygousity for the mTOR kinase-dead allele did not sensitize T cells to rapamycin in a CD3-mediated proliferation assay. Unexpectedly, mTOR kinase activity towards its substrate 4E-BP1 was not decreased in hearts and livers from heterozygous animals. Conclusion Altogether, our findings indicate that mTOR kinase activity is indispensable for the early development of mouse embryos. Moreover, a single wild type mTOR allele is sufficient to maintain normal postnatal growth and lymphocyte development and proliferation.

  4. Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase and nutrient-sensing mTOR pathways control T lymphocyte trafficking

    Sinclair, Linda V.; Finlay, David; Feijoo, Carmen; Cornish, Georgina H.; Gray, Alex; Ager, Ann; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Hagenbeek, Thijs J.; Spits, Hergen; Cantrell, Doreen A.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K) and the nutrient sensor mTOR are evolutionarily conserved regulators of cell metabolism. Here we show that PI(3)K and mTOR determined the repertoire of adhesion and chemokine receptors expressed by T lymphocytes. The key lymph node-homing receptors CD62L

  5. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    Lakhlili W

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wiame Lakhlili,1 Gwénaël Chevé,2 Abdelaziz Yasri,2 Azeddine Ibrahimi1 1Laboratoire de Biotechnologie (MedBiotech, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie de Rabat, Université Mohammed V de Rabat, Rabat, Morroco; 2OriBase Pharma, Cap Gamma, Parc Euromédecine, Montpellier, France Abstract: The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site.Keywords: mTOR, homology modeling, mTOR kinase-domain, docking

  6. Maintaining glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity is critical for mTOR kinase inhibitors to inhibit cancer cell growth.

    Koo, Junghui; Yue, Ping; Gal, Anthony A; Khuri, Fadlo R; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2014-05-01

    mTOR kinase inhibitors that target both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are being evaluated in cancer clinical trials. Here, we report that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a critical determinant for the therapeutic response to this class of experimental drugs. Pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3 antagonized their suppressive effects on the growth of cancer cells similarly to genetic attenuation of GSK3. Conversely, expression of a constitutively activated form of GSK3β sensitized cancer cells to mTOR inhibition. Consistent with these findings, higher basal levels of GSK3 activity in a panel of human lung cancer cell lines correlated with more efficacious responses. Mechanistic investigations showed that mTOR kinase inhibitors reduced cyclin D1 levels in a GSK3β-dependent manner, independent of their effects on suppressing mTORC1 signaling and cap binding. Notably, selective inhibition of mTORC2 triggered proteasome-mediated cyclin D1 degradation, suggesting that mTORC2 blockade is responsible for GSK3-dependent reduction of cyclin D1. Silencing expression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase FBX4 rescued this reduction, implicating FBX4 in mediating this effect of mTOR inhibition. Together, our findings define a novel mechanism by which mTORC2 promotes cell growth, with potential implications for understanding the clinical action of mTOR kinase inhibitors. ©2014 AACR.

  7. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition.

    Clemens, Michael J; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are subjected to the physiological stress imposed by hypertonic conditions. In contrast, protein synthesis in MEFs with a double knockout of 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2 remains resistant to mTOR inhibitors under these conditions. Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) is blocked by the mTOR inhibitor Ku0063794 equally well in both wild-type and 4E-BP knockout cells, under both normal and hypertonic conditions. The response of protein synthesis to hypertonic stress itself does not require the 4E-BPs. These data suggest that under certain stress conditions: (i) translation has a greater requirement for mTOR activity and (ii) there is an absolute requirement for the 4E-BPs for regulation by mTOR. Importantly, dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and Akt is not sufficient to affect protein synthesis acutely.

  8. Identification of a Non-Gatekeeper Hot Spot for Drug-Resistant Mutations in mTOR Kinase.

    Wu, Tzung-Ju; Wang, Xiaowen; Zhang, Yanjie; Meng, Linghua; Kerrigan, John E; Burley, Stephen K; Zheng, X F Steven

    2015-04-21

    Protein kinases are therapeutic targets for human cancer. However, "gatekeeper" mutations in tyrosine kinases cause acquired clinical resistance, limiting long-term treatment benefits. mTOR is a key cancer driver and drug target. Numerous small-molecule mTOR kinase inhibitors have been developed, with some already in human clinical trials. Given our clinical experience with targeted therapeutics, acquired drug resistance in mTOR is thought likely, but not yet documented. Herein, we describe identification of a hot spot (L2185) for drug-resistant mutations, which is distinct from the gatekeeper site, and a chemical scaffold refractory to drug-resistant mutations. We also provide new insights into mTOR kinase structure and function. The hot spot mutations are potentially useful as surrogate biomarkers for acquired drug resistance in ongoing clinical trials and future treatments and for the design of the next generation of mTOR-targeted drugs. Our study provides a foundation for further research into mTOR kinase function and targeting. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Rapamycin-Binding Domain of the Protein Kinase mTOR is a Destabilizing Domain*

    Edwards, Sarah R.; Wandless, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug that binds simultaneously to the 12-kDa FK506- and rapamycin-binding protein (FKBP12, or FKBP) and the FKBP-rapamycin binding domain (FRB) of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase. The resulting ternary complex has been used to conditionally perturb protein function, and one such method involves perturbation of a protein of interest through its mislocalization. We synthesized two rapamycin derivatives that possess large substituents at the C16 position within the FRB-binding interface, and these derivatives were screened against a library of FRB mutants using a three-hybrid assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several FRB mutants responded to one of the rapamycin derivatives, and twenty of these mutants were further characterized in mammalian cells. The mutants most responsive to the ligand were fused to yellow fluorescent protein, and fluorescence levels in the presence and absence of the ligand were measured to determine stability of the fusion proteins. Wild-type and mutant FRB domains were expressed at low levels in the absence of the rapamycin derivative, and expression levels rose up to ten-fold upon treatment with ligand. The synthetic rapamycin derivatives were further analyzed using quantitative mass spectrometry, and one of the compounds was found to contain contaminating rapamycin. Furthermore, uncontaminated analogs retain the ability to inhibit mTOR, albeit with diminished potency relative to rapamycin. The ligand-dependent stability displayed by wildtype FRB and FRB mutants as well as the inhibitory potential and purity of the rapamycin derivatives should be considered as potentially confounding experimental variables when using these systems. PMID:17350953

  10. Regulation of androgen receptor transactivity and mTOR-S6 kinase pathway by Rheb in prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Shimizu, Yosuke; Terada, Naoki; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Nakamura, Eijiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu; Inoue, Takahiro

    2010-06-01

    Ras homolog-enriched in brain (Rheb), a small GTP-binding protein, is associated with prostate carcinogenesis through activating mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. This study aimed to elucidate whether Rheb promotes proliferation of prostate cancer cells and can act as a potent therapeutic target in prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cell lines and human prostatic tissues were examined for the expression of Rheb. The effects of forced expression or knockdown of Rheb on cell proliferation were also examined. Semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR were performed to evaluate mRNA expression. Western blotting was used to examine protein expression. Cell count and WST-1 assay were used to measure cell proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting was used to assess the cell cycle. Rheb mRNA and protein expression was higher in more aggressive, androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, and C4-2, compared with the less aggressive LNCaP. Rheb expression was higher in cancer tissues than in benign prostatic epithelia. Forced expression of Rheb in LNCaP cells accelerated proliferation without enhancing androgen receptor transactivity. Attenuation of Rheb expression or treatment with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreased proliferation of PC3 and DU145 cells, with a decrease in the activated form of p70S6 kinase, one of the main targets of mTOR. Rheb potentiates proliferation of prostate cancer cells and inhibition of Rheb or mTOR can lead to suppressed proliferation of aggressive prostate cancer cell lines in vitro. Rheb and the mTOR pathway are therefore probable targets for suppressing prostate cancer.

  11. Systemic inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin disrupts consolidation and reconsolidation of auditory fear memory.

    Mac Callum, Phillip E; Hebert, Mark; Adamec, Robert E; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a critical regulator of mRNA translation and is known to be involved in various long lasting forms of synaptic and behavioural plasticity. However, information concerning the temporal pattern of mTOR activation and susceptibility to pharmacological intervention during both consolidation and reconsolidation of long-term memory (LTM) remains scant. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following conditioning or retrieval in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, and compared to vehicle (and/or anisomycin) controls for subsequent memory recall. Systemic blockade of mTOR with rapamycin immediately or 12h after training or reactivation impairs both consolidation and reconsolidation of an auditory fear memory. Further behavioural analysis revealed that the enduring effects of rapamycin on reconsolidation are dependent upon reactivation of the memory trace. Rapamycin, however, has no effect on short-term memory or the ability to retrieve an established fear memory. Collectively, our data suggest that biphasic mTOR signalling is essential for both consolidation and reconsolidation-like activities that contribute to the formation, re-stabilization, and persistence of long term auditory-fear memories, while not influencing other aspects of the memory trace. These findings also provide evidence for a cogent treatment model for reducing the emotional strength of established, traumatic memories analogous to those observed in acquired anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobias, through pharmacologic blockade of mTOR using systemic rapamycin following reactivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. mTORC2 promotes type I insulin-like growth factor receptor and insulin receptor activation through the tyrosine kinase activity of mTOR.

    Yin, Yancun; Hua, Hui; Li, Minjing; Liu, Shu; Kong, Qingbin; Shao, Ting; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Yuanming; Wang, Qian; Luo, Ting; Jiang, Yangfu

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a core component of raptor-mTOR (mTORC1) and rictor-mTOR (mTORC2) complexes that control diverse cellular processes. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate several elements downstream of type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) and insulin receptor (InsR). However, it is unknown whether and how mTOR regulates IGF-IR and InsR themselves. Here we show that mTOR possesses unexpected tyrosine kinase activity and activates IGF-IR/InsR. Rapamycin induces the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of IGF-IR/InsR, which is largely dependent on rictor and mTOR. Moreover, mTORC2 promotes ligand-induced activation of IGF-IR/InsR. IGF- and insulin-induced IGF-IR/InsR phosphorylation is significantly compromised in rictor-null cells. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS) directly interacts with SIN1 thereby recruiting mTORC2 to IGF-IR/InsR and promoting rapamycin- or ligand-induced phosphorylation of IGF-IR/InsR. mTOR exhibits tyrosine kinase activity towards the general tyrosine kinase substrate poly(Glu-Tyr) and IGF-IR/InsR. Both recombinant mTOR and immunoprecipitated mTORC2 phosphorylate IGF-IR and InsR on Tyr1131/1136 and Tyr1146/1151, respectively. These effects are independent of the intrinsic kinase activity of IGF-IR/InsR, as determined by assays on kinase-dead IGF-IR/InsR mutants. While both rictor and mTOR immunoprecitates from rictor(+/+) MCF-10A cells exhibit tyrosine kinase activity towards IGF-IR and InsR, mTOR immunoprecipitates from rictor(-/-) MCF-10A cells do not induce IGF-IR and InsR phosphorylation. Phosphorylation-deficient mutation of residue Tyr1131 in IGF-IR or Tyr1146 in InsR abrogates the activation of IGF-IR/InsR by mTOR. Finally, overexpression of rictor promotes IGF-induced cell proliferation. Our work identifies mTOR as a dual-specificity kinase and clarifies how mTORC2 promotes IGF-IR/InsR activation.

  13. Protein kinase A-mediated cell proliferation in brown preadipocytes is independent of Erk1/2, PI3K and mTOR

    Wang, Yanling; Sato, Masaaki; Guo, Yuan; Bengtsson, Tore; Nedergaard, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The physiological agonist norepinephrine promotes cell proliferation of brown preadipocytes during the process of tissue recruitment. In a primary culture system, cAMP mediates these adrenergic effects. In the present study, we demonstrated that, in contrast to other systems where the mitogenic effect of cAMP requires the synergistic action of (serum) growth factors, especially insulin/IGF, the cAMP effect in brown preadipocytes was independent of serum and insulin. Protein kinase A, rather than Epac, mediated the cAMP mitogenic effect. The Erk 1/2 family of MAPK, the PI 3 K system and the mTOR complexes were all activated by cAMP, but these activations were not necessary for cAMP-induced cell proliferation; a protein kinase C isoform may be involved in mediating cAMP-activated cell proliferation. We conclude that the generally acknowledged cellular mediators for induction of cell proliferation are not involved in this process in the brown preadipocyte system; this conclusion may be of relevance both for examination of mechanisms for induction of brown adipose tissue recruitment but also for understanding the mechanism behind e.g. certain endocrine neoplasias. - Highlights: • cAMP can mimick norepinephrine-induced proliferation of brown preadipocytes. • The cAMP-induced proliferation can occur in the absence of serum, of any other growth factors, and of insulin. • Erk1/2, PI 3 K and mTOR are cAMP activated but not involved in induction of proliferation. • A Protein Kinase C member may be in the signalling cascade. • This pathway analysis may also be of importance for certain endocrine hyper- and neoplasias

  14. Protein kinase A-mediated cell proliferation in brown preadipocytes is independent of Erk1/2, PI{sub 3}K and mTOR

    Wang, Yanling; Sato, Masaaki; Guo, Yuan; Bengtsson, Tore; Nedergaard, Jan, E-mail: jan@metabol.su.se

    2014-10-15

    The physiological agonist norepinephrine promotes cell proliferation of brown preadipocytes during the process of tissue recruitment. In a primary culture system, cAMP mediates these adrenergic effects. In the present study, we demonstrated that, in contrast to other systems where the mitogenic effect of cAMP requires the synergistic action of (serum) growth factors, especially insulin/IGF, the cAMP effect in brown preadipocytes was independent of serum and insulin. Protein kinase A, rather than Epac, mediated the cAMP mitogenic effect. The Erk 1/2 family of MAPK, the PI{sub 3}K system and the mTOR complexes were all activated by cAMP, but these activations were not necessary for cAMP-induced cell proliferation; a protein kinase C isoform may be involved in mediating cAMP-activated cell proliferation. We conclude that the generally acknowledged cellular mediators for induction of cell proliferation are not involved in this process in the brown preadipocyte system; this conclusion may be of relevance both for examination of mechanisms for induction of brown adipose tissue recruitment but also for understanding the mechanism behind e.g. certain endocrine neoplasias. - Highlights: • cAMP can mimick norepinephrine-induced proliferation of brown preadipocytes. • The cAMP-induced proliferation can occur in the absence of serum, of any other growth factors, and of insulin. • Erk1/2, PI{sub 3}K and mTOR are cAMP activated but not involved in induction of proliferation. • A Protein Kinase C member may be in the signalling cascade. • This pathway analysis may also be of importance for certain endocrine hyper- and neoplasias.

  15. The anti-hepatocellular carcinoma cell activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor CZ415

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Kaiqiang; Hao, Ke; Jiang, Luxi; Wang, Ying; Mou, Xiaozhou; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a valuable treatment target. Recent studies have developed a highly-selective and potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, CZ415. Here, we showed that nM concentrations of CZ415 efficiently inhibited survival and induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh-7) and primary-cultured human HCC cells. Meanwhile, CZ415 inhibited proliferation of HCC cells, more potently than mTORC1 inhibitors (rapamycin and RAD001). CZ415 was yet non-cytotoxic to the L02 human hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies showed that CZ415 disrupted assembly of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2 in HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, activation of mTORC1 (p-S6K1) and mTORC2 (p-AKT, Ser-473) was almost blocked by CZ415. In vivo studies revealed that oral administration of CZ415 significantly suppressed HepG2 xenograft tumor growth in severe combined immuno-deficient (SCID) mice. Activation of mTORC1/2 was also largely inhibited in CZ415-treated HepG2 tumor tissue. Together, these results show that CZ415 blocks mTORC1/2 activation and efficiently inhibits HCC cell growth in vitro and in vivo. - Highlights: • CZ415 is anti-survival and pro-apoptotic to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. • CZ415 inhibits HCC cell proliferation, more efficiently than mTORC1 inhibitors. • CZ415 blocks assembly and activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 in HCC cells. • CZ415 oral administration inhibits HepG2 tumor growth in SCID mice. • mTORC1/2 activation in HepG2 tumor is inhibited with CZ415 administration.

  16. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alleviates Extracellular Matrix Accumulation in High Glucose-Induced Renal Fibroblasts through mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Xia Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular matrix accumulation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Although AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been found to inhibit extracellular matrix synthesis by experiments in vivo and vitro, its role in alleviating the deposition of extracellular matrix in renal interstitial fibroblasts has not been well defined. Methods: Currently, we conducted this study to investigate the effects of AMPK on high glucose-induced extracellular matrix synthesis and involved intracellular signaling pathway by using western blot in the kidney fibroblast cell line (NRK-49f. Results: Collagen IV protein levels were significantly increased by high glucose in a time-dependent manner. This was associated with a decrease in Thr72 phosphorylation of AMPK and an increase in phosphorylation of mTOR on Ser2448. High glucose-induced extracellular matrix accumulation and mTOR activation were significantly inhibited by the co-treatment of rAAV-AMPKα1312 (encoding constitutively active AMPKα1 whereas activated by r-AAV-AMPKα1D157A (encoding dominant negative AMPKα1. In cultured renal fibroblasts, overexpression of AMPKα1D157A upregulated mTOR signaling and matrix synthesis, which were ameliorated by co-treatment with the inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that AMPK exerts renoprotective effects by inhibiting the accumulation of extracellular matrix through mTOR signaling pathway.

  17. Preclinical evaluation of WYE-687, a mTOR kinase inhibitor, as a potential anti-acute myeloid leukemia agent

    Cheng, Feng; Wang, Lingling; Shen, Yunfeng; Xia, Jun; Chen, Heng; Jiang, Yuanqiang; Lu, Mize

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity by WYE-687, a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor. We demonstrated that WYE-687 potently inhibited survival and proliferation of established (HL-60, U937, AML-193 and THP-1 lines) and human AML progenitor cells. Yet, same WYE-687 treatment was non-cytotoxic to the primary peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. WYE-687 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death in above AML cells/progenitor cells. On the other hand, the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK), the caspase-3 specific inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK) or the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (z-LEHD-fmk) attenuated WYE-687-induced cytotoxicity. At the molecular level, WYE-687 concurrently inhibited activation of mTORC1 (p70S6K1 and S6 phosphorylations) and mTORC2 (AKT Ser-473 and FoxO1/3a phosphorylations), whiling downregulating mTORC1/2-regulated genes (Bcl-xL and hypoxia-inducible factor 1/2α) in both HL-60/U937 cells and human AML progenitor cells. In vivo, oral administration of WYE-687 potently inhibited U937 leukemic xenograft tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without causing significant toxicities. In summary, our results demonstrate that targeting mTORC1/2 by WYE-687 leads to potent antitumor activity in preclinical models of AML. - Highlights: • WYE-687 inhibits survival and proliferation of human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 induces apoptotic death of human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 inhibits mTORC1/2 activation in human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of WYE-687, a mTOR kinase inhibitor, as a potential anti-acute myeloid leukemia agent

    Cheng, Feng; Wang, Lingling; Shen, Yunfeng; Xia, Jun; Chen, Heng; Jiang, Yuanqiang, E-mail: jiangyuanqiangwuxi@163.com; Lu, Mize, E-mail: lumizewuxi9@sina.com

    2016-02-05

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity by WYE-687, a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor. We demonstrated that WYE-687 potently inhibited survival and proliferation of established (HL-60, U937, AML-193 and THP-1 lines) and human AML progenitor cells. Yet, same WYE-687 treatment was non-cytotoxic to the primary peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. WYE-687 induced caspase-dependent apoptotic death in above AML cells/progenitor cells. On the other hand, the pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-FMK), the caspase-3 specific inhibitor (Z-DEVD-FMK) or the caspase-9 specific inhibitor (z-LEHD-fmk) attenuated WYE-687-induced cytotoxicity. At the molecular level, WYE-687 concurrently inhibited activation of mTORC1 (p70S6K1 and S6 phosphorylations) and mTORC2 (AKT Ser-473 and FoxO1/3a phosphorylations), whiling downregulating mTORC1/2-regulated genes (Bcl-xL and hypoxia-inducible factor 1/2α) in both HL-60/U937 cells and human AML progenitor cells. In vivo, oral administration of WYE-687 potently inhibited U937 leukemic xenograft tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice, without causing significant toxicities. In summary, our results demonstrate that targeting mTORC1/2 by WYE-687 leads to potent antitumor activity in preclinical models of AML. - Highlights: • WYE-687 inhibits survival and proliferation of human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 induces apoptotic death of human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 inhibits mTORC1/2 activation in human AML cells/progenitor cells. • WYE-687 inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  19. The mTOR kinase inhibitor Everolimus decreases S6 kinase phosphorylation but fails to reduce mutant huntingtin levels in brain and is not neuroprotective in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease

    Frentzel Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease (HD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within the huntingtin gene. Mutant huntingtin protein misfolds and accumulates within neurons where it mediates its toxic effects. Promoting mutant huntingtin clearance by activating macroautophagy is one approach for treating Huntington's disease (HD. In this study, we evaluated the mTOR kinase inhibitor and macroautophagy promoting drug everolimus in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. Results Everolimus decreased phosphorylation of the mTOR target protein S6 kinase indicating brain penetration. However, everolimus did not activate brain macroautophagy as measured by LC3B Western blot analysis. Everolimus protected against early declines in motor performance; however, we found no evidence for neuroprotection as determined by brain pathology. In muscle but not brain, everolimus significantly decreased soluble mutant huntingtin levels. Conclusions Our data suggests that beneficial behavioral effects of everolimus in R6/2 mice result primarily from effects on muscle. Even though everolimus significantly modulated its target brain S6 kinase, this did not decrease mutant huntingtin levels or provide neuroprotection.

  20. Deregulation of miR-100, miR-99a and miR-199b in tissues and plasma coexists with increased expression of mTOR kinase in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

    Torres, Anna; Torres, Kamil; Pesci, Anna; Ceccaroni, Marcello; Paszkowski, Tomasz; Cassandrini, Paola; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Maciejewski, Ryszard

    2012-01-01

    Alterations of mTOR gene expression have been implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrioid endometrial cancer however only few studies explored the cause of increased mTOR activation in this malignancy. miRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs, which were proven to regulated gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. The study aimed to explore deregulation of miRNAs targeting mTOR kinase (miR-99a, miR-100 and miR-199b) as a possible cause of its altered expression in EEC tissues. In addition expression of the three miRNAs was investigated in plasma of EEC patients and was assessed in terms of diagnostic and prognostic utility. We investigated expression of mTOR kinase transcripts in 46 fresh tissue samples. Expression of miR-99a, miR-100 and miR-199b was investigated in the same group of fresh samples, and in additional 58 FFPE sections as well as in 48 plasma samples using qPCR. Relative quantification was performed using experimentally validated endogenous controls. mTOR kinase expression was increased in EEC tissues and was accompanied by decreased expression of all three miRNAs. Down-regulation of the investigated miRNAs was discovered in plasma of EEC patients and miRNA signatures classified EEC tissues (miR-99a/miR-100/miR-199b) and plasma (miR-99a/miR-199b) samples with higher accuracy in comparison to single miRNAs. We also revealed that miR-100 was an independent prognostic marker of overall survival. We conclude that increased expression of mTOR kinase coexists with down-regulation of its targeting miRNAs, which could suggest a new mechanism of mTOR pathway alterations in EEC. In addition, our findings implicate that miRNA signatures can be considered promising biomarkers for early detection and prognosis of endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

  1. Advanced Research of mTOR and Lung Carcinoid Tumors

    Zixuan ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a main protein kinase in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, is an important intracellular mediator involved in multiple celluar functions including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and angiogenesis. Recently, the high expression of mTOR and mTOR-related kinase have been found in neuroendocrin tumors. Therefore, mTOR pathway represents an attractive target for new anticancer therapies except surgery.

  2. Chronic Alcohol Consumption Alters Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), Reduces Ribosomal p70S6 Kinase and p4E-BP1 Levels in Mouse Cerebral Cortex

    Li, Qun; Ren, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Reduced insulin sensitivity following chronic alcohol consumption may contribute to alcohol-induced brain damage although the underlying mechanism(s) has not been elucidated. This study was designed to examine the effect of chronic alcohol intake on insulin signaling in mouse cerebral cortex. FVB mice were fed with a 4% alcohol diet for 16 weeks. Insulin receptor substrates (IRS-1, IRS-2) and post-receptor signaling molecules Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal p70s6 kinase (...

  3. MTOR-Driven Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates Legionella pneumophila Intracellular Niche Homeostasis

    Abshire, Camille F.; Roy, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar bacterial pathogens are sheltered within unique membrane-bound organelles that expand over time to support bacterial replication. These compartments sequester bacterial molecules away from host cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways that induce antimicrobial responses. The mechanisms by which the human pulmonary pathogen Legionella pneumophila maintains niche homeostasis are poorly understood. We uncovered that the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required a sustained supply of host lipids during expansion. Lipids shortage resulted in LCV rupture and initiation of a host cell death response, whereas excess of host lipids increased LCVs size and housing capacity. We found that lipids uptake from serum and de novo lipogenesis are distinct redundant supply mechanisms for membrane biogenesis in Legionella-infected macrophages. During infection, the metabolic checkpoint kinase Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (MTOR) controlled lipogenesis through the Serum Response Element Binding Protein 1 and 2 (SREBP1/2) transcription factors. In Legionella-infected macrophages a host-driven response that required the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) adaptor protein Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88) dampened MTOR signaling which in turn destabilized LCVs under serum starvation. Inactivation of the host MTOR-suppression pathway revealed that L. pneumophila sustained MTOR signaling throughout its intracellular infection cycle by a process that required the upstream regulator Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K) and one or more Dot/Icm effector proteins. Legionella-sustained MTOR signaling facilitated LCV expansion and inhibition of the PI3K-MTOR-SREPB1/2 axis through pharmacological or genetic interference or by activation of the host MTOR-suppression response destabilized expanding LCVs, which in turn triggered cell death of infected macrophages. Our work identified a host metabolic requirement for LCV homeostasis and demonstrated that L

  4. Cap-independent translation ensures mTOR expression and function upon protein synthesis inhibition.

    Marques-Ramos, Ana; Candeias, Marco M; Menezes, Juliane; Lacerda, Rafaela; Willcocks, Margaret; Teixeira, Alexandre; Locker, Nicolas; Romão, Luísa

    2017-11-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase that integrates cellular signals from the nutrient and energy status to act, namely, on the protein synthesis machinery. While major advances have emerged regarding the regulators and effects of the mTOR signaling pathway, little is known about the regulation of mTOR gene expression. Here, we show that the human mTOR transcript can be translated in a cap-independent manner, and that its 5' untranslated region (UTR) is a highly folded RNA scaffold capable of binding directly to the 40S ribosomal subunit. We further demonstrate that mTOR is able to bypass the cap requirement for translation both in normal and hypoxic conditions. Moreover, our data reveal that the cap-independent translation of mTOR is necessary for its ability to induce cell-cycle progression into S phase. These results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for mTOR gene expression that integrates the global protein synthesis changes induced by translational inhibitory conditions. © 2017 Marques-Ramos et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. mTOR Complex Signaling through the SEMA4A-Plexin B2 Axis Is Required for Optimal Activation and Differentiation of CD8+ T Cells.

    Ito, Daisuke; Nojima, Satoshi; Nishide, Masayuki; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Kang, Sujin; Kimura, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuji; Morimoto, Keiko; Maeda, Yohei; Hosokawa, Takashi; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Ohshima, Jun; Kamimura, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Murakami, Masaaki; Morii, Eiichi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays crucial roles in activation and differentiation of diverse types of immune cells. Although several lines of evidence have demonstrated the importance of mTOR-mediated signals in CD4(+) T cell responses, the involvement of mTOR in CD8(+) T cell responses is not fully understood. In this study, we show that a class IV semaphorin, SEMA4A, regulates CD8(+) T cell activation and differentiation through activation of mTOR complex (mTORC) 1. SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited impairments in production of IFN-γ and TNF-α and induction of the effector molecules granzyme B, perforin, and FAS-L. Upon infection with OVA-expressing Listeria monocytogenes, pathogen-specific effector CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly impaired in SEMA4A(-/-) mice. Furthermore, SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited reduced mTORC1 activity and elevated mTORC2 activity, suggesting that SEMA4A is required for optimal activation of mTORC1 in CD8(+) T cells. IFN-γ production and mTORC1 activity in SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were restored by administration of recombinant Sema4A protein. In addition, we show that plexin B2 is a functional receptor of SEMA4A in CD8(+) T cells. Collectively, these results not only demonstrate the role of SEMA4A in CD8(+) T cells, but also reveal a novel link between a semaphorin and mTOR signaling. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypothalamic mTOR signaling regulates food intake.

    Cota, Daniela; Proulx, Karine; Smith, Kathi A Blake; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2006-05-12

    The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) protein is a serine-threonine kinase that regulates cell-cycle progression and growth by sensing changes in energy status. We demonstrated that mTOR signaling plays a role in the brain mechanisms that respond to nutrient availability, regulating energy balance. In the rat, mTOR signaling is controlled by energy status in specific regions of the hypothalamus and colocalizes with neuropeptide Y and proopiomelanocortin neurons in the arcuate nucleus. Central administration of leucine increases hypothalamic mTOR signaling and decreases food intake and body weight. The hormone leptin increases hypothalamic mTOR activity, and the inhibition of mTOR signaling blunts leptin's anorectic effect. Thus, mTOR is a cellular fuel sensor whose hypothalamic activity is directly tied to the regulation of energy intake.

  8. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets

  9. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  10. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets. PMID:24212825

  11. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Savitha Sridharan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  12. ESCMID Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts (ESGICH) Consensus Document on the safety of targeted and biological therapies: an infectious diseases perspective (Intracellular signaling pathways: tyrosine kinase and mTOR inhibitors).

    Reinwald, M; Silva, J T; Mueller, N J; Fortún, J; Garzoni, C; de Fijter, J W; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Grossi, P; Aguado, J M

    2018-06-01

    The present review is part of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts (ESGICH) Consensus Document on the safety of targeted and biologic therapies. To review, from an infectious diseases perspective, the safety profile of therapies targeting different intracellular signaling pathways and to suggest preventive recommendations. Computer-based Medline searches with MeSH terms pertaining to each agent or therapeutic family. Although BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors modestly increase the overall risk of infection, dasatinib has been associated with cytomegalovirus and hepatitis B virus reactivation. BRAF/MEK kinase inhibitors do not significantly affect infection susceptibility. The effect of Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitors (ibrutinib) among patients with B-cell malignancies is difficult to distinguish from that of previous immunosuppression. However, cases of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), invasive fungal infection and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have been occasionally reported. Because phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitors (idelalisib) may predispose to opportunistic infections, anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis and prevention strategies for cytomegalovirus are recommended. No increased rates of infection have been observed with venetoclax (antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 inhibitor). Therapy with Janus kinase inhibitors markedly increases the incidence of infection. Pretreatment screening for chronic hepatitis B virus and latent tuberculosis infection must be performed, and anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis should be considered for patients with additional risk factors. Cancer patients receiving mTOR inhibitors face an increased incidence of overall infection, especially those with additional risk factors (prior therapies or delayed wound healing). Specific preventive approaches are warranted in view of the increased risk of infection associated with some of the

  13. Translation initiation complex eIF4F is a therapeutic target for dual mTOR kinase inhibitors in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Stenson, Mary J.; Maurer, Matthew J.; Wellik, Linda E.; Link, Brian; Hege, Kristen; Dogan, Ahmet; Sotomayor, Eduardo; Witzig, Thomas; Gupta, Mamta

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated mRNA translation has been implicated in disease development and in part is controlled by a eukaryotic initiation complex eIF4F (composed of eIF4E, eIF4G and eIF4A). We demonstrate here that the cap bound fraction from lymphoma cells was enriched with eIF4G and eIF4E indicating that lymphoma cells exist in an activated translational state. Moreover, 77% (110/142) of diffuse large B cell lymphoma tumors expressed eIF4E and this was associated with an inferior event free survival. Over-expression of wild-type eIF4E (eIF4EWT) but not cap-mutant eIF4E (eIF4Ecap mutant) increased the activation of the eIF4F complex. Treatment with the active-site dual mTOR inhibitor CC214-1 reduced the level of the eIF4F complex by decreasing the cap bound fraction of eIF4G and increasing the levels of 4E-BP1. CC214-1 inhibited both the cap dependent and global protein translation. CC214-1 inhibited c-Myc, and cyclin D3 translation by decreasing polysomal fractions from lymphoma cells. Inhibition of eIF4E with shRNA further decreased the CC214-1 induced inhibition of the eIF4F complex, c-Myc, cyclin D3 translation, and colony formation. These studies demonstrate that the eIF4F complex is deregulated in aggressive lymphoma and that dual mTOR therapy has therapeutic potential in these patients. PMID:25839159

  14. The nuclear import of ribosomal proteins is regulated by mTOR

    Kazyken, Dubek; Kaz, Yelimbek; Kiyan, Vladimir; Zhylkibayev, Assylbek A.; Chen, Chien-Hung; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central component of the essential signaling pathway that regulates cell growth and proliferation by controlling anabolic processes in cells. mTOR exists in two distinct mTOR complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2 that reside mostly in cytoplasm. In our study, the biochemical characterization of mTOR led to discovery of its novel localization on nuclear envelope where it associates with a critical regulator of nuclear import Ran Binding Protein 2 (RanBP2). We show that association of mTOR with RanBP2 is dependent on the mTOR kinase activity that regulates the nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. The mTOR kinase inhibitors within thirty minutes caused a substantial decrease of ribosomal proteins in the nuclear but not cytoplasmic fraction. Detection of a nuclear accumulation of the GFP-tagged ribosomal protein rpL7a also indicated its dependence on the mTOR kinase activity. The nuclear abundance of ribosomal proteins was not affected by inhibition of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or deficiency of mTORC2, suggesting a distinctive role of the nuclear envelope mTOR complex in the nuclear import. Thus, we identified that mTOR in association with RanBP2 mediates the active nuclear import of ribosomal proteins. PMID:25294810

  15. Fear memory consolidation in sleep requires protein kinase A.

    Cho, Jiyeon; Sypniewski, Krzysztof A; Arai, Shoko; Yamada, Kazuo; Ogawa, Sonoko; Pavlides, Constantine

    2018-05-01

    It is well established that protein kinase A (PKA) is involved in hippocampal dependent memory consolidation. Sleep is also known to play an important role in this process. However, whether sleep-dependent memory consolidation involves PKA activation has not been clearly determined. Using behavioral observation, animals were categorized into sleep and awake groups. We show that intrahippocampal injections of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPs in post-contextual fear conditioning sleep produced a suppression of long-term fear memory, while injections of Rp-cAMPs during an awake state, at a similar time point, had no effect. In contrast, injections of the PKA activator Sp-cAMPs in awake state, rescued sleep deprivation-induced memory impairments. These results suggest that following learning, PKA activation specifically in sleep is required for the consolidation of long-term memory. © 2018 Cho et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. PKI-179: an orally efficacious dual phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor.

    Venkatesan, Aranapakam M; Chen, Zecheng; dos Santos, Osvaldo; Dehnhardt, Christoph; Santos, Efren Delos; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mallon, Robert; Hollander, Irwin; Feldberg, Larry; Lucas, Judy; Yu, Ker; Chaudhary, Inder; Mansour, Tarek S

    2010-10-01

    A series of mono-morpholino 1,3,5-triazine derivatives (8a-8q) bearing a 3-oxa-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane were prepared and evaluated for PI3-kinase/mTOR activity. Replacement of one of the bis-morpholines in lead compound 1 (PKI-587) with 3-oxa-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane and reduction of the molecular weight yielded 8m (PKI-179), an orally efficacious dual PI3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor. The in vitro activity, in vivo efficacy, and PK properties of 8m are discussed. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the ...

  18. Glucose Induces Mouse β-Cell Proliferation via IRS2, MTOR, and Cyclin D2 but Not the Insulin Receptor

    Stamateris, Rachel E.; Sharma, Rohit B.; Kong, Yahui; Ebrahimpour, Pantea; Panday, Deepika; Ranganath, Pavana; Zou, Baobo; Levitt, Helena; Parambil, Nisha Abraham; O’Donnell, Christopher P.; García-Ocaña, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    An important goal in diabetes research is to understand the processes that trigger endogenous β-cell proliferation. Hyperglycemia induces β-cell replication, but the mechanism remains debated. A prime candidate is insulin, which acts locally through the insulin receptor. Having previously developed an in vivo mouse hyperglycemia model, we tested whether glucose induces β-cell proliferation through insulin signaling. By using mice lacking insulin signaling intermediate insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), we confirmed that hyperglycemia-induced β-cell proliferation requires IRS2 both in vivo and ex vivo. Of note, insulin receptor activation was not required for glucose-induced proliferation, and insulin itself was not sufficient to drive replication. Glucose and insulin caused similar acute signaling in mouse islets, but chronic signaling differed markedly, with mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR) and extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK) activation by glucose and AKT activation by insulin. MTOR but not ERK activation was required for glucose-induced proliferation. Cyclin D2 was necessary for glucose-induced β-cell proliferation. Cyclin D2 expression was reduced when either IRS2 or MTOR signaling was lost, and restoring cyclin D2 expression rescued the proliferation defect. Human islets shared many of these regulatory pathways. Taken together, these results support a model in which IRS2, MTOR, and cyclin D2, but not the insulin receptor, mediate glucose-induced proliferation. PMID:26740601

  19. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    Zhang, Pengpeng [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Jiang, Qinyang [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); College of Animal Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Deng, Changyan [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zheng, Rong, E-mail: zhengrong@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Swine Genetics and Breeding of Agricultural Ministry & Key Laboratory of Agricultural Animal Genetics, Breeding and Reproduction of Ministry of Education, College of Animal Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Kuang, Shihuan, E-mail: skuang@purdue.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7{sup CreER} and Mtor{sup flox/flox} mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7{sup CreER} was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes.

  20. mTOR is necessary for proper satellite cell activity and skeletal muscle regeneration

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Liang, Xinrong; Shan, Tizhong; Jiang, Qinyang; Deng, Changyan; Zheng, Rong; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of protein synthesis, cell proliferation and energy metabolism. As constitutive deletion of Mtor gene results in embryonic lethality, the function of mTOR in muscle stem cells (satellite cells) and skeletal muscle regeneration remains to be determined. In this study, we established a satellite cell specific Mtor conditional knockout (cKO) mouse model by crossing Pax7 CreER and Mtor flox/flox mice. Skeletal muscle regeneration after injury was severely compromised in the absence of Mtor, indicated by increased number of necrotic myofibers infiltrated by Evans blue dye, and reduced number and size of regenerated myofibers in the Mtor cKO mice compared to wild type (WT) littermates. To dissect the cellular mechanism, we analyzed satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts grown on single myofibers or adhered to culture plates. The Mtor cKO myoblasts exhibited defective proliferation and differentiation kinetics when compared to myoblasts derived from WT littermates. At the mRNA and protein levels, the Mtor cKO myoblasts expressed lower levels of key myogenic determinant genes Pax7, Myf5, Myod, Myog than did the WT myoblasts. These results suggest that mTOR is essential for satellite cell function and skeletal muscle regeneration through controlling the expression of myogenic genes. - Highlights: • Pax7 CreER was used to delete Mtor gene in satellite cells. • Satellite cell specific deletion of Mtor impairs muscle regeneration. • mTOR is necessary for satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. • Deletion of Mtor leads to reduced expression of key myogenic genes

  1. The role of mTOR in ovarian cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian aging.

    Liu, Jin; Wu, Dai-Chao; Qu, Li-Hua; Liao, Hong-Qing; Li, Mei-Xiang

    2018-05-12

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, is a serine-threonine protein kinase downstream of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT axis. The pathway can regulate cell growth, proliferation, and survival by activating ribosomal kinases. Recent studies have implicated the mTOR signaling pathway in ovarian neoplasms, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and premature ovarian failure (POF). Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in the control of various ovarian functions. mTOR allows cancer cells to escape the normal biochemical system and regulates the balance between apoptosis and survival. Some recent studies have suggested that involvement of the mTOR signaling system is an important pathophysiological basis of PCOS. Overexpression of the mTOR pathway can impair the interaction of cumulus cells, lead to insulin resistance, and affect the growth of follicles directly. The roles of mTOR signaling in follicular development have been extensively studied in recent years; abnormalities in this process lead to a series of pathologies such as POF and infertility. To improve understanding of the role of the mTOR signaling pathway in the pathogenesis and development of ovarian diseases, here we review the roles of mTOR signaling in such diseases and discuss the corresponding therapeutic strategies that target this pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    Nobuyuki eTakei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Target of rapamycin (TOR was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mTOR (mammalian TOR. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system (CNS, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  3. PRAS40 and PRR5-like protein are new mTOR interactors that regulate apoptosis.

    Kathrin Thedieck

    Full Text Available TOR (Target of Rapamycin is a highly conserved protein kinase and a central controller of cell growth. TOR is found in two functionally and structurally distinct multiprotein complexes termed TOR complex 1 (TORC1 and TOR complex 2 (TORC2. In the present study, we developed a two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC-MS/MS based proteomic strategy to identify new mammalian TOR (mTOR binding proteins. We report the identification of Proline-rich Akt substrate (PRAS40 and the hypothetical protein Q6MZQ0/FLJ14213/CAE45978 as new mTOR binding proteins. PRAS40 binds mTORC1 via Raptor, and is an mTOR phosphorylation substrate. PRAS40 inhibits mTORC1 autophosphorylation and mTORC1 kinase activity toward eIF-4E binding protein (4E-BP and PRAS40 itself. HeLa cells in which PRAS40 was knocked down were protected against induction of apoptosis by TNFalpha and cycloheximide. Rapamycin failed to mimic the pro-apoptotic effect of PRAS40, suggesting that PRAS40 mediates apoptosis independently of its inhibitory effect on mTORC1. Q6MZQ0 is structurally similar to proline rich protein 5 (PRR5 and was therefore named PRR5-Like (PRR5L. PRR5L binds specifically to mTORC2, via Rictor and/or SIN1. Unlike other mTORC2 members, PRR5L is not required for mTORC2 integrity or kinase activity, but dissociates from mTORC2 upon knock down of tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1 and TSC2. Hyperactivation of mTOR by TSC1/2 knock down enhanced apoptosis whereas PRR5L knock down reduced apoptosis. PRR5L knock down reduced apoptosis also in mTORC2 deficient cells. The above suggests that mTORC2-dissociated PRR5L may promote apoptosis when mTOR is hyperactive. Thus, PRAS40 and PRR5L are novel mTOR-associated proteins that control the balance between cell growth and cell death.

  4. The Role of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Nho, Richard

    2018-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent pathway is one of the most integral pathways linked to cell metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. This pathway is dysregulated in a variety of diseases, including neoplasia, immune-mediated diseases, and fibroproliferative diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. The mTOR kinase is frequently referred to as the master regulator of this pathway. Alterations in mTOR signaling are closely associated with dysregulation of autophagy, inflammation, and cell growth and survival, leading to the development of lung fibrosis. Inhibitors of mTOR have been widely studied in cancer therapy, as they may sensitize cancer cells to radiation therapy. Studies also suggest that mTOR inhibitors are promising modulators of fibroproliferative diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIPF). Therefore, mTOR represents an attractive and unique therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the pathological role of mTOR kinase in pulmonary fibrosis and examine how mTOR inhibitors may mitigate fibrotic progression. PMID:29518028

  5. Down-regulation of mTOR leads to up-regulation of osteoprotegerin in bone marrow cells

    Mogi, Makio; Kondo, Ayami

    2009-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG)/osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. mTOR, which is the mammalian target of rapamycin, is a kinase and central regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. By using Rapamycin, we studied whether mTOR pathway is associated with OPG protein production in the mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2. Rapamycin markedly increased the level of soluble OPG in ST2 cells. This antibiotic treatment resulted in the suppression of phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin had no effects on the proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis of the cells. Treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-4, which can induce OPG protein in ST2 cells, also resulted in a decrease in the density of the phospho-mTOR-band, suggesting that the suppression of the phospho-mTOR pathway is necessary for OPG production in ST2 cells. Thus, suitable suppression of mTOR phosphorylation is a necessary requirement for OPG production in bone marrow stromal cells.

  6. Sphingosine kinase activity is not required for tumor cell viability.

    Karen Rex

    Full Text Available Sphingosine kinases (SPHKs are enzymes that phosphorylate the lipid sphingosine, leading to the formation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P. In addition to the well established role of extracellular S1P as a mitogen and potent chemoattractant, SPHK activity has been postulated to be an important intracellular regulator of apoptosis. According to the proposed rheostat theory, SPHK activity shifts the intracellular balance from the pro-apoptotic sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine to the mitogenic S1P, thereby determining the susceptibility of a cell to apoptotic stress. Despite numerous publications with supporting evidence, a clear experimental confirmation of the impact of this mechanism on tumor cell viability in vitro and in vivo has been hampered by the lack of suitable tool reagents. Utilizing a structure based design approach, we developed potent and specific SPHK1/2 inhibitors. These compounds completely inhibited intracellular S1P production in human cells and attenuated vascular permeability in mice, but did not lead to reduced tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo. In addition, siRNA experiments targeting either SPHK1 or SPHK2 in a large panel of cell lines failed to demonstrate any statistically significant effects on cell viability. These results show that the SPHK rheostat does not play a major role in tumor cell viability, and that SPHKs might not be attractive targets for pharmacological intervention in the area of oncology.

  7. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Busenlehner, Laura [Department of Chemistry, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Marcus, Stevan, E-mail: smarcus@bama.ua.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. {yields} The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. {yields} Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. {yields} PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  8. The MAP kinase Pmk1 and protein kinase A are required for rotenone resistance in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Wang, Yiwei; Gulis, Galina; Buckner, Scott; Johnson, P. Connor; Sullivan, Daniel; Busenlehner, Laura; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Rotenone induces generation of ROS and mitochondrial fragmentation in fission yeast. → The MAPK Pmk1 and PKA are required for rotenone resistance in fission yeast. → Pmk1 and PKA are required for ROS clearance in rotenone treated fission yeast cells. → PKA plays a role in ROS clearance under normal growth conditions in fission yeast. -- Abstract: Rotenone is a widely used pesticide that induces Parkinson's disease-like symptoms in rats and death of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although rotenone is a potent inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, it can induce death of dopaminergic neurons independently of complex I inhibition. Here we describe effects of rotenone in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which lacks complex I and carries out rotenone-insensitive cellular respiration. We show that rotenone induces generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as fragmentation of mitochondrial networks in treated S. pombe cells. While rotenone is only modestly inhibitory to growth of wild type S. pombe cells, it is strongly inhibitory to growth of mutants lacking the ERK-type MAP kinase, Pmk1, or protein kinase A (PKA). In contrast, cells lacking the p38 MAP kinase, Spc1, exhibit modest resistance to rotenone. Consistent with these findings, we provide evidence that Pmk1 and PKA, but not Spc1, are required for clearance of ROS in rotenone treated S. pombe cells. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of S. pombe for elucidating complex I-independent molecular targets of rotenone as well as mechanisms conferring resistance to the toxin.

  9. Promotion of ovarian follicle growth following mTOR activation: synergistic effects of AKT stimulators.

    Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase and mTOR signaling is important in regulating cell growth and proliferation. Recent studies using oocyte- and granulosa cell-specific deletion of mTOR inhibitor genes TSC1 or TSC2 demonstrated the important role of mTOR signaling in the promotion of ovarian follicle development. We now report that treatment of ovaries from juvenile mice with an mTOR activator MHY1485 stimulated mTOR, S6K1 and rpS6 phosphorylation. Culturing ovaries for 4 days with MHY1485 increased ovarian explant weights and follicle development. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pre-incubation of these ovaries with MHY1485 for 2 days, followed by allo-grafting into kidney capsules of adult ovariectomized hosts for 5 days, led to marked increases in graft weights and promotion of follicle development. Mature oocytes derived from MHY1485-activated ovarian grafts could be successfully fertilized, leading the delivery of healthy pups. We further treated ovaries with the mTOR activator together with AKT activators (PTEN inhibitor and phosphoinositol-3-kinase stimulator before grafting and found additive enhancement of follicle growth. Our studies demonstrate the ability of an mTOR activator in promoting follicle growth, leading to a potential strategy to stimulate preantral follicle growth in infertile patients.

  10. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M.; Liu, Jinsong; Chadee, Deborah N.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: ► Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. ► MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. ► MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. ► MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  11. Loss of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP3K4) Reveals a Requirement for MAPK Signalling in Mouse Sex Determination

    Bogani, Debora; Siggers, Pam; Brixey, Rachel; Warr, Nick; Beddow, Sarah; Edwards, Jessica; Williams, Debbie; Wilhelm, Dagmar; Koopman, Peter; Flavell, Richard A.; Chi, Hongbo; Ostrer, Harry; Wells, Sara; Cheeseman, Michael; Greenfield, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY) gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY) protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg) mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas). These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and create a novel

  12. Loss of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP3K4 reveals a requirement for MAPK signalling in mouse sex determination.

    Debora Bogani

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex determination in mammals is controlled by the presence or absence of the Y-linked gene SRY. In the developing male (XY gonad, sex-determining region of the Y (SRY protein acts to up-regulate expression of the related gene, SOX9, a transcriptional regulator that in turn initiates a downstream pathway of testis development, whilst also suppressing ovary development. Despite the requirement for a number of transcription factors and secreted signalling molecules in sex determination, intracellular signalling components functioning in this process have not been defined. Here we report a role for the phylogenetically ancient mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signalling pathway in mouse sex determination. Using a forward genetic screen, we identified the recessive boygirl (byg mutation. On the C57BL/6J background, embryos homozygous for byg exhibit consistent XY gonadal sex reversal. The byg mutation is an A to T transversion causing a premature stop codon in the gene encoding MAP3K4 (also known as MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase. Analysis of XY byg/byg gonads at 11.5 d post coitum reveals a growth deficit and a failure to support mesonephric cell migration, both early cellular processes normally associated with testis development. Expression analysis of mutant XY gonads at the same stage also reveals a dramatic reduction in Sox9 and, crucially, Sry at the transcript and protein levels. Moreover, we describe experiments showing the presence of activated MKK4, a direct target of MAP3K4, and activated p38 in the coelomic region of the XY gonad at 11.5 d post coitum, establishing a link between MAPK signalling in proliferating gonadal somatic cells and regulation of Sry expression. Finally, we provide evidence that haploinsufficiency for Map3k4 accounts for T-associated sex reversal (Tas. These data demonstrate that MAP3K4-dependent signalling events are required for normal expression of Sry during testis development, and

  13. The progesterone-induced enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation involves activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways in the dorsal hippocampus

    Orr, Patrick T.; Rubin, Amanda J.; Fan, Lu; Kent, Brianne A.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Although much recent work has elucidated the biochemical mechanisms underlying the modulation of memory by 17β-estradiol, little is known about the signaling events through which progesterone (P) regulates memory. We recently demonstrated that immediate post-training infusion of P into the dorsal hippocampus enhances object recognition memory consolidation in young ovariectomized female mice (Orr et al., 2009). The goal of the present study was to identify the biochemical alterations that might underlie this mnemonic enhancement. We hypothesized that the P-induced enhancement of object recognition would be dependent on activation of the ERK and mTOR pathways. In young ovariectomized mice, we found that bilateral dorsal hippocampal infusion of P significantly increased levels of phospho-p42 ERK and the mTOR substrate S6K in the dorsal hippocampus 5 minutes after infusion. Phospho-p42 ERK levels were downregulated 15 minutes after infusion and returned to baseline 30 minutes after infusion, suggesting a biphasic effect of P on ERK activation. Dorsal hippocampal ERK and mTOR activation were necessary for P to facilitate memory consolidation, as suggested by the fact that inhibitors of both pathways infused into the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training blocked the P-induced enhancement of object recognition. Collectively, these data provide the first demonstration that the ability of P to enhance memory consolidation depends on the rapid activation of cell signaling and protein synthesis pathways in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:22265866

  14. Discrepancy between low levels of mTOR activity and high levels of p-S6 in primary central nervous system lymphoma may be explained by PAS domain-containing serine/threonine-protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation

    Marosvari, Dora; Nagy, Noemi; Kriston, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine mTOR-pathway activity in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), which could be a potential target for therapy. After demonstrating that p-S6 positivity largely exceeded mTOR activity, we aimed to identify other pathways that may lead to S6...... phosphorylation. We measured mTOR activity with immunohistochemistry for p-mTOR and its downstream effectors p(T389)-p70S6K1, p-S6, and p-4EBP1 in 31 cases of PCNSL and 51 cases of systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and evaluated alternative S6 phosphorylation pathways with p-RSK, p(T229)-p70S6K1...... responsible for S6 phosphorylation, PASK proved to be positive in all cases of PCNSL and DLBCL. Inhibition of PASK resulted in reduced expression of p-S6 in BHD1-cells. This is the first study demonstrating an mTOR independent p-S6 activity in PCNSL and that PASK may contribute to the phosphorylation of S6...

  15. Casein kinase 1-Like 3 is required for abscisic acid regulation of ...

    Casein kinase 1-Like 3 is required for abscisic acid regulation of seed germination, root growth, and gene expression in Arabidopsis. M Wang, D Yu, X Guo, X Li, J Zhang, L Zhao, H Chang, S Hu, C Zhang, J Shi, X Liu ...

  16. Analysis list: Mtor [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Mtor + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Mtor.1.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Mtor.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/tar...get/Mtor.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Mtor..tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/.gml ...

  17. Architecture of human mTOR complex 1.

    Aylett, Christopher H S; Sauer, Evelyn; Imseng, Stefan; Boehringer, Daniel; Hall, Michael N; Ban, Nenad; Maier, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR), a conserved protein kinase and central controller of cell growth, functions in two structurally and functionally distinct complexes: TORC1 and TORC2. Dysregulation of mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is implicated in pathologies that include diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We resolved the architecture of human mTORC1 (mTOR with subunits Raptor and mLST8) bound to FK506 binding protein (FKBP)-rapamycin, by combining cryo-electron microscopy at 5.9 angstrom resolution with crystallographic studies of Chaetomium thermophilum Raptor at 4.3 angstrom resolution. The structure explains how FKBP-rapamycin and architectural elements of mTORC1 limit access to the recessed active site. Consistent with a role in substrate recognition and delivery, the conserved amino-terminal domain of Raptor is juxtaposed to the kinase active site. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Kinase activity in the olfactory bulb is required for odor memory consolidation.

    Tong, Michelle T; Kim, Tae-Young P; Cleland, Thomas A

    2018-05-01

    Long-term fear memory formation in the hippocampus and neocortex depends upon brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling after acquisition. Incremental, appetitive odor discrimination learning is thought to depend substantially on the differentiation of adult-born neurons within the olfactory bulb (OB)-a process that is closely associated with BDNF signaling. We sought to elucidate the role of neurotrophin signaling within the OB on odor memory consolidation. Male mice were trained on odor-reward associative discriminations after bilateral infusion of the kinase inhibitor K252a, or vehicle control, into the OB. K252a is a partially selective inhibitor of tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptors, including the TrkB receptor for BDNF, though it also inhibits other plasticity-related kinases such as PKC and CaMKII/IV. K252a infusion into the OB did not impair odor acquisition or short-term (2 h) memory for the learned discriminations, but significantly impaired long-term (48 h) odor memory (LTM). This LTM deficit also was associated with reduced selectivity for the conditioned odorant in a reward-seeking digging task. Infusions of K252a immediately prior to testing did not impair LTM recall. These results indicate that kinase activation in the OB is required for the consolidation of odor memory of incrementally acquired information. © 2018 Tong et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Interdomain allosteric regulation of Polo kinase by Aurora B and Map205 is required for cytokinesis

    Kachaner, David; Pinson, Xavier; El Kadhi, Khaled Ben; Normandin, Karine; Talje, Lama; Lavoie, Hugo; Lépine, Guillaume; Carréno, Sébastien; Kwok, Benjamin H.; Hickson, Gilles R.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo and its human orthologue Polo-like kinase 1 fulfill essential roles during cell division. Members of the Polo-like kinase (Plk) family contain an N-terminal kinase domain (KD) and a C-terminal Polo-Box domain (PBD), which mediates protein interactions. How Plks are regulated in cytokinesis is poorly understood. Here we show that phosphorylation of Polo by Aurora B is required for cytokinesis. This phosphorylation in the activation loop of the KD promotes the dissociation of Polo from the PBD-bound microtubule-associated protein Map205, which acts as an allosteric inhibitor of Polo kinase activity. This mechanism allows the release of active Polo from microtubules of the central spindle and its recruitment to the site of cytokinesis. Failure in Polo phosphorylation results in both early and late cytokinesis defects. Importantly, the antagonistic regulation of Polo by Aurora B and Map205 in cytokinesis reveals that interdomain allosteric mechanisms can play important roles in controlling the cellular functions of Plks. PMID:25332165

  20. Kinetic modelling of in vitro data of PI3K, mTOR1, PTEN enzymes and on-target inhibitors Rapamycin, BEZ235, and LY294002.

    Goltsov, Alexey; Tashkandi, Ghassan; Langdon, Simon P; Harrison, David J; Bown, James L

    2017-01-15

    The phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR1) are two key targets for anti-cancer therapy. Predicting the response of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 signalling pathway to targeted therapy is made difficult because of network complexities. Systems biology models can help explore those complexities but the value of such models is dependent on accurate parameterisation. Motivated by a need to increase accuracy in kinetic parameter estimation, and therefore the predictive power of the model, we present a framework to integrate kinetic data from enzyme assays into a unified enzyme kinetic model. We present exemplar kinetic models of PI3K and mTOR1, calibrated on in vitro enzyme data and founded on Michaelis-Menten (MM) approximation. We describe the effects of an allosteric mTOR1 inhibitor (Rapamycin) and ATP-competitive inhibitors (BEZ235 and LY294002) that show dual inhibition of mTOR1 and PI3K. We also model the kinetics of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which modulates sensitivity of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR1 pathway to these drugs. Model validation with independent data sets allows investigation of enzyme function and drug dose dependencies in a wide range of experimental conditions. Modelling of the mTOR1 kinetics showed that Rapamycin has an IC 50 independent of ATP concentration and that it is a selective inhibitor of mTOR1 substrates S6K1 and 4EBP1: it retains 40% of mTOR1 activity relative to 4EBP1 phosphorylation and inhibits completely S6K1 activity. For the dual ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR1 and PI3K, LY294002 and BEZ235, we derived the dependence of the IC 50 on ATP concentration that allows prediction of the IC 50 at different ATP concentrations in enzyme and cellular assays. Comparison of drug effectiveness in enzyme and cellular assays showed that some features of these drugs arise from signalling modulation beyond the on-target action and MM approximation and require a systems-level consideration of the whole PI3K

  1. RET Functions as a Dual-Specificity Kinase that Requires Allosteric Inputs from Juxtamembrane Elements

    Iván Plaza-Menacho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases exhibit a variety of activation mechanisms despite highly homologous catalytic domains. Such diversity arises through coupling of extracellular ligand-binding portions with highly variable intracellular sequences flanking the tyrosine kinase domain and specific patterns of autophosphorylation sites. Here, we show that the juxtamembrane (JM segment enhances RET catalytic domain activity through Y687. This phospho-site is also required by the JM region to rescue an otherwise catalytically deficient RET activation-loop mutant lacking tyrosines. Structure-function analyses identified interactions between the JM hinge, αC helix, and an unconventional activation-loop serine phosphorylation site that engages the HRD motif and promotes phospho-tyrosine conformational accessibility and regulatory spine assembly. We demonstrate that this phospho-S909 arises from an intrinsic RET dual-specificity kinase activity and show that an equivalent serine is required for RET signaling in Drosophila. Our findings reveal dual-specificity and allosteric components for the mechanism of RET activation and signaling with direct implications for drug discovery.

  2. Resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting mTOR through ATP competition

    Park, Dohyun; Jeong, Heeyoon; Lee, Mi Nam; Koh, Ara; Kwon, Ohman; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Noh, Jungeun; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenol that has a beneficial effect on health, and resveratrol-induced autophagy has been suggested to be a key process in mediating many beneficial effects of resveratrol, such as reduction of inflammation and induction of cancer cell death. Although various resveratrol targets have been suggested, the molecule that mediates resveratrol-induced autophagy remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces autophagy by directly inhibiting the mTOR-ULK1 pathway. We found that inhibition of mTOR activity and presence of ULK1 are required for autophagy induction by resveratrol. In line with this mTOR dependency, we found that resveratrol suppresses the viability of MCF7 cells but not of SW620 cells, which are mTOR inhibitor sensitive and insensitive cancer cells, respectively. We also found that resveratrol-induced cancer cell suppression occurred ULK1 dependently. For the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mTOR inhibition, we demonstrate that resveratrol directly inhibits mTOR. We found that resveratrol inhibits mTOR by docking onto the ATP-binding pocket of mTOR (i.e., it competes with ATP). We propose mTOR as a novel direct target of resveratrol, and inhibition of mTOR is necessary for autophagy induction. PMID:26902888

  3. The Pim kinases: new targets for drug development.

    Swords, Ronan; Kelly, Kevin; Carew, Jennifer; Nawrocki, Stefan; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Sarantopoulos, John; Bearss, David; Giles, Francis

    2011-12-01

    The three Pim kinases are a small family of serine/threonine kinases regulating several signaling pathways that are fundamental to cancer development and progression. They were first recognized as pro-viral integration sites for the Moloney Murine Leukemia virus. Unlike other kinases, they possess a hinge region which creates a unique binding pocket for ATP. Absence of a regulatory domain means that these proteins are constitutively active once transcribed. Pim kinases are critical downstream effectors of the ABL (ableson), JAK2 (janus kinase 2), and Flt-3 (FMS related tyrosine kinase 1) oncogenes and are required by them to drive tumorigenesis. Recent investigations have established that the Pim kinases function as effective inhibitors of apoptosis and when overexpressed, produce resistance to the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, rapamycin . Overexpression of the PIM kinases has been reported in several hematological and solid tumors (PIM 1), myeloma, lymphoma, leukemia (PIM 2) and adenocarcinomas (PIM 3). As such, the Pim kinases are a very attractive target for pharmacological inhibition in cancer therapy. Novel small molecule inhibitors of the human Pim kinases have been designed and are currently undergoing preclinical evaluation.

  4. mTOR inhibition sensitizes ONC201-induced anti-colorectal cancer cell activity.

    Jin, Zhe-Zhu; Wang, Wei; Fang, Di-Long; Jin, Yong-Jun

    2016-09-30

    We here tested the anti-colorectal cancer (CRC) activity by a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer ONC201. The potential effect of mTOR on ONC201's actions was also examined. ONC201 induced moderate cytotoxicity against CRC cell lines (HT-29, HCT-116 and DLD-1) and primary human CRC cells. Significantly, AZD-8055, a mTOR kinase inhibitor, sensitized ONC201-induced cytotoxicity in CRC cells. Meanwhile, ONC201-induced TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR-5) expression, caspase-8 activation and CRC cell apoptosis were also potentiated with AZD-8055 co-treatment. Reversely, TRAIL sequestering antibody RIK-2 or the caspase-8 specific inhibitor z-IETD-fmk attenuated AZD-8055 plus ONC201-induced CRC cell death. Further, mTOR kinase-dead mutation (Asp-2338-Ala) or shRNA knockdown significantly sensitized ONC201's activity in CRC cells, leading to profound cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, expression of a constitutively-active S6K1 (T389E) attenuated ONC201-induced CRC cell apoptosis. For the mechanism study, we showed that ONC201 blocked Akt, but only slightly inhibited mTOR in CRC cells. Co-treatment with AZD-8055 also concurrently blocked mTOR activation. These results suggest that mTOR could be a primary resistance factor of ONC201 in CRC cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The mTOR signalling pathway in cancer and the potential mTOR inhibitory activities of natural phytochemicals.

    Tan, Heng Kean; Moad, Ahmed Ismail Hassan; Tan, Mei Lan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase plays an important role in regulating cell growth and cell cycle progression in response to cellular signals. It is a key regulator of cell proliferation and many upstream activators and downstream effectors of mTOR are known to be deregulated in various types of cancers. Since the mTOR signalling pathway is commonly activated in human cancers, many researchers are actively developing inhibitors that target key components in the pathway and some of these drugs are already on the market. Numerous preclinical investigations have also suggested that some herbs and natural phytochemicals, such as curcumin, resveratrol, timosaponin III, gallic acid, diosgenin, pomegranate, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCC), genistein and 3,3'-diindolylmethane inhibit the mTOR pathway either directly or indirectly. Some of these natural compounds are also in the clinical trial stage. In this review, the potential anti-cancer and chemopreventive activities and the current status of clinical trials of these phytochemicals are discussed.

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR): a central regulator of male fertility?

    Jesus, Tito T; Oliveira, Pedro F; Sousa, Mário; Cheng, C Yan; Alves, Marco G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cellular metabolic phenotype and is involved in virtually all aspects of cellular function. It integrates not only nutrient and energy-sensing pathways but also actin cytoskeleton organization, in response to environmental cues including growth factors and cellular energy levels. These events are pivotal for spermatogenesis and determine the reproductive potential of males. Yet, the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR signaling acts in male reproductive system remain a matter of debate. Here, we review the current knowledge on physiological and molecular events mediated by mTOR in testis and testicular cells. In recent years, mTOR inhibition has been explored as a prime strategy to develop novel therapeutic approaches to treat cancer, cardiovascular disease, autoimmunity, and metabolic disorders. However, the physiological consequences of mTOR dysregulation and inhibition to male reproductive potential are still not fully understood. Compelling evidence suggests that mTOR is an arising regulator of male fertility and better understanding of this atypical protein kinase coordinated action in testis will provide insightful information concerning its biological significance in other tissues/organs. We also discuss why a new generation of mTOR inhibitors aiming to be used in clinical practice may also need to include an integrative view on the effects in male reproductive system.

  7. mTOR as a Key Regulator in Maintaining Skeletal Muscle Mass

    Mee-Sup Yoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of skeletal muscle mass is regulated by the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, and is known to play vital roles in protein synthesis. Recent findings have continued to refine our understanding of the function of mTOR in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. mTOR controls the anabolic and catabolic signaling of skeletal muscle mass, resulting in the modulation of muscle hypertrophy and muscle wastage. This review will highlight the fundamental role of mTOR in skeletal muscle growth by summarizing the phenotype of skeletal-specific mTOR deficiency. In addition, the evidence that mTOR is a dual regulator of anabolism and catabolism in skeletal muscle mass will be discussed. A full understanding of mTOR signaling in the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass could help to develop mTOR-targeted therapeutics to prevent muscle wasting.

  8. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  9. Next-generation mTOR inhibitors in clinical oncology: how pathway complexity informs therapeutic strategy.

    Wander, Seth A

    2011-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a PI3K-related kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival via mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. The mTOR pathway is often aberrantly activated in cancers. While hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and DNA damage restrain mTORC1 activity, multiple genetic events constitutively activate mTOR in cancers. Here we provide a brief overview of the signaling pathways up- and downstream of mTORC1 and -2, and discuss the insights into therapeutic anticancer targets - both those that have been tried in the clinic with limited success and those currently under clinical development - that knowledge of these pathways gives us.

  10. Structural Requirements for Yersinia YopJ Inhibition of MAP Kinase Pathways

    Burdette, Dara; Mukherjee, Sohini; Keitany, Gladys; Goldsmith, Elizabeth; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    MAPK signaling cascades are evolutionally conserved. The bacterial effector, YopJ, uses the unique activity of Ser/Thr acetylation to inhibit the activation of the MAPK kinase (MKK) and prevent activation by phosphorylation. YopJ is also able to block yeast MAPK signaling pathways using this mechanism. Based on these observations, we performed a genetic screen to isolate mutants in the yeast MKK, Pbs2, that suppress YopJ inhibition. One suppressor contains a mutation in a conserved tyrosine residue and bypasses YopJ inhibition by increasing the basal activity of Pbs2. Mutations on the hydrophobic face of the conserved G α-helix in the kinase domain prevent both binding and acetylation by YopJ. Corresponding mutants in human MKKs showed that they are conserved not only structurally, but also functionally. These studies reveal a conserved binding site found on the superfamily of MAPK kinases while providing insight into the molecular interactions required for YopJ inhibition. PMID:18167536

  11. Structural requirements for Yersinia YopJ inhibition of MAP kinase pathways.

    Yi-Heng Hao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available MAPK signaling cascades are evolutionally conserved. The bacterial effector, YopJ, uses the unique activity of Ser/Thr acetylation to inhibit the activation of the MAPK kinase (MKK and prevent activation by phosphorylation. YopJ is also able to block yeast MAPK signaling pathways using this mechanism. Based on these observations, we performed a genetic screen to isolate mutants in the yeast MKK, Pbs2, that suppress YopJ inhibition. One suppressor contains a mutation in a conserved tyrosine residue and bypasses YopJ inhibition by increasing the basal activity of Pbs2. Mutations on the hydrophobic face of the conserved G alpha-helix in the kinase domain prevent both binding and acetylation by YopJ. Corresponding mutants in human MKKs showed that they are conserved not only structurally, but also functionally. These studies reveal a conserved binding site found on the superfamily of MAPK kinases while providing insight into the molecular interactions required for YopJ inhibition.

  12. Arabidopsis Raf-Like Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Gene Raf43 Is Required for Tolerance to Multiple Abiotic Stresses.

    Nasar Virk

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are critical signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli into intracellular response. A relatively large number of MAPKKKs have been identified in a variety of plant genomes but only a few of them have been studied for their biological function. In the present study, we identified an Arabidopsis Raf-like MAPKKK gene Raf43 and studied its function in biotic and abiotic stress response using a T-DNA insertion mutant raf43-1 and two Raf43-overexpressing lines Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13. Expression of Raf43 was induced by multiple abiotic and biotic stresses including treatments with drought, mannitol and oxidative stress or defense signaling molecule salicylic acid and infection with necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Seed germination and seedling root growth of raf43-1 were significantly inhibited on MS medium containing mannitol, NaCl, H2O2 or methyl viologen (MV while seed germination and seedling root growth of the Raf43-OE#1 and Raf43-OE#13 lines was similar to wild type Col-0 under the above stress conditions. Soil-grown raf43-1 plants exhibited reduced tolerance to MV, drought and salt stress. Abscisic acid inhibited significantly seed germination and seedling root growth of the raf43-1 line but had no effect on the two Raf43-overexpressing lines. Expression of stress-responsive RD17 and DREB2A genes was significantly down-regulated in raf43-1 plants. However, the raf43-1 and Raf43-overexpressing plants showed similar disease phenotype to the wild type plants after infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Our results demonstrate that Raf43, encoding for a Raf-like MAPKKK, is required for tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

  13. Novel nervous and multi-system regenerative therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus with mTOR

    Kenneth Maiese

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the globe, diabetes mellitus (DM is increasing in incidence with limited therapies presently available to prevent or resolve the significant complications of this disorder. DM impacts multiple organs and affects all components of the central and peripheral nervous systems that can range from dementia to diabetic neuropathy. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is a promising agent for the development of novel regenerative strategies for the treatment of DM. mTOR and its related signaling pathways impact multiple metabolic parameters that include cellular metabolic homeostasis, insulin resistance, insulin secretion, stem cell proliferation and differentiation, pancreatic β-cell function, and programmed cell death with apoptosis and autophagy. mTOR is central element for the protein complexes mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTOR Complex 2 (mTORC2 and is a critical component for a number of signaling pathways that involve phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K, protein kinase B (Akt, AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SIRT1, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1, and growth factors. As a result, mTOR represents an exciting target to offer new clinical avenues for the treatment of DM and the complications of this disease. Future studies directed to elucidate the delicate balance mTOR holds over cellular metabolism and the impact of its broad signaling pathways should foster the translation of these targets into effective clinical regimens for DM.

  14. Inhibitors of mTOR

    Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Beijnen, Jos H.; Gurney, Howard; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been approved for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and appear to have a role in the treatment of other malignancies. The primary objective of this drug review is to provide pharmacokinetic and dynamic properties of the commonly used drugs

  15. A dynamic network model of mTOR signaling reveals TSC-independent mTORC2 regulation

    Dalle Pezze, Piero; Sonntag, Annika G; Thien, Antje; Prentzell, Mirja T; Gödel, Markus; Fischer, Sven; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke; Huber, Tobias B; Baumeister, Ralf; Shanley, Daryl P; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) exists in two multiprotein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) and is a central regulator of growth and metabolism. Insulin activation of mTORC1, mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt, and the inhibitory tuberous sclerosis complex 1/2

  16. Differential Requirements for Src-Family Kinases in SYK or ZAP70-Mediated SLP-76 Phosphorylation in Lymphocytes

    Frank Fasbender

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In a synthetic biology approach using Schneider (S2 cells, we show that SLP-76 is directly phosphorylated at tyrosines Y113 and Y128 by SYK in the presence of ITAM-containing adapters such as CD3ζ, DAP12, or FcεRγ. This phosphorylation was dependent on at least one functional ITAM and a functional SH2 domain within SYK. Inhibition of Src-kinases by inhibitors PP1 and PP2 did not reduce SLP-76 phosphorylation in S2 cells, suggesting an ITAM and SYK dependent, but Src-kinase independent signaling pathway. This direct ITAM/SYK/SLP-76 signaling pathway therefore differs from previously described ITAM signaling. However, the SYK-family kinase ZAP70 required the additional co-expression of the Src-family kinases Fyn or Lck to efficiently phosphorylate SLP-76 in S2 cells. This difference in Src-family kinase dependency of SYK versus ZAP70-mediated ITAM-based signaling was further demonstrated in human lymphocytes. ITAM signaling in ZAP70-expressing T cells was dependent on the activity of Src-family kinases. In contrast, Src-family kinases were partially dispensable for ITAM signaling in SYK-expressing B cells or in natural killer cells, which express SYK and ZAP70. This demonstrates that SYK can signal using a Src-kinase independent ITAM-based signaling pathway, which may be involved in calibrating the threshold for lymphocyte activation.

  17. A novel mTOR activating protein protects dopamine neurons against oxidative stress by repressing autophagy related cell death.

    Choi, Kyou-Chan; Kim, Shin-Hee; Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Sang-Tae; Son, Jin H

    2010-01-01

    Our previous microarray analysis identified a neuroprotective protein Oxi-alpha, that was down-regulated during oxidative stress (OS)-induced cell death in dopamine neurons [Neurochem. Res. (2004) vol. 29, pp. 1223]. Here we find that the phylogenetically conserved Oxi-alpha protects against OS by a novel mechanism: activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase and subsequent repression of autophagic vacuole accumulation and cell death. To the best of our knowledge, Oxi-alpha is the first molecule discovered in dopamine neurons, which activates mTOR kinase. Indeed, the down-regulation of Oxi-alpha by OS suppresses the activation of mTOR kinase. The pathogenic effect of down-regulated Oxi-alpha was confirmed by gene-specific knockdown experiment, which resulted in not only the repression of mTOR kinase and the subsequent phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, but also enhanced susceptibility to OS. In accordance with these observations, treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and autophagy inducer, potentiated OS-induced cell death, while similar treatment with an autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine protected the dopamine cells. Our findings present evidence for the presence of a novel class of molecule involved in autophagic cell death triggered by OS in dopamine neurons.

  18. PRAS40 is an integral regulatory component of erythropoietin mTOR signaling and cytoprotection.

    Zhao Zhong Chong

    Full Text Available Emerging strategies that center upon the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling for neurodegenerative disorders may bring effective treatment for a number of difficult disease entities. Here we show that erythropoietin (EPO, a novel agent for nervous system disorders, prevents apoptotic SH-SY5Y cell injury in an oxidative stress model of oxygen-glucose deprivation through phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI 3-K/protein kinase B (Akt dependent activation of mTOR signaling and phosphorylation of the downstream pathways of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1, and proline rich Akt substrate 40 kDa (PRAS40. PRAS40 is an important regulatory component either alone or in conjunction with EPO signal transduction that can determine cell survival through apoptotic caspase 3 activation. EPO and the PI 3-K/Akt pathways control cell survival and mTOR activity through the inhibitory post-translational phosphorylation of PRAS40 that leads to subcellular binding of PRAS40 to the cytoplasmic docking protein 14-3-3. However, modulation and phosphorylation of PRAS40 is independent of other protective pathways of EPO that involve extracellular signal related kinase (ERK 1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT5. Our studies highlight EPO and PRAS40 signaling in the mTOR pathway as potential therapeutic strategies for development against degenerative disorders that lead to cell demise.

  19. Crosstalk of the mTOR network with stress granules and the TGF-beta pathway

    Prentzell, Mirja Tamara

    2018-01-01

    Alle organismen en cellen hebben voedingsstoffen nodig om te kunnen groeien en overleven. Het mTOR (mechanistic of mammalian target of rapamycin) kinase is een knooppunt in een complex signaaltransductie netwerk dat celgroei in reactie op voedingsstoffen faciliteert. Ontregeling van dit netwerk

  20. Integrin-linked kinase is required for TGF-β1 induction of dermal myofibroblast differentiation.

    Vi, Linda; de Lasa, Cristina; DiGuglielmo, Gianni M; Dagnino, Lina

    2011-03-01

    Cutaneous repair after injury requires activation of resident dermal fibroblasts and their transition to myofibroblasts. The key stimuli for myofibroblast formation are activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors and mechanotransduction mediated by integrins and associated proteins. We investigated the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in TGF-β1 induction of dermal fibroblast transition to myofibroblasts. ILK-deficient fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1 exhibited attenuation of Smad 2 and 3 phosphorylation, accompanied by impaired transcriptional activation of Smad targets, such as α-smooth muscle actin. These alterations were not limited to Smad-associated TGF-β1 responses, as stimulation of noncanonical mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways by this growth factor was also diminished in the absence of ILK. ILK-deficient fibroblasts exhibited abnormalities in the actin cytoskeleton, and did not form supermature focal adhesions or contractile F-actin stress fibers, indicating a severe impairment in their capacity to differentiate into myofibroblasts. These defects extended to the inability of cells to contract extracellular matrices when embedded in collagen lattices. We conclude that ILK is necessary to transduce signals implicated in the transition of dermal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts originating from matrix substrates and TGF-β1.

  1. Domains of the growth hormone receptor required for association and activation of JAK2 tyrosine kinase

    VanderKuur, J A; Wang, X; Zhang, L

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to activate the GH receptor (GHR)-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. In the present study, regions of the GHR required for JAK2 association with GHR were identified. GH-dependent JAK2 association with GHR was detected in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells...... and RIN-5AH cells, the ability of JAK2 to associate with the mutated GHR was found to correlate with GH-dependent activation of JAK2, tyrosyl phosphorylation of GHR (in the case of GHR1-638 and GHR1-454), and the ability of the GHR to copurify with tyrosine kinase activity. In CHO cells expressing mutated......, and that tyrosines in the N-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain of the GHR are phosphorylated by JAK2. The finding that a specific interaction with the C-terminal half of GHR appears to be necessary for p97 phosphorylation indicates that while JAK2 activation may be necessary for a full biological response to GH...

  2. β-Catenin is required for intrinsic but not extrinsic BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Eiring, A M; Khorashad, J S; Anderson, D J; Yu, F; Redwine, H M; Mason, C C; Reynolds, K R; Clair, P M; Gantz, K C; Zhang, T Y; Pomicter, A D; Kraft, I L; Bowler, A D; Johnson, K; Partlin, M Mac; O'Hare, T; Deininger, M W

    2015-12-01

    Activation of nuclear β-catenin and expression of its transcriptional targets promotes chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progression, tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance, and leukemic stem cell self-renewal. We report that nuclear β-catenin has a role in leukemia cell-intrinsic but not -extrinsic BCR-ABL1 kinase-independent TKI resistance. Upon imatinib inhibition of BCR-ABL1 kinase activity, β-catenin expression was maintained in intrinsically resistant cells grown in suspension culture and sensitive cells cultured in direct contact (DC) with bone marrow (BM) stromal cells. Thus, TKI resistance uncouples β-catenin expression from BCR-ABL1 kinase activity. In β-catenin reporter assays, intrinsically resistant cells showed increased transcriptional activity versus parental TKI-sensitive controls, and this was associated with restored expression of β-catenin target genes. In contrast, DC with BM stromal cells promoted TKI resistance, but had little effects on Lef/Tcf reporter activity and no consistent effects on cytoplasmic β-catenin levels, arguing against a role for β-catenin in extrinsic TKI resistance. N-cadherin or H-cadherin blocking antibodies abrogated DC-based resistance despite increasing Lef/Tcf reporter activity, suggesting that factors other than β-catenin contribute to extrinsic, BM-derived TKI resistance. Our data indicate that, while nuclear β-catenin enhances survival of intrinsically TKI-resistant CML progenitors, it is not required for extrinsic resistance mediated by the BM microenvironment.

  3. Targeting tumorigenesis: development and use of mTOR inhibitors in cancer therapy

    Kay Andrea

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase positioned at a central point in a variety of cellular signaling cascades. The established involvement of mTOR activity in the cellular processes that contribute to the development and progression of cancer has identified mTOR as a major link in tumorigenesis. Consequently, inhibitors of mTOR, including temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus (formerly deforolimus have been developed and assessed for their safety and efficacy in patients with cancer. Temsirolimus is an intravenously administered agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC. Everolimus is an oral agent that has recently obtained US FDA and EMEA approval for the treatment of advanced RCC after failure of treatment with sunitinib or sorafenib. Ridaforolimus is not yet approved for any indication. The use of mTOR inhibitors, either alone or in combination with other anticancer agents, has the potential to provide anticancer activity in numerous tumor types. Cancer types in which these agents are under evaluation include neuroendocrine tumors, breast cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, sarcoma, endometrial cancer, and non-small-cell lung cancer. The results of ongoing clinical trials with mTOR inhibitors, as single agents and in combination regimens, will better define their activity in cancer.

  4. mTOR inhibition sensitizes human hepatocellular carcinoma cells to resminostat

    Peng, Xingang, E-mail: pengxinggang26@sina.com [Department of Emergency General Surgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao (China); Zhang, Donghui, E-mail: zhangdonghuiyx@sina.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China); Li, Zhengling, E-mail: lizhenglingzz@sina.com [Department of Nursing, Tengzhou Central People’s Hospital, Tengzhou (China); Fu, Meili, E-mail: fumeilidrlinyi@tom.com [Department of Infectious Disease, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China); Liu, Haiyan, E-mail: liuhaiyanlinyi5@sina.com [Department of Nursing, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi (China)

    2016-09-02

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) hyper-activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is often associated with patients’ poor prognosis. Our previous study has shown that resminostat, a novel HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), activated mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP)-dependent apoptosis pathway in HCC cells. Here we explored the potential resminostat resistance factor by focusing on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We showed that AZD-2014, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, potentiated resminostat-induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition in HCC cells. Molecularly, AZD-2014 enhanced resminostat-induced mPTP apoptosis pathway activation in HCC cells. Inhibition of this apoptosis pathway, by the caspase-9 specific inhibitor Ac-LEHD-CHO, the mPTP blockers (sanglifehrin A/cyclosporine A), or by shRNA-mediated knockdown of mPTP component cyclophilin-D (Cyp-D), significantly attenuated resminostat plus AZD-2014-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCC cells. Significantly, mTOR shRNA knockdown or kinase-dead mutation (Asp-2338-Ala) also sensitized HCC cells to resminostat, causing profound cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction. Together, these results suggest that mTOR could be a primary resistance factor of resminostat. Targeted inhibition of mTOR may thus significantly sensitize HCC cells to resminostat. - Highlights: • AZD-2014 potentiates resminostat’s cytotoxicity against HCC cells. • AZD-2014 facilitates resminostat-induced HCC cell apoptosis. • AZD-2014 augments resminostat-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway activation. • mTOR shRNA or kinase-dead mutation significantly sensitizes HCC cells to resminostat.

  5. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  6. Repigmentation in vitiligo using the Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib may require concomitant light exposure.

    Liu, Lucy Y; Strassner, James P; Refat, Maggi A; Harris, John E; King, Brett A

    2017-10-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which cutaneous depigmentation occurs. Existing therapies are often inadequate. Prior reports have shown benefit of the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. To evaluate the efficacy of the JAK 1/3 inhibitor tofacitinib in the treatment of vitiligo. This is a retrospective case series of 10 consecutive patients with vitiligo treated with tofacitinib. Severity of disease was assessed by body surface area of depigmentation. Ten consecutive patients were treated with tofacitinib. Five patients achieved some repigmentation at sites of either sunlight exposure or low-dose narrowband ultraviolet B phototherapy. Suction blister sampling revealed that the autoimmune response was inhibited during treatment in both responding and nonresponding lesions, suggesting that light rather than immunosuppression was primarily required for melanocyte regeneration. Limitations include the small size of the study population, retrospective nature of the study, and lack of a control group. Treatment of vitiligo with JAK inhibitors appears to require light exposure. In contrast to treatment with phototherapy alone, repigmentation during treatment with JAK inhibitors may require only low-level light. Maintenance of repigmentation may be achieved with JAK inhibitor monotherapy. These results support a model wherein JAK inhibitors suppress T cell mediators of vitiligo and light exposure is necessary for stimulation of melanocyte regeneration. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Requirement for PLK1 kinase activity in the maintenance of a robust spindle assembly checkpoint

    Aisling O'Connor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During mitotic arrest induced by microtubule targeting drugs, the weakening of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC allows cells to progress through the cell cycle without chromosome segregation occurring. PLK1 kinase plays a major role in mitosis and emerging evidence indicates that PLK1 is also involved in establishing the checkpoint and maintaining SAC signalling. However, mechanistically, the role of PLK1 in the SAC is not fully understood, with several recent reports indicating that it can cooperate with either one of the major checkpoint kinases, Aurora B or MPS1. In this study, we assess the role of PLK1 in SAC maintenance. We find that in nocodazole-arrested U2OS cells, PLK1 activity is continuously required for maintaining Aurora B protein localisation and activity at kinetochores. Consistent with published data we find that upon PLK1 inhibition, phosphoThr3-H3, a marker of Haspin activity, is reduced. Intriguingly, Aurora B inhibition causes PLK1 to relocalise from kinetochores into fewer and much larger foci, possibly due to incomplete recruitment of outer kinetochore proteins. Importantly, PLK1 inhibition, together with partial inhibition of Aurora B, allows efficient SAC override to occur. This phenotype is more pronounced than the phenotype observed by combining the same PLK1 inhibitors with partial MPS1 inhibition. We also find that PLK1 inhibition does not obviously cooperate with Haspin inhibition to promote SAC override. These results indicate that PLK1 is directly involved in maintaining efficient SAC signalling, possibly by cooperating in a positive feedback loop with Aurora B, and that partially redundant mechanisms exist which reinforce the SAC.

  8. Transient activation of mTOR following forced treadmill exercise in rats

    Elfving, Betina; Christensen, Tina; Ratner, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    , while the induction of neurogenesis requires signaling through the VEGF receptor, Flk-1 (VEGFR-2). VEGF expression is believed to be regulated by two distinct mTOR (mammalian Target of Rapamycin)-containing multiprotein complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. This study was initiated to investigate...... of mTOR was regulated after a single bout of exercise. In conclusion, the effect of treadmill exercise on the VEGF system is acute rather than chronic and there is a transient activation of mTOR. More studies are needed to understand whether this could be beneficial in the treatment of neuropsychiatric...

  9. The sensor kinase MprB is required for Rhodococcus equi virulence.

    MacArthur, Iain; Parreira, Valeria R; Lepp, Dion; Mutharia, Lucy M; Vazquez-Boland, José A; Prescott, John F

    2011-01-10

    Rhodococcus equi is a soil bacterium and, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a member of the mycolata. Through possession of a virulence plasmid, it has the ability to infect the alveolar macrophages of foals, resulting in pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia. The virulence plasmid has an orphan two-component system (TCS) regulatory gene, orf8, mutation of which completely attenuates virulence. This study attempted to find the cognate sensor kinase (SK) of orf8. Annotation of the R. equi strain 103 genome identified 23 TCSs encoded on the chromosome, which were used in a DNA microarray to compare TCS gene transcription in murine macrophage-like cells to growth in vitro. This identified six SKs as significantly up-regulated during growth in macrophages. Mutants of these SKs were constructed and their ability to persist in macrophages was determined with one SK, MprB, found to be required for intracellular survival. The attenuation of the mprB- mutant, and its complementation, was confirmed in a mouse virulence assay. In silico analysis of the R. equi genome sequence identified an MprA binding box motif homologous to that of M. tuberculosis, on mprA, pepD, sigB and sigE. The results of this study also show that R. equi responds to the macrophage environment differently from M. tuberculosis. MprB is the first SK identified as required for R. equi virulence and intracellular survival. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of CAD, a multifunctional protein involved in pyrimidine synthesis, with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes

    2013-01-01

    Background mTOR is a genetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, which controls cell growth, proliferation, and survival. A multifunctional protein CAD, catalyzing the initial three steps in de novo pyrimidine synthesis, is regulated by the phosphorylation reaction with different protein kinases, but the relationship with mTOR protein kinase has not been known. Results CAD was recovered as a binding protein with mLST8, a component of the mTOR complexes, from HEK293 cells transfected with the FLAG-mLST8 vector. Association of these two proteins was confirmed by the co-immuoprecipitaiton followed by immunoblot analysis of transfected myc-CAD and FLAG-mLST8 as well as that of the endogenous proteins in the cells. Analysis using mutant constructs suggested that CAD has more than one region for the binding with mLST8, and that mLST8 recognizes CAD and mTOR in distinct ways. The CAD enzymatic activity decreased in the cells depleted of amino acids and serum, in which the mTOR activity is suppressed. Conclusion The results obtained indicate that mLST8 bridges between CAD and mTOR, and plays a role in the signaling mechanism where CAD is regulated in the mTOR pathway through the association with mLST8. PMID:23594158

  11. A chemical-genetic strategy reveals distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1 kinase in neuronal polarization and synapse formation

    Shokat Kevan M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons assemble into a functional network through a sequence of developmental processes including neuronal polarization and synapse formation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the serine/threonine SAD-1 kinase is essential for proper neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. To determine if SAD-1 activity regulates the establishment or maintenance of these neuronal structures, we examined its temporal requirements using a chemical-genetic method that allows for selective and reversible inactivation of its kinase activity in vivo. Results We generated a PP1 analog-sensitive variant of SAD-1. Through temporal inhibition of SAD-1 kinase activity we show that its activity is required for the establishment of both neuronal polarity and synaptic organization. However, while SAD-1 activity is needed strictly when neurons are polarizing, the temporal requirement for SAD-1 is less stringent in synaptic organization, which can also be re-established during maintenance. Conclusion This study reports the first temporal analysis of a neural kinase activity using the chemical-genetic system. It reveals that neuronal polarity and synaptic organization have distinct temporal requirements for SAD-1.

  12. MenTORing Immunity: mTOR Signaling in the Development and Function of Tissue-Resident Immune Cells.

    Jones, Russell G; Pearce, Edward J

    2017-05-16

    Tissue-resident immune cells must balance survival in peripheral tissues with the capacity to respond rapidly upon infection or tissue damage, and in turn couple these responses with intrinsic metabolic control and conditions in the tissue microenvironment. The serine/threonine kinase mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central integrator of extracellular and intracellular growth signals and cellular metabolism and plays important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review discusses the function of mTOR signaling in the differentiation and function of tissue-resident immune cells, with focus on the role of mTOR as a metabolic sensor and its impact on metabolic regulation in innate and adaptive immune cells. We also discuss the impact of metabolic constraints in tissues on immune homeostasis and disease, and how manipulating mTOR activity with drugs such as rapamycin can modulate immunity in these contexts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Gβγ interacts with mTOR and promotes its activation

    Robles-Molina, Evelyn [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Dionisio-Vicuña, Misael [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Guzmán-Hernández, María Luisa [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Vázquez-Prado, José, E-mail: jvazquez@cinvestav.mx [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN), Apartado postal 14-740, México, D.F. 07360 (Mexico)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Gβγ interacts with mTOR kinase domain via a mechanism sensitive to chronic treatment with rapamycin. • Gβγ interacts with mTORC1 and mTORC2 which correlates with its ability to promote mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling. • Gβγ heterodimers containing different Gβ subunits, except Gβ{sub 4}, interact with mTOR. - Abstract: Diverse G protein-coupled receptors depend on Gβγ heterodimers to promote cell polarization and survival via direct activation of PI3Kγ and potentially other effectors. These events involve full activation of AKT via its phosphorylation at Ser473, suggesting that mTORC2, the kinase that phosphorylates AKT at Ser473, is activated downstream of Gβγ. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that Gβγ directly contributes to mTOR signaling. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous mTOR interacts with Gβγ. Cell stimulation with serum modulates Gβγ interaction with mTOR. The carboxyl terminal region of mTOR, expressed as a GST-fusion protein, including the serine/threonine kinase domain, binds Gβγ heterodimers containing different Gβ subunits, except Gβ{sub 4}. Both, mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes interact with Gβ{sub 1}γ{sub 2} which promotes phosphorylation of their respective substrates, p70S6K and AKT. In addition, chronic treatment with rapamycin, a condition known to interfere with assembly of mTORC2, reduces the interaction between Gβγ and mTOR and the phosphorylation of AKT; whereas overexpression of Gαi interfered with the effect of Gβγ as promoter of p70S6K and AKT phosphorylation. Altogether, our results suggest that Gβγ positively regulates mTOR signaling via direct interactions and provide further support to emerging strategies based on the therapeutical potential of inhibiting different Gβγ signaling interfaces.

  14. A Requirement for ZAK Kinase Activity in Canonical TGF-β Signaling

    Shyam Nyati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase ZAK (AZK, MLT, MLK7, is a MAPK-kinase kinase (MKKK. Like most MAPKKKs which are known to activate the c-Jun. amino-terminal kinase (JNK pathway, ZAK has been shown to participate in the transduction of Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β-mediated non-canonical signaling. A role for ZAK in SMAD-dependent, canonical TGF-β signaling has not been previously appreciated. Using a combination of functional genomics and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ZAK regulates canonical TGFβRI/II signaling in lung and breast cancer cell lines and may serve as a key node in the regulation of TGFBR kinase activity. Remarkably, we demonstrate that siRNA mediated depletion of ZAK strongly inhibited TGF-β dependent SMAD2/3 activation and subsequent promoter activation (SMAD binding element driven luciferase expression; SBE4-Luc. A ZAK specific inhibitor (DHP-2, dose-dependently activated the bioluminescent TGFBR-kinase activity reporter (BTR, blocked TGF-β induced SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and SBE4-Luc activation and cancer cell-invasion. In aggregate, these findings identify a novel role for the ZAK kinase in canonical TGF-β signaling and an invasive cancer cell phenotype thus providing a novel target for TGF-β inhibition.

  15. Inca: a novel p21-activated kinase-associated protein required for cranial neural crest development.

    Luo, Ting; Xu, Yanhua; Hoffman, Trevor L; Zhang, Tailin; Schilling, Thomas; Sargent, Thomas D

    2007-04-01

    Inca (induced in neural crest by AP2) is a novel protein discovered in a microarray screen for genes that are upregulated in Xenopus embryos by the transcriptional activator protein Tfap2a. It has no significant similarity to any known protein, but is conserved among vertebrates. In Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos, Inca is expressed predominantly in the premigratory and migrating neural crest (NC). Knockdown experiments in frog and fish using antisense morpholinos reveal essential functions for Inca in a subset of NC cells that form craniofacial cartilage. Cells lacking Inca migrate successfully but fail to condense into skeletal primordia. Overexpression of Inca disrupts cortical actin and prevents formation of actin "purse strings", which are required for wound healing in Xenopus embryos. We show that Inca physically interacts with p21-activated kinase 5 (PAK5), a known regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that is co-expressed with Inca in embryonic ectoderm, including in the NC. These results suggest that Inca and PAK5 cooperate in restructuring cytoskeletal organization and in the regulation of cell adhesion in the early embryo and in NC cells during craniofacial development.

  16. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  17. Learned stressor resistance requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the prefrontal cortex

    John Paul Christianson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Behaviorally controllable stressors confer protection from the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of future uncontrollable stressors, a phenomenon termed behavioral immunization. Recent data implicate neuroplasticity within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (mPFC as critical to behavioral immunization. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a series of controllable tailshocks and one week later to uncontrollable tailshocks, followed 24h later by social exploration and shuttlebox escape tests. To test the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK cascade in behavioral immunization, either D-AP5 or the MEK inhibitor U0126 was injected to the prelimbic (PL or infralimbic (IL mPFC prior to controllable stress exposure. Phosphorylated ERK and P70S6K, regulators of transcription and translation, were quantified by Western blot or immunohistochemistry after controllable or uncontrollable tailshocks. Prior controllable stress prevented the social exploration and shuttlebox performance deficits caused by the later uncontrollable stressor, and this effect was blocked by injections of D-AP5 into mPFC. A significant increase in phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, but not P70S6K, occurred within the PL and IL in rats exposed to controllable stress, but not to uncontrollable stress. However, U0126 only prevented behavioral immunization when injected to the PL. We provide evidence that NMDAR and ERK dependent plasticity within the PL region is required for behavioral immunization, a learned form of stressor resistance.

  18. Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase but Not of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways in Lymphocytes Requires Allosteric Activation of SOS

    Jun, Jesse E.; Yang, Ming; Chen, Hang; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Thymocytes convert graded T cell receptor (TCR) signals into positive selection or deletion, and activation of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), p38, and Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) has been postulated to play a discriminatory role. Two families of Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs), SOS and RasGRP, activate Ras and the downstream RAF-MEK-ERK pathway. The pathways leading to lymphocyte p38 and JNK activation are less well defined. We previously described how RasGRP alone induces analog Ras-ERK activation while SOS and RasGRP cooperate to establish bimodal ERK activation. Here we employed computational modeling and biochemical experiments with model cell lines and thymocytes to show that TCR-induced ERK activation grows exponentially in thymocytes and that a W729E allosteric pocket mutant, SOS1, can only reconstitute analog ERK signaling. In agreement with RasGRP allosterically priming SOS, exponential ERK activation is severely decreased by pharmacological or genetic perturbation of the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)-diacylglycerol-RasGRP1 pathway. In contrast, p38 activation is not sharply thresholded and requires high-level TCR signal input. Rac and p38 activation depends on SOS1 expression but not allosteric activation. Based on computational predictions and experiments exploring whether SOS functions as a RacGEF or adaptor in Rac-p38 activation, we established that the presence of SOS1, but not its enzymatic activity, is critical for p38 activation. PMID:23589333

  19. Scalable and Anonymous Group Communication with MTor

    Lin Dong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents MTor, a low-latency anonymous group communication system. We construct MTor as an extension to Tor, allowing the construction of multi-source multicast trees on top of the existing Tor infrastructure. MTor does not depend on an external service to broker the group communication, and avoids central points of failure and trust. MTor’s substantial bandwidth savings and graceful scalability enable new classes of anonymous applications that are currently too bandwidth-intensive to be viable through traditional unicast Tor communication-e.g., group file transfer, collaborative editing, streaming video, and real-time audio conferencing.

  20. mTOR pathway inhibition prevents neuroinflammation and neuronal death in a mouse model of cerebral palsy.

    Srivastava, Isha N; Shperdheja, Jona; Baybis, Marianna; Ferguson, Tanya; Crino, Peter B

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling governs cellular responses to hypoxia and inflammation including induction of autophagy and cell survival. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a neurodevelopmental disorder linked to hypoxic and inflammatory brain injury however, a role for mTOR modulation in CP has not been investigated. We hypothesized that mTOR pathway inhibition would diminish inflammation and prevent neuronal death in a mouse model of CP. Mouse pups (P6) were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation (HIL), a model of CP causing neuronal injury within the hippocampus, periventricular white matter, and neocortex. mTOR pathway inhibition was achieved with rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor; 5mg/kg) or PF-4708671 (an inhibitor of the downstream p70S6kinase, S6K, 75 mg/kg) immediately following HIL, and then for 3 subsequent days. Phospho-activation of the mTOR effectors p70S6kinase and ribosomal S6 protein and expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) were assayed. Neuronal cell death was defined with Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) and autophagy was measured using Beclin-1 and LC3II expression. Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were quantified. Neuronal death, enhanced HIF-1α expression, and numerous Iba-1 labeled, activated microglia were evident at 24 and 48 h following HIL. Basal mTOR signaling, as evidenced by phosphorylated-S6 and -S6K levels, was unchanged by HIL. Rapamycin or PF-4,708,671 treatment significantly reduced mTOR signaling, neuronal death, HIF-1α expression, and microglial activation, coincident with enhanced expression of Beclin-1 and LC3II, markers of autophagy induction. mTOR pathway inhibition prevented neuronal death and diminished neuroinflammation in this model of CP. Persistent mTOR signaling following HIL suggests a failure of autophagy induction, which may contribute to neuronal death in CP. These results suggest that mTOR signaling may be a novel therapeutic target to reduce neuronal cell death in

  1. Regulation of EphA4 kinase activity is required for a subset of axon guidance decisions suggesting a key role for receptor clustering in Eph function

    Egea, Joaquim; Nissen, Ulla Vig; Dufour, Audrey

    2005-01-01

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is mediated by their intrinsic kinase activity. Typically, kinase-activating mutations result in ligand-independent signaling and gain-of-function phenotypes. Like other RTKs, Ephs require kinase activity to signal, but signaling by Ephs in vitro also...... requires clustering by their membrane bound ephrin ligands. The relative importance of Eph kinase activity and clustering for in vivo functions is unknown. We find that knockin mice expressing a mutant form of EphA4 (EphA4 EE), whose kinase is constitutively activated in the absence of ephrinB ligands......, are deficient in the development of thalamocortical projections and some aspects of central pattern generator rhythmicity. Surprisingly, other functions of EphA4 were regulated normally by EphA4EE, including midline axon guidance, hindlimb locomotion, in vitro growth cone collapse, and phosphorylation...

  2. Efficient production of infectious viruses requires enzymatic activity of Epstein-Barr virus protein kinase.

    Murata, Takayuki; Isomura, Hiroki; Yamashita, Yoriko; Toyama, Shigenori; Sato, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Sanae; Kudoh, Ayumi; Iwahori, Satoko; Kanda, Teru; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2009-06-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BGLF4 gene product is the only protein kinase encoded by the virus genome. In order to elucidate its physiological roles in viral productive replication, we here established a BGLF4-knockout mutant and a revertant virus. While the levels of viral DNA replication of the deficient mutant were equivalent to those of the wild-type and the revertant, virus production was significantly impaired. Expression of the BGLF4 protein in trans fully complemented the low yield of the mutant virus, while expression of a kinase-dead (K102I) form of the protein failed to restore the virus titer. These results demonstrate that BGLF4 plays a significant role in production of infectious viruses and that the kinase activity is crucial.

  3. Comment on "A dynamic network model of mTOR signaling reveals TSC-independent mTORC2 regulation": building a model of the mTOR signaling network with a potentially faulty tool.

    Manning, Brendan D

    2012-07-10

    In their study published in Science Signaling (Research Article, 27 March 2012, DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2002469), Dalle Pezze et al. tackle the dynamic and complex wiring of the signaling network involving the protein kinase mTOR, which exists within two distinct protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) that differ in their regulation and function. The authors use a combination of immunoblotting for specific phosphorylation events and computational modeling. The primary experimental tool employed is to monitor the autophosphorylation of mTOR on Ser(2481) in cell lysates as a surrogate for mTOR activity, which the authors conclude is a specific readout for mTORC2. However, Ser(2481) phosphorylation occurs on both mTORC1 and mTORC2 and will dynamically change as the network through which these two complexes are connected is manipulated. Therefore, models of mTOR network regulation built using this tool are inherently imperfect and open to alternative explanations. Specific issues with the main conclusion made in this study, involving the TSC1-TSC2 (tuberous sclerosis complex 1 and 2) complex and its potential regulation of mTORC2, are discussed here. A broader goal of this Letter is to clarify to other investigators the caveats of using mTOR Ser(2481) phosphorylation in cell lysates as a specific readout for either of the two mTOR complexes.

  4. Germline activating MTOR mutation arising through gonadal mosaicism in two brothers with megalencephaly and neurodevelopmental abnormalities.

    Mroske, Cameron; Rasmussen, Kristen; Shinde, Deepali N; Huether, Robert; Powis, Zoe; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Baxter, Ruth M; McPherson, Elizabeth; Tang, Sha

    2015-11-05

    In humans, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (MTOR) encodes a 300 kDa serine/ threonine protein kinase that is ubiquitously expressed, particularly at high levels in brain. MTOR functions as an integrator of multiple cellular processes, and in so doing either directly or indirectly regulates the phosphorylation of at least 800 proteins. While somatic MTOR mutations have been recognized in tumors for many years, and more recently in hemimegalencephaly, germline MTOR mutations have rarely been described. We report the successful application of family-trio Diagnostic Exome Sequencing (DES) to identify the underlying molecular etiology in two brothers with multiple neurological and developmental lesions, and for whom previous testing was non-diagnostic. The affected brothers, who were 6 and 23 years of age at the time of DES, presented symptoms including but not limited to mild Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), megalencephaly, gross motor skill delay, cryptorchidism and bilateral iris coloboma. Importantly, we determined that each affected brother harbored the MTOR missense alteration p.E1799K (c.5395G>A). This exact variant has been previously identified in multiple independent human somatic cancer samples and has been shown to result in increased MTOR activation. Further, recent independent reports describe two unrelated families in whom p.E1799K co-segregated with megalencephaly and intellectual disability (ID); in both cases, p.E1799K was shown to have originated due to germline mosaicism. In the case of the family reported herein, the absence of p.E1799K in genomic DNA extracted from the blood of either parent suggests that this alteration most likely arose due to gonadal mosaicism. Further, the p.E1799K variant exerts its effect by a gain-of-function (GOF), autosomal dominant mechanism. Herein, we describe the use of DES to uncover an activating MTOR missense alteration of gonadal mosaic origin that is likely to be the causative mutation in two brothers who present

  5. Casein kinase 1-Like 3 is required for abscisic acid regulation of ...

    Jane

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... root growth compared with ckl3 plants under different ABA concentration treatment. Also, compared with wild-type plants, the expressions of the ABA and abiotic stress-responsive ... CK1 isoforms show that the interaction between CK1 and ..... kinase I, in root development and plant hormone sensitivity.

  6. Reduced AMPK-ACC and mTOR signaling in muscle from older men, and effect of resistance exercise.

    Li, Mengyao; Verdijk, Lex B; Sakamoto, Kei; Ely, Brian; van Loon, Luc J C; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy-sensitive enzyme that controls numerous metabolic and cellular processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is another energy/nutrient-sensitive kinase that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. In this study we determined whether older versus younger men have alterations in the AMPK and mTOR pathways in skeletal muscle, and examined the effect of a long term resistance type exercise training program on these signaling intermediaries. Older men had decreased AMPKα2 activity and lower phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream signaling substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). mTOR phosphylation also was reduced in muscle from older men. Exercise training increased AMPKα1 activity in older men, however, AMPKα2 activity, and the phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and mTOR, were not affected. In conclusion, older men have alterations in the AMPK-ACC and mTOR pathways in muscle. In addition, prolonged resistance type exercise training induces an isoform-selective up regulation of AMPK activity. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Differential control of ageing and lifespan by isoforms and splice variants across the mTOR network.

    Razquin Navas, Patricia; Thedieck, Kathrin

    2017-07-15

    Ageing can be defined as the gradual deterioration of physiological functions, increasing the incidence of age-related disorders and the probability of death. Therefore, the term ageing not only reflects the lifespan of an organism but also refers to progressive functional impairment and disease. The nutrient-sensing kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is a major determinant of ageing. mTOR promotes cell growth and controls central metabolic pathways including protein biosynthesis, autophagy and glucose and lipid homoeostasis. The concept that mTOR has a crucial role in ageing is supported by numerous reports on the lifespan-prolonging effects of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms. Dietary restriction increases lifespan and delays ageing phenotypes as well and mTOR has been assigned a major role in this process. This may suggest a causal relationship between the lifespan of an organism and its metabolic phenotype. More than 25 years after mTOR's discovery, a wealth of metabolic and ageing-related effects have been reported. In this review, we cover the current view on the contribution of the different elements of the mTOR signalling network to lifespan and age-related metabolic impairment. We specifically focus on distinct roles of isoforms and splice variants across the mTOR network. The comprehensive analysis of mouse knockout studies targeting these variants does not support a tight correlation between lifespan prolongation and improved metabolic phenotypes and questions the strict causal relationship between them. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. JAK kinases are required for the bacterial RNA and poly I:C induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand; Kumar, Aseem

    2013-01-01

    Discriminating the molecular patterns associated with RNA is central to innate immunity. The protein kinase PKR is a cytosolic sensor involved in the recognition of viral dsRNA and triggering interferon-induced signaling. Here, we identified bacterial RNA as a novel distinct pattern recognized by PKR. We show that the tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR induced by either bacterial RNA or poly I:C is impaired in mutant cells lacking TYK2, JAK1, or JAK2 kinases. PKR was found to be a direct substrate for the activated JAKs. Our results indicated that the double-stranded structures of bacterial RNA are required to fully activate PKR. These results suggest that bacterial RNA signaling is analogous in some respects to that of viral RNA and interferons and may have implications in bacterial immunity. PMID:23236554

  9. Requirement for tyrosine phosphatase during serotonergic neuromodulation by protein kinase C.

    Catarsi, S; Drapeau, P

    1997-08-01

    Tyrosine kinases and phosphatases are abundant in the nervous system, where they signal cellular differentiation, mediate the responses to growth factors, and direct neurite outgrowth during development. Tyrosine phosphorylation can also alter ion channel activity, but its physiological significance remains unclear. In an identified leech mechanosensory neuron, the ubiquitous neuromodulator serotonin increases the activity of a cation channel by activating protein kinase C (PKC), resulting in membrane depolarization and modulation of the receptive field properties. We observed that the effects on isolated neurons and channels were blocked by inhibiting tyrosine phosphatases. Serotonergic stimulation of PKC thus activates a tyrosine phosphatase activity associated with the channels, which reverses their constitutive inhibition by tyrosine phosphorylation, representing a novel form of neuromodulation.

  10. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway

    Bryan Victor Phillips-Farfan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway.

  11. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-01-01

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G 1 phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  12. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a novel target of curcumin, is required for B lymphoma growth.

    Gururajan, Murali; Dasu, Trivikram; Shahidain, Seif; Jennings, C Darrell; Robertson, Darrell A; Rangnekar, Vivek M; Bondada, Subbarao

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a component of dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been shown in recent studies to have therapeutic potential in the treatment of cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and osteoporosis. We investigated the ability of curcumin to modulate the growth of B lymphomas. Curcumin inhibited the growth of both murine and human B lymphoma in vitro and murine B lymphoma in vivo. We also demonstrate that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of B lymphoma is through inhibition of the survival kinase Akt and its key target Bad. However, in vitro kinase assays show that Akt is not a direct target of curcumin. We identified a novel target for curcumin in B lymphoma viz spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). Syk is constitutively activated in primary tumors and B lymphoma cell lines and curcumin down-modulates Syk activity accompanied by down-regulation of Akt activation. Moreover, we show that overexpression of Akt, a target of Syk, or Bcl-x(L), a target of Akt can overcome curcumin-induced apoptosis of B lymphoma cells. These observations suggest a novel growth promoting role for Syk in lymphoma cells.

  13. Association of MTOR and AKT Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility and Survival of Gastric Cancer.

    Ying Piao

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway plays a critical role in angiogenesis and cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. Genetic diversity in key factors of this pathway may influence protein function and signal transduction, contributing to disease initiation and progression. Studies suggest that MTOR rs1064261 and AKT rs1130233 polymorphisms are associated with risk and/or prognosis of multiple cancer types. However, this relationship with gastric cancer (GC remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MTOR and AKT polymorphisms in the risk and prognosis of GC.The Sequenom MassARRAY platform was used to genotype 1842 individuals for MTOR rs1064261 T→C and AKT rs1130233 G→A polymorphisms. ELISA was used to detect Helicobacter pylori antibodies in serum. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect total and phosphorylated MTOR and AKT proteins.The MTOR rs1064261 (TC+CC genotype and the AKT rs1130233 (GA+AA genotype were associated with increased risk of GC in men (P = 0.049, P = 0.030. In H. pylori-negative individuals, the AKT rs1130233 GA and (GA+AA genotypes were related to increased risk of atrophic gastritis (AG; P = 0.012, P = 0.024. Notably, the AKT rs1130233 (GA+AA genotype demonstrated significant interactions with H. pylori in disease progression from healthy controls (CON to AG (P = 0.013 and from AG to GC (P = 0.049. Additionally, for individuals with the AKT rs1130233 variant, those in the H. pylori-positive group had higher levels of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT expression. The AKT rs1130233 genotype was found to be associated with clinicopathological parameters including lymph node metastasis and alcohol drinking (P<0.05.MTOR rs1064261and AKT rs1130233 polymorphisms were associated with increased GC risk in males and increased AG risk in H. pylori-negative individuals. A significant

  14. Hydrophobic interaction between the SH2 domain and the kinase domain is required for the activation of Csk.

    Mikkola, Esa T; Gahmberg, Carl G

    2010-06-18

    The protein tyrosine kinase C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) is activated by the engagement of its Src homology (SH) 2 domain. However, the molecular mechanism required for this is not completely understood. The crystal structure of the active Csk indicates that Csk could be activated by contact between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop in the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. To study the importance of this interaction for the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk, we mutated the amino acid residues forming the contacts between the SH2 domain and the beta3-alphaC loop. The mutation of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to glycine and of the SH2 domain Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 to alanine resulted in the inability of the SH2 domain ligand to activate Csk. Furthermore, the overexpressed Csk mutants A228G, Y133A/Y116A, L138A, and L149A were unable to efficiently inactivate endogenous Src in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The results suggest that the SH2-domain-mediated activation of Csk is dependent on the binding of the beta3-alphaC loop Ala228 to the hydrophobic pocket formed by the side chains of Tyr116, Tyr133, Leu138, and Leu149 on the surface of the SH2 domain. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The mTOR inhibitor sirolimus suppresses renal, hepatic, and cardiac tissue cellular respiration.

    Albawardi, Alia; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Saraswathiamma, Dhanya; Abdul-Kader, Hidaya Mohammed; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Alfazari, Ali S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to develop a useful biomarker (e.g., cellular respiration, or mitochondrial O2 consumption) for measuring activities of mTOR inhibitors. It measured the effects of commonly used immunosuppressants (sirolimus-rapamycin, tacrolimus, and cyclosporine) on cellular respiration in target tissues (kidney, liver, and heart) from C57BL/6 mice. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/ threonine kinase that supports nutrient-dependent cell growth and survival, is known to control energy conversion processes within the mitochondria. Consistently, inhibitors of mTOR (e.g., rapamycin, also known as sirolimus or Rapamune®) have been shown to impair mitochondrial function. Inhibitors of the calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin (e.g., tacrolimus and cyclosporine), on the other hand, strictly prevent lymphokine production leading to a reduced T-cell function. Sirolimus (10 μM) inhibited renal (22%, P=0.002), hepatic (39%, Prespiration. Tacrolimus and cyclosporine had no or minimum effects on cellular respiration in these tissues. Thus, these results clearly demonstrate that impaired cellular respiration (bioenergetics) is a sensitive biomarker of the immunosuppressants that target mTOR.

  16. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: The mTOR pathway as an antiepileptogenic target

    Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Gorter, Jan A.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mTOR signaling pathway regulates cell growth, differentiation, proliferation and metabolism. Loss of function mutations in upstream regulators of mTOR have been highly associated with dysplasias, epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders. These include tuberous sclerosis, which is due to mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 genes, mutations in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) as in Cowden syndrome, polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) due to mutations in the STE20-related kinase adaptor alpha (STRADalpha), and neurofibromatosis type 1 attributed to neurofibromin 1 mutations. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway with rapamycin may prevent epilepsy and improve the underlying pathology in mouse models with disrupted mTOR signaling, due to PTEN or TSC mutations. However the timing and duration of its administration appear critical in defining the seizure and pathology-related outcomes. Rapamycin application in human cortical slices from patients with cortical dysplasias reduces the 4-aminopyridine induced oscillations. In the multiple-hit model of infantile spasms, pulse high dose rapamycin administration can reduce the cortical overactivation of the mTOR pathway, suppresses spasms and has disease-modifying effects by partially improving cognitive deficits. In post-status epilepticus models of temporal lobe epilepsy, rapamycin may ameliorate the development of epilepsy-related pathology and reduce the expression of spontaneous seizures, but its effects depend on the timing and duration of administration, and possibly the model used. The observed recurrence of seizures and epilepsy-related pathology after rapamycin discontinuation suggests the need for continuous administration to maintain the benefit. However, the use of pulse administration protocols may be useful in certain age-specific epilepsy syndromes, like infantile spasms, whereas repetitive pulse rapamycin protocols may suffice to sustain a long-term benefit in genetic disorders

  17. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunits in skeletal muscle mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy-sensing protein in skeletal muscle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates translation initiation and protein synthesis through ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). AMPK...... activation reduces muscle protein synthesis by down-regulating mTOR signaling, whereas insulin mediates mTOR signaling via Akt activation. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated inhibitory effects on mTOR signaling depend on catalytic alpha2 and regulatory gamma3 subunits. Extensor digitorum longus muscle from...... (Thr37/46) (P mTOR targets, suggesting mTOR signaling is blocked by prior AMPK activation. The AICAR-induced inhibition was partly rescued...

  18. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  19. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    Shimada, Midori; Yamamoto, Ayumu; Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi; Aiba, Hirofumi; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2 + . The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  20. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    Feng, Xue [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Ling [Department of Brain Cognition Computing Lab, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zheng, Jianhua, E-mail: zhengjianhua1115@126.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  1. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    Feng, Xue; Li, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells

  2. Sphingosine kinase 1 is required for mesothelioma cell proliferation: role of histone acetylation.

    Satish Kalari

    Full Text Available Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM is a devastating disease with an overall poor prognosis. Despite the recent advances in targeted molecular therapies, there is a clear and urgent need for the identification of novel mesothelioma targets for the development of highly efficacious therapeutics.In this study, we report that the expression of Sphingosine Kinase 1 (SphK1 protein was preferentially elevated in MPM tumor tissues (49 epithelioid and 13 sarcomatoid compared to normal tissue (n = 13. In addition, we also observed significantly elevated levels of SphK1 and SphK2 mRNA and SphK1 protein expression in MPM cell lines such as H2691, H513 and H2461 compared to the non-malignant mesothelial Met5 cells. The underlying mechanism appears to be mediated by SphK1 induced upregulation of select gene transcription programs such as that of CBP/p300 and PCAF, two histone acetyl transferases (HAT, and the down regulation of cell cycle dependent kinase inhibitor genes such as p27Kip1 and p21Cip1. In addition, using immunoprecipitates of anti-acetylated histone antibody from SphK inhibitor, SphK-I2 treated Met5A and H2691 cell lysates, we also showed activation of other cell proliferation related genes, such as Top2A (DNA replication, AKB (chromosome remodeling and mitotic spindle formation, and suppression of p21 CIP1 and p27KIP1. The CDK2, HAT1 and MYST2 were, however, unaffected in the above study. Using SphK inhibitor and specific siRNA targeting either SphK1 or SphK2, we also unequivocally established that SphK1, but not SphK2, promotes H2691 mesothelioma cell proliferation. Using a multi-walled carbon nanotubes induced peritoneal mesothelioma mouse model, we showed that the SphK1-/- null mice exhibited significantly less inflammation and granulamatous nodules compared to their wild type counterparts.The lipid kinase SphK1 plays a positive and essential role in the growth and development of malignant mesothelioma and is therefore a likely

  3. Leucine supplementation of a chronically restricted protein and energy diet enhances mTOR pathway activation but not muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

    Manjarín, Rodrigo; Columbus, Daniel A; Suryawan, Agus; Nguyen, Hanh V; Hernandez-García, Adriana D; Hoang, Nguyet-Minh; Fiorotto, Marta L; Davis, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrient intake represents a limiting factor for growth and long-term survival of low-birth weight infants. The objective of this study was to determine if in neonates who can consume only 70 % of their protein and energy requirements for 8 days, enteral leucine supplementation will upregulate the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in skeletal muscle, leading to an increase in protein synthesis and muscle anabolism. Nineteen 4-day-old piglets were fed by gastric tube 1 of 3 diets, containing (kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) 16 g protein and 190 kcal (CON), 10.9 g protein and 132 kcal (R), or 10.8 g protein + 0.2 % leucine and 136 kcal (RL) at 4-h intervals for 8 days. On day 8, plasma AA and insulin levels were measured during 6 post-feeding intervals, and muscle protein synthesis rate and mTOR signaling proteins were determined at 120 min post-feeding. At 120 min, leucine was highest in RL (P protein synthesis, phosphorylation of S6 kinase (p-S6K1) and 4E-binding protein (p-4EBP1), and activation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4 complex (eIF4E · eIF4G). RL increased (P ≤ 0.01) p-S6K1, p-4EBP1 and eIF4E · eIF4G compared to R. In conclusion, when protein and energy intakes are restricted for 8 days, leucine supplementation increases muscle mTOR activation, but does not improve body weight gain or enhance skeletal muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs.

  4. Phosphorylation of SLP-76 by the ZAP-70 protein-tyrosine kinase is required for T-cell receptor function.

    Bubeck Wardenburg, J; Fu, C; Jackman, J K; Flotow, H; Wilkinson, S E; Williams, D H; Johnson, R; Kong, G; Chan, A C; Findell, P R

    1996-08-16

    Two families of tyrosine kinases, the Src and Syk families, are required for T-cell receptor activation. While the Src kinases are responsible for phosphorylation of receptor-encoded signaling motifs and for up-regulation of ZAP-70 activity, the downstream substrates of ZAP-70 are unknown. Evidence is presented herein that the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is a substrate of ZAP-70. Phosphorylation of SLP-76 is diminished in T cells that express a catalytically inactive ZAP-70. Moreover, SLP-76 is preferentially phosphorylated by ZAP-70 in vitro and in heterologous cellular systems. In T cells, overexpression of wild-type SLP-76 results in a hyperactive receptor, while expression of a SLP-76 molecule that is unable to be tyrosine-phosphorylated attenuates receptor function. In addition, the SH2 domain of SLP-76 is required for T-cell receptor function, although its role is independent of the ability of SLP-76 to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation. As SLP-76 interacts with both Grb2 and phospholipase C-gamma1, these data indicate that phosphorylation of SLP-76 by ZAP-70 provides an important functional link between the T-cell receptor and activation of ras and calcium pathways.

  5. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The novel chloroplast outer membrane kinase KOC1 is a required component of the plastid protein import machinery.

    Zufferey, Mónica; Montandon, Cyrille; Douet, Véronique; Demarsy, Emilie; Agne, Birgit; Baginsky, Sacha; Kessler, Felix

    2017-04-28

    The biogenesis and maintenance of cell organelles such as mitochondria and chloroplasts require the import of many proteins from the cytosol, a process that is controlled by phosphorylation. In the case of chloroplasts, the import of hundreds of different proteins depends on translocons at the outer and inner chloroplast membrane (TOC and TIC, respectively) complexes. The essential protein TOC159 functions thereby as an import receptor. It has an N-terminal acidic (A-) domain that extends into the cytosol, controls receptor specificity, and is highly phosphorylated in vivo However, kinases that phosphorylate the TOC159 A-domain to enable protein import have remained elusive. Here, using co-purification with TOC159 from Arabidopsis , we discovered a novel component of the chloroplast import machinery, the regulatory kinase at the outer chloroplast membrane 1 (KOC1). We found that KOC1 is an integral membrane protein facing the cytosol and stably associates with TOC. Moreover, KOC1 phosphorylated the A-domain of TOC159 in vitro , and in mutant koc1 chloroplasts, preprotein import efficiency was diminished. koc1 Arabidopsis seedlings had reduced survival rates after transfer from the dark to the light in which protein import into plastids is required to rapidly complete chloroplast biogenesis. In summary, our data indicate that KOC1 is a functional component of the TOC machinery that phosphorylates import receptors, supports preprotein import, and contributes to efficient chloroplast biogenesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. CK2 phospho-dependent binding of R2TP complex to TEL2 is essential for mTOR and SMG1 stability.

    Horejsí, Zuzana; Takai, Hiroyuki; Adelman, Carrie A; Collis, Spencer J; Flynn, Helen; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; de Lange, Titia; Boulton, Simon J

    2010-09-24

    TEL2 interacts with and is essential for the stability of all phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs), but its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we show that TEL2 is constitutively phosphorylated on conserved serines 487 and 491 by casein kinase 2 (CK2). Proteomic analyses establish that the CK2 phosphosite of TEL2 confers binding to the R2TP/prefoldin-like complex, which possesses chaperon/prefoldin activities required during protein complex assembly. The PIH1D1 subunit of the R2TP complex binds directly to the CK2 phosphosite of TEL2 in vitro and is required for the TEL2-R2TP/prefoldin-like complex interaction in vivo. Although the CK2 phosphosite mutant of TEL2 retains association with the PIKKs and HSP90 in cells, failure to interact with the R2TP/prefoldin-like complex results in instability of the PIKKs, principally mTOR and SMG1. We propose that TEL2 acts as a scaffold to coordinate the activities of R2TP/prefoldin-like and HSP90 chaperone complexes during the assembly of the PIKKs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  9. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action

  10. Correlation between telomerase and mTOR pathway in cancer stem cells.

    Dogan, Fatma; Biray Avci, Cigir

    2018-01-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are defined as a subset of tumor cells, are able to self-renew, proliferate, differentiate similar to normal stem cells. Therefore, targeting CSCs has been considered as a new approach in cancer therapy. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase which plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, cell growth, self-renewal in CSCs. On the other hand, hTERT overactivation provides replicative feature and immortality to CSCs, so the stemness and replicative properties of CSCs depend on telomerase activity. Therefore hTERT/telomerase activity may become a universal biomarker for anticancer therapy and it is an attractive therapeutic target for CSCs. It is known that mTOR regulates telomerase activity at the translational and post-translational level. Researchers show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduces telomerase activity without changing hTERT mRNA activity. Correlation between mTOR and hTERT is important for survival and immortality of cancer cells. In addition, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway and hTERT up-regulation are related with cancer stemness features and drug resistance. mTOR inhibitor and TERT inhibitor combination may construct a novel strategy in cancer stem cells and it can make a double effect on telomerase enzyme. Consequently, inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway components and hTERT activation may prohibit CSC self-renewal and surpass CSC-mediated resistance in order to develop new cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-proliferative effect of metformin on a feline injection site sarcoma cell line independent of Mtor inhibition.

    Pierro, J; Saba, C; McLean, K; Williams, R; Karpuzoglu, E; Prater, R; Hoover, K; Gogal, R

    2017-10-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic drug that has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation via up-regulation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase), and possibly inhibition of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metformin on a feline injection site sarcoma cell line. Cells from a feline injection site sarcoma cell line were treated with metformin at varied concentrations. A dose-dependent decrease in cell viability following metformin treatment was observed, with an IC50 of 8.0mM. Using flow cytometry, the mechanism of cell death was determined to be apoptosis or necrosis. To evaluate the role of mTOR inhibition in metformin-induced cell death, Western blot was performed. No inhibition of mTOR or phosphorylated mTOR was found. Although metformin treatment leads to apoptotic or necrotic cell death in feline injection site sarcoma cells, the mechanism does not appear to be mediated by mTOR inhibition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase γ is required for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    Norinne Lacerda-Queiroz

    Full Text Available Experimental cerebral malaria (ECM is characterized by a strong immune response, with leukocyte recruitment, blood-brain barrier breakdown and hemorrhage in the central nervous system. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ is central in signaling diverse cellular functions. Using PI3Kγ-deficient mice (PI3Kγ-/- and a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor, we investigated the relevance of PI3Kγ for the outcome and the neuroinflammatory process triggered by Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA infection. Infected PI3Kγ-/- mice had greater survival despite similar parasitemia levels in comparison with infected wild type mice. Histopathological analysis demonstrated reduced hemorrhage, leukocyte accumulation and vascular obstruction in the brain of infected PI3Kγ-/- mice. PI3Kγ deficiency also presented lower microglial activation (Iba-1+ reactive microglia and T cell cytotoxicity (Granzyme B expression in the brain. Additionally, on day 6 post-infection, CD3+CD8+ T cells were significantly reduced in the brain of infected PI3Kγ-/- mice when compared to infected wild type mice. Furthermore, expression of CD44 in CD8+ T cell population in the brain tissue and levels of phospho-IkB-α in the whole brain were also markedly lower in infected PI3Kγ-/- mice when compared with infected wild type mice. Finally, AS605240, a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor, significantly delayed lethality in infected wild type mice. In brief, our results indicate a pivotal role for PI3Kγ in the pathogenesis of ECM.

  13. LIM kinase activity is required for microtubule organising centre positioning in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Li, Xin; Zhu, Yubo; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Du, Juan; Tian, Jianhui; Liang, Yuanjing; Ma, Wei

    2017-04-01

    LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) activity is essential for cell migration and cell cycle progression. Little is known about LIMK1 expression and function in mammalian oocytes. In the present study we assessed LIMK1 protein expression, subcellular distribution and function during mouse oocyte meiosis. Western blot analysis revealed high and stable expression of LIMK1 from the germinal vesicle (GV) to MII stage. In contrast, activated LIMK1 (i.e. LIMK1 phosphorylated at threonine 508 (pLIMK1 Thr508 )) was only detected after GV breakdown, with levels increasing gradually to peak at MI and MII. Immunofluorescence showed pLIMK1 Thr508 was colocalised with the microtubule organising centre (MTOC) components pericentrin and γ-tubulin at the spindle poles. A direct interaction between γ-tubulin and pLIMK1 Thr508 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. LIMK inhibition with 1μM BMS3 damaged MTOC protein localisation to spindle poles, undermined the formation and positioning of functional MTOC and thus disrupted spindle formation and chromosome alignment. These effects were phenocopied by microinjection of LIMK1 antibody into mouse oocytes. In summary, the data demonstrate that LIMK activity is essential for MTOC organisation and distribution and so bipolar spindle formation and maintenance in mouse oocytes.

  14. Focal adhesion kinase is required for actin polymerization and remodeling of the cytoskeleton during sperm capacitation

    Roa-Espitia, Ana L.; Hernández-Rendón, Eva R.; Baltiérrez-Hoyos, Rafael; Muñoz-Gotera, Rafaela J.; Cote-Vélez, Antonieta; Jiménez, Irma; González-Márquez, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several focal adhesion proteins are known to cooperate with integrins to link the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton; as a result, many intracellular signaling pathways are activated and several focal adhesion complexes are formed. However, how these proteins function in mammalian spermatozoa remains unknown. We confirm the presence of focal adhesion proteins in guinea pig spermatozoa, and we explore their role during capacitation and the acrosome reaction, and their relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest the presence of a focal adhesion complex formed by β1-integrin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, vinculin, talin, and α-actinin in the acrosomal region. Inhibition of FAK during capacitation affected the protein tyrosine phosphorylation associated with capacitation that occurs within the first few minutes of capacitation, which caused the acrosome reaction to become increasingly Ca2+ dependent and inhibited the polymerization of actin. The integration of vinculin and talin into the complex, and the activation of FAK and paxillin during capacitation, suggests that the complex assembles at this time. We identify that vinculin and α-actinin increase their interaction with F-actin while it remodels during capacitation, and that during capacitation focal adhesion complexes are structured. FAK contributes to acrosome integrity, likely by regulating the polymerization and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27402964

  15. A Myb transcription factor of Phytophthora sojae, regulated by MAP kinase PsSAK1, is required for zoospore development.

    Meng Zhang

    Full Text Available PsSAK1, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase from Phytophthora sojae, plays an important role in host infection and zoospore viability. However, the downstream mechanism of PsSAK1 remains unclear. In this study, the 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE profiling method was applied to sequence the global transcriptional sequence of PsSAK1-silenced mutants during the cysts stage and 1.5 h after inoculation onto susceptible soybean leaf tissues. Compared with the gene expression levels of the recipient P. sojae strain, several candidates of Myb family were differentially expressed (up or down in response to the loss of PsSAK1, including of a R2R3-type Myb transcription factor, PsMYB1. qRT-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of PsMYB1 decreased due to PsSAK1 silencing. The transcriptional level of PsMYB1 increased during sporulating hyphae, in germinated cysts, and early infection. Silencing of PsMYB1 results in three phenotypes: a no cleavage of the cytoplasm into uninucleate zoospores or release of normal zoospores, b direct germination of sporangia, and c afunction in zoospore-mediated plant infection. Our data indicate that the PsMYB1 transcription factor functions downstream of MAP kinase PsSAK1 and is required for zoospore development of P. sojae.

  16. Specific primary sequence requirements for Aurora B kinase-mediated phosphorylation and subcellular localization of TMAP during mitosis.

    Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kwon, Hye-Rim; Bae, Chang-Dae; Park, Joobae; Hong, Kyung U

    2010-05-15

    During mitosis, regulation of protein structures and functions by phosphorylation plays critical roles in orchestrating a series of complex events essential for the cell division process. Tumor-associated microtubule-associated protein (TMAP), also known as cytoskeleton-associated protein 2 (CKAP2), is a novel player in spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. We have previously reported that TMAP is phosphorylated at multiple residues specifically during mitosis. However, the mechanisms and functional importance of phosphorylation at most of the sites identified are currently unknown. Here, we report that TMAP is a novel substrate of the Aurora B kinase. Ser627 of TMAP was specifically phosphorylated by Aurora B both in vitro and in vivo. Ser627 and neighboring conserved residues were strictly required for efficient phosphorylation of TMAP by Aurora B, as even minor amino acid substitutions of the phosphorylation motif significantly diminished the efficiency of the substrate phosphorylation. Nearly all mutations at the phosphorylation motif had dramatic effects on the subcellular localization of TMAP. Instead of being localized to the chromosome region during late mitosis, the mutants remained associated with microtubules and centrosomes throughout mitosis. However, the changes in the subcellular localization of these mutants could not be completely explained by the phosphorylation status on Ser627. Our findings suggest that the motif surrounding Ser627 ((625) RRSRRL (630)) is a critical part of a functionally important sequence motif which not only governs the kinase-substrate recognition, but also regulates the subcellular localization of TMAP during mitosis.

  17. Characteristic mTOR activity in Hodgkin-lymphomas offers a potential therapeutic target in high risk disease – a combined tissue microarray, in vitro and in vivo study

    Márk, Ágnes; Kopper, László; Sebestyén, Anna; Hajdu, Melinda; Váradi, Zsófia; Sticz, Tamás Béla; Nagy, Noémi; Csomor, Judit; Berczi, Lajos; Varga, Viktória; Csóka, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Targeting signaling pathways is an attractive approach in many malignancies. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is activated in a number of human neoplasms, accompanied by lower overall and/or disease free survival. mTOR kinase inhibitors have been introduced in the therapy of renal cell carcinoma and mantle cell lymphoma, and several trials are currently underway. However, the pathological characterization of mTOR activity in lymphomas is still incomplete. mTOR activity and the elements of mTOR complexes were investigated by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays representing different human non-Hodgkin-lymphomas (81 cases) and Hodgkin-lymphomas (87 cases). The expression of phospho-mTOR, phospho-4EBP1, phospho-p70S6K, phospho-S6, Rictor, Raptor and Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin and NF-kappaB-p50 were evaluated, and mTOR activity was statistically analyzed along with 5-year survival data. The in vitro and in vivo effect of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin was also examined in human Hodgkin-lymphoma cell lines. The majority (>50%) of mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin-lymphoma cases showed higher mTOR activity compared to normal lymphoid tissues. Hodgkin-lymphoma was characterized by high mTOR activity in 93% of the cases, and Bcl-xL and NF-kappaB expression correlated with this mTOR activity. High mTOR activity was observed in the case of both favorable and unfavorable clinical response. Low mTOR activity was accompanied by complete remission and at least 5-year disease free survival in Hodgkin-lymphoma patients. However, statistical analysis did not identify correlation beetween mTOR activity and different clinical data of HL patients, such as survival. We also found that Rictor (mTORC2) was not overexpressed in Hodgkin-lymphoma biopsies and cell lines. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in Hodgkin-lymphoma cells both in vitro and in vivo, moreover, it increased the apoptotic

  18. Requirement of Sequences outside the Conserved Kinase Domain of Fission Yeast Rad3p for Checkpoint Control

    Chapman, Carolyn Riley; Evans, Sarah Tyler; Carr, Antony M.; Enoch, Tamar

    1999-01-01

    The fission yeast Rad3p checkpoint protein is a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related family of protein kinases, which includes human ATMp. Mutation of the ATM gene is responsible for the disease ataxia-telangiectasia. The kinase domain of Rad3p has previously been shown to be essential for function. Here, we show that although this domain is necessary, it is not sufficient, because the isolated kinase domain does not have kinase activity in vitro and cannot complement a rad3 deletion strain. Using dominant negative alleles of rad3, we have identified two sites N-terminal to the conserved kinase domain that are essential for Rad3p function. One of these sites is the putative leucine zipper, which is conserved in other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related family members. The other is a novel motif, which may also mediate Rad3p protein–protein interactions. PMID:10512862

  19. mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-induced, cultured immature boar Sertoli cell proliferation via regulating the expression of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1.

    Yang, Wei-Rong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Jia-Hua; Lu, Cheng; Wang, Xian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is known to be involved in mammalian cell proliferation, while S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) plays a vital role in the cell cycle. Within the testis, estrogen also plays an important role in Sertoli cell proliferation, although it is not clear how. The present study asked if mTOR is involved in 17β-estradiol-dependent Sertoli cell proliferation. We specifically assessed if extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and/or phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) exert convergent effects toward the activation of mTOR signaling, and if this signaling regulates the expression of SKP2 through retinoblastoma (RB) and early mitotic inhibitor 1 (EMI1) protein and on CCNE1 and CCND1 mRNA levels. Treatment with 17β-estradiol for 15-90 min activated mTOR, with mTOR phosphorylation peaking after 30 min. U0126 (5 μM), a specific inhibitor of (MEK1/2), and 10-DEBC (2 μM), a selective inhibitor of AKT, both significantly reduced 17β-estradiol-induced phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced Sertoli cell proliferation, appearing to act by reducing the abundance of SKP2, CCND1, and CCNE1 mRNA as well as RB and EMI1 protein. These data indicated that 17β-estradiol enhances Sertoli cell proliferation via mTOR activation, which involves both ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling. Activated mTOR subsequently increases SKP2 mRNA and protein expression by enhancing the expression of CCND1 and CCNE1, and inhibits SKP2 protein degradation by increasing EMI1 abundance. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Focal Adhesion Kinase Is Required for Intestinal Regeneration and Tumorigenesis Downstream of Wnt/c-Myc Signaling

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration following DNA damage. Given Wnt/c-Myc signaling is activated following intestinal regeneration, we investigated the functional importance of FAK following deletion of the Apc tumor suppressor protein within the intestinal epithelium. Following Apc loss, FAK expression increased in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Codeletion of Apc and Fak strongly reduced proliferation normally induced following Apc loss, and this was associated with reduced levels of phospho-Akt and suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc heterozygous mice. Thus, FAK is required downstream of Wnt Signaling, for Akt/mTOR activation, intestinal regeneration, and tumorigenesis. Importantly, this work suggests that FAK inhibitors may suppress tumorigenesis in patients at high risk of developing colorectal cancer. PMID:20708588

  1. Casein kinase II is required for the spindle assembly checkpoint by regulating Mad2p in fission yeast

    Shimada, Midori [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Yamamoto, Ayumu [Department of Chemistry, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Sizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Murakami-Tonami, Yuko; Nakanishi, Makoto; Yoshida, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Aiba, Hirofumi [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Agriculture, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Murakami, Hiroshi, E-mail: hmura@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2009-10-23

    The spindle checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Here we show that fission yeast casein kinase II (CK2) is required for this checkpoint function. In the CK2 mutants mitosis occurs in the presence of a spindle defect, and the spindle checkpoint protein Mad2p fails to localize to unattached kinetochores. The CK2 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule depolymerising drug thiabendazole, which is counteracted by ectopic expression of mad2{sup +}. The level of Mad2p is low in the CK2 mutants. These results suggest that CK2 has a role in the spindle checkpoint by regulating Mad2p.

  2. Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase.

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Asmat, Tauseef M; Dierdorf, Nina I; Hauck, Christof R; Hammerschmidt, Sven

    2010-11-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae are commensals of the human nasopharynx with the capacity to invade mucosal respiratory cells. PspC, a pneumococcal surface protein, interacts with the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) to promote bacterial adherence to and invasion into epithelial cells. Internalization of pneumococci requires the coordinated action of actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and the retrograde machinery of pIgR. Here, we demonstrate the involvement of Src protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in pneumococcal invasion via pIgR. Pharmacological inhibitors of PTKs and MAPKs and genetic interference with Src PTK and FAK functions caused a significant reduction of pIgR-mediated pneumococcal invasion but did not influence bacterial adhesion to host cells. Furthermore, pneumococcal ingestion by host cells induces activation of ERK1/2 and JNK. In agreement with activated JNK, its target molecule and DNA-binding protein c-Jun was phosphorylated. We also show that functionally active Src PTK is essential for activation of ERK1/2 upon pneumococcal infections. In conclusion, these data illustrate the importance of a coordinated signaling between Src PTKs, ERK1/2, and JNK during PspC-pIgR-mediated uptake of pneumococci by host epithelial cells.

  3. Sepsis and mechnaical ventilation restrain translation initiation in skeletal muscle by inducing AMPK-associated TSC[2] restriction of mTOR signaling in pigs

    In skeletal muscle, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a cellular energy sensor of AMP: ATP and modulates translation by repressing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Endotoxin (LPS)-induced sepsis reduces muscle protein synthesis by blunting translation initiation. We hypothe...

  4. PRKCI negatively regulates autophagy via PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR signaling

    Qu, Liujing; Li, Ge; Xia, Dan; Hongdu, Beiqi; Xu, Chentong; Lin, Xin [Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, Peking University Health Sciences Center, Beijing (China); Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Chen, Yingyu, E-mail: yingyu_chen@bjmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Medical Immunology, Ministry of Health, Peking University Health Sciences Center, Beijing (China); Peking University Center for Human Disease Genomics, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2016-02-05

    The atypical protein kinase C isoform PRKC iota (PRKCI) plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and carcinogenesis, and it has been shown to be a human oncogene. Here, we show that PRKCI overexpression in U2OS cells impaired functional autophagy in normal or cell stress conditions, as characterized by decreased levels of light chain 3B-II protein (LC3B-II) and weakened degradation of endogenous and exogenous autophagic substrates. Conversely, PRKCI knockdown by small interference RNA resulted in opposite effects. Additionally, we identified two novel PRKCI mutants, PRKCI{sup L485M} and PRKCI{sup P560R}, which induced autophagy and exhibited dominant negative effects. Further studies indicated that PRKCI knockdown–mediated autophagy was associated with the inactivation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR) signaling. These data underscore the importance of PRKCI in the regulation of autophagy. Moreover, the finding may be useful in treating PRKCI-overexpressing carcinomas that are characterized by increased levels of autophagy. - Highlights: • The atypical protein kinase C iota isoform (PRKCI) is a human oncogene. • PRKCI overexpression impairs functional autophagy in U2OS cells. • It reduces LC3B-II levels and weakens SQSTM1 and polyQ80 aggregate degradation. • PRKCI knockdown has the opposite effect. • The effect of PRKCI knockdown is related to PIK3CA/AKT–MTOR signaling inactivation.

  5. mTOR inhibition in macrophages of asymptomatic HIV+ persons reverses the decrease in TLR4-mediated TNFα release through prolongation of MAPK pathway activation1

    Li, Xin; Han, Xinbing; Llano, Juliana; Bole, Medhavi; Zhou, Xiuqin; Swan, Katharine; Anandaiah, Asha; Nelson, Benjamin; Patel, Naimish R.; Reinach, Peter S.; Koziel, Henry; Tachado, Souvenir D.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mediated signaling is significantly impaired in macrophages from HIV+ persons predominantly due to altered MyD88-dependent pathway signaling caused in part by constitutive activation of PI3K. Here we assessed in these macrophages if the blunted increase in TLR4-mediated TNFα release induced by lipid A are associated with PI3K-induced upregulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. mTOR inhibition with rapamycin enhanced TLR4-mediated TNFα release, but instead suppressed anti-inflammatory IL-10 release. Targeted gene silencing of mTOR in macrophages resulted in lipid A-induced TNFα and IL-10 release patterns similar to those induced by rapamycin. Rapamycin restored MyD88-IRAK interaction in a dose-dependent manner. Targeted gene silencing of MyD88 (shRNA) and mTOR (RNAi) inhibition resulted in TLR4-mediated p70s6K activation and enhanced TNFα release, whereas IL-10 release was inhibited in both silenced and non-silenced HIV+ macrophages. Furthermore, mTOR inhibition augmented lipid A-induced TNFα release through enhanced and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 MAP kinases, which was associated with time-dependent MKP-1 destabilization. Taken together, impaired TLR4-mediated TNFα release in HIV+ macrophages is attributable in part to mTOR activation by constitutive PI3K expression in a MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These changes result in MKP-1 stabilization, which shortens and blunts MAP kinase activation. mTOR inhibition may serve as a potential therapeutic target to upregulate macrophage innate immune host defense responsiveness in HIV+ persons. PMID:22025552

  6. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-01-01

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of 35 S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  7. Role of the Phosphorylation of mTOR in the Differentiation of AML Cells Triggered with CD44 Antigen

    Darwish, Manar M

    2013-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematological disorder characterized by blockage of differentiation of myeloblasts. To date, the main therapy for AML is chemotherapy. Yet, studies are seeking a better treatment to enhance the survival rate of patients and minimize the relapsing of the disease. Since the major problem in these cells is that they are arrested in cellular differentiation, drugs that could induce their differentiation have proven to be efficient and of major interest for AML therapy. CD44 triggering appeared as a promising target for AML therapy as it has been shown that specific monoclonal antibodies, such as A3D8 and H90, reversed the blockage of differentiation, inhibited the proliferation of all AML subtypes, and in some cases, induced cell apoptosis. Studies conducted in our laboratory have added strength to these antibodies as potential treatment for AML. Indeed, our laboratory found that treating HL60 cells with A3D8 shows a decrease in the phosphorylation of the mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) kinase correlated with the inhibition of proliferation/induction of differentiation of AML cells.The relationship between the induction of differentiation and the inhibition of proliferation and the decrease of mTOR phosphorylation remains to be clarified. To study the importance of the de-phosphorylation of mTOR and the observed effect of CD44 triggering on differentiation and/or proliferation, we sought to prepare phospho-mimic mutants of the mTOR kinase that will code for a constitutively phosphorylated form of mTOR and used two main methods to express this mutant in HL60 cells: lentiviral and simple transfection (cationic-liposomal transfection).

  8. Differential requirements for Tousled-like kinases 1 and 2 in mammalian development

    Segura-Bayona, Sandra; Knobel, Philip A.; Gonzalez-Buron, Helena

    2017-01-01

    , RNA interference, cell cycle progression, viral latency, chromosome segregation and mitosis. However, little is known about the functions of TLK activity in vivo or the relative functions of the highly similar TLK1 and TLK2 in any cell type. To begin to address this, we have generated Tlk1- and Tlk2......-deficient mice. We found that while TLK1 was dispensable for murine viability, TLK2 loss led to late embryonic lethality because of placental failure. TLK2 was required for normal trophoblast differentiation and the phosphorylation of ASF1 was reduced in placentas lacking TLK2. Conditional bypass...... of the placental phenotype allowed the generation of apparently healthy Tlk2-deficient mice, while only the depletion of both TLK1 and TLK2 led to extensive genomic instability, indicating that both activities contribute to genome maintenance. Our data identifies a specific role for TLK2 in placental function...

  9. Up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 by ketamine requires glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition

    Grieco, Steven F.; Cheng, Yuyan; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eléonore

    2016-01-01

    An antidepressant dose of the rapidly-acting ketamine inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) in mouse hippocampus, and this inhibition is required for the antidepressant effect of ketamine in learned helplessness depression-like behavior. Here we report that treatment with an antidepressant dose of ketamine (10 mg/kg) increased expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in mouse hippocampus, an effect that required ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK3. Ketamine also inhibited hippocampal GSK3 and increased expression of hippocampal IGF2 in mice when administered after the induction of learned helplessness. Treatment with the specific GSK3 inhibitor L803-mts was sufficient to up-regulate hippocampal IGF2 expression. Administration of IGF2 siRNA reduced ketamine's antidepressant effect in the learned helplessness paradigm. Mice subjected to the learned helplessness paradigm were separated into two groups, those that were resilient (non-depressed) and those that were susceptible (depressed). Non-depressed resilient mice displayed higher expression of IGF2 than susceptible mice. These results indicate that IGF2 contributes to ketamine's antidepressant effect and that IGF2 may confer resilience to depression-like behavior. PMID:27542584

  10. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    Schuster, Susanne, E-mail: Susanne.Schuster@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gebhardt, Rolf [Institute of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Weiss, Thomas S. [Children' s University Hospital, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje [Center for Pediatric Research Leipzig, University Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Faculty of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Liebigstr. 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  11. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  12. Atypical protein kinase C activity is required for extracellular matrix degradation and invasion by Src-transformed cells.

    Rodriguez, Elena M; Dunham, Elizabeth E; Martin, G Steven

    2009-10-01

    Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) isoforms have been shown to mediate Src-dependent signaling in response to growth factor stimulation. To determine if aPKC activity contributes to the transformed phenotype of cells expressing oncogenic Src, we have examined the activity and function of aPKCs in 3T3 cells expressing viral Src (v-Src). aPKC activity and tyrosine phosphorylation were found to be elevated in some but not all clones of mouse fibroblasts expressing v-Src. aPKC activity was inhibited either by addition of a membrane-permeable pseudosubstrate, by expression of a dominant-negative aPKC, or by RNAi-mediated knockdown of specific aPKC isoforms. aPKC activity contributes to morphological transformation and stress fiber disruption, and is required for migration of Src-transformed cells and for their ability to polarize at the edge of a monolayer. The lambda isoform of aPKC is specifically required for invasion through extracellular matrix in Boyden chamber assays and for degradation of the extracellular matrix in in situ zymography assays. Tyrosine phosphorylation of aPKClambda is required for its ability to promote cell invasion. The defect in invasion upon aPKC inhibition appears to result from a defect in the assembly and/or function of podosomes, invasive adhesions on the ventral surface of the cell that are sites of protease secretion. aPKC was also found to localize to podosomes of v-Src transformed cells, suggesting a direct role for aPKC in podosome assembly and/or function. We conclude that basal or elevated aPKC activity is required for the ability of Src-transformed cells to degrade and invade the extracellular matrix. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Matriptase is required for the active form of hepatocyte growth factor induced Met, focal adhesion kinase and protein kinase B activation on neural stem/progenitor cell motility.

    Fang, Jung-Da; Lee, Sheau-Ling

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a chemoattractant and inducer for neural stem/progenitor (NS/P) cell migration. Although the type II transmembrane serine protease, matriptase (MTP) is an activator of the latent HGF, MTP is indispensable on NS/P cell motility induced by the active form of HGF. This suggests that MTP's action on NS/P cell motility involves mechanisms other than proteolytic activation of HGF. In the present study, we investigate the role of MTP in HGF-stimulated signaling events. Using specific inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (Akt) or focal adhesion kinase (FAK), we demonstrated that in NS/P cells HGF-activated c-Met induces PI3k-Akt signaling which then leads to FAK activation. This signaling pathway ultimately induces MMP2 expression and NS/P cell motility. Knocking down of MTP in NS/P cells with specific siRNA impaired HGF-stimulation of c-Met, Akt and FAK activation, blocked HGF-induced production of MMP2 and inhibited HGF-stimulated NS/P cell motility. MTP-knockdown NS/P cells cultured in the presence of recombinant protein of MTP protease domain or transfected with the full-length wild-type but not the protease-defected MTP restored HGF-responsive events in NS/P cells. In addition to functioning as HGF activator, our data revealed novel function of MTP on HGF-stimulated c-Met signaling activation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Androgen interacts with exercise through the mTOR pathway to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Zeng, Fanxing; Zhao, Hua; Liao, Jingwen

    2017-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of exogenous androgen and resistance exercise on skeletal muscle hypertrophy and the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling during the process. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham operation and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) implantation groups with subgroups subjected to sedentary conditions or resistance exercise (SHAM+SED, SHAM+EX, DHT+SED, and DHT+EX). The experimental procedure lasted for 10 days. The mRNA expression of androgen receptor (AR) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC), as well as the phosphorylation statuses of AR, mTOR, p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70 S6K ), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) were determined in the white gastrocnemius muscle. The cross sectional area and wet mass of the muscle were also measured. The cross sectional area and MHC expression were significantly higher in SHAM+EX, DHT+SED, and DHT+EX than in SHAM+SED. There was no significant difference among groups in muscle mass. The mRNA expression of AR and IGF-I and the phosphorylation of mTOR, p70 S6K , and 4EBP1 were significantly increased in DHT+SED and SHAM+EX and were significantly enhanced in DHT+EX compared with either DHT or exercise alone. These data show that DHT causes hypertrophy in skeletal muscle and that exercise has a synergistic effect on DHT-induced hypertrophy. Exercise enhances androgen-induced rapid anabolic action, which involves activation of the mTOR pathway.

  15. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein.

    Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2016-03-02

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors.

  16. The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes

    Cameron-Smith David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The branched-chain amino acid (BCAA leucine has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal muscle anabolism. Activation of anabolic signalling occurs via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR through an undefined mechanism. System A and L solute carriers transport essential amino acids across plasma membranes; however it remains unknown whether an exogenous supply of leucine regulates their gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic leucine stimulation of anabolic signalling and specific amino acid transporters, using cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells. Results Human myotubes were treated with leucine, insulin or co-treated with leucine and insulin for 30 min, 3 h or 24 h. Activation of mTOR signalling kinases were examined, together with putative nutrient sensor human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34 and gene expression of selected amino acid transporters. Phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K was transiently increased following leucine exposure, independently to insulin. hVps34 protein expression was also significantly increased. However, genes encoding amino acid transporters were differentially regulated by insulin and not leucine. Conclusions mTOR signalling is transiently activated by leucine within human myotubes independently of insulin stimulation. While this occurred in the absence of changes in gene expression of amino acid transporters, protein expression of hVps34 increased.

  17. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition

    Elizabeth M. MacDonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization and denervation (sciatic nerve resection atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy.

  18. Negative regulation of ciliary length by ciliary male germ cell-associated kinase (Mak) is required for retinal photoreceptor survival.

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Katoh, Kimiko; Kajimura, Naoko; Sato, Shigeru; Muraoka, Koichiro; Ueno, Shinji; Koyasu, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2010-12-28

    Cilia function as cell sensors in many organs, and their disorders are referred to as "ciliopathies." Although ciliary components and transport machinery have been well studied, regulatory mechanisms of ciliary formation and maintenance are poorly understood. Here we show that male germ cell-associated kinase (Mak) regulates retinal photoreceptor ciliary length and subcompartmentalization. Mak was localized both in the connecting cilia and outer-segment axonemes of photoreceptor cells. In the Mak-null retina, photoreceptors exhibit elongated cilia and progressive degeneration. We observed accumulation of intraflagellar transport 88 (IFT88) and IFT57, expansion of kinesin family member 3A (Kif3a), and acetylated α-tubulin signals in the Mak-null photoreceptor cilia. We found abnormal rhodopsin accumulation in the Mak-null photoreceptor cell bodies at postnatal day 14. In addition, overexpression of retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1), a microtubule-associated protein localized in outer-segment axonemes, induced ciliary elongation, and Mak coexpression rescued excessive ciliary elongation by RP1. The RP1 N-terminal portion induces ciliary elongation and increased intensity of acetylated α-tubulin labeling in the cells and is phosphorylated by Mak. These results suggest that Mak is essential for the regulation of ciliary length and is required for the long-term survival of photoreceptors.

  19. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A kinome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila Glia reveals that the RIO kinases mediate cell proliferation and survival through TORC2-Akt signaling in glioblastoma.

    Renee D Read

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor, is incurable with current therapies. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrate that glioblastomas frequently display mutations that activate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK and Pi-3 kinase (PI3K signaling pathways. In Drosophila melanogaster, activation of RTK and PI3K pathways in glial progenitor cells creates malignant neoplastic glial tumors that display many features of human glioblastoma. In both human and Drosophila, activation of the RTK and PI3K pathways stimulates Akt signaling along with other as-yet-unknown changes that drive oncogenesis. We used this Drosophila glioblastoma model to perform a kinome-wide genetic screen for new genes required for RTK- and PI3K-dependent neoplastic transformation. Human orthologs of novel kinases uncovered by these screens were functionally assessed in mammalian glioblastoma models and human tumors. Our results revealed that the atypical kinases RIOK1 and RIOK2 are overexpressed in glioblastoma cells in an Akt-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that overexpressed RIOK2 formed a complex with RIOK1, mTor, and mTor-complex-2 components, and that overexpressed RIOK2 upregulated Akt signaling and promoted tumorigenesis in murine astrocytes. Conversely, reduced expression of RIOK1 or RIOK2 disrupted Akt signaling and caused cell cycle exit, apoptosis, and chemosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by inducing p53 activity through the RpL11-dependent ribosomal stress checkpoint. These results imply that, in glioblastoma cells, constitutive Akt signaling drives RIO kinase overexpression, which creates a feedforward loop that promotes and maintains oncogenic Akt activity through stimulation of mTor signaling. Further study of the RIO kinases as well as other kinases identified in our Drosophila screen may reveal new insights into defects underlying glioblastoma and related cancers and may reveal new therapeutic opportunities for these cancers.

  1. mTOR dysregulation and tuberous sclerosis-related epilepsy

    Curatolo, Paolo; Moavero, Romina; van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Aronica, Eleonora

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has emerged as a key player for proper neural network development, and it is involved in epileptogenesis triggered by both genetic or acquired factors. Areas covered. The robust mTOR signaling deregulation observed in a large spectrum of epileptogenic

  2. Rho-associated kinase activity is required for proper morphogenesis of the inner cell mass in the mouse blastocyst.

    Laeno, Arlene May A; Tamashiro, Dana Ann A; Alarcon, Vernadeth B

    2013-11-01

    The blastocyst consists of the outer layer of trophectoderm and pluripotent inner cell mass (ICM), the precursor of the placenta and fetus, respectively. During blastocyst expansion, the ICM adopts a compact, ovoidal shape, whose proper morphology is crucial for normal embryogenesis. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), an effector of small GTPase RHO signaling, mediates the diverse cellular processes of morphogenesis, but its role in ICM morphogenesis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ROCK is required for cohesion of ICM cells and formation of segregated tissues called primitive endoderm (PrE) and epiblast (Epi) in the ICM of the mouse blastocyst. Blastocyst treatment with ROCK inhibitors Y-27632 and Fasudil caused widening or spreading of the ICM, and intermingling of PrE and Epi. Widening of ICM was independent of trophectoderm because isolated ICMs as well as colonies of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) also spread upon Y-27632 treatment. PrE, Epi, and trophectoderm cell numbers were similar between control and treated blastocysts, suggesting that ROCK inhibition affected ICM morphology but not lineage differentiation. Rock1 and Rock2 knockdown via RNA interference in mESC also induced spreading, supporting the conclusion that morphological defects caused by the pharmacological inhibitors were due to ROCK inactivation. When blastocysts were transferred into surrogates, implantation efficiencies were unaffected by ROCK inhibition, but treated blastocysts yielded greater fetal loss. These results show that proper ICM morphology is dependent on ROCK activity and is crucial for fetal development. Our studies have wider implication for improving efficiencies of human assisted reproductive technologies that diminish pregnancy loss and promote successful births.

  3. Three mitogen-activated protein kinases required for cell wall integrity contribute greatly to biocontrol potential of a fungal entomopathogen.

    Ying Chen

    Full Text Available Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 are three mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases constituting cell wall integrity (CWI pathway that may control multi-stress responses via crosstalk with high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG pathway in budding yeast. In this study, Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 orthologues in Beauveria bassiana were confirmed as the three-module cascade essential for CWI because cell wall impairment occurred in the hyphae and conidia of Δbck1, Δmkk1 and Δslt2 examined in multiple experiments. Strikingly, all the deletion mutants became more sensitive to hyperosmotic NaCl and sorbitol with the Western blot of Hog1 phosphorylation being weakened in Δbck1 and absent in Δmkk1 and Δslt2. Apart from crossing responses to cell wall perturbation and high osmolarity, three deletion mutants exhibited faster growth and conidiation on nutrition-rich medium, much less virulence to Galleria mellonella larvae, and higher sensitivity to nutritional, fungicidal, thermal and UV-B irradiative stresses, accompanied with less accumulation of intracellular mannitol and trehalose. Moreover, Δmkk1 and Δslt2 were equally more sensitive to all the stresses of different types except wet-heat stress than wild type and more or less different from Δbck1 in sensitivity to most of the stresses despite their null responses to two oxidants. All the changes in three deletion mutants were restored by each targeted gene complementation. Taken together, the CWI-required Bck1, Mkk1 and Slt2 are all positive, but differential, regulators of multi-stress tolerance and virulence perhaps due to interplay with the HOG pathway essential for osmoregulation, thereby contributing greatly to the biocontrol potential of the fungal entomopathogen.

  4. Critical analysis of the potential for therapeutic targeting of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR in gastric cancer

    Inokuchi M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mikito Inokuchi,1 Keiji Kato,1 Kazuyuki Kojima,2 Kenichi Sugihara1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Minimally Invasive Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Multidisciplinary treatment including chemotherapy has become the global standard of care for patients with metastatic gastric cancer (mGC; nonetheless, survival remains poor. Although many molecular-targeted therapies have been developed for various cancers, only anti-HER2 treatment has produced promising results in patients with mGC. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR plays a key role in cell proliferation, antiapoptosis, and metastasis in signaling pathways from the tyrosine kinase receptor, and its activation has been demonstrated in gastric cancer (GC cells. This review discusses the clinical relevance of mTOR in GC and examines its potential as a therapeutic target in patients with mGC. Preclinical studies in animal models suggest that suppression of the mTOR pathway inhibits the proliferation of GC cells and delays tumor progression. The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has been evaluated as second- or third-line treatment in clinical trials. Adverse events were well tolerated although the effectiveness of everolimus alone was limited. Everolimus is now being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy in Phase III clinical studies in this subgroup of patients. Two Phase III studies include exploratory biomarker research designed to evaluate the predictive value of the expression or mutation of molecules related to the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. These biomarker studies may lead to the realization of targeted therapy for selected patients with mGC in the future. Keywords: gastric cancer, mTOR, everolimus

  5. mTOR Inhibition Induces EGFR Feedback Activation in Association with Its Resistance to Human Pancreatic Cancer

    Feng Wei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is dysregulated in diverse cancers and contributes to tumor progression and drug resistance. The first generation of mTOR inhibitors have failed to show clinical efficiency in treating pancreatic cancers due in part to the feedback relief of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R-AKT signaling pathway. The second generation of mTOR inhibitors, such as AZD8055, could inhibit AKT activation upon mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2 inhibition. However, whether this generation of mTOR inhibitors can obtain satisfactory activities in pancreatic cancer therapy remains unclear. In this study, we found AZD8055 did not show great improvement compared with everolimus, AZD8055 induced a temporal inhibition of AKT kinase activities and AKT was then rephosphorylated. Additionally, we found that AZD8055-induced transient AKT inhibition increased the expression and activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR by releasing its transcriptional factors Fork-head box O 1/3a (FoxO1/3a, which might contribute to cell resistance to AZD8055. The in vitro and in vivo experiments further indicated the combination of AZD8055 and erlotinib synergistically inhibited the mTORC1/C2 signaling pathway, EGFR/AKT feedback activation, and cell growth, as well as suppressed the progression of pancreatic cancer in a xenograft model. This study provides a rationale and strategy for overcoming AZD8055 resistance by a combined treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  6. LMW-E/CDK2 Deregulates Acinar Morphogenesis, Induces Tumorigenesis, and Associates with the Activated b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR Pathway in Breast Cancer Patients

    Duong, MyLinh T.; Akli, Said; Wei, Caimiao; Wingate, Hannah F.; Liu, Wenbin; Lu, Yiling; Yi, Min; Mills, Gordon B.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2012-01-01

    -E requires CDK2–associated kinase activity to induce mammary tumor formation by disrupting acinar development. The b-Raf-ERK1/2-mTOR signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in breast cancer and can be suppressed by combination treatment with roscovitine plus either rapamycin or sorafenib. PMID:22479189

  7. Rotavirus NSP1 Requires Casein Kinase II-Mediated Phosphorylation for Hijacking of Cullin-RING Ligases.

    Davis, Kaitlin A; Morelli, Marco; Patton, John T

    2017-08-29

    The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 repurposes cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) to antagonize innate immune responses. By functioning as substrate adaptors of hijacked CRLs, NSP1 causes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of host proteins that are essential for expression of interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene products. The target of most human and porcine rotaviruses is the β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP), a regulator of NF-κB activation. β-TrCP recognizes a phosphorylated degron (DSGΦXS) present in the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB); phosphorylation of the IκB degron is mediated by IκB kinase (IKK). Because NSP1 contains a C-terminal IκB-like degron (ILD; DSGXS) that recruits β-TrCP, we investigated whether the NSP1 ILD is similarly activated by phosphorylation and whether this modification is required to trigger the incorporation of NSP1 into CRLs. Based on mutagenesis and phosphatase treatment studies, we found that both serine residues of the NSP1 ILD are phosphorylated, a pattern mimicking phosphorylation of IκB. A three-pronged approach using small-molecule inhibitors, small interfering RNAs, and mutagenesis demonstrated that NSP1 phosphorylation is mediated by the constitutively active casein kinase II (CKII), rather than IKK. In coimmunoprecipitation assays, we found that this modification was essential for NSP1 recruitment of β-TrCP and induced changes involving the NSP1 N-terminal RING motif that allowed formation of Cul3-NSP1 complexes. Taken together, our results indicate a highly regulated stepwise process in the formation of NSP1-Cul3 CRLs that is initiated by CKII phosphorylation of NSP1, followed by NSP1 recruitment of β-TrCP and ending with incorporation of the NSP1-β-TrCP complex into the CRL via interactions dependent on the highly conserved NSP1 RING motif. IMPORTANCE Rotavirus is a segmented double-stranded RNA virus that causes severe diarrhea in young children. A primary mechanism used by the

  8. JAK kinases are required for the bacterial RNA and poly I:C induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR

    Bleiblo, Farag; Michael, Paul; Brabant, Danielle; Ramana, Chilakamarti V; Tai, TC; Saleh, Mazen; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand; Kumar, Aseem

    2012-01-01

    Discriminating the molecular patterns associated with RNA is central to innate immunity. The protein kinase PKR is a cytosolic sensor involved in the recognition of viral dsRNA and triggering interferon-induced signaling. Here, we identified bacterial RNA as a novel distinct pattern recognized by PKR. We show that the tyrosine phosphorylation of PKR induced by either bacterial RNA or poly I:C is impaired in mutant cells lacking TYK2, JAK1, or JAK2 kinases. PKR was found to be a direct substra...

  9. CDK2 and mTOR are direct molecular targets of isoangustone A in the suppression of human prostate cancer cell growth

    Lee, Eunjung; Son, Joe Eun; Byun, Sanguine; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Yeong A [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Kangdong [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Kim, Jiyoung [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Science, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [The Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Ki Won, E-mail: kiwon@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyong Joo, E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr [WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Center for Food and Bioconvergence, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    Licorice extract which is used as a natural sweetener has been shown to possess inhibitory effects against prostate cancer, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Here, we report a compound, isoangustone A (IAA) in licorice that potently suppresses the growth of aggressive prostate cancer and sought to clarify its mechanism of action. We analyzed its inhibitory effects on the growth of PTEN-deleted human prostate cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Administration of IAA significantly attenuated the growth of prostate cancer cell cultures and xenograft tumors. These effects were found to be attributable to inhibition of the G1/S phase cell cycle transition and the accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. The elevated p27{sup kip1} expression levels were concurrent with the decrease of its phosphorylation at threonine 187 through suppression of CDK2 kinase activity and the reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473 by diminishing the kinase activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Further analysis using recombinant proteins and immunoprecipitated cell lysates determined that IAA exerts suppressive effects against CDK2 and mTOR kinase activity by direct binding with both proteins. These findings suggested that the licorice compound IAA is a potent molecular inhibitor of CDK2 and mTOR, with strong implications for the treatment of prostate cancer. Thus, licorice-derived extracts with high IAA content warrant further clinical investigation for nutritional sources for prostate cancer patients. - Highlights: • Isoangustone A suppresses growth of PC3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. • Administration of isoangustone A inhibits tumor growth in mice. • Treatment of isoangustone A induces cell cycle arrest and accumulation of p27{sup kip1}. • Isoangustone A inhibits CDK2 and mTOR activity. • Isoangustone A directly binds with CDK2 and mTOR complex in prostate cancer cells.

  10. Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase beta regulates mTOR signaling.

    Michelle A Blaskovich

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT-β is a phosphatidic acid (PA generating enzyme that plays an essential role in triglyceride synthesis. However, LPAAT-β is now being studied as an important regulator of cell growth and differentiation and as a potential therapeutic target in cancer since PA is necessary for the activity of key proteins such as Raf, PKC-ζ and mTOR. In this report we determine the effect of LPAAT-β silencing with siRNA in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. We show for the first time that LPAAT-β knockdown inhibits proliferation and anchorage-independent growth of pancreatic cancer cells. This is associated with inhibition of signaling by mTOR as determined by levels of mTORC1- and mTORC2-specific phosphorylation sites on 4E-BP1, S6K and Akt. Since PA regulates the activity of mTOR by modulating its binding to FKBP38, we explored the possibility that LPAAT-β might regulate mTOR by affecting its association with FKBP38. Coimmunoprecipitation studies of FKBP38 with mTOR show increased levels of FKBP38 associated with mTOR when LPAAT-β protein levels are knocked down. Furthermore, depletion of LPAAT-β results in increased Lipin 1 nuclear localization which is associated with increased nuclear eccentricity, a nuclear shape change that is dependent on mTOR, further confirming the ability of LPAAT-β to regulate mTOR function. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that PA generated by LPAAT-β regulates mTOR signaling. We discuss the implications of these findings for using LPAAT-β as a therapeutic target.

  11. Focal adhesion kinase is required for intestinal regeneration and tumorigenesis downstream of Wnt/c-Myc signaling

    Ashton, Gabrielle H.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Myant, Kevin; Phesse, Toby J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Marsh, Victoria; Wilkins, Julie A.; Athineos, Dimitris; Muncan, Vanesa; Kemp, Richard; Neufeld, Kristi; Clevers, Hans; Brunton, Valerie; Winton, Douglas J.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Sears, Rosalie C.; Clarke, Alan R.; Frame, Margaret C.; Sansom, Owen J.

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a remarkable capacity to regenerate after injury and DNA damage. Here, we show that the integrin effector protein Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is dispensable for normal intestinal homeostasis and DNA damage signaling, but is essential for intestinal regeneration

  12. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation is required for consolidation and reconsolidation of memory at an early stage of ontogenesis.

    Languille, Solène; Davis, Sabrina; Richer, Paulette; Alcacer, Cristina; Laroche, Serge; Hars, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    The ability to form long-term memories exists very early during ontogeny; however, the properties of early memory processes, brain structures involved and underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we examine the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling cascade, which is crucial for adult memory, in the consolidation and reconsolidation of an early memory using a conditioned taste aversion paradigm in 3-day-old rat pups. We show that intraperitoneal injection of SL327, the upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, impairs both consolidation and reconsolidation of early memory, leaving short-term memory after acquisition and after reactivation intact. The amnesic effect of SL327 diminishes with increasing delays after acquisition and reactivation. Biochemical analyses revealed ERK hyperphosphorylation in the amygdala but not the hippocampus following acquisition, suggesting functional activation of the amygdala as early as post-natal day 3, although there was no clear evidence for amygdalar ERK activation after reactivation. These results indicate that, despite an immature brain, the basic properties of memory and at least some of the molecular mechanisms and brain structures implicated in aversion memory share a number of similarities with the adult and emerge very early during ontogeny.

  13. Antibody-induced activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase requires the presence of detergent

    Spaargaren, M.; Defize, L. H.; de Laat, S. W.; Boonstra, J.

    1990-01-01

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) tyrosine kinase was investigated in membrane preparations as well as intact A431 cells, using anti-EGF-R antibodies directed against extra- and intracellular receptor domains. In vitro assay conditions were mimicked on whole cells by a mild

  14. Yeast phospholipase C is required for stability of casein kinase I Yck2p and expression of hexose transporters

    Zhang, T.; Galdieri, L.; Hašek, Jiří; Vančura, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 364, č. 22 (2017), č. článku fnx227. ISSN 0378-1097 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05497S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : phospholipase C * casein kinase I * hexose transporters Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2016

  15. Zebrafish integrin-linked kinase is required in skeletal muscles for strengthening the integrin-ECM adhesion complex.

    Postel, R.; Vakeel, P.; Topczewski, J.; Knoll, R.; Bakkers, J.

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical instability of skeletal muscle cells is the major cause of congenital muscular dystrophy. Here we show that the zebrafish lost-contact mutant, that lacks a functional integrin-linked kinase (ilk) gene, suffers from mechanical instability of skeletal muscle fibres. With genetic and

  16. The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in mice.

    Adam L Hartman

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway integrates signals from different nutrient sources, including amino acids and glucose. Compounds that inhibit mTOR kinase activity such as rapamycin and everolimus can suppress seizures in some chronic animal models and in patients with tuberous sclerosis. However, it is not known whether mTOR inhibitors exert acute anticonvulsant effects in addition to their longer term antiepileptogenic effects. To gain insights into how rapamycin suppresses seizures, we investigated the anticonvulsant activity of rapamycin using acute seizure tests in mice.Following intraperitoneal injection of rapamycin, normal four-week-old male NIH Swiss mice were evaluated for susceptibility to a battery of acute seizure tests similar to those currently used to screen potential therapeutics by the US NIH Anticonvulsant Screening Program. To assess the short term effects of rapamycin, mice were seizure tested in ≤ 6 hours of a single dose of rapamycin, and for longer term effects of rapamycin, mice were tested after 3 or more daily doses of rapamycin.The only seizure test where short-term rapamycin treatment protected mice was against tonic hindlimb extension in the MES threshold test, though this protection waned with longer rapamycin treatment. Longer term rapamycin treatment protected against kainic acid-induced seizure activity, but only at late times after seizure onset. Rapamycin was not protective in the 6 Hz or PTZ seizure tests after short or longer rapamycin treatment times. In contrast to other metabolism-based therapies that protect in acute seizure tests, rapamycin has limited acute anticonvulsant effects in normal mice.The efficacy of rapamycin as an acute anticonvulsant agent may be limited. Furthermore, the combined pattern of acute seizure test results places rapamycin in a third category distinct from both fasting and the ketogenic diet, and which is more similar to drugs acting on sodium channels.

  17. Silencing Nrf2 impairs glioma cell proliferation via AMPK-activated mTOR inhibition

    Jia, Yue [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Handong, E-mail: njhdwang@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wang, Qiang [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Ding, Hui [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Southern Medical University (Guangzhou), 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Heming [Department of Neurosurgery, Nanjing Jingdu Hospital, No. 34, Biao 34, Yanggongjing Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China); Pan, Hao [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, School of Medicine, Nanjing University, 305 East Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-01-15

    Gliomas are the leading cause of death among adults with primary brain malignancies. Treatment for malignant gliomas remains limited, and targeted therapies have been incompletely explored. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a key transcription regulator for antioxidant and detoxification enzymes, is abundantly expressed in cancer cells. In this study, the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in cancer cell proliferation was investigated in multiple glioma cell lines. We first evaluated the expression patterns of Nrf2 in four glioma cell lines and found all four cell lines expressed Nrf2, but the highest level was observed in U251 cells. We further evaluated the biological functions of Nrf2 in U251 glioma cell proliferation by specific inhibition of Nrf2 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). We found that Nrf2 depletion inhibited glioma cell proliferation. Nrf2 depletion also decreased colony formation in U251 cells stably expressing Nrf2 shRNA compared to scrambled control shRNA. Moreover, suppression of Nrf2 expression could lead to ATP depletion (with concomitant rise in AMP/ATP ratio) and consequently to AMPK-activated mTOR inhibition. Finally, activation of adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) by treated with phenformin, an AMPK agonist, can mimic the inhibitory effect of Nrf2 knockdown in U251 cells. In conclusion, our findings will shed light to the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in regulating glioma proliferation via ATP-depletion-induced AMPK activation and consequent mTOR inhibition, a novel insight into our understanding the role and mechanism of Nrf2 in glioma pathoetiology. To our knowledge, this is also the first report to provide a rationale for the implication of cross-linking between Nrf2 and mTOR signaling.

  18. Herpes simplex virus internalization into epithelial cells requires Na+/H+ exchangers and p21-activated kinases but neither clathrin- nor caveolin-mediated endocytosis.

    Devadas, Deepika; Koithan, Thalea; Diestel, Randi; Prank, Ute; Sodeik, Beate; Döhner, Katinka

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus that has been reported to infect some epithelial cell types by fusion at the plasma membrane but others by endocytosis. To determine the molecular mechanisms of productive HSV-1 cell entry, we perturbed key endocytosis host factors using specific inhibitors, RNA interference (RNAi), or overexpression of dominant negative proteins and investigated their effects on HSV-1 infection in the permissive epithelial cell lines Vero, HeLa, HEp-2, and PtK2. HSV-1 internalization required neither endosomal acidification nor clathrin- or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, HSV-1 gene expression and internalization were significantly reduced after treatment with 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). EIPA blocks the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, which are plasma membrane proteins implicated in all forms of macropinocytosis. HSV-1 internalization furthermore required the function of p21-activated kinases that contribute to macropinosome formation. However, in contrast to some forms of macropinocytosis, HSV-1 did not enlist the activities of protein kinase C (PKC), tyrosine kinases, C-terminal binding protein 1, or dynamin to activate its internalization. These data suggest that HSV-1 depends on Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and p21-activated kinases either for macropinocytosis or for local actin rearrangements required for fusion at the plasma membrane or subsequent passage through the actin cortex underneath the plasma membrane. After initial replication in epithelial cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) establish latent infections in neurons innervating these regions. Upon primary infection and reactivation from latency, HSVs cause many human skin and neurological diseases, particularly in immunocompromised hosts, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Many viruses use macropinocytosis for virus internalization, and many host factors mediating this entry route have been identified, although the

  19. Global phosphoproteomic analysis of human skeletal muscle reveals a network of exercise-regulated kinases and AMPK substrates

    Hoffman, Nolan J; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima

    2015-01-01

    -intensity exercise bout, revealing 1,004 unique exercise-regulated phosphosites on 562 proteins. These included substrates of known exercise-regulated kinases (AMPK, PKA, CaMK, MAPK, mTOR), yet the majority of kinases and substrate phosphosites have not previously been implicated in exercise signaling. Given...

  20. mTOR Inhibition and Tuberous Sclerosis Prevention

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Children's Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw, Poland, report monozygotic twin sisters with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, one treated with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus since age 4 years.

  1. mTOR Inhibition and Clinical Transplantation: Pancreas and Islet.

    Berney, Thierry; Andres, Axel; Toso, Christian; Majno, Pietro; Squifflet, Jean-Paul

    2018-02-01

    This brief overview discusses the beneficial and deleterious effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors on β cells, and how sirolimus- and everolimus-based immunosuppression have impacted on practices and outcomes of pancreas and islet transplantation. Sirolimus was the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimens in islet transplantation at the turn of the millenium, but utilization of mTOR inhibitors has progressively decreased from greater than 80% to less than 50% of islet transplant recipients in more recent years. For whole pancreas transplantation, mTOR inhibitors were used in approximately 20% of patients in the early 2000s, but this dropped over the years to less than 10% currently. This decrease is arguably due to less well-tolerated side effects without the advantage of better outcomes. Nonetheless, mTOR inhibitors remain extremely valuable as second-line immunosuppressants in pancreas and islet transplantation.

  2. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  3. Role of mTOR Inhibitors in Kidney Disease

    Moto Kajiwara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The first compound that inhibited the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, sirolimus (rapamycin was discovered in the 1970s as a soil bacterium metabolite collected on Easter Island (Rapa Nui. Because sirolimus showed antiproliferative activity, researchers investigated its molecular target and identified the TOR1 and TOR2. The mTOR consists of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1 and mTORC2. Rapalogues including sirolimus, everolimus, and temsirolimus exert their effect mainly on mTORC1, whereas their inhibitory effect on mTORC2 is mild. To obtain compounds with more potent antiproliferative effects, ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR targeting both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have been developed and tested in clinical trials as anticancer drugs. Currently, mTOR inhibitors are used as anticancer drugs against several solid tumors, and immunosuppressive agents for transplantation of various organs. This review discusses the role of mTOR inhibitors in renal disease with a particular focus on renal cancer, diabetic nephropathy, and kidney transplantation.

  4. TBK1 Regulates Prostate Cancer Dormancy through mTOR Inhibition

    Jin Koo Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC dormancy and self-renewal are well established and are largely dependent on signals emanating from the HSC niche. Recently, we found that prostate cancer (PCa cells target the HSC niche in mouse bone marrow (BM during metastasis. Little is known, however, as to how the HSC niche may regulate dormancy in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1 on PCa dormancy in the BM niche. We found that binding with niche osteoblasts induces the expression of TBK1 in PCa cells PC3 and C4-2B. Interestingly, TBK1 interacts with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and inhibits its function. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, induces cell cycle arrest of PCa cells and enhances chemotherapeutic resistance of PCa cells. As a result, the knockdown of TBK1 decreases PCa stem-like cells and drug resistance in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that TBK1 plays an important role in the dormancy and drug resistance of PCa.

  5. Casein kinase II is required for proper cell division and acts as a negative regulator of centrosome duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos

    Jeffrey C. Medley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are the primary microtubule-organizing centers that orchestrate microtubule dynamics during the cell cycle. The correct number of centrosomes is pivotal for establishing bipolar mitotic spindles that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. Thus, centrioles must duplicate once per cell cycle, one daughter per mother centriole, the process of which requires highly coordinated actions among core factors and modulators. Protein phosphorylation is shown to regulate the stability, localization and activity of centrosome proteins. Here, we report the function of Casein kinase II (CK2 in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The catalytic subunit (KIN-3/CK2α of CK2 localizes to nuclei, centrosomes and midbodies. Inactivating CK2 leads to cell division defects, including chromosome missegregation, cytokinesis failure and aberrant centrosome behavior. Furthermore, depletion or inhibiting kinase activity of CK2 results in elevated ZYG-1 levels at centrosomes, restoring centrosome duplication and embryonic viability to zyg-1 mutants. Our data suggest that CK2 functions in cell division and negatively regulates centrosome duplication in a kinase-dependent manner.

  6. Requirement for Pectin Methyl Esterase and Preference for Fragmented over Native Pectins for Wall-associated Kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent Stress Response in Arabidopsis*

    Kohorn, Bruce D.; Kohorn, Susan L.; Saba, Nicholas J.; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-01-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. PMID:24855660

  7. Requirement for pectin methyl esterase and preference for fragmented over native pectins for wall-associated kinase-activated, EDS1/PAD4-dependent stress response in Arabidopsis.

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Kohorn, Susan L; Saba, Nicholas J; Martinez, Victoriano Meco

    2014-07-04

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs) have a cytoplasmic protein kinase domain that spans the plasma membrane and binds pectin in the extracellular matrix of plants. WAKs are required for cell expansion during Arabidopsis seedling development but are also an integral part of the response to pathogens and stress that present oligogalacturonides (OGs), which subsequently bind to WAKs and activate a MPK6 (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway. It was unclear how WAKs distinguish native pectin polymers and OGs to activate one or the other of these two pathways. A dominant allele of WAK2 constitutively activates the stress response, and we show here that the effect is dependent upon EDS1 and PAD4, transcriptional activators involved in the pathogen response. Moreover, the WAK2 dominant allele is suppressed by a null allele of a pectin methyl esterase (PME3) whose activity normally leads to cross-linking of pectins in the cell wall. Although OGs activate a transcriptional response in wild type, the response is enhanced in a pme3/pme3 null, consistent with a competition by OG and native polymers for activation of WAKs. This provides a plausible mechanism for WAKs to distinguish an expansion from a stress pathway. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. FvBck1, a Component of Cell Wall Integrity MAP Kinase Pathway, is Required for Virulence and Oxidative Stress Response in Sugarcane Pokkah Boeng Pathogen

    Chengkang eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides (formerly F. moniliforme is suggested as one of the causal agents of Pokkah Boeng, a serious disease of sugarcane worldwide. Currently, detailed molecular and physiological mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown. In this study, we focused on cell wall integrity MAPK pathway as one of the potential signaling mechanisms associated with Pokkah Boeng pathogenesis. We identified FvBCK1 gene that encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase homolog and determined that it is not only required for growth, micro- and macro-conidia production, and cell wall integrity but also for response to osmotic and oxidative stresses. The deletion of FvBCK1 caused a significant reduction in virulence and FB1 production, a carcinogenic mycotoxin produced by the fungus. Moreover, we found the expression levels of three genes, which are known to be involved in superoxide scavenging, were down regulated in the mutant. We hypothesized that the loss of superoxide scavenging capacity was one of the reasons for reduced virulence, but overexpression of catalase or peroxidase gene failed to restore the virulence defect in the deletion mutant. When we introduced Magnaporthe oryzae MCK1 into the FvBck1 deletion mutant, while certain phenotypes were restored, the complemented strain failed to gain full virulence. In summary, FvBck1 plays a diverse role in F. verticillioides, and detailed investigation of downstream signaling pathways will lead to a better understanding of how this MAPK pathway regulates Pokkah Boeng on sugarcane.

  9. mTOR (Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) Inhibition Decreases Mechanosignaling, Collagen Accumulation, and Stiffening of the Thoracic Aorta in Elastin-Deficient Mice.

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Guangxin; Li, Qingle; Ali, Rahmat; Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Wei; Qyang, Yibing; Greif, Daniel M; Geirsson, Arnar; Humphrey, Jay D; Tellides, George

    2017-09-01

    Elastin deficiency because of heterozygous loss of an ELN allele in Williams syndrome causes obstructive aortopathy characterized by medial thickening and fibrosis and consequent aortic stiffening. Previous work in Eln -null mice with a severe arterial phenotype showed that inhibition of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin), a key regulator of cell growth, lessened the aortic obstruction but did not prevent early postnatal death. We investigated the effects of mTOR inhibition in Eln -null mice partially rescued by human ELN that manifest a less severe arterial phenotype and survive long term. Thoracic aortas of neonatal and juvenile mice with graded elastin deficiency exhibited increased signaling through both mTOR complex 1 and 2. Despite lower predicted wall stress, there was increased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, suggestive of greater integrin activation, and increased transforming growth factor-β-signaling mediators, associated with increased collagen expression. Pharmacological blockade of mTOR by rapalogs did not improve luminal stenosis but reduced mechanosignaling (in delayed fashion after mTOR complex 1 inhibition), medial collagen accumulation, and stiffening of the aorta. Rapalog administration also retarded somatic growth, however, and precipitated neonatal deaths. Complementary, less-toxic strategies to inhibit mTOR via altered growth factor and nutrient responses were not effective. In addition to previously demonstrated therapeutic benefits of rapalogs decreasing smooth muscle cell proliferation in the absence of elastin, we find that rapalogs also prevent aortic fibrosis and stiffening attributable to partial elastin deficiency. Our findings suggest that mTOR-sensitive perturbation of smooth muscle cell mechanosensing contributes to elastin aortopathy. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Fungal communication requires the MAK-2 pathway elements STE-20 and RAS-2, the NRC-1 adapter STE-50 and the MAP kinase scaffold HAM-5.

    Dettmann, Anne; Heilig, Yvonne; Valerius, Oliver; Ludwig, Sarah; Seiler, Stephan

    2014-11-01

    Intercellular communication is critical for the survival of unicellular organisms as well as for the development and function of multicellular tissues. Cell-to-cell signaling is also required to develop the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi and is a prerequisite for symbiotic and pathogenic host colonization achieved by molds. Somatic cell-cell communication and subsequent cell fusion is governed by the MAK-2 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade in the filamentous ascomycete model Neurospora crassa, yet the composition and mode of regulation of the MAK-2 pathway are currently unclear. In order to identify additional components involved in MAK-2 signaling we performed affinity purification experiments coupled to mass spectrometry with strains expressing functional GFP-fusion proteins of the MAPK cascade. This approach identified STE-50 as a regulatory subunit of the Ste11p homolog NRC-1 and HAM-5 as cell-communication-specific scaffold protein of the MAPK cascade. Moreover, we defined a network of proteins consisting of two Ste20-related kinases, the small GTPase RAS-2 and the adenylate cyclase capping protein CAP-1 that function upstream of the MAK-2 pathway and whose signals converge on the NRC-1/STE-50 MAP3K complex and the HAM-5 scaffold. Finally, our data suggest an involvement of the striatin interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, the casein kinase 2 heterodimer, the phospholipid flippase modulators YPK-1 and NRC-2 and motor protein-dependent vesicle trafficking in the regulation of MAK-2 pathway activity and function. Taken together, these data will have significant implications for our mechanistic understanding of MAPK signaling and for homotypic cell-cell communication in fungi and higher eukaryotes.

  11. Combination of mTOR and MAPK Inhibitors—A Potential Way to Treat Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Ashutosh Chauhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common neoplasm that occurs in the kidney and is marked by a unique biology, with a long history of poor response to conventional cancer treatments. In the past few years, there have been significant advancements to understand the biology of RCC. This has led to the introduction of novel targeted therapies in the management of patients with metastatic disease. Patients treated with targeted therapies for RCC had shown positive impact on overall survival, however, no cure is possible and patients need to undergo treatment for long periods of time, which raises challenges to manage the associated adverse events. Moreover, many patients may not respond to it and even response may not last long enough in the responders. Many inhibitors of the Mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway are currently being used in treatment of advanced RCC. Studies showed that inhibitions of mTOR pathways induce Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK escape cell death and cells become resistant to mTOR inhibitors. Because of this, there is a need to inhibit both pathways with their inhibitors comparatively for a better outcome and treatment of patients with RCC.

  12. Suppression of NYVAC Infection in HeLa Cells Requires RNase L but Is Independent of Protein Kinase R Activity

    Fernández-Escobar, Mercedes; Nájera, José Luis; Baldanta, Sara; Rodriguez, Dolores; Way, Michael; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase R (PKR) and RNase L are host cell components that function to contain viral spread after infections. In this study, we analyzed the role of both proteins in the abortive infection of human HeLa cells with the poxvirus strain NYVAC, for which an inhibition of viral A27L and B5R gene expression is described. Specifically, the translation of these viral genes is independent of PKR activation, but their expression is dependent on the RNase L activity. PMID:26656695

  13. SAD-A kinase controls islet β-cell size and function as a mediator of mTORC1 signaling.

    Nie, Jia; Liu, Xiaolei; Lilley, Brendan N; Zhang, Hai; Pan, Y Albert; Kimball, Scot R; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Wang, Li; Jefferson, Leonard S; Sanes, Joshua R; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2013-08-20

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in controlling islet β-cell function. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Synapses of amphids defective kinase-A (SAD-A) is a 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-related protein kinase that is exclusively expressed in pancreas and brain. In this study, we investigated a role of the kinase in regulating pancreatic β-cell morphology and function as a mediator of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. We show that global SAD-A deletion leads to defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and petite islets, which are reminiscent of the defects in mice with global deletion of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, a downstream target of mTORC1. Consistent with these findings, selective deletion of SAD-A in pancreas decreased islet β-cell size, whereas SAD-A overexpression significantly increased the size of mouse insulinomas cell lines β-cells. In direct support of SAD-A as a unique mediator of mTORC1 signaling in islet β-cells, we demonstrate that glucose dramatically stimulated SAD-A protein translation in isolated mouse islets, which was potently inhibited by rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1. Moreover, the 5'-untranslated region of SAD-A mRNA is highly structured and requires mTORC1 signaling for its translation initiation. Together, these findings identified SAD-A as a unique pancreas-specific effector protein of mTORC1 signaling.

  14. ATR-Chk1-APC/C-dependent stabilization of Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) kinase is required for DNA lesion bypass under replication stress

    Yamada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Mistrik, M.

    2013-01-01

    replication. Stalled DNA replication evoked stabilization of the Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) complex in a manner dependent on ATR-Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling and its interplay with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosomeCdh1 (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. Mechanistically, Chk1 kinase inactivates APC/C through...... degradation of Cdh1 upon replication block, thereby stabilizing APC/C substrates, including Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4). Furthermore, motif C of ASK (Dbf4) interacts with the N-terminal region of RAD18 ubiquitin ligase, and this interaction is required for chromatin binding of RAD18. Impaired interaction of ASK (Dbf4...

  15. Activation of the LRR Receptor-Like Kinase PSY1R Requires Transphosphorylation of Residues in the Activation Loop

    Christian B. Oehlenschlæger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available PSY1R is a leucine-rich repeat (LRR receptor-like kinase (RLK previously shown to act as receptor for the plant peptide hormone PSY1 (peptide containing sulfated tyrosine 1 and to regulate cell expansion. PSY1R phosphorylates and thereby regulates the activity of plasma membrane-localized H+-ATPases. While this mechanism has been studied in detail, little is known about how PSY1R itself is activated. Here we studied the activation mechanism of PSY1R. We show that full-length PSY1R interacts with members of the SERK co-receptor family in planta. We identified seven in vitro autophosphorylation sites on serine and threonine residues within the kinase domain of PSY1R using mass spectrometry. We furthermore show that PSY1R autophosphorylation occurs in trans and that the initial transphosphorylation takes place within the activation loop at residues Ser951, Thr959, and Thr963. While Thr959 and Thr963 are conserved among other related plant LRR RLKs, Ser951 is unique to PSY1R. Based on homology modeling we propose that phosphorylation of Ser951 stabilize the inactive conformation of PSY1R.

  16. mTOR complex 1: a key player in neuroadaptations induced by drugs of abuse.

    Neasta, Jeremie; Barak, Segev; Hamida, Sami Ben; Ron, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) is a serine and threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, survival, and proliferation. mTORC1 is a master controller of the translation of a subset of mRNAs. In the central nervous system mTORC1 plays a crucial role in mechanisms underlying learning and memory by controlling synaptic protein synthesis. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting that the mTORC1 signaling pathway promotes neuroadaptations following exposure to a diverse group of drugs of abuse including stimulants, cannabinoids, opiates, and alcohol. We further describe potential molecular mechanisms by which drug-induced mTORC1 activation may alter brain functions. Finally, we propose that mTORC1 is a focal point shared by drugs of abuse to mediate drug-related behaviors such as reward seeking and excessive drug intake, and offer future directions to decipher the contribution of the kinase to mechanisms underlying addiction. Recent studies suggesting that exposure to diverse classes of drugs of abuse as well as exposure to drug-associated memories lead to mTORC1 kinase activation in the limbic system. In turn, mTORC1 controls the onset and the maintenance of pathological neuroadaptions that underlie several features of drug addiction such as drug seeking and relapse. Therefore, we propose that targeting mTORC1 and its effectors is a promising strategy to treat drug disorders. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Transcriptional activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ requires activation of both protein kinase A and Akt during adipocyte differentiation

    Kim, Sang-pil; Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Chung, Sung Woon; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae; Bae, Sun Sik

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Elevated cAMP activates both PKA and Epac. → PKA activates CREB transcriptional factor and Epac activates PI3K/Akt pathway via Rap1. → Akt modulates PPAR-γ transcriptional activity in concert with CREB. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) is required for the conversion of pre-adipocytes. However, the mechanism underlying activation of PPAR-γ is unclear. Here we showed that cAMP-induced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Akt is essential for the transcriptional activation of PPAR-γ. Hormonal induction of adipogenesis was blocked by a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002), by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H89), and by a Rap1 inhibitor (GGTI-298). Transcriptional activity of PPAR-γ was markedly enhanced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), but not insulin and dexamethasone. In addition, IBMX-induced PPAR-γ transcriptional activity was blocked by PI3K/Akt, PKA, or Rap1 inhibitors. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) which is a specific agonist for exchanger protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) significantly induced the activation of Akt. Furthermore, knock-down of Akt1 markedly attenuated PPAR-γ transcriptional activity. These results indicate that both PKA and Akt signaling pathways are required for transcriptional activation of PPAR-γ, suggesting post-translational activation of PPAR-γ might be critical step for adipogenic gene expression.

  18. SAR405, a PIK3C3/Vps34 inhibitor that prevents autophagy and synergizes with MTOR inhibition in tumor cells.

    Pasquier, Benoit

    2015-04-03

    Autophagy plays an important role in cancer and it has been suggested that it functions not only as a tumor suppressor pathway to prevent tumor initiation, but also as a prosurvival pathway that helps tumor cells endure metabolic stress and resist death triggered by chemotherapeutic agents. We recently described the discovery of inhibitors of PIK3C3/Vps34 (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 3), the lipid kinase component of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K). This PtdIns3K isoform has attracted significant attention in recent years because of its role in autophagy. Following chemical optimization we identified SAR405, a low molecular mass kinase inhibitor of PIK3C3, highly potent and selective with regard to other lipid and protein kinases. We demonstrated that inhibiting the catalytic activity of PIK3C3 disrupts vesicle trafficking from late endosomes to lysosomes. SAR405 treatment also inhibits autophagy induced either by starvation or by MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) inhibition. Finally our results show that combining SAR405 with everolimus, the FDA-approved MTOR inhibitor, results in a significant synergy on the reduction of cell proliferation using renal tumor cells. This result indicates a potential therapeutic application for PIK3C3 inhibitors in cancer.

  19. Biphasic activation of the mTOR pathway in the gustatory cortex is correlated with and necessary for taste learning.

    Belelovsky, Katya; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Elkobi, Alina; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2009-06-10

    Different forms of memories and synaptic plasticity require synthesis of new proteins at the time of acquisition or immediately after. We are interested in the role of translation regulation in the cortex, the brain structure assumed to store long-term memories. The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR (also known as FRAP and RAFT-1), is part of a key signal transduction mechanism known to regulate translation of specific subset of mRNAs and to affect learning and synaptic plasticity. We report here that novel taste learning induces two waves of mTOR activation in the gustatory cortex. Interestingly, the first wave can be identified both in synaptoneurosomal and cellular fractions, whereas the second wave is detected in the cellular fraction but not in the synaptic one. Inhibition of mTOR, specifically in the gustatory cortex, has two effects. First, biochemically, it modulates several known downstream proteins that control translation and reduces the expression of postsynaptic density-95 in vivo. Second, behaviorally, it attenuates long-term taste memory. The results suggest that the mTOR pathway in the cortex modulates both translation factor activity and protein expression, to enable normal taste memory consolidation.

  20. The cytomegalovirus homolog of interleukin-10 requires phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity for inhibition of cytokine synthesis in monocytes.

    Spencer, Juliet V

    2007-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) has evolved numerous strategies for evading host immune defenses, including piracy of cellular cytokines. A viral homolog of interleukin-10, designated cmvIL-10, binds to the cellular IL-10 receptor and effects potent immune suppression. The signaling pathways employed by cmvIL-10 were investigated, and the classic IL-10R/JAK1/Stat3 pathway was found to be activated in monocytes. However, inhibition of JAK1 had little effect on cmvIL-10-mediated suppression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway had a more significant impact on TNF-alpha levels but did not completely relieve the immune suppression, demonstrating that cmvIL-10 stimulates multiple signaling pathways to modulate cell function.

  1. Novel Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase MpkC of Aspergillus fumigatus Is Required for Utilization of Polyalcohol Sugars▿

    Reyes, Guadalupe; Romans, Angela; Nguyen, C. Kim; May, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    The genome of Aspergillus fumigatus has four genes that encode mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), sakA/hogA, mpkA, mpkB, and mpkC. The functions of the MpkB and MpkC MAPKs are unknown for A. fumigatus and the closely related and genetically amenable species Aspergillus nidulans. mpkC deletion mutants of A. fumigatus were made and their phenotypes characterized. The mpkC deletion mutants were viable and had normal conidial germination and hyphal growth on minimal or complete media. This is in contrast to deletion mutants with deletions in the closely related MAPK gene sakA/hogA that we previously reported had a nitrogen source-dependent germination phenotype. Similarly, the growth of the mpkC deletion mutants was wild type on high-osmolarity medium. Consistent with these two MAP kinase genes regulating different cellular responses, we determined that the mpkC deletion mutants were unable to grow on minimal medium with sorbitol or mannitol as the sole carbon source. This result implicates MpkC signaling in carbon source utilization. Changes in mRNA levels for sakA and mpkC were measured in response to hypertonic stress, oxidative stress, and a shift from glucose to sorbitol to determine if there was overlap in the SakA and MpkC signaling pathways. These studies demonstrated that SakA- and MpkC-dependent patterns of change in mRNA levels are distinct and have minimal overlap in response to these environmental stresses. PMID:16998074

  2. Novel mitogen-activated protein kinase MpkC of Aspergillus fumigatus is required for utilization of polyalcohol sugars.

    Reyes, Guadalupe; Romans, Angela; Nguyen, C Kim; May, Gregory S

    2006-11-01

    The genome of Aspergillus fumigatus has four genes that encode mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), sakA/hogA, mpkA, mpkB, and mpkC. The functions of the MpkB and MpkC MAPKs are unknown for A. fumigatus and the closely related and genetically amenable species Aspergillus nidulans. mpkC deletion mutants of A. fumigatus were made and their phenotypes characterized. The mpkC deletion mutants were viable and had normal conidial germination and hyphal growth on minimal or complete media. This is in contrast to deletion mutants with deletions in the closely related MAPK gene sakA/hogA that we previously reported had a nitrogen source-dependent germination phenotype. Similarly, the growth of the mpkC deletion mutants was wild type on high-osmolarity medium. Consistent with these two MAP kinase genes regulating different cellular responses, we determined that the mpkC deletion mutants were unable to grow on minimal medium with sorbitol or mannitol as the sole carbon source. This result implicates MpkC signaling in carbon source utilization. Changes in mRNA levels for sakA and mpkC were measured in response to hypertonic stress, oxidative stress, and a shift from glucose to sorbitol to determine if there was overlap in the SakA and MpkC signaling pathways. These studies demonstrated that SakA- and MpkC-dependent patterns of change in mRNA levels are distinct and have minimal overlap in response to these environmental stresses.

  3. Autophagic kinases SmVPS34 and SmVPS15 are required for viability in the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora.

    Voigt, Oliver; Herzog, Britta; Jakobshagen, Antonia; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a tightly controlled degradation process of all eukaryotes. It includes the sequestration of cytoplasmic contents and organelles within a double-membraned autophagosome. Autophagy involves core autophagy related (atg) genes as well as genes regulating vesicle trafficking. Previously, we analyzed the impact of proteins of the core autophagic machinery SmATG7, SmATG8 and SmATG4 on the sexual and vegetative development of the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora. While deletion of Smatg8 and Smatg4 abolished fruiting-body formation and impaired vegetative growth, Smatg7 is required for viability. In yeast, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34) and its myristoylated membrane targeting unit, the protein kinase Vps15 have been shown to be important regulators of autophagy and vacuolar protein sorting. However, their exact role in filamentous ascomycetes remains elusive. To determine the function of Smvps34 and Smvps15 we isolated genes with high sequence similarity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae VPS34 and VPS15. For both genes we were not able to generate a homokaryotic knockout mutant in S. macrospora, suggesting that Smvps34 and Smvps15 are required for viability. Furthermore, we analyzed the repertoire of vps genes encoded by S. macrospora and could identify putative homologs of nearly all of the 61 VPS genes of S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylation and activation of p42 and p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase are required for the P2 purinoceptor stimulation of endothelial prostacyclin production.

    Patel, V; Brown, C; Goodwin, A; Wilkie, N; Boarder, M R

    1996-11-15

    Extracellular ATP and ADP, released from platelets and other sites stimulate the endothelial production of prostacyclin (PGI2) by acting on G-protein-coupled P2Y2 and P2Y2 purinoceptors, contributing to the maintenance of a non-thrombogenic surface. The mechanism, widely described as being dependent on elevated cytosolic [Ca2+], also requires protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Here we show that activation of both these P2 receptor types leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of both the p42 and p44 forms of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). 2-Methylthio-ATP and UTP, selectively activating P2Y1 and P2Y2 purinoceptors respectively, and ATP, a non-selective agonist at these two receptors, stimulate the tyrosine phosphorylation of both p42mapk and p44mapk, as revealed by Western blots with an antiserum specific for the tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of the enzymes. By using separation on Resource Q columns, peptide kinase activity associated with the phosphorylated MAPK enzymes distributes into two peaks, one mainly p42mapk and one mainly p44mapk, both of which are stimulated by ATP with respect to kinase activity and phospho-MAPK immunoreactivity. Stimulation of P2Y1 or P2Y2 purinoceptors leads to a severalfold increase in PGI2 efflux; this was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by the selective MAPK kinase inhibitor PD98059. This drug also blocked the agonist-stimulated increase in phospho-MAPK immunoreactivity for both p42mapk and p44mapk but left the phospholipase C response to P2 agonists essentially unchanged. Olomoucine has been reported to inhibit p44mapk activity. Here we show that in the same concentration range olomoucine inhibits activity in both peaks from the Resource Q column and also the agonist stimulation of 6-keto-PGF1, but has no effect on agonist-stimulated phospho-MAPK immunoreactivity. These results provide direct evidence for the involvement of p42 and p44 MAPK in the PGI2 response of intact endothelial cells: we have shown

  5. mTOR Signaling Confers Resistance to Targeted Cancer Drugs.

    Guri, Yakir; Hall, Michael N

    2016-11-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Extensive research over decades has led to the development of therapies that target cancer-specific signaling pathways. However, the clinical benefits of such drugs are at best transient due to tumors displaying intrinsic or adaptive resistance. The underlying compensatory pathways that allow cancer cells to circumvent a drug blockade are poorly understood. We review here recent studies suggesting that mammalian TOR (mTOR) signaling is a major compensatory pathway conferring resistance to many cancer drugs. mTOR-mediated resistance can be cell-autonomous or non-cell-autonomous. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling should be monitored routinely in tumors and that an mTOR inhibitor should be considered as a co-therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Requirement of ERα and basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase in Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells

    Song, Xiulong, E-mail: songxiulong@hotmail.com; Wei, Zhengxi; Shaikh, Zahir A., E-mail: zshaikh@uri.edu

    2015-08-15

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental toxicant and an established carcinogen. Epidemiological studies implicate Cd with human breast cancer. Low micromolar concentrations of Cd promote proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. The growth promotion of breast cancer cells is associated with the activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. This study explores the mechanism of Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK pathway. Specifically, the role of cell surface receptors ERα, EGFR, and Src kinase was evaluated in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells treated with 1–3 μM Cd. The activation of ERK was studied using a serum response element (SRE) luciferase reporter assay. Receptor phosphorylation was detected by Western blot analyses. Cd treatment increased both the SRE reporter activity and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner. Cd treatment had no effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Also, blocking the entry of Cd into the cells with manganese did not diminish Cd-induced activation of MAPK/ERK. These results suggest that the effect of Cd was likely not caused by intracellular ROS generation, but through interaction with the membrane receptors. While Cd did not appear to activate either EGFR or Src kinase, their inhibition completely blocked the Cd-induced activation of ERK as well as cell proliferation. Similarly, silencing ERα with siRNA or use of ERα antagonist blocked the effects of Cd. Based on these results, it is concluded that not only ERα, but also basal activities of EGFR and Src kinase are essential for Cd-induced signal transduction and activation of MAPK/ERK pathway for breast cancer cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Low micromolar concentrations of Cd rapidly activate ERK1/2 in MCF-7 cells. • Signal transduction and resulting cell proliferation require EGFR, ERα, and Src. • These findings implicate Cd in promotion of breast cancer.

  7. Clinical implications of recent studies using mTOR inhibitors to treat advanced hormone receptor-positive breast cancer

    Arena, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Approximately 75% of breast cancer is hormone receptor-positive (HR + ) and is managed with endocrine therapies. However, relapse or disease progression caused by primary or acquired endocrine resistance is frequent. Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling is one of the molecular mechanisms leading to endocrine resistance. mTOR inhibitors that target the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are the first of the targeted therapies to be evaluated in clinical trials to overcome endocrine resistance. Although the clinical trial with temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, did not show any benefit when compared with endocrine therapy alone, a Phase II clinical trial with sirolimus has been promising. Recently, everolimus was approved in combination with exemestane by the US Food and Drug Administration for treating postmenopausal women with advanced HR + breast cancer, based on the results of a Phase III trial. Therefore, everolimus represents the first and only targeted agent approved for combating endocrine resistance

  8. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in cultured rat astrocytes induced by an organophosphorus agent requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation

    Isobe, Ichiro; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Nagao, Masataka; Iwasa, Mineo; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Seko-Nakamura, Yoshimi; Monma-Ohtaki, Jun

    2003-01-01

    There are various toxic chemicals that cause cell death. However, in certain cases deleterious agents elicit various cellular responses prior to cell death. To determine the cellular mechanisms by which such cellular responses are induced is important, but sufficient attention has not been paid to this issue to date. In this study, we showed the characteristic effects of an organophosphorus (OP) agent, bis(pinacolyl methyl)phosphonate (BPMP), which we synthesized for the study of OP nerve agents, on cultured rat astrocytes. Morphologically, BPMP induced cytoplasmic vacuolation and stellation in the rat astrocytes. Cytoplasmic vacuolation is a cell pathological change observed, for example, in vacuolar degeneration, and stellation has been reported in astrocytic reactions against various stimuli. By pretreatment with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, stellation was inhibited, although vacuolation was not. Cell staining with a mitochondrion-selective dye indicated that the vacuolation probably occurs in the mitochondria that are swollen and vacuolatred in the center. Interestingly, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade inhibitor inhibited vacuolation and, to some extent, stellation. These results suggest that the ERK signaling cascade is important for the induction of mitochondrial vacuolation. We expect that a detailed study of these astrocytic reactions will provide us new perspectives regarding the variation and pathological significance of cell morphological changes, such as vacuolar degeneration, and also the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders

  9. Pantothenate kinase 1 is required to support the metabolic transition from the fed to the fasted state.

    Roberta Leonardi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme A (CoA biosynthesis is regulated by the pantothenate kinases (PanK, of which there are four active isoforms. The PanK1 isoform is selectively expressed in liver and accounted for 40% of the total PanK activity in this organ. CoA synthesis was limited using a Pank1(-/- knockout mouse model to determine whether the regulation of CoA levels was critical to liver function. The elimination of PanK1 reduced hepatic CoA levels, and fasting triggered a substantial increase in total hepatic CoA in both Pank1(-/- and wild-type mice. The increase in hepatic CoA during fasting was blunted in the Pank1(-/- mouse, and resulted in reduced fatty acid oxidation as evidenced by abnormally high accumulation of long-chain acyl-CoAs, acyl-carnitines, and triglycerides in the form of lipid droplets. The Pank1(-/- mice became hypoglycemic during a fast due to impaired gluconeogenesis, although ketogenesis was normal. These data illustrate the importance of PanK1 and elevated liver CoA levels during fasting to support the metabolic transition from glucose utilization and fatty acid synthesis to gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. The findings also suggest that PanK1 may be a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in metabolic disorders that feature hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  10. Riboflavin-Induced Disease Resistance Requires the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases 3 and 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Nie, Shengjun; Xu, Huilian

    2016-01-01

    As a resistance elicitor, riboflavin (vitamin B2) protects plants against a wide range of pathogens. At molecular biological levels, it is important to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying the disease resistance induced by riboflavin. Here, riboflavin was tested to induce resistance against virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis. Results showed that riboflavin induced disease resistance based on MAPK-dependent priming for the expression of PR1 gene. Riboflavin induced transient expression of PR1 gene. However, following Pst DC3000 inoculation, riboflavin potentiated stronger PR1 gene transcription. Further was suggested that the transcript levels of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK3 and MPK6, were primed under riboflavin. Upon infection by Pst DC3000, these two enzymes were more strongly activated. The elevated activation of both MPK3 and MPK6 was responsible for enhanced defense gene expression and resistance after riboflavin treatment. Moreover, riboflavin significantly reduced the transcript levels of MPK3 and MPK6 by application of AsA and BAPTA, an H2O2 scavenger and a calcium (Ca2+) scavenger, respectively. In conclusion, MPK3 and MPK6 were responsible for riboflavin-induced resistance, and played an important role in H2O2- and Ca2+-related signaling pathways, and this study could provide a new insight into the mechanistic study of riboflavin-induced defense responses.

  11. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Repeated pulses of serotonin required for long-term facilitation activate mitogen-activated protein kinase in sensory neurons of Aplysia

    Michael, Dan; Martin, Kelsey C.; Seger, Rony; Ning, Ming-Ming; Baston, Rene; Kandel, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Long-term facilitation of the connections between the sensory and motor neurons of the gill-withdrawal reflex in Aplysia requires five repeated pulses of serotonin (5-HT). The repeated pulses of 5-HT initiate a cascade of gene activation that leads ultimately to the growth of new synaptic connections. Several genes in this process have been identified, including the transcriptional regulators apCREB-1, apCREB-2, apC/EBP, and the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, which is thought to be involved in the formation of new synaptic connections. Here we report that the transcriptional regulators apCREB-2 and apC/EBP, as well as a peptide derived from the cytoplasmic domain of apCAM, are phosphorylated in vitro by Aplysia mitogen-activated protein kinase (apMAPK). We have cloned the cDNA encoding apMAPK and show that apMAPK activity is increased in sensory neurons treated with repeated pulses of 5-HT and by the cAMP pathway. These results suggest that apMAPK may participate with cAMP-dependent protein kinase during long-term facilitation in sensory cells by modifying some of the key elements involved in the consolidation of short- to long-lasting changes in synaptic strength. PMID:9465108

  13. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    Almadanim, M. Cecília

    2017-01-19

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here we test the hypothesis that OsCPK17 plays a role in rice cold stress response by analyzing OsCPK17 knockout, silencing, and overexpressing rice lines under low temperature. Altered OsCPK17 gene expression compromises cold tolerance performance, without affecting the expression of key cold stress-inducible genes. A comparative phosphoproteomic approach led to the identification of six potential in vivo OsCPK17 targets, which are associated with sugar and nitrogen metabolism, and with osmotic regulation. To test direct interaction, in vitro kinase assays were performed, showing that the sucrose phosphate synthase OsSPS4, and the aquaporin OsPIP2;1/OsPIP2;6 are phosphorylated by OsCPK17 in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether, our data indicates that OsCPK17 is required for a proper cold stress response in rice, likely affecting the activity of membrane channels and sugar metabolism.

  14. A Recollection of mTOR Signaling in Learning and Memory

    Graber, Tyson E.; McCamphill, Patrick K.; Sossin, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamcyin (mTOR) is a central player in cell growth throughout the organism. However, mTOR takes on an additional, more specialized role in the developed neuron, where it regulates the protein synthesis-dependent, plastic changes underlying learning and memory. mTOR is sequestered in two multiprotein complexes (mTORC1 and…

  15. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate overall survival (OS) after treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) following the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors. Material and methods. One-hundred and forty...

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans polo-like kinase PLK-1 is required for merging parental genomes into a single nucleus.

    Rahman, Mohammad M; Munzig, Mandy; Kaneshiro, Kiyomi; Lee, Brandon; Strome, Susan; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2015-12-15

    Before the first zygotic division, the nuclear envelopes of the maternal and paternal pronuclei disassemble, allowing both sets of chromosomes to be incorporated into a single nucleus in daughter cells after mitosis. We found that in Caenorhabditis elegans, partial inactivation of the polo-like kinase PLK-1 causes the formation of two nuclei, containing either the maternal or paternal chromosomes, in each daughter cell. These two nuclei gave rise to paired nuclei in all subsequent cell divisions. The paired-nuclei phenotype was caused by a defect in forming a gap in the nuclear envelopes at the interface between the two pronuclei during the first mitotic division. This was accompanied by defects in chromosome congression and alignment of the maternal and paternal metaphase plates relative to each other. Perturbing chromosome congression by other means also resulted in failure to disassemble the nuclear envelope between the two pronuclei. Our data further show that PLK-1 is needed for nuclear envelope breakdown during early embryogenesis. We propose that during the first zygotic division, PLK-1-dependent chromosome congression and metaphase plate alignment are necessary for the disassembly of the nuclear envelope between the two pronuclei, ultimately allowing intermingling of the maternal and paternal chromosomes. © 2015 Rahman et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. mTOR activity in AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Sara H Browne

    Full Text Available Patients infected with HIV have a significantly increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphomas despite the widespread use of HAART. To investigate mTOR pathway activity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma AR-DLBCL, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the phosphorylated 70 ribosomal S6 protein-kinase (p70S6K, an extensively studied effector of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1 and the phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog (pPTEN, a negative regulator of mTORC1 pathway.We evaluated tissue samples from 126 patients with AR-DLBCL. Among them, 98 samples were from tissue microarrays (TMAs supplied by the Aids and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR, the remaining 28 samples were from cases diagnosed and treated at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD. The presence of p70S6K was evaluated with two antibodies directed against the combined epitopes Ser235/236 and Ser240/244, respectively; and additional monoclonal anti-bodies were used to identify pPTEN and phosphorylated proline-rich Akt substrate of 40kDa (pPRAS40. The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive for p70S6K and pPTEN were assessed in all the samples. In addition, a subgroup of 28 patients from UCSD was studied to assess the presence of pPRAS40, an insulin-regulated activator of the mTORC1. The expression of each of these markers was correlated with clinical and histopathologic features.The majority of the patients evaluated were males (88%; only two cases (1.6% were older than 65 years of age. We found high levels of both p70S6K-paired epitopes studied, 48% positivity against Ser235/236 (44% in ACSR and 64% in UCSD group, and 86% positivity against Ser240/244 (82% in ACSR and 100% in UCSD group. We observed more positive cells and stronger intensity with epitope Ser240/244 in comparison to Ser235/236 (p<0.0001. The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive for pPTEN was positively correlated with

  18. mTOR signaling promotes foam cell formation and inhibits foam cell egress through suppressing the SIRT1 signaling pathway.

    Zheng, Haixiang; Fu, Yucai; Huang, Yusheng; Zheng, Xinde; Yu, Wei; Wang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is a chronic immuno‑inflammatory disease accompanied by dyslipidemia. The authors previously demonstrated that sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) may prevent atherogenesis through influencing the liver X receptor/C‑C chemokine receptor type 7/nuclear factor‑κB (LXR‑CCR7/NF‑κB) signaling pathway. Previous studies have suggested a role for mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the potential association between mTOR signaling and SIRT1‑LXR‑CCR7/NF‑κB signaling (SIRT1 signaling) in AS pathogenesis. To induce foam cell formation, U937 cells were differentiated into macrophages by exposure to phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate (PMA) for 24 h, followed by treatment with palmitate and oxidized low density lipoprotein for a further 24 h. Oil red O staining revealed a large accumulation of lipid droplets present in foam cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated increased protein levels of phosphorylated (p)‑mTOR and its downstream factor p‑ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses additionally revealed decreased expression of SIRT1, LXRα and CCR7 and increased expression of NF‑κB and its downstream factor tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) in an atherogenetic condition induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). In addition, abundant lipid droplets accumulated in U937‑LPA‑treated foam cells. Rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, suppressed the expression and activity of mTOR and p70S6K, however enhanced expression of SIRT1, LXRα, and CCR7. Conversely, rapamycin deceased TNF‑α and NF‑κB activity, the latter of which was further confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis demonstrating increased levels of NF‑κB present in the cytoplasm compared with the nucleus. The findings of the present study suggest that mTOR signaling promotes foam cell formation and inhibits foam

  19. FAK/src-family dependent activation of the Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for microtubule-dependent focal adhesion turnover and cell migration.

    Simona Wagner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration involves a multitude of signals that converge on cytoskeletal reorganization, essential for development, immune responses and tissue repair. Using knockdown and dominant negative approaches, we show that the microtubule-associated Ste20-like kinase SLK is required for focal adhesion turnover and cell migration downstream of the FAK/c-src complex. Our results show that SLK co-localizes with paxillin, Rac1 and the microtubules at the leading edge of migrating cells and is activated by scratch wounding. SLK activation is dependent on FAK/c-src/MAPK signaling, whereas SLK recruitment to the leading edge is src-dependent but FAK independent. Our results show that SLK represents a novel focal adhesion disassembly signal.

  20. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    Kouchi, Zen; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase IIβ (PIPKIIβ) function in cancer. → PIPKIIβ is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. → PIPKIIβ suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. → Nuclear PIP 2 but not plasma membrane-localized PIP 2 mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKIIβ) but not PIPKIIα is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLCδ1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLCδ1 PHD inhibited 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 -induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P 2 production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKIIβ in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKIIβ is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1α,25(OH) 2 D 3 . These results indicate that PIPKIIβ-mediated PI(4,5)P 2 signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  2. Fisetin inhibits human melanoma cell growth through direct binding to p70S6K and mTOR: findings from 3-D melanoma skin equivalents and computational modeling.

    Syed, Deeba N; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Khan, Mohammad Imran; Sechi, Mario; Lall, Rahul K; Adhami, Vaqar M; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma continues to rise. Inspite of treatment advances, the prognosis remains grim once the disease has metastasized, emphasizing the need to explore additional therapeutic strategies. One such approach is through the use of mechanism-based dietary intervention. We previously showed that the flavonoid fisetin inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, in vitro and in vivo. Here, we studied fisetin-mediated regulation of kinases involved in melanoma growth and progression. Time-course analysis in 3-D melanoma constructs that transitioned from radial to vertical growth showed that fisetin treatment resulted in significant decrease in melanocytic lesions in contrast to untreated controls that showed large tumor nests and invading disseminated cells. Further studies in melanoma cultures and mouse xenografts showed that fisetin-mediated growth inhibition was associated with dephosphorylation of AKT, mTOR and p70S6K proteins. In silico modeling indicated direct interaction of fisetin with mTOR and p70S6K with favorable free energy values. These findings were validated by cell-free competition assays that established binding of fisetin to p70S6K and mTOR while little affinity was detected with AKT. Kinase activity studies reflected similar trend with % inhibition observed for p70S6K and mTOR at lower doses than AKT. Our studies characterized, for the first time, the differential interactions of any botanical agent with kinases involved in melanoma growth and demonstrate that fisetin inhibits mTOR and p70S6K through direct binding while the observed inhibitory effect of fisetin on AKT is mediated indirectly, through targeting interrelated pathways. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Leucine Supplementation in a Chronically Protein-Restricted Diet Enhances Muscle Weight and Postprandial Protein Synthesis of Skeletal Muscle by Promoting the mTOR Pathway in Adult Rats

    Bo Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Low protein intake causes a decrease in protein deposition in most animal tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether leucine supplementation would increase the synthesis rate of protein and muscle weight in adult rats, which chronically consume only 58.8% of their protein requirements. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of three dietary treatments including a 20% casein diet (CON, a 10% casein + 0.44% alanine diet (R, and a 10% casein + 0.87% leucine diet (RL. After a 10 d dietary treatment, plasma amino acid levels were measured after feeding, the gastrocnemius muscles and soleus muscles were harvested and weighed, and the fractional synthesis rate (FSR and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling proteins in skeletal muscle were measured. Regarding the plasma amino acid level, the RL group had the highest concentration of leucine (P < 0.05 and the lowest concentration of isoleucine (P < 0.05 among the three groups, and the CON group had a lower concentration of valine (P < 0.05 than the R and RL groups. Compared with the R and RL groups, the CON group diet significantly increased (P < 0.05 feed intake, protein synthesis rate, and the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, and decreased the weight of abdominal adipose. Compared with the R group, the RL group significantly increased in gastrocnemius muscle weight, protein synthesis rate, and phosphorylation of both ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1 and 4E-BP1. In conclusion, when protein is chronically restricted in adult rat diets, leucine supplementation moderately improves body weight gain and increases muscle protein synthesis through mTOR activation.

  4. 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol Enhances Male Broiler Breast Meat Yield through the mTOR Pathway.

    Vignale, Karen; Greene, Elizabeth S; Caldas, Justina V; England, Judith A; Boonsinchai, Nirun; Sodsee, Phiphob; Pollock, Erik D; Dridi, Sami; Coon, Craig N

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing body of evidence indicating that replacing cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃) with 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D₃] through dietary supplementation enhances breast meat yield in broiler chickens. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. We investigated the effect of 25(OH)D₃ on male broiler growth performance (body weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio, and breast meat yield), muscle protein synthesis, and the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Male Cobb 500 broiler chickens were divided into 4 body weight-matched groups and received a control diet with normal cholecalciferol (2760 IU/kg feed) for 42 d, a diet with high concentrations of cholecalciferol (5520 IU/kg feed) for 42 d, or a diet with 25(OH)D₃ (5520 IU/kg feed) for 42 d (HyD-42). A fourth group consumed the HyD-42 for 21 d and then control feed for 21 d (HyD-21) (n = 360 birds, 12 replicates/treatment). Food and clean water were available for ad libitum consumption. At the end of the 42-d experiment, protein turnover was measured by phenylalanine flooding dose. Breast muscle tissues were collected and protein synthesis-related gene and protein expression were measured by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Functional studies were performed in vitro with the use of a quail myoblast (QM7) cell line. QM7 cells were treated with 2 doses (1 nM and 10 nM) of cholecalciferol or 25(OH)D₃ alone or in combination with 100 nM rapamycin, and cell proliferation was determined by cell proliferation assay. Protein synthesis-related gene and protein expression were also determined. The HyD-42 increased 25(OH)D₃ circulating concentrations by 126% (P meat yield (P vitro functional studies showed that cells treated with 25(OH)D₃ for 24 h had increased VDR expression, and activated the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6 kinase (S6K) pathway, enhanced Ki67 protein concentrations, and induced QM7

  5. mTOR inhibitors in urinary bladder cancer.

    Pinto-Leite, R; Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, P A; Santos, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the great scientific advances that have been made in cancer treatment, there is still much to do, particularly with regard to urinary bladder cancer. Some of the drugs used in urinary bladder cancer treatment have been in use for more than 30 years and show reduced effectiveness and high recurrence rates. There have been several attempts to find new and more effective drugs, to be used alone or in combination with the drugs already in use, in order to overcome this situation.The biologically important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is altered in cancer and mTOR inhibitors have raised many expectations as potentially important anticancer drugs. In this article, the authors will review the mTOR pathway and present their experiences of the use of some mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, in isolation and in conjunction with non-mTOR inhibitors cisplatin and gemcitabine, on urinary bladder tumour cell lines. The non-muscle-invasive cell line, 5637, is the only one that exhibits a small alteration in the mTOR and AKT phosphorylation after rapalogs exposure. Also, there was a small inhibition of cell proliferation. With gemcitabine plus everolimus or temsirolimus, the results were encouraging as a more effective response was noticed with both combinations, especially in the 5637 and T24 cell lines. Cisplatin associated with everolimus or temsirolimus also gave promising results, as an antiproliferative effect was observed when the drugs were associated, in particular on the 5637 and HT1376 cell lines. Everolimus or temsirolimus in conjunction with gemcitabine or cisplatin could have an important role to play in urinary bladder cancer treatment, depending on the tumour grading.

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Cell Death in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells by Repressing mTOR via AMPK Activation and PI3K/Akt Inhibition

    Nayeong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anticancer properties and mechanism of action of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω3-PUFAs have been demonstrated in several cancers; however, the mechanism in lung cancer remains unclear. Here, we show that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, a ω3-PUFA, induced apoptosis and autophagy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. DHA-induced cell death was accompanied by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and inactivated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. Knocking down AMPK and overexpressing Akt increased mTOR activity and attenuated DHA-induced cell death, suggesting that DHA induces cell death via AMPK- and Akt-regulated mTOR inactivation. This was confirmed in Fat-1 transgenic mice, which produce ω3-PUFAs. Lewis lung cancer (LLC tumor cells implanted into Fat-1 mice showed slower growth, lower phospho-Akt levels, and higher levels of apoptosis and autophagy than cells implanted into wild-type mice. Taken together, these data suggest that DHA-induced apoptosis and autophagy in NSCLC cells are associated with AMPK activation and PI3K/Akt inhibition, which in turn lead to suppression of mTOR; thus ω3-PUFAs may be utilized as potential therapeutic agents for NSCLC treatment.

  7. Mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis identify several autophosphorylated residues required for the activity of PrkC, a Ser/Thr kinase from Bacillus subtilis

    Madec, Edwige; Stensballe, Allan; Kjellström, Sven

    2003-01-01

    We have shown recently that PrkC, which is involved in developmental processes in Bacillus subtilis, is a Ser/Thr kinase with features of the receptor kinase family of eukaryotic Hanks kinases. In this study, we expressed and purified from Escherichia coli the cytoplasmic domain of PrkC containing...... the kinase and a short juxtamembrane region. This fragment, which we designate PrkCc, undergoes autophosphorylation in E.coli. PrkCc is further autophosphorylated in vitro, apparently through a trans-kinase, intermolecular reaction. PrkC also displays kinase activity with myelin basic protein. Using high...... mass accuracy electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we identified seven phosphorylated threonine and one serine residue in PrkCc. All the corresponding residues were replaced by systematic site-directed mutagenesis and the purified mutant...

  8. Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1 by a PB1-Domain-Driven Kinase Complex Cascade.

    Linares, Juan F; Duran, Angeles; Reina-Campos, Miguel; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Campos, Alex; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria T

    2015-08-25

    The mTORC1 complex is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient availability. The signaling adaptor p62 contributes to mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids and interacts with TRAF6, which is required for the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosome and the subsequent K63 polyubiquitination and activation of mTOR. However, the signal initiating these p62-driven processes was previously unknown. Here, we show that p62 is phosphorylated via a cascade that includes MEK3/6 and p38δ and is driven by the PB1-containing kinase MEKK3. This phosphorylation results in the recruitment of TRAF6 to p62, the ubiquitination and activation of mTOR, and the regulation of autophagy and cell proliferation. Genetic inactivation of MEKK3 or p38δ mimics that of p62 in that it leads to inhibited growth of PTEN-deficient prostate organoids. Analysis of human prostate cancer samples showed upregulation of these three components of the pathway, which correlated with enhanced mTORC1 activation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1 by a PB1-Domain-Driven Kinase Complex Cascade

    Juan F. Linares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mTORC1 complex is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient availability. The signaling adaptor p62 contributes to mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids and interacts with TRAF6, which is required for the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosome and the subsequent K63 polyubiquitination and activation of mTOR. However, the signal initiating these p62-driven processes was previously unknown. Here, we show that p62 is phosphorylated via a cascade that includes MEK3/6 and p38δ and is driven by the PB1-containing kinase MEKK3. This phosphorylation results in the recruitment of TRAF6 to p62, the ubiquitination and activation of mTOR, and the regulation of autophagy and cell proliferation. Genetic inactivation of MEKK3 or p38δ mimics that of p62 in that it leads to inhibited growth of PTEN-deficient prostate organoids. Analysis of human prostate cancer samples showed upregulation of these three components of the pathway, which correlated with enhanced mTORC1 activation.

  10. The extracytoplasmic domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinase PknB binds specific muropeptides and is required for PknB localization.

    Mir, Mushtaq; Asong, Jinkeng; Li, Xiuru; Cardot, Jessica; Boons, Geert-Jan; Husson, Robert N

    2011-07-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinase PknB has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and morphology in this organism. The extracytoplasmic domain of this membrane protein comprises four penicillin binding protein and Ser/Thr kinase associated (PASTA) domains, which are predicted to bind stem peptides of peptidoglycan. Using a comprehensive library of synthetic muropeptides, we demonstrate that the extracytoplasmic domain of PknB binds muropeptides in a manner dependent on the presence of specific amino acids at the second and third positions of the stem peptide, and on the presence of the sugar moiety N-acetylmuramic acid linked to the peptide. We further show that PknB localizes strongly to the mid-cell and also to the cell poles, and that the extracytoplasmic domain is required for PknB localization. In contrast to strong growth stimulation by conditioned medium, we observe no growth stimulation of M. tuberculosis by a synthetic muropeptide with high affinity for the PknB PASTAs. We do find a moderate effect of a high affinity peptide on resuscitation of dormant cells. While the PASTA domains of PknB may play a role in stimulating growth by binding exogenous peptidoglycan fragments, our data indicate that a major function of these domains is for proper PknB localization, likely through binding of peptidoglycan fragments produced locally at the mid-cell and the cell poles. These data suggest a model in which PknB is targeted to the sites of peptidoglycan turnover to regulate cell growth and cell division.

  11. The extracytoplasmic domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinase PknB binds specific muropeptides and is required for PknB localization.

    Mushtaq Mir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr kinase PknB has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and morphology in this organism. The extracytoplasmic domain of this membrane protein comprises four penicillin binding protein and Ser/Thr kinase associated (PASTA domains, which are predicted to bind stem peptides of peptidoglycan. Using a comprehensive library of synthetic muropeptides, we demonstrate that the extracytoplasmic domain of PknB binds muropeptides in a manner dependent on the presence of specific amino acids at the second and third positions of the stem peptide, and on the presence of the sugar moiety N-acetylmuramic acid linked to the peptide. We further show that PknB localizes strongly to the mid-cell and also to the cell poles, and that the extracytoplasmic domain is required for PknB localization. In contrast to strong growth stimulation by conditioned medium, we observe no growth stimulation of M. tuberculosis by a synthetic muropeptide with high affinity for the PknB PASTAs. We do find a moderate effect of a high affinity peptide on resuscitation of dormant cells. While the PASTA domains of PknB may play a role in stimulating growth by binding exogenous peptidoglycan fragments, our data indicate that a major function of these domains is for proper PknB localization, likely through binding of peptidoglycan fragments produced locally at the mid-cell and the cell poles. These data suggest a model in which PknB is targeted to the sites of peptidoglycan turnover to regulate cell growth and cell division.

  12. A Major Facilitator Superfamily Transporter-Mediated Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Fungicides Requires Yap1, Skn7, and MAP Kinases in the Citrus Fungal Pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    Li-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS transporters play an important role in multidrug resistance in fungi. We report an AaMFS19 gene encoding a MFS transporter required for cellular resistance to oxidative stress and fungicides in the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata. AaMFS19, containing 12 transmembrane domains, displays activity toward a broad range of substrates. Fungal mutants lacking AaMFS19 display profound hypersensitivities to cumyl hydroperoxide, potassium superoxide, many singlet oxygen-generating compounds (eosin Y, rose Bengal, hematoporphyrin, methylene blue, and cercosporin, and the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor, Congo red. AaMFS19 mutants also increase sensitivity to copper ions, clotrimazole, fludioxonil, and kocide fungicides, 2-chloro-5-hydroxypyridine (CHP, and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA. AaMFS19 mutants induce smaller necrotic lesions on leaves of a susceptible citrus cultivar. All observed phenotypes in the mutant are restored by introducing and expressing a wild-type copy of AaMFS19. The wild-type strain of A. alternata treated with either CHP or TIBA reduces radial growth and formation and germination of conidia, increases hyphal branching, and results in decreased expression of the AaMFS19 gene. The expression of AaMFS19 is regulated by the Yap1 transcription activator, the Hog1 and Fus3 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases, the 'two component' histidine kinase, and the Skn7 response regulator. Our results demonstrate that A. alternata confers resistance to different chemicals via a membrane-bound MFS transporter.

  13. The inability of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation to stimulate GLUT4 translocation indicates additional signaling pathways are required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

    Isakoff, S J; Taha, C; Rose, E; Marcusohn, J; Klip, A; Skolnik, E Y

    1995-10-24

    Recent experimental evidence has focused attention to the role of two molecules, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase), in linking the insulin receptor to glucose uptake; IRS-1 knockout mice are insulin resistant, and pharmacological inhibitors of PI3-kinase block insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. To investigate the role of PI3-kinase and IRS-1 in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake we examined whether stimulation of insulin-sensitive cells with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or with interleukin 4 (IL-4) stimulates glucose uptake; the activated PDGF receptor (PDGFR) directly binds and activates PI3-kinase, whereas the IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) activates PI3-kinase via IRS-1 or the IRS-1-related molecule 4PS. We found that stimulation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with PDGF resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of the PDGFR and activation of PI3-kinase in these cells. To examine whether IL-4 stimulates glucose uptake, L6 myoblasts were engineered to overexpress GLUT4 as well as both chains of the IL-4R (L6/IL-4R/GLUT4); when these L6/IL-4R/GLUT4 myoblasts were stimulated with IL-4, IRS-1 became tyrosine phosphorylated and associated with PI3-kinase. Although PDGF and IL-4 can activate PI3-kinase in the respective cell lines, they do not possess insulin's ability to stimulate glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that activation of PI3-kinase is not sufficient to stimulate GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane. We postulate that activation of a second signaling pathway by insulin, distinct from PI3-kinase, is necessary for the stimulation of glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive cells.

  14. Leptin induces cardiac fibrosis through galectin-3, mTOR and oxidative stress: potential role in obesity.

    Martínez-Martínez, Ernesto; Jurado-López, Raquel; Valero-Muñoz, María; Bartolomé, María Visitación; Ballesteros, Sandra; Luaces, María; Briones, Ana María; López-Andrés, Natalia; Miana, María; Cachofeiro, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Leptin acts as a cardiac profibrotic factor. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. Therefore, we sought to elucidate the mediators involved in this process and the potential role of leptin in cardiac fibrosis associated with obesity. Male Wistar rats were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD; 33.5% fat), or a standard diet (3.5% fat) for 6 weeks. HFD animals show cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and an increase in O2- production as evaluated by dihydroethidium. Echocardiographic parameters of cardiac structure and systolic function were similar in both groups. Cardiac levels of leptin, collagen I, galectin-3 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) were higher in HFD than in controls. In cardiac myofibroblasts, leptin (10-100 ng/ml) increased O2-, collagen I, galectin-3, TGF-β and connective tissue growth factor production (CTGF). These effects were prevented by the presence of either melatonin (10 mmol/l) or the inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin (10 mmol/l). Blockage of galectin-3 activity by N-acetyllactosamine (LacNac 10 mmol/l) reduced both collagen I and O2(*-) production induced by leptin. The p70S6 kinase activation/phosphorylation, the downstream mediator of mTOR, induced by leptin was not modified by melatonin. Leptin reduced the metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 activity and the presence of melatonin, rapamycin or LacNac were unable to prevent it. The data suggest that leptin locally produced in the heart could participate in the fibrosis observed in HFD by affecting collagen turnover. Collagen synthesis induced by leptin seems to be mediated by the production of galectin-3, TGF-β and CTGF through oxidative stress increased by activation of mTOR pathway.

  15. Coupled down-regulation of mTOR and telomerase activity during fluorouracil-induced apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Bu, Xinxin; Jia, Fengqi; Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Xianling; Wu, Mengchao; Wei, Lixin [Tumor Immunology and Gene Therapy Center, Eastern Hepatobiliary Hospital, Second Military Medical Universisty, 225 Changhai Road, Shanghai 200438 (China)

    2007-11-12

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most invasive and frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in many regions of Asia. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. Up-regulation of telomerase activity is thought to be a critical step leading to cell transformation. This study investigated changes in mTOR pathway and telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated with chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu). We detected apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells by TUNEL assay. Telomerase activity, hTERT transcription level and p- p70 S6k was demonstrated by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol and silver staining assay, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and Western blot analysis respectively. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with 5-Fu leads to apoptosis of the cells, and reduction in telomerase activity, as well as a dramatic reduction in the activated form of p70 S6 kinase, a mTOR substrate. The 5-Fu treatment nearly abolishes transcription of hTERT (the major component of telomerase) mRNA. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reduce hTERT protein level but did not affect hTERT transcription. 5-Fu and rapamycin were synergistic in regards to down-regulation of telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fu may down-regulate telomerase activity at both transcriptional level and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway-dependent post-transcriptional level to facilitate hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  16. Coupled down-regulation of mTOR and telomerase activity during fluorouracil-induced apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Bu, Xinxin; Jia, Fengqi; Wang, Weifeng; Guo, Xianling; Wu, Mengchao; Wei, Lixin

    2007-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most invasive and frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in many regions of Asia. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. Up-regulation of telomerase activity is thought to be a critical step leading to cell transformation. This study investigated changes in mTOR pathway and telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated with chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu). We detected apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells by TUNEL assay. Telomerase activity, hTERT transcription level and p- p70 S6k was demonstrated by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol and silver staining assay, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and Western blot analysis respectively. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with 5-Fu leads to apoptosis of the cells, and reduction in telomerase activity, as well as a dramatic reduction in the activated form of p70 S6 kinase, a mTOR substrate. The 5-Fu treatment nearly abolishes transcription of hTERT (the major component of telomerase) mRNA. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reduce hTERT protein level but did not affect hTERT transcription. 5-Fu and rapamycin were synergistic in regards to down-regulation of telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fu may down-regulate telomerase activity at both transcriptional level and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway-dependent post-transcriptional level to facilitate hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

  17. Coupled down-regulation of mTOR and telomerase activity during fluorouracil-induced apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Wu Mengchao

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most invasive and frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in many regions of Asia. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. Up-regulation of telomerase activity is thought to be a critical step leading to cell transformation. Methods This study investigated changes in mTOR pathway and telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated with chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu. We detected apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells by TUNEL assay. Telomerase activity, hTERT transcription level and p- p70 S6k was demonstrated by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol and silver staining assay, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and Western blot analysis respectively. Results Treating SMMC-7721 cells with 5-Fu leads to apoptosis of the cells, and reduction in telomerase activity, as well as a dramatic reduction in the activated form of p70 S6 kinase, a mTOR substrate. The 5-Fu treatment nearly abolishes transcription of hTERT (the major component of telomerase mRNA. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reduce hTERT protein level but did not affect hTERT transcription. 5-Fu and rapamycin were synergistic in regards to down-regulation of telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cells. Conclusion These results suggest that chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fu may down-regulate telomerase activity at both transcriptional level and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway-dependent post-transcriptional level to facilitate hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  18. Ste12/Fab1 phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase is required for nitrogen-regulated mitotic commitment and cell size control.

    David Cobley

    Full Text Available Tight coupling of cell growth and cell cycle progression enable cells to adjust their rate of division, and therefore size, to the demands of proliferation in varying nutritional environments. Nutrient stress promotes inhibition of Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1 activity. In fission yeast, reduced TORC1 activity advances mitotic onset and switches growth to a sustained proliferation at reduced cell size. A screen for mutants, that failed to advance mitosis upon nitrogen stress, identified a mutant in the PIKFYVE 1-phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate 5-kinase fission yeast homolog Ste12. Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants were unable to advance the cell cycle to reduce cell size after a nitrogen downshift to poor nitrogen (proline growth conditions. While it is well established that PI(3,5P2 signalling is required for autophagy and that Ste12PIKFYVE mutants have enlarged vacuoles (yeast lysosomes, neither a block to autophagy or mutants that independently have enlarged vacuoles had any impact upon nitrogen control of mitotic commitment. The addition of rapamycin to Ste12PIKFYVE deficient mutants reduced cell size at division to suggest that Ste12PIKFYVE possibly functions upstream of TORC1. ste12 mutants display increased Torin1 (TOR inhibitor sensitivity. However, no major impact on TORC1 or TORC2 activity was observed in the ste12 deficient mutants. In summary, Ste12PIKFYVE is required for nitrogen-stress mediated advancement of mitosis to reduce cell size at division.

  19. TIS21/(BTG2) negatively regulates estradiol-stimulated expansion of hematopoietic stem cells by derepressing Akt phosphorylation and inhibiting mTOR signal transduction.

    Kim, Bong Cho; Ryu, Min Sook; Oh, S Paul; Lim, In Kyoung

    2008-09-01

    It has been known that 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate-inducible sequence 21 (TIS21), ortholog of human B-cell translocation gene 2, regulates expansions of stage-specific thymocytes and hematopoietic progenitors. In the present study, lineage-negative (Lin(-))/stem cell antigen-1-positive (Sca-1+)/c-Kit+ (LSK) cell content was significantly elevated in bone marrow (BM) of TIS21-knockout (TIS21(-/-)) female mice, suggesting 17beta-estradiol (E(2))-regulated progenitor expansion. E(2) induced DNA synthesis and cell proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from TIS21(-/-) mice, but not wild type (WT). In contrast to WT, E(2) failed to activate protein kinase B (Akt) in the TIS21(-/-) MEFs, independent of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) activation. Despite attenuation of Akt activation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was constitutively activated in the TIS21(-/-) MEFs. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2 inhibitor or knockdown of Erk1 could restore activation of Akt and downregulate mTOR. Immunoprecipitation showed Akt preferentially bound to phosphorylated Erk1/2 (p-Erk1/2) in TIS21(-/-) cells, but reconstitution of TIS21 inhibited their interaction. E(2)-injected TIS21(-/-) male mice also increased LSK cells in BM. Taken together, expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in TIS21(-/-) female mice might be through inhibition of Akt activation, and constitutive activation of mTOR via preferential binding of TIS21 to E(2)-induced p-Erk1/2, compared with that of Akt. Our results suggest that TIS21 plays a pivotal role in maintaining the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and hematopoiesis.

  20. mTOR and the health benefits of exercise.

    Watson, Kurt; Baar, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Exercise is the greatest physiological stress that our bodies experience. For example, during maximal endurance exercise in elite athlete's cardiac output can increase up to 8-fold and the working muscles receive 21-times more blood each minute than at rest. Given the physiological stress associated with exercise and the adaptations that occur to handle this stress, it is not surprising that exercise training is known to prevent or effectively treat a multitude of degenerative conditions including cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and many others. Many of the health benefits of exercise are mediated by the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), either in complex 1 or 2, not only within the working muscle, but also in distant tissues such as fat, liver, and brain. This review will discuss how exercise activates mTOR in diverse tissues and the ways that mTOR is important in the adaptive response that makes us bigger, stronger, and healthier as a result of exercise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Genetic Screen Identifies a Requirement for Cysteine-Rich-Receptor-Like Kinases in Rice NH1 (OsNPR1-Mediated Immunity.

    Mawsheng Chern

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance, mediated by the Arabidopsis NPR1 gene and the rice NH1 gene, confers broad-spectrum immunity to diverse pathogens. NPR1 and NH1 interact with TGA transcription factors to activate downstream defense genes. Despite the importance of this defense response, the signaling components downstream of NPR1/NH1 and TGA proteins are poorly defined. Here we report the identification of a rice mutant, snim1, which suppresses NH1-mediated immunity and demonstrate that two genes encoding previously uncharacterized cysteine-rich-receptor-like kinases (CRK6 and CRK10, complement the snim1 mutant phenotype. Silencing of CRK6 and CRK10 genes individually in the parental genetic background recreates the snim1 phenotype. We identified a rice mutant in the Kitaake genetic background with a frameshift mutation in crk10; this mutant also displays a compromised immune response highlighting the important role of crk10. We also show that elevated levels of NH1 expression lead to enhanced CRK10 expression and that the rice TGA2.1 protein binds to the CRK10 promoter. These experiments demonstrate a requirement for CRKs in NH1-mediated immunity and establish a molecular link between NH1 and induction of CRK10 expression.

  2. Prelimbic cortex extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation is required for memory retrieval of long-term inhibitory avoidance.

    Luo, Fei; Zheng, Jian; Sun, Xuan; Deng, Wei-Ke; Li, Bao Ming; Liu, Fang

    2017-04-15

    Neural mechanism underlying memory retrieval has been extensively studied in the hippocampus and amygdala. However, little is known about the role of medial prefrontal cortex in long-term memory retrieval. We evaluate this issue in one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance (IA) paradigm. Our results showed that, 1) inactivation of mPFC by local infusion of GABA A -receptor agonist muscimol caused severe deficits in retrieval of 1-day and 7-day but had no effects on 2-h inhibitory avoidance memory; 2) the protein level of phosphorylated-ERK1/2 in mPFC were significantly increased following retrieval of 1-day and 7-day IA memory, so did the numbers of phosphorylated-ERK (pERK) and phosphorylated-CREB (pCREB) labeled neurons; 3) intra-mPFC infusion of ERK kinase inhibitor PD98095 significantly reduced phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels and phosphorylated-ERK1/2 and phosphorylated-CREB labeled cells, and severely impaired retrieval of 7-day IA memory when the drugs were administrated 30min prior to test. The present study provides evidence that retrieval of long-lasting memory for inhibitory avoidance requires mPFC and involves the ERK-CREB signaling cascade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Germline and somatic mutations in the MTOR gene in focal cortical dysplasia and epilepsy

    Møller, Rikke S; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Chipaux, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of somatic MTOR mutations in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and of germline MTOR mutations in a broad range of epilepsies. METHODS: We collected 20 blood-brain paired samples from patients with FCD and searched for somatic variants using deep-targeted gene panel...... sequencing. Germline mutations in MTOR were assessed in a French research cohort of 93 probands with focal epilepsies and in a diagnostic Danish cohort of 245 patients with a broad range of epilepsies. Data sharing among collaborators allowed us to ascertain additional germline variants in MTOR. RESULTS: We...... detected recurrent somatic variants (p.Ser2215Phe, p.Ser2215Tyr, and p.Leu1460Pro) in the MTOR gene in 37% of participants with FCD II and showed histologic evidence for activation of the mTORC1 signaling cascade in brain tissue. We further identified 5 novel de novo germline missense MTOR variants in 6...

  4. Functional human sperm capacitation requires both bicarbonate-dependent PKA activation and down-regulation of Ser/Thr phosphatases by Src family kinases.

    Battistone, M A; Da Ros, V G; Salicioni, A M; Navarrete, F A; Krapf, D; Visconti, P E; Cuasnicú, P S

    2013-09-01

    In all mammalian species studied so far, sperm capacitation correlates with an increase in protein tyrosine (Tyr) phosphorylation mediated by a bicarbonate-dependent cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Recent studies in mice revealed, however, that a Src family kinase (SFK)-induced inactivation of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) phosphatases is also involved in the signaling pathways leading to Tyr phosphorylation. In view of these observations and with the aim of getting a better understanding of the signaling pathways involved in human sperm capacitation, in the present work we investigated the involvement of both the cAMP/PKA and SFK/phosphatase pathways in relation to the capacitation state of the cells. For this purpose, different signaling events and sperm functional parameters were analyzed as a function of capacitation time. Results revealed a very early bicarbonate-dependent activation of PKA indicated by the rapid (1 min) increase in both phospho-PKA substrates and cAMP levels (P < 0.05). However, a complete pattern of Tyr phosphorylation was detected only after 6-h incubation at which time sperm exhibited the ability to undergo the acrosome reaction (AR) and to penetrate zona-free hamster oocytes. Sperm capacitated in the presence of the SFK inhibitor SKI606 showed a decrease in both PKA substrate and Tyr phosphorylation levels, which was overcome by exposure of sperm to the Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA). However, OA was unable to induce phosphorylation when sperm were incubated under PKA-inhibitory conditions (i.e. in the absence of bicarbonate or in the presence of PKA inhibitor). Moreover, the increase in PKA activity by exposure to a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor did not overcome the inhibition produced by SKI606. Whereas the presence of SKI606 during capacitation produced a negative effect (P < 0.05) on sperm motility, progesterone-induced AR and fertilizing ability, none of these inhibitions were observed when sperm

  5. The receptor-like kinase SOBIR1 interacts with Brassica napus LepR3 and is required for Leptosphaeria maculans AvrLm1-triggered immunity

    Lisong eMa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (L. maculans is the causal agent of blackleg disease of canola/oilseed rape (Brassica napus worldwide. We previously reported cloning of the B. napus blackleg resistance gene, LepR3, which encodes a receptor-like protein. LepR3 triggers localised cell death upon recognition of its cognate Avr protein, AvrLm1. Here, we exploited the Nicotiana benthamiana model plant to investigate the recognition mechanism of AvrLm1 by LepR3. Co-expression of the LepR3/AvrLm1 gene pair in N. benthamiana resulted in development of a hypersensitive response (HR. However, a truncated AvrLm1 lacking its indigenous signal peptide was compromised in its ability to induce LepR3-mediated HR, indicating that AvrLm1 is perceived by LepR3 extracellularly. Structure-function analysis of the AvrLm1 protein revealed that the C-terminal region of AvrLm1 was required for LepR3-mediated HR in N. benthamiana and for resistance to L. maculans in B. napus. LepR3 was shown to be physically interacting with the B. napus receptor like kinase, SOBIR1 (BnSOBIR1. Silencing of NbSOBIR1 or NbSERK3 (BAK1 compromised LepR3-AvrLm1-dependent HR in N. benthamiana, suggesting that LepR3-mediated resistance to L. maculans in B. napus requires SOBIR1 and BAK1/SERK3. Using this model system, we determined that BnSOBIR1 and SERK3/BAK1 are essential partners in the LepR3 signalling complex and were able to define the AvrLm1 effector domain.

  6. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c......AMP signaling whereby cAMP uses both PKA and Epac to achieve an appropriate cellular response....

  7. Rice calcium-dependent protein kinase OsCPK17 targets plasma membrane intrinsic protein and sucrose phosphate synthase and is required for a proper cold stress response

    Almadanim, M. Cecí lia; Alexandre, Bruno M.; Rosa, Margarida T.G.; Sapeta, Helena; Leitã o, Antó nio E.; Ramalho, José C.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Negrã o, Só nia; Abreu, Isabel A.; Oliveira, M. Margarida

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are involved in plant tolerance mechanisms to abiotic stresses. Although CDPKs are recognized as key messengers in signal transduction, the specific role of most members of this family remains unknown. Here

  8. Thyroid hormone-dependent development of early cortical networks: Temporal specificity and the contribution of trkB and mTOR pathways

    Sören eWesterholz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Early in neocortical network development, triiodothyronine (T3 promotes GABAergic neurons’ population increase, their somatic growth and the formation of GABAergic synapses. In the presence of T3, GABAergic interneurons form longer axons and conspicuous axonal arborizations, with an increased number of putative synaptic boutons. Here we show that the increased GABAergic axonal growth is positively correlated with the proximity to non-GABAergic neurons. A differential innervation emerges from a T3-dependent decrease of axonal length in fields with low density of neuronal cell bodies, combined with an increased bouton formation in fields with high density of neuronal somata. T3 addition to deprived networks after the first two weeks of development did not rescue deficits in the GABAergic synaptic bouton distribution, or in the frequency and duration of spontaneous bursts. During the critical two-week-period, GABAergic signaling is depolarizing as revealed by calcium imaging experiments. Interestingly, T3 enhanced the expression of the potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2, and accelerated the developmental shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing GABAergic signaling in non-GABAergic neurons.The T3-related increase of spontaneous network activity was remarkably reduced after blockade of either tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (trkB or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways. T3-dependent increase in GABAergic neurons’ soma size was mediated mainly by mTOR signaling. Conversely, the T3-dependent selective increase of GABAergic boutons near non-GABAergic cell bodies is mediated by trkB signaling only. Both trkB and mTOR signaling mediate T3-dependent reduction of the GABAergic axon extension. The circuitry context is relevant for the interaction between T3 and trkB signaling, but not for the interactions between T3 and mTOR signaling.

  9. Systemic and Nonrenal Adverse Effects Occurring in Renal Transplant Patients Treated with mTOR Inhibitors

    Gianluigi Zaza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I, sirolimus and everolimus, are immunosuppressive drugs largely used in renal transplantation. The main mechanism of action of these drugs is the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a regulatory protein kinase involved in lymphocyte proliferation. Additionally, the inhibition of the crosstalk among mTORC1, mTORC2, and PI3K confers the antineoplastic activities of these drugs. Because of their specific pharmacological characteristics and their relative lack of nephrotoxicity, these inhibitors are valid option to calcineurine inhibitors (CNIs for maintenance immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy. However, as other immunosuppressive drugs, mTOR-I may induce the development of several adverse effects that need to be early recognized and treated to avoid severe illness in renal transplant patients. In particular, mTOR-I may induce systemic nonnephrological side effects including pulmonary toxicity, hematological disorders, dysmetabolism, lymphedema, stomatitis, cutaneous adverse effects, and fertility/gonadic toxicity. Although most of the adverse effects are dose related, it is extremely important for clinicians to early recognize them in order to reduce dosage or discontinue mTOR-I treatment avoiding the onset and development of severe clinical complications.

  10. mTOR inhibition elicits a dramatic response in PI3K-dependent colon cancers.

    Dustin A Deming

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K signaling pathway is critical for multiple cellular functions including metabolism, proliferation, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, and is the most commonly altered pathway in human cancers. Recently, we developed a novel mouse model of colon cancer in which tumors are initiated by a dominant active PI3K (FC PIK3ca. The cancers in these mice are moderately differentiated invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas of the proximal colon that develop by 50 days of age. Interestingly, these cancers form without a benign intermediary or aberrant WNT signaling, indicating a non-canonical mechanism of tumorigenesis. Since these tumors are dependent upon the PI3K pathway, we investigated the potential for tumor response by the targeting of this pathway with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor. A cohort of FC PIK3ca mice were treated with rapamycin at a dose of 6 mg/kg/day or placebo for 14 days. FDG dual hybrid PET/CT imaging demonstrated a dramatic tumor response in the rapamycin arm and this was confirmed on necropsy. The tumor tissue remaining after treatment with rapamycin demonstrated increased pERK1/2 or persistent phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (pS6, indicating potential resistance mechanisms. This unique model will further our understanding of human disease and facilitate the development of therapeutics through pharmacologic screening and biomarker identification.

  11. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Jae Sung You

    Full Text Available Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  12. Identifying kinase dependency in cancer cells by integrating high-throughput drug screening and kinase inhibition data.

    Ryall, Karen A; Shin, Jimin; Yoo, Minjae; Hinz, Trista K; Kim, Jihye; Kang, Jaewoo; Heasley, Lynn E; Tan, Aik Choon

    2015-12-01

    Targeted kinase inhibitors have dramatically improved cancer treatment, but kinase dependency for an individual patient or cancer cell can be challenging to predict. Kinase dependency does not always correspond with gene expression and mutation status. High-throughput drug screens are powerful tools for determining kinase dependency, but drug polypharmacology can make results difficult to interpret. We developed Kinase Addiction Ranker (KAR), an algorithm that integrates high-throughput drug screening data, comprehensive kinase inhibition data and gene expression profiles to identify kinase dependency in cancer cells. We applied KAR to predict kinase dependency of 21 lung cancer cell lines and 151 leukemia patient samples using published datasets. We experimentally validated KAR predictions of FGFR and MTOR dependence in lung cancer cell line H1581, showing synergistic reduction in proliferation after combining ponatinib and AZD8055. KAR can be downloaded as a Python function or a MATLAB script along with example inputs and outputs at: http://tanlab.ucdenver.edu/KAR/. aikchoon.tan@ucdenver.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Regulation of mTORC1 Signaling by Src Kinase Activity Is Akt1-Independent in RSV-Transformed Cells

    Martina Vojtěchová

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased activity of the Src tyrosine protein kinase that has been observed in a large number of human malignancies appears to be a promising target for drug therapy. In the present study, a critical role of the Src activity in the deregulation of mTOR signaling pathway in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV-transformed hamster fibroblasts, H19 cells, was shown using these cells treated with the Src-specific inhibitor, SU6656, and clones of fibroblasts expressing either the active Src or the dominant-negative Src kinase-dead mutant. Disruption of the Src kinase activity results in substantial reduction of the phosphorylation and activity of the Akt/protein kinase B (PKB, phosphorylation of tuberin (TSC2, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, S6K1, ribosomal protein S6, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 4E-BP1. The ectopic, active Akt1 that was expressed in Src-deficient cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of TSC2 in these cells, but it failed to activate the inhibited components of the mTOR pathway that are downstream of TSC2. The data indicate that the Src kinase activity is essential for the activity of mTOR-dependent signaling pathway and suggest that mTOR targets may be controlled by Src independently of Akt1/TSC2 cascade in cells expressing hyperactive Src protein. These observations might have an implication in drug resistance to mTOR inhibitor-based cancer therapy in certain cell types.

  14. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding in AGC protein kinases.

    Chan, Tung O; Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S; Rodeck, Ulrich

    2012-02-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non- ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families.

  15. Autoregulation of kinase dephosphorylation by ATP binding to AGC protein kinases

    Pascal, John M; Armen, Roger S

    2012-01-01

    AGC kinases, including the three Akt (protein kinase B) isoforms, protein kinase A (PKA) and all protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, require activation loop phosphorylation (threonine 308 in Akt1) as well as phosphorylation of a C-terminal residue (serine 473 in Akt1) for catalytic activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets. Conversely, phosphatases reverse these phosphorylations. Virtually all cellular processes are affected by AGC kinases, a circumstance that has led to intense scrutiny of the molecular mechanisms that regulate phosphorylation of these kinases. Here, we review a new layer of control of phosphorylation in Akt, PKA and PKC pointing to ATP binding pocket occupancy as a means to decelerate dephosphorylation of these and, potentially, other kinases. This additional level of kinase regulation opens the door to search for new functional motifs for the rational design of non-ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors that discriminate within and between protein kinase families. PMID:22262182

  16. The p21-activated kinase (PAK family member PakD is required for chemorepulsion and proliferation inhibition by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Jonathan E Phillips

    Full Text Available In Dictyostelium discoideum, the secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as reporters of cell density and regulate cell number by inhibiting proliferation at high cell densities. AprA also functions to disperse groups of cells at high density by acting as a chemorepellent. However, the signal transduction pathways associated with AprA and CfaD are not clear, and little is known about how AprA affects the cytoskeleton to regulate cell movement. We found that the p21-activated kinase (PAK family member PakD is required for both the proliferation-inhibiting activity of AprA and CfaD and the chemorepellent activity of AprA. Similar to cells lacking AprA or CfaD, cells lacking PakD proliferate to a higher cell density than wild-type cells. Recombinant AprA and CfaD inhibit the proliferation of wild-type cells but not cells lacking PakD. Like AprA and CfaD, PakD affects proliferation but does not significantly affect growth (the accumulation of mass on a per-nucleus basis. In contrast to wild-type cells, cells lacking PakD are not repelled from a source of AprA, and colonies of cells lacking PakD expand at a slower rate than wild-type cells, indicating that PakD is required for AprA-mediated chemorepulsion. A PakD-GFP fusion protein localizes to an intracellular punctum that is not the nucleus or centrosome, and PakD-GFP is also occasionally observed at the rear cortex of moving cells. Vegetative cells lacking PakD show excessive actin-based filopodia-like structures, suggesting that PakD affects actin dynamics, consistent with previously characterized roles of PAK proteins in actin regulation. Together, our results implicate PakD in AprA/CfaD signaling and show that a PAK protein is required for proper chemorepulsive cell movement in Dictyostelium.

  17. The p21-activated kinase (PAK) family member PakD is required for chemorepulsion and proliferation inhibition by autocrine signals in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Gomer, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the secreted proteins AprA and CfaD function as reporters of cell density and regulate cell number by inhibiting proliferation at high cell densities. AprA also functions to disperse groups of cells at high density by acting as a chemorepellent. However, the signal transduction pathways associated with AprA and CfaD are not clear, and little is known about how AprA affects the cytoskeleton to regulate cell movement. We found that the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family member PakD is required for both the proliferation-inhibiting activity of AprA and CfaD and the chemorepellent activity of AprA. Similar to cells lacking AprA or CfaD, cells lacking PakD proliferate to a higher cell density than wild-type cells. Recombinant AprA and CfaD inhibit the proliferation of wild-type cells but not cells lacking PakD. Like AprA and CfaD, PakD affects proliferation but does not significantly affect growth (the accumulation of mass) on a per-nucleus basis. In contrast to wild-type cells, cells lacking PakD are not repelled from a source of AprA, and colonies of cells lacking PakD expand at a slower rate than wild-type cells, indicating that PakD is required for AprA-mediated chemorepulsion. A PakD-GFP fusion protein localizes to an intracellular punctum that is not the nucleus or centrosome, and PakD-GFP is also occasionally observed at the rear cortex of moving cells. Vegetative cells lacking PakD show excessive actin-based filopodia-like structures, suggesting that PakD affects actin dynamics, consistent with previously characterized roles of PAK proteins in actin regulation. Together, our results implicate PakD in AprA/CfaD signaling and show that a PAK protein is required for proper chemorepulsive cell movement in Dictyostelium.

  18. Casein kinases

    Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The present review on casein kinases focuses mainly on the possible metabolic role of CK-2, with special emphasis on its behavior in pathological tissues. From these data at least three ways to regulate CK-2 activity emerge: (i) CK-2 activity changes during embryogenesis, being high at certain...

  19. TaCPK2-A, a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene that is required for wheat powdery mildew resistance enhances bacterial blight resistance in transgenic rice.

    Geng, Shuaifeng; Li, Aili; Tang, Lichuan; Yin, Lingjie; Wu, Liang; Lei, Cailin; Guo, Xiuping; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Guanghuai; Zhai, Wenxue; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, Youliang; Lan, Xiujin; Mao, Long

    2013-08-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are important Ca2+ signalling components involved in complex immune and stress signalling networks; but the knowledge of CPK gene functions in the hexaploid wheat is limited. Previously, TaCPK2 was shown to be inducible by powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis tritici, Bgt) infection in wheat. Here, its functions in disease resistance are characterized further. This study shows the presence of defence-response and cold-response cis-elements on the promoters of the A subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-A) and D subgenome homoeologue (TaCPK2-D), respectively. Their expression patterns were then confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) using genome-specific primers, where TaCPK2-A was induced by Bgt treatment while TaCPK2-D mainly responded to cold treatment. Downregulation of TaCPK2-A by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) causes loss of resistance to Bgt in resistant wheat lines, indicating that TaCPK2-A is required for powdery mildew resistance. Furthermore, overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice enhanced bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Xoo) resistance. qRT-PCR analysis showed that overexpression of TaCPK2-A in rice promoted the expression of OsWRKY45-1, a transcription factor involved in both fungal and bacterial resistance by regulating jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signalling genes. The opposite effect was found in wheat TaCPK2-A VIGS plants, where the homologue of OsWRKY45-1 was significantly repressed. These data suggest that modulation of WRKY45-1 and associated defence-response genes by CPK2 genes may be the common mechanism for multiple disease resistance in grass species, which may have undergone subfunctionalization in promoters before the formation of hexaploid wheat.

  20. Heartland virus NSs protein disrupts host defenses by blocking the TBK1 kinase-IRF3 transcription factor interaction and signaling required for interferon induction.

    Ning, Yun-Jia; Feng, Kuan; Min, Yuan-Qin; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2017-10-06

    Heartland virus (HRTV) is a pathogenic phlebovirus related to the severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), another phlebovirus causing life-threatening disease in humans. Previous findings have suggested that SFTSV can antagonize the host interferon (IFN) system via viral nonstructural protein (NSs)-mediated sequestration of antiviral signaling proteins into NSs-induced inclusion bodies. However, whether and how HRTV counteracts the host innate immunity is unknown. Here, we report that HRTV NSs (HNSs) also antagonizes IFN and cytokine induction and bolsters viral replication, although no noticeable inclusion body formation was observed in HNSs-expressing cells. Furthermore, HNSs inhibited the virus-triggered activation of IFN-β promoter by specifically targeting the IFN-stimulated response element but not the NF-κB response element. Consistently, HNSs blocked the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, an IFN-stimulated response element-activating transcription factor). Reporter gene assays next showed that HNSs blockades the antiviral signaling mediated by RIG-I-like receptors likely at the level of TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Indeed, HNSs strongly interacts with TBK1 as indicated by confocal microscopy and pulldown analyses, and we also noted that the scaffold dimerization domain of TBK1 is required for the TBK1-HNSs interaction. Finally, pulldown assays demonstrated that HNSs expression dose-dependently diminishes a TBK1-IRF3 interaction, further explaining the mechanism for HNSs function. Collectively, these data suggest that HNSs, an antagonist of host innate immunity, interacts with TBK1 and thereby hinders the association of TBK1 with its substrate IRF3, thus blocking IRF3 activation and transcriptional induction of the cellular antiviral responses. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  2. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Hikaru Nishida

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH, prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs. Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  3. Kinases and Cancer

    Jonas Cicenas; Egle Zalyte; Amos Bairoch; Pascale Gaudet

    2018-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...

  4. Unkempt is negatively regulated by mTOR and uncouples neuronal differentiation from growth control.

    Amélie Avet-Rochex

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal differentiation is exquisitely controlled both spatially and temporally during nervous system development. Defects in the spatiotemporal control of neurogenesis cause incorrect formation of neural networks and lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy and autism. The mTOR kinase integrates signals from mitogens, nutrients and energy levels to regulate growth, autophagy and metabolism. We previously identified the insulin receptor (InR/mTOR pathway as a critical regulator of the timing of neuronal differentiation in the Drosophila melanogaster eye. Subsequently, this pathway has been shown to play a conserved role in regulating neurogenesis in vertebrates. However, the factors that mediate the neurogenic role of this pathway are completely unknown. To identify downstream effectors of the InR/mTOR pathway we screened transcriptional targets of mTOR for neuronal differentiation phenotypes in photoreceptor neurons. We identified the conserved gene unkempt (unk, which encodes a zinc finger/RING domain containing protein, as a negative regulator of the timing of photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of unk phenocopies InR/mTOR pathway activation and unk acts downstream of this pathway to regulate neurogenesis. In contrast to InR/mTOR signalling, unk does not regulate growth. unk therefore uncouples the role of the InR/mTOR pathway in neurogenesis from its role in growth control. We also identified the gene headcase (hdc as a second downstream regulator of the InR/mTOR pathway controlling the timing of neurogenesis. Unk forms a complex with Hdc, and Hdc expression is regulated by unk and InR/mTOR signalling. Co-overexpression of unk and hdc completely suppresses the precocious neuronal differentiation phenotype caused by loss of Tsc1. Thus, Unk and Hdc are the first neurogenic components of the InR/mTOR pathway to be identified. Finally, we show that Unkempt-like is expressed in the developing mouse retina and in neural stem

  5. Targeting mTOR in HIV-Negative Classic Kaposi's Sarcoma

    Ofer Merimsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year old female with HIV-negative classic Kaposi's sarcoma responded to mTOR targeting by rapamycin. The response was well documented by PET-CT. This case provides supporting evidence that the mTOR pathway may be important in the tumorigenesis of KS and that rapamycin may have activity in this disease.

  6. Dietary interventions that reduce mTOR activity rescue autistic-like behavioral deficits in mice

    Wu, Jiangbo; de Theije, Caroline G M; da Silva, Sofia Lopes; Abbring, Suzanne; van der Horst, Hilma; Broersen, Laus M; Willemsen, Linette; Kas, Martien; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    Enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the brain has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Inhibition of the mTOR pathway improves behavior and neuropathology in mouse models of ASD containing mTOR-associated single gene mutations. The current

  7. mTOR in squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus: a potential target for molecular therapy?

    Boone, J.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; van Diest, P. J.; Borel Rinkes, I. H. M.; van Hillegersberg, R.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an important regulator of protein translation and cell proliferation, is activated in various malignancies. In a randomised controlled trial of advanced renal cell carcinoma patients, targeted therapy to mTOR by means of rapamycin analogues has been

  8. Finding a better drug for epilepsy: the mTOR pathway as an antiepileptogenic target.

    Galanopoulou, A.S.; Gorter, J.A.; Cepeda, C.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway regulates cell growth, differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in upstream regulators of mTOR have been highly associated with dysplasias, epilepsy, and neurodevelopmental disorders. These include tuberous

  9. Ammonia Induces Autophagy through Dopamine Receptor D3 and MTOR

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Wenchao; Liu, Juanjuan; Liang, Xiaofei; Wu, Hong; Liu, Jing; Eggert, Ulrike S.; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is frequently seen in tumor microenvironments as well as in liver diseases where it can lead to severe brain damage or death. Ammonia induces autophagy, a mechanism that tumor cells may use to protect themselves from external stresses. However, how cells sense ammonia has been unclear. Here we show that culture medium alone containing Glutamine can generate milimolar of ammonia at 37 degrees in the absence of cells. In addition, we reveal that ammonia acts through the G protein-coupled receptor DRD3 (Dopamine receptor D3) to induce autophagy. At the same time, ammonia induces DRD3 degradation, which involves PIK3C3/VPS34-dependent pathways. Ammonia inhibits MTOR (mechanistic target of Rapamycin) activity and localization in cells, which is mediated by DRD3. Therefore, ammonia has dual roles in autophagy: one to induce autophagy through DRD3 and MTOR, the other to increase autophagosomal pH to inhibit autophagic flux. Our study not only adds a new sensing and output pathway for DRD3 that bridges ammonia sensing and autophagy induction, but also provides potential mechanisms for the clinical consequences of hyperammonemia in brain damage, neurodegenerative diseases and tumors. PMID:27077655

  10. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) protein expression in the tumor and its microenvironment correlates with more aggressive pathology at cystectomy

    Winters, B.R. (Brian R.); Vakar-Lopez, F. (Funda); Brown, L. (Lisha); Montgomery, B. (Bruce); Seiler, R. (Roland); P.C. Black (Peter C.); J.L. Boormans (Joost); Dall′Era, M. (Marc); Davincioni, E. (Elai); Douglas, J. (James); Gibb, E.A. (Ewan A.); B.W. van Rhijn (Bas); M.S. van der Heijden (Michiel); Hsieh, A.C. (Andrew C.); Wright, J.L. (Jonathan L.); Lam, H.-M. (Hung-Ming)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been implicated in driving tumor biology in multiple malignancies, including urothelial carcinoma (UC). We investigate how mTOR and phosphorylated mTOR (pmTOR) protein expression correlate with chemoresponsiveness in the tumor

  11. The Golgi localization of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta requires the protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of serine 262 and is essential for maintaining plasma membrane sphingomyelin levels

    van Tiel, Claudia M.; Westerman, Jan; Paasman, Marten A.; Hoebens, Martha M.; Wirtz, Karel W. A.; Snoek, Gerry T.

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant mouse phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP)beta is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation in vitro. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping, Ser(262) was identified as the major site of phosphorylation and Ser(165)

  12. Efficient autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of the beta-subunit by casein kinase-2 require the integrity of an acidic cluster 50 residues downstream from the phosphoacceptor site

    Boldyreff, B; Meggio, F; Pinna, L A

    1994-01-01

    Various beta-mutants were investigated either as subunits or as substrates for casein kinase 2 (CK-2), in the absence of presence of polylysine. A total of 21 beta-mutants were characterized for their susceptibility to autophosphorylation, by combining them in equimolar amounts with the recombina...

  13. The emerging role of m-TOR up-regulation in brain Astrocytoma.

    Ryskalin, Larisa; Limanaqi, Fiona; Biagioni, Francesca; Frati, Alessandro; Esposito, Vincenzo; Calierno, Maria Teresa; Lenzi, Paola; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript is an overview of various effects of mTOR up-regulation in astrocytoma with an emphasis on its deleterious effects on the proliferation of Glioblastoma Multiforme. The manuscript reports consistent evidence indicating the occurrence of mTOR up-regulation both in experimental and human astrocytoma. The grading of human astrocytoma is discussed in relationship with mTOR up-regulation. In the second part of the manuscript, the biochemical pathways under the influence of mTOR are translated to cell phenotypes which are generated by mTOR up-regulation and reverted by its inhibition. A special section is dedicated to the prominent role of autophagy in mediating the effects of mTOR in glioblastoma. In detail, autophagy inhibition produced by mTOR up-regulation determines the fate of cancer stem cells. On the other hand, biochemical findings disclose the remarkable effects of autophagy activators as powerful inducers of cell differentiation with a strong prevalence towards neuronal phenotypes. Thus, mTOR modulation acts on the neurobiology of glioblastoma just like it operates in vivo at the level of brain stem cell niches by altering autophagy-dependent cell differentiation. In the light of such a critical role of autophagy we analyzed the ubiquitin proteasome system. The merging between autophagy and proteasome generates a novel organelle, named autophagoproteasome which is strongly induced by mTOR inhibitors in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, when mTOR is maximally inhibited the proteasome component selectively moves within autophagy vacuoles, thus making the proteasome activity dependent on the entry within autophagy compartment.

  14. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death.

    Peng-Hsu Chen

    Full Text Available Temozolomide (TMZ, an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (miRNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding

  15. The Predictive and Prognostic Significance of c-erb-B2, EGFR, PTEN, mTOR, PI3K, p27, and ERCC1 Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Bassullu, Nuray; Turkmen, Ilknur; Dayangac, Murat; Yagiz Korkmaz, Pinar; Yasar, Reyhan; Akyildiz, Murat; Yaprak, Onur; Tokat, Yaman; Yuzer, Yildiray; Bulbul Dogusoy, Gulen

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common fatal cancer and an important healthcare problem worldwide. There are many studies describing the prognostic and predictive effects of epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (c-erb-B2) and epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (EGFR), transmembrane tyrosine kinases that influence cell growth and proliferation in many tumors. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the expression levels of c-erb-B2, EGFR, PTEN, mTOR, PI3K, p27, and ERCC1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and their correlation with other clinicopathologic features. Patients and Methods Fifty HCC cases were stained immunohistochemically with these markers. Correlations between the markers and clinicopathologic characteristics and survival rates were analyzed. Results No membranous c-erb-B2 staining was seen, whereas cytoplasmic positivity was present in 92% of HCC samples, membranous EGFR was observed in 40%, PI3K was found in all samples, and mTOR was seen in 30%, whereas reduced or absent PTEN expression was observed in 56% of samples and loss of p27 was seen in 92% of the cases. c-erb-B2 and mTOR overexpression, as well as reduced expression of p27, all correlated with multiple tumors (P = 0.041, P < 0.001, and P < 0.001, respectively). P27 loss, and mTOR and EGFR positivity were significantly correlated with AFP (P = 0.047, P = 0.004, and P = 0.008, respectively). Angiolymphatic invasion was more commonly seen in EGFR- and ERCC1-positive cases (P = 0.003 and P = 0.005). EGFR was also correlated with histological grade (P = 0.039). No significant correlations were found among PTEN , PI3K, and the clinicopathological parameters. Disease-free or overall survival rates showed significant differences among therapy modalities, AFP levels, angiolymphatic or lymph node invasions, and ERCC1 and p27 expression levels (P < 0.05). Conclusions c-erb-B2, EGFR, mTOR, ERCC1 overexpression levels, and loss of p27 may play roles in

  16. Activation of the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 via the interleukin-6 signal transducing receptor protein gp130 requires tyrosine kinase Jak1 and limits acute-phase protein expression.

    Schaper, F; Gendo, C; Eck, M; Schmitz, J; Grimm, C; Anhuf, D; Kerr, I M; Heinrich, P C

    1998-11-01

    Stimulation of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) signalling pathway occurs via the IL-6 receptor-glycoprotein 130 (IL-6R-gp130) receptor complex and results in the regulation of acute-phase protein genes in liver cells. Ligand binding to the receptor complex leads to tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of Janus kinases (Jak), phosphorylation of the signal transducing subunit gp130, followed by recruitment and phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT1 and the src homology domain (SH2)-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP2). The tyrosine phosphorylated STAT factors dissociate from the receptor, dimerize and translocate to the nucleus where they bind to enhancer sequences of IL-6 target genes. Phosphorylated SHP2 is able to bind growth factor receptor bound protein (grb2) and thus might link the Jak/STAT pathway to the ras/raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Here we present data on the dose-dependence, kinetics and kinase requirements for SHP2 phosphorylation after the activation of the signal transducer, gp130, of the IL-6-type family receptor complex. When human fibrosarcoma cell lines deficient in Jak1, Jak2 or tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) were stimulated with IL-6-soluble IL-6R complexes it was found that only in Jak1-, but not in Jak 2- or Tyk2-deficient cells, SHP2 activation was greatly impaired. It is concluded that Jak1 is required for the tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP2. This phosphorylation depends on Tyr-759 in the cytoplasmatic domain of gp130, since a Tyr-759-->Phe exchange abrogates SHP2 activation and in turn leads to elevated and prolonged STAT3 and STAT1 activation as well as enhanced acute-phase protein gene induction. Therefore, SHP2 plays an important role in acute-phase gene regulation.

  17. Dietary interventions that reduce mTOR activity rescue autistic-like behavioral deficits in mice.

    Wu, Jiangbo; de Theije, Caroline G M; da Silva, Sofia Lopes; Abbring, Suzanne; van der Horst, Hilma; Broersen, Laus M; Willemsen, Linette; Kas, Martien; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the brain has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Inhibition of the mTOR pathway improves behavior and neuropathology in mouse models of ASD containing mTOR-associated single gene mutations. The current study demonstrated that the amino acids histidine, lysine, threonine inhibited mTOR signaling and IgE-mediated mast cell activation, while the amino acids leucine, isoleucine, valine had no effect on mTOR signaling in BMMCs. Based on these results, we designed an mTOR-targeting amino acid diet (Active 1 diet) and assessed the effects of dietary interventions with the amino acid diet or a multi-nutrient supplementation diet (Active 2 diet) on autistic-like behavior and mTOR signaling in food allergic mice and in inbred BTBR T+Itpr3tf/J mice. Cow's milk allergic (CMA) or BTBR male mice were fed a Control, Active 1, or Active 2 diet for 7 consecutive weeks. CMA mice showed reduced social interaction and increased self-grooming behavior. Both diets reversed behavioral impairments and inhibited the mTOR activity in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of CMA mice. In BTBR mice, only Active 1 diet reduced repetitive self-grooming behavior and attenuated the mTOR activity in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. The current results suggest that activated mTOR signaling pathway in the brain may be a convergent pathway in the pathogenesis of ASD bridging genetic background and environmental triggers (food allergy) and that mTOR over-activation could serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ASD. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  19. The ATM and Rad3-Related (ATR) Protein Kinase Pathway Is Activated by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Required for Efficient Viral Replication.

    Edwards, Terri G; Bloom, David C; Fisher, Chris

    2018-03-15

    The ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) protein kinase and its downstream effector Chk1 are key sensors and organizers of the DNA damage response (DDR) to a variety of insults. Previous studies of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) showed no evidence for activation of the ATR pathway. Here we demonstrate that both Chk1 and ATR were phosphorylated by 3 h postinfection (h.p.i.). Activation of ATR and Chk1 was observed using 4 different HSV-1 strains in multiple cell types, while a specific ATR inhibitor blocked activation. Mechanistic studies point to early viral gene expression as a key trigger for ATR activation. Both pATR and pChk1 localized to the nucleus within viral replication centers, or associated with their periphery, by 3 h.p.i. Significant levels of pATR and pChk1 were also detected in the cytoplasm, where they colocalized with ICP4 and ICP0. Proximity ligation assays confirmed that pATR and pChk1 were closely and specifically associated with ICP4 and ICP0 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm by 3 h.p.i., but not with ICP8 or ICP27, presumably in a multiprotein complex. Chemically distinct ATR and Chk1 inhibitors blocked HSV-1 replication and infectious virion production, while inhibitors of ATM, Chk2, and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) did not. Together our data show that HSV-1 activates the ATR pathway at early stages of infection and that ATR and Chk1 kinase activities play important roles in HSV-1 replication fitness. These findings indicate that the ATR pathway may provide insight for therapeutic approaches. IMPORTANCE Viruses have evolved complex associations with cellular DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, which sense troublesome DNA structures formed during infection. The first evidence for activation of the ATR pathway by HSV-1 is presented. ATR is activated, and its downstream target Chk1 is robustly phosphorylated, during early stages of infection. Both activated proteins are found in the nucleus associated with viral replication compartments and in

  20. Prenatal physical activity and diet composition affect the expression of nutrient transporters and mTOR signaling molecules in the human placenta.

    Brett, K E; Ferraro, Z M; Holcik, M; Adamo, K B

    2015-02-01

    Adequate nutrient delivery to the fetus is essential for optimal growth. Differences in prenatal physical activity level and diet quality influence maternal energy balance and these factors may alter placental nutrient transport. We investigated the associations between meeting physical activity guidelines and the quality of maternal diet on the expression of genes involved in fatty acid, amino acid and glucose transport, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin signaling in the placenta from 16 term pregnancies. Physical activity was directly measured with accelerometry, diet composition was assessed with 24 h dietary recalls, and gene expression was measured with custom polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays. Women who met physical activity guidelines had lower gene expression of fatty acid transport protein 4 (FATP4), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), and the beta non-catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and a higher expression of SNAT2. There was a strong positive correlation observed between total sugar intake and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) (r = 0.897, p = 0.000, n = 12), and inverse correlations between total sugar and mTOR and IGF1 expression. Percentage of total calories from protein was inversely related to insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) (r = -0.605, p = 0.028, n = 13). Variations in maternal physical activity and diet composition altered the expression of genes involved in fatty acid, amino acid and glucose transport and mTOR signaling. Future research on placental nutrient transport should include direct measures of maternal PA and dietary habits to help eliminate confounding factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation.

    Harraz, M M; Tyagi, R; Cortés, P; Snyder, S H

    2016-03-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb that enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression.

  2. PREDICTION OF THE COURSE OF OSTEOARTHROSIS FROM mTOR (MAMMALIAN TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN GENE EXPRESSION

    E V Chetina

    2012-01-01

    Results. Analysis of gene expression in the outpatients with OA identified two subgroups: in one subgroup (n = 13 mTOR expression was considerably much less than that in the control group; the expression of ATG1 and p21 did not differ greatly from the control and that of caspase 3 and TNF-α was significantly higher. The other outpatients (n = 20 and all the examined patients needing endoprosthetic replacement were ascertained to have a higher gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, caspase 3, and TNF-α than in the control group. Before endoprosthetic replacement, severe joint destruction in patients with OA was associated with enhanced gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, and caspase 3. Conclusion. In early-stage disease, increased mTOR gene expression may serve as a prognostic marker of the severity of the disease and articular cartilage destruction.

  3. mTOR as a multifunctional therapeutic target in HIV infection

    Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Fagone, Paolo; Meroni, PierLuigi

    2011-01-01

    Patients undergoing long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy treatment are probably at a higher risk of various HIV-related complications. Hyperactivation of The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been found to contribute to dysregulated apoptosis and autophagy which determine CD4(+)-T......-cell loss, impaired function of innate immunity and development of neurocognitive disorders. Dysregulated mTOR activation has also been shown to play a key part in the development of nephropathy and in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated malignancies. These studies strongly support a multifunctional key role...... for mTOR in the pathogenesis of HIV-related disorders and suggest that specific mTOR inhibitors could represent a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of these pathologies....

  4. Regulation of the mTOR Pathway by a Novel Rheb Binding Protein BNIP3

    Guan, Kun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that BNIP3 plays a critical role in hypoxia-induced mTOR inhibition. Furthermore we found that BNIP3 itself has a growth inhibitory activity and inactivation of BNIP3 promotes cell growth...

  5. Using 3D Culture of Primary Mammary Epithelial Cells to Define Molecular Entities Required for Acinus Formation: Analyzing MAP Kinase Phosphatases.

    Gajewska, Malgorzata; McNally, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures on reconstituted basement membrane (rBM) enable the study of complex interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and epithelial cells, which are crucial for the establishment of cell polarity and functional development of epithelia. 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) on Matrigel (a laminin-rich ECM derived from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) murine tumor) promote interactions of MECs with the matrix via integrins, leading to formation of spherical monolayers of polarized cells surrounding a hollow lumen (acini). Acini closely resemble mammary alveoli found in the mammary gland. Thus, it is possible to study ECM-cell interactions and signalling pathways that regulate formation and maintenance of tissue-specific shape and functional differentiation of MECs in 3D under in vitro conditions. Here we present experimental protocols used to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs) during development of the alveoli-like structures by primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (PMMEC) cultured on Matrigel. We present detailed protocols for PMMEC isolation, and establishment of 3D cultures using an "on top" method, use of specific kinase and phosphatases inhibitors (PD98059 and pervanadate, respectively) administered at different stages of acinus development, and give examples of analyses carried out post-culture (Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, and confocal imaging).

  6. Delayed Recovery of Skeletal Muscle Mass following Hindlimb Immobilization in mTOR Heterozygous Mice

    Lang, Susan M.; Kazi, Abid A.; Hong-Brown, Ly; Lang, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    The present study addressed the hypothesis that reducing mTOR, as seen in mTOR heterozygous (+/-) mice, would exaggerate the changes in protein synthesis and degradation observed during hindlimb immobilization as well as impair normal muscle regrowth during the recovery period. Atrophy was produced by unilateral hindlimb immobilization and data compared to the contralateral gastrocnemius. In wild-type (WT) mice, the gradual loss of muscle mass plateaued by day 7. This response was associated ...

  7. Discovery and Development of ATP-Competitive mTOR Inhibitors Using Computational Approaches.

    Luo, Yao; Wang, Ling

    2017-11-16

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central controller of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and angiogenesis. This protein is an attractive target for new anticancer drug development. Significant progress has been made in hit discovery, lead optimization, drug candidate development and determination of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of mTOR. Computational methods have been applied to accelerate the discovery and development of mTOR inhibitors helping to model the structure of mTOR, screen compound databases, uncover structure-activity relationship (SAR) and optimize the hits, mine the privileged fragments and design focused libraries. Besides, computational approaches were also applied to study protein-ligand interactions mechanisms and in natural product-driven drug discovery. Herein, we survey the most recent progress on the application of computational approaches to advance the discovery and development of compounds targeting mTOR. Future directions in the discovery of new mTOR inhibitors using computational methods are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. The Role of mTOR Inhibitors for the Treatment of B-Cell Lymphomas

    Pinelopi Argyriou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the majority of lymphomas initially respond to treatment, many patients relapse and die from disease that is refractory to current regimens. The need for new treatment strategies in lymphomas has led to the investigation and evaluation of novel agents that target cellular pathways. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a representative pathway that may be implicated in lymphomagenesis. Rapamycin and especially its derivatives (temsirolimus, everolimus, and deforolimus represent the first described mTOR inhibitors. These agents have shown promising results in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. On the other hand, new ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that provoke a broader inhibition of mTOR activity are in early stages of clinical development. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge about mTOR inhibitors and their use in the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. Relevant issues regarding mTOR biology in general as well as in B-cell lymphoid neoplasms are also discussed in short.

  9. mTOR regulates metabolic adaptation of APCs in the lung and controls the outcome of allergic inflammation.

    Sinclair, Charles; Bommakanti, Gayathri; Gardinassi, Luiz; Loebbermann, Jens; Johnson, Matthew Joseph; Hakimpour, Paul; Hagan, Thomas; Benitez, Lydia; Todor, Andrei; Machiah, Deepa; Oriss, Timothy; Ray, Anuradha; Bosinger, Steven; Ravindran, Rajesh; Li, Shuzhao; Pulendran, Bali

    2017-09-08

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) occupy diverse anatomical tissues, but their tissue-restricted homeostasis remains poorly understood. Here, working with mouse models of inflammation, we found that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent metabolic adaptation was required at discrete locations. mTOR was dispensable for dendritic cell (DC) homeostasis in secondary lymphoid tissues but necessary to regulate cellular metabolism and accumulation of CD103 + DCs and alveolar macrophages in lung. Moreover, while numbers of mTOR-deficient lung CD11b + DCs were not changed, they were metabolically reprogrammed to skew allergic inflammation from eosinophilic T helper cell 2 (T H 2) to neutrophilic T H 17 polarity. The mechanism for this change was independent of translational control but dependent on inflammatory DCs, which produced interleukin-23 and increased fatty acid oxidation. mTOR therefore mediates metabolic adaptation of APCs in distinct tissues, influencing the immunological character of allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Strong synergism between small molecule inhibitors of HER2, PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 in human breast cancer cells.

    Hamunyela, Roswita H; Serafin, Antonio M; Akudugu, John M

    2017-02-01

    Targeting pro-survival cell signaling components has been promising in cancer therapy, but the benefit of targeting with single agents is limited. For malignancies such as triple-negative breast cancer, there is a paucity of targets that are amenable to existing interventions as they are devoid of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), progesterone receptor (PR), and estrogen receptor (ER). Concurrent targeting of cell signaling entities other than HER2, PR and ER with multiple agents may be more effective. Evaluating modes of interaction between agents can inform efficient selection of agents when used in cocktails. Using clonogenic cell survival, interaction between inhibitors of HER2 (TAK-165), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (NVP-BEZ235), and the pro-survival gene (Bcl-2) (ABT-263) in three human breast cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MCF-12A) ranged from strong to very strong synergism. The strongest synergy was demonstrated in PR and ER negative cells. Inhibition of PI3K, mTOR and Bcl-2 could potentially be effective in the treatment of triple-negative cancers. The very strong synergy observed even at lowest concentrations of inhibitors indicates that these cocktails might be able to be used at a minimised risk of systemic toxicity. Concurrent use of multiple inhibitors can potentiate conventional interventions like radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Arabidopsis thaliana lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is required for full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and affects jasmonate signalling.

    Balagué, Claudine; Gouget, Anne; Bouchez, Olivier; Souriac, Camille; Haget, Nathalie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Govers, Francine; Roby, Dominique; Canut, Hervé

    2017-09-01

    On microbial attack, plants can detect invaders and activate plant innate immunity. For the detection of pathogen molecules or cell wall damage, plants employ receptors that trigger the activation of defence responses. Cell surface proteins that belong to large families of lectin receptor kinases are candidates to function as immune receptors. Here, the function of LecRK-I.9 (At5g60300), a legume-type lectin receptor kinase involved in cell wall-plasma membrane contacts and in extracellular ATP (eATP) perception, was studied through biochemical, gene expression and reverse genetics approaches. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LecRK-I.9 expression is rapidly, highly and locally induced on inoculation with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Two allelic lecrk-I.9 knock-out mutants showed decreased resistance to Pst. Conversely, over-expression of LecRK-I.9 led to increased resistance to Pst. The analysis of defence gene expression suggests an alteration of both the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways. In particular, LecRK-I.9 expression during plant-pathogen interaction was dependent on COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1) and JAR1 (JASMONATE RESISTANT 1) components, and JA-responsive transcription factors (TFs) showed altered levels of expression in plants over-expressing LecRK-I.9. A similar misregulation of these TFs was obtained by JA treatment. This study identified LecRK-I.9 as necessary for full resistance to Pst and demonstrated its involvement in the control of defence against pathogens through a regulation of JA signalling components. The role of LecRK-I.9 is discussed with regard to the potential molecular mechanisms linking JA signalling to cell wall damage and/or eATP perception. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. Autophagy in muscle of glucose-infusion hyperglycemia rats and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia rats via selective activation of m-TOR or FoxO3.

    Pengfei Lv

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a conserved process in eukaryotes required for metabolism and is involved in diverse diseases. To investigate autophagy in skeletal muscle under hyperglycemia status, we established two hyperglycemia-rat models that differ in their circulating insulin levels, by glucose infusion and singe high-dose streptozotocin injection. We then detected expression of autophagy related genes with real-time PCR and western blot. We found that under hyperglycemia status induced by glucose-infusion, autophagy was inhibited in rat skeletal muscle, whereas under streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia status autophagy was enhanced. Meanwhile, hyperglycemic gastrocnemius muscle was more prone to autophagy than soleus muscle. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy in skeletal muscle in glucose-infusion hyperglycemia rats was mediated by the m-TOR pathway while m-TOR and FoxO3 both contributed to enhancement of autophagy in gastrocnemius muscle in streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia rats. These data shows that insulin plays a relatively more important role than hyperglycemia in regulating autophagy in hyperglycemia rat muscle through selectively activating the m-TOR or FoxO3 pathway in a fiber-selective manner.

  13. Dual acylation and lipid raft association of Src-family protein tyrosine kinases are required for SDF-1/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in the Jurkat human T cell lymphoma cell line.

    Zaman, Sabiha N; Resek, Mary E; Robbins, Stephen M

    2008-10-01

    Chemokines play pivotal roles in regulating a wide variety of biological processes by modulating cell migration and recruitment. Deregulation of chemokine signaling can alter cell recruitment, contributing to the pathogenic states associated with autoimmune disease, inflammatory disorders, and sepsis. During chemotaxis, lipid rafts and their resident signaling molecules have been demonstrated to partition to different parts of the cell. Herein, we investigated the role of lipid raft resident Src-family kinases (SFK) in stromal cell-derived factor 1/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis. We have shown that Lck-deficient J.CaM 1.6 cells are defective in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in contrast to their parental counterpart, Jurkat cells. Ectopic expression of the SFK hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) in J.CaM 1.6 cells reconstituted CXCL12 responsiveness. The requirement of lipid raft association of SFK was assessed using both isoforms of Hck: the dually acylated p59(Hck) isoform that is targeted to lipid rafts and the monoacylated p61(Hck) isoform that is nonraft-associated. We have shown using several gain and loss of acylation alleles that dual acylation of Hck was required for CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in J.CaM 1.6 cells. These results highlight the importance of the unique microenvironment provided by lipid rafts and their specific contribution in providing specificity to CXCL12 signaling.

  14. GFR meets mTOR: value of different methods to measure and estimate GFR & (side) effects of mTOR inhibition in renal transplantation

    Baas, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is twofold: where GFR and mTOR meet. Precise measurement of kidney function is difficult and cumbersome and many, simpler alternatives have been developed to determine GFR. Determination of GFR remains an approximation since the GFR itself is not a static phenomenon. This

  15. mTOR drives cerebral blood flow and memory deficits in LDLR-/- mice modeling atherosclerosis and vascular cognitive impairment.

    Jahrling, Jordan B; Lin, Ai-Ling; DeRosa, Nicholas; Hussong, Stacy A; Van Skike, Candice E; Girotti, Milena; Javors, Martin; Zhao, Qingwei; Maslin, Leigh Ann; Asmis, Reto; Galvan, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    We recently showed that mTOR attenuation blocks progression and abrogates established cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse models. These outcomes were associated with the restoration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density (BVD) resulting from relief of mTOR inhibition of NO release. Recent reports suggested a role of mTOR in atherosclerosis. Because mTOR drives aging and vascular dysfunction is a universal feature of aging, we hypothesized that mTOR may contribute to brain vascular and cognitive dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis. We measured CBF, BVD, cognitive function, markers of inflammation, and parameters of cardiovascular disease in LDLR -/- mice fed maintenance or high-fat diet ± rapamycin. Cardiovascular pathologies were proportional to severity of brain vascular dysfunction. Aortic atheromas were reduced, CBF and BVD were restored, and cognitive dysfunction was attenuated potentially through reduction in systemic and brain inflammation following chronic mTOR attenuation. Our studies suggest that mTOR regulates vascular integrity and function and that mTOR attenuation may restore neurovascular function and cardiovascular health. Together with our previous studies in AD models, our data suggest mTOR-driven vascular damage may be a mechanism shared by age-associated neurological diseases. Therefore, mTOR attenuation may have promise for treatment of cognitive impairment in atherosclerosis.

  16. ESAT6 inhibits autophagy flux and promotes BCG proliferation through MTOR

    Dong, Hu, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Jing, Wu, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Runpeng, Zhao; Xuewei, Xu; Min, Mu; Ru, Cai [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Yingru, Xing; Shengfa, Ni [Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Rongbo, Zhang [Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology (China); Medical Inspection Center, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, increasing studies have found that pathogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits autophagy, which mediates the anti-mycobacterial response, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously reported that secretory acid phosphatase (SapM) of Mtb can negatively regulate autophagy flux. Recently, another virulence factor of Mtb, early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT6), has been found to be involved in inhibiting autophagy, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we show that ESAT6 hampers autophagy flux to boost bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) proliferation and reveals a mechanism by which ESAT6 blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion in a mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR)-dependent manner. In both Raw264.7 cells and primary macrophages derived from the murine abdominal cavity (ACM), ESAT6 repressed autophagy flux by interfering with the autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which resulted in an increased load of BCG. Impaired degradation of LC3Ⅱ and SQSTM1 by ESAT6 was related to the upregulated activity of MTOR. Contrarily, inhibiting MTOR with Torin1 removed the ESAT6-induced autophagy block and lysosome dysfunction. Furthermore, in both Raw264.7 and ACM cells, MTOR inhibition significantly suppressed the survival of BCG. In conclusion, our study highlights how ESAT6 blocks autophagy and promotes BCG survival in a way that activates MTOR. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disruping autophagy flux induced by ESAT6. • ESAT6-inhibited autophagy is MTOR-dependent. • ESAT6-boosted BCG is MTOR-dependent.

  17. Delayed recovery of skeletal muscle mass following hindlimb immobilization in mTOR heterozygous mice.

    Susan M Lang

    Full Text Available The present study addressed the hypothesis that reducing mTOR, as seen in mTOR heterozygous (+/- mice, would exaggerate the changes in protein synthesis and degradation observed during hindlimb immobilization as well as impair normal muscle regrowth during the recovery period. Atrophy was produced by unilateral hindlimb immobilization and data compared to the contralateral gastrocnemius. In wild-type (WT mice, the gradual loss of muscle mass plateaued by day 7. This response was associated with a reduction in basal protein synthesis and development of leucine resistance. Proteasome activity was consistently elevated, but atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNAs were only transiently increased returning to basal values by day 7. When assessed 7 days after immobilization, the decreased muscle mass and protein synthesis and increased proteasome activity did not differ between WT and mTOR(+/- mice. Moreover, the muscle inflammatory cytokine response did not differ between groups. After 10 days of recovery, WT mice showed no decrement in muscle mass, and this accretion resulted from a sustained increase in protein synthesis and a normalization of proteasome activity. In contrast, mTOR(+/- mice failed to fully replete muscle mass at this time, a defect caused by the lack of a compensatory increase in protein synthesis. The delayed muscle regrowth of the previously immobilized muscle in the mTOR(+/- mice was associated with a decreased raptor•4EBP1 and increased raptor•Deptor binding. Slowed regrowth was also associated with a sustained inflammatory response (e.g., increased TNFα and CD45 mRNA during the recovery period and a failure of IGF-I to increase as in WT mice. These data suggest mTOR is relatively more important in regulating the accretion of muscle mass during recovery than the loss of muscle during the atrophy phase, and that protein synthesis is more sensitive than degradation to the reduction in mTOR during muscle regrowth.

  18. Delayed recovery of skeletal muscle mass following hindlimb immobilization in mTOR heterozygous mice.

    Lang, Susan M; Kazi, Abid A; Hong-Brown, Ly; Lang, Charles H

    2012-01-01

    The present study addressed the hypothesis that reducing mTOR, as seen in mTOR heterozygous (+/-) mice, would exaggerate the changes in protein synthesis and degradation observed during hindlimb immobilization as well as impair normal muscle regrowth during the recovery period. Atrophy was produced by unilateral hindlimb immobilization and data compared to the contralateral gastrocnemius. In wild-type (WT) mice, the gradual loss of muscle mass plateaued by day 7. This response was associated with a reduction in basal protein synthesis and development of leucine resistance. Proteasome activity was consistently elevated, but atrogin-1 and MuRF1 mRNAs were only transiently increased returning to basal values by day 7. When assessed 7 days after immobilization, the decreased muscle mass and protein synthesis and increased proteasome activity did not differ between WT and mTOR(+/-) mice. Moreover, the muscle inflammatory cytokine response did not differ between groups. After 10 days of recovery, WT mice showed no decrement in muscle mass, and this accretion resulted from a sustained increase in protein synthesis and a normalization of proteasome activity. In contrast, mTOR(+/-) mice failed to fully replete muscle mass at this time, a defect caused by the lack of a compensatory increase in protein synthesis. The delayed muscle regrowth of the previously immobilized muscle in the mTOR(+/-) mice was associated with a decreased raptor•4EBP1 and increased raptor•Deptor binding. Slowed regrowth was also associated with a sustained inflammatory response (e.g., increased TNFα and CD45 mRNA) during the recovery period and a failure of IGF-I to increase as in WT mice. These data suggest mTOR is relatively more important in regulating the accretion of muscle mass during recovery than the loss of muscle during the atrophy phase, and that protein synthesis is more sensitive than degradation to the reduction in mTOR during muscle regrowth.

  19. Phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is required for cytokinesis and progression of cell cycle in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Ma, Zhaowu; Yu, Guanghui

    2010-02-15

    The role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in plant cytokinesis remains largely uncharacterized. To elucidate its role, tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (BY-2) cells have been synchronized using a two-step procedure, and the different phases of the cell cycle identified by Histone 4 gene expression and the mitotic index. MAPK expression was analyzed by semi-quantitative (SQ) RT-PCR and protein gel blot analysis for phosphorylated MAPK during cell cycle progression. The SQ RT-PCR analysis indicated that MAPK expression is lower in mitosis than in interphase (G1, G2 and S). However, the amount of phosphorylated MAPK remained stable throughout the cell cycle, indicating that MAPK activity is predominantly regulated at the post-translational level and that phosphorylation of MAPK plays an important role in mitosis. Application of the specific MAPK phosphorylation inhibitor U0126 revealed that while U0126 treatment decreases the phosphorylation of MAPK and the progression from telophase to early cytokinesis is significantly inhibited. The formation of the phragmoplast is also negatively affected at this stage. These results demonstrate that MAPK phosphorylation is involved in the formation of the cell plate within the phragmoplast during cytokinesis and that MAPK predominantly functions during the cytokinesis stage of the cell cycle in tobacco BY-2 cells. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 5 is Required for Low-Concentration H2O2-Induced Angiogenesis of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Dongxin; Huang, Hong; Lei, Yonghong; Han, Yan; Han, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    Background . The aim of this study was to assess the effects of low concentrations of H 2 O 2 on angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods . HUVECs were cultured and stimulated with different concentrations of H 2 O 2 . Flow cytometric analysis was used to select an optimal concentration of H 2 O 2 for the following experiments. Cell proliferation, migration, and tubule formation were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays, scratch wound assays, and Matrigel tubule formation assays, respectively. For gain and loss of function studies, constitutively active MEK5 (CA-MEK5) and ERK5 shRNA lentiviruses were used to activate or knock down extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5). Results . We found that low concentrations of H 2 O 2 promoted HUVECs proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. ERK5 in HUVECs was significantly activated by H 2 O 2 . Enhanced ERK5 activity significantly amplified the proangiogenic effects of H 2 O 2 ; in contrast, ERK5 knock-down abrogated the effects of H 2 O 2 . Conclusions . Our results confirmed that low concentrations of H 2 O 2 promoted HUVECs angiogenesis in vitro, and ERK5 is an essential mediator of this process. Therefore, ERK5 may be a potential therapeutic target for promoting angiogenesis and improving graft survival.

  1. SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase-mediated processing of NF-κB p105 requires phosphorylation of its C-terminus by IκB kinase

    Orian, Amir; Gonen, Hedva; Bercovich, Beatrice; Fajerman, Ifat; Eytan, Esther; Israël, Alain; Mercurio, Frank; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Schwartz, Alan L.; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Processing of the p105 precursor to form the active subunit p50 of the NF-κB transcription factor is a unique case in which the ubiquitin system is involved in limited processing rather than in complete destruction of the target substrate. A glycine-rich region along with a downstream acidic domain have been demonstrated to be essential for processing. Here we demonstrate that following IκB kinase (IκK)-mediated phosphorylation, the C-terminal domain of p105 (residues 918–934) serves as a recognition motif for the SCFβ-TrCP ubiquitin ligase. Expression of IκKβ dramatically increases processing of wild-type p105, but not of p105-Δ918–934. Dominant-negative β-TrCP inhibits IκK-dependent processing. Furthermore, the ligase and wild-type p105 but not p105-Δ918–934 associate physically following phosphorylation. In vitro, SCFβ-TrCP specifically conjugates and promotes processing of phosphorylated p105. Importantly, the TrCP recognition motif in p105 is different from that described for IκBs, β-catenin and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpu. Since p105-Δ918–934 is also conjugated and processed, it appears that p105 can be recognized under different physiological conditions by two different ligases, targeting two distinct recognition motifs. PMID:10835356

  2. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-κB activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-κB activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  3. Presynaptic protein synthesis required for NT-3-induced long-term synaptic modulation

    Je H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins elicit both acute and long-term modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity. Previously, we demonstrated that the long-term synaptic modulation requires the endocytosis of neurotrophin-receptor complex, the activation of PI3K and Akt, and mTOR mediated protein synthesis. However, it is unclear whether the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins depends on protein synthesis in pre- or post-synaptic cells. Results Here we have developed an inducible protein translation blocker, in which the kinase domain of protein kinase R (PKR is fused with bacterial gyrase B domain (GyrB-PKR, which could be dimerized upon treatment with a cell permeable drug, coumermycin. By genetically targeting GyrB-PKR to specific cell types, we show that NT-3 induced long-term synaptic modulation requires presynaptic, but not postsynaptic protein synthesis. Conclusions Our results provide mechanistic insights into the cell-specific requirement for protein synthesis in the long-term synaptic modulation by neurotrophins. The GyrB-PKR system may be useful tool to study protein synthesis in a cell-specific manner.

  4. Fisetin targets phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and induces apoptosis of human B lymphoma Raji cells

    Ji Yeon Lim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant regulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinases (PI3Ks is known to be involved in the progression of cancers. PI3K-binding flavonoids such as quercetin and myricetin have been shown to inhibit PI3K activity, but the direct targeting of fisetin to PI3K has not been established. Here, we carried out an in silico investigation of fisetin binding to PI3K and determined fisetin’s inhibitory activity in enzymatic and cell-based assays. In addition, fisetin induced apoptosis in human Burkitt’s lymphoma Raji cells by inhibiting both PI3Ks and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Our results indicate that fisetin may serve as a natural backbone for the development of novel dual inhibitors of PI3Ks and mTOR for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Hypothalamic mTOR pathway mediates thyroid hormone-induced hyperphagia in hyperthyroidism.

    Varela, Luis; Martínez-Sánchez, Noelia; Gallego, Rosalía; Vázquez, María J; Roa, Juan; Gándara, Marina; Schoenmakers, Erik; Nogueiras, Rubén; Chatterjee, Krishna; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2012-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism is characterized in rats by increased energy expenditure and marked hyperphagia. Alterations of thermogenesis linked to hyperthyroidism are associated with dysregulation of hypothalamic AMPK and fatty acid metabolism; however, the central mechanisms mediating hyperthyroidism-induced hyperphagia remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that hyperthyroid rats exhibit marked up-regulation of the hypothalamic mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway associated with increased mRNA levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased mRNA levels of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), an area where mTOR co-localizes with thyroid hormone receptor-α (TRα). Central administration of thyroid hormone (T3) or genetic activation of thyroid hormone signalling in the ARC recapitulated hyperthyroidism effects on feeding and the mTOR pathway. In turn, central inhibition of mTOR signalling with rapamycin in hyperthyroid rats reversed hyperphagia and normalized the expression of ARC-derived neuropeptides, resulting in substantial body weight loss. The data indicate that in the hyperthyroid state, increased feeding is associated with thyroid hormone-induced up-regulation of mTOR signalling. Furthermore, our findings that different neuronal modulations influence food intake and energy expenditure in hyperthyroidism pave the way for a more rational design of specific and selective therapeutic compounds aimed at reversing the metabolic consequences of this disease. Copyright © 2012 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Golgi localization of phosphatidylinositol transfer protein beta requires the protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of serine 262 and is essential for maintaining plasma membrane sphingomyelin levels.

    van Tiel, Claudia M; Westerman, Jan; Paasman, Marten A; Hoebens, Martha M; Wirtz, Karel W A; Snoek, Gerry T

    2002-06-21

    Recombinant mouse phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PI-TP)beta is a substrate for protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation in vitro. Based on site-directed mutagenesis and two-dimensional tryptic peptide mapping, Ser(262) was identified as the major site of phosphorylation and Ser(165) as a minor phosphorylation site. The phospholipid transfer activities of wild-type PI-TP beta and PI-TP beta(S262A) were identical, whereas PI-TP beta(S165A) was completely inactive. PKC-dependent phosphorylation of Ser(262) also had no effect on the transfer activity of PI-TP beta. To investigate the role of Ser(262) in the functioning of PI-TP beta, wtPI-TP beta and PI-TP beta(S262A) were overexpressed in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells. Two-dimensional PAGE analysis of cell lysates was used to separate PI-TP beta from its phosphorylated form. After Western blotting, wtPI-TP beta was found to be 85% phosphorylated, whereas PI-TP beta(S262A) was not phosphorylated. In the presence of the PKC inhibitor GF 109203X, the phosphorylated form of wtPI-TP beta was strongly reduced. Immunolocalization showed that wtPI-TP beta was predominantly associated with the Golgi membranes. In the presence of the PKC inhibitor, wtPI-TP beta was distributed throughout the cell similar to what was observed for PI-TP beta(S262A). In contrast to wtPI-TP beta overexpressors, cells overexpressing PI-TP beta(S262A) were unable to rapidly replenish sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane upon degradation by sphingomyelinase. This implies that PKC-dependent association with the Golgi complex is a prerequisite for PI-TP beta to express its effect on sphingomyelin metabolism.

  7. Studying the biochemical function of the pea receptor-like kinases sym10, sym37 and k1, required for the legume-rhizobia symbiosis development

    Elena A. Dolgikh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rhizobial Nod factors (NFs, the key regulators of legume-rhizobia symbiosis, act in low concentrations and their biological activity depends on structural features, that suggests the presence of specific receptors in plants. Putative receptors, LysM-receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs, were found in model legumes L. japonicus and M. truncatula. However, binding capacity with NFs was only studied for L. japonicus LysM-RLKs. In pea a few candidates for NF receptors like Sym10, Sym37 and K1 were found. Analysis of mutants revealed the importance of these proteins for symbiosis development. However, the biochemical function of these receptors has not been studied. Materials and methods. Sequences encoding extracellular domains (ECDs of LysM-RLKs Sym10, Sym37, and K1 were cloned in the pRSETa vector. Constructs were introduced in E. coli strain C41 to produce proteins with His6 residues on either the amino or carboxyl terminus. Protein purification was carried out using metal chelate affinity chromatography. The binding capacity with ligand was evaluated using ProteonXPR36 biosensor. Results. To study binding capacity with NFs, we have developed approaches for the synthesis of LysM-RLK Sym10, Sym37 and K1 in soluble form in heterologous system. The high level of protein synthesis was achieved at +28 °C using 0,5 mM IPTG in 2-16 hours. Analysis of binding capacity of ECDs with NFs revealed the low affinity using the surface plasmon resonance. Conclusion. The possibility of recombinant receptor synthesis in soluble state in E. coli at high level was demonstrated. Analysis of binding capacity with NFs showed the potential interaction, but with low affinity.

  8. The receptor-like kinase SERK3/BAK1 is required for basal resistance against the late blight pathogen phytophthora infestans in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Angela Chaparro-Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The filamentous oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans causes late blight, an economically important disease, on members of the nightshade family (Solanaceae, such as the crop plants potato and tomato. The related plant Nicotiana benthamiana is a model system to study plant-pathogen interactions, and the susceptibility of N. benthamiana to Phytophthora species varies from susceptible to resistant. Little is known about the extent to which plant basal immunity, mediated by membrane receptors that recognise conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, contributes to P. infestans resistance.We found that different species of Phytophthora have varying degrees of virulence on N. benthamiana ranging from avirulence (incompatible interaction to moderate virulence through to full aggressiveness. The leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK BAK1/SERK3 is a major modulator of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI in Arabidopsis thaliana and N. benthamiana. We cloned two NbSerk3 homologs, NbSerk3A and NbSerk3B, from N. benthamiana based on sequence similarity to the A. thaliana gene. N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbSerk3 showed markedly enhanced susceptibility to P. infestans infection but were not altered in resistance to Phytophthora mirabilis, a sister species of P. infestans that specializes on a different host plant. Furthermore, silencing of NbSerk3 reduced the cell death response triggered by the INF1, a secreted P. infestans protein with features of PAMPs.We demonstrated that N. benthamiana NbSERK3 significantly contributes to resistance to P. infestans and regulates the immune responses triggered by the P. infestans PAMP protein INF1. In the future, the identification of novel surface receptors that associate with NbSERK3A and/or NbSERK3B should lead to the identification of new receptors that mediate recognition of oomycete PAMPs, such as INF1.

  9. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Is Required for the Expression of the Immune Checkpoint PD-L1 in Immune Cells and Tumors

    Eva M. Palsson-McDermott

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Blocking interaction of the immune checkpoint receptor PD-1 with its ligand PD-L1 is associated with good clinical outcomes in a broad variety of malignancies. High levels of PD-L1 promote tumor growth by restraining CD8+ T-cell responses against tumors. Limiting PD-L1 expression and function is therefore critical for allowing the development of antitumor immune responses and effective tumor clearance. Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2 is also a key player in regulating cancer as well as immune responses. PKM2 catalyzes the final rate-limiting step of glycolysis. Furthermore, PKM2 as a dimer translocates to the nucleus, where it stimulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif-1α transactivation domain function and recruitment of p300 to the hypoxia response elements (HRE of Hif-1α target genes. Here, we provide the first evidence of a role for PKM2 in regulating the expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs, T cells, and tumor cells. LPS-induced expression of PD-L1 in primary macrophages was inhibited by the PKM2 targeting compound TEPP-46. Furthermore, RNA silencing of PKM2 inhibited LPS-induced PD-L1 expression. This regulation occurs through direct binding of PKM2 and Hif-1α to HRE sites on the PD-L1 promoter. Moreover, TEPP-46 inhibited expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, DCs, and T cells as well as tumor cells in a mouse CT26 cancer model. These findings broaden our understanding of how PKM2 may contribute to tumor progression and may explain the upregulation of PD-L1 in the tumor microenvironment.

  10. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 are not required for GnRH neuron development and normal female reproductive axis function in mice.

    Wierman, Margaret E; Xu, Mei; Pierce, A; Bliesner, B; Bliss, S P; Roberson, M S

    2012-01-01

    Selective deletion of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and ERK2 in the pituitary gonadotrope and ovarian granulosa cells disrupts female reproductive axis function. Thus, we asked if ERK1 and ERK2 are critical for GnRH neuron ontogeny or the central control of female reproductive function. GnRH-Cre-recombinase (Cre+) expressing mice were crossed with mice with a global deletion of ERK1 and a floxed ERK2 allele (Erk1-/Erk2fl/fl) to selectively delete ERK2 in GnRH neurons. Cre-recombinase mRNA was selectively expressed in the brain of Cre+ mice. GnRH neuron number and location were determined during embryogenesis and in the adult. GnRH neuron counts at E15 did not differ between experimental and control groups (1,198 ± 65 and 1,160 ± 80 respectively, p = NS). In adults, numbers of GnRH neurons in the GnRHCre+Erk1-/Erk2- mice (741 ± 157) were similar to those in controls (756 ± 7), without alteration in their distribution across the forebrain. ERK1 and 2 deficiency did not alter the timing of vaginal opening, age at first estrus, or estrous cyclicity. Although ERK1 and 2 are components of a dominant signaling pathway in GnRH neuronal cells that modulates survival and control of GnRH gene expression, other signaling pathways compensate for their deletion in vivo to allow GnRH neuron survival and targeting and normal onset of female sexual maturation and reproductive function. In contrast to effects at the pituitary and the ovary, ERK1 and ERK2 are dispensable at the level of the GnRH neuron. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Synergism between the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and FAK down-regulation in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Pei-Jie Shi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is an aggressive malignant disorder of lymphoid progenitor cells in both children and adults. Although improvements in contemporary therapy and development of new treatment strategies have led to dramatic increases in the cure rate in children with ALL, the relapse rate remains high and the prognosis of relapsed childhood ALL is poor. Molecularly targeted therapies have emerged as the leading treatments in cancer therapy. Multi-cytotoxic drug regimens have achieved success, yet many studies addressing targeted therapies have focused on only one single agent. In this study, we attempted to investigate whether the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is synergistic with the effect of focal adhesion kinase (FAK down-regulation in the treatment of ALL. Methods The effect of rapamycin combined with FAK down-regulation on cell proliferation, the cell cycle, and apoptosis was investigated in the human precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells REH and on survival time and leukemia progression in a non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse model. Results When combined with FAK down-regulation, rapamycin-induced suppression of cell proliferation, G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis were significantly enhanced. In addition, REH cell-injected NOD/SCID mice treated with rapamycin and a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA to down-regulate FAK had significantly longer survival times and slower leukemia progression compared with mice injected with REH-empty vector cells and treated with rapamycin. Moreover, the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (BCL-2 gene family was shown to be involved in the enhancement, by combined treatment, of REH cell apoptosis. Conclusions FAK down-regulation enhanced the in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effects of rapamycin on REH cell growth, indicating that the simultaneous targeting of mTOR- and FAK-related pathways might offer a novel

  12. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  13. Discovery and optimization of potent and selective imidazopyridine and imidazopyridazine mTOR inhibitors.

    Peterson, Emily A; Boezio, Alessandro A; Andrews, Paul S; Boezio, Christiane M; Bush, Tammy L; Cheng, Alan C; Choquette, Deborah; Coats, James R; Colletti, Adria E; Copeland, Katrina W; DuPont, Michelle; Graceffa, Russell; Grubinska, Barbara; Kim, Joseph L; Lewis, Richard T; Liu, Jingzhou; Mullady, Erin L; Potashman, Michele H; Romero, Karina; Shaffer, Paul L; Stanton, Mary K; Stellwagen, John C; Teffera, Yohannes; Yi, Shuyan; Cai, Ti; La, Daniel S

    2012-08-01

    mTOR is a critical regulator of cellular signaling downstream of multiple growth factors. The mTOR/PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently mutated in human cancers and is thus an important oncology target. Herein we report the evolution of our program to discover ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that demonstrate improved pharmacokinetic properties and selectivity compared to our previous leads. Through targeted SAR and structure-guided design, new imidazopyridine and imidazopyridazine scaffolds were identified that demonstrated superior inhibition of mTOR in cellular assays, selectivity over the closely related PIKK family and improved in vivo clearance over our previously reported benzimidazole series. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Activity Bound to Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) Receptor, which Is Continuously Sustained by IGF-I Stimulation, Is Required for IGF-I-induced Cell Proliferation*

    Fukushima, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Yusaku; Yamanaka, Daisuke; Shibano, Takashi; Chida, Kazuhiro; Minami, Shiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Continuous stimulation of cells with insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in G1 phase is a well established requirement for IGF-induced cell proliferation; however, the molecular components of this prolonged signaling pathway that is essential for cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase are unclear. IGF-I activates IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) tyrosine kinase, followed by phosphorylation of substrates such as insulin receptor substrates (IRS) leading to binding of signaling molecules containing SH2 domains, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) to IRS and activation of the downstream signaling pathways. In this study, we found prolonged (>9 h) association of PI3K with IGF-IR induced by IGF-I stimulation. PI3K activity was present in this complex in thyrocytes and fibroblasts, although tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS was not yet evident after 9 h of IGF-I stimulation. IGF-I withdrawal in mid-G1 phase impaired the association of PI3K with IGF-IR and suppressed DNA synthesis the same as when PI3K inhibitor was added. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Tyr1316-X-X-Met of IGF-IR functioned as a PI3K binding sequence when this tyrosine is phosphorylated. We then analyzed IGF signaling and proliferation of IGF-IR−/− fibroblasts expressing exogenous mutant IGF-IR in which Tyr1316 was substituted with Phe (Y1316F). In these cells, IGF-I stimulation induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IGF-IR and IRS-1/2, but mutated IGF-IR failed to bind PI3K and to induce maximal phosphorylation of GSK3β and cell proliferation in response to IGF-I. Based on these results, we concluded that PI3K activity bound to IGF-IR, which is continuously sustained by IGF-I stimulation, is required for IGF-I-induced cell proliferation. PMID:22767591

  15. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: Integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight...

  16. Phenformin-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction Sensitizes Hepatocellular Carcinoma for Dual Inhibition of mTOR.

    Veiga, Sonia Rosa; Ge, Xuemei; Mercer, Carol A; Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Thomas, Hala Elnakat; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Zorzano, Antonio; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C

    2018-04-24

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ranks second in cancer mortality and has limited therapeutic options. We recently described the synergistic effect of allosteric and ATP-site competitive inhibitors against the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) for the treatment of HCC. However, such inhibitors induce glycemia and increase mitochondrial efficiency. Here we determined whether the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor Phenformin could reverse both side effects, impose an energetic-stress on cancer cells and suppress the growth of HCC. Human HCC cell lines were used in vitro to access the signaling and energetic impact of mTOR inhibitors and Phenformin, either alone or in combination. Next, the therapeutic utility of these drugs alone or in combination was investigated pre-clinically in human orthotopic tumors implanted in mice, by analyzing their impact on the tumor burden and overall survival. We found Phenformin caused mitochondrial dysfunction and fragmentation, inducing a compensatory shift to glycolysis. In contrast, dual inhibition of mTOR impaired cell growth and glycolysis, while increasing mitochondrial fusion and efficiency. In a mouse model of human HCC, dual inhibition of mTOR, together with Phenformin, was highly efficacious in controlling tumor burden. However, more striking, pretreatment with Phenformin sensitized tumors to dual inhibition of mTOR, leading to a dramatic improvement in survival. Treatment of HCC cells in vitro with the biguanide Phenformin causes a metabolic shift to glycolysis, mitochondrial dysfunction and fragmentation, and dramatically sensitizes orthotopic liver tumors to dual inhibition of mTOR. We therefore propose this therapeutic approach should be tested clinically in HCC. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Cross regulation between mTOR signaling and O-GlcNAcylation.

    Very, Ninon; Steenackers, Agata; Dubuquoy, Caroline; Vermuse, Jeanne; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Lefebvre, Tony; El Yazidi-Belkoura, Ikram

    2018-06-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) integrates glucose, amino acids, fatty acids and nucleotides metabolisms for uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) synthesis. UDP-GlcNAc is the nucleotide sugar donor for O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminylation (O-GlcNAcylation) processes. O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is the enzyme which transfers the N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue onto target proteins. Several studies previously showed that glucose metabolism dysregulations associated with obesity, diabetes or cancer correlated with an increase of OGT expression and global O-GlcNAcylation levels. Moreover, these diseases present an increased activation of the nutrient sensing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other works demonstrate that mTOR regulates protein O-GlcNAcylation in cancer cells through stabilization of OGT. In this context, we studied the cross-talk between these two metabolic sensors in vivo in obese mice predisposed to diabetes and in vitro in normal and colon cancer cells. We report that levels of OGT and O-GlcNAcylation are increased in obese mice colon tissues and colon cancer cells and are associated with a higher activation of mTOR signaling. In parallel, treatments with mTOR regulators modulate OGT and O-GlcNAcylation levels in both normal and colon cancer cells. However, deregulation of O-GlcNAcylation affects mTOR signaling activation only in cancer cells. Thus, a crosstalk exists between O-GlcNAcylation and mTOR signaling in contexts of metabolism dysregulation associated to obesity or cancer.

  18. Thymidine kinases in archaea

    Clausen, A.R.; Matakos, A.; Sandrini, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six fully sequenced archaeal genomes were searched for genes coding for putative deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs). We identified only 5 human-like thymidine kinase 1 genes (TK1s) and none for non-TK1 kinases. Four TK1s were identified in the Euryarchaea and one was found in the Crenarcha...

  19. mTOR at the Transmitting and Receiving Ends in Tumor Immunity.

    Guri, Yakir; Nordmann, Thierry M; Roszik, Jason

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Immunity is critical for cancer control. Cancer cells exhibit high mutational rates and therefore altered self or neo-antigens, eliciting an immune response to promote tumor eradication. Failure to mount a proper immune response leads to cancer progression. mTOR signaling controls cellular metabolism, immune cell differentiation, and effector function. Deregulated mTOR signaling in cancer cells modulates the tumor microenvironment, thereby affecting tumor immunity and possibly promoting carcinogenesis.

  20. mTOR at the Transmitting and Receiving Ends in Tumor Immunity

    Yakir Guri

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex disease and a leading cause of death worldwide. Immunity is critical for cancer control. Cancer cells exhibit high mutational rates and therefore altered self or neo-antigens, eliciting an immune response to promote tumor eradication. Failure to mount a proper immune response leads to cancer progression. mTOR signaling controls cellular metabolism, immune cell differentiation, and effector function. Deregulated mTOR signaling in cancer cells modulates the tumor microenvironment, thereby affecting tumor immunity and possibly promoting carcinogenesis.

  1. Transient mTOR inhibition facilitates continuous growth of liver tumors by modulating the maintenance of CD133+ cell populations.

    Zhaojuan Yang

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, which drives cell proliferation, is frequently hyperactivated in a variety of malignancies. Therefore, the inhibition of the mTOR pathway has been considered as an appropriate approach for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the roles of mTOR in the maintenance and differentiation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs, the conversion of conventional cancer cells to CSCs and continuous tumor growth in vivo. In H-Ras-transformed mouse liver tumor cells, we found that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin greatly increased not only the CD133+ populations both in vitro and in vivo but also the expression of stem cell-like genes. Enhancing mTOR activity by over-expressing Rheb significantly decreased CD133 expression, whereas knockdown of the mTOR yielded an opposite effect. In addition, mTOR inhibition severely blocked the differentiation of CD133+ to CD133- liver tumor cells. Strikingly, single-cell culture experiments revealed that CD133- liver tumor cells were capable of converting to CD133+ cells and the inhibition of mTOR signaling substantially promoted this conversion. In serial implantation of tumor xenografts in nude BALB/c mice, the residual tumor cells that were exposed to rapamycin in vivo displayed higher CD133 expression and had increased secondary tumorigenicity compared with the control group. Moreover, rapamycin treatment also enhanced the level of stem cell-associated genes and CD133 expression in certain human liver tumor cell lines, such as Huh7, PLC/PRC/7 and Hep3B. The mTOR pathway is significantly involved in the generation and the differentiation of tumorigenic liver CSCs. These results may be valuable for the design of more rational strategies to control clinical malignant HCC using mTOR inhibitors.

  2. The Unfolded Protein Response Is Induced by the Cell Wall Integrity Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Cascade and Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Scrimale, Thomas; Didone, Louis; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is an extracellular structure that is dependent on secretory and membrane proteins for its construction. We investigated the role of protein quality control mechanisms in cell wall integrity and found that the unfolded protein response (UPR) and, to a lesser extent, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathways are required for proper cell wall construction. Null mutation of IRE1, double mutation of ERAD components (hrd1Δ and ubc7Δ) and ire1Δ, or expres...

  3. Gemcitabine resistance in breast cancer cells regulated by PI3K/AKT-mediated cellular proliferation exerts negative feedback via the MEK/MAPK and mTOR pathways

    Yang XL

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiao Li Yang, Feng Juan Lin, Ya Jie Guo, Zhi Min Shao, Zhou Luo Ou Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer in Shanghai, Breast Cancer Institute, Cancer Hospital, Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Chemoresistance is a major cause of cancer treatment failure and leads to a reduction in the survival rate of cancer patients. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are aberrantly activated in many malignant tumors, including breast cancer, which may indicate an association with breast cancer chemoresistance. In this study, we generated a chemoresistant human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231/gemcitabine (simplified hereafter as “231/Gem”, from MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. Flow cytometry studies revealed that with the same treatment concentration of gemcitabine, 231/Gem cells displayed more robust resistance to gemcitabine, which was reflected by fewer apoptotic cells and enhanced percentage of S-phase cells. Through the use of inverted microscopy, Cell Counting Kit-8, and Transwell assays, we found that compared with parental 231 cells, 231/Gem cells displayed more morphologic projections, enhanced cell proliferative ability, and improved cell migration and invasion. Mechanistic studies revealed that the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK/MAPK signaling pathways were activated through elevated expression of phosphorylated (p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, p-AKT, mTOR, p-mTOR, p-P70S6K, and reduced expression of p-P38 and LC3-II (the marker of autophagy in 231/Gem in comparison to control cells. However, there was no change in the expression of Cyclin D1 and p-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK. In culture, inhibitors of PI3K/AKT and mTOR, but not of MEK/MAPK, could reverse the enhanced proliferative

  4. Gonadotropin-dependent oocyte maturational competence requires activation of the protein kinase A pathway and synthesis of RNA and protein in ovarian follicles of Nibe, Nibea mitsukurii (Teleostei, Sciaenidae)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Shusa, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Patino, R.

    2002-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone- (LH)-dependent ovarian follicle maturation has been recently described in two stages for teleost fishes. The oocyte's ability to respond to the steroidal maturation-inducing hormone (MIH), also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is acquired during the first stage; whereas the MIH-dependent resumption of meiosis occurs during the second stage. However, studies directly addressing OMC have been performed with a limited number of species and therefore the general relevance of the two-stage model and its mechanisms remain uncertain. In this study, we examined the hormonal regulation of OMC and its basic transduction mechanisms in ovarian follicles of the sciaenid teleost, Nibe (Nibea mitsukurii). Exposure to MIH [17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one or 17,20??,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one] stimulated germinal vesicle breakdown (index of meiotic resumption) in full-grown follicles primed with human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG, an LH-like gonadotropin) but not in those pre-cultured in plain incubation medium. The induction of OMC by HCG was mimicked by protein kinase A (PKA) activators (forskolin and dibutyryl cyclic AMP), and blocked by specific inhibitors of PKA (H89 and H8) as well as inhibitors of RNA (actinomycin D) and protein (cycloheximide) synthesis. Forskolin-induced OMC was also inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. A strong activator of protein kinase C, PMA, inhibited HCG-dependent OMC. In conclusion, OMC in Nibe ovarian follicles is gonadotropin-dependent and requires activation of the PKA pathway followed by gene transcription and translation events. These observations are consistent with the two-stage model of ovarian follicle maturation proposed for other teleosts, and suggest that Nibe can be used as new model species for mechanistic studies of ovarian follicle differentiation and maturation in fishes.

  5. Myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation in tracheal smooth muscle

    Stull, J.T.; Hsu, L.C.; Tansey, M.G.; Kamm, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    Purified myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, and the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Because phosphorylation in a specific site (site A) by any one of these kinases desensitizes myosin light chain kinase to activation by Ca2+/calmodulin, kinase phosphorylation could play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contractility. This possibility was investigated in 32 P-labeled bovine tracheal smooth muscle. Treatment of tissues with carbachol, KCl, isoproterenol, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate increased the extent of kinase phosphorylation. Six primary phosphopeptides (A-F) of myosin light chain kinase were identified. Site A was phosphorylated to an appreciable extent only with carbachol or KCl, agents which contract tracheal smooth muscle. The extent of site A phosphorylation correlated to increases in the concentration of Ca2+/calmodulin required for activation. These results show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C do not affect smooth muscle contractility by phosphorylating site A in myosin light chain kinase. It is proposed that phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase in site A in contracting tracheal smooth muscle may play a role in the reported desensitization of contractile elements to activation by Ca2+

  6. Phosphorylation of mTOR and S6RP predicts the efficacy of everolimus in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Li, Siming; Kong, Yan; Si, Lu; Chi, Zhihong; Cui, Chuanliang; Sheng, Xinan; Guo, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell cancer (RCC) has been increasing for the past decade, and the 5-year survival for patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC) is rather low. Everolimus (RAD001), a new inhibitor for mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is generally well tolerated, and demonstrates clinical benefit to patients with anti-VEGF-refractory mRCC. However, factors for selection of patients who may benefit from everolimus remain largely unknown. Here we aimed to explore potential molecular indicators for mRCC patients who may benefit from everolimus treatment. Paraffin-embedded tumor tissue specimens derived from 18 mRCC patients before everolimus treatment, who participated the phase 1b trial of everolimus in VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-refractory Chinese patients with mRCC (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01152801), were examined for the expression levels of phosphorylated AKT, mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binding protein-1 (4EBP1) and 40S ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP) by immunohistochemistry. Clinical benefit rate (complete response [CR], partial response [PR], plus stable disease [SD] ≥ 6 months) and progression-free survival time (PFS) were correlated with expression levels of these mTOR-associated molecules. In these 18 patients, there were 1 PR, 15 SDs (including 9 SDs ≥ 6 months), and 2 progressive diseases (PD). The clinical benefit rate (CBR) was 55.6% (10/18), and the median PFS time was 8.4 months. Patients with positive expression of phospho-mTOR showed a better CBR (71.4% versus 0%, P = 0.023) and PFS time (11.3 versus 3.7 months, P = 0.001) than those patients with negative expression. The median PFS of patients with positive phospho-S6RP expression was longer (11.3 versus 3.7 months, P = 0.002) than that of patients negative for phospho-S6RP expression. However, expression levels of phospho-4EBP1 and phospho-AKT were unassociated to efficacy of everolimus treatment with respect to CBR and PFS. Co-expression of

  7. Atg6/UVRAG/Vps34-Containing Lipid Kinase Complex Is Required for Receptor Downregulation through Endolysosomal Degradation and Epithelial Polarity during Drosophila Wing Development

    Péter Lőrincz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atg6 (Beclin 1 in mammals is a core component of the Vps34 PI3K (III complex, which promotes multiple vesicle trafficking pathways. Atg6 and Vps34 form two distinct PI3K (III complexes in yeast and mammalian cells, either with Atg14 or with UVRAG. The functions of these two complexes are not entirely clear, as both Atg14 and UVRAG have been suggested to regulate both endocytosis and autophagy. In this study, we performed a microscopic analysis of UVRAG, Atg14, or Atg6 loss-of-function cells in the developing Drosophila wing. Both autophagy and endocytosis are seriously impaired and defective endolysosomes accumulate upon loss of Atg6. We show that Atg6 is required for the downregulation of Notch and Wingless signaling pathways; thus it is essential for normal wing development. Moreover, the loss of Atg6 impairs cell polarity. Atg14 depletion results in autophagy defects with no effect on endocytosis or cell polarity, while the silencing of UVRAG phenocopies all but the autophagy defect of Atg6 depleted cells. Thus, our results indicate that the UVRAG-containing PI3K (III complex is required for receptor downregulation through endolysosomal degradation and for the establishment of proper cell polarity in the developing wing, while the Atg14-containing complex is involved in autophagosome formation.

  8. Ropinirole and Pramipexole Promote Structural Plasticity in Human iPSC-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons via BDNF and mTOR Signaling

    Ginetta Collo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiparkinsonian ropinirole and pramipexole are D3 receptor- (D3R- preferring dopaminergic (DA agonists used as adjunctive therapeutics for the treatment resistant depression (TRD. While the exact antidepressant mechanism of action remains uncertain, a role for D3R in the restoration of impaired neuroplasticity occurring in TRD has been proposed. Since D3R agonists are highly expressed on DA neurons in humans, we studied the effect of ropinirole and pramipexole on structural plasticity using a translational model of human-inducible pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. Two hiPSC clones from healthy donors were differentiated into midbrain DA neurons. Ropinirole and pramipexole produced dose-dependent increases of dendritic arborization and soma size after 3 days of culture, effects antagonized by the selective D3R antagonists SB277011-A and S33084 and by the mTOR pathway kinase inhibitors LY294002 and rapamycin. All treatments were also effective in attenuating the D3R-dependent increase of p70S6-kinase phosphorylation. Immunoneutralisation of BDNF, inhibition of TrkB receptors, and blockade of MEK-ERK signaling likewise prevented ropinirole-induced structural plasticity, suggesting a critical interaction between BDNF and D3R signaling pathways. The highly similar profiles of data acquired with DA neurons derived from two hiPSC clones underpin their reliability for characterization of pharmacological agents acting via dopaminergic mechanisms.

  9. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  10. The effects of β-elemene on the expression of mTOR, HIF-1α ...

    The purpose of this manuscript was to study the regulation effects of â-elemene combined with radiotherapy on three different gene expressions in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell. mTOR gene, HIF-1á gene, Survivin gene were included in the gene group. Cell culture and RT-PCR were applied to finish this research.

  11. Trichomonas vaginalis Metalloproteinase Induces mTOR Cleavage of SiHa Cells

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Choi, In-Wook; Yang, Jung-Bo; Zhou, Wei; Cha, Guang-Ho; Zhou, Yu; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis secretes a number of proteases which are suspected to be the cause of pathogenesis; however, little is understood how they manipulate host cells. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth, cell proliferation, cell motility, cell survival, protein synthesis, and transcription. We detected various types of metalloproteinases including GP63 protein from T. vaginalis trophozoites, and T. vaginalis GP63 metalloproteinase was confirmed by sequencing and western blot. When SiHa cells were stimulated with live T. vaginalis, T. vaginalis excretory-secretory products (ESP) or T. vaginalis lysate, live T. vaginalis and T. vaginalis ESP induced the mTOR cleavage in both time- and parasite load-dependent manner, but T. vaginalis lysate did not. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with a metalloproteinase inhibitor, 1,10-phenanthroline, completely disappeared the mTOR cleavage in SiHa cells. Collectively, T. vaginalis metallopeptidase induces host cell mTOR cleavage, which may be related to survival of the parasite. PMID:25548410

  12. mTOR Hyperactivation in down syndrome hippocampus appears early during development

    Iyer, Anand M.; van Scheppingen, Jackelien; Milenkovic, Ivan; Anink, Jasper J.; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key developmental pathway involved in mechanisms underlying cellular aging and neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that its deregulation may occur during early brain development in patients with Down syndrome (DS). The expression

  13. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    Geng Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyositis (PM is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  14. Role of nutrients and mTOR signaling in the regulation of pancreatic progenitors development

    Lynda Elghazi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Poor fetal nutrition increases the risk of type 2 diabetes in the offspring at least in part by reduced embryonic β-cell growth and impaired function. However, it is not entirely clear how fetal nutrients and growth factors impact β-cells during development to alter glucose homeostasis and metabolism later in life. The current experiments aimed to test the impact of fetal nutrients and growth factors on endocrine development and how these signals acting on mTOR signaling regulate β-cell mass and glucose homeostasis. Method: Pancreatic rudiments in culture were used to study the role of glucose, growth factors, and amino acids on β-cell development. The number and proliferation of pancreatic and endocrine progenitor were assessed in the presence or absence of rapamycin. The impact of mTOR signaling in vivo on pancreas development and glucose homeostasis was assessed in models deficient for mTOR or Raptor in Pdx1 expressing pancreatic progenitors. Results: We found that amino acid concentrations, and leucine in particular, enhance the number of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors and are essential for growth factor induced proliferation. Rapamycin, an mTORC1 complex inhibitor, reduced the number and proliferation of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors. Mice lacking mTOR in pancreatic progenitors exhibited hyperglycemia in neonates, hypoinsulinemia and pancreatic agenesis/hypoplasia with pancreas rudiments containing ductal structures lacking differentiated acinar and endocrine cells. In addition, loss of mTORC1 by deletion of raptor in pancreatic progenitors reduced pancreas size with reduced number of β-cells. Conclusion: Together, these results suggest that amino acids concentrations and in particular leucine modulates growth responses of pancreatic and endocrine progenitors and that mTOR signaling is critical for these responses. Inactivation of mTOR and raptor in pancreatic progenitors suggested that alterations in some of

  15. A conserved p38 MAP kinase pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans innate immunity.

    Kim, Dennis H; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Alloing, Geneviève; Emerson, Fred E; Garsin, Danielle A; Inoue, Hideki; Tanaka-Hino, Miho; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Tan, Man-Wah; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2002-07-26

    A genetic screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants with enhanced susceptibility to killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of two genes required for pathogen resistance: sek-1, which encodes a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase, and nsy-1, which encodes a MAP kinase kinase kinase. RNA interference assays and biochemical analysis established that a p38 ortholog, pmk-1, functions as the downstream MAP kinase required for pathogen defense. These data suggest that this MAP kinase signaling cassette represents an ancient feature of innate immune responses in evolutionarily diverse species.

  16. Autophagy is required for the activation of NFκB.

    Criollo, Alfredo; Chereau, Fanny; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Mariño, Guillermo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Baud, Véronique; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    It is well-established that the activation of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκBα) kinase (IKK) complex is required for autophagy induction by multiple stimuli. Here, we show that in autophagy-competent mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), distinct autophagic triggers, including starvation, mTOR inhibition with rapamycin and p53 inhibition with cyclic pifithrin α lead to the activation of IKK, followed by the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of IκBα and nuclear translocation of NFκB. Remarkably, the NFκB signaling pathway was blocked in MEFs lacking either the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7. In addition, we found that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced NFκB nuclear translocation is abolished in both Atg5- and Atg7-deficient MEFs. Similarly, the depletion of essential autophagy modulators, including ATG5, ATG7, Beclin 1 and VPS34, by RNA interference inhibited TNFα-driven NFκB activation in two human cancer cell lines. In conclusion, it appears that, at least in some instances, autophagy is required for NFκB activation, highlighting an intimate crosstalk between these two stress response signaling pathways.

  17. Fluoxetine regulates mTOR signalling in a region-dependent manner in depression-like mice

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Luo, Liu; Mu, Rong-Hao; Liu, Bin-Bin; Geng, Di; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has an important role in ketamine-induced, rapid antidepressant effects despite the acute administration of fluoxetine not affecting mTOR phosphorylation in the brain. However, the effects of long-term fluoxetine treatment on mTOR modulation have not been assessed to date. In the present study, we examined whether fluoxetine, a type of commonly used antidepressant agent, alters mTOR signaling following chronic administration in different brain regions, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and hypothalamus. We also investigated whether fluoxetine enhanced synaptic protein levels in these regions via the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream regulators, p70S6K and 4E-BP-1. The results indicated that chronic fluoxetine treatment attenuated the chronic, unpredictable, mild stress (CUMS)-induced mTOR phosphorylation reduction in the hippocampus and amygdala of mice but not in the frontal cortex or the hypothalamus. Moreover, the CUMS-decreased PSD-95 and synapsin I levels were reversed by fluoxetine, and these effects were blocked by rapamycin only in the hippocampus. In conclusion, our findings suggest that chronic treatment with fluoxetine can induce synaptic protein expression by activating the mTOR signaling pathway in a region-dependent manner and mainly in the hippocampus. PMID:26522512

  18. Cord Blood Cells Responses to IL2, IL7 and IL15 Cytokines for mTOR Expression

    Anahita Mohammadian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORis important in hematopoiesis and affect cell growth,differentiation and survival. Although previous studies were identified the effect of cytokines on the mononuclear cells development however the cytokines effect on mTOR in cord blood mononuclear cells was unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate mTOR expression in cord blood mononuclear and cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells in culture conditions for lymphoid cell development. Methods: Isolation of The mononuclear cells (MNCs from umbilical cord blood were done with use of Ficollpaque density gradient. We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear and CD34+ cells in presece of IL2, IL7 and IL15 at distinct time points during 21 days by using flow cytometry. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 on the expression of mTOR in cord blood cells. Results: mTOR expression were increased in peresence of IL2, IL7 and IL15 in day 14 and afterword reduced. However in persence of IL2 and IL15 expression of mTOR significantly reduced. mTOR expression in CD34+ cells decreased significantly from day7 to day 21 in culture. Conclusion: cytokines play important role in mTOR expression during hematopoiesis and development of cord blood mononuclear cells.

  19. Resveratrol engages AMPK to attenuate ERK and mTOR signaling in sensory neurons and inhibits incision-induced acute and chronic pain

    Tillu Dipti V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in our understanding of basic mechanisms driving post-surgical pain, treating incision-induced pain remains a major clinical challenge. Moreover, surgery has been implicated as a major cause of chronic pain conditions. Hence, more efficacious treatments are needed to inhibit incision-induced pain and prevent the transition to chronic pain following surgery. We reasoned that activators of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK may represent a novel treatment avenue for the local treatment of incision-induced pain because AMPK activators inhibit ERK and mTOR signaling, two important pathways involved in the sensitization of peripheral nociceptors. Results To test this hypothesis we used a potent and efficacious activator of AMPK, resveratrol. Our results demonstrate that resveratrol profoundly inhibits ERK and mTOR signaling in sensory neurons in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion and that these effects are mediated by AMPK activation and independent of sirtuin activity. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is thought to play an important role in incision-induced pain and resveratrol potently inhibited IL-6-mediated signaling to ERK in sensory neurons and blocked IL-6-mediated allodynia in vivo through a local mechanism of action. Using a model of incision-induced allodynia in mice, we further demonstrate that local injection of resveratrol around the surgical wound strongly attenuates incision-induced allodynia. Intraplantar IL-6 injection and plantar incision induces persistent nociceptive sensitization to PGE2 injection into the affected paw after the resolution of allodynia to the initial stimulus. We further show that resveratrol treatment at the time of IL-6 injection or plantar incision completely blocks the development of persistent nociceptive sensitization consistent with the blockade of a transition to a chronic pain state by resveratrol treatment. Conclusions These results highlight the importance of signaling

  20. Collagen type I induces EGFR-TKI resistance in EGFR-mutated cancer cells by mTOR activation through Akt-independent pathway.

    Yamazaki, Shota; Higuchi, Youichi; Ishibashi, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Hiroko; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2018-06-01

    Primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) is a serious problem in lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring EGFR mutations. The aim of this study was to examine whether and how collagen type I (Col I), the most abundantly deposited matrix in tumor stroma, affects EGFR-TKI sensitivity in EGFR-mutant cells. We evaluated the EGFR-TKI sensitivity of EGFR-mutated cancer cells cultured with Col I. Changes in the activation of downstream signaling molecules of EGFR were analyzed. We also examined the association between the Col I expression in tumor stroma in surgical specimens and EGFR-TKI response of postoperative recurrence patients with EGFR mutations. Compared to cancer cells without Col I, the survival rate of cancer cells cultured with Col I was significantly higher after EGFR-TKI treatment. In cancer cells cultured with and without Col I, EGFR-TKI suppressed the levels of phosphorylated (p-)EGFR, p-ERK1/2, and p-Akt. When compared to cancer cells without Col I, expression of p-P70S6K, a hallmark of mTOR activation, was dramatically upregulated in cancer cells with Col I. This activation was maintained even after EGFR-TKI treatment. Simultaneous treatment with EGFR-TKI and mTOR inhibitor abrogated Col I-induced resistance to EGFR-TKI. Patients with Col I-rich stroma had a significantly shorter progression-free survival time after EGFR-TKI therapy (238 days vs 404 days; P Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  1. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  2. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  3. Cortisol inhibits mTOR signaling in avascular necrosis of the femoral head.

    Liao, Yun; Su, Rui; Zhang, Ping; Yuan, Bo; Li, Ling

    2017-10-18

    ANFH is a major health problem, to which long lasting and definitive treatments are lacking. The aim of this study is to study RNA alterations attributed to cortisol-induced ANFH. Rat models were stratified into three groups: in vitro group (n = 20) for molecular biological assays, control group (n = 3), and ANFH group induced using lipopolysaccharide and dexamethasone (n = 3). Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) were extracted from the rats. An RNA expression array was performed on BM-EPCs, and enriched genes were subject to pathway analysis. In vitro studies following findings of array results were also performed using the isolated BM-EPCs. Significant alterations in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and HIF signaling pathways were identified in BM-EPCs of ANFH. By applying cortisol and dexamethasone to BM-EPCs, significant changes in mTOR and HIF elements were identified. The alteration of HIF pathways appeared to be downstream of mTOR signaling. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression was related to glucocorticoid-dependent mRNA expression of mTOR/HIF genes. mTOR-dependent angiogenesis but not anabolism was the target of GR in ANFH. Inhibition of mTOR signaling also induced apoptosis of BM-EPCs via CHOP-dependent DR5 induction in response to GR stimulation. Decreased mTOR signaling in response to GR stimulation leading to downregulated HIF pathway as well as increased apoptosis could be the pathophysiology.

  4. Diacylglycerol kinases in T cell tolerance and effector function

    Shelley S Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs are a family of enzymes that regulate the relative levels of diacylglycerol (DAG and phosphatidic acid (PA in cells by phosphorylating DAG to produce PA. Both DAG and PA are important second messengers cascading T cell receptor (TCR signal by recruiting multiple effector molecules such as RasGRP1, PKC, and mTOR. Studies have revealed important physiological functions of DGKs in the regulation of receptor signaling and the development and activation of immune cells. In this review, we will focus on recent progresses in our understanding of two DGK isoforms,  and , in CD8 T effector and memory cell differentiation, regulatory T cell development and function, and invariant NKT cell development and effector lineage differentiation.

  5. Role of Host Type IA Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Pathway Components in Invasin-Mediated Internalization of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    Dowd, Georgina C; Bhalla, Manmeet; Kean, Bernard; Thomas, Rowan; Ireton, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Many bacterial pathogens subvert mammalian type IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in order to induce their internalization into host cells. How PI3K promotes internalization is not well understood. Also unclear is whether type IA PI3K affects different pathogens through similar or distinct mechanisms. Here, we performed an RNA interference (RNAi)-based screen to identify components of the type IA PI3K pathway involved in invasin-mediated entry of Yersinia enterocolitica, an enteropathogen that causes enteritis and lymphadenitis. The 69 genes targeted encode known upstream regulators or downstream effectors of PI3K. A similar RNAi screen was previously performed with the food-borne bacterium Listeria monocytogenes The results of the screen with Y. enterocolitica indicate that at least nine members of the PI3K pathway are needed for invasin-mediated entry. Several of these proteins, including centaurin-α1, Dock180, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Grp1, LL5α, LL5β, and PLD2 (phospholipase D2), were recruited to sites of entry. In addition, centaurin-α1, FAK, PLD2, and mTOR were required for remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton during entry. Six of the human proteins affecting invasin-dependent internalization also promote InlB-mediated entry of L. monocytogenes Our results identify several host proteins that mediate invasin-induced effects on the actin cytoskeleton and indicate that a subset of PI3K pathway components promote internalization of both Y. enterocolitica and L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Identification of anti-proliferative kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents to treat canine osteosarcoma.

    Mauchle, Ulrike; Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Mol, Jan A; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Verheije, Monique H

    2015-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumour in dogs but various forms of therapy have not significantly improved clinical outcomes. As dysregulation of kinase activity is often present in tumours, kinases represent attractive molecular targets for cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify novel compounds targeting kinases with the potential to induce cell death in a panel of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. The ability of 80 well-characterized kinase inhibitor compounds to inhibit the proliferation of four canine osteosarcoma cell lines was investigated in vitro. For those compounds with activity, the mechanism of action and capability to potentiate the activity of doxorubicin was further evaluated. The screening showed 22 different kinase inhibitors that induced significant anti-proliferative effects across the four canine osteosarcoma cell lines investigated. Four of these compounds (RO 31-8220, 5-iodotubercidin, BAY 11-7082 and an erbstatin analog) showed significant cell growth inhibitory effects across all cell lines in association with variable induction of apoptosis. RO 31-8220 and 5-iodotubercidin showed the highest ability to potentiate the effects of doxorubicin on cell viability. In conclusion, the present study identified several potent kinase inhibitors targeting the PKC, CK1, PKA, ErbB2, mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which may warrant further investigations for the treatment of osteosarcoma in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of protein kinase C delta attenuates allergic airway inflammation through suppression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR/HIF-1 alpha/VEGF pathway.

    Yun Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is supposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of allergic airway disease. VEGF expression is regulated by a variety of stimuli such as nitric oxide, growth factors, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α. Recently, inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to alleviate cardinal asthmatic features, including airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, and increased vascular permeability in asthma models. Based on these observations, we have investigated whether mTOR is associated with HIF-1α-mediated VEGF expression in allergic asthma. In studies with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we have elucidated the stimulatory role of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF axis in allergic response. Next, the mechanisms by which mTOR is activated to modulate this response have been evaluated. mTOR is known to be regulated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt or protein kinase C-delta (PKC δ in various cell types. Consistent with these, our results have revealed that suppression of PKC δ by rottlerin leads to the inhibition of PI3K/Akt activity and the subsequent blockade of a mTOR-HIF-1α-VEGF module, thereby attenuating typical asthmatic attack in a murine model. Thus, the present data indicate that PKC δ is necessary for the modulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling cascade, resulting in a tight regulation of HIF-1α activity and VEGF expression. In conclusion, PKC δ may represent a valuable target for innovative therapeutic treatment of allergic airway disease.

  8. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, is a dual phosphoinositide-3-kinase/mTOR inhibitor

    Van Aller, Glenn S.; Carson, Jeff D.; Tang, Wei; Peng, Hao; Zhao, Lin; Copeland, Robert A.; Tummino, Peter J.; Luo, Lusong

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is an ATP-competitive inhibitor of PI3K and mTOR with Ki values around 300 nM. → EGCG inhibits cell proliferation and AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 in MDA-MB-231and A549 cells. → Molecular docking studies show that EGCG binds well to the PI3K kinase domain active site. → These results suggest another important molecular mechanism for the anticancer activities of EGCG. -- Abstract: The PI3K signaling pathway is activated in a broad spectrum of human cancers, either directly by genetic mutation or indirectly via activation of receptor tyrosine kinases or inactivation of the PTEN tumor suppressor. The key nodes of this pathway have emerged as important therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we show that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, is an ATP-competitive inhibitor of both phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) with K i values of 380 and 320 nM respectively. The potency of EGCG against PI3K and mTOR is within physiologically relevant concentrations. In addition, EGCG inhibits cell proliferation and AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 in MDA-MB-231 and A549 cells. Molecular docking studies show that EGCG binds well to the PI3K kinase domain active site, agreeing with the finding that EGCG competes for ATP binding. Our results suggest another important molecular mechanism for the anticancer activities of EGCG.

  9. p38 MAP kinase is required for Wnt3a-mediated osterix expression independently of Wnt-LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis in dental follicle cells

    Sakisaka, Yukihiko; Kanaya, Sousuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Tamura, Masato; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi; Nemoto, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Wnt3a is a secreted glycoprotein that activates the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)/β-catenin signaling pathway through low-density-lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)5/6 co-receptors. Wnt3a has been implicated in periodontal development and homeostasis, as well as in cementum formation. Recently, we have reported that Wnt3a increases alkaline phosphatase expression through the induction of osterix (Osx) expression in dental follicle cells, a precursor of cementoblasts. However, the molecular mechanism by which Wnt3a induces Osx expression is still unknown. In this study, we show that Wnt3a-induced Osx expression was inhibited in the presence of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors (SB203580 and SB202190) at gene and protein levels, as assessed by real-time PCR and immunocytohistochemistry, respectively. Pretreatment of cells with Dickkopf-1, a potent canonical Wnt antagonist binding to LRP5/6 co-receptors, did not influence Wnt3a-mediated p38 MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting that Wnt3a activates p38 MAPK through LRP5/6-independent signaling. On the other hand, pretreatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors had no effects on the phosphorylated status of GSK3β and β-catenin as well as β-catenin nuclear translocation, but inhibited Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that p38 MAPK modulates canonical Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level without any crosstalk with the Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6-GSK3β signaling axis and subsequent β-catenin nuclear translocation. These findings expand our knowledge of the mechanisms controlling periodontal development and regeneration. - Highlights: • Wnt3a induces Osx expression via p38 MAPK signaling in dental follicle cells. • p38 MAPK has no crosstalk with Wnt3a-mediated LRP5/6 and GSK3β signaling. • p38 MAPK is required for Wnt signaling at the β-catenin transcriptional level.

  10. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  11. Glutamate alleviates muscle protein loss by modulating TLR4, NODs, Akt/FOXO and mTOR signaling pathways in LPS-challenged piglets.

    Ping Kang

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the effect of the glutamate (Glu on muscle protein loss through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs, Akt/Forkhead Box O (Akt/FOXO and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathways in LPS-challenged piglets. Twenty-four weaned piglets were assigned into four treatments: (1 Control; (2 LPS+0% Glu; (3 LPS + 1.0% Glu; (4 LPS + 2.0% Glu. The experiment was lasted for 28 days. On d 28, the piglets in the LPS challenged groups were injected with LPS on 100 μg/kg body weight (BW, and the piglets in the control group were injected with the same volume of 0.9% NaCl solution. After 4 h LPS or saline injection, the piglets were slaughtered and the muscle samples were collected. Glu supplementation increased the protein/DNA ratio in gastrocnemius muscle, and the protein content in longissimus dorsi (LD muscle after LPS challenge (P<0.05. In addition, Glu supplementation decreased TLR4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK 1, receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase (RIPK 2, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB mRNA expression in gastrocnemius muscle (P<0.05, MyD88 mRNA expression in LD muscle, and FOXO1 mRNA expression in LD muscle (P<0.05. Moreover, Glu supplementation increased p-Akt/t-Akt ratio (P<0.05 in gastrocnemius muscle, and p-4EBP1/t-4EBP1 ratio in both gastrocnemius and LD muscles (P<0.05. Glu supplementation in the piglets' diets might be an effective strategy to alleviate LPS-induced muscle protein loss, which might be due to suppressing the mRNA expression of TLR4 and NODs signaling-related genes, and modulating Akt/FOXO and mTOR signaling pathways.

  12. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  13. mTOR: A Link from the Extracellular Milieu to Transcriptional Regulation of Oligodendrocyte Development

    Teresa L. Wood

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte development is controlled by numerous extracellular signals that regulate a series of transcription factors that promote the differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells to myelinating cells in the central nervous system. A major element of this regulatory system that has only recently been studied is the intracellular signalling from surface receptors to transcription factors to down-regulate inhibitors and up-regulate inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. The current review focuses on one such pathway: the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, which integrates signals in many cell systems and induces cell responses including cell proliferation and cell differentiation. This review describes the known functions of mTOR as they relate to oligodendrocyte development, and its recently discovered impact on oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. A potential model for its role in oligodendrocyte development is proposed.

  14. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  15. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis is functional in neuroendocrine tumors and signals on mTOR.

    Circelli, Luisa; Sciammarella, Concetta; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; del Basso de Caro, Marialaura; Botti, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Luciano; Aria, Massimo; Ramundo, Valeria; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Ieranò, Caterina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Izzo, Francesco; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Colao, Annamaria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-05

    To evaluate the possible crosstalk between C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4)/C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12)/C-X-C chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) axis with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Sixty-one human NETs were included into the study. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis and mTOR pathway were assessed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). The effect of mTOR inhibitor, RAD001, was evaluated on CXCR4 pathway through proliferation and p-Erk and p-AKT induction. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis and p-mTOR were found to be active and correlated with grading, Ki67 index and tumor stage. mTOR pathway activation significantly correlated with poor prognosis. In human NET cells, CXCL12 induced mTOR signalling while AMD3100 (CXCR4-antagonist) impaired it. The mTOR-antagonist, RAD001, impaired the CXCL12-dependent induction of CXCR4 downstream effectors. Combination of AMD3100 and RAD001 potentiate cell growth inhibition. CXCR4/CXCL12/CXCR7 axis is active in NETs and signals on mTOR. CXCR4 might be considered a prognostic factor in NETs. Combined treatment with AMD3100 and RAD001 may provide clinical benefits in NET patients with drug-resistant.

  16. Protein kinase C activation decreases cell surface expression of the GLT-1 subtype of glutamate transporter. Requirement of a carboxyl-terminal domain and partial dependence on serine 486.

    Kalandadze, Avtandil; Wu, Ying; Robinson, Michael B

    2002-11-29

    Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters are required for the clearance of extracellular glutamate and influence both physiological and pathological effects of this excitatory amino acid. In the present study, the effects of a protein kinase C (PKC) activator on the cell surface expression and activity of the GLT-1 subtype of glutamate transporter were examined in two model systems, primary co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes that endogenously express GLT-1 and C6 glioma cells transfected with GLT-1. In both systems, activation of PKC with phorbol ester caused a decrease in GLT-1 cell surface expression. This effect is opposite to the one observed for the EAAC1 subtype of glutamate transporter (Davis, K. E., Straff, D. J., Weinstein, E. A., Bannerman, P. G., Correale, D. M., Rothstein, J. D., and Robinson, M. B. (1998) J. Neurosci. 18, 2475-2485). Several recombinant chimeric proteins between GLT-1 and EAAC1 transporter subtypes were generated to identify domains required for the subtype-specific redistribution of GLT-1. We identified a carboxyl-terminal domain consisting of 43 amino acids (amino acids 475-517) that is required for PKC-induced GLT-1 redistribution. Mutation of a non-conserved serine residue at position 486 partially attenuated but did not completely abolish the PKC-dependent redistribution of GLT-1. Although we observed a phorbol ester-dependent incorporation of (32)P into immunoprecipitable GLT-1, mutation of serine 486 did not reduce this signal. We also found that chimeras containing the first 446 amino acids of GLT-1 were not functional unless amino acids 475-517 of GLT-1 were also present. These non-functional transporters were not as efficiently expressed on the cell surface and migrated to a smaller molecular weight, suggesting that a subtype-specific interaction is required for the formation of functional transporters. These studies demonstrate a novel effect of PKC on GLT-1 activity and define a unique carboxyl-terminal domain as an

  17. A pilot trial of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor RAD001 in patients with advanced B-CLL.

    Decker, Thomas; Sandherr, Michael; Goetze, Katharina; Oelsner, Madlen; Ringshausen, Ingo; Peschel, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Although B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is treatable, it remains an incurable disease and most patients inevitably suffer relapse. Many therapeutic options exist for those requiring therapy, including monoclonal antibodies and stem cell transplantation, but remissions tend to last shorter in the course of the disease. Targeting the cell cycle has recently been realized to be an attractive therapeutic approach in solid and hematological malignancies, and the proliferative nature of B-CLL is increasingly accepted. Here, we report data on a phase II pilot trial with the oral mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor RAD001 5 mg/daily in patients with advanced B-CLL who had progressive disease after at least two lines of treatment. After treatment of seven patients, this trial was stopped because of toxicity concerns, although some degree of activity was observed (one partial remission, three patients with stable disease). Interestingly, cyclin E expression decreased in responding patients. Further strategies of mTOR inhibition by RAD001 in B-CLL should focus on different treatment schedules, adequate anti-infectious prophylaxis, or combinations with cytotoxic drugs.

  18. The Effects of Krill Oil on mTOR Signaling and Resistance Exercise: A Pilot Study

    Georges, John; Sharp, Matthew H.; Lowery, Ryan P.; Wilson, Jacob M.; Purpura, Martin; Hornberger, Troy A.; Harding, Flint; Johnson, James H.; Peele, David M.; Jäger, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Introduction. Krill oil supplementation has been shown to improve postexercise immune function; however, its effect on muscle hypertrophy is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the ability of krill oil to stimulate mTOR signaling and its ability to augment resistance training-induced changes in body composition and performance. Methods. C2C12 myoblasts cells were stimulated with krill oil or soy-derived phosphatidylcholine (S-PC), and then, the ratio of P...

  19. The Effects of Krill Oil on mTOR Signaling and Resistance Exercise: A Pilot Study

    John Georges

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Krill oil supplementation has been shown to improve postexercise immune function; however, its effect on muscle hypertrophy is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the ability of krill oil to stimulate mTOR signaling and its ability to augment resistance training-induced changes in body composition and performance. Methods. C2C12 myoblasts cells were stimulated with krill oil or soy-derived phosphatidylcholine (S-PC, and then, the ratio of P-p70-389 to total p70 was used as readout for mTOR signaling. In double-blind,placebo-controlled study, resistance trained subjects consumed either 3 g krill oil daily or placebo, and each took part in an 8-week periodized resistance training program. Body composition, maximal strength, peak power, and rate of perceived recovery were assessed collectively at the end of weeks 0 and 8. In addition, safety parameters (comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP, complete blood count (CBC, and urine analysis (UA and cognitive performance were measured pre- and posttesting. Results. Krill oil significantly stimulated mTOR signaling in comparison to S-PC and control. No differences for markers on the CMP, CBC, or UA were observed. Krill oil significantly increased lean body mass from baseline (p=0.021, 1.4 kg, +2.1%; however, there were no statistically significant differences between groups for any measures taken. Conclusion. Krill oil activates mTOR signaling. Krill oil supplementation in athletes is safe, and its effect on resistance exercise deserves further research.

  20. Alcohol Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells by Activating mTOR Signaling

    Wei Qin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term heavy alcohol consumption could result in a range of health, social, and behavioral problems. People who abuse alcohol are at high risks of seriously having osteopenia, periodontal disease, and compromised oral health. However, the role of ethanol (EtOH in the biological functions of human dental pulp cells (DPCs is unknown. Whether EtOH affects the odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs through the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR remains unexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of EtOH on DPC differentiation and mineralization. DPCs were isolated and purified from human dental pulps. The proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs treated with EtOH were subsequently investigated. Different doses of EtOH were shown to be cytocompatible with DPCs. EtOH significantly activated the mTOR pathway in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EtOH downregulated the alkaline phosphatase activity, attenuated the mineralized nodule formation, and suppressed the expression of odontoblastic markers including ALP, DSPP, DMP-1, Runx2, and OCN. Moreover, the pretreatment with rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, markedly reversed the EtOH-induced odontoblastic differentiation and cell mineralization. Our findings show for the first time that EtOH can suppress DPC differentiation and mineralization in a mTOR-dependent manner, indicating that EtOH may be involved in negatively regulating the dental pulp repair.

  1. Differential Reponses of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells to mTOR Inhibition

    Aimin Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway has been observed in a variety of human cancers. Therefore, targeting of the mTOR pathway is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment and several mTOR inhibitors, including AZD8055 (AZD, a novel dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor, are currently in clinical trials. Although bone marrow (BM suppression is one of the primary side effects of anticancer drugs, it is not known if pharmacological inhibition of dual mTORC1/2 affects BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs function and plasticity. Here we report that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 by AZD or its analogue (KU-63794 depletes mouse BM Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells in cultures via the induction of apoptotic cell death. Subsequent colony-forming unit (CFU assays revealed that inhibition of mTORC1/2 suppresses the clonogenic function of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, we found that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 markedly inhibits the growth of day-14 cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs but enhances the generation of day-35 CAFCs. Given the fact that day-14 and day-35 CAFCs are functional surrogates of HPCs and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, respectively, these results suggest that dual inhibition of mTORC1/2 may have distinct effects on HPCs versus HSCs.

  2. Endocrine responses and acute mTOR pathway phosphorylation to resistance exercise with leucine and whey

    MT Lane

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leucine ingestion reportedly activates the mTOR pathway in skeletal muscle, contributing to a hypertrophy response. The purpose of the study was to compare the post-resistance exercise effects of leucine and whey protein supplementation on endocrine responses and muscle mTOR pathway phosphorylation. On visit 1, subjects (X±SD; n=20; age=27.8±2.8yrs provided baseline blood samples for analysis of cortisol, glucose and insulin; a muscle biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle to assess mTOR signaling pathway phosphorylation; and were tested for maximum strength on the leg press and leg extension exercises. For visits 2 and 3, subjects were randomized in a double-blind crossover design to ingest either leucine and whey protein (10g+10g; supplement or a non-caloric placebo. During these visits, 5 sets of 10 repetitions were performed on both exercises, immediately followed by ingestion of the supplement or placebo. Blood was sampled 30 min post-, and a muscle biopsy 45 min post-exercise. Western blots quantified total and phosphorylated proteins. Insulin increased (α<.05 with supplementation with no change in glucose compared to placebo. Relative phosphorylation of AKT and rpS6 were greater with leucine and whey supplementation compared to placebo. Supplementation of leucine and whey protein immediately after heavy resistance exercise increases anabolic signaling in human skeletal muscle.

  3. Alcohol Inhibits Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Cells by Activating mTOR Signaling.

    Qin, Wei; Huang, Qi-Ting; Weir, Michael D; Song, Zhi; Fouad, Ashraf F; Lin, Zheng-Mei; Zhao, Liang; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-01-01

    Long-term heavy alcohol consumption could result in a range of health, social, and behavioral problems. People who abuse alcohol are at high risks of seriously having osteopenia, periodontal disease, and compromised oral health. However, the role of ethanol (EtOH) in the biological functions of human dental pulp cells (DPCs) is unknown. Whether EtOH affects the odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs through the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) remains unexplored. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of EtOH on DPC differentiation and mineralization. DPCs were isolated and purified from human dental pulps. The proliferation and odontoblastic differentiation of DPCs treated with EtOH were subsequently investigated. Different doses of EtOH were shown to be cytocompatible with DPCs. EtOH significantly activated the mTOR pathway in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, EtOH downregulated the alkaline phosphatase activity, attenuated the mineralized nodule formation, and suppressed the expression of odontoblastic markers including ALP, DSPP, DMP-1, Runx2, and OCN. Moreover, the pretreatment with rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, markedly reversed the EtOH-induced odontoblastic differentiation and cell mineralization. Our findings show for the first time that EtOH can suppress DPC differentiation and mineralization in a mTOR-dependent manner, indicating that EtOH may be involved in negatively regulating the dental pulp repair.

  4. Deregulation of mTOR signaling is involved in thymic lymphoma development in Atm-/- mice

    Kuang, Xianghong; Shen, Jianjun; Wong, Paul K.Y.; Yan, Mingshan

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal thymocyte development with thymic lymphomagenesis inevitably occurs in Atm-/- mice, indicating that ATM plays a pivotal role in regulating postnatal thymocyte development and preventing thymic lymphomagenesis. The mechanism for ATM controls these processes is unclear. We have shown previously that c-Myc, an oncoprotein regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is overexpressed in Atm-/- thymocytes. Here, we show that inhibition of mTOR signaling with its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, suppresses normal thymocyte DNA synthesis by downregulating 4EBP1, but not S6K, and that 4EBP1 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression are coordinately increased in Atm-/- thymocytes. Administration of rapamycin to Atm-/- mice attenuates elevated phospho-4EBP1, c-Myc and cyclin D1 in their thymocytes, and delays thymic lymphoma development. These results indicate that mTOR downstream effector 4EBP1 is essential for normal thymocyte proliferation, but deregulation of 4EBP1 in Atm deficiency is a major factor driving thymic lymphomagenesis in the animals.

  5. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis mimicking organizing pneumonia after mTOR inhibitor therapy: A case report

    Yuki Iijima

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man presented to the hospital with complaints of fever and cough. He had a past medical history of renal cell carcinoma and had just started treatment with temsirolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor. A 1-week course of antibiotics did not have any effect on his symptoms. A chest computed tomography (CT scan showed the reversed halo sign (RHS. Organizing pneumonia induced by mTOR inhibitor treatment was initially considered. However, transbronchial biopsy revealed clusters of fungal organisms, suggesting infection with Aspergillus spp. Within just 2 weeks, a CT scan showed drastic enlargement of the cavitary lesion, with multiple newly formed consolidations. The patient was diagnosed with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Concomitant treatment with voriconazole and micafungin was started. Two weeks after the initiation of treatment, he became afebrile with gradual regression of the cavitary lesion and consolidations. Keywords: mTOR inhibitor, Organizing pneumonia, Reversed halo sign, Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, Immunocompromise

  6. Targeting Glutamatergic Signaling and the PI3 Kinase Pathway to Halt Melanoma Progression

    Stephen A. Rosenberg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Our group has previously reported that the majority of human melanomas (>60% express the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1 and that the glutamate release inhibitor riluzole, a drug currently used to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can induce apoptosis in GRM1-expressing melanoma cells. Our group previously reported that in vitro riluzole treatment reduces cell growth in three-dimensional (3D soft agar colony assays by 80% in cells with wildtype phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway activation. However, melanoma cell lines harboring constitutive activating mutations of the PI3K pathway (PTEN and NRAS mutations showed only a 35% to 40% decrease in colony formation in soft agar in the presence of riluzole. In this study, we have continued our preclinical studies of riluzole and its effect on melanoma cells alone and in combination with inhibitors of the PI3 kinase pathway: the AKT inhibitor, API-2, and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. We modeled these combinatorial therapies on various melanoma cell lines in 3D and 2D systems and in vivo. Riluzole combined with mTOR inhibition is more effective at halting melanoma anchorage-independent growth and xenograft tumor progression than either agent alone. PI3K signaling changes associated with this combinatorial treatment shows that 3D (nanoculture modeling of cell signaling more closely resembles in vivo signaling than monolayer models. Riluzole combined with mTOR inhibition is effective at halting tumor cell progression independent of BRAF mutational status. This makes this combinatorial therapy a potentially viable alternative for metastatic melanoma patients who are BRAF WT and are therefore ineligible for vemurafenib therapy.

  7. Structure-Based Design of a Novel Series of Potent, Selective Inhibitors of the Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases

    Smith, Adrian L.; D’Angelo, Noel D.; Bo, Yunxin Y.; Booker, Shon K.; Cee, Victor J.; Herberich, Brad; Hong, Fang-Tsao; Jackson, Claire L.M.; Lanman, Brian A.; Liu, Longbin; Nishimura, Nobuko; Pettus, Liping H.; Reed, Anthony B.; Tadesse, Seifu; Tamayo, Nuria A.; Wurz, Ryan P.; Yang, Kevin; Andrews, Kristin L.; Whittington, Douglas A.; McCarter, John D.; Miguel, Tisha San; Zalameda, Leeanne; Jiang, Jian; Subramanian, Raju; Mullady, Erin L.; Caenepeel, Sean; Freeman, Daniel J.; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Nancy; Wu, Tian; Hughes, Paul E.; Norman, Mark H. (Amgen)

    2012-09-17

    A highly selective series of inhibitors of the class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) has been designed and synthesized. Starting from the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor 5, a structure-based approach was used to improve potency and selectivity, resulting in the identification of 54 as a potent inhibitor of the class I PI3Ks with excellent selectivity over mTOR, related phosphatidylinositol kinases, and a broad panel of protein kinases. Compound 54 demonstrated a robust PD-PK relationship inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway in vivo in a mouse model, and it potently inhibited tumor growth in a U-87 MG xenograft model with an activated PI3K/Akt pathway.

  8. 14-3-3γ Regulates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lactation in Dairy Cow Mammary Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs and Up-Regulating mTOR Signaling

    Lixin Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As a protective factor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced injury, 14-3-3γ has been the subject of recent research. Nevertheless, whether 14-3-3γ can regulate lactation in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs induced by LPS remains unknown. Here, the anti-inflammatory effect and lactation regulating ability of 14-3-3γ in LPS-induced DCMECs are investigated for the first time, and the molecular mechanisms responsible for their effects are explored. The results of qRT-PCR showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-1β (IL-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis revealed that 14-3-3γ overexpression also suppressed the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in cell culture supernatants. Meanwhile, CASY-TT Analyser System showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression clearly increased the viability and proliferation of cells. The results of kit methods and western blot analysis showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression promoted the secretion of triglycerides and lactose and the synthesis of β-casein. Furthermore, the expression of genes relevant to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs and lactation-associated proteins were assessed by western blot, and the results suggested that 14-3-3γ overexpression inactivated the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways by down-regulating extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK and inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB phosphorylation levels, as well as by inhibiting NF-κB translocation. Meanwhile, 14-3-3γ overexpression enhanced the expression levels of β-casein, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1, serine/threonine protein kinase Akt 1 (AKT1, sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

  9. Rictor and integrin-linked kinase interact and regulate Akt phosphorylation and cancer cell survival.

    McDonald, Paul C; Oloumi, Arusha; Mills, Julia; Dobreva, Iveta; Maidan, Mykola; Gray, Virginia; Wederell, Elizabeth D; Bally, Marcel B; Foster, Leonard J; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2008-03-15

    An unbiased proteomic screen to identify integrin-linked kinase (ILK) interactors revealed rictor as an ILK-binding protein. This finding was interesting because rictor, originally identified as a regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics, is also a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), a complex implicated in Akt phosphorylation. These functions overlap with known ILK functions. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses confirmed this interaction, and ILK and rictor colocalized in membrane ruffles and leading edges of cancer cells. Yeast two-hybrid assays showed a direct interaction between the NH(2)- and COOH-terminal domains of rictor and the ILK kinase domain. Depletion of ILK and rictor in breast and prostate cancer cell lines resulted in inhibition of Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation and induction of apoptosis, whereas, in several cell lines, depletion of mTOR increased Akt phosphorylation. Akt and Ser(473)P-Akt were detected in ILK immunoprecipitates and small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of rictor, but not mTOR, inhibited the amount of Ser(473)P-Akt in the ILK complex. Expression of the NH(2)-terminal (1-398 amino acids) rictor domain also resulted in the inhibition of ILK-associated Akt Ser(473) phosphorylation. These data show that rictor regulates the ability of ILK to promote Akt phosphorylation and cancer cell survival.

  10. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein and Dendritic Local Translation of the Alpha Subunit of the Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Messenger RNA Are Required for the Structural Plasticity Underlying Olfactory Learning.

    Daroles, Laura; Gribaudo, Simona; Doulazmi, Mohamed; Scotto-Lomassese, Sophie; Dubacq, Caroline; Mandairon, Nathalie; Greer, Charles August; Didier, Anne; Trembleau, Alain; Caillé, Isabelle

    2016-07-15

    In the adult brain, structural plasticity allowing gain or loss of synapses remodels circuits to support learning. In fragile X syndrome, the absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) leads to defects in plasticity and learning deficits. FMRP is a master regulator of local translation but its implication in learning-induced structural plasticity is unknown. Using an olfactory learning task requiring adult-born olfactory bulb neurons and cell-specific ablation of FMRP, we investigated whether learning shapes adult-born neuron morphology during their synaptic integration and its dependence on FMRP. We used alpha subunit of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (αCaMKII) mutant mice with altered dendritic localization of αCaMKII messenger RNA, as well as a reporter of αCaMKII local translation to investigate the role of this FMRP messenger RNA target in learning-dependent structural plasticity. Learning induces profound changes in dendritic architecture and spine morphology of adult-born neurons that are prevented by ablation of FMRP in adult-born neurons and rescued by an metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist. Moreover, dendritically translated αCaMKII is necessary for learning and associated structural modifications and learning triggers an FMRP-dependent increase of αCaMKII dendritic translation in adult-born neurons. Our results strongly suggest that FMRP mediates structural plasticity of olfactory bulb adult-born neurons to support olfactory learning through αCaMKII local translation. This reveals a new role for FMRP-regulated dendritic local translation in learning-induced structural plasticity. This might be of clinical relevance for the understanding of critical periods disruption in autism spectrum disorder patients, among which fragile X syndrome is the primary monogenic cause. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tim-4 inhibition of T-cell activation and T helper type 17 differentiation requires both the immunoglobulin V and mucin domains and occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Cao, Wei; Ryan, Michelle; Buckley, Deirdre; O'Connor, Rosemary; Clarkson, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Emerging experimental data suggest an important role for the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 1 (Tim-1):Tim-4 pathway in autoimmune and alloimmune responses in vivo. Using a Tim-4 ectodomain human IgG Fc fusion protein we studied the role of Tim-4 in T-cell activation, signalling and differentiation responses in vitro. We demonstrate that Tim-4Fc can inhibit naive and pre-activated T-cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion via a Tim-1-independent pathway. Tim-4 contains immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and mucin domains; to identify which domain accounts for the inhibitory effect novel Tim-4 fusion proteins containing either the IgV or mucin domain were generated. We demonstrate that both IgV and mucin domains are required for the inhibitory effects and that they are mediated at least in part by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity. Given the emerging interest in the role of the Tim family in T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, which play an important role in autoimmune disease and transplantation tolerance, our data show that Tim-4Fc can prevent polarization of CD4+ T cells to the Th17 phenotype. Collectively, our results highlight an inhibitory role for Tim-4Fc in vitro, which we propose is mediated by a receptor other than Tim-1. In addition, this study provides new insights into the role of Tim-4Fc in regulating Th17 immune responses and may open a new avenue for autoimmune therapy. PMID:21463297

  12. Tim-4 inhibition of T-cell activation and T helper type 17 differentiation requires both the immunoglobulin V and mucin domains and occurs via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Cao, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Emerging experimental data suggest an important role for the T-cell immunoglobulin mucin 1 (Tim-1):Tim-4 pathway in autoimmune and alloimmune responses in vivo. Using a Tim-4 ectodomain human IgG Fc fusion protein we studied the role of Tim-4 in T-cell activation, signalling and differentiation responses in vitro. We demonstrate that Tim-4Fc can inhibit naive and pre-activated T-cell activation, proliferation and cytokine secretion via a Tim-1-independent pathway. Tim-4 contains immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and mucin domains; to identify which domain accounts for the inhibitory effect novel Tim-4 fusion proteins containing either the IgV or mucin domain were generated. We demonstrate that both IgV and mucin domains are required for the inhibitory effects and that they are mediated at least in part by inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity. Given the emerging interest in the role of the Tim family in T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, which play an important role in autoimmune disease and transplantation tolerance, our data show that Tim-4Fc can prevent polarization of CD4(+) T cells to the Th17 phenotype. Collectively, our results highlight an inhibitory role for Tim-4Fc in vitro, which we propose is mediated by a receptor other than Tim-1. In addition, this study provides new insights into the role of Tim-4Fc in regulating Th17 immune responses and may open a new avenue for autoimmune therapy.

  13. The role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during immobilization in mice

    You, Jae-Sung; Anderson, Garrett B.; Dooley, Matthew S.; Hornberger, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass contributes substantially to health and to issues associated with the quality of life. It has been well recognized that skeletal muscle mass is regulated by mechanically induced changes in protein synthesis, and that signaling by mTOR is necessary for an increase in protein synthesis and the hypertrophy that occurs in response to increased mechanical loading. However, the role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during decreased mechanical loading remains largely undefined. In order to define the role of mTOR signaling, we employed a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization along with pharmacological, mechanical and genetic means to modulate mTOR signaling. The results first showed that immobilization induced a decrease in the global rates of protein synthesis and muscle mass. Interestingly, immobilization also induced an increase in mTOR signaling, eIF4F complex formation and cap-dependent translation. Blocking mTOR signaling during immobilization with rapamycin not only impaired the increase in eIF4F complex formation, but also augmented the decreases in global protein synthesis and muscle mass. On the other hand, stimulating immobilized muscles with isometric contractions enhanced mTOR signaling and rescued the immobilization-induced decrease in global protein synthesis through a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism that was independent of ribosome biogenesis. Unexpectedly, the effects of isometric contractions were also independent of eIF4F complex formation. Similar to isometric contractions, overexpression of Rheb in immobilized muscles enhanced mTOR signaling, cap-dependent translation and global protein synthesis, and prevented the reduction in fiber size. Therefore, we conclude that the activation of mTOR signaling is both necessary and sufficient to alleviate the decreases in protein synthesis and muscle mass that occur during immobilization. Furthermore, these results indicate

  14. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    Yeon Ja Choi

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel

  15. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  16. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis.

    Clark, Alison D; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit "kinase" module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways.

  17. Adiponectin promotes VEGF-A-dependent angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma through PI3K, Akt, mTOR, and HIF-α pathway.

    Lee, Hsiang-Ping; Lin, Chih-Yang; Shih, Jhao-Sheng; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Li, Te-Mao; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-11-03

    Chondrosarcoma is a type of highly malignant tumor with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis. Adiponectin is a protein hormone secreted predominantly by differentiated adipocytes. On the other hand, angiogenesis is a critical step in tumor growth and metastasis. However, the relationship of adiponectin with vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma is mostly unknown. In this study we first demonstrated that the expression of adiponectin was correlated with tumor stage of human chondrosarcoma tissues. In addition, we also found that adiponectin increased VEGF-A expression in human chondrosarcoma cells and subsequently induced migration and tube formation in human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Adiponectin promoted VEGF-A expression through adiponectin receptor (AdipoR), phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K), Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF)-1α signaling cascades. Knockdown of adiponectin decreased VEGF-A expression and also abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated tube formation in EPCs in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mice model in vivo. Therefore, adiponectin is crucial for tumor angiogenesis and growth, which may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy in human chondrosarcoma.

  18. Restriction on an energy-dense diet improves markers of metabolic health and cellular aging in mice through decreasing hepatic mTOR activity.

    Schloesser, Anke; Campbell, Graeme; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Rimbach, Gerald; Huebbe, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) on a normal low-fat diet improves metabolic health and may prolong life span. However, it is still uncertain whether restriction of an energy-dense, high-fat diet would also be beneficial and mitigate age-related processes. In the present study, we determined biomarkers of metabolic health, energy metabolism, and cellular aging in obesity-prone mice subjected to 30% DR on a high-fat diet for 6 months. Dietary-restricted mice had significantly lower body weights, less adipose tissue, lower energy expenditure, and altered substrate oxidation compared to their ad libitum-fed counterparts. Hepatic major urinary proteins (Mup) expression, which is linked to glucose and energy metabolism, and biomarkers of metabolic health, including insulin, glucose, cholesterol, and leptin/adiponectin ratio, were likewise reduced in high-fat, dietary-restricted mice. Hallmarks of cellular senescence such as Lamp2a and Hsc70 that mediate chaperone-mediated autophagy were induced and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mitigated upon high-fat DR. In contrast to DR applied in low-fat diets, anti-oxidant gene expression, proteasome activity, as well as 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were not changed, suggesting that high-fat DR may attenuate some processes associated with cellular aging without the induction of cellular stress response or energy deprivation.

  19. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model.

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K; Chaudhary, Sandeep C; Ballestas, Mary E; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway and response to everolimus in endocrine receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer – A retrospective pilot analysis and viewpoint

    Jyoti Bajpai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biomarkers predictive of response to mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, in endocrine receptor (ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC are a work in progress. We evaluated the feasibility of directly measuring mTOR activity and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN expression and correlating their expression with response and survival. Materials and Methods: MBC patients who received everolimus with endocrine therapy (ET after progression on an aromatase inhibitor and had adequate tissue preservation for estimation of mTOR activity and PTEN expression were selected for analysis from a prospectively maintained database. Progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were estimated by Kaplan–Meier method, and correlation between mTOR activity and PTEN expression with survival was done by log-rank test. Results: Thirteen ER-positive MBC patients were available for analysis. PTEN expression was lost in 11/13 (84.6% patients and retained in 2/13 patients (15.4%. mTOR activity was absent in four patients (30.7%, weak in six patients (46.1%, and moderate in 3 patients (23.2%. Median PFS for the entire population was 2.5 months while median OS was not reached. Patients with an absent mTOR activity showed a longer PFS (5 vs. 1.5 vs. 2 months than those with weak and moderate activity, respectively (P = 0.043. There was no correlation between loss of PTEN expression and PFS. Conclusions: Measurement of direct mTOR activity in patients with MBC receiving everolimus/ET combination appears feasible. Absent mTOR activity may predict for longer PFS with everolimus-ET combination and requires further study.

  1. NVP-BEZ235 overcomes gefitinib-acquired resistance by down-regulating PI3K/AKT/ mTOR phosphorylation

    Sun ZH

    2015-01-01

    /AKT/mTOR phosphorylation. Keywords: gefitinib-acquired resistance, PI3K kinase, mTOR, NVP-BEZ235

  2. Dietary protein sources differentially affect microbiota, mTOR activity and transcription of mTOR signaling pathways in the small intestine.

    Soumya K Kar

    Full Text Available Dietary protein sources can have profound effects on host-microbe interactions in the gut that are critically important for immune resilience. However more knowledge is needed to assess the impact of different protein sources on gut and animal health. Thirty-six wildtype male C57BL/6J mice of 35 d age (n = 6/group; mean ± SEM body weight 21.9 ± 0.25 g were randomly assigned to groups fed for four weeks with semi synthetic diets prepared with one of the following protein sources containing (300 g/kg as fed basis: soybean meal (SBM, casein, partially delactosed whey powder, spray dried plasma protein, wheat gluten meal and yellow meal worm. At the end of the experiment, mice were sacrificed to collect ileal tissue to acquire gene expression data, and mammalian (mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR activity, ileal digesta to study changes in microbiota and serum to measure cytokines and chemokines. By genome-wide transcriptome analysis, we identified fourteen high level regulatory genes that are strongly affected in SBM-fed mice compared to the other experimental groups. They mostly related to the mTOR pathway. In addition, an increased (P < 0.05 concentration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was observed in serum of SBM-fed mice compared to other dietary groups. Moreover, by 16S rRNA sequencing, we observed that SBM-fed mice had higher (P < 0.05 abundances of Bacteroidales family S24-7, compared to the other dietary groups. We showed that measurements of genome-wide expression and microbiota composition in the mouse ileum reveal divergent responses to diets containing different protein sources, in particular for a diet based on SBM.

  3. mTOR inhibitors alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors effectively inhibit cells of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Costanza Bogani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysregulated signaling of the JAK/STAT pathway is a common feature of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN, usually associated with JAK2V617F mutation. Recent clinical trials with JAK2 inhibitors showed significant improvements in splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms in patients with myelofibrosis but meaningful molecular responses were not documented. Accordingly, there remains a need for exploring new treatment strategies of MPN. A potential additional target for treatment is represented by the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway that has been found constitutively activated in MPN cells; proof-of-evidence of efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor RAD001 has been obtained recently in a Phase I/II trial in patients with myelofibrosis. The aim of the study was to characterize the effects in vitro of mTOR inhibitors, used alone and in combination with JAK2 inhibitors, against MPN cells. FINDINGS: Mouse and human JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and primary hematopoietic progenitors from MPN patients were challenged with an allosteric (RAD001 and an ATP-competitive (PP242 mTOR inhibitor and two JAK2 inhibitors (AZD1480 and ruxolitinib. mTOR inhibitors effectively reduced proliferation and colony formation of cell lines through a slowed cell division mediated by changes in cell cycle transition to the S-phase. mTOR inhibitors also impaired the proliferation and prevented colony formation from MPN hematopoietic progenitors at doses significantly lower than healthy controls. JAK2 inhibitors produced similar antiproliferative effects in MPN cell lines and primary cells but were more potent inducers of apoptosis, as also supported by differential effects on cyclinD1, PIM1 and BcLxL expression levels. Co-treatment of mTOR inhibitor with JAK2 inhibitor resulted in synergistic activity against the proliferation of JAK2V617F mutated cell lines and significantly reduced erythropoietin-independent colony growth in patients with

  4. Induction of the gap-pgk operon encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Xanthobacter flavus requires the LysR-type transcriptional activator CbbR

    Meijer, W.G; van den Bergh, E.R E; Smith, L.M

    In a previous study, a gene (pgk) encoding phosphoglycerate kinase was isolated from a genomic labrid of Xanthobacter flavus. Although this gene is essential for autotrophic growth, it is not located within the cbb operon encoding other Calvin cycle enzymes. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence

  5. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  6. mTOR in breast cancer: differential expression in triple-negative and non-triple-negative tumors.

    Walsh, S

    2012-04-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is defined by the absence of estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR) and overexpression of HER2. Targeted therapy is currently unavailable for this subgroup of breast cancer patients. mTOR controls cancer cell growth, survival and invasion and is thus a potential target for the treatment of patients with TNBC. Using immunohistochemistry, mTOR and p-mTOR were measured in 89 TNBCs and 99 non-TNBCs. While mTOR expression was confined to tumor cell cytoplasm, p-mTOR staining was located in the nucleus, perinuclear area and in the cytoplasm. Potentially important, was our finding that nuclear p-mTOR was found more frequently in triple-negative than non triple-negative cancers (p < 0.001). These results suggest that mTOR may play a more important role in the progression of TNBC compared to non-TNBC. Based on these findings, we conclude that mTOR may be a new target for the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer.

  7. mTOR up-regulation of PFKFB3 is essential for acute myeloid leukemia cell survival

    Feng, Yonghuai; Wu, Liusong

    2017-01-01

    Although mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) activation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, the precise function and the downstream targets of mTOR are poorly understood. Here we revealed that PFKFB3, but not PFKFB1, PFKFB2 nor PFKFB4 was a novel downstream substrate of mTOR signaling pathway as PFKFB3 level was augmented after knocking down TSC2 in THP1 and OCI-AML3 cells. Importantly, PFKFB3 silencing suppressed glycolysis and cell proliferation of TSC2 silencing OCI-AML3 cells and activated apoptosis pathway. These results suggested that mTOR up-regulation of PFKFB3 was essential for AML cells survival. Mechanistically, Rapamycin treatment or Raptor knockdown reduced the expression of PFKFB3 in TSC2 knockdown cells, while Rictor silencing did not have such effect. Furthermore, we also revealed that mTORC1 up-regulated PFKFB3 was dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), a positive regulator of glycolysis. Moreover, PFKFB3 inhibitor PFK15 and rapamycin synergistically blunted the AML cell proliferation. Taken together, PFKFB3 was a promising drug target in AML patients harboring mTOR hyper-activation.

  8. Phosphorylation of the Yeast Choline Kinase by Protein Kinase C

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Kurnov, Vladlen; Kersting, Michael C.; Sreenivas, Avula; Carman, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae CKI1-encoded choline kinase catalyzes the committed step in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. The enzyme is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues, and some of this phosphorylation is mediated by protein kinase A. In this work, we examined the hypothesis that choline kinase is also phosphorylated by protein kinase C. Using choline kinase as a substrate, protein kinase C activity was dose- and time-dependent, and dependent on the concentrations of choline kinase (Km = 27 μg/ml) and ATP (Km = 15 μM). This phosphorylation, which occurred on a serine residue, was accompanied by a 1.6-fold stimulation of choline kinase activity. The synthetic peptide SRSSS25QRRHS (Vmax/Km = 17.5 mM-1 μmol min-1 mg-1) that contains the protein kinase C motif for Ser25 was a substrate for protein kinase C. A Ser25 to Ala (S25A) mutation in choline kinase resulted in a 60% decrease in protein kinase C phosphorylation of the enzyme. Phosphopeptide mapping analysis of the S25A mutant enzyme confirmed that Ser25 was a protein kinase C target site. In vivo, the S25A mutation correlated with a decrease (55%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway whereas an S25D phosphorylation site mimic correlated with an increase (44%) in phosphatidylcholine synthesis. Whereas the S25A (protein kinase C site) mutation did not affect the phosphorylation of choline kinase by protein kinase A, the S30A (protein kinase A site) mutation caused a 46% reduction in enzyme phosphorylation by protein kinase C. A choline kinase synthetic peptide (SQRRHS30LTRQ) containing Ser30 was a substrate (Vmax/Km = 3.0 mM−1 μmol min−1 mg−1) for protein kinase C. Comparison of phosphopeptide maps of the wild type and S30A mutant choline kinase enzymes phosphorylated by protein kinase C confirmed that Ser30 was also a target site for protein kinase C. PMID:15919656

  9. Acute mTOR inhibition induces insulin resistance and alters substrate utilization in vivo

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Sylow, Lykke; Fazakerley, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    , but not rapamycin reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into incubated muscles, despite normal GLUT4 translocation in muscle cells. AZD8055 inhibited glycolysis in MEF cells. Abrogation of mTORC2 activity by SIN1 deletion impaired glycolysis and AZD8055 had no effect in SIN1 KO MEFs. Re-expression of wildtype...... SIN1 rescued glycolysis. Glucose intolerance following AZD8055 administration was absent in mice lacking the mTORC2 subunit Rictor in muscle, and in vivo glucose uptake into Rictor-deficient muscle was reduced despite normal Akt activity. Taken together, acute mTOR inhibition is detrimental to glucose...

  10. Mechanisms of amino acid sensing in mTOR signaling pathway

    Kim, Eunjung

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids are fundamental nutrients for protein synthesis and cell growth (increase in cell size). Recently, many compelling evidences have shown that the level of amino acids is sensed by extra- or intra-cellular amino acids sensor(s) and regulates protein synthesis/degradation. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is placed in a central position in cell growth regulation and dysregulation of mTOR signaling pathway has been implicated in many serious human diseases including ca...

  11. Leucine minimizes denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of rats through akt/mtor signaling pathways

    Carolina Barbosa Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of leucine treatment (0.30 mM on muscle weight and signaling of myoproteins related to synthesis and degradation pathways of soleus muscle following seven days of complete sciatic nerve lesion.Wistar rats (n=24 of 3 to 4 months of age (192 ± 23 g were used. The animals were randomly distributed into four experimental groups (n=6/group: control, treated with leucine (L, denervated (D and denervated treated with leucine (DL.Dependent measures were proteins levels of AKT, AMPK, mTOR, and ACC performed by Western blot. Leucine induced a reduction in the phosphorylation of AMPK (p<0.05 by 16% in the L and by 68% in the DL groups as compared with control group. Denervation increased AMPK by 24% in the D group as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT was also modulated by denervation and leucine treatment, highlighted by the elevation of AKT phosphorylation in the D (65%, L (98% and DL (146% groups as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT phosphorylation was 49% higher in the D group as compared with the DL group.Furthermore, denervation decreased mTOR phosphorylation by 29% in the D group as compared with the control group. However, leucine treatment induced an increase of 49% in the phosphorylation of mTOR in the L group as compared with the control group, and an increase of 154% in the DL as compared with the D group ( p<0.05. ACC phosphorylation was 20% greater in the D group than the control group. Furthermore, ACC in the soleus was 22% lower in the in the L group and 50% lower in the DL group than the respective control group (p<0.05.In conclusion, leucine treatment minimized the deleterious effects of denervation on rat soleus muscle by increasing anabolic (AKT and mTOR and decreasing catabolic (AMPK pathways. These results may be interesting for muscle recovery following acute denervation, which may contribute to musculoskeletal rehabilitation after denervation.

  12. Practical recommendations for the early use of m-TOR inhibitors (sirolimus) in renal transplantation.

    Campistol, Josep M; Cockwell, Paul; Diekmann, Fritz; Donati, Donato; Guirado, Luis; Herlenius, Gustaf; Mousa, Dujanah; Pratschke, Johann; San Millán, Juan Carlos Ruiz

    2009-07-01

    m-TOR inhibitors (e.g. sirolimus) are well-tolerated immunosuppressants used in renal transplantation for prophylaxis of organ rejection, and are associated with long-term graft survival. Early use of sirolimus is often advocated by clinicians, but this may be associated with a number of side-effects including impaired wound-healing, lymphoceles and delayed graft function. As transplant clinicians with experience in the use of sirolimus, we believe such side-effects can be limited by tailored clinical management. We present recommendations based on published literature and our clinical experience. Furthermore, guidance is provided on sirolimus use during surgery, both at transplantation and for subsequent operations.

  13. Enterococcus faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase

    Doun, Stephanie S.; Burgner, John W.; Briggs, Scott D.; Rodwell, Victor W.

    2005-01-01

    The six enzymes of the mevalonate pathway of isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis represent potential for addressing a pressing human health concern, the development of antibiotics against resistant strains of the Gram-positive streptococci. We previously characterized the first four of the mevalonate pathway enzymes of Enterococcus faecalis, and here characterize the fifth, phosphomevalonate kinase (E.C. 2.7.4.2). E. faecalis genomic DNA and the polymerase chain reaction were used to clone DNA thought to encode phosphomevalonate kinase into pET28b(+). Double-stranded DNA sequencing verified the sequence of the recombinant gene. The encoded N-terminal hexahistidine-tagged protein was expressed in Escherichia coli with induction by isopropylthiogalactoside and purified by Ni++ affinity chromatography, yield 20 mg protein per liter. Analysis of the purified protein by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established it as E. faecalis phosphomevalonate kinase. Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that the kinase exists in solution primarily as a dimer. Assay for phosphomevalonate kinase activity used pyruvate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase to couple the formation of ADP to the oxidation of NADH. Optimal activity occurred at pH 8.0 and at 37°C. The activation energy was ~5.6 kcal/mol. Activity with Mn++, the preferred cation, was optimal at about 4 mM. Relative rates using different phosphoryl donors were 100 (ATP), 3.6 (GTP), 1.6 (TTP), and 0.4 (CTP). Km values were 0.17 mM for ATP and 0.19 mM for (R,S)-5-phosphomevalonate. The specific activity of the purified enzyme was 3.9 μmol substrate converted per minute per milligram protein. Applications to an immobilized enzyme bioreactor and to drug screening and design are discussed. PMID:15802646

  14. From Phosphosites to Kinases

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations...... sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available...

  15. Alcohol impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in a time-dependent manner following electrically stimulated muscle contraction.

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Lang, Charles H

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol (EtOH) decreases protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and blunts the anabolic response to growth factors in skeletal muscle. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether acute EtOH intoxication antagonizes the contraction-induced increase in protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle. Fasted male mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3 g/kg EtOH or saline (control), and the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated (10 sets of 6 contractions). The gastrocnemius muscle complex was collected 30 min, 4 h, or 12 h after stimulation. EtOH decreased in vivo basal protein synthesis (PS) in the nonstimulated muscle compared with time-matched Controls at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. In Control, but not EtOH, PS was decreased 15% after 30 min. In contrast, PS was increased in Control 4 h poststimulation but remained unchanged in EtOH. Last, stimulation increased PS 10% in Control and EtOH at 12 h, even though the absolute rate remained reduced by EtOH. The stimulation-induced increase in the phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr(421)/Ser(424) (20-52%), S6K1 Thr(389) (45-57%), and its substrate rpS6 Ser(240/244) (37-72%) was blunted by EtOH at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 Ser(65) was also attenuated by EtOH (61%) at 4 h. Conversely, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase Thr(202)/Tyr(204) was increased by stimulation in Control and EtOH mice at 30 min but only in Control at 4 h. Our data indicate that acute EtOH intoxication suppresses muscle protein synthesis for at least 12 h and greatly impairs contraction-induced changes in synthesis and mTOR signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The PTPN11 loss-of-function mutation Q510E-Shp2 causes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by dysregulating mTOR signaling.

    Schramm, Christine; Fine, Deborah M; Edwards, Michelle A; Reeb, Ashley N; Krenz, Maike

    2012-01-01

    The identification of mutations in PTPN11 (encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2) in families with congenital heart disease has facilitated mechanistic studies of various cardiovascular defects. However, the roles of normal and mutant Shp2 in the developing heart are still poorly understood. Furthermore, it remains unclear how Shp2 loss-of-function (LOF) mutations cause LEOPARD Syndrome (also termed Noonan Syndrome with multiple lentigines), which is characterized by congenital heart defects such as pulmonary valve stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). In normal hearts, Shp2 controls cardiomyocyte size by regulating signaling through protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). We hypothesized that Shp2 LOF mutations dysregulate this pathway, resulting in HCM. For our studies, we chose the Shp2 mutation Q510E, a dominant-negative LOF mutation associated with severe early onset HCM. Newborn mice with cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of Q510E-Shp2 starting before birth displayed increased cardiomyocyte sizes, heart-to-body weight ratios, interventricular septum thickness, and cardiomyocyte disarray. In 3-mo-old hearts, interstitial fibrosis was detected. Echocardiographically, ventricular walls were thickened and contractile function was depressed. In ventricular tissue samples, signaling through Akt/mTOR was hyperactivated, indicating that the presence of Q510E-Shp2 led to upregulation of this pathway. Importantly, rapamycin treatment started shortly after birth rescued the Q510E-Shp2-induced phenotype in vivo. If rapamycin was started at 6 wk of age, HCM was also ameliorated. We also generated a second mouse model in which cardiomyocyte-specific Q510E-Shp2 overexpression started after birth. In contrast to the first model, these mice did not develop HCM. In summary, our studies establish a role for mTOR signaling in HCM caused by Q510E-Shp2. Q510E-Shp2 overexpression in the cardiomyocyte population alone was sufficient to

  17. mTOR signaling plays a critical role in the defects observed in muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells isolated from a murine model of accelerated aging.

    Takayama, Koji; Kawakami, Yohei; Lavasani, Mitra; Mu, Xiaodong; Cummins, James H; Yurube, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Fu, Freddie H; Robbins, Paul D; Niedernhofer, Laura J; Huard, Johnny

    2017-07-01

    Mice expressing reduced levels of ERCC1-XPF (Ercc1 -/Δ mice) demonstrate premature onset of age-related changes due to decreased repair of DNA damage. Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) isolated from Ercc1 -/Δ mice have an impaired capacity for cell differentiation. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a critical regulator of cell growth in response to nutrient, hormone, and oxygen levels. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway extends the lifespan of several species. Here, we examined the role of mTOR in regulating the MDSPC dysfunction that occurs with accelerated aging. We show that mTOR signaling pathways are activated in Ercc1 -/Δ MDSPCs compared with wild-type (WT) MDSPCs. Additionally, inhibiting mTOR with rapamycin promoted autophagy and improved the myogenic differentiation capacity of the Ercc1 -/Δ MDSPCs. The percent of apoptotic and senescent cells in Ercc1 -/Δ MDSPC cultures was decreased upon mTOR inhibition. These results establish that mTOR signaling contributes to stem cell dysfunction and cell fate decisions in response to endogenous DNA damage. Therefore, mTOR represents a potential therapeutic target for improving defective, aged stem cells. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 35:1375-1382, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells through inhibiting mTOR-s6K pathway

    Huang, Xiongfei; Zeng, Yeting; Wang, Xinrui; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Li, Qianqian; Li, Ningbo; Su, Hongying; Huang, Wendong

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is likely a tumor suppressor in liver tissue but its molecular mechanism of suppression is not well understood. In this study, the gene expression profile of human liver cancer cells was investigated by microarray. Bioinformatics analysis of these data revealed that FXR might regulate the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. This was confirmed by altering the expression level of FXR in liver cancer cells. Overexpression of FXR prevented the growth of cells and induced cell cycle arrest, which was enhanced by the mTOR/S6K inhibitor rapamycin. FXR upregulation also intensified the inhibition of cell growth by rapamycin. Downregulation of FXR produced the opposite effect. Finally, we found that ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep-1 xenografts inhibits tumor growth and reduces expression of the phosphorylated protein S6K. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that FXR suppresses proliferation of human liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. FXR expression can be used as a biomarker of personalized mTOR inhibitor treatment assessment for liver cancer patients. -- Highlights: •FXR inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells by prolonging G0/G1 phase. •Microarray results indicate that mTOR-S6k signaling is involved in cellular processes in which FXR plays an important role. •FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

  19. FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells through inhibiting mTOR-s6K pathway

    Huang, Xiongfei, E-mail: xiongfeihuang@hotmail.com [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Gastrointestinal Cancer, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Zeng, Yeting [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Wang, Xinrui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Ma, Xiaoxiao [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States); Li, Qianqian; Li, Ningbo; Su, Hongying [Department of Pathology and Institute of Oncology, Preclinical School, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350108, Fujian (China); Huang, Wendong [Department of Diabetes Complications and Metabolism, Diabetes & Metabolism Research Institute, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, CA 91010 (United States)

    2016-05-27

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) is likely a tumor suppressor in liver tissue but its molecular mechanism of suppression is not well understood. In this study, the gene expression profile of human liver cancer cells was investigated by microarray. Bioinformatics analysis of these data revealed that FXR might regulate the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. This was confirmed by altering the expression level of FXR in liver cancer cells. Overexpression of FXR prevented the growth of cells and induced cell cycle arrest, which was enhanced by the mTOR/S6K inhibitor rapamycin. FXR upregulation also intensified the inhibition of cell growth by rapamycin. Downregulation of FXR produced the opposite effect. Finally, we found that ectopic expression of FXR in SK-Hep-1 xenografts inhibits tumor growth and reduces expression of the phosphorylated protein S6K. Taken together, our data provide the first evidence that FXR suppresses proliferation of human liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway. FXR expression can be used as a biomarker of personalized mTOR inhibitor treatment assessment for liver cancer patients. -- Highlights: •FXR inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer cells by prolonging G0/G1 phase. •Microarray results indicate that mTOR-S6k signaling is involved in cellular processes in which FXR plays an important role. •FXR blocks the growth of liver cancer cells via the inhibition of the mTOR/S6K signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Impact of mTOR Inhibitors on Cancer Development in Kidney Transplantation Recipients: A Population-Based Study.

    Kao, C-C; Liu, J-S; Lin, M-H; Hsu, C-Y; Chang, F-C; Lin, Y-C; Chen, H-H; Chen, T-W; Hsu, C-C; Wu, M-S

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor is an immunosuppressive drug used in kidney transplantation. Whether the mTOR inhibitor is associated with reduced risk of cancer development and mortality after kidney transplantation is controversial. We conducted a nationwide population-based study. Patients who did not have malignancy history and received kidney transplantation between 2010 and 2013 were enrolled. Recipients who had mTOR inhibitors (n = 430) for more than 30 days comprised the study group; 1720 recipients who did not have mTOR inhibitors comprised the control group. The primary outcome is the development of cancer after kidney transplantation. These patients were followed until the first-time admission with diagnosis of cancer, death, or the end of 2014. A Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the risk of cancer development and all-cause mortality. During the 35-month median duration of observation, there were 16 and 61 patients with cancer development in the study group and the control group, respectively. The cancer incidence was 12.8 and 12.4 per 1000 person-years. There were 10 and 135 mortality cases, with the incidence rate of 7.8 and 26.9 per 1000 person-years. After multivariable adjustment, the mTOR inhibitors users were not associated with reduced risk of new cancer development as compared with control (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46-1.60; P = .63), nor risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.33-1.46; P = .34). The use of mTOR inhibitors was not associated with a reduction in the risk of cancer development and all-cause mortality in kidney transplantation recipients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed that the presence of the SH2 domain is frequently required for catalytic activity, suggesting a crucial function stabilizing the active state of many nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, the structure of the SH2-kinase domain of Fes revealed that the SH2 domain stabilizes the active kinase conformation by direct interactions with the regulatory helix alphaC. Stabilizing interactions between the SH2 and the kinase domains have also been observed in the structures of active Csk and Abl. Interestingly, mutations in the SH2 domain found in human disease can be explained by SH2 domain destabilization or incorrect positioning of the SH2. Here we summarize our understanding of mechanisms that lead to tyrosine kinase activation by direct interactions mediated by the SH2 domain and discuss how mutations in the SH2 domain trigger kinase inactivation.

  2. Mechanism of polyphosphate kinase from Propionibacterium shermanii

    Robinson, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    Polyphosphate kinase, which catalyzes the reaction shown below, is one of two enzymes which have been reported to catalyze the synthesis of polyphosphate. Purification performed by ammonium sulfate precipitation (0-40% fraction) was followed by chromatography. The enzyme represents 70% of the protein in the hydroxylapatite pool and is stable at this level of purity. The subunit molecular weight was determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel analysis, (83,000 +/- 3000), nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, (80,000 and 86,000 daltons), gel filtration (Biogel A 0.5m column was 85,000 +/- 4000.) Polyphosphate kinase appears to be a monomeric enzyme of ∼83,000 daltons. Four assays were developed for polyphosphate kinase. Basic proteins such as polylysine stimulate the synthesis of polyphosphate, these proteins cause precipitation of polyphosphate kinase from relatively impure enzyme extracts: Synthesized polyphosphate interacts noncovalently with the basic protein-enzyme precipitate. Efficient synthesis of polyphosphate requires the addition of either phosphate or short chain polyphosphate. Synthesis did occur at 1/10 the rate when neither of these two compounds were included. Initiation, elongation, and termination events of polyphosphate synthesis were examined. Short chain polyphosphate acts as a primer, with [ 32 P] short-chain polyphosphate incorporation into long chain polyphosphate by the kinase

  3. The target landscape of clinical kinase drugs.

    Klaeger, Susan; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Wilhelm, Mathias; Polzer, Harald; Vick, Binje; Koenig, Paul-Albert; Reinecke, Maria; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Petzoldt, Svenja; Meng, Chen; Zecha, Jana; Reiter, Katrin; Qiao, Huichao; Helm, Dominic; Koch, Heiner; Schoof, Melanie; Canevari, Giulia; Casale, Elena; Depaolini, Stefania Re; Feuchtinger, Annette; Wu, Zhixiang; Schmidt, Tobias; Rueckert, Lars; Becker, Wilhelm; Huenges, Jan; Garz, Anne-Kathrin; Gohlke, Bjoern-Oliver; Zolg, Daniel Paul; Kayser, Gian; Vooder, Tonu; Preissner, Robert; Hahne, Hannes; Tõnisson, Neeme; Kramer, Karl; Götze, Katharina; Bassermann, Florian; Schlegl, Judith; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Aiche, Stephan; Walch, Axel; Greif, Philipp A; Schneider, Sabine; Felder, Eduard Rudolf; Ruland, Juergen; Médard, Guillaume; Jeremias, Irmela; Spiekermann, Karsten; Kuster, Bernhard

    2017-12-01

    Kinase inhibitors are important cancer therapeutics. Polypharmacology is commonly observed, requiring thorough target deconvolution to understand drug mechanism of action. Using chemical proteomics, we analyzed the target spectrum of 243 clinically evaluated kinase drugs. The data revealed previously unknown targets for established drugs, offered a perspective on the "druggable" kinome, highlighted (non)kinase off-targets, and suggested potential therapeutic applications. Integration of phosphoproteomic data refined drug-affected pathways, identified response markers, and strengthened rationale for combination treatments. We exemplify translational value by discovering SIK2 (salt-inducible kinase 2) inhibitors that modulate cytokine production in primary cells, by identifying drugs against the lung cancer survival marker MELK (maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase), and by repurposing cabozantinib to treat FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia. This resource, available via the ProteomicsDB database, should facilitate basic, clinical, and drug discovery research and aid clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Effects of the single and combined treatment with dopamine agonist, somatostatin analog and mTOR inhibitors in a human lung carcinoid cell line: an in vitro study.

    Pivonello, Claudia; Rousaki, Panagoula; Negri, Mariarosaria; Sarnataro, Maddalena; Napolitano, Maria; Marino, Federica Zito; Patalano, Roberta; De Martino, Maria Cristina; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Rocco, Gaetano; Franco, Renato; Kaltsas, Gregory A; Colao, Annamaria; Pivonello, Rosario

    2017-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues and mTOR inhibitors have been used as medical therapy in lung carcinoids with variable results. No data are available on dopamine agonists as treatment for lung carcinoids. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of the combined treatment of somatostatin analogue octreotide and the dopamine agonist cabergoline with mTOR inhibitors in an in vitro model of typical lung carcinoids: the NCI-H727 cell line. In NCI-H727 cell line, reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence were assessed to characterize the expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 and 5, dopamine receptor 2 and mTOR pathway components. Fifteen typical lung carcinoids tissue samples have been used for somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and the main mTOR pathway component p70S6K expression and localization by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and western blot have been assessed to test the pharmacological effects of octreotide, cabergoline and mTOR inhibitors, and to evaluate the activation of specific cell signaling pathways in NCI-H727 cell line. NCI-H727 cell line expressed somatostatin receptor 2, somatostatin receptor 5 and dopamine receptor 2 and all mTOR pathway components at messenger and protein levels. Somatostatin receptor 2, dopamine receptor 2, and p70S6K (non phosphorylated and phosphorylated) proteins were expressed in most typical lung carcinoids tissue samples. Octreotide and cabergoline did not reduce cell viability as single agents but, when combined with mTOR inhibitors, they potentiate mTOR inhibitors effect after long-term exposure, reducing Akt and ERK phosphorylation, mTOR escape mechanisms, and increasing the expression DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4, an mTOR suppressor. In conclusion, the single use of octreotide and cabergoline is not sufficient to block cell viability but the combined approach of these agents with mTOR inhibitors

  5. Hierarchy of protein tyrosine kinases in interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling: activation of syk depends on Jak3; however, neither Syk nor Lck is required for IL-2-mediated STAT activation.

    Zhou, Y J; Magnuson, K S; Cheng, T P; Gadina, M; Frucht, D M; Galon, J; Candotti, F; Geahlen, R L; Changelian, P S; O'Shea, J J

    2000-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) activates several different families of tyrosine kinases, but precisely how these kinases interact is not completely understood. We therefore investigated the functional relationships among Jak3, Lck, and Syk in IL-2 signaling. We first observed that in the absence of Jak3, both Lck and Syk had the capacity to phosphorylate Stat3 and Stat5a. However, neither supported IL-2-induced STAT activation, nor did dominant negative alleles of these kinases inhibit. Moreover, pharmacological abrogation of Lck activity did not inhibit IL-2-mediated phosphorylation of Jak3 and Stat5a. Importantly, ligand-dependent Syk activation was dependent on the presence of catalytically active Jak3, whereas Lck activation was not. Interestingly, Syk functioned as a direct substrate of Jak1 but not Jak3. Additionally, Jak3 phosphorylated Jak1, whereas the reverse was not the case. Taken together, our data support a model in which Lck functions in parallel with Jak3, while Syk functions as a downstream element of Jaks in IL-2 signaling. Jak3 may regulate Syk catalytic activity indirectly via Jak1. However, IL-2-mediated Jak3/Stat activation is not dependent on Lck or Syk. While the essential roles of Jak1 and Jak3 in signaling by gammac-utilizing cytokines are clear, it will be important to dissect the exact contributions of Lck and Syk in mediating the effects of IL-2 and related cytokines.

  6. Telocinobufagin inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/Snail signaling pathway.

    Gao, Yuxue; Shi, Lihong; Cao, Zhen; Zhu, Xuetao; Li, Feng; Wang, Ruyan; Xu, Jinyuan; Zhong, Jinyi; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun

    2018-05-01

    Telocinobufagin (TBG), an active ingredient of Venenumbufonis , exhibits an immunomodulatory activity. However, its antimetastatic activity in breast cancer remains unknown. The present study investigated whether TBG prevents breast cancer metastasis and evaluated its regulatory mechanism. TBG inhibited the migration and invasion of 4T1 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, TBG triggered the collapse of F-actin filaments in breast cancer. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, vimentin and fibronectin, were downregulated following TBG treatment. However, E-cadherin was upregulated following TBG treatment. Snail, a crucial transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated following TBG treatment. Signaling pathway markers, including phosphorylated protein kinase B (P-Akt), p-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), were decreased following TBG treatment. The same results were obtained from in vivo experiments. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo experiments reveal that TBG inhibited migration, invasion and EMT via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/ERK/Snail signaling pathway in breast cancer.

  7. Niclosamide inhibits lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus by disrupting mTOR activation.

    Huang, Lu; Yang, Mengtian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the oncogenic γ-herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) cause several severe malignancies in humans. Inhibition of the lytic replication of EBV and KSHV eliminates the reservoir of persistent infection and transmission, consequently preventing the occurrence of diseases from the sources of infection. Antiviral drugs are limited in controlling these viral infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that niclosamide, an old anthelmintic drug, inhibits mTOR activation during EBV lytic replication. Consequently, niclosamide effectively suppresses EBV lytic gene expression, viral DNA lytic replication and virion production in EBV-infected lymphoma cells and epithelial cells. Niclosamide exhibits cytotoxicity toward lymphoma cells and induces irreversible cell cycle arrest in lytically EBV-infected cells. The ectopic overexpression of mTOR reverses the inhibition of niclosamide in EBV lytic replication. Similarly, niclosamide inhibits KSHV lytic replication. Thus, we conclude that niclosamide is a promising candidate for chemotherapy against the acute occurrence and transmission of infectious diseases of oncogenic γ-herpesviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in the therapeutic use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in dermatology.

    Fogel, Alexander L; Hill, Sharleen; Teng, Joyce M C

    2015-05-01

    Significant developments in the use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors (mTORIs) as immunosuppressant and antiproliferative agents have been made. Recent advances in the understanding of the mTOR signaling pathway and its downstream effects on tumorigenesis and vascular proliferation have broadened the clinical applications of mTORIs in many challenging disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex, pachyonychia congenita, complex vascular anomalies, and inflammatory dermatoses. Systemic mTORI therapy has shown benefits in these areas, but is associated with significant side effects that sometimes necessitate drug holidays. To mitigate the side effects of systemic mTORIs for dermatologic applications, preliminary work to assess the potential of percutaneous therapy has been performed, and the evidence suggests that percutaneous delivery of mTORIs may allow for effective long-term therapy while avoiding systemic toxicities. Additional large placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized studies are needed to assess the efficacy, safety, duration, and tolerability of topical treatments. The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the novel use of mTORIs in the management of many cutaneous disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Localization of two mammalian cyclin dependent kinases during mammalian meiosis

    Ashley, T.; Walpita, D.; de rooij, D. G.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian meiotic progression, like mitotic cell cycle progression, is regulated by cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs). However, the unique requirements of meiosis (homologous synapsis, reciprocal recombination and the dual divisions that segregate first homologues, then sister chromatids)

  10. DUAL INHIBITION OF PI3K/AKT AND mTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER CELLS BY A DIETARY FLAVONOID FISETIN

    Khan, Naghma; Afaq, Farrukh; Khusro, Fatima H.; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Suh, Yewseok; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most commonly occurring malignancies. It has been reported that mTOR is phosphorylated in lung cancer and its activation was more frequent in tumors with over-expression of PI3K/Akt. Therefore, dual inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling could be valuable agents for treating lung cancer. In the present study, we show that fisetin, a dietary tetrahydroxyflavone inhibits cell-growth with the concomitant suppression of PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Using autodock 4, we found that fisetin physically interacts with the mTOR complex at two sites. Fisetin treatment was also found to reduce the formation of A549 cell colonies in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of cells with fisetin caused decrease in the protein expression of PI3K (p85 and p110), inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, p70S6K1, eIF-4E and 4E-BP1. Fisetin-treated cells also exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of the constituents of mTOR signaling complex like Rictor, Raptor, GβL and PRAS40. There was increase in the phosphorylation of AMPKα and decrease in the phosphorylation of TSC2 on treatment of cells with fisetin. We also found that treatment of cells with mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and mTOR-siRNA caused decrease in phosphorylation of mTOR and its target proteins which were further downregulated on treatment with fisetin, suggesting that these effects are mediated in part, through mTOR signaling. Our results show that fisetin suppressed PI3K/Akt and mTOR signaling in NSCLC cells and thus, could be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent against human lung cancer. PMID:21618507

  11. A cGMP kinase mutant with increased sensitivity to the protein kinase inhibitor peptide PKI(5-24).

    Ruth, P; Kamm, S; Nau, U; Pfeifer, A; Hofmann, F

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to the active domain of the heat-stable inhibitor protein PKI are very potent inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but are extremely weak inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we tried to confer PKI sensitivity to cGMP kinase by site-directed mutagenesis. The molecular requirements for high affinity inhibition by PKI were deduced from the crystal structure of the cAMP kinase/PKI complex. A prominent site of interaction are residues Tyr235 and Phe239 in the catalytic subunit, which from a sandwich-like structure with Phe10 of the PKI(5-24) peptide. To increase the sensitivity for PKI, the cGMP kinase codons at the corresponding sites, Ser555 and Ser559, were changed to Tyr and Phe. The mutant cGMP kinase was stimulated half maximally by cGMP at 3-fold higher concentrations (240 nM) than the wild type (77 nM). Wild type and mutant cGMP kinase did not differ significantly in their Km and Vmax for three different substrate peptides. The PKI(5-24) peptide inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the mutant cGMP kinase with higher potency than that of wild type, with Ki values of 42 +/- .3 microM and 160 +/- .7 microM, respectively. The increased affinity of the mutant cGMP kinase was specific for the PKI(5-24) peptide. Mutation of the essential Phe10 in the PKI(5-24) sequence to an Ala yielded a peptide that inhibited mutant and wild type cGMP kinase with similar potency, with Ki values of 160 +/- 11 and 169 +/- 27 microM, respectively. These results suggest that the mutations Ser555Tyr and Ser559Phe are required, but not sufficient, for high affinity inhibition of cGMP kinase by PKI.

  12. Early LC3 lipidation induced by d-limonene does not rely on mTOR inhibition, ERK activation and ROS production and it is associated with reduced clonogenic capacity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Berliocchi, Laura; Chiappini, Carlotta; Adornetto, Annagrazia; Gentile, Debora; Cerri, Silvia; Russo, Rossella; Bagetta, Giacinto; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana

    2018-02-01

    d-Limonene is a natural monoterpene abundant in Citrus essential oils. It is endowed with several biological activities, including inhibition of carcinogenesis and promotion of tumour regression. Recently, d-limonene has been shown to modulate autophagic markers in vitro at concentrations found in vivo, in clinical pharmacokinetic studies. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process serving as both an adaptive metabolic response and a quality control mechanism. Because autophagy defects have been linked to a wide range of human pathologies, including neurodegeneration and cancer, there is a need for new pharmacological tools to control deregulated autophagy. To better understand the effects of d-limonene on autophagy, to identify the molecular mechanisms through which this monoterpene rapidly triggers LC3 lipidation and to evaluate the role for autophagy in long-term effects of d-limonene. Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma and MCF7 breast cancer cells were used. Endogenous LC3-II levels were evaluated by western blotting. Autophagic flux assay was performed using bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine. Intracellular distribution of LC3 protein was studied by confocal microscopy analysis of LC3B-GFP transduced cells. Expression of lysosomal-membrane protein LAMP-1 was assessed by immunofluorescence analysis. Phosphorylated levels of downstream substrates of mTOR kinase (p70S6 kinase, 4E-BP1, and ULK1) and ERK were analyzed by western blotting. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was assessed by live confocal microscopy of cells loaded with CellROX ® Green Reagent. Clonogenic assay was used to evaluate the ability of treated cells to proliferate and form colonies. LC3 lipidation promoted by d-limonene correlates with autophagosome formation and stimulation of basal autophagy. LC3 lipidation does not rely on inhibition of mTOR kinase, which instead appears to be transiently activated. In addition, d-limonene rapidly activates ERK and

  13. Role of mTOR, Bad, and Survivin in RasGAP Fragment N-Mediated Cell Protection

    Yang, Jiang-Yan; Widmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Partial cleavage of p120 RasGAP by caspase-3 in stressed cells generates an N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, which activates an anti-apoptotic Akt-dependent survival response. Akt regulates several effectors but which of these mediate fragment N-dependent cell protection has not been defined yet. Here we have investigated the role of mTORC1, Bad, and survivin in the capacity of fragment N to protect cells from apoptosis. Neither rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, nor silencing of raptor, a subunit of the mTORC1 complex, altered the ability of fragment N from inhibiting cisplatin- and Fas ligand-induced death. Cells lacking Bad, despite displaying a stronger resistance to apoptosis, were still protected by fragment N against cisplatin-induced death. Fragment N was also able to protect cells from Fas ligand-induced death in conditions where Bad plays no role in apoptosis regulation. Fragment N expression in cells did neither modulate survivin mRNA nor its protein expression. Moreover, the expression of cytoplasmic survivin, known to exert anti-apoptotic actions in cells, still occurred in UV-B-irradiated epidermis of mouse expressing a caspase-3-resistant RasGAP mutant that cannot produce fragment N. Additionally, survivin function in cell cycle progression was not affected by fragment N. These results indicate that, taken individually, mTOR, Bad, or Survivin are not required for fragment N to protect cells from cell death. We conclude that downstream targets of Akt other than mTORC1, Bad, or survivin mediate fragment N-induced protection or that several Akt effectors can compensate for each other to induce the pro-survival fragment N-dependent response. PMID:23826368

  14. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  15. Simvastatin and metformin inhibit cell growth in hepatitis C virus infected cells via mTOR increasing PTEN and autophagy.

    José A Del Campo

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been related to increased risk of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC while metformin (M and statins treatment seemed to protect against HCC development. In this work, we aim to identify the mechanisms by which metformin and simvastatin (S could protect from liver cancer. Huh7.5 cells were infected with HCV particles and treated with M+S. Human primary hepatocytes were treated with M+S. Treatment with both drugs inhibited Huh7.5 cell growth and HCV infection. In non-infected cells S increased translational controlled tumor protein (TCTP and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN proteins while M inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and TCTP. Simvastatin and metformin co-administered down-regulated mTOR and TCTP, while PTEN was increased. In cells infected by HCV, mTOR, TCTP, p62 and light chain 3B II (LC3BII were increased and PTEN was decreased. S+M treatment increased PTEN, p62 and LC3BII in Huh7.5 cells. In human primary hepatocytes, metformin treatment inhibited mTOR and PTEN, but up-regulated p62, LC3BII and Caspase 3. In conclusion, simvastatin and metformin inhibited cell growth and HCV infection in vitro. In human hepatocytes, metformin increased cell-death markers. These findings suggest that M+S treatment could be useful in therapeutic prevention of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Follistatin-mediated skeletal muscle hypertrophy is regulated by Smad3 and mTOR independently of myostatin

    Winbanks, Catherine E.; Weeks, Kate L.; Thomson, Rachel E.; Sepulveda, Patricio V.; Beyer, Claudia; Qian, Hongwei; Chen, Justin L.; Allen, James M.; Lancaster, Graeme I.; Febbraio, Mark A.; Harrison, Craig A.; McMullen, Julie R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Follistatin is essential for skeletal muscle development and growth, but the intracellular signaling networks that regulate follistatin-mediated effects are not well defined. We show here that the administration of an adeno-associated viral vector expressing follistatin-288aa (rAAV6:Fst-288) markedly increased muscle mass and force-producing capacity concomitant with increased protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. These effects were attenuated by inhibition of mTOR or deletion of S6K1/2. Furthermore, we identify Smad3 as the critical intracellular link that mediates the effects of follistatin on mTOR signaling. Expression of constitutively active Smad3 not only markedly prevented skeletal muscle growth induced by follistatin but also potently suppressed follistatin-induced Akt/mTOR/S6K signaling. Importantly, the regulation of Smad3- and mTOR-dependent events by follistatin occurred independently of overexpression or knockout of myostatin, a key repressor of muscle development that can regulate Smad3 and mTOR signaling and that is itself inhibited by follistatin. These findings identify a critical role of Smad3/Akt/mTOR/S6K/S6RP signaling in follistatin-mediated muscle growth that operates independently of myostatin-driven mechanisms. PMID:22711699

  17. Estradiol-Induced Object Recognition Memory Consolidation Is Dependent on Activation of mTOR Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Fan, Lu; Orr, Patrick T.; Zhao, Zaorui; Frick, Karyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is an important regulator of protein synthesis and is essential for various forms of hippocampal memory. Here, we asked whether the enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation produced by dorsal hippocampal infusion of 17[Beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) is dependent on mTOR…

  18. Leucine Modulation of the mTOR Pathway for Cognition Modulation: Kinetic and In Vitro Studies and Model Development

    2015-09-30

    ultimately at regional levels. In other words , the arrival of free leucine at a tissue site and taken up by the cells would impart a signal for...immunohistochemical techniques and immortalized rat hippocampal cells. Figure 2. Schematic of the Impact of Leucine on the mTOR Protein Synthesis Pathway

  19. Effective Therapeutic Intervention and Comprehensive Genetic Analysis of mTOR Signaling in PEComa : A Case Report

    Weeber, Fleur; Koudijs, Marco J; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Besselink, Nicolle J M; VAN Lieshout, Stef; Nijman, Isaac J; Cuppen, Edwin; Offerhaus, G Johan; Voest, Emile E

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms. The exact genetic alterations underlying the pathophysiology of PEComas are largely unknown, although it has been shown that activation of the Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays a

  20. Hypothalamic roles of mTOR complex I: integration of nutrient and hormone signals to regulate energy homeostasis.

    Hu, Fang; Xu, Yong; Liu, Feng

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) senses nutrient, energy, and hormone signals to regulate metabolism and energy homeostasis. mTOR activity in the hypothalamus, which is associated with changes in energy status, plays a critical role in the regulation of food intake and body weight. mTOR integrates signals from a variety of "energy balancing" hormones such as leptin, insulin, and ghrelin, although its action varies in response to these distinct hormonal stimuli as well as across different neuronal populations. In this review, we summarize and highlight recent findings regarding the functional roles of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hypothalamus specifically in its regulation of body weight, energy expenditure, and glucose/lipid homeostasis. Understanding the role and underlying mechanisms behind mTOR-related signaling in the brain will undoubtedly pave new avenues for future therapeutics and interventions that can combat obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. The interaction of CK2alpha and CK2beta, the subunits of protein kinase CK2, requires CK2beta in a preformed conformation and is enthalpically driven

    Raaf, Jennifer; Brunstein, Elena; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    . In contrast to the cyclins in the case of the cyclin-dependent kinases CK2beta is no on-switch of CK2alpha; rather the formation of the CK2 holoenzyme is accompanied with an overall change of the enzyme's profile including a modulation of the substrate specificity, an increase of the thermostability......, and an allocation of docking sites for membranes and other proteins. In this study we used C-terminal deletion variants of human CK2alpha and CK2beta that were enzymologically fully competent and in particular able to form a heterotetrameric holoenzyme. With differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) we confirmed...

  2. Agmatine produces antidepressant-like effects by activating AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling.

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Bettio, Luis Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila Batista; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Lopes, Mark William; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-06-01

    The activation of AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling has been reported as mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of fast-acting agents, specially the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In the present study, oral administration of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), a neuromodulator that has been reported to modulate NMDA receptors, caused a significant reduction in the immobility time of mice submitted to the tail suspension test (TST), an effect prevented by the administration of DNQX (AMPA receptor antagonist, 2.5μg/site, i.c.v.), BDNF antibody (1μg/site, i.c.v.), K-252a (TrkB receptor antagonist, 1μg/site, i.c.v.), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor, 10nmol/site, i.c.v.) or rapamycin (selective mTOR inhibitor, 0.2nmol/site, i.c.v.). Moreover, the administration of lithium chloride (non-selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 10mg/kg, p.o.) or AR-A014418 (selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 0.01μg/site, i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the TST when compared with either drug alone. Furthermore, increased immunocontents of BDNF, PSD-95 and GluA1 were found in the prefrontal cortex of mice just 1h after agmatine administration. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the TST may be dependent on the activation of AMPA and TrkB receptors, PI3K and mTOR signaling as well as inhibition of GSK-3β, and increase in synaptic proteins. The results contribute to elucidate the complex signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant effect of agmatine and reinforce the pivotal role of these molecular targets for antidepressant responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca 2+ concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes

  4. Protein Kinase Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase Kinase 4 (MAP4K4) Promotes Obesity-induced Hyperinsulinemia.

    Roth Flach, Rachel J; Danai, Laura V; DiStefano, Marina T; Kelly, Mark; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Jurczyk, Agata; Sharma, Rohit B; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jason K; Bortell, Rita; Alonso, Laura C; Czech, Michael P

    2016-07-29

    Previous studies revealed a paradox whereby mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (Map4k4) acted as a negative regulator of insulin sensitivity in chronically obese mice, yet systemic deletion of Map4k4 did not improve glucose tolerance. Here, we report markedly reduced glucose-responsive plasma insulin and C-peptide levels in whole body Map4k4-depleted mice (M4K4 iKO) as well as an impaired first phase of insulin secretion from islets derived from M4K4 iKO mice ex vivo After long-term high fat diet (HFD), M4K4 iKO mice pancreata also displayed reduced β cell mass, fewer proliferating β cells and reduced islet-specific gene mRNA expression compared with controls, although insulin content was normal. Interestingly, the reduced plasma insulin in M4K4 iKO mice exposed to chronic (16 weeks) HFD was not observed in response to acute HFD challenge or short term treatment with the insulin receptor antagonist S961. Furthermore, the improved insulin sensitivity in obese M4K4 iKO mice was abrogated by high exogenous insulin over the course of a euglycemic clamp study, indicating that hypoinsulinemia promotes insulin sensitivity in chronically obese M4K4 iKO mice. These results demonstrate that protein kinase Map4k4 drives obesity-induced hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in part by promoting insulin secretion from β cells in mice. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. FBXW7 mutations in patients with advanced cancers: clinical and molecular characteristics and outcomes with mTOR inhibitors.

    Denis L Jardim

    Full Text Available FBXW7 is a tumor suppressor gene responsible for the degradation of several proto-oncogenes. Preclinical data suggest that FBXW7 mutations sensitize cells to mTOR inhibitors. Clinicopathologic characteristics of cancer patients with FBXW7 mutations and their responses to mTOR inhibitors remain unknown.Using multiplex gene panels we evaluated how the FBXW7 mutation affected the cancer phenotype of patients referred to a phase I clinic starting January 2012. Whenever possible patients positive for FBXW7 mutation were treated with regimens containing an mTOR inhibitors and their outcomes were reviewed.FBXW7 mutations were detected in 17 of 418 patients (4.0%. Among tumor types with more than 10 patients tested, FBXW7 mutations occurred in colorectal cancer (7/49; 14.3%, squamous cell cancer of head and neck (2/18; 11.1%, liver (1/13; 7.7%, and ovarian cancers (1/40; 2.5%. No one clinical, pathological or demographic feature was characteristic of the FBXW7-mutated patient population. The mutation occurred in isolation in only 2/17 (12% patients, and KRAS was frequently found as a concomitant mutation, especially in patients with colorectal cancer (6/7; 86%. Ten patients were treated on a protocol containing an mTOR inhibitor, with a median time to treatment failure of 2.8 months (range, 1.3-6.8. One patient with liver cancer (fibrolamellar subtype continues to have a prolonged stable disease for 6.8+ months.In patients with advanced cancers, somatic mutations in FBXW7 usually occur with other simultaneous molecular aberrations, which can contribute to limited therapeutic efficacy of mTOR inhibitors.

  6. Inflammatory stress increases hepatic CD36 translational efficiency via activation of the mTOR signalling pathway.

    Chuan Wang

    Full Text Available Inflammatory stress is an independent risk factor for the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Although CD36 is known to facilitate long-chain fatty acid uptake and contributes to NAFLD progression, the mechanisms that link inflammatory stress to hepatic CD36 expression and steatosis remain unclear. As the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway is involved in CD36 translational activation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether inflammatory stress enhances hepatic CD36 expression via mTOR signalling pathway and the underlying mechanisms. To induce inflammatory stress, we used tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 stimulation of the human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells in vitro and casein injection in C57BL/6J mice in vivo. The data showed that inflammatory stress increased hepatic CD36 protein levels but had no effect on mRNA expression. A protein degradation assay revealed that CD36 protein stability was not different between HepG2 cells treated with or without TNF-α or IL-6. A polysomal analysis indicated that CD36 translational efficiency was significantly increased by inflammatory stress. Additionally, inflammatory stress enhanced the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream translational regulators including p70S6K, 4E-BP1 and eIF4E. Rapamycin, an mTOR-specific inhibitor, reduced the phosphorylation of mTOR signalling pathway and decreased the CD36 translational efficiency and protein level even under inflammatory stress resulting in the alleviation of inflammatory stress-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. This study demonstrates that the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway increases hepatic CD36 translational efficiency, resulting in increased CD36 protein expression under inflammatory stress.

  7. Fasting Increases Human Skeletal Muscle Net Phenylalanine Release and This Is Associated with Decreased mTOR Signaling

    Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Andreas Buch; Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte; Clasen, Berthil Frederik Forrest; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Aim Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth. Methods Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days. Results Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation. Conclusions Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth. PMID:25020061

  8. Fasting increases human skeletal muscle net phenylalanine release and this is associated with decreased mTOR signaling.

    Mikkel Holm Vendelbo

    Full Text Available Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a key regulator of cell growth.Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days.Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation.Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth.

  9. M(o)TOR of aging: MTOR as a universal molecular hypothalamus.

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-07-01

    A recent ground-breaking publication described hypothalamus-driven programmatic aging. As a Russian proverb goes "everything new is well-forgotten old". In 1958, Dilman proposed that aging and its related diseases are programmed by the hypothalamus. This theory, supported by beautiful experiments, remained unnoticed just to be re-discovered recently. Yet, it does not explain all manifestations of aging. And would organism age without hypothalamus? Do sensing pathways such as MTOR (mechanistic Target of Rapamycin) and IKK-beta play a role of a "molecular hypothalamus" in every cell? Are hypothalamus-driven alterations simply a part of quasi-programmed aging manifested by hyperfunction and secondary signal-resistance? Here are some answers.

  10. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ regulates RhoA activation via a kinase-independent scaffolding mechanism

    Ard, Ryan; Mulatz, Kirk; Abramovici, Hanan

    2012-01-01

    , but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, selectively dissociates Rac1 by stimulating PAK1-mediated phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-101/174. Similarly, phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-34 by protein kinase Cα (PKCα......GDI and was required for efficient interaction of PKCα and RhoA. DGKζ-null fibroblasts had condensed F-actin bundles and altered focal adhesion distribution, indicative of aberrant RhoA signaling. Two targets of the RhoA effector ROCK showed reduced phosphorylation in DGKζ-null cells. Collectively our findings suggest...

  11. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... and highlighted their importance in bacterial physiology. Having no orthologues in Eukarya, BY-kinases are receiving a growing attention from the biomedical field, since they represent a particularly promising target for anti-bacterial drug design....

  12. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  13. Growth Inhibition by Bupivacaine Is Associated with Inactivation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase 1

    Beigh, Mushtaq Ahmad; Showkat, Mehvish; Bashir, Basharat; Bashir, Asma; Hussain, Mahboob ul; Andrabi, Khurshid Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Bupivacaine is an amide type long acting local anesthetic used for epidural anesthesia and nerve blockade in patients. Use of bupivacaine is associated with severe cytotoxicity and apoptosis along with inhibition of cell growth and proliferation. Although inhibition of Erk, Akt, and AMPK seemingly appears to mediate some of the bupivacaine effects, potential downstream targets that mediate its effect remain unknown. S6 kinase 1 is a common downstream effector of several growth regulatory pathways involved in cell growth and proliferation known to be affected by bupivacaine. We have accordingly attempted to relate the growth inhibitory effects of bupivacaine with the status of S6K1 activity and we present evidence that decrease in cell growth and proliferation by bupivacaine is mediated through inactivation of S6 kinase 1 in a concentration and time dependent manner. We also show that ectopic expression of constitutively active S6 kinase 1 imparts substantial protection from bupivacaine induced cytotoxicity. Inactivation of S6K1 though associated with loss of putative mTOR mediated phosphorylation did not correspond with loss of similar phosphorylations in 4EBP1 indicating that S6K1 inhibition was not mediated through inactivation of mTORC1 signaling pathway or its down regulation. PMID:24605337

  14. Ribosomal S6 Kinase Cooperates with Casein Kinase 2 to Modulate the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator

    Akten, Bikem; Tangredi, Michelle M.; Jauch, Eike; Roberts, Mary A.; Ng, Fanny; Raabe, Thomas; Jackson, F. Rob

    2009-01-01

    There is a universal requirement for post-translational regulatory mechanisms in circadian clock systems. Previous work in Drosophila has identified several kinases, phosphatases and an E3 ligase that are critical for determining the nuclear translocation and/or stability of clock proteins. The present study evaluated the function of p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in the Drosophila circadian system. In mammals, RSK1 is a light- and clock-regulated kinase known to be activated by the MAPK pathway, but there is no direct evidence that it functions as a component of the circadian system. Here, we show that Drosophila S6KII RNA displays rhythms in abundance, indicative of circadian control. Importantly, an S6KII null mutant exhibits a short-period circadian phenotype that can be rescued by expression of the wild-type gene in clock neurons, indicating a role for S6KII in the molecular oscillator. Peak PER clock protein expression is elevated in the mutant, indicative of enhanced stability, whereas per mRNA level is decreased, consistent with enhanced feedback repression. Gene reporter assays show that decreased S6KII is associated with increased PER repression. Surprisingly, we demonstrate a physical interaction between S6KII and the Casein Kinase 2 regulatory subunit (CK2β), suggesting a functional relationship between the two kinases. In support of such a relationship, there are genetic interactions between S6KII and CK2 mutations, in vivo, which indicate that CK2 activity is required for S6KII action. We propose that the two kinases cooperate within clock neurons to fine-tune circadian period, improving the precision of the clock mechanism. PMID:19144847

  15. Intravenous maternal -arginine administration to twin-bearing ewes, during late pregnancy, is associated with increased fetal muscle mTOR abundance and postnatal growth in twin female lambs.

    Sales, F; Sciascia, Q; van der Linden, D S; Wards, N J; Oliver, M H; McCoard, S A

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether parenteral Arg administered to well-fed twin-bearing ewes from 100 to 140 d of pregnancy influences fetal skeletal muscle growth, the abundance and activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein, and postnatal muscle growth of the offspring. Ewes fed 100% of NRC-recommended nutrient requirements for twin-bearing ewes were administered an intravenous bolus of either 345 μmol Arg HCl/kg BW or saline solution (Control) 3 times per day. At 140 d of pregnancy (P140), a group of 11 Control and 9 Arg-treated ewes were euthanized and hind leg muscles and longissimus dorsi (LD) were excised and weighed. A sample of LD was snap frozen in liquid nitrogen for later analysis of free AA (FAA) concentration, mTOR abundance and phosphorylation, and biochemical indices (DNA, RNA, and protein content). For the remaining 25 ewes (Arg, = 13, and Control, = 12), Arg administration was continued until the initiation of parturition and ewes were allowed to lamb. Lambs were weaned at postnatal Day 82 and grazed on pasture until postnatal day 153 (PN153), when a subset of 20 lambs ( = 10 per group) was euthanized. At P140, only the psoas major was heavier in the Arg-administered group compared with the Control group. Female lambs from ewes supplemented with Arg (Arg-F) had increased abundance of total mTOR, RNA concentration, and RNA:DNA ratio in LD compared with female lambs from Control ewes (Con-F), whereas males did not differ. At PN153, Arg-F were heavier than Con-F and had heavier LD and plantaris and a trend for heavier psoas major muscles compared with Con-F. In contrast, BW and individual muscle weights did not differ in male lambs. Lambs from Arg-treated ewes had heavier semimembranosus and tended to have heavier biceps femoris compared with Control lambs. The RNA concentration in LD was greater in Arg-F compared with Con-F, and DNA concentration was greater in the Arg group compared with the Control group. In

  16. Enzastaurin (LY317615), a Protein Kinase C Beta Selective Inhibitor, Enhances Antiangiogenic Effect of Radiation

    Willey, Christopher D.; Xiao Dakai; Tu Tianxiang; Kim, Kwang Woon; Moretti, Luigi; Niermann, Kenneth J.; Tawtawy, Mohammed N.; Quarles, Chad C. Ph.D.; Lu Bo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Angiogenesis has generated interest in oncology because of its important role in cancer growth and progression, particularly when combined with cytotoxic therapies, such as radiotherapy. Among the numerous pathways influencing vascular growth and stability, inhibition of protein kinase B(Akt) or protein kinase C(PKC) can influence tumor blood vessels within tumor microvasculature. Therefore, we wanted to determine whether PKC inhibition could sensitize lung tumors to radiation. Methods and Materials: The combination of the selective PKCβ inhibitor Enzastaurin (ENZ, LY317615) and ionizing radiation were used in cell culture and a mouse model of lung cancer. Lung cancer cell lines and human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) were examined using immunoblotting, cytotoxic assays including cell proliferation and clonogenic assays, and Matrigel endothelial tubule formation. In vivo, H460 lung cancer xenografts were examined for tumor vasculature and proliferation using immunohistochemistry. Results: ENZ effectively radiosensitizes HUVEC within in vitro models. Furthermore, concurrent ENZ treatment of lung cancer xenografts enhanced radiation-induced destruction of tumor vasculature and proliferation by IHC. However, tumor growth delay was not enhanced with combination treatment compared with either treatment alone. Analysis of downstream effectors revealed that HUVEC and the lung cancer cell lines differed in their response to ENZ and radiation such that only HUVEC demonstrate phosphorylated S6 suppression, which is downstream of mTOR. When ENZ was combined with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, in H460 lung cancer cells, radiosensitization was observed. Conclusion: PKC appears to be crucial for angiogenesis, and its inhibition by ENZ has potential to enhance radiotherapy in vivo.

  17. miR-155 Controls Lymphoproliferation in LAT Mutant Mice by Restraining T-Cell Apoptosis via SHIP-1/mTOR and PAK1/FOXO3/BIM Pathways.

    Alexandre K Rouquette-Jazdanian

    Full Text Available Linker for Activation of T cells (LAT is an adapter protein that is essential for T cell function. Knock-in mice with a LAT mutation impairing calcium flux develop a fatal CD4+ lymphoproliferative disease. miR-155 is a microRNA that is correlated with hyperproliferation in a number of cancers including lymphomas and leukemias and is overexpressed in mutant LAT T cells. To test whether miR-155 was merely indicative of T cell activation or whether it contributes to lymphoproliferative disease in mutant LAT mice, we interbred LAT mutant and miR-155-deficient mice. miR-155 deficiency markedly inhibited lymphoproliferative disease by stimulating BIM-dependent CD4+ T cell apoptosis, even though ERK activation and T cell proliferation were increased in double mutant CD4+ T cells. Bim/Bcl2l11 expression is activated by the forkhead transcription factor FOXO3. Using miR-155-deficient, LAT mutant T cells as a discovery tool, we found two connected pathways that impact the nuclear translocation and activation of FOXO3 in T cells. One pathway is mediated by the inositide phosphatase SHIP-1 and the serine/threonine kinases AKT and PDK1. The other pathway involves PAK1 and JNK kinase activation. We define crosstalk between the two pathways via the kinase mTOR, which stabilizes PAK1. This study establishes a role for PAK1 in T cell apoptosis, which contrasts to its previously identified role in T cell proliferation. Furthermore, miR-155 regulates the delicate balance between PAK1-mediated proliferation and apoptosis in T cells impacting lymphoid organ size and function.

  18. AMP kinase-related kinase NUAK2 affects tumor growth, migration, and clinical outcome of human melanoma.

    Namiki, Takeshi; Tanemura, Atsushi; Valencia, Julio C; Coelho, Sergio G; Passeron, Thierry; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Vieira, Wilfred D; Ishikawa, Masashi; Nishijima, Wataru; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Ichiro; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Yin, Lanlan; Polley, Eric C; Liu, Hongfang; Kawakami, Yutaka; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Eishi; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Hearing, Vincent J

    2011-04-19

    The identification of genes that participate in melanomagenesis should suggest strategies for developing therapeutic modalities. We used a public array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) database and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to identify the AMP kinase (AMPK)-related kinase NUAK2 as a candidate gene for melanomagenesis, and we analyzed its functions in melanoma cells. Our analyses had identified a locus at 1q32 where genomic gain is strongly associated with tumor thickness, and we used real-time qPCR analyses and regression analyses to identify NUAK2 as a candidate gene at that locus. Associations of relapse-free survival and overall survival of 92 primary melanoma patients with NUAK2 expression measured using immunohistochemistry were investigated using Kaplan-Meier curves, log rank tests, and Cox regression models. Knockdown of NUAK2 induces senescence and reduces S-phase, decreases migration, and down-regulates expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In vivo analysis demonstrated that knockdown of NUAK2 suppresses melanoma tumor growth in mice. Survival analysis showed that the risk of relapse is greater in acral melanoma patients with high levels of NUAK2 expression than in acral melanoma patients with low levels of NUAK2 expression (hazard ratio = 3.88; 95% confidence interval = 1.44-10.50; P = 0.0075). These data demonstrate that NUAK2 expression is significantly associated with the oncogenic features of melanoma cells and with the survival of acral melanoma patients. NUAK2 may provide a drug target to suppress melanoma progression. This study further supports the importance of NUAK2 in cancer development and tumor progression, while AMPK has antioncogenic properties.

  19. The NDR kinase scaffold HYM1/MO25 is essential for MAK2 map kinase signaling in Neurospora crassa.

    Anne Dettmann

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell communication is essential for eukaryotic development, but our knowledge of molecules and mechanisms required for intercellular communication is fragmentary. In particular, the connection between signal sensing and regulation of cell polarity is poorly understood. In the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa, germinating spores mutually attract each other and subsequently fuse. During these tropic interactions, the two communicating cells rapidly alternate between two different physiological states, probably associated with signal delivery and response. The MAK2 MAP kinase cascade mediates cell-cell signaling. Here, we show that the conserved scaffolding protein HYM1/MO25 controls the cell shape-regulating NDR kinase module as well as the signal-receiving MAP kinase cascade. HYM1 functions as an integral part of the COT1 NDR kinase complex to regulate the interaction with its upstream kinase POD6 and thereby COT1 activity. In addition, HYM1 interacts with NRC1, MEK2, and MAK2, the three kinases of the MAK2 MAP kinase cascade, and co-localizes with MAK2 at the apex of growing cells. During cell fusion, the three kinases of the MAP kinase module as well as HYM1 are recruited to the point of cell-cell contact. hym-1 mutants phenocopy all defects observed for MAK2 pathway mutants by abolishing MAK2 activity. An NRC1-MEK2 fusion protein reconstitutes MAK2 signaling in hym-1, while constitutive activation of NRC1 and MEK2 does not. These data identify HYM1 as a novel regulator of the NRC1-MEK2-MAK2 pathway, which may coordinate NDR and MAP kinase signaling during cell polarity and intercellular communication.

  20. Aging-associated dysfunction of Akt/protein kinase B: S-nitrosylation and acetaminophen intervention.

    Miaozong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aged skeletal muscle is characterized by an increased incidence of metabolic and functional disorders, which if allowed to proceed unchecked can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. The mechanism(s underlying the development of these disorders in aging skeletal muscle are not well understood. Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB is an important regulator of cellular metabolism and survival, but it is unclear if aged muscle exhibits alterations in Akt function. Here we report a novel dysfunction of Akt in aging muscle, which may relate to S-nitrosylation and can be prevented by acetaminophen intervention. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared to 6- and 27-month rats, the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473 and Thr308 was higher in soleus muscles of very aged rats (33-months. Paradoxically, these increases in Akt phosphorylation were associated with diminished mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR phosphorylation, along with decreased levels of insulin receptor beta (IR-beta, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN and phosphorylation of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1 (Ser241. In vitro Akt kinase measurements and ex vivo muscle incubation experiments demonstrated age-related impairments of Akt kinase activity, which were associated with increases in Akt S-nitrosylation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS. Impairments in Akt function occurred parallel to increases in myocyte apoptosis and decreases in myocyte size and the expression of myosin and actin. These age-related disorders were attenuated by treating aged (27-month animals with acetaminophen (30 mg/kg body weight/day for 6-months. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that Akt dysfunction and increased S-nitrosylation of Akt may contribute to age-associated disorders in skeletal muscle and that acetaminophen may be efficacious for the treatment of age-related muscle dysfunction.

  1. Calcium-dependent but calmodulin-independent protein kinase from soybean

    Harmon, A.C.; Putnam-Evans, C.; Cormier, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase activity from suspension-cultured soybean cells (Glycine max L. Wayne) was shown to be dependent on calcium but not calmodulin. The concentrations of free calcium required for half-maximal histone H1 phosphorylation and autophosphorylation were similar (≥ 2 micromolar). The protein kinase activity was stimulated 100-fold by ≥ 10 micromolar-free calcium. When exogenous soybean or bovine brain calmodulin was added in high concentration (1 micromolar) to the purified kinase, calcium-dependent and -independent activities were weakly stimulated (≤ 2-fold). Bovine serum albumin had a similar effect on both activities. The kinase was separated from a small amount of contaminating calmodulin by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. After renaturation the protein kinase autophosphorylated and phosphorylated histone H1 in a calcium-dependent manner. Following electroblotting onto nitrocellulose, the kinase bound 45 Ca 2+ in the presence of KCl and MgCl 2 , which indicated that the kinase itself is a high-affinity calcium-binding protein. Also, the mobility of one of two kinase bands in SDS gels was dependent on the presence of calcium. Autophosphorylation of the calmodulin-free kinase was inhibited by the calmodulin-binding compound N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W-7), showing that the inhibition of activity by W-7 is independent of calmodulin. These results show that soybean calcium-dependent protein kinase represents a new class of protein kinase which requires calcium but not calmodulin for activity

  2. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    Pooja Ghatalia

    Full Text Available Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T, matched normal kidney (N and metastatic tumor tissue (M may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79 compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187. Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001. The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  3. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering...

  4. [Protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 blocks polyploidization of SP600125-induced CMK cells by regulating phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1].

    Zhao, Song; Yang, Jingang; Li, Changling; Xing, Sining; Yu, Ying; Liu, Shuo; Pu, Feifei; Ma, Dongchu

    2016-10-01

    Objective To investigate the regulatory effect of post-translation modification of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) on the polyploidization of megakaryocytes. Methods SP600125, a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, and H-89, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, were used to treat CMK cells separately or in combination. With propidium iodide (PI) to dye DNA in the treated cells, the relative DNA content was detected by flow cytometry, and then the DNA polyploidy was analyzed. The change of expression and phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), an important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) downstream target molecule, was analyzed by Western blotting. Molecular docking study and kinase activity assay were performed to analyze the combination of H-89 with S6K1 and the effect of H-89 on the activity of S6K1 kinase. Results SP600125 induced CMK cell polyploidization in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. At the same time, it increased the phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr421/Ser424 and decreased the phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr389. H-89 not only blocked polyploidization, but also decreased the phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr421/Ser424 and increased the phosphorylation of S6K1 at Thr389. Molecular docking and kinase activity assay showed that H-89 occupied the ATP binding sites of S6K1 and inhibited its activity. Noticeably, both H-89 and SP600125 inhibited the activity of PKA. Moreover, the two drugs further inhibited the activity of PKA when used together. Therefore, these data indicated that H-89 blocked the SP600125-induced polyploidization of CMK cells mainly by changing S6K1 phosphorylation state, rather than its inhibitory effect on PKA. Conclusion H-89 can block the polyploidization of SP600125-induced CMK cells by regulating S6K1 phosphorylation state.

  5. Association of breast cancer risk and the mTOR pathway in women of African ancestry in 'The Root' Consortium.

    Wang, Shengfeng; Huo, Dezheng; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Nathanson, Katherine L; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Zheng, Yonglan

    2017-08-01

    Functional studies have elucidated the role of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in breast carcinogenesis, but to date, there is a paucity of data on its contribution to breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry. We examined 47628 SNPs in 61 mTOR pathway genes in the genome wide association study of breast cancer in the African Diaspora study (The Root consortium), which included 3686 participants (1657 cases). Pathway- and gene-level analyses were conducted using the adaptive rank truncated product (ARTP) test for 10994 SNPs that were not highly correlated (r2 studies of breast cancer in the African Diaspora. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. A chemical genetic screen for mTOR pathway inhibitors based on 4E-BP-dependent nuclear accumulation of eIF4E.

    Livingstone, Mark; Larsson, Ola; Sukarieh, Rami; Pelletier, Jerry; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2009-12-24

    The signal transduction pathway wherein mTOR regulates cellular growth and proliferation is an active target for drug discovery. The search for new mTOR inhibitors has recently yielded a handful of promising compounds that hold therapeutic potential. This search has been limited by the lack of a high-throughput assay to monitor the phosphorylation of a direct rapamycin-sensitive mTOR substrate in cells. Here we describe a novel cell-based chemical genetic screen useful for efficiently monitoring mTOR signaling to 4E-BPs in response to stimuli. The screen is based on the nuclear accumulation of eIF4E, which occurs in a 4E-BP-dependent manner specifically upon inhibition of mTOR signaling. Using this assay in a small-scale screen, we have identified several compounds not previously known to inhibit mTOR signaling, demonstrating that this method can be adapted to larger screens. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. miR-199a Links MeCP2 with mTOR Signaling and Its Dysregulation Leads to Rett Syndrome Phenotypes

    Keita Tsujimura

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by MECP2 mutations. Although emerging evidence suggests that MeCP2 deficiency is associated with dysregulation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, which functions as a hub for various signaling pathways, the mechanism underlying this association and the molecular pathophysiology of RTT remain elusive. We show here that MeCP2 promotes the posttranscriptional processing of particular microRNAs (miRNAs as a component of the microprocessor Drosha complex. Among the MeCP2-regulated miRNAs, we found that miR-199a positively controls mTOR signaling by targeting inhibitors for mTOR signaling. miR-199a and its targets have opposite effects on mTOR activity, ameliorating and inducing RTT neuronal phenotypes, respectively. Furthermore, genetic deletion of miR-199a-2 led to a reduction of mTOR activity in the brain and recapitulated numerous RTT phenotypes in mice. Together, these findings establish miR-199a as a critical downstream target of MeCP2 in RTT pathogenesis by linking MeCP2 with mTOR signaling.

  8. Outside-in HLA class I signaling regulates ICAM-1 clustering and endothelial cell-monocyte interactions via mTOR in transplant antibody-mediated rejection.

    Salehi, Sahar; Sosa, Rebecca A; Jin, Yi-Ping; Kageyama, Shoichi; Fishbein, Michael C; Rozengurt, Enrique; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Reed, Elaine F

    2018-05-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) resulting in transplant allograft vasculopathy (TAV) is the major obstacle for long-term survival of solid organ transplants. AMR is caused by donor-specific antibodies to HLA, which contribute to TAV by initiating outside-in signaling transduction pathways that elicit monocyte recruitment to activated endothelium. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors can attenuate TAV; therefore, we sought to understand the mechanistic underpinnings of mTOR signaling in HLA class I Ab-mediated endothelial cell activation and monocyte recruitment. We used an in vitro model to assess monocyte binding to HLA I Ab-activated endothelial cells and found mTOR inhibition reduced ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) phosphorylation, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) clustering, and monocyte firm adhesion to HLA I Ab-activated endothelium. Further, in a mouse model of AMR, in which C57BL/6. RAG1 -/- recipients of BALB/c cardiac allografts were passively transferred with donor-specific MHC I antibodies, mTOR inhibition significantly reduced vascular injury, ERM phosphorylation, and macrophage infiltration of the allograft. Taken together, these studies indicate mTOR inhibition suppresses ERM phosphorylation in endothelial cells, which impedes ICAM-1 clustering in response to HLA class I Ab and prevents macrophage infiltration into cardiac allografts. These findings indicate a novel therapeutic application for mTOR inhibitors to disrupt endothelial cell-monocyte interactions during AMR. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Phosphorylations of Serines 21/9 in Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3α/β Are Not Required for Cell Lineage Commitment or WNT Signaling in the Normal Mouse Intestine.

    Fiona Hey

    Full Text Available The WNT signalling pathway controls many developmental processes and plays a key role in maintenance of intestine renewal and homeostasis. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK3 is an important component of the WNT pathway and is involved in regulating β-catenin stability and expression of WNT target genes. The mechanisms underpinning GSK3 regulation in this context are not completely understood, with some evidence suggesting this occurs through inhibitory N-terminal serine phosphorylation in a similar way to GSK3 inactivation in insulin signaling. To investigate this in a physiologically relevant context, we have analysed the intestinal phenotype of GSK3 knockin mice in which N-terminal serines 21/9 of GSK3α/β have been mutated to non-phosphorylatable alanine residues. We show that these knockin mutations have very little effect on overall intestinal integrity, cell lineage commitment, β-catenin localization or WNT target gene expression although a small increase in apoptosis at villi tips is observed. Our results provide in vivo evidence that GSK3 is regulated through mechanisms independent of N-terminal serine phosphorylation in order for β-catenin to be stabilised.

  10. Enhancement of Autophagy by Simvastatin through Inhibition of Rac1-mTOR Signaling Pathway in Coronary Arterial Myocytes

    Yu-Miao Wei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In addition to their action of lowering blood cholesterol levels, statins modulate biological characteristics and functions of arterial myocytes such as viability, proliferation, apoptosis, survival and contraction. The present study tested whether simvastatin, as a prototype statin, enhances autophagy in coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs to thereby exert their beneficial effects in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that simvastatin significantly increased the autophagsome formation in CAMs. Western blot analysis confirmed that simvastatin significantly increased protein expression of typical autophagy markers LC3B and Beclin1 in these CAMs. Confocal microscopy further demonstrated that simvastatin increased fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, which was blocked by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of Atg7 genes. Simvastatin reduced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR activity, which was reversed by Rac1-GTPase overexpression and the mTOR agonist phosphatidic acid. Moreover, both Rac1-GTPase overexpression and activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid drastically blocked simvastatin-induced autophagosome formation in CAMs. Interestingly, simvastatin increased protein expression of a contractile phenotype marker calponin in CAMs, which was blocked by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. Simvastatin markedly reduced proliferation of CAMs under both control and proatherogenic stimulation. However, this inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CAM proliferation was blocked by by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine or silencing of Atg7 genes. Lastly, animal experiments demonstrated that simvastatin increased protein expression of LC3B and calponin in mouse coronary arteries. Conclusion: Our results indicate that simvastatin inhibits the Rac1-mTOR pathway and thereby increases autophagy in CAMs which may stabilize CAMs in the contractile phenotype to prevent proliferation and growth

  11. Genetic variability of the mTOR pathway and prostate cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC.

    Daniele Campa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway integrates various signals, regulating ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis as a function of available energy and amino acids, and assuring an appropriate coupling of cellular proliferation with increases in cell size. In addition, recent evidence has pointed to an interplay between the mTOR and p53 pathways. We investigated the genetic variability of 67 key genes in the mTOR pathway and in genes of the p53 pathway which interact with mTOR. We tested the association of 1,084 tagging SNPs with prostate cancer risk in a study of 815 prostate cancer cases and 1,266 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC. We chose the SNPs (n = 11 with the strongest association with risk (p<0.01 and sought to replicate their association in an additional series of 838 prostate cancer cases and 943 controls from EPIC. In the joint analysis of first and second phase two SNPs of the PRKCI gene showed an association with risk of prostate cancer (OR(allele = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78-0.94, p = 1.3 x 10⁻³ for rs546950 and OR(allele = 0.84, 95% CI 0.76-0.93, p = 5.6 x 10⁻⁴ for rs4955720. We confirmed this in a meta-analysis using as replication set the data from the second phase of our study jointly with the first phase of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project. In conclusion, we found an association with prostate cancer risk for two SNPs belonging to PRKCI, a gene which is frequently overexpressed in various neoplasms, including prostate cancer.

  12. Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinase family

    Zhang, Duanwu; Lin, Juan; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-01-01

    Receptor-interacting protein (RIP) kinases are a group of threonine/serine protein kinases with a relatively conserved kinase domain but distinct non-kinase regions. A number of different domain structures, such as death and caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD) domains, were found in different RIP family members, and these domains should be keys in determining the specific function of each RIP kinase. It is known that RIP kinases participate in different biological processes, incl...

  13. Nutrient-Deprived Retinal Progenitors Proliferate in Response to Hypoxia: Interaction of the HIF-1 and mTOR Pathway

    Helena Khaliullina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At a cellular level, nutrients are sensed by the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR. The response of cells to hypoxia is regulated via action of the oxygen sensor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1. During development, injury and disease, tissues might face conditions of both low nutrient supply and low oxygen, yet it is not clear how cells adapt to both nutrient restriction and hypoxia, or how mTOR and HIF-1 interact in such conditions. Here we explore this question in vivo with respect to cell proliferation using the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ of Xenopus. We found that both nutrient-deprivation and hypoxia cause retinal progenitors to decrease their proliferation, yet when nutrient-deprived progenitors are exposed to hypoxia there is an unexpected rise in cell proliferation. This increase, mediated by HIF-1 signalling, is dependent on glutaminolysis and reactivation of the mTOR pathway. We discuss how these findings in non-transformed tissue may also shed light on the ability of cancer cells in poorly vascularised solid tumours to proliferate.

  14. Metabolic Symbiosis Enables Adaptive Resistance to Anti-angiogenic Therapy that Is Dependent on mTOR Signaling

    Elizabeth Allen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of tumor angiogenesis with VEGF inhibitors results in demonstrable, but transitory efficacy in certain human tumors and mouse models of cancer, limited by unconventional forms of adaptive/evasive resistance. In one such mouse model, potent angiogenesis inhibitors elicit compartmental reorganization of cancer cells around remaining blood vessels. The glucose and lactate transporters GLUT1 and MCT4 are induced in distal hypoxic cells in a HIF1α-dependent fashion, indicative of glycolysis. Tumor cells proximal to blood vessels instead express the lactate transporter MCT1, and p-S6, the latter reflecting mTOR signaling. Normoxic cancer cells import and metabolize lactate, resulting in upregulation of mTOR signaling via glutamine metabolism enhanced by lactate catabolism. Thus, metabolic symbiosis is established in the face of angiogenesis inhibition, whereby hypoxic cancer cells import glucose and export lactate, while normoxic cells import and catabolize lactate. mTOR signaling inhibition disrupts this metabolic symbiosis, associated with upregulation of the glucose transporter GLUT2.

  15. Treatment of post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplant with rituximab and conversion to m-TOR inhibitor.

    Nieto-Rios, John Fredy; Gómez de Los Ríos, Sandra Milena; Serna-Higuita, Lina María; Ocampo-Kohn, Catalina; Aristizabal-Alzate, Arbey; Gálvez-Cárdenas, Kenny Mauricio; Zuluaga-Valencia, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-12-30

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders are serious complications of organ transplantation which treatment is not yet standardized. To describe the clinical response, overall and graft survival of patients in our center with this complication after kidney transplantation, which received rituximab as part of their treatment as well as conversion to m-TOR. Retrospective study, which included patients, diagnosed with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation from January 2011 to July 2014. Eight cases were found with a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. Most had monomorphic histology, 85% were associated with Epstein-Barr virus, 25% of patients had tumor involvement of the renal graft, and 12.5% ​​had primary central nervous system lymphoma. All patients were managed with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR (except one who lost the graft at diagnosis) and rituximab-based therapy. The overall response rate was 87.5% (62.5% complete response, 25% partial response). Survival was 87.5% with a median follow-up of 34 months. An additional patient lost the graft, with chronic nephropathy already known. All the remaining patients had stable renal function. There are no standardized treatment regimens for lymphoproliferative disorders after kidney transplantation, but these patients can be managed successfully with reduction of immunosuppression, conversion to m-TOR and rituximab-based schemes.

  16. [Interleukin-37 induces apoptosis and autophagy of SMMC-7721 cells by inhibiting phosphorylation of mTOR].

    Li, Tingting; Zhu, Di; Mou, Tong; Guo, Zhen; Pu, Junliang; Wu, Zhongjun

    2017-04-01

    Objective To investigate the underlying mechanism by which interleukin-37 (IL-37) induces the apoptosis and autophagy in SMMC-7721 cells. Methods SMMC-7721 cells were incubated in vitro and divided into two groups, IL-37 treated group and control group. The cells were treated with (50, 100, 200) ng/mL of recombinant human interleukin-37 (rhIL-37). CCK-8 assay was used to detect the cell proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to examine the expressions of apoptosis-related proteins, Bax, Bcl-2, and autophagy related proteins, microtubule-associated proteins 1 light chain 3 (LC3), beclin 1 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the ultrastructures of autophagosomes. Results The rhIL-37 inhibited the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cells. It induced the apoptosis and autophagy in SMMC-7721 cells. In the IL-37 treated group, the levels of Bax, LC3 and beclin 1 increased but Bcl-2 decreased. The phosphorylation of mTOR was inhibited in the IL-37 treated group. Autophagosome was obvious in the IL-37 treated group. Conclusion IL-37 induces the apoptosis and autophagy in SMMC-7721 cells, which may be related to the phosphorylation of mTOR.

  17. Plasticity and mTOR: Towards Restoration of Impaired Synaptic Plasticity in mTOR-Related Neurogenetic Disorders

    Tanjala T. Gipson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review the recent literature on the clinical features, genetic mutations, neurobiology associated with dysregulation of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin, and clinical trials for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1 and fragile X syndrome (FXS, and phosphatase and tensin homolog hamartoma syndromes (PTHS, which are neurogenetic disorders associated with abnormalities in synaptic plasticity and mTOR signaling. Methods. Pubmed and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched using specific search strategies. Results/Conclusions. Although traditionally thought of as irreversible disorders, significant scientific progress has been made in both humans and preclinical models to understand how pathologic features of these neurogenetic disorders can be reduced or reversed. This paper revealed significant similarities among the conditions. Not only do they share features of impaired synaptic plasticity and dysregulation of mTOR, but they also share clinical features—autism, intellectual disability, cutaneous lesions, and tumors. Although scientific advances towards discovery of effective treatment in some disorders have outpaced others, progress in understanding the signaling pathways that connect the entire group indicates that the lesser known disorders will become treatable as well.

  18. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    M Kasim Diril

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing.

  19. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Diril, M Kasim; Bisteau, Xavier; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kaldis, Philipp

    2016-09-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing.

  20. PsMPK7, a stress-associated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in Phytophthora sojae, is required for stress tolerance, reactive oxygenated species detoxification, cyst germination, sexual reproduction and infection of soybean.

    Gao, Jian; Cao, Mingna; Ye, Wenwu; Li, Haiyang; Kong, Liang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-01-01

    The sensing of stress signals and their transduction into appropriate responses are crucial for the adaptation, survival and infection of phytopathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Amongst evolutionarily conserved pathways, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades function as key signal transducers that use phosphorylation to convey information. In this study, we identified a gene, designated PsMPK7, one of 14 predicted genes encoding MAPKs in Phytophthora sojae. PsMPK7 was highly transcribed in each tested stage, but was up-regulated in the zoospore, cyst and cyst germination stages. Silencing of PsMPK7 affected the growth of germinated cysts, oospore production and the pathogenicity of soybean. PsMPK7 transcription was induced by stresses from sorbitol, NaCl and hydrogen peroxide. Transformants in which PsMPK7 expression was silenced (PsMPK7-silenced) were significantly more sensitive to osmotic and oxidative stress. Aniline blue and diaminobenzidine staining revealed that the silenced lines did not suppress the host reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, indicating that either the inoculated plants activated stronger defence responses to the transformants and/or the PsMPK7-silenced transformants failed to overcome plant defences. In addition, extracellular secretion of laccase decreased in the silenced lines. Overall, our results indicate that the PsMPK7 gene encodes a stress-associated MAPK in P. sojae that is important not only for responses to various stresses, but also for ROS detoxification, cyst germination, sexual oospore production and infection of soybean. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  1. Place of mTOR inhibitors in management of BKV infection after kidney transplantation.

    Jouve, Thomas; Rostaing, Lionel; Malvezzi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) viremia and BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN) have become a serious nuisance to kidney transplant (KT) patients since the mid-nineties, when the incidence of this disease has increased significantly. Directory of open access journals (DOAJ), EMBASE, Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO, and Web of Science have been searched. Many hypothesis have been made as to why this phenomenon has developed; it is of general opinion that a more potent immunosuppression is at the core of the problem. The use of the association of tacrolimus (TAC) with mycophenolic acid (MPA) has gained momentum in the same years as the increase in BKV viremia incidence making it seem to be the most likely culprit. m-TOR inhibitors (m-TORIs) have been shown to have antiviral properties in vitro and this fact has encouraged different transplant teams to use these agents when confronted with BKV infection (viremia or nephropathy). However, the results are mitigated. There had been conflicting results for example when converting from TAC-to sirolimus-based immunosuppression in the setting of established BKVAN. In order to prevent BKV infection we have to minimize to some extent immunosuppression, but it is not always possible, e.g. in high immunological risk patients. Conversely, we could use m-TORIs associated with low-dose calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). This could be actually the key to a safe immunosuppression regimen both from the immunological stand point and from the viral one.

  2. Nutrient sensing via mTOR in T cells maintains a tolerogenic microenvironment

    Duncan eHowie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed that tolerance can be maintained by the induction, by Treg cells, of a tolerogenic microenvironment within tolerated tissues that inhibits effector cell activity but which supports the generation of further Treg cells by infectious tolerance. Two important components of this tolerogenic microenvironment depend on metabolism and nutrient sensing. The first is due to the up-regulation of multiple enzymes that consume essential amino acids (EAAs, which are sensed in naive T cells primarily via inhibition of the mTOR pathway, which in turn encourages their further differentiation into foxp3+ Treg cells. The second mechanism is the metabolism of extracellular ATP to adenosine by the ectoenzymes CD39 and CD73. These two enzymes are constitutively co-expressed on Treg cells, but can also be induced on a wide variety of cell types by TGFbeta and the adenosine generated can be shown to be a potent inhibitor of T cell proliferation. This review will focus on mechanisms of nutrient sensing in T cells, how these are integrated with TCR and cytokine signals via the mnTOR pathway, and what impact this has on intracellular metabolism and subsequently the control of differentiation into different effector or regulatory T cell subsets.

  3. mTOR inhibitors in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma

    Barilla, R.; Sycova-Mila, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 4 % of all malignancies. Much is known about the pathogenesis of RCC because of studies examining its close relationship with dysfunction of the Von Hippel-Lindau gene (VHL) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates nutritional needs, cell growth, and angiogenesisi in cells by down regulating or up regulating a variety of proteins including HIF. Until 2005, only a single agent high dose interleukin 2 was approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. More recently thanks to better knowledge in the field of molecular biology new treatment options appeared. Sunitinib and bevacizumab are currently considered to be treatment of first choice for patients in good and intermediate prognostic group and sorafenib is preferred second line treatment in the same patient population pretreated with cytokines after disease progression. Temsirolimus and everolimus, rapamycin analouges, have recently been tested in III trials in first and second line treatment in patients with advanced metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma. (author)

  4. Optimising the use of mTOR inhibitors in renal transplantation.

    Russ, Graeme R

    2013-11-20

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure. Although advances in immunosuppression have led to improvements in short-term outcomes, graft survival beyond 5 to 10 years has not improved. One of the major causes of late renal allograft failure is chronic allograft nephropathy, a component of which is nephrotoxicity from the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). In addition, premature patient death is a major limitation of renal transplantation and the major causes are cancer, cardiovascular disease and infection. CNI-free immunosuppressive regimens based on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have been trial led over the last few years and have defined the rational use of these agents. Conversion from a CNI-based to an mTOR-inhibitor-based regimen has been successful at improving renal function for a number of years after conversion, although long-term survival outcomes are still awaited. The studies suggest that the safest and most effective time to convert is between 1 and 6 months after transplant. In addition, mTOR-inhibitor-based regimens have been shown to be associated with lower rates of post-transplant malignancy and less cytomegalovirus infection, which may add further to the appeal of this approach.

  5. Structure-function similarities between a plant receptor-like kinase and the human interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4.

    Klaus-Heisen, Dörte; Nurisso, Alessandra; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, Anna; Mbengue, Malick; Camut, Sylvie; Timmers, Ton; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Imberty, Anne; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie V

    2011-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has previously shown that plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are monophyletic with respect to the kinase domain and share an evolutionary origin with the animal interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase/Pelle-soluble kinases. The lysin motif domain-containing receptor-like kinase-3 (LYK3) of the legume Medicago truncatula shows 33% amino acid sequence identity with human IRAK-4 over the kinase domain. Using the structure of this animal kinase as a template, homology modeling revealed that the plant RLK contains structural features particular to this group of kinases, including the tyrosine gatekeeper and the N-terminal extension α-helix B. Functional analysis revealed the importance of these conserved features for kinase activity and suggests that kinase activity is essential for the biological role of LYK3 in the establishment of the root nodule nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia bacteria. The kinase domain of LYK3 has dual serine/threonine and tyrosine specificity, and mass spectrometry analysis identified seven serine, eight threonine, and one tyrosine residue as autophosphorylation sites in vitro. Three activation loop serine/threonine residues are required for biological activity, and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Thr-475 is the prototypical phosphorylated residue that interacts with the conserved arginine in the catalytic loop, whereas Ser-471 and Thr-472 may be secondary sites. A threonine in the juxtamembrane region and two threonines in the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain are important for biological but not kinase activity. We present evidence that the structure-function similarities that we have identified between LYK3 and IRAK-4 may be more widely applicable to plant RLKs in general.

  6. In vitro antiglioma action of indomethacin is mediated via AMP-activated protein kinase/mTOR complex 1 signalling pathway.

    Pantovic, Aleksandar; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Arsikin, Katarina; Kosic, Milica; Mandic, Milos; Ristic, Biljana; Tosic, Jelena; Grujicic, Danica; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Micic, Nikola; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the role of the intracellular energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the in vitro antiglioma effect of the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin. Indomethacin was more potent than COX inhibitors diclofenac, naproxen, and ketoprofen in reducing the viability of U251 human glioma cells. Antiglioma effect of the drug was associated with p21 increase and G 2 M cell cycle arrest, as well as with oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation, and the induction of apoptosis. Indomethacin increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and its targets Raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and reduced the phosphorylation of mTOR and mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) substrates p70S6 kinase and PRAS40 (Ser183). AMPK knockdown by RNA interference, as well as the treatment with the mTORC1 activator leucine, prevented indomethacin-mediated mTORC1 inhibition and cytotoxic action, while AMPK activators metformin and AICAR mimicked the effects of the drug. AMPK activation by indomethacin correlated with intracellular ATP depletion and increase in AMP/ATP ratio, and was apparently independent of COX inhibition or the increase in intracellular calcium. Finally, the toxicity of indomethacin towards primary human glioma cells was associated with the activation of AMPK/Raptor/ACC and subsequent suppression of mTORC1/S6K. By demonstrating the involvement of AMPK/mTORC1 pathway in the antiglioma action of indomethacin, our results support its further exploration in glioma therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PRAS40 and PRR5-like protein are new mTOR interactors that regulate apoptosis

    Thedieck, Kathrin; Polak, Pazit; Kim, Man Lyang; Molle, Klaus D; Cohen, Adiel; Jenö, Paul; Arrieumerlou, Cécile; Hall, Michael N

    2007-01-01

    TOR (Target of Rapamycin) is a highly conserved protein kinase and a central controller of cell growth. TOR is found in two functionally and structurally distinct multiprotein complexes termed TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). In the present study, we developed a two-dimensional

  8. mTOR pathway is activated in endothelial cells from patients with Takayasu arteritis and is modulated by serum immunoglobulin G.

    Hadjadj, Jérôme; Canaud, Guillaume; Mirault, Tristan; Samson, Maxime; Bruneval, Patrick; Régent, Alexis; Goulvestre, Claire; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc; Terrier, Benjamin

    2018-06-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) and GCA are large-vessel vasculitides characterized by vascular remodelling involving endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has been involved in vascular remodelling. We hypothesized that the mTOR pathway was involved in the pathogenesis of large-vessel vasculitis. We used IF analysis on aortic and temporal artery biopsies from patients with TA and GCA to assess the involvement of the mTOR pathway and searched for antibodies targeting ECs in serum by IIF and cellular ELISA. We evaluated in vitro the effect of purified IgG from patients on mTOR pathway activation and cell proliferation. IF analyses on tissues revealed that both mTORC1 and mTORC2 are activated specifically in ECs from TA pa