WorldWideScience

Sample records for reproductive decline effects

  1. Decline in child marriage and changes in its effect on reproductive outcomes in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, S M Mostafa

    2012-09-01

    This paper explores the decline in child marriage and changes in its effect on reproductive outcomes of Bangladeshi women, using the 2007 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey data. Chi-square tests, negative binomial Poisson regression and binary logistic regression were performed in analyzing the data. Overall, 82% of women aged 20-49 years were married-off before 18 years of age, and 63% of the marriages took place before 16 years of age. The incidence of child marriage was significantly less among the young women aged 20-24 years compared to their older counterparts. Among others, women's education appeared as the most significant single determinant of child marriage as well as decline in child marriage. Findings revealed that, after being adjusted for sociodemographic factors, child marriage compared to adult marriage appeared to be significantly associated with lower age at first birth (OR=0.81, 95% CI=76-0.86), higher fertility (IRR=1.45, 95% WCI=1.35-1.55), increased risk of child mortality (IRR=1.64, 95% WCI=1.44-1.87), decreased risk of contraceptive-use before any childbirths (OR=0.56, 95% CI=0.50-0.63), higher risk of giving three or more childbirth (OR=3.94, 95% CI=3.38-4.58), elevated risk of unplanned pregnancies (OR=1.21, 95% CI=1.02-1.45), increased risk of pregnancy termination (OR=1.16, 95% CI=1.00-1.34), and higher risk of the use of any current contraceptive method (OR=1.20, 95% CI=1.06-1.35). Increased enforcement of existing policies is crucial for the prevention of child marriage. Special programmes should be undertaken to keep girls in school for longer period to raise the age of females at first marriage in Bangladesh and thereby reduce the adverse reproductive outcomes.

  2. Effect of aging on the female reproductive system: evidence for a role of uterine senescence in the decline in female fecundity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, F; Simón, C; Remohí, J; Pellicer, A

    1995-09-01

    To determine the effects of age on reproductive performance of women using oocyte donation as an in vivo model. Oocyte donation and IVF programs at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad. Seventy-six women undergoing 90 cycles of ovum donation, who were recipients of 36 donors undergoing IVF, and 9 fertile women. Prospective longitudinal study: [1] recipients underwent an artificial cycle to demonstrate adequate response of the endometrium to exogenous steroids; [2] oocytes from the same cohort of follicles were distributed randomly into recipients younger and older than 40 years; and [3] pregnancies were followed during the first trimester. Endometrial histology, fertilization, embryo quality, pregnancy, implantation, and abortion rates in both groups of recipients. Serum E2, P and beta-hCG levels during initial pregnancy. Similar implantation rates but significantly higher abortion rates were detected in women > 40 years despite an appropriate action of P on the endometrium and the transfer of embryos in similar number and quality. The secretion of E2 and P by the placenta started earlier in pregnancies included in the group < 40 years. Age increases pregnancy losses in ovum donation patients after implantation is completed. This is accompanied by a retardation of steroid synthesis and suggests that the mechanism(s) responsible for placenta formation and functioning in the uterus is affected by age. Thus, uterine aging also is a factor influencing the poor reproductive performance of women with advancing age.

  3. Date and parental quality effects in the seasonal decline in reproductive performance of the Tree Swallow Tachycineta bicolor: Interpreting results in light of potential experimental bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardrop, S.L.; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    In many bird species early breeders have higher reproductive performance than late breeders from the same population. This could be caused by a reduction in environmental factors related to date per se (Date Hypothesis), or because poorer performers nest later (Parent Quality Hypothesis). We manipul

  4. Mathematical modelling of decline in follicle pool during female reproductive ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilagam, Alagu

    2016-03-01

    The factors which govern the subtle links between follicle loss and mammalian female reproductive ageing remain unclear despite extensive studies undertaken to understand the critical physiological and biochemical mechanisms that underly the accelerated decline in follicle numbers in women older than 37 years. It is not certain whether there is a sole control by the ovary or whether other factors which affect ageing also intersect with the ovarian effect. There is convincing experimental evidence for an interplay of several processes that seem to influence the follicle loss-female reproductive ageing links, with specific hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, anti-Müllerian hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone) noted to play important roles in follicular dynamics and ovarian ageing. In this work, we examine the subtle links between the rate of follicular decline with ageing and the role of hormones via a series of non-autonomous equations. Simulation results based on the time evolution of the number of ovarian follicles and biochemical changes in the ovarian environment influenced by hormone levels is compared with empirical data based on follicle loss-reproductive ageing correlation studies. © Crown copyright 2015.

  5. Female reproductive decline is determined by remaining ovarian reserve and age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Wilkosz

    Full Text Available The early decline and loss of female fertility in humans and other species represents an evolutionary paradox. Despite being born with a vast stock of oocytes, females encounter an exhaustion of ovarian reserve and sterility half way through their natural lives. Female reproductive ageing has been proposed to proceed as an ongoing decline in ovarian reserve, determined by remaining ovarian follicle number. However, despite extensive modelling, the respective contributions of intra-, inter-, and extra-ovarian signalling have not been fully characterised. It remains unclear whether reproductive ageing progresses simply as a pre-determined function of remaining ovarian follicles, or as an age-dependent process in humans. Here, we have analysed ovarian response to hormonal stimulation in women who have undergone surgical removal of a single ovary, in order to investigate the relative contributions of intra-, inter, and extra-ovarian signalling on reproductive ageing. Our data show that in unilaterally oophorectomised women, ovarian response to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH declines beyond levels predicted by a total ovarian follicle pool model of reproductive ageing. Maintenance of ovarian function later in reproductive life, despite the removal of half of the total ovarian reserve, suggests a role for an extra-ovarian age-dependent regulation of reproductive decline. This highlights the need for further work to identify signalling factors that communicate age-related signals between the soma and the germline.

  6. New Zealand University students' knowledge of fertility decline in women via natural pregnancy and assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Nathanael; Rosario, Roseanne; Shelling, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Female fertility declines with age. University students are the group of people most likely to postpone parenthood, yet several international studies have shown that they overestimate their fertility. We designed a questionnaire based on a previous study in Israel, where university students were asked to answer questions related to their awareness of fertility decline in spontaneous and in vitro fertilisation (IVF) pregnancies, and methods they considered would prolong their reproductive lifespan. Our study has shown that New Zealand University students overestimated the rates of pregnancy for both spontaneous natural and IVF pregnancies. Students are mainly aware of the availability of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs), but overestimate their effectiveness. Few students mentioned non-medical or well-being initiatives as measures to prolong parenthood. It is important that university students are aware of the rate of fertility decline in women, as although ARTs can be effective at times, they are not a guaranteed solution to an ageing woman's fertility. New Zealand University students, like other cohorts, overestimated the chances of a woman getting pregnant and predicted the fertility decline to occur much later than it does in reality.

  7. Reproduction and microhabitat selection in a sharply declining Northern Bobwhite population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.M.; Williams, C.K.; Castelli, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) populations have been declining throughout their range, but some of the sharpest declines have been documented in the Mid-Atlantic states. We conducted a 2 year (2006-2007) breeding season (1 May-30 Sep) telemetry study in southern New Jersey to collect baseline data on Northern Bobwhite reproductive rates, and nest and brood microhabitat selection. We located 23 Northern Bobwhite nests, of which 21 were usable for survival analyses. Incubation-period nest survival rate was 0.454 ?? 0.010 (95 CI =0.2800.727). Mean clutch size was 14.2 ?? 0.58 (range 10-19, n = 20) and hatching success was 96.1 ?? 2.0 (range 86-100%, n = 10). The estimated probability that an individual that entered the breeding season would initiate incubation of ???1 nest was 0.687 for females and 0.202 for males. Nest microhabitat selection was positively related to visual obstruction and percentage of litter. Brood microhabitat selection was positively related to visual obstruction, vegetation height, and percentage of forbs but negatively related to percentage of cool season grass and litter. Fecundity metrics for Northern Bobwhites in southern New Jersey appear similar to those reported elsewhere in the species' range. Conservation efforts to increase Northern Bobwhite reproductive success in southern New Jersey should focus on increasing the quantity of available breeding habitat. ?? 2009 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  8. Mortality decline and reproductive change during the Dutch demographic transition: Revisiting a traditional debate with new data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Van Poppel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to classic demographic transition theory, mortality change is the key factor that triggers a decline in fertility. Research on this topic has mostly relied on aggregate or time series data. Since fertility is based on the joint decisions of couples when confronted with specific fertility-childhood mortality outcomes, a focus on the experiences of individual couples is needed. Recently, Reher and Sanz-Gimeno used this approach to analyze individual longitudinal data for the Spanish town of Aranjuez. OBJECTIVE We investigate whether, in a country and in populations characterized by varying cultural and socioeconomic circumstances, family organization, and demographic regimes, the same mechanisms influenced the process of fertility decline as in Spain. METHODS The study uses micro longitudinal data from the Historical Sample of the Netherlands for a period stretching from the last quarter of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th century, and demographic measures identical to those used in the Spanish study to test whether the decline in fertility was triggered by the decline in mortality at the level of the family. As religious groups and social classes differed in their ability to correctly assess the implications of mortality levels, and in their willingness, readiness, and ability to react to these changes by adapting their reproductive behavior, we also compared the effect of mortality decline by the religion and the social class of the couples. RESULTS We observed that childhood survival had clear effects on reproduction, the chances of having another child, and the length of the intervals between births, which indicates that this variable was crucial for fertility decisions. This pattern was especially strong after 1900. There were rather consistent and expected differences in the reactions to the survival of children by social class and religious group. Whereas skilled workers were rather sensitive to the number of

  9. Backcasting the decline of a vulnerable Great Plains reproductive ecotype: identifying threats and conservation priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Thomas A.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Grabowski, Timothy B.; Mueller, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation efforts for threatened or endangered species are challenging because the multi-scale factors that relate to their decline or inhibit their recovery are often unknown. To further exacerbate matters, the perceptions associated with the mechanisms of species decline are often viewed myopically rather than across the entire species range. We used over 80 years of fish presence data collected from the Great Plains and associated ecoregions of the United States, to investigate the relative influence of changing environmental factors on the historic and current truncated distributions of the Arkansas River shiner Notropis girardi. Arkansas River shiner represent a threatened reproductive ecotype considered especially well adapted to the harsh environmental extremes of the Great Plains. Historic (n = 163 records) and current (n = 47 records) species distribution models were constructed using a vector-based approach in MaxEnt by splitting the available data at a time when Arkansas River shiner dramatically declined. Discharge and stream order were significant predictors in both models; however, the shape of the relationship between the predictors and species presence varied between time periods. Drift distance (river fragment length available for ichthyoplankton downstream drift before meeting a barrier) was a more important predictor in the current model and indicated river segments 375–780 km had the highest probability of species presence. Performance for the historic and current models was high (area under the curve; AUC > 0.95); however, forecasting and backcasting to alternative time periods suggested less predictive power. Our results identify fragments that could be considered refuges for endemic plains fish species and we highlight significant environmental factors (e.g., discharge) that could be manipulated to aid recovery.

  10. Backcasting the decline of a vulnerable Great Plains reproductive ecotype: identifying threats and conservation priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Thomas A; Brewer, Shannon K; Grabowski, Timothy B; Mueller, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Conservation efforts for threatened or endangered species are challenging because the multi-scale factors that relate to their decline or inhibit their recovery are often unknown. To further exacerbate matters, the perceptions associated with the mechanisms of species decline are often viewed myopically rather than across the entire species range. We used over 80 years of fish presence data collected from the Great Plains and associated ecoregions of the United States, to investigate the relative influence of changing environmental factors on the historic and current truncated distributions of the Arkansas River shiner Notropis girardi. Arkansas River shiner represent a threatened reproductive ecotype considered especially well adapted to the harsh environmental extremes of the Great Plains. Historic (n = 163 records) and current (n = 47 records) species distribution models were constructed using a vector-based approach in MaxEnt by splitting the available data at a time when Arkansas River shiner dramatically declined. Discharge and stream order were significant predictors in both models; however, the shape of the relationship between the predictors and species presence varied between time periods. Drift distance (river fragment length available for ichthyoplankton downstream drift before meeting a barrier) was a more important predictor in the current model and indicated river segments 375-780 km had the highest probability of species presence. Performance for the historic and current models was high (area under the curve; AUC > 0.95); however, forecasting and backcasting to alternative time periods suggested less predictive power. Our results identify fragments that could be considered refuges for endemic plains fish species and we highlight significant environmental factors (e.g., discharge) that could be manipulated to aid recovery. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  11. Strong families and declining fertility: a comparative study of family relations and reproductive careers in Soviet Ukraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilevych, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the role of family and social relationships in individuals’ reproductive careers during the fertility decline in Soviet Ukraine from around 1950 to 1975. These three decades after the Second World War signified the end of the First Demographic Transition in Ukraine

  12. Dramatic decline in fertility marks changes in reproductive behavior in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A summary is given of data from the 1993-94 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey. Fertility declined from 6.3 births per woman during the 1970s to 4.3 during 1989-91 and finally 3.4 births during 1991-93, which was a 21% decline in a 2-year period. A validation study in the Matlab area confirmed the decline. The decline is attributed to increases in age at first marriage, increases in age at first birth, and, mostly, increases in contraceptive usage. Family planning use increased from 8% in 1975 to 45% during 1993-94. Almost 40% of all contraceptive use was the pill. 8% used sterilization, 5% used periodic abstinence, and 5% used injection. 3% of married relied on condoms for contraception, and 3% practiced withdrawal. Under 2% relied on the IUD or male sterilization. A slight shift has occurred away from permanent methods to spacing methods, which are less effective. This shift is a concern, given that 48% of women reported a desire to stop childbearing. Almost 50% of women reported having heard or seen family planning messages in the month preceding the survey. Under-5 child mortality declined from 180 deaths per 1000 births during 1979-83 to 133 during 1989-93. 60% of children 12-23 months old were fully immunized, which reflects a considerable increase since 1989. Maternal health has not made the same improvements as child health. Almost 75% did not receive any prenatal care, and 96% of births were home deliveries. Under 10% of deliveries were with trained medical personnel.

  13. Cost-effectiveness in reproductive medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Moolenaar

    2013-01-01

    This thesis reports on cost-effectiveness in reproductive medicine. Firstly, we evaluated the methodologic quality of studies in reproductive medicine. Insight into the quality of economical analysis in reproductive medicine is important for valuing the performed studies and to assess whether these

  14. Amphibian declines in the twenty-first century: why we need assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clulow, John; Trudeau, Vance L; Kouba, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Each amphibian species is evolutionarily distinct, having developed highly specialized and diverse reproductive strategies in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. These unique reproductive patterns and mechanisms, key to species propagation, have only been explored in a limited number of laboratory models. Although the development of applied reproductive technologies for amphibians has proven useful for a few threatened species, the real benefit of this technology has been new insights into the reproductive adaptations, behavior, endocrinology, and physiological mechanisms that have evolved over millions of years. As the basic fundamental database on amphibian reproductive physiology has grown, so has the applied benefit for species conservation. In particular, technologies such as non-invasive fecal and urinary hormone assays, hormone treatments for induced breeding or gamete collection, in vitro fertilization, and the ability to establish genome resource banks have all played important roles in monitoring or managing small populations of captive species. Amphibians have the ability to produce a large excess of germplasm (up to 10,000 ovulated eggs in a single reproductive event) that if not collected and preserved, would represent a wasted valuable resource. We discuss the current state of knowledge in assisted reproductive technologies for amphibians and why their extinction crisis means these available tools can no longer be implemented as small-scale, last-ditch efforts. The reproductive technologies must be established early as a key component of large-scale species recovery.

  15. The "amazing" fertility decline: Islam, economics, and reproductive decision making among working-class Moroccan women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Cortney L

    2011-12-01

    Often it is understood that Islam prohibits family planning because the Qur'an does not explicitly address contraception. Public health and development officials have recently congratulated the Muslim world for decreases in fertility given the supposed constraints placed on reproductive healthcare by Islam, while popular culture writers have warned the West of threats by young Muslims if the population goes uncontrolled. This article draws on data collected through interviews with working-class women seeking reproductive healthcare at clinics in Rabat, Morocco, and with medical providers to challenge the link between Islamic ideology and reproductive practices and the correlation among Islam, poverty, and fertility. Morocco, a predominantly Muslim country, has experienced a dramatic decrease in fertility between the 1970s and today. I argue that patients and providers give new meanings to modern reproductive practices and produce new discourses of reproduction and motherhood that converge popular understandings of Islam with economic conditions of the Moroccan working class.

  16. The Role of RFamide-Related Peptide-3 in Age-Related Reproductive Decline in Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Bentley, George E; Kaufer, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive senescence, the point in time when females cease to show estrous cyclicity, is associated with endocrine changes in the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonads. However, the mechanisms triggering this transition are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the top-down control of the transition from reproductive competence to a state of reproductive senescence, we investigated middle-aged female rats exhibiting varying degrees of reproductive decline, including individuals with normal cycles, irregular cycles, and complete cessation of cycles. We identified hormonal changes in the brain that manifest before ovarian cycles exhibit any deterioration. We found that females exhibit an increase in RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3) mRNA expression in the hypothalamus in middle age prior to changes in estrous cycle length. This increase is transient and followed by subsequent decreases in kisspeptin (KiSS1) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) mRNA expression. Expression of RFRP3 and its receptor also increased locally in the ovaries with advancing age. While it is well known that aging is associated with decreased GnRH release and downstream disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, herein, we provide evidence that reproductive senescence is likely triggered by alterations in a network of regulatory neuropeptides upstream of the GnRH system.

  17. Effects of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident on goshawk reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kaori; Murase, Joe; Horie, Reiko; Endo, Koichi

    2015-03-24

    Although the influence of nuclear accidents on the reproduction of top predators has not been investigated, it is important that we identify the effects of such accidents because humans are also top predators. We conducted field observation for 22 years and analysed the reproductive performance of the goshawk (Accipiter gentilis fujiyamae), a top avian predator in the North Kanto area of Japan, before and after the accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that occurred in 2011. The reproductive performance declined markedly compared with the pre-accident years and progressively decreased for the three post-accident study years. Moreover, it was suggested that these declines were primarily caused by an increase in the air dose rate of radio-active contaminants measured under the nests caused by the nuclear accidents, rather than by other factors. We consider the trends in the changes of the reproductive success rates and suggest that internal exposure may play an important role in the reproductive performance of the goshawk, as well as external exposure.

  18. Grandparental effects on reproductive strategizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes data from the household registers for two villages in the Nôbi region of central Japan in the late Edo period (1717-1869 to assess how grandparents may have affected reproductive strategizing in stem families. The particulars of the family system fostered a culturally favored set of reproductive goals, in particular, a daughter as eldest child, followed by a son (and heir, coupled with gender alternation in subsequent reproduction and overall gender balance. This reproductive strategy was generally followed during the stem phase of the domestic cycle, when one or both grandparents were present, especially when the family head was in the senior generation. By contrast, a son-first strategy was favored when childbearing began in the conjugal phase of the cycle. This suggests grandparental influence on the junior couple's reproductive decisions in favor of the cultural ideal. I find that the senior couple's decision to marry the heir early or late strongly affects the reproductive strategies followed by him after marriage. I show that when a grandmother is present at the onset of childbearing, especially if she is relatively young, the junior couple ends up with more offspring on average. A controlled analysis of infanticiding behavior is interpreted in terms of conjugal power and coalition formation. It appears that a grandmother gets her way only when she and her son gang up on the daughter-in-law, but such a coalition is likely only when her son dominates the conjugal relationship (which in turn reflects the grandmother's success in binding the son tightly to her emotionally and in delaying his marriage. Otherwise, the grandmother may be shut out from reproductive decision-making by the solidary conjugal coalition.

  19. Reproductive Responses to Economic Uncertainty : Fertility Decline in Post-Soviet Ust'-Avam, Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, David A; Ziker, John P

    2016-12-01

    In the face of economic and political changes following the end of the Soviet Union, total fertility rates fell significantly across the post-Soviet world. In this study we examine the dramatic fertility transition in one community in which the total fertility rate fell from approximately five children per woman before 1993 to just over one child per woman a decade later. We apply hypotheses derived from evolutionary ecology and demography to the question of fertility transition in the post-Soviet period, focusing on an indigenous community (Ust'-Avam) in the Taimyr Region, northern Russia. We employ a mixed parametric accelerated failure-time model that allows comparison of age at first birth, interbirth interval, and reproductive postponement or cessation prior to and following 1993. We find that short-term reproductive delay alone does not explain the dramatic drop in fertility in Ust'-Avam. Age at first birth remains constant. Interbirth intervals increase moderately. The estimated fraction of women who have ceased or indefinitely postponed reproducing doubles (for parities 2 through 4) or triples (for nulliparous women). We caution against assuming that environmental harshness necessarily leads to earlier and more rapid reproduction. An evolutionary theory of fertility responses to acute environmental shocks remains relatively undeveloped. In such contexts it is possible that selection favors a conservative reproductive strategy while more information is learned about the new environment. When investigating fertility responses to environmental stressors we suggest researchers examine postponement and stopping behavior in addition to changes in age at first birth and interbirth interval.

  20. Effects of surface wind speed decline on hydrology in China

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    Liu, X.; Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2013-12-01

    Surface wind speed decline in China has been widely reported, but its effects on hydrology have not been fully evaluated to date. In this study, we evaluate the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology in China during 1966-2011 by using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrological model. Two model experiments, i.e. VIC simulations with the observed (EXP1) and detrended wind speed (EXP2), are performed in the major river basins in China. The differences between the two experiments are analyzed to assess the effects of wind speed decline on hydrology. Results show that wind speed has decreased by 29% of its mean in China, even by 80% for some areas in the northern China. The wind speed decline have resulted in a decrease of evapotranspiration by 1-3% of mean annual evapotranspiration and an increase of runoff by 1-6% of mean annual runoff at most basins in China. The effect of wind speed on runoff and soil moisture is large in the northern basins where small change in hydrological conditions would have significant implications for water management. In addition, Wind speed decline has offset the expansion of the drought area in China. It has contributed to a reduction of drought areas by 21%, 17%, 15% and 12% for the mean drought area in the Songhuajiang River, Hai River, Liao River and Yellow River basins, respectively, and by 8.8% of the mean drought area over China. The effect of wind speed decline on soil moisture drought is large in most basins in China expect for the Southwest and Pearl River basins.

  1. Effect of age on reproductive attributes of an aphidophagous ladybird, Cheilomenes sexmaculata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OMKAR, SATYENDRA K. SINGH; KALPANA SINGH

    2006-01-01

    The effect of both male and female age was investigated on certain reproductive attributes, viz. mating incidence, mating duration, fecundity, percent egg viability, ratio of reproductive and non-reproductive periods and reproductive rate, of an aphidophagous ladybird, Cheilomenes sexmaculata (Fabricius). Females started mating at the age of 8 hours post-emergence (PE) and males at the age of 2 days PE. Mating in the laboratory was a maledominated phenomenon. The mating duration and reproductive rate of 10-day-old females when mated with males of varying ages increased up to the male age of 60 days, and thereafter decreased, whereas, fecundity, egg viability and ratio of reproductive and non-reproductive periods increased up to the male age of 50 days, and thereafter declined. However, when females of varying ages were mated with 10-day-old males, fecundity and reproductive rate increased up to 40 days of female age, respectively, then decreased. The ratio of reproductive and non-reproductive periods increased with increasing age of females. Mating age for optimal reproductive output was 10-50-day-old males and NE to 40-day-old females.Reproductive cessation in males was recorded after 50 days PE, whereas in females at the age of 40 days PE. Higher mating durations lead to elevated reproductive rates. Delay in the reproductive phase was positively correlated with longevity. The results of this study may aid mass multiplication of this ladybird by identifying and promoting usage of adults of optimal age. Our results also enhance our understanding of the effect of age on reproductive attributes in ladybirds.

  2. A greater decline in female facial attractiveness during middle age reflects women’s loss of reproductive value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eMaestripieri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Facial attractiveness represents an important component of an individual’s overall attractiveness as a potential mating partner. Perceptions of facial attractiveness are expected to vary with age-related changes in health, reproductive value, and power. In this study, we investigated perceptions of facial attractiveness, power, and personality in two groups of women of pre- and post-menopausal ages (35-50 years and 51-65 years, respectively and two corresponding groups of men. We tested three hypotheses: 1 that perceived facial attractiveness would be lower for older than for younger men and women; 2 that the age-related reduction in facial attractiveness would be greater for women than for men; and 3 that for men, there would be a larger increase in perceived power at older ages. Eighty facial stimuli were rated by 60 (30 male, 30 female middle-aged women and men using online surveys. Our three main hypotheses were supported by the data. Consistent with sex differences in mating strategies, the greater age-related decline in female facial attractiveness was driven by male respondents, while the greater age-related increase in male perceived power was driven by female respondents. In addition, we found evidence that some personality ratings were correlated with perceived attractiveness and power ratings. The results of this study are consistent with evolutionary theory and with previous research showing that faces can provide important information about characteristics that men and women value in a potential mating partner such as their health, reproductive value, and power or possession of resources.

  3. Effect of electromagnetic waves on human reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowiak, Artur; Mazurek, Paweł A; Wdowiak, Anita; Bojar, Iwona

    2017-03-31

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitting from the natural environment, as well as from the use of industrial and everyday appliances, constantly influence the human body. The effect of this type of energy on living tissues may exert various effects on their functioning, although the mechanisms conditioning this phenomenon have not been fully explained. It may be expected that the interactions between electromagnetic radiation and the living organism would depend on the amount and parameters of the transmitted energy and type of tissue exposed. Electromagnetic waves exert an influence on human reproduction by affecting the male and female reproductive systems, the developing embryo, and subsequently, the foetus. Knowledge concerning this problem is still being expanded; however, all the conditionings of human reproduction still remain unknown. The study presents the current state of knowledge concerning the problem, based on the latest scientific reports.

  4. IMAP Statement on safeguarding reproductive rights in the face of declining fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellier, Siri

    of population ageing, and its consequent effects on lower economic productivity and escalating costs for medical care for older people. Some argue that birth rates must be stimulated to increase again. A few have begun to question the legitimacy of contraception and parenthood by choice, as well as challenging...

  5. IMAP Statement on safeguarding reproductive rights in the face of declining fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellier, Siri

    This Statement has been prepared by the International Medical Advisory Panel (IMAP) and was approved in November 2016. Profound changes in demographic patterns are taking place globally. Birth rates are falling in most countries around the world. Many governments are concerned about the impact...... of population ageing, and its consequent effects on lower economic productivity and escalating costs for medical care for older people. Some argue that birth rates must be stimulated to increase again. A few have begun to question the legitimacy of contraception and parenthood by choice, as well as challenging...... the principle of gender equality. This concern may also result in reduced focus on ‘the other side of the story’, namely that 225 million women who wish to avoid or delay pregnancy are not using modern contraception. Such restrictive approaches contravene people’s right to “reproduce and the freedom to decide...

  6. Multiple stressor effects in relation to declining amphibian populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This book represents the work of several authors who participated in the symposium entitled 'Multiple Stressor Effects in Relation to Declining Amphibian Populations' convened 16-17 April, 2002, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Declines of amphibian populations of varying severity have been observed for many years, and in the last 8 to 10 years considerable progress has been made in documenting the status and distribution of a range of amphibian species. Habitat alteration and destruction are likely linked to many amphibian declines, but a variety of other factors, both anthropogenic and natural, have been observed or proposed to have caused declines or extinctions of amphibian populations. Unfortunately, determining the environmental causes for the decline of many species has proven difficult. The goals of this symposium were three-fold. First, highlight ASTM's historic role in providing a forum for the standardization of amphibian toxicity test methods and the characterization of adverse effects potentially associated with chemical stressors. Second, demonstrate through case studies the current state of technical 'tools' available to biologists, ecologists, environmental scientists and natural resource professionals for assessing amphibian populations exposed to various environmental stressors. And third, characterize a process that brings a range of interdisciplinary technical and management tools to the tasks of causal analysis, especially as those relate to a multiple stressor risk assessment 'mind-set.' As part of the symposium, scientists and resource management professionals from diverse fields including ecotoxicology and chemistry, ecology and field biology, conservation biology, and natural resource management and policy contributed oral presentations and posters that addressed topics related to declining amphibian populations and the role that various stressors have in those losses. The papers contained in this publication reflect the commitment of ASTM

  7. Effects of sodium fluoride on reproductive function in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongjiang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Junlin; Chen, Xuemei; Ding, Yubing; Wang, Yingxiong; Liu, Xueqing

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) on female reproductive function and examine the morphology of the ovaries and uteri of rats exposed to NaF. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided randomly into four groups of 20: one control group and three NaF treated groups. The three NaF treated groups received 100, 150, and 200 ppm, respectively, of NaF for 6 months via their drinking water, while the control group (GC) received distilled water. The levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone (T), progesterone (P) and estradiol (E2) were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pathomorphological evaluation of the uteri and ovaries was conducted after staining with hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemistry. The rate of successful pregnancy in the NaF-treated groups declined in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of reproductive hormones was significantly lower in the three NaF-treated groups, and the endometrium was damaged. The maturation of follicles was inhibited. In addition, the total number of follicles of all types was significantly lower in the NaF-treated groups. These results suggest that female reproductive function is inhibited by NaF and that exposure to NaF causes ovarian and uterine structural damage. NaF may thus significantly reduce the fertility of female rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Declining densities and reproductive activities of the queen conch Strombus gigas (Mesogastropoda: Strombidae in Banco Chinchorro, Eastern Caribbean, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto De Jesús Navarrete

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Queen conch is a gastropod inhabiting the Caribbean Sea, it represents the second largest fishery after the spiny lobster, but it has been extensively captured in the area. In order to know its population status in Chinchorro Bank, we determined conch density changes and its effects on reproductive activities, between July and November 2009. For this, data on conch density, morphology and reproductive activities were obtained from 15 sites within three fishing zones, and compared with previously collected data (1990, 1992, 1994, and 1997. Data showed that adult density decreased with time, from 10 700ind./ha in 1990, to 198ind./h in 2009. Neither egg masses nor spawns were found and mating was only observed once in July 2009. In July, adult (lip>4mm density in the Southern zone was 23ind./ha whereas in the Northern zone and Central zone densities were 15 and 9ind./ha respectively. In November, density was somewhat higher: Southern zone 96ind./ha; Central zone 39ind./ha and Northern zone had 38ind./ha. In July, mean shell length was 170.80±46.28mm, with a higher median abundance at 180-189mm. In November, higher frequency was 187.63±45.14mm, maximum at 210-219mm interval. For the last 10 years period, mean adult conch densities have diminished in each zone, which might be the main cause of decreased reproductive activities of the conch at Banco Chinchorro. It is therefore an immediate need to analyse the management plan for this species in this Reserve and perhaps to promote a re-population of queen conch and culture activities. Rev. Biol. Trop. 61 (4: 1671-1679. Epub 2013 December 01.

  9. Stress and its effects on horses reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Amal M. AboEl-Maaty

    2011-01-01

    A total of 90 mares and horses were subjected to blood sampling for determining the effect of management (farm), reproductive condition, sex, age, breed and month of the year during breeding on circulating levels of cortisol and sex hormones. Blood samples were collected from December to the following June from four farms. Blood sera underwent testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol assaying using ELISA kits. Cortisol levels were significantly low in lactating mares during their fo...

  10. Effect of APOE and CD33 on Cognitive Decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Hayden

    Full Text Available An Alzheimer's disease (AD diagnosis is preceded by a long period of cognitive decline. We previously demonstrated increased risk of decline among individuals possessing one or more APOE ε4 alleles together with a family history of AD. The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility that such an increased risk might be due to AD risk genes with small effects in combination with APOE.Participants in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS over the age of 65, who contributed DNA, and had two or more evaluations with an abbreviated version of the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-m were eligible for the study (n = 7451. A genetic risk score (g-score was derived using AD risk genes' meta-analyses data, assigning risk according to the number of risk alleles and summed over all the risk genes. Trajectories of cognitive function were modeled in four groups of Caucasian participants with and without one or more APOE ε4 alleles and either a high or low g-score: APOE ε4-/low g-score; APOE ε4-/high g-score; APOE ε4+/low g-score; and APOE ε4+/high g-score. Post hoc analyses evaluated interactions between individual genes and APOE.Individuals in the APOE ε4+/high g-score group exhibited the greatest cognitive decline over time (p<.0001. This risk appeared to be greater than the sum of the effects of either high g-score or APOE ε4 alone. When gene interactions were individually tested with APOE, a statistically significant interaction with CD33 was discovered (p = 0.04 although the interaction was no longer significant when adjusted for multiple comparisons.Individuals with multiple AD risk genes in addition to having one or more APOE ε4 alleles are at greater risk of cognitive decline than individuals with either APOE ε4 or a high genetic risk score. Among those with one or more APOE ε4 alleles, having one or more copies of the CD33 C (risk allele may further increase the risk of cognitive decline.

  11. EFFECT OF PHYTOADDITIVES ON SOW REPRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rolinec

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytoadditives are characterized as herbal products to use in nutrition to increase the productivity of animals. At present, the really assumed potential of fecundity is 15.0 piglets born alive, 2.4 litters/year, 10% losses and 32.5 piglets per sow/year. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of phytogenic additive in sows feed rations on reproductive efficiency. In control group were 12 sows Large white (between2nd and 5th farrows and in experimental group were the same sows as in control group, but they were on the next farrowing (between 3rd and 6th farrows. Sows in experimental group were fed with the same feed ratio, but with phytogenic additive supplementation.We studied in both groups number of all born, live born and weaned piglets in litter. We found out that reproductive efficiency of sows in control group was: 10.17 all born piglets, 8.67 live born piglets, 8.17 weaned piglets. Reproductive efficiency of sows fed with phytogenic additive was: 13.00 all born piglets,10.67 live born piglets, 10.17 weaned piglets. However we did not find statistically significant effect of the addition of phytogenic additive to the feed onreproductive efficiency of sows between control and experimental group.

  12. Endocrine disruptors and estrogenic effects on male reproductive axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh C. Sikka; Run Wang

    2008-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane [DDT], dioxin,and some pesticides) are estrogen-like and anti-androgenic chemicals in the environment. They mimic natural hormones,inhibit the action of hormones, or alter the normal regulatory function of the endocrine system and have potential hazardous effects on male reproductive axis causing infertility. Although testicular and prostate cancers, abnormal sexual development, undescended testis, chronic inflammation, Sertoli-cell-only pattern, hypospadias, altered pituitary and thyroid gland functions are also observed, the available data are insufficient to deduce worldwide conclusions.The development of intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is beyond doubt the most important recent breakthrough in the treatment of male infertility, but it does not necessarily treat the cause and may inadvertently pass on adverse genetic consequences. Many well-controlled clinical studies and basic scientific discoveries in the physiology,biochemistry, and molecular and cellular biology of the male reproductive system have helped in the identification of greater numbers of men with male factor problems. Newer tools for the detection of Y-chromosome deletions have further strengthened the hypothesis that the decline in male reproductive health and fertility may be related to the presence of certain toxic chemicals in the environment. Thus the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of male factor infertility remain a real challenge. Clinicians should always attempt to identify the etiology of a possible testicular toxicity, assess the degree of risk to the patient being evaluated for infertility, and initiate a plan to control and prevent exposure to others once an association between occupation/toxicant and infertility has been established.

  13. Effects of forest fragmentation on male and female reproductive success in Cestrum parqui (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Ramiro; Galetto, Leonardo

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we evaluate the effects of forest fragmentation on male (pollen removal, pollen load, and pollen tubes) and female reproductive success (fruit- and seed-set) of Cestrum parqui, a self-incompatible, pollination-specialist plant species. We also measure focal individual conspecific density to account for possible density-related effects that could influence the response variables. We calculate an index which incorporates male and female fitness and gives an integrated assessment of overall reproductive success. Forest fragmentation strongly affected the amount of pollen grains on stigmas and number of pollen tubes as well as seed-set, decreasing from continuous forest to small forest fragments, whereas focal individual conspecific density failed to explain any of the variability for the studied variables. Declines in overall reproductive success (i.e. male and female) in small forest fragments are ascribed to decreases in both the quality and quantity of pollination. Self-incompatibility coupled with a specialist pollination system may be particularly important traits determining the negative fragmentation effects observed in C. parqui. Logarithmic regression models described the behaviour of the variables along the fragmentation size gradient, allowing us to detect a threshold below which the effects of fragmentation begin to negatively affect reproductive success in C. parqui. Our results emphasize the importance of evaluating both components of the total plant fitness, as well as including simultaneously several aspects of pollination and reproduction processes when assessing the effects of forest fragmentation on plant reproductive success.

  14. Effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoving, L.L.; Soede, N.M.; Graat, E.A.M.; Feitsma, H.; Kemp, B.

    2010-01-01

    An impaired reproductive performance in second parity compared to first parity sows, decreases reproductive efficiency and, perhaps, longevity of sows. This study aims to quantify the effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity

  15. reproduction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    slow, yet no other field in medicine has integrated new knowledge ... Many countries have introduced tight ethical regulation ... and research, such as human reproductive cloning." Howover ... human pregnancy and birth after embryo donation.

  16. The catastrophic decline of the Sumatran rhino (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni in Sabah: Historic exploitation, reduced female reproductive performance and population viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kretzschmar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The reasons for catastrophic declines of Sumatran rhinos are far from clear and data necessary to improve decisions for conservation management are often lacking. We reviewed literature and assembled a comprehensive data set on surveys of the Sumatran rhino subspecies (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni in the Malaysian state of Sabah on Borneo to chart the historical development of the population in Sabah and its exploitation until the present day. We fitted resource selection functions to identify habitat features preferred by a remnant population of rhinos living in the Tabin Wildlife Reserve in Sabah, and ran a series of population viability analyses (PVAs to extract the key demographic parameters most likely to affect population dynamics. We show that as preferred habitat, the individuals in the reserve were most likely encountered in elevated areas away from roads, in close distance to mud-volcanoes, with a low presence of human trespassers and a wallow on site, and within a neighbourhood of dense forest and grassland patches preferably on Fluvisols and Acrisols. Our population viability analyses identified the percentage of breeding females and female lifetime reproductive period as the crucial parameters driving population dynamics, in combination with total protection even moderate improvements could elevate population viability substantially. The analysis also indicates that unrestrained hunting between 1930 and 1950 drastically reduced the historical rhino population in Sabah and that the remnant population could be rescued by combining the effort of total protection and stimulation of breeding activity. Based on our results, we recommend to translocate isolated reproductively healthy individuals to protected locations and to undertake measures to maximise conceptions, or running state-of-the-art reproductive management with assisted reproduction techniques. Our study demonstrates that a judicious combination of techniques can do

  17. Mortality decline and reproductive change during the Dutch demographic transition: revisiting a traditional debate with new data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, F.W.A.; Reher, D.S.; Sanz-Gimeno, A.; Sanchez-Dominguez, M.; Beekink, E.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND According to classic demographic transition theory, mortality change is the key factor that triggers a decline in fertility. Research on this topic has mostly relied on aggregate or time series data. Since fertility is based on the joint decisions of couples when confronted with specific

  18. Contrasting effects of climate change on rabbit populations through reproduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulima Tablado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Climate change is affecting many physical and biological processes worldwide. Anticipating its effects at the level of populations and species is imperative, especially for organisms of conservation or management concern. Previous studies have focused on estimating future species distributions and extinction probabilities directly from current climatic conditions within their geographical ranges. However, relationships between climate and population parameters may be so complex that to make these high-level predictions we need first to understand the underlying biological processes driving population size, as well as their individual response to climatic alterations. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the influence that climate change may have on species population dynamics through altering breeding season. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a mechanistic model based on drivers of rabbit reproductive physiology together with demographic simulations to show how future climate-driven changes in breeding season result in contrasting rabbit population trends across Europe. In the Iberian Peninsula, where rabbits are a native species of high ecological and economic value, breeding seasons will shorten and become more variable leading to population declines, higher extinction risk, and lower resilience to perturbations. Whereas towards north-eastern countries, rabbit numbers are expected to increase through longer and more stable reproductive periods, which augment the probability of new rabbit invasions in those areas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals the type of mechanisms through which climate will cause alterations at the species level and emphasizes the need to focus on them in order to better foresee large-scale complex population trends. This is especially important in species like the European rabbit whose future responses may aggravate even further its dual keystone/pest problematic. Moreover

  19. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies.

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    Madelon van de Kerk

    Full Text Available Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp.

  20. Amphibian decline: An integrated analysis of multiple stressor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, G.; Krest, S.K.; Sparling, D. W.; Linder, G.; Krest, S.K.; Sparling, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Capturing the attention and imagination of the public and the scientific community alike, the mysterious decline in amphibian populations drew scientists and resource managers from ecotoxicology and chemistry, ecology and field biology, conservation biology, and natural resource policy to a SETAC–Johnson Foundation workshop. Facilitating environmental stewardship, increasing capacity of the sciences to explain complex stressors, and educating the public on relationships among communities of all types motivated these experts to address amphibian decline and the role of various stressors in these losses.

  1. Effects of Training for Reproductive Health of Knowledge of Reproductive Health and Behaviour in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Bahar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a period when physical, psychological and social maturity is achieved. Therefore, reproductive health in adolescence is of great importance.Aims: This study was performed to determine the effects of training for reproductive health and behavior on knowledge of reproductive health and reproductive behavior in adolescents.Methodology: This is a semi-experimental study and included 700 adolescent from the city of Sanlıurfa, Turkey. The participants were selected from volunteers and aged 15-24 years. A questionnaire composed of questions about demographic features and reproductive health and behavior. The dependent variables tested were mean scores of the participants on reproductive health, breast self-examination of the female participants, testicular self-examination and use of condoms by the male participants. The independent variable tested was training for reproductive health. T-test was used to analyze data about dependent groups and Chi-square test (McNemar was used to compare between two dependent groups.Results: The mean age of the participants was 18.80 ± 2.82 years and 51.0% of the participants secondary school graduates. The total score of the participants on knowledge of reproductive health increased from 6.48 before training to 15.80 after training, with a significant difference (p=0.000. While the percentage of the female participants performing breast self-examination was 22.9% before training, it increased to 71.2% after training, with a significant difference (p=0.000. However, the percentage of the male participants performing testicular self-examination only rose from 14.7% to 29.4% (p=0.000. The use of condoms by the male participants increased from 12.2% to 18.3%, with a significant difference (p=0.000.Conclusion: Training for reproductive health did not only increase knowledge of reproductive health but also promote reproductive health behavior. It can be recommended that nurses should

  2. The effects of juvenile hormone on Lasius niger reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamminger, T; Buttstedt, A; Norman, V; Schierhorn, A; Botías, C; Jones, J C; Basley, K; Hughes, W O H

    2016-12-01

    Reproduction has been shown to be costly for survival in a wide diversity of taxa. The resulting trade-off, termed the reproduction-survival trade-off, is thought to be one of the most fundamental forces of life-history evolution. In insects the pleiotropic effect of juvenile hormone (JH), antagonistically regulating reproduction and pathogen resistance, is suggested to underlie this phenomenon. In contrast to the majority of insects, reproductive individuals in many eusocial insects defy this trade-off and live both long and prosper. By remodelling the gonadotropic effects of JH in reproductive regulation, the queens of the long-lived black garden ant Lasius niger (living up to 27 years), have circumvented the reproduction-survival trade off enabling them to maximize both reproduction and pathogen resistance simultaneously. In this study we measure fertility, vitellogenin gene expression and protein levels after experimental manipulation of hormone levels. We use these measurements to investigate the mechanistic basis of endocrinological role remodelling in reproduction and determine how JH suppresses reproduction in this species, rather then stimulating it, like in the majority of insects. We find that JH likely inhibits three key aspects of reproduction both during vitellogenesis and oogenesis, including two previously unknown mechanisms. In addition, we document that juvenile hormone, as in the majority of insects, has retained some stimulatory function in regulating vitellogenin expression. We discuss the evolutionary consequences of this complex regulatory architecture of reproduction in L. niger, which might enable the evolution of similar reproductive phenotypes by alternate regulatory pathways, and the surprising flexibility regulatory role of juvenile hormone in this process.

  3. Stress and its effects on horses reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal M. AboEl-Maaty

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A total of 90 mares and horses were subjected to blood sampling for determining the effect of management (farm, reproductive condition, sex, age, breed and month of the year during breeding on circulating levels of cortisol and sex hormones. Blood samples were collected from December to the following June from four farms. Blood sera underwent testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and cortisol assaying using ELISA kits. Cortisol levels were significantly low in lactating mares during their foal heat but significantly high levels were recorded in both repeat breeder mares and horses used for racing. High and significant testosterone and estradiol levels were recorded in both stallions used for breeding especially after semen collection and early pregnant mares. Similar testosterone levels were recorded in both early pregnant mares and racing horses but high levels were recorded in stallions. Estradiol was high in both early pregnant and mares with endometritis but the highest levels were observed in stallions. Horses held in private farms had high cortisol levels compared to those of governmental farms. In contrast to mares, horses had low cortisol and high estradiol levels. Cortisol levels were high from April to June (Spring and early summer compared to its levels from December to March (Winter. Arab horses had low cortisol compared to native and imported foreign breeds. In conclusion, environmental condition, exercise, breed, management and the purpose of raising horses all are affecting its cortisol levels.

  4. Temperature is the evil twin: effects of increased temperature and ocean acidification on reproduction in a reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G M; Kroon, F J; Metcalfe, S; Mundayi, P L

    2015-04-01

    Reproduction in many organisms can be disrupted by changes to the physical environment, such as those predicted to occur during climate change. Marine organisms face the dual climate change threats of increasing temperature and ocean acidification, yet no studies have examined the potential interactive effects of these stressors on reproduction in marine fishes. We used a long-term experiment to test the interactive effects of increased temperature and CO2 on the reproductive performance of the anemonefish, Amphiprion melanopus. Adult breeding pairs were kept for 10 months at three temperatures (28.5°C [+0.0°C], 30.0°C [-1.5°C] and 31.5°C [+3.0°C]) cross-factored with three CO2 levels (a current-day control [417 µatm] and moderate [644 µatm] and high [1134 µatm]) treatments consistent with the range of CO2 projections for the year 2100. We recorded each egg clutch produced during the breeding season, the number of eggs laid per clutch, average egg size, fertilization success, survival to hatching, hatchling length, and yolk provisioning. Adult body condition, hepatosomatic index, gonadosomatic index, and plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations were measured at the end of the breeding season to determine the effect of prolonged exposure to increased temperature and elevated. CO2 on adults, and to examine potential physiological mechanisms for changes in reproduction. Temperature had by far the stronger influence on reproduction, with clear declines in reproduction occurring in the +1.5°C treatment and ceasing altogether in the +3.0°C treatment. In contrast, CO2 had a minimal effect on the majority of reproductive traits measured, but caused a decline in offspring quality in combination with elevated temperature. We detected no significant effect of temperature or Co2 on adult body condition or hepatosomatic index. Elevated temperature had a significant negative effect on plasma 17β-estradiol concentrations, suggesting that declines in reproduction with

  5. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen J; He, Hong S; Spetich, Martin A; Shifley, Stephen R; Thompson Iii, Frank R; Fraser, Jacob S

    2013-01-01

    Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition) would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak decline.

  6. Modeling the Effects of Harvest Alternatives on Mitigating Oak Decline in a Central Hardwood Forest Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J Wang

    Full Text Available Oak decline is a process induced by complex interactions of predisposing factors, inciting factors, and contributing factors operating at tree, stand, and landscape scales. It has greatly altered species composition and stand structure in affected areas. Thinning, clearcutting, and group selection are widely adopted harvest alternatives for reducing forest vulnerability to oak decline by removing susceptible species and declining trees. However, the long-term, landscape-scale effects of these different harvest alternatives are not well studied because of the limited availability of experimental data. In this study, we applied a forest landscape model in combination with field studies to evaluate the effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline in a Central Hardwood Forest landscape. Results showed that the potential oak decline in high risk sites decreased strongly in the next five decades irrespective of harvest alternatives. This is because oak decline is a natural process and forest succession (e.g., high tree mortality resulting from intense competition would eventually lead to the decrease in oak decline in this area. However, forest harvesting did play a role in mitigating oak decline and the effectiveness varied among the three harvest alternatives. The group selection and clearcutting alternatives were most effective in mitigating oak decline in the short and medium terms, respectively. The long-term effects of the three harvest alternatives on mitigating oak decline became less discernible as the role of succession increased. The thinning alternative had the highest biomass retention over time, followed by the group selection and clearcutting alternatives. The group selection alternative that balanced treatment effects and retaining biomass was the most viable alternative for managing oak decline. Insights from this study may be useful in developing effective and informed forest harvesting plans for managing oak

  7. Sublethal effects of hexaflumuron on development and reproduction of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Mahmoudvand; Habib Abbasipour; Aziz Sheikhi Garian; Ali Reza Bandani

    2011-01-01

    Effects of hexaflumuron at 10% lethal concentration (LC10) and LC25 on development and reproduction parameters of the diamondback moth,Plutella xylostella (Linnaeus,1753) (Lep.:Yponomeutidae) were investigated.Estimated LC50,LC10 and LC25 values of leaf dip bioassay of hexaflumuron on the third instar larvae of the P.xylostella were 1.48,0.59 and 0.91 mg/L,respectively.Hexaflumuron decreased pupal weight in the parent generation at sublethal concentrations but in the offspring generation,this effect was not observed.Sublethal concentrations increased egg,first and second larval instar and pupa developmental time and shortened life span of adults,but did not change the third and fourth larval instars and pre-pupa developmental period.Also fecundity of females reduced significantly but hatchability of treatments and control were similar.Survival rate of pre-adult stages declined significantly at LC25 concentration.Reproduction parameters such as reproductive rate (R0) and intrinsic rate of increase in sublethal concentrations were significantly lower compared with control,but gross reproduction rate (GRR) at the LC10 concentration was increased and it could be hormoligosis.Also hexaflumuron significantly increased doubling time (Dt).We conclude that the sublethal effects of hexaflumuron might exhibit significant effects on the population dynamics of P.xylostella.

  8. Effects of Chinese opera on the reproductions of Ibsen's plays

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    As part of a globalized phenomenon, the reproductions of Ibsen’s plays on the Chinese theatrical stage increasingly focus upon the exploration and expansion of new cultural forms, as Patrice Pavis defines interculturalism as “grasping the dialectical of exchanges of civilities between cultures”. However, how do we evaluate the effectiveness of the many “intercultural” productions that surround us today? I attempt to answer this question by comparing two Chinese reproductions of Ibsen’s pl...

  9. Effect of electromagnetic field exposure on the reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gye, Myung Chan; Park, Chan Jin

    2012-03-01

    The safety of human exposure to an ever-increasing number and diversity of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources both at work and at home has become a public health issue. To date, many in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed that EMF exposure can alter cellular homeostasis, endocrine function, reproductive function, and fetal development in animal systems. Reproductive parameters reported to be altered by EMF exposure include male germ cell death, the estrous cycle, reproductive endocrine hormones, reproductive organ weights, sperm motility, early embryonic development, and pregnancy success. At the cellular level, an increase in free radicals and [Ca(2+)]i may mediate the effect of EMFs and lead to cell growth inhibition, protein misfolding, and DNA breaks. The effect of EMF exposure on reproductive function differs according to frequency and wave, strength (energy), and duration of exposure. In the present review, the effects of EMFs on reproductive function are summarized according to the types of EMF, wave type, strength, and duration of exposure at cellular and organism levels.

  10. Female reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J; Edwards, Thea M

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...

  11. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Soumya; Chakravarty, A. K.; Singh, Avtar; Upadhyay, Arpan; Singh, Manvendra; Yousuf, Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI) is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The objective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ) (October to March) is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September) and critical HSZ (CHSZ) (May and June). Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate. PMID:27057105

  12. Effect of heat stress on reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Dash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat stress has adverse effects on the reproductive performances of dairy cattle and buffaloes. The dairy sector is a more vulnerable to global warming and climate change. The temperature humidity index (THI is the widely used index to measure the magnitude of heat stress in animals. The bjective of this paper was to assess the decline in performances of reproductive traits such as service period, conception rate and pregnancy rate of dairy cattle and buffaloes with respect to increase in THI. The review stated that service period in cattle is affected by season of calving for which cows calved in summer had the longest service period. The conception rate and pregnancy rate in dairy cattle were found decreased above THI 72 while a significant decline in reproductive performances of buffaloes was observed above threshold THI 75. The non-heat stress zone (HSZ (October to March is favorable for optimum reproductive performance, while fertility is depressed in HSZ (April to September and critical HSZ (CHSZ (May and June. Heat stress in animals has been associated with reduced fertility through its deleterious impact on oocyte maturation and early embryo development. The management strategies viz., nutrition modification, environment modification and timed artificial insemination protocol are to be strictly operated to ameliorate the adverse effects of heat stress in cattle and buffaloes during CHSZ to improve their fertility. The identification of genes associated with heat tolerance, its incorporation into breeding program and the inclusion of THI covariate effects in selection index should be targeted for genetic evaluation of dairy animals in the hot climate.

  13. Female reproductive disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crain, D Andrew; Janssen, Sarah J; Edwards, Thea M;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive disrupti......To evaluate the possible role of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) on female reproductive disorders emphasizing developmental plasticity and the complexity of endocrine-dependent ontogeny of reproductive organs. Declining conception rates and the high incidence of female reproductive...

  14. Low-dose paroxetine exposure causes lifetime declines in male mouse body weight, reproduction and competitive ability as measured by the novel organismal performance assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaukler, Shannon M; Ruff, James S; Galland, Tessa; Kandaris, Kirstie A; Underwood, Tristan K; Liu, Nicole M; Young, Elizabeth L; Morrison, Linda C; Yost, Garold S; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-01-01

    Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that is currently available on the market and is suspected of causing congenital malformations in babies born to mothers who take the drug during the first trimester of pregnancy. We utilized organismal performance assays (OPAs), a novel toxicity assessment method, to assess the safety of paroxetine during pregnancy in a rodent model. OPAs utilize genetically diverse wild mice (Mus musculus) to evaluate competitive performance between experimental and control animals as they compete among each other for limited resources in semi-natural enclosures. Performance measures included reproductive success, male competitive ability and survivorship. Paroxetine-exposed males weighed 13% less, had 44% fewer offspring, dominated 53% fewer territories and experienced a 2.5-fold increased trend in mortality, when compared with controls. Paroxetine-exposed females had 65% fewer offspring early in the study, but rebounded at later time points, presumably, because they were no longer exposed to paroxetine. In cages, paroxetine-exposed breeders took 2.3 times longer to produce their first litter and pups of both sexes experienced reduced weight when compared with controls. Low-dose paroxetine-induced health declines detected in this study that were undetected in preclinical trials with doses 2.5-8 times higher than human therapeutic doses. These data indicate that OPAs detect phenotypic adversity and provide unique information that could be useful towards safety testing during pharmaceutical development.

  15. Reduced quality and accelerated follicle loss with female reproductive aging - does decline in theca dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) underlie the problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Judith H

    2013-12-13

    Infertility, spontaneous abortion and conception of trisomic offspring increase exponentially with age in mammals but in women there is an apparent acceleration in the rate from about age 37. The problems mostly commonly occur when the ovarian pool of follicles is depleted to a critical level with age but are also found in low follicular reserve of other etiologies. Since recent clinical studies have indicated that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplementation may reverse the problem of oocyte quality, this review of the literature was undertaken in an attempt to find an explanation of why this is effective? In affected ovaries, oxygenation of follicular fluid is low, ultrastructural disturbances especially of mitochondria, occur in granulosa cells and oocytes, and considerable disturbances of meiosis occur. There is, however, no evidence to date that primordial follicles are compromised. In females with normal fertility, pre-antral ovarian theca cells respond to stimulation by inhibin B to provide androgen-based support for the developing follicle. With depletion of follicle numbers, inhibin B is reduced with consequent reduction in theca DHEA. Theca cells are the sole ovarian site of synthesis of DHEA, which is both a precursor of androstenedione and an essential ligand for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), the key promoter of genes affecting fatty acid metabolism and fat transport and genes critical to mitochondrial function. As well as inducing a plethora of deleterious changes in follicular cytoplasmic structure and function, the omega 9 palmitate/oleate ratio is increased by lowered activity of PPARα. This provides conditions for increased ceramide synthesis and follicular loss through ceramide-induced apoptosis is accelerated. In humans critical theca DHEA synthesis occurs at about 70 days prior to ovulation thus effective supplementation needs to be undertaken about four months prior to intended conception; timing which is also

  16. Effects of Cow's Milk on Reproduction in ICR Male Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU-XIA MA; NAOYUKI EBINE; KAZUO AOKI; MASAHIRO KUSUNOKI; JUNICHI MISUMI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of Cow's milk on the reproduction in male mice. Methods Twenty-four male mice were divided randomly into two groups: milk group (M) and control group (C). Each mouse was given 10 mL milk per day from 4 to 16 weeks in the group M. At the age of 17 weeks, all the mice were sacrificed. Results Serum testosterone was decreased in the group M (P=0.037). No significant difference was found in weight of testes, seminal vesicle or adrenal gland of mice between the groups C and M. However, the weight of seminal vesicle decreased when expressed in g/100g body weight in the group M. Epididymal sperm concentration, motility, morphology, and sperm head number were not affected by milk. Conclusion Cow's milk has adverse effects on the reproductive system in ICR male mice. Further studies are needed to clarify the specific effects of milk on reproductive health.

  17. Reproductive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008270 Conjugated effects of fluorine and aluminum on the sex hormones of male rats. XIA Shuhua(夏曙华), et al. Dept Clin Lab Sci, Guiyang Med Coo, Guiyang 550004. Chin J Endemiol 2008;27(2):134-136.Objective To observe the combined poisonous effects of fluoride and aluminum on sex hormone of male rats.Methods Sixteen weaned SD healthy male rats aged two week were selected and divided into control group,aluminum group,fluoride group,fluorine-aluminum group,four rats in each group.All rats in the experimental

  18. Maintaining Organizational Effectiveness during Periods of Financial Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Jerry W.; Anderson, Beverly D.

    1989-01-01

    Notes that retrenchment has become part of institutional life for many college and university administrators. Highlights excerpts from relevant literature and presents series of recommendations for use by college and university administrators in mitigating negative effects of budget retrenchment. Concludes that thoughtful preparation for impending…

  19. Effects of Common Equine Endocrine Diseases on Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Teresa A

    2016-12-01

    Endocrine diseases, such as equine metabolic syndrome and pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, are common in domesticated horse populations, and the frequency with which these diseases are encountered and managed by equine veterinary practitioners is expected to increase as the population ages. As clinicians learn more about the effects of these diseases on equine reproductive physiology and efficiency (including effects on reproductive seasonality, ovulation efficiency, implantation, early pregnancy loss, duration of pregnancy, and lactation), strategies and guidelines for improving fertility in affected animals continue to evolve. It is hoped that further research will establish these recommendations more firmly.

  20. Effect of exposure to lead on reproduction in male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piasek, M.; Kostial, K.

    1987-09-01

    The objective of present study was to determine the effect of chronic oral exposure to different levels of lead on male reproductive performance since oral exposure data are more relevant to human environmental exposure. Additionally, most previous results have been obtained after parenteral administration of lead. These experiments were performed on rats by using the incidence of pregnancy to assess male fertility and litter size and pup weight as indicators of the lead effect on perinatal development. Similar parameters were used in reproduction studies by other authors.

  1. The potential effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Tim; Hölzel, Britta K; Lazar, Sara W

    2014-01-01

    With a rapidly aging society it becomes increasingly important to counter normal age-related decline in cognitive functioning. Growing evidence suggests that cognitive training programs may have the potential to counteract this decline. On the basis of a growing body of research that shows that meditation has positive effects on cognition in younger and middle-aged adults, meditation may be able to offset normal age-related cognitive decline or even enhance cognitive function in older adults. In this paper, we review studies investigating the effects of meditation on age-related cognitive decline. We searched the Web of Science (1900 to present), PsycINFO (1597 to present), MEDLINE (1950 to present), and CABI (1910 to present) to identify original studies investigating the effects of meditation on cognition and cognitive decline in the context of aging. Twelve studies were included in the review, six of which were randomized controlled trials. Studies involved a wide variety of meditation techniques and reported preliminary positive effects on attention, memory, executive function, processing speed, and general cognition. However, most studies had a high risk of bias and small sample sizes. Reported dropout rates were low and compliance rates high. We conclude that meditation interventions for older adults are feasible, and preliminary evidence suggests that meditation can offset age-related cognitive decline.

  2. Effects of task complexity on rhythmic reproduction performance in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannarilli, Flora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Iosa, Marco; Pesce, Caterina; Capranica, Laura

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of task complexity on the capability to reproduce rhythmic patterns. Sedentary musically illiterate individuals (age: 34.8±4.2 yrs; M±SD) were administered a rhythmic test including three rhythmic patterns to be reproduced by means of finger-tapping, foot-tapping and walking. For the quantification of subjects' ability in the reproduction of rhythmic patterns, qualitative and quantitative parameters were submitted to analysis. A stereophotogrammetric system was used to reconstruct and evaluate individual performances. The findings indicated a good internal stability of the rhythmic reproduction, suggesting that the present experimental design is suitable to discriminate the participants' rhythmic ability. Qualitative aspects of rhythmic reproduction (i.e., speed of execution and temporal ratios between events) varied as a function of the perceptual-motor requirements of the rhythmic reproduction task, with larger reproduction deviations in the walking task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of propoxur on the reproductive system of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoula, Ferdinand; Watcho, Pierre; Bouseko, Tepi Serges; Kenfack, Augustave; Tchoumboué, Joseph; Kamtchouing, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    The reproductive toxicity of propoxur (2-isopropoxy-phenyl-N-methylcarbamate), a carbamate pesticide, was investigated in adult male Wistar rats exposed to 0, 1.73, 2.6, and 5.2 mg/kg body weight/day for 90 successive days. Results obtained from this study showed a significant (p propoxur (5.2 mg/kg) compared to the control. On the contrary, there was a significant (p propoxur at the dose of 5.2 mg/kg body weight. Propoxur had no significant effect on gestation, fertility and parturition indices, average birth weight, litter size and pups sex ratio of untreated female rats mated with treated males rats. These results suggested that propoxur increased food consumption, relative weight of reproductive and detoxication organs, decreased body weight gain and sperm density per gram of cauda epididymis without affecting the reproductive performances.

  4. Effects of aging on the male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Sezgin; Hekim, Gulgez Neslihan Taskurt; Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Asci, Ramazan

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to discuss the effects of aging on the male reproductive system. A systematic review was performed using PubMed from 1980 to 2014. Aging is a natural process comprising of irreversible changes due to a myriad of endogenous and environmental factors at the level of all organs and systems. In modern life, as more couples choose to postpone having a child due to various socioeconomic reasons, research for understanding the effects of aging on the reproductive system has gained an increased importance. Paternal aging also causes genetic and epigenetic changes in spermatozoa, which impair male reproductive functions through their adverse effects on sperm quality and count as, well as, on sexual organs and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Hormone production, spermatogenesis, and testes undergo changes as a man ages. These small changes lead to decrease in both the quality and quantity of spermatozoa. The offspring of older fathers show high prevalence of genetic abnormalities, childhood cancers, and several neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition, the latest advances in assisted reproductive techniques give older men a chance to have a child even with poor semen parameters. Further studies should investigate the onset of gonadal senesce and its effects on aging men.

  5. 40 CFR 798.4700 - Reproduction and fertility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... testing is designed to provide general information concerning the effects of a test substance on gonadal...,” American Journal of Anatomy. 100:241-267 (1957). (2) Goldenthal, E.I. Guidelines for Reproduction Studies... the Seminiferous Epithelium,” American Journal of Anatomy. 9:507-516 (1956). (5) Roosen-Runge, E.C...

  6. Gender Based Violence and its Effects on Women's Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    and information, education, counselling pertaining to the negative effects of GBV to both males and females. There is need for ... Keywords: physical abuse, sexual violence, forced marriages, Hatcliffe, Zimbabwe .... reproductive age group who are HIV and AIDS positive ...... Khanum N. Forced Marriage, family cohesion and.

  7. Effects of cancer treatment on reproduction and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Janice S; Case, Allison M

    2002-08-01

    (1) To review the effects of cancer treatment on reproduction and fertility in both women and men and (2) to review current and new techniques that could be used to preserve fertility and hormone production in women who have undergone cancer treatment. Entries to MEDLINE and CANCERLIT through to October 2001 were searched for evidence relevant to this article. This document is primarily based on large retrospective cohort series and case reports, as no randomized trials were available. The first part of this review article focuses on the effects of radiation and chemotherapy on reproductive function and innovative medical and surgical techniques employed to minimize these effects. The second part of this article describes conservative methods of managing cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancer for women who wish to preserve their fertility. Over the last decade, there has been a trend toward trying to preserve reproductive function in young patients with malignancy. Information acquired over the last century on the reproductive effects of radiation and chemo-therapy has enabled us to tailor our treatment of various malignancies affecting young patients. As we learn more about the biology and clinical behaviour of gynaecologic malignancies, we are able to modify surgical management to preserve fertility in select cases. All of these trends are in keeping with our goal to optimize quality of life in cancer care without compromising safety or survival.

  8. The effects of oxidative stress on female reproduction: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Ashok

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oxidative stress (OS, a state characterized by an imbalance between pro-oxidant molecules including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and antioxidant defenses, has been identified to play a key role in the pathogenesis of subfertility in both males and females. The adverse effects of OS on sperm quality and functions have been well documented. In females, on the other hand, the impact of OS on oocytes and reproductive functions remains unclear. This imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants can lead to a number of reproductive diseases such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, and unexplained infertility. Pregnancy complications such as spontaneous abortion, recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia, can also develop in response to OS. Studies have shown that extremes of body weight and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and recreational drug use can promote excess free radical production, which could affect fertility. Exposures to environmental pollutants are of increasing concern, as they too have been found to trigger oxidative states, possibly contributing to female infertility. This article will review the currently available literature on the roles of reactive species and OS in both normal and abnormal reproductive physiological processes. Antioxidant supplementation may be effective in controlling the production of ROS and continues to be explored as a potential strategy to overcome reproductive disorders associated with infertility. However, investigations conducted to date have been through animal or in vitro studies, which have produced largely conflicting results. The impact of OS on assisted reproductive techniques (ART will be addressed, in addition to the possible benefits of antioxidant supplementation of ART culture media to increase the likelihood for ART success. Future randomized controlled clinical trials on humans are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanisms

  9. Effect of hypothyroidism on female reproductive hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Saran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Objective was to evaluate reproductive hormones levels in hypothyroid women and impact of treatment on their levels. Materials and Methods: A total of 59 women with untreated primary hypothyroidism were included in this prospective study. Venous blood was taken at baseline and after euthyroidism was achieved for measuring serum free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine (FT3, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, prolactin (PRL, follicular stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, estradiol (E2, testosterone (T, and thyroid peroxidase antibody. Thirty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles without any hormonal disturbances served as controls. The statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 20 ([SPSS] IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: On an average at diagnosis cases have more serum TSH (mean[M] = 77.85; standard error [SE] = 11.72, PRL (M = 39.65; SE = 4.13 and less serum E2(M = 50.00; SE = 2.25 and T (M = 35.40; SE = 2.31 than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 1.74; SE = 0.73, (M = 16.04; SE = 0.84, (M = 76.25; SE = 2.60, and (M = 40.29; SE = 2.27, respectively. This difference was statistically significant t(58 = 6.48, P <0.05; t(58 = 6.49, P < 0.05; t(58 = 12.47; P <0.05; and t(58 = 2.04, P <0.05; respectively. Although average serum FSH(M = 12.14; SE = 0.40 and LH (M = 5.89; SE = 0.27 were lower in cases at diagnosis than after achieving euthyroidism (M = 12.70; SE = 0.40,(M = 6.22; SE = 0.25, respectively, but these differences were statistically insignificant t(58 = 1.61, P = 0.11; t(58 = 1.11, P = 0.27, respectively. Conclusion: The study has demonstrated low E2 and T levels in hypothyroid women which were increased after achieving euthyroidism. Although average serum FSH and LH were increased in hypothyroid women after achieving euthyroidism but this difference was statistically insignificant.

  10. Toxic Effects of Atrazine on Reproductive System of Male Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yang; JIA Zhen Chao; CHEN Jin Yao; HU Jun Xiang; ZHANG Li Shi

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study was designed to evaluate the toxic effects of Atrazine (ATZ) on the reproductive system of male rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ATZ by gavage at dosages of 0, 38.5, 77, and 154 mg/kg bw/day for 30 d. The toxic effects of ATZ to rats were assessed through histopathologcal observation, spermatozoa quality evaluation, testicular marker enzyme indicators, antioxidant capacity and reproductive hormone levels. Results Significant adverse effects on reproductive system were observed in rats exposed to ATZ at different dosages compared with 0 mg/kg group, including an irregular and disordered arrangement of the seminiferous epithelium in 154 mg/kg group;a decreased spermatozoa number and an increased spermatozoa abnormality rate in 77 and 154 mg/kg groups;decreased levels of acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) with the increasing of ATZ concentration; a decreased level of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in a dose-dependent manner, and a decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in 154 mg/kg group;and decreased serum levels of testosterone (T) and inhibin-B (INH-B) and an increased serum level of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) in 77 and 154 mg/kg groups, and an increased serum level of luteinizing hormone (LH) in 154 mg/kg group. Conclusion These results suggested that relatively high doses of ATZ could exert reproductive toxicity of male rats.

  11. Effects of Diabetes Mellitus on Cognitive Decline in Patients with Alzheimer Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Cesari, Matteo; Liu, Fei; Dong, Birong; Vellas, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    Basic and clinical research support a link between diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the relationship with AD progression is unclear. This review focuses on the association between diabetes and cognitive decline in patients with AD. The literature published through May 2015 was searched in 3 databases: PubMed, Embase and Cochrane. Studies evaluating the effects of diabetes on patients with AD or cognitive decline were included, and extracted data were analyzed. A total of 10 articles met the inclusion criteria for review. The results of these studies were inconsistent in terms of the association between diabetes and cognitive decline. Only 2 studies demonstrated that the presence of diabetes was independently related to the progression of cognitive decline in the patients with AD, and 3 studies suggested that histories of diabetes were not correlated with the changes in cognitive function in patients with AD. Half of the included studies even indicated that histories of diabetes were associated with lesser declines in cognitive function in patients with AD. Current evidence indicates that the link between diabetes and cognitive decline in patients with AD is uncertain. Further clinical studies are needed, with larger samples, long-term follow up and an extended battery of cognitive assessments.

  12. Crop type influences edge effects on the reproduction of songbirds in sagebrush habitat near agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly C. Knight

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive fragmentation of the sagebrush shrubsteppe of western North America could be contributing to observed population declines of songbirds in sagebrush habitat. We examined whether habitat fragmentation impacts the reproduction of songbirds in sagebrush edge habitat near agriculture, and if potential impacts vary depending on the adjacent crop type. Specifically, we evaluated whether nest abundance and nest survival varied between orchard edge habitat, vineyard edge habitat, and interior habitat. We then examined whether the local nest predator community and vegetation could explain the differences detected. We detected fewer nests in edge than interior habitat. Nest abundance per songbird was also lower in edge than interior habitat, although only adjacent to vineyards. Nest predation was more frequent in orchard edge habitat than vineyard edge or interior habitat. Predators identified with nest cameras were primarily snakes, however, reduced nest survival in orchard edge habitat was not explained by differences in the abundance of snakes or any other predator species identified. Information theoretic analysis of daily survival rates showed that greater study plot shrub cover and lower grass height at nests were partially responsible for the lower rate of predation-specific daily nest survival rate (PDSR observed in orchard edge habitat, but additional factors are likely important. Results of this study suggest that different crop types have different edge effects on songbirds nesting in sagebrush shrubsteppe, and that these reproductive edge effects may contribute to observed declines of these species. Habitat managers should avoid the creation of new orchard-sagebrush habitat edges to avoid further impacts on already declining songbird populations.

  13. Metformin and male reproduction: effects on Sertoli cell metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teona Albertovna Shvangiradze

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is increasingly becoming the subject of research in other areas of medicine. Apart form antihyperglycemic effect of metformin has an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of various tumor cells both in vivo and in vitro. Metformin is well established in the treatment of anovulatory infertility in polycystic ovary syndrome, while its influence male reproductive function are poorly understood.

  14. Long-term effects of prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances on female reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Susanne Lund; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia; Ernst, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Does prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have long-term effects on female reproductive function?.......Does prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) have long-term effects on female reproductive function?....

  15. Declining trends in conception rates in recent birth cohorts of native Danish women: a possible role of deteriorating male reproductive health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Sobotka, Thomás; Hansen, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings of poor semen quality among at least 20% of normal young men in Denmark prompted us to use unique Danish registers on births and induced abortions to evaluate a possible effect of the poor male fecundity on pregnancy rates among their presumed partners - the younger cohorts of women...... of relatively young couples in the later cohorts. Furthermore, the lower rates of induced abortion among the younger birth cohorts, often viewed as a success of health education programs, may not be fully explained by improved use of contraception. It seems more likely that decreased fecundity because....... We have analysed data from the Danish birth and abortion registries as well as the Danish registry for assisted reproduction (ART) and defined a total natural conception rate (TNCR), which is equal to fertility rate plus induced abortion rate minus ART conception rate. A unique personal...

  16. Declining trends in conception rates in recent birth cohorts of native Danish women: a possible role of deteriorating male reproductive health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.K.; Sobotka, T.; Hansen, Marc Allan

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings of poor semen quality among at least 20% of normal young men in Denmark prompted us to use unique Danish registers on births and induced abortions to evaluate a possible effect of the poor male fecundity on pregnancy rates among their presumed partners--the younger cohorts of women...... of relatively young couples in the later cohorts. Furthermore, the lower rates of induced abortion among the younger birth cohorts, often viewed as a success of health education programs, may not be fully explained by improved use of contraception. It seems more likely that decreased fecundity because....... We have analysed data from the Danish birth and abortion registries as well as the Danish registry for assisted reproduction (ART) and defined a total natural conception rate (TNCR), which is equal to fertility rate plus induced abortion rate minus ART conception rate. A unique personal...

  17. The effect of education and occupational complexity on rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andel, Ross; Vigen, Cheryl; Mack, Wendy J; Clark, Linda J; Gatz, Margaret

    2006-01-01

    We explored the effect of education and occupational complexity on the rate of cognitive decline (as measured by the Mini-Mental State Examination) in 171 patients with a confirmed Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis. Complexity was measured as substantive complexity of work and complexity of work with data, people, and things. Average lifetime occupational complexity was calculated based on years at each occupation. Participants were followed for an average of 2.5 years and 3.7 visits. In multivariate mixed-effects models, high education, high substantive complexity, and high complexity of work with data and people predicted faster rates of cognitive decline, controlling for age, gender, native language, dementia severity, and entry into the analyses at initial versus follow-up testing. These results provide support for the concept of cognitive reserve according to which greater reserve may postpone clinical onset of AD but also accelerate cognitive decline after the onset.

  18. Population genetic variation in the tree fern Alsophila spinulosa (Cyatheaceae: effects of reproductive strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Essentially all ferns can perform both sexual and asexual reproduction. Their populations represent suitable study objects to test the population genetic effects of different reproductive systems. Using the diploid homosporous fern Alsophila spinulosa as an example species, the main purpose of this study was to assess the relative impact of sexual and asexual reproduction on the level and structure of population genetic variation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inter-simple sequence repeats analysis was conducted on 140 individuals collected from seven populations (HSG, LCH, BPC, MPG, GX, LD, and ZHG in China. Seventy-four polymorphic bands discriminated a total of 127 multilocus genotypes. Character compatibility analysis revealed that 50.0 to 70.0% of the genotypes had to be deleted in order to obtain a tree-like structure in the data set from populations HSG, LCH, MPG, BPC, GX, and LD; and there was a gradual decrease of conflict in the data set when genotypes with the highest incompatibility counts were successively deleted. In contrast, in population ZHG, only 33.3% of genotypes had to be removed to achieve complete compatibility in the data set, which showed a sharp decline in incompatibility upon the deletion of those genotypes. All populations examined possessed similar levels of genetic variation. Population ZHG was not found to be more differentiated than the other populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Sexual recombination is the predominant source of genetic variation in most of the examined populations of A. spinulosa. However, somatic mutation contributes most to the genetic variation in population ZHG. This change of the primary mode of reproduction does not cause a significant difference in the population genetic composition. Character compatibility analysis represents an effective approach to separate the role of sexual and asexual components in shaping the genetic pattern of fern populations.

  19. Knowledge of reproductive system cancers, their treatments and side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rot, Irena; Ogah, Imhokhai; Wassersug, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    We explored, via an online questionnaire, knowledge of breast and reproductive system cancers in patients and non-patients who access the internet for information on these diseases. We compared that knowledge to the attention the diseases have received in medical research and on the Internet. Data were collected from 690 respondents (37 % male, 63 % female) about their knowledge of prevalence, lethality, treatments and side effects of testicular, prostate, breast, uterine, cervical and ovarian cancers. Most males, but only half of the female participants, were patients themselves. Although participants showed better knowledge of cancers specific to their own sex, both sexes felt familiar with breast cancer and less aware of other cancers. Women were as aware as men of side effects of treatments for male reproductive cancers. Sex differences in awareness appear to reflect different attitudes towards illness, bias toward females as caregivers, and the disproportionate media attention given to breast cancer.

  20. Linking global warming to amphibian declines through its effects on female body condition and survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, C J

    2007-02-01

    There is general consensus that climate change has contributed to the observed decline, and extinction, of many amphibian species throughout the world. However, the mechanisms of its effects remain unclear. A laboratory study in 1980-1981 in which temperate zone amphibians that were prevented from hibernating had decreased growth rates, matured at a smaller size and had increased mortality compared with those that hibernated suggested one possible mechanism. I used data from a field study of common toads (Bufo bufo) in the UK, between 1983 and 2005, to determine whether this also occurs in the field. The results demonstrated two pathways by which global warming may cause amphibian declines. First, there was a clear relationship between a decline in the body condition of female common toads and the occurrence of warmer than average years since 1983. This was paralleled by a decline in their annual survival rates with the relationship between these two declines being highly correlated. Second, there was a significant relationship between the occurrence of mild winters and a reduction in female body size, resulting in fewer eggs being laid annually. Climate warming can, therefore, act on wild temperate zone amphibians by deleteriously affecting their physiology, during and after hibernation, causing increased female mortality rates and decreased fecundity in survivors.

  1. Explaining the Decline in Mexico-U.S. Migration: The Effect of the Great Recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    The rate of Mexico-U.S. migration has declined precipitously in recent years. From 25 migrants per thousand in 2005, the annual international migration rate for Mexican men dropped to 7 per thousand by 2012. If sustained, this low migration rate is likely to have a profound effect on the ethnic and national-origin composition of the U.S. population. This study examines the origins of the migration decline using a nationally representative panel survey of Mexican households. The results support an explanation that attributes a large part of the decline to lower labor demand for Mexican immigrants in the United States. Decreases in labor demand in industrial sectors that employ a large percentage of Mexican-born workers, such as construction, are found to be strongly associated with lower rates of migration for Mexican men. Second, changes in migrant selectivity are also consistent with an economic explanation for the decline in international migration. The largest declines in migration occurred precisely among the demographic groups most affected by the Great Recession: namely, economically active young men with low education. Results from the statistical analysis also show that the reduction in labor demand in key sectors of the U.S. economy resulted in a more positive educational selectivity of young migrants. PMID:25407844

  2. Surface reproduction of elastomeric materials: viscosity and groove shape effects

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmood, N.; Abu Kasim, N.H.; Azuddin, M.; Kasim, N.L. Abu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of viscosity and type of grooves on surface detail reproduction of elastomeric impression materials. Methods: Express putty/light-, Impregum medium- and heavy/light-bodied and Aquasil medium- and putty/light-bodied elastomeric impression materials were chosen for this study. Five impressions were made using a cylindrical aluminum reference block with U- and V- shaped grooves and to produce 35 master dies. Each master die was immersed in distilled water at 370...

  3. Declining efficacy in controlled trials of antidepressants: effects of placebo dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, S.J.; Undurraga, J.; Tondo, L.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-placebo differences (effect-sizes) in controlled trials of antidepressants for major depressive episodes have declined for several decades, in association with selectively increasing clinical improvement associated with placebo-treatment. As these trends require adequate explanation, we tested

  4. Canagliflozin Slows Progression of Renal Function Decline Independently of Glycemic Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J. L.; Desai, Mehul; Jardine, Meg; Balis, Dainius; Meininger, Gary; Perkovic, Vlado

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition with canagliflozin decreases HbA1c, body weight, BP, and albuminuria, implying that canagliflozin confers renoprotection. We determined whether canagliflozin decreases albuminuria and reduces renal function decline independently of its glycemic effects in a

  5. Declining efficacy in controlled trials of antidepressants: effects of placebo dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, S.J.; Undurraga, J.; Tondo, L.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-placebo differences (effect-sizes) in controlled trials of antidepressants for major depressive episodes have declined for several decades, in association with selectively increasing clinical improvement associated with placebo-treatment. As these trends require adequate explanation, we tested

  6. Combined effect of lung function level and decline increases morbidity and mortality risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baughman, Penelope; Marott, Jacob Louis; Lange, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lung function level and decline are each pre- dictive of morbidity and mortality. Evaluation of the combined effect of these measurements may help further identify high-risk groups. Using Copenhagen City Heart Study longitudinal spirometry data (n = 10,457), 16–21 year risks of chronic o...

  7. Environmental endocrine disruptors: Effects on the human male reproductive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, M F; Hasan, N; Soto, A M; Sonnenschein, C

    2015-12-01

    Incidences of altered development and neoplasia of male reproductive organs have increased during the last 50 years, as shown by epidemiological data. These data are associated with the increased presence of environmental chemicals, specifically "endocrine disruptors," that interfere with normal hormonal action. Much research has gone into testing the effects of specific endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on the development of male reproductive organs and endocrine-related cancers in both in vitro and in vivo models. Efforts have been made to bridge the accruing laboratory findings with the epidemiological data to draw conclusions regarding the relationship between EDCs, altered development and carcinogenesis. The ability of EDCs to predispose target fetal and adult tissues to neoplastic transformation is best explained under the framework of the tissue organization field theory of carcinogenesis (TOFT), which posits that carcinogenesis is development gone awry. Here, we focus on the available evidence, from both empirical and epidemiological studies, regarding the effects of EDCs on male reproductive development and carcinogenesis of endocrine target tissues. We also critique current research methodology utilized in the investigation of EDCs effects and outline what could possibly be done to address these obstacles moving forward.

  8. Quantitative evidence for the effects of multiple drivers on continental-scale amphibian declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H Campbell; Miller, David A W; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Adams, Michael J; Amburgey, Staci M; Chambert, Thierry; Cruickshank, Sam S; Fisher, Robert N; Green, David M; Hossack, Blake R; Johnson, Pieter T J; Joseph, Maxwell B; Rittenhouse, Tracy A G; Ryan, Maureen E; Waddle, J Hardin; Walls, Susan C; Bailey, Larissa L; Fellers, Gary M; Gorman, Thomas A; Ray, Andrew M; Pilliod, David S; Price, Steven J; Saenz, Daniel; Sadinski, Walt; Muths, Erin

    2016-05-23

    Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a "smoking gun" was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we use observations of 389 time-series of 83 species and complexes from 61 study areas across North America to test the effects of 4 of the major hypothesized drivers of declines. While we find that local amphibian populations are being lost from metapopulations at an average rate of 3.79% per year, these declines are not related to any particular threat at the continental scale; likewise the effect of each stressor is variable at regional scales. This result - that exposure to threats varies spatially, and populations vary in their response - provides little generality in the development of conservation strategies. Greater emphasis on local solutions to this globally shared phenomenon is needed.

  9. Quantitative evidence for the effects of multiple drivers on continental-scale amphibian declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Miller, David A. W.; Schmidt, Benedikt R.; Adams, Michael J.; Amburgey, Staci M.; Chambert, Thierry A; Cruickshank, Sam S.; Fisher, Robert N.; Green, David M.; Hossack, Blake R.; Johnson, Pieter T.J.; Joseph, Maxwell B.; Rittenhouse, Tracy A. G.; Ryan, Maureen E.; Waddle, J. Hardin; Walls, Susan C.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Fellers, Gary M.; Gorman, Thomas A.; Ray, Andrew M.; Pilliod, David S.; Price, Steven J.; Saenz, Daniel; Sadinski, Walt; Muths, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Since amphibian declines were first proposed as a global phenomenon over a quarter century ago, the conservation community has made little progress in halting or reversing these trends. The early search for a “smoking gun” was replaced with the expectation that declines are caused by multiple drivers. While field observations and experiments have identified factors leading to increased local extinction risk, evidence for effects of these drivers is lacking at large spatial scales. Here, we use observations of 389 time-series of 83 species and complexes from 61 study areas across North America to test the effects of 4 of the major hypothesized drivers of declines. While we find that local amphibian populations are being lost from metapopulations at an average rate of 3.79% per year, these declines are not related to any particular threat at the continental scale; likewise the effect of each stressor is variable at regional scales. This result - that exposure to threats varies spatially, and populations vary in their response - provides little generality in the development of conservation strategies. Greater emphasis on local solutions to this globally shared phenomenon is needed.

  10. EFFECT OF SIMULATED WEIGHTLESSNESS ON REPRODUCTION OF ADULT MALE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies had mainly focused on thehar mful effects of space environment on human be-ing's muscle,skeleton and blood circulation[1-3].However,the studies concerningthe effects of spaceenvironment on male reproduction are scare.The space environment is complicated,andweightlessness is one of the most i mportant healthrisk factors.Tail-suspension model is widely usedfor si mulated weightlessness in space health re-search[4].Therefore,the present study was designed toclarify the adverse effects of si mu...

  11. Effects of methylmercury on reproduction in American kestrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.; Koterba, M.T.; Rossmann, R.; Link, W.A.; French, J.B.; Bennett, R.S.; Bauer, W.C.

    2007-01-01

    Sixty breeding pairs of captive American kestrels (Falco sparverius) were exposed to a range of sublethal dietary concentrations of mercury (Hg), in the form of methylmercuric chloride, and their subsequent reproduction was measured. Egg production, incubation performance, and the number and percent of eggs hatched decreased markedly between 3.3 and 4.6 mg/kg dry weight of Hg (1.2 and 1.7 mg/kg wet wt), in the diet. The number of fledglings and the percent of nestlings fledged were reduced markedly at 0.7 mg/kg dry weight (0.3 mg/kg wet wt) and declined further between 2 and 3.3 mg/kg dry weight (0.7 and 1.2 mg/kg wet wt). Dietary concentrations of ?4.6 mg/kg dry weight (1.7 mg/kg wet wt) were associated with total fledging failure. The estimated decline in fledged young per pair (24%, Bayesian regression) for kestrels consuming 0.7 mg/kg dry weight (0.3 mg/ kg wet wt) raises concerns about population maintenance in areas subject to high inputs of anthropogenic Hg. Mercury concentrations in 20 second-laid eggs collected from all groups were related to dietary concentrations of Hg, and the Hg concentrations in 19 of these eggs were related to eggs laid and young fledged. Concentrations of Hg in eggs from the highest diet group (5.9 mg/kg dry wt; 2.2 mg/kg wet wt) were higher than egg concentrations reported for either wild birds or for captive birds (nonraptors) fed dry commercial food containing 5 mg/kg methylmercury. Accumulation ratios of Hg from diets to eggs were higher than those reported for feeding studies with other species.

  12. Changes in male reproductive health and effects of endocrine disruptors in Scandinavian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toppari Jorma

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Male reproductive health has deteriorated in many ways during the last decades. The incidence of testicular cancer has rapidly increased in Europe and European-derived populations. Sperm concentrations have declined and sperm motility and morphology have worsened in many areas. Both adverse trends have been shown to be associated with year of birth. Older birth cohorts have better reproductive health than the younger generations. Incidences of cryptorchidism and hypospadias have also increased according to several studies. The reasons for secular trends are unknown, but the rapid pace of the change points to environmental causes. Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been hypothesized to influence male reproductive health.

  13. Effect of zinc supplementation on reproductive performance of Teressa goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Kundu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study evaluates the effect of dietary zinc supplementation on reproductive and productive performance of Teressa goat, an indigenous species of Andaman and Nicobar Islands. Materials and Methods: Eighteen female goats were randomly divided into 3 groups of 6 animals each; (A control with basal ration without any zinc supplementation (B Treatment 1 with basal ration supplemented with 50 ppm zinc oxide (C Treatment 2 with basal ration supplemented with 100 ppm zinc oxide. Different reproductive parameters, e.g. numbers of days to oestrus, the incidence of oestrus, pregnancy rate, kidding rates and weight of kids were recorded. Results: Data indicated that the supplementation of different levels of inorganic zinc oxide significantly increased the incidence of oestrus (33%, pregnancy rate (12%, kidding rate (5% and resulted in shorter onset (8 days of oestrus as compared to the control. The mean body weight and daily weight gain of kids born to supplemented does were significantly (p<0.05 higher than the kids born to control. Conclusion: The supplementation of 50 to 100 ppm zinc oxide to the basal diet of Teressa goat significantly improved different productive and reproductive parameters.

  14. Effect of Vitamin Intake on Cognitive Decline in Older Adults: Evaluation of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, D; Roupas, P

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence from human studies on the intake of vitamins, either as monotherapies or in combination with other vitamins, as neuroprotective agents that may delay the onset of cognitive decline in older adults. Evidence-based methodologies were used to capture and evaluate the highest levels of evidence. The current evidence available showed no association for cognitive benefits of vitamins B6 or B12 as a monotherapy, and recent systematic reviews provide no clear evidence that supplementation with vitamin B6, B12 and/or folic acid improves dementia outcomes or slows cognitive decline, even though it may normalise homocysteine levels. Meta-analyses from systematic reviews have shown an association between low vitamin D levels and diminished cognitive function, although causality cannot be confirmed from the available evidence. There is no convincing evidence for an association of vitamin A, vitamin C or vitamin E either as a monotherapy or in combination with other antioxidant vitamins such as β-carotene and the prevention of cognitive decline. The appraisal of nineteen systematic reviews and meta-analyses has highlighted the heterogeneity between studies, and the need for better consensus on definitions of cognitive decline, duration of testing and agreement on which specific endpoints are clinically relevant. Evaluation of the totality of the currently available evidence indicates that intake of the above vitamins, either as a monotherapy, or in combination with other vitamins, has no clinically-relevant effect on delaying cognitive decline or delaying the onset of dementia in older adults.

  15. Effects of sediments on the reproductive cycle of corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R; Ricardo, G F; Negri, A P

    2015-11-15

    Dredging, river plumes and natural resuspension events can release sediments into the water column where they exert a range of effects on underlying communities. In this review we examine possible cause-effect pathways whereby light reduction, elevated suspended sediments and sediment deposition could affect the reproductive cycle and early life histories of corals. The majority of reported or likely effects (30+) were negative, including a suite of previously unrecognized effects on gametes. The length of each phase of the life-cycle was also examined together with analysis of water quality conditions that can occur during a dredging project over equivalent durations, providing a range of environmentally relevant exposure scenarios for future testing. The review emphasizes the need to: (a) accurately quantify exposure conditions, (b) identify the mechanism of any effects in future studies, and (c) recognize the close interlinking of proximate factors which could confound interpretation of studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of coronavirus infection on reproductive performance of turkey hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Olusegun O; Ali, Ahmed; Elaish, Mohamed; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Murgia, Maria; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Saif, Yehia M; Lee, Chang-Won

    2013-09-01

    Turkey coronavirus (TCoV) infection causes enteritis in turkeys of varying ages with high mortality in young birds. In older birds, field evidence indicates the possible involvement of TCoV in egg-production drops in turkey hens. However, no experimental studies have been conducted to demonstrate TCoV pathogenesis in turkey hens and its effect on reproductive performance. In the present study, we assessed the possible effect of TCoV on the reproductive performance of experimentally infected turkey hens. In two separate trials, 29- to 30-wk-old turkey hens in peak egg production were either mock-infected or inoculated orally with TCoV (Indiana strain). Cloacal swabs and intestinal and reproductive tissues were collected and standard reverse-transcription PCR was conducted to detect TCoV RNA. In the cloacal swabs, TCoV was detected consistently at 3, 5, 7, and 12 days postinoculation (DPI) with higher rates of detection after 5 DPI (> 90%). All intestinal samples were also positive for TCoV at 7 DPI, and microscopic lesions consisting of severe enteritis with villous atrophy were observed in the duodenum and jejunum of TCoV-infected hens. In one of the trials TCoV was detected from the oviduct of two birds at 7 DPI; however, no or mild microscopic lesions were present. In both experimental trials an average of 28%-29% drop in egg production was observed in TCoV-infected turkey hens between 4 and 7 DPI. In a separate trial we also confirmed that TCoV can efficiently transmit from infected to contact control hens. Our results show that TCoV infection can affect the reproductive performance in turkey hens, causing a transient drop in egg production. This drop in egg production most likely occurred as consequence of the severe enteritis produced by the TCoV. However, the potential replication of TCoV in the oviduct and its effect on pathogenesis should be considered and further investigated.

  17. Effects of endocrine disruptors on developmental and reproductive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevini, Tiziana A L; Zanetto, Simona Bertola; Cillo, Fabiana

    2005-03-01

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are exogenous environmental molecules that may affect the synthesis, secretion, transport, metabolism, binding, action, and catabolism of natural hormones in the body. EDs may thus interact with the endocrine system of animals and humans and can exert this effect even when present in minute amounts. EDs have adverse impacts on a number of developmental functions in wildlife and humans. Critical periods of urogenital tract and nervous system development in-utero and during early post-natal life are especially sensitive to hormonal disruption. Furthermore a wide range of hormone-dependent organs (pituitary gland, hypothalamus, reproductive tract) are targets of EDs disrupting effects in adult subjects, possibly resulting in cell transformation and cancer. At present about 60 chemicals have been identified and characterized as EDs and belong to three main groups: (a) synthetic compounds utilized in industry, agriculture and consumer products; (b) synthetic molecules used as pharmaceutical drugs and (c) natural chemicals found in human and animal food (phytoestrogens). In the present review we will give special attention to the family of Polychlorinated biphenyls (also indicated as PCBs) because of their persistence in the environment, ability to concentrate up the food chain, continued detection in environmental matrices, and ability to be stored in the adipose tissue of animals as well as humans. The detrimental effects of these compounds, and of EDs more in general, on health and reproduction will be discussed, presenting experimental data aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in their action.

  18. Effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R J; Pesarini, J R; Mauro, M O; Fronza, L S; Victorelli, S G; Cantero, W B; Sena, M C; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-07-25

    We evaluated the effects of phenylalanine on reproductive performance and teratogenesis in mice, as well as we assessed its protective effect in mice treated with an acute dose of cyclophosphamide. Animals were divided into 6 experimental groups (females N = 15/group, males N = 5/group): G1, the negative control group, phosphate-buffered saline; G2, the positive control group, 35 mg cyclophosphamide/kg body weight (b.w.); G3 and G4 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/ kg b.w., respectively; G5 and G6 received phenylalanine at doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg b.w. co-administered with cyclophosphamide at a dose of 35 mg/kg b.w., respectively. Pregnant mice received phenylalanine from 8-12 days of pregnancy and cyclophosphamide on the 10th day of treatment or the respective vehicles. In animals treated with cyclophosphamide, offspring fetal weight significantly decreased. The G5 and G6 groups, which received cyclophosphamide co-administered with phenylalanine, showed a smaller reduction in weight. Based on this analysis, the offspring from groups G2, G5, and G6 showed low weight due to pregnancy age. Moreover, at the doses used, phenylalanine did not interfere with embryo-fetal development. However, further studies are necessary to increase the understanding of the effects of phenylalanine on mouse reproductive performance and teratogenesis.

  19. Synergistic Effect of β-Amyloid and Neurodegeneration on Cognitive Decline in Clinically Normal Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Assessing the ability of Alzheimer disease neuroimaging markers to predict short-term cognitive decline among clinically normal (CN) individuals is critical for upcoming secondary prevention trials using cognitive outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether neuroimaging markers of β-amyloid (Aβ) and neurodegeneration (ND) are independently or synergistically associated with longitudinal cognitive decline in CN individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Academic medical center longitudinal natural history study among 166 CN individuals (median age, 74 years; 92 women). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The Aβ status was determined with Pittsburgh Compound B–positron emission tomography, while ND was assessed using 2 a priori measures, hippocampus volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18), extracted from Alzheimer disease–vulnerable regions. Based on imaging markers, CN individuals were categorized into the following preclinical Alzheimer disease stages: stage 0 (Aβ−/ND−), stage 1 (Aβ+/ND−), stage 2 (Aβ+/ND+), and suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (Aβ−/ND+). Cognition was assessed with a composite of neuropsychological tests administered annually. RESULTS The Aβ+ CN individuals were more likely to be classified as ND+: 59.6% of Aβ+ CN individuals were ND+, whereas 31.9% of Aβ− CN individuals were ND+ (odds ratio, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.44–7.02; P = .004). In assessing longitudinal cognitive performance, practice effects were evident in CN individuals negative for both Aβ and ND, whereas diminished practice effects were observed in CN individuals positive for either Aβ or ND. Decline over time was observed only in CN individuals positive for both Aβ and ND, and decline in this group was significantly greater than that in all other groups (P < .001 for all). A significant interaction term between Aβ and ND confirmed that this decline was greater than the

  20. Predicting effects of cold shock: modeling the decline of a thermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Trent, D.S.; Schneider, M.J.

    1977-10-01

    Predicting direct impact of cold shock on aquatic organisms after termination of power plant thermal discharges requires thermal tests that provide quantitative data on the resistance of acclimated species to lower temperatures. Selected examples from the literature on cold shock resistance of freshwater and marine fishes are illustrated to show predictive use. Abrupt cold shock data may be applied to field situations involving either abrupt or gradual temperature declines but yield conservative estimates under the latter conditions. Gradual cold shock data may be applied where heated plumes gradually dissipate because poikilotherms partially compensate for lowering temperature regimes. A simplified analytical model is presented for estimating thermal declines in terminated plumes originating from offshore, submerged discharges where shear current and boundary effects are minimal. When applied to site-specific conditions, the method provides time-temperature distributions for correlation with cold resistance data and, therefore, aids in assessing cold shock impact on aquatic biota.

  1. Adverse effects of bisphenol A on male reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfo, Faustin Pascal Tsagué; Jubendradass, Rajamanickam; Nantia, Edouard Akono; Moundipa, Paul Fewou; Mathur, Premendu Prakash

    2014-01-01

    BPA is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, resulting mainly from manufacturing,use or disposal of plastics of which it is a component, and the degradation of industrial plastic-related wastes. Growing evidence from research on laboratory animals, wildlife, and humans supports the view that BPA produces an endocrine disrupting effect and adversely affects male reproductive function. To better understand the adverse effects caused by exposure to BPA, we performed an up-to-date literature review on the topic, with particular emphasis on in utero exposure, and associated effects on spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, and accessory organs.BPA studies on experimental animals show that effects are generally more detrimental during in utero exposure, a critical developmental stage for the embryo. BPA has been found to produce several defects in the embryo, such as feminization of male fetuses, atrophy of the testes and epididymides, increased prostate size, shortening of AGD, disruption of BTB, and alteration of adult sperm parameters (e.g.,sperm count, motility, and density). BPA also affects embryo thyroid development.During the postnatal and pubertal periods and adulthood, BPA affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis by modulating hormone (e.g., LH and FSH,androgen and estrogen) synthesis, expression and function of respective receptors(ER, AR). These effects alter sperm parameters. BPA also induces oxidative stress in the testis and epididymis, by inhibiting antioxidant enzymes and stimulating lipid peroxidation. This suggests that employing antioxidants may be a promising strategy to relieve BPA-induced disturbances.Epidemiological studies have also provided data indicating that BPA alters male reproductive function in humans. These investigations revealed that men occupationally exposed to BPA had high blood/urinary BPA levels, and abnormal semen parameters. BPA-exposed men also showed reduced libido and erectile ejaculatory difficulties; moreover, the

  2. Declination Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Declination is calculated using the current International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) model. Declination is calculated using the current World Magnetic Model...

  3. Direct effects of leptin and adiponectin on peripheral reproductive tissues: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawwass, Jennifer F; Summer, Ross; Kallen, Caleb B

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for infertility and adverse reproductive outcomes. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine gland that secretes a host of endocrine factors, called adipokines, which modulate diverse physiologic processes including appetite, metabolism, cardiovascular function, immunity and reproduction. Altered adipokine expression in obese individuals has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a host of health disorders including diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether adipokines play a significant role in the pathogenesis of adverse reproductive outcomes in obese individuals and, if so, whether the adipokines are acting directly or indirectly on the peripheral reproductive tissues. Many groups have demonstrated that receptors for the adipokines leptin and adiponectin are expressed in peripheral reproductive tissues and that these adipokines are likely, therefore, to exert direct effects on these tissues. Many groups have tested for direct effects of leptin and adiponectin on reproductive tissues including the testis, ovary, uterus, placenta and egg/embryo. The hypothesis that decreased fertility potential or adverse reproductive outcomes may result, at least in part, from defects in adipokine signaling within reproductive tissues has also been tested. Here, we present a critical analysis of published studies with respect to two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, for which significant data have been generated. Our evaluation reveals significant inconsistencies and methodological limitations regarding the direct effects of these adipokines on peripheral reproductive tissues. We also observe a pervasive failure to account for in vivo data that challenge observations made in vitro. Overall, while leptin and adiponectin may directly modulate peripheral reproductive tissues, existing data suggest that these effects are minor and non-essential to human or mouse reproductive function. Current evidence suggests that direct effects of

  4. Men's status and reproductive success in 33 nonindustrial societies: Effects of subsistence, marriage system, and reproductive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rueden, Christopher R; Jaeggi, Adrian V

    2016-09-27

    Social status motivates much of human behavior. However, status may have been a relatively weak target of selection for much of human evolution if ancestral foragers tended to be more egalitarian. We test the "egalitarianism hypothesis" that status has a significantly smaller effect on reproductive success (RS) in foragers compared with nonforagers. We also test between alternative male reproductive strategies, in particular whether reproductive benefits of status are due to lower offspring mortality (parental investment) or increased fertility (mating effort). We performed a phylogenetic multilevel metaanalysis of 288 statistical associations between measures of male status (physical formidability, hunting ability, material wealth, political influence) and RS (mating success, wife quality, fertility, offspring mortality, and number of surviving offspring) from 46 studies in 33 nonindustrial societies. We found a significant overall effect of status on RS (r = 0.19), though this effect was significantly lower than for nonhuman primates (r = 0.80). There was substantial variation due to marriage system and measure of RS, in particular status associated with offspring mortality only in polygynous societies (r = -0.08), and with wife quality only in monogamous societies (r = 0.15). However, the effects of status on RS did not differ significantly by status measure or subsistence type: foraging, horticulture, pastoralism, and agriculture. These results suggest that traits that facilitate status acquisition were not subject to substantially greater selection with domestication of plants and animals, and are part of reproductive strategies that enhance fertility more than offspring well-being.

  5. Effect of Rearing Systems on Reproductive Performance of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M AnnaAnandh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of rearing systems on reproductive performance of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo. A total of 180 Beltsville Small White and Board Breasted Bronze turkeys were taken for the study and reared under three different rearing system viz. intensive system (full confinement, semi-intensive system (partial confinement and partial day scavenging and free range system (all-day scavenging. Average egg weight (g, percentage of infertile eggs, embryonic mortalities, total egg hatchability, fertile egg hatchability, fertility and poults survivability values were significantly (P>0.01 higher in turkeys reared under intensive system of management followed by semi intensive system and free range system of management. The highest percentage of dead in shell was found in intensive system and was did not differ significantly from semi intensive and free range system. Hatched weight of poults (g between semi intensive and intensive system did not differ significantly between them, but both groups found statistically significant (P>0.01 from free range system. From the study, it is concluded that higher reproductive performance was obtained in intensive system of management followed by semi intensive and free range system of management. [Vet. World 2012; 5(4.000: 226-229

  6. Effect of pharmacotherapy on rate of decline of lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: results from the TORCH study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celli, Bartolomé R; Thomas, Nicola E; Anderson, Julie A

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an accelerated decline in lung function. No drug has been shown conclusively to reduce this decline. OBJECTIVES: In a post hoc analysis of the Toward a Revolution in COPD Health (TORCH) study, we investigated the effects...

  7. Age-related decline in forest production: modelling the effects of growth limitation, neighbourhood competition and self-thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, U.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Grimm, V.

    2004-01-01

    1 In growing forest stands, above-ground net primary production peaks early in stand development and then declines. The causes for this decline are not yet well understood, but hypotheses include physiological and ecophysiological effects, as well as changes in stand structure due to local competiti

  8. Laterally wedged insoles in knee osteoarthritis: do biomechanical effects decline after one month of wear?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennell Kim L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study aimed to determine whether the effect of laterally wedged insoles on the adduction moment in knee osteoarthritis (OA declined after one month of wear, and whether higher reported use of insoles was associated with a reduced effect on the adduction moment at one month. Methods Twenty people with medial compartment OA underwent gait analysis in their own shoes wearing i no insoles and; ii insoles wedged laterally 5° in random order. Testing occurred at baseline and after one month of use of the insoles. Participants recorded daily use of insoles in a log-book. Outcomes were the first and second peak external knee adduction moment and the adduction angular impulse, compared across conditions and time with repeated measures general linear models. Correlations were obtained between total insole use and change in gait parameters with used insoles at one month, and change scores were compared between high and low users of insoles using general linear models. Results There was a significant main effect for condition, whereby insoles significantly reduced the adduction moment (all p Conclusion Effects of laterally wedged insoles on the adduction moment do not appear to decline after one month of continuous use, suggesting that significant wedge degradation does not occur over the short-term.

  9. Effect of electromagnetic field exposure on the reproductive system

    OpenAIRE

    Gye, Myung Chan; Park, Chan Jin

    2012-01-01

    The safety of human exposure to an ever-increasing number and diversity of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources both at work and at home has become a public health issue. To date, many in vivo and in vitro studies have revealed that EMF exposure can alter cellular homeostasis, endocrine function, reproductive function, and fetal development in animal systems. Reproductive parameters reported to be altered by EMF exposure include male germ cell death, the estrous cycle, reproductive endocrine h...

  10. Egg freezing for age-related fertility decline: preventive medicine or a further medicalization of reproduction? Analyzing the new Israeli policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkedi-Rafid, Shiri; Hashiloni-Dolev, Yael

    2011-08-01

    In December 2009, the Israel National Bioethics Council (INBC) issued recommendations permitting egg freezing to prevent both disease- and age-related fertility decline. The INBC report forms the basis of Israel's new policy regarding egg freezing. This article analyzes the medical section of the INBC's recommendations, comparing it with guidelines formulated by medical regulatory bodies in Europe and the United States. Our findings suggest that the INBC's recommendations consider age-related fertility decline to be a medical problem, and hence treat the new technology favorably, as preventive medicine, which we perceive as another instance of medicalization. The technology's risks are downplayed by the INBC, unlike the positions of medical organizations in both Europe and the United States, which consider the new technology experimental. This may culminate in raising false hopes about women's possible late genetic motherhood leading to involuntary future childlessness.

  11. Effect of Soybean on Male Reproductive Physiology in Male Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Modaresi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Soybean (Soja hispida Moench is a member of Fabaceae family. It is a species of legume native to East Asia. Soy contains significant amount of all the essential amino acids for humans therefore, is a good source of protein .Soy has an important role in the improvement and treatment of some cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of soybeans on reproductive system in male mice. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Isfahan Payam e Noor University in 2009. In this research, 32 male mice were randomly grouped into four experimental groups. The control group was fed with soy-free basic diet. The experimental groups 1, 2, and 3 were fed with a diet containing 20%, 30% and 50% soy diet respectively.At the end of 9 weeks of treatment, blood samples were collected and serum levels of testosterone, LH and FSH were measured. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software using one way ANOVA with Dunnett's post test and Duncan test. Results : In the experimental group which received 20% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful decrease in comparison with the control group (P<0.05, but in the experimental group which received a 50% soy diet, the level of testosterone had a meaningful increase (P<0.05 .The LH level in 30% and 50% groups had a meaningful increase but no significant differences were observed in FSH level & weight of testicles (P<0.05.The number of sperms in all of the treatment regimes had a meaningful decrease (P0.05 Conclusion: Results of this research indicated that the 20, 30, and 50 percent soy diet had a negative effect on the male reproductive system in mice.

  12. Effects of Chinese opera on the reproductions of Ibsen's plays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Leung Che LAU

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As part of a globalized phenomenon, the reproductions of Ibsen’s plays on the Chinese theatrical stage increasingly focus upon the exploration and expansion of new cultural forms, as Patrice Pavis defines interculturalism as “grasping the dialectical of exchanges of civilities between cultures”. However, how do we evaluate the effectiveness of the many “intercultural” productions that surround us today? I attempt to answer this question by comparing two Chinese reproductions of Ibsen’s plays that employ elements of Chinese opera on varying scales. The first one is a total transformation of Hedda Gabler into a Hangzhou yue opera form, Xin Bi Tian Gao (Aspirations Higher than the Sky, 心比天高 in 2006. As part of the yue opera tradition, Hedda Gabler was staged in an all-female cast. The second one is a fragmented insertion of a Peking opera excerpt into the staging of A Doll’s House by the National Experimental Theatre of China in 1998. One of the highlights of the play is a Norwegian actress, who plays Nora, singing and dancing a short Peking opera excerpt, thus replacing the tarantella dance in the original play. Contextualising the multiple perspectives towards interculturalism by Patrice Pavis, Richard Schechner and Rustom Bharucha, I aim to explore how the appropriation of Chinese opera in such performances might strengthen or weaken the reciprocal flows between the source and target cultures in Pavis’s “hourglass model”, and whether the initial attempt of revitalising both Chinese and Western art forms has backfired and misproduced Bertolt Brecht’s alienation effect directed at the contemporary audience.

  13. Toxic effects of bisphenol A on sexual and asexual reproduction in Hydra oligactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhori, N; Kitano, M; Kimura, H

    2005-05-01

    Hydra oligactis, an evolutionarily primitive invertebrate, produced eggs or testes (sexual reproduction) when starved at 10 degrees C, and produced buds (asexual reproduction) when fed at 20 degrees C. Bisphenol A (BPA) at 2-4 mg/L given to male or female hydra had adverse effects on both sexual and asexual reproduction. Despite the estrogenic nature of BPA, testis formation and egg formation were similarly affected. The doses causing these acute toxicities were comparable to those reported earlier in aquatic invertebrates and were much higher than environmentally detected doses, at which the disruption of the endocrine system has been reported in fishes. All these facts indicate that the adverse effects are the results of general toxicity and may not be due to the estrogenic function of the compound. On the other hand, we found that BPA at 1 mg/L (a dose still much higher than environmental doses) stimulated asexual reproduction. No such stimulation of sexual reproduction was seen. When male hydras were fed at 10 degrees C, they produced both buds and testes simultaneously. BPA at 0.5 and 1 mg/L under this condition also stimulated asexual reproduction, whereas it suppressed sexual reproduction more severely than BPA at 2-3 mg/L. There may be some interaction between processes involved in sexual and asexual reproduction under this condition, and the stimulation of asexual reproduction by BPA may cause suppression of sexual reproduction.

  14. Boosting beauty in an economic decline: mating, spending, and the lipstick effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; Rodeheffer, Christopher D; Griskevicius, Vladas; Durante, Kristina; White, Andrew Edward

    2012-08-01

    Although consumer spending typically declines in economic recessions, some observers have noted that recessions appear to increase women's spending on beauty products--the so-called lipstick effect. Using both historical spending data and rigorous experiments, the authors examine how and why economic recessions influence women's consumer behavior. Findings revealed that recessionary cues--whether naturally occurring or experimentally primed--decreased desire for most products (e.g., electronics, household items). However, these cues consistently increased women's desire for products that increase attractiveness to mates--the first experimental demonstration of the lipstick effect. Additional studies show that this effect is driven by women's desire to attract mates with resources and depends on the perceived mate attraction function served by these products. In addition to showing how and why economic recessions influence women's desire for beauty products, this research provides novel insights into women's mating psychology, consumer behavior, and the relationship between the two.

  15. The declining effect of sibling size on children's education in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Costa Rica experienced a dramatic fertility decline in the 1960s and 1970s. The same period saw substantial improvement in children's educational attainment in Costa Rica. This correlation is consistent with household-level quantity-quality tradeoffs, but prior research on quantity-quality tradeoff magnitudes is mixed, and little research has estimated quantity-quality tradeoff behaviors in Latin America. Objective: This study explores one dimension of the potential demographic dividend from the fertility decline: the extent to which it was accompanied by quantity-quality tradeoffs leading to higher educational attainment. Specifically, we provide the first estimate of quantity-quality tradeoffs in Costa Rica, analyzing the increase in secondary school attendance among Costa Rican children as the number of siblings decreases. Furthermore, we advance the literature by exploring how that tradeoff has changed over time. Methods: We use 1984 and 2000 Costa Rican census data as well as survey data from the Costa Rican Longevity and Healthy Aging Study (CRELES. To address endogenous family size, the analysis uses an instrumental variable strategy based on the gender of the first two children to identify the causal relationship between number of siblings and children's education. Results: We find that, among our earlier cohorts, having fewer siblings is associated with a significantly higher probability of having attended at least one year of secondary school, particularly among girls. The effect is stronger after we account for the endogeneity of number of children born by the mother. For birth cohorts after 1980 this relationship largely disappears. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a declining quantity-quality (Q-Q tradeoff in Costa Rica. This result suggests one potential explanation for the heterogeneous findings in prior studies elsewhere, but more work will be required to understand why such tradeoffs might vary

  16. Effects of education on reproductive behavior: lessons from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, A

    1992-12-01

    Evidence from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 1990/91 (PDHS) and a 1987 study by Zeba A. Sathar and Karen Oppenheim on women's fertility in Karachi and the impact of educational status, corroborates the correlation between improved education for women and fertility decline. PDHS revealed that current fertility is 5.4 children/ever married woman by the end of the reproductive period. 12% currently use a contraceptive method compared to 49% in India, 40% in Bangladesh, and 62% in Sri Lanka. The social environment of high illiteracy, low educational attainment, poverty, high infant and child and maternal mortality, son preference, and low status of women leads to high fertility. Fertility rates vary by educational status; i.e., women with no formal education have 2 more children than women with at least some secondary education. Education also affects infant and child mortality and morbidity. Literacy is 31% for women and 43% for men. 30% of all males and 20% of all females have attended primary school. Although most women know at least 1 contraceptive method, it is the urban educated woman who is twice as likely to know a source of supply and 5 times more likely to be a user. The Karachi study found that lower fertility among better educated urban women is an unintended consequence of women's schooling and deliberate effort to limit the number of children they have. Education-related fertility differentials could not be explained by the length of time women are at risk of becoming pregnant (late marriage age). Fertility limitation may be motivated by the predominant involvement in the formal work force and higher income. The policy implications are the increasing female schooling is a good investment in lowering fertility; broader improvements also need to be made in economic opportunities for women, particularly in the formal sector. Other needs are for increasing availability and accessibility of contraceptive and family planning services and increasing

  17. Effective inhibition of viral reproduction by hydrophobised antiviral antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, A V; Ovcharenko, A V; Melik-Nubarov, N S; Bannikov, A I; Lisok, T P; Klyushnenkova, E V; Cherchenko, N G; Alakhov VYu; Levashov, A V; Kiselev, V I

    1990-01-01

    A method is proposed for the inhibition of viral reproduction in cells by means of fatty-acylated antiviral antibodies which, in contrast to the unmodified antibodies, have the ability to enter the cells. The potential of this technique is demonstrated in experiments involving inhibition of the reproduction of various strains of influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus.

  18. Heterosis and recombination effects on pig reproductive traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, J P; Young, L D; Leymaster, K A

    2002-09-01

    The objective was to estimate breed, heterosis, and recombination effects on pig reproductive traits in two different four-breed composite populations. Breeds included Yorkshire, Landrace, Large White, and Chester White in Exp. 1 and Duroc, Hampshire, Pietrain, and Spot in Exp. 2. Data were recorded on purebred pigs, two-breed cross pigs, and pigs from generations F1 through F6, where F1 pigs were the first generation of a four-breed cross. Litter traits were considered a trait of the gilt. There were 868 first parity litters in Exp. 1 and 865 in Exp. 2. Direct heterosis significantly increased sow weight at 110 d of gestation and litter weight at 14 and 28 d (weaning) in both experiments. Direct heterosis significantly increased number of nipples, weight at puberty, lactation weight loss, litter size, and litter birth weight in Exp. 2. Gestation length in Exp. 1 and age at puberty in Exp. 1 and Exp. 2 were significantly decreased by direct heterosis. Maternal heterosis significantly increased age at puberty in Exp. 2 and decreased sow weight at 110 d of gestation in Exp. 1. Recombination significantly increased sow weight at 110 d of gestation and tended to increase total number born and litter birth weight in Exp. 1. Recombination significantly decreased age at puberty in Exp. 2. Litter heterosis significantly increased number of pigs at 14 and 28 d; litter weights at birth, 14, and 28 d; and tended to increase lactation weight loss in Exp. 1. Litter heterosis decreased litter size in Exp. 2. Maternal heterosis and recombination effects had a sampling correlation of -0.97 in Exp. 1 and -0.91 in Exp. 2 for number of fully formed pigs. Therefore, maternal heterosis and recombination effects were summed, and their net effect was tested. This net effect tended to increase number of nipples, lactation weight loss, and litter birth weight and significantly increased number of fully formed pigs in Exp. 1. Direct, maternal, and litter heterosis and recombination effects

  19. Effect of copper exposure on reproductive ability in the bank vole (Myodes glareolus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miska-Schramm, Agata; Kruczek, Małgorzata; Kapusta, Joanna

    2014-10-01

    The amount of copper in natural ecosystems is steadily increasing, due to human activities. It accumulates in plants, posing a threat to herbivores. In polluted areas the population density of small rodents is observed to be lower. The decline in rodent numbers may be caused by increased mortality or diminished fertility. This study examined the effect of copper on the reproductive activity of the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), a small rodent which during foraging often wanders into fields where it might be exposed to pollution. The animals were treated with solutions of 0, 150 or 600 ppm Cu. After 12 weeks of exposure the quality and quantity of the male's sperm was tested. To assess morphological development we compared the experimental groups for body weight, the weight of the male's testes and accessory sex glands, the female's uterus, and the number of matured ovary follicles in tested females. At both doses, copper administration led to lower sperm count and caused sperm head anomalies. The higher dose compromised sperm tail membrane integrity, viability and motility. No effect of copper on morphological development was observed in males, and only the lower dose increased testes weight. In females the higher dose had a negative effect on morphological development, and the lower dose increased uterus weight. No effect of copper on ovarian follicle number was found. For the first time, the morphology of the most typical ovarian follicles of the bank vole is presented.

  20. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  1. Evidence of long term global decline in the Earth's thermospheric densities apparently related to anthropogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, G. M.; Tolson, R. H.; Bradford, M. S.

    2000-05-01

    A study was performed of the long-term orbital decay of five Earth satellites with perigee altitudes averaging near 350km. To decouple long-term trend measurements from the effects of solar variability, measurements were evaluated during the years of solar minimum (1976, 1986 and 1996). Atmospheric densities derived from these essentially global measurements showed substantial evidence of a decline averaging 9.8 ± 2.5% in thermospheric density over 20 years pointing toward a long-term cooling of the upper atmosphere. Increases in greenhouse gases induced by human activity are hypothesized to warm the Earth's surface and lower atmosphere, but strongly cool the upper atmosphere. Assuming that the 10% increase in CO2 over these 20 years caused cooling resulting in the 10% decline in density, a doubling of CO2 could cause the thermospheric densities measured near 350km to decrease by a factor of 3. This decrease may shrink the altitude of a constant density surface by 40km before the end of the 21st century.

  2. Age-related cognitive decline during normal aging: the complex effect of education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, A; Ostrosky-Solis, F; Rosselli, M; Gómez, C

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to further analyze the effects of education on cognitive decline during normal aging. An 806-subject sample was taken from five different Mexican regions. Participants ranged in age from 16 to 85 years. Subjects were grouped into four educational levels: illiterate, 1-4, 5-9, and 10 or more years of education, and four age ranges: 16-30, 31-50, 51-65, and 66-85 years. A brief neuropsychological test battery (NEUROPSI), standardized and normalized in Spanish, was administered. The NEUROPSI test battery includes assessment of orientation, attention, memory, language, visuoperceptual abilities, motor skills, and executive functions. In general, test scores were strongly associated with level of educational, and differences among age groups were smaller than differences among education groups. However, there was an interaction between age and education such as that among illiterate individuals scores of participants 31-50 years old were higher than scores of participants 16-30 years old for over 50% of the tests. Different patterns of interaction among educational groups were distinguished. It was concluded that: (a) The course of life-span changes in cognition are affected by education. Among individuals with a low level of education, best neuropsychological test performance is observed at an older age than among higher-educated subjects; and (b) there is not a single relationship between age-related cognitive decline and education, but different patterns may be found, depending upon the specific cognitive domain.

  3. Monarchs in decline: a collateral landscape-level effect of modern agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenoien, Carl; Nail, Kelly R; Zalucki, Jacinta M; Parry, Hazel; Oberhauser, Karen S; Zalucki, Myron P

    2016-09-21

    We review the postulated threatening processes that may have affected the decline in the eastern population of the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae), in North America. Although there are likely multiple contributing factors, such as climate and resource-related effects on breeding, migrating, and overwintering populations, the key landscape-level change appears to be associated with the widespread use of genetically modified herbicide resistant crops that have rapidly come to dominate the extensive core summer breeding range. We dismiss misinterpretations of the apparent lack of population change in summer adult count data as logically flawed. Glyphosate-tolerant soybean and maize have enabled the extensive use of this herbicide, generating widespread losses of milkweed (Asclepias spp.), the only host plants for monarch larvae. Modeling studies that simulate lifetime realized fecundity at a landscape scale, direct counts of milkweeds, and extensive citizen science data across the breeding range suggest that a herbicide-induced, landscape-level reduction in milkweed has precipitated the decline in monarchs. A recovery will likely require a monumental effort for the re-establishment of milkweed resources at a commensurate landscape scale.

  4. Forest stand structure, productivity, and age mediate climatic effects on aspen decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2014-08-01

    Because forest stand structure, age, and productivity can mediate the impacts of climate on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality, ignoring stand-scale factors limits inference on the drivers of recent sudden aspen decline. Using the proportion of aspen trees that were dead as an index of recent mortality at 841 forest inventory plots, we examined the relationship of this mortality index to forest structure and climate in the Rocky Mountains and Intermountain Western United States. We found that forest structure explained most of the patterns in mortality indices, but that variation in growing-season vapor pressure deficit and winter precipitation over the last 20 years was important. Mortality index sensitivity to precipitation was highest in forests where aspen exhibited high densities, relative basal areas, quadratic mean diameters, and productivities, whereas sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit was highest in young forest stands. These results indicate that the effects of drought on mortality may be mediated by forest stand development, competition with encroaching conifers, and physiological vulnerabilities of large trees to drought. By examining mortality index responses to both forest structure and climate, we show that forest succession cannot be ignored in studies attempting to understand the causes and consequences of sudden aspen decline.

  5. EFFECTS OF INTRAUTERINE NUTRITION ON FETAL PROGRAMMING OF REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS AND THE FUTURE REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE IN SHEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Clariget R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of uterine undernutrition during the embryonic and fetal development has been of concern in human medicine due to the consequences on the health and welfare of the people it causes. However, in animal production it is in just the past two decades that the issue has gained interest from researchers. Animal production based on native pasture grazing systems often presets periods of under nutrition during gestation, so the topic is of particular interest to our region. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the effects of nutrition, with special emphasis on undernutrition of the pregnant ewe on the intrauterine development of the reproductive tract of both male and female offspring, and the reproductive performance of the adult ewe and ram.

  6. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun

    2014-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations.

  7. Effects of Roselle and Ginger on cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amr Amin; AlaaEldin A. Hamza

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the protective effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Roselle) and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) against cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in rats and to study the mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods:which began 21 days before a single cisplatin I.p. Injection (10 mg/kg body weight). Results: Extracts of H. Sabdariffa and Z. Officinale reduced the extent of cisplatin-induced sperm abnormality and enhanced sperm motility. Both extracts restored the control level of malondialdehyde (MDA) (lipid peroxidation marker) in the cisplatin-treated testis.The cisplatin injection induced decline in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were significantly reversed to control levels in groups where cisplatin was preceded by the administration of either H. Sabdariffa or Z. Officinale. Conclusion: Both H. Sabdariffa and Z. Officinale treatment increased the activities of testicular antioxidant enzymes and restored sperm motility of cisplatin-treated rats. The protective effects of tested plants are, therefore, suggested to be mediated by their potent antioxidant activities.

  8. [Effects of water temperature and edible algal density on the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of Moina irrasa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ying; Deng, Dao-Gui; Lei, Juan; Xi, Yi-Long

    2011-12-01

    This paper studied the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of Moina irrasa at different water temperature and edible algal density. The population density of M. irrasa was obviously higher at high than at medium and low densities of edible algae, with the maximum at high edible algal density and 20 degrees C. At the same temperatures, the average number of the offsprings first produced by per female M. irrasa declined with decreasing edible algal density, and the maximum value appeared at 25 degrees C and at high edible algal density. The male offsprings produced were obviously higher at high than at medium and low edible algal densities. There was a significant correlation between the male density and the population density of M. irrasa. The number of ephippia produced by M. irrasa declined with decreasing edible algal density, and was higher at 25 degrees C than at other temperatures. Edible algal density had larger effects on the population dynamics and sexual reproduction of M. irrasa, as compared with temperature.

  9. The effect of submerged aquatic vegetation expansion on a declining turbidity trend in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestir, E.L.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Jonathan Greenberg,; Morgan, Tara; Ustin, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) has well-documented effects on water clarity. SAV beds can slow water movement and reduce bed shear stress, promoting sedimentation and reducing suspension. However, estuaries have multiple controls on turbidity that make it difficult to determine the effect of SAV on water clarity. In this study, we investigated the effect of primarily invasive SAV expansion on a concomitant decline in turbidity in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. The objective of this study was to separate the effects of decreasing sediment supply from the watershed from increasing SAV cover to determine the effect of SAV on the declining turbidity trend. SAV cover was determined by airborne hyperspectral remote sensing and turbidity data from long-term monitoring records. The turbidity trends were corrected for the declining sediment supply using suspended-sediment concentration data from a station immediately upstream of the Delta. We found a significant negative trend in turbidity from 1975 to 2008, and when we removed the sediment supply signal from the trend it was still significant and negative, indicating that a factor other than sediment supply was responsible for part of the turbidity decline. Turbidity monitoring stations with high rates of SAV expansion had steeper and more significant turbidity trends than those with low SAV cover. Our findings suggest that SAV is an important (but not sole) factor in the turbidity decline, and we estimate that 21–70 % of the total declining turbidity trend is due to SAV expansion.

  10. EFFECTS OF CADMIUM ON THE REPRODUCTIVE AXIS OF JAPANESE MEDAKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a ubquitous element and a significant inorganic pollutant that has previously been found to bioaccumulate in reproductive organs of fish and disrupt important endocrine processes, especially those involved in synthesis, release and metabolism of hormones. Clearly,...

  11. Protective Effect of Vitamin E on Nicotine Induced Reproductive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Igbinedion University, Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Okada, Edo State, Nigeria ... nicotine on reproductive functions in male rats. .... The experiment was conducted in accordance ..... Male infertility, clinical ...

  12. the reproductive dysfunction effects of gasoline inhalation in albino

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    hormones of reproduction in both the male and female test animals. The results ... additive of gasoline) in humans are thought to be lower than levels ... In developing countries such as Nigeria .... functions. We had used animal models as part.

  13. Effects of common-use pesticides on developmental and reproductive processes in Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashian, Donna R; Dodson, Stanley I

    2002-06-01

    Daphnia magna were evaluated for use as a screen for pesticides that have been demonstrated to have estrogenic (o'p'-DDT, di-n-butyl phthalate, toxaphene), anti-androgenic (p'p-DDE, linuron), thyroid (acetochlor, alachlor, metribuzin), insulin (amitraz) or lutenizing hormone (2,4-D) activity in vertebrates, and to establish daphnid sensitivity to these compounds. Pesticides with unknown effects on vertebrate endocrine systems (chlorosulfuran, cyanazine, diflubenzuron, metolachlor, and diquat) were also evaluated. Compounds were assayed for six days at environmentally relevant concentrations ranging from 0.001 to 100 mirog/L, using female Daphnia and their offspring. Sublethal endpoints included offspring sex (sex determination), clutch size (fecundity), and adult size (growth rate). Toxaphene was the only compound that affected sexual differentiation, increasing male production. Daphnia fecundity declined with exposure to toxaphene, and daphnid growth rates were reduced by acetochlor exposure. Diflubenzuron, o'p'-DDT, and p'p-DDE significantly reduced Daphnia survival. No correlation existed between affected reproductive or developmental processes and specific endocrine systems or subsystems. Results from this study indicate that Daphnia make a good screen for assessing potential environmental impacts but are not a useful indicator of pesticide hormonal activity in vertebrates. This assay consistently detected sublethal but ecologically relevant effects of these pesticides on Daphnia at environmentally relevant concentrations typically below their listed EC50 value.

  14. Are we witnessing the decline effect in the Type D personality literature? What can be learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, James C; de Voogd, Jacob N

    2012-12-01

    After an unbroken series of positive, but underpowered studies seemed to demonstrate Type D personality predicting mortality in cardiovascular disease patients, initial claims now appear at least exaggerated and probably false. Larger studies with consistently null findings are accumulating. Conceptual, methodological, and statistical issues can be raised concerning the construction of Type D personality as a categorical variable, whether Type D is sufficiently distinct from other negative affect variables, and if it could be plausibly assumed to predict mortality independent of depressive symptoms and known biomedical factors, including disease severity. The existing literature concerning negative affect and health suggests a low likelihood of discovering a new negative affect variable that independently predicts mortality better than its many rivals. The apparent decline effect in the Type D literature is discussed in terms of the need to reduce the persistence of false positive findings in the psychosomatic medicine literature, even while preserving a context allowing risk-taking and discovery. Recommendations include greater transparency concerning research design and analytic strategy; insistence on replication with larger samples before accepting "discoveries" from small samples; reduced confirmatory bias; and availability of all relevant data. Such changes would take time to implement, face practical difficulties, and run counter to established practices. An interim solution is for readers to maintain a sense of pre-discovery probabilities, to be sensitized to the pervasiveness of the decline effect, and to be skeptical of claims based on findings reaching significance in small-scale studies that have not been independently replicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physical activity and inflammation: effects on gray-matter volume and cognitive decline in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, Goran; Ferencz, Beata; Mangialasche, Francesca; Mecocci, Patrizia; Cecchetti, Roberta; Kalpouzos, Grégoria; Fratiglioni, Laura; Bäckman, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity has been positively associated with gray-matter integrity. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokines seem to have negative effects on the aging brain and have been related to dementia. It was investigated whether an inactive lifestyle and high levels of inflammation resulted in smaller gray-matter volumes and predicted cognitive decline across 6 years in a population-based study of older adults (n = 414). Self-reported physical activity (fitness-enhancing, health-enhancing, inadequate) was linked to gray-matter volume, such that individuals with inadequate physical activity had the least gray matter. There were no overall associations between different pro-and anti-inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, G-CSF, and TNF-α) and gray-matter integrity. However, persons with inadequate activity and high levels of the pro-inflammatory marker IL-12p40 had smaller volumes of lateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus and declined more on the Mini-Mental State Examination test over 6 years compared with physically inactive individuals with low levels of IL-12p40 and to more physically active persons, irrespective of their levels of IL-12p40. These patterns of data suggested that inflammation was particularly detrimental in inactive older adults and may exacerbate the negative effects of physical inactivity on brain and cognition in old age. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3462-3473, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A spreadsheet-based model demonstrating the nonuniform economic effects of varying reproductive performance in Ohio dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, C; Rajala-Schultz, P J; Frazer, G S

    2005-03-01

    A spreadsheet-based model was developed to estimate the economic effect of varying reproductive performance in dairy herds. Scenarios were created to model an average cow with respect to production, herd lifetime, and reproductive events. Average milk yield per day of life as well as lifetime calf and replacement heifer production were examined. Additional inputs representing milk, feed, semen, calf, and salvage prices were used to calculate net cash flow for each day of herd life for the average cow in a scenario. Economic comparison of different scenarios was accomplished using an equivalent annual cash flow (annuity) methodology.Herd performance measures and prices representative of Ohio dairy herds were used to establish a baseline average cow that had a 160-d calving-to-conception interval [days open (DO)]. Alternative scenarios that differed from baseline in DO, annual culling rate, and feed and milk prices were created to characterize the effects of changes. Under scenario inputs representative of typical Ohio dairy herds, the model indicated that a lower annual culling rate (25%) was preferable to higher annual culling rates (34 or 45%). The model estimated maximum average milk yield per day of life to occur at 110 DO. At 34% annual culling rate, calves and replacement heifers produced per lifetime declined as DO increased; beyond 150 DO, the modeled cow produced less than 1 replacement heifer per lifetime. The model also estimated a loss of $1.37 per cow per year for a 1-d increase in DO beyond 160 d. At 20% higher feed and milk prices, the model estimated a loss of $1.52 per cow per year; at 20% lower feed and milk prices, the model estimated a loss of $1.23 per cow per year. Furthermore, the model suggested that the loss associated with a 1-d increase in DO changed as DO changed. Using baseline inputs, the model calculated losses for a 1-d increase of $0.44 per cow per year at 130 DO and $1.71 per cow per year at 190 DO. The nonuniform nature of the cost

  17. Nikkomycin Z is an effective inhibitor of the chytrid fungus linked to global amphibian declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Whitney M; Fites, J Scott; Reinert, Laura K; Rollins-Smith, Louise A

    2014-01-01

    Fungal infections in humans, wildlife, and plants are a growing concern because of their devastating effects on human and ecosystem health. In recent years, populations of many amphibian species have declined, and some have become extinct due to chytridiomycosis caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. For some endangered amphibian species, captive colonies are the best intermediate solution towards eventual reintroduction, and effective antifungal treatments are needed to cure chytridiomycosis and limit the spread of this pathogen in such survival assurance colonies. Currently, the best accepted treatment for infected amphibians is itraconazole, but its toxic side effects reduce its usefulness for many species. Safer antifungal treatments are needed for disease control. Here, we show that nikkomycin Z, a chitin synthase inhibitor, dramatically alters the cell wall stability of B. dendrobatidis cells and completely inhibits growth of B. dendrobatidis at 250 μM. Low doses of nikkomycin Z enhanced the effectiveness of natural antimicrobial skin peptide mixtures tested in vitro. These studies suggest that nikkomycin Z would be an effective treatment to significantly reduce the fungal burden in frogs infected by B. dendrobatidis.

  18. Organizational resilience: Sustained institutional effectiveness among smaller, private, non-profit US higher education institutions experiencing organizational decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kenneth A

    2016-06-04

    Recent changes in the United States (US) economy have radically disrupted revenue generation among many institutions within higher education within the US. Chief among these disruptions has been fallout associated with the financial crisis of 2008-2009, which triggered a change in the US higher education environment from a period of relative munificence to a prolonged period of scarcity. The hardest hit by this disruption have been smaller, less wealthy institutions which tend to lack the necessary reserves to financially weather the economic storm. Interestingly, a review of institutional effectiveness among these institutions revealed that while many are struggling, some institutions have found ways to not only successfully cope with the impact of declining revenue, but have been able to capitalize on the disruption and thrive. Organizational response is an important factor in successfully coping with conditions of organizational decline. The study examined the impacts of organizational response on institutional effectiveness among higher education institutions experiencing organizational decline. The study's research question asked why some US higher educational institutions are more resilient at coping with organizational decline than other institutions operating within the same segment of the higher education sector. More specifically, what role does organizational resilience have in helping smaller, private non-profit institutions cope and remain effective during organizational decline? A total of 141 US smaller, private non-profit higher educational institutions participated in the study; specifically, the study included responses from participant institutions' key administrators. 60-item survey evaluated administrator responses corresponding to organizational response and institutional effectiveness. Factor analysis was used to specify the underlying structures of rigidity response, resilience response, and institutional effectiveness. Multiple regression

  19. Gestational exposure to atrazine has little effect on female reproductive parameters in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrazine (ATR), a commonly used herbicide, has been shown to exert reproductive effects in animals; however, most ofthese studies have focused on adult exposure. In contrast, there is limited information available on the reproductive and developmental effects of gestational expos...

  20. Gestational exposure to atrazine has little effect on female reproductive parameters in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrazine (ATR), a commonly used herbicide, has been shown to exert reproductive effects in animals; however, most ofthese studies have focused on adult exposure. In contrast, there is limited information available on the reproductive and developmental effects of gestational expos...

  1. The effect of milk yield on some reproductive parameters of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    these factors include accurate heat detection methods, insemination ... 1994; Muller et al., 1995) while managed under the same conditions, the effect of increasing milk yield levels on some reproductive parameters in the two herds was determined. ... Interrelationships between energy balance and post partum reproductive.

  2. Effect of different diets on reproduction, longevity and predation capacity of Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calixto, A.M.; Bueno, V.H.P.; Montes, F.C.; Silva, A.C.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Orius insidiosus is a generalist predator for which diet influences important biological traits like reproduction and predation. We tested the effects of different diets alone or in combination on reproduction, longevity and predation capacity of this predator. The diets tested were: no food (contro

  3. Effect of 17ß trenbolone on male and female reproduction in japanese quail (Coturnix japonica japonica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The anabolic steroid 17ß trenbolone (17ß-TB), a known endocrine disruptive chemical, may influence reproductive functions in avian wildlife. We evaluated the effects of dietary exposure to 17ß-TB at 5 and 20 ppm on reproductive functional endpoints in Japanese quail during and after sexual maturati...

  4. Effect of stocking rate on pasture production, milk production, and reproduction of dairy cows in pasture-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K A; Penno, J W; Lancaster, J A S; Roche, J R

    2008-05-01

    Ninety-four cows were randomly allocated to 1 of 5 stocking rates (2.2, 2.7, 3.1, 3.7, and 4.3 cows/ha) in a completely randomized design for 3 years. Herds were seasonal calving, with only minor differences in grazing management to optimize the profitability of each stocking rate (SR). Pasture production and quality data, milk and milk component data, and reproduction data were collected, averaged for SR treatment, and linear and quadratic contrasts on SR were evaluated. In addition, the Wilmink exponential model (y(t) = a + b x e((-0.05t) )+ c x t) was fitted to milk yield within lactation, and the parameters were averaged by SR treatment and analyzed as above. The median variation explained by the function for individual lactations was 84%. The amount of pasture grown tended to increase, and the quality of the pasture on offer increased linearly with increasing SR, reducing some of the negative impact of SR on the availability of pasture per cow. Milk production per cow declined linearly with increasing SR, although there was a tendency for most production variables to decline quadratically, with the negative effect of SR declining with increasing SR. The effect on milk production per cow was primarily because of a lower peak milk yield and a greater post-peak decline (less persistent milk profile), although a decline in lactation length with increasing SR was responsible for 24% of the effect of SR on milk yield. Milk production per hectare increased linearly with increasing SR, and there was only a small difference (approximately 3%/cow per ha) in the efficiency of converting feed dry matter into milk energy. Stocking rate did not affect reproductive success. The data are consistent with the need for a more robust measure of SR than cows per hectare because farms will differ in the genetic merit of their cows and in the potential to produce pasture. We introduce the concept of a comparative SR, whereby the carrying capacity of the farm is defined by the BW of

  5. Partitioning of habitat effects casts light on the decline of the fen orchid, Liparis loeselii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dagmar Kappel; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Minter, Martine Olesen;

    2015-01-01

    Liparis loeselii is a rare and declining orchid species restricted to rich fens in the northern hemisphere. Suggested reasons for the decline are habitat destruction, eutrophication, altered hydrology and scrub encroachment after termination of traditional management such as grazing and hay makin...

  6. Canagliflozin Slows Progression of Renal Function Decline Independently of Glycemic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerspink, Hiddo J L; Desai, Mehul; Jardine, Meg; Balis, Dainius; Meininger, Gary; Perkovic, Vlado

    2017-01-01

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibition with canagliflozin decreases HbA1c, body weight, BP, and albuminuria, implying that canagliflozin confers renoprotection. We determined whether canagliflozin decreases albuminuria and reduces renal function decline independently of its glycemic effects in a secondary analysis of a clinical trial in 1450 patients with type 2 diabetes receiving metformin and randomly assigned to either once-daily canagliflozin 100 mg, canagliflozin 300 mg, or glimepiride uptitrated to 6-8 mg. End points were annual change in eGFR and albuminuria over 2 years of follow-up. Glimepiride, canagliflozin 100 mg, and canagliflozin 300 mg groups had eGFR declines of 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.8 to 3.8), 0.5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% CI, 0.0 to 1.0), and 0.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.4), respectively (Pcanagliflozin group versus glimepiride). In the subgroup of patients with baseline urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio decreased more with canagliflozin 100 mg (31.7%; 95% CI, 8.6% to 48.9%; P=0.01) or canagliflozin 300 mg (49.3%; 95% CI, 31.9% to 62.2%; Pcanagliflozin 100 mg, or canagliflozin 300 mg had reductions in HbA1c of 0.81%, 0.82%, and 0.93%, respectively, at 1 year and 0.55%, 0.65%, and 0.74%, respectively, at 2 years. In conclusion, canagliflozin 100 or 300 mg/d, compared with glimepiride, slowed the progression of renal disease over 2 years in patients with type 2 diabetes, and canagliflozin may confer renoprotective effects independently of its glycemic effects. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  7. Effect of glyphosate on reproductive organs in male rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Pengyuan; Hu, Ping; Tang, Juan; Li, Yansen; Li, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    Glyphosate as an active ingredient of Roundup(®) which is thought to be one of the most popular herbicide was used worldwide. Many studies have focused on reproductive toxicity on glyphosate-based herbicide, but few evidence exists to imply the male reproductive toxicity of glyphosate alone in vivo. In this study SD rats were Lavaged with glyphosate at doses of 5, 50, 500mg/kg to detect the toxicity of glyphosate on rat testis. Glyphosate significantly decreased the average daily feed intake at dose of 50mg/kg, and the weight of seminal vesicle gland, coagulating gland as well as the total sperm count at dose of 500mg/kg. Immunohistochemistry of androgen receptor (AR) has no difference among all groups. As to testosterone, estradiol, progesterone and oxidative stress parameters, the level of them has no differences amidst all doses. Taken together, we conclude that glyphosate alone has low toxicity on male rats reproductive system.

  8. Reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    This article explores the reproductive health status of China. Since 1990, China has stepped up its efforts in promoting reproductive health and maternal and child health. Several studies demonstrated a remarkable progress made in this area. By 1997, maternal and infant mortality rates have declined, while the penetration rate for the immunization program and inpatient delivery rate increased. Despite these achievements, however, much remains to be done such as the lack of client-centered approaches to meet the increasingly diverse needs of the population for family planning services. A survey conducted in 1995 showed that the country's family planning program was focused primarily on demographic issues while little attention was given to reproductive health objectives. The situation improved when the State Planning Commission implemented its pilot program called the Quality of Care in Family Planning in China. The program yielded encouraging results including a reoriented philosophy towards reproductive health services, enhanced service facilities, informed choices for family planning methods, and the development of an operational information system. Another strategy adopted to address fertility and reproductive health issues was the implementation of adolescent reproductive health education as a required course for senior middle schools. Lastly, this article provided a brief overview of China's HIV/AIDS situation.

  9. Attribution of declining Western U.S. Snowpack to human effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D.W.; Barnett, T.P.; Hidalgo, H.G.; Das, T.; Bonfils, Celine; Santer, B.D.; Bala, G.; Dettinger, M.D.; Cayan, D.R.; Mirin, A.; Wood, A.W.; Nozawa, T.

    2008-01-01

    Observations show snowpack has declined across much of the western United States over the period 1950-99. This reduction has important social and economic implications, as water retained in the snowpack from winter storms forms an important part of the hydrological cycle and water supply in the region. A formal model-based detection and attribution (D-A) study of these reductions is performed. The detection variable is the ratio of 1 April snow water equivalent (SWE) to water-year-to-date precipitation (P), chosen to reduce the effect of P variability on the results. Estimates of natural internal climate variability are obtained from 1600 years of two control simulations performed with fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Estimates of the SWE/P response to anthropogenic greenhouse gases, ozone, and some aerosols are taken from multiple-member ensembles of perturbation experiments run with two models. The D-A shows the observations and anthropogenically forced models have greater SWE/P reductions than can be explained by natural internal climate variability alone. Model-estimated effects of changes in solar and volcanic forcing likewise do not explain the SWE/P reductions. The mean model estimate is that about half of the SWE/P reductions observed in the west from 1950 to 1999 are the result of climate changes forced by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, ozone, and aerosols. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  10. Effects of nectar-robbing on plant reproduction and evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanwen; WANG Yong; GUO Youbao

    2007-01-01

    does not affect the fruit sets or seed sets of the hosting plant.Besides the direct impacts on plants,nectar robbers may also have an indirect effect on the behavior of the legitimate pollinators.Under some circumstances,the change in pollinator behavior could result in improved reproductive fitness of plants through increased pollen flow and out-crossing.

  11. The Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Cognitive and Neural Decline in Aging and Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott M; Alosco, Michael L; Forman, Daniel E

    2014-12-01

    Aging is characterized by a decline in cognitive functions, particularly in the domains of executive function, processing speed and episodic memory. These age-related declines are exacerbated by cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, obesity, elevated total cholesterol). Structural and functional alterations in brain regions, including the fronto-parietal and medial temporal lobes, have been linked to age- and CVD-related cognitive decline. Multiple recent studies indicate that aerobic exercise programs may slow the progression of age-related neural changes and reduce the risk for mild cognitive impairment as well as dementia. We review age- and CVD-related decline in cognition and the underlying changes in brain morphology and function, and then clarify the impact of aerobic exercise on moderating these patterns.

  12. Effect of amyloid on memory and non-memory decline from preclinical to clinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yen Ying; Maruff, Paul; Pietrzak, Robert H; Ames, David; Ellis, Kathryn A; Harrington, Karra; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Szoeke, Cassandra; Martins, Ralph N; Masters, Colin L; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    High amyloid has been associated with substantial episodic memory decline over 18 and 36 months in healthy older adults and individuals with mild cognitive impairment. However, the nature and magnitude of amyloid-related memory and non-memory change from the preclinical to the clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease has not been evaluated over the same time interval. Healthy older adults (n = 320), individuals with mild cognitive impairment (n = 57) and individuals with Alzheimer's disease (n = 36) enrolled in the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle study underwent at least one positron emission tomography neuroimaging scan for amyloid. Cognitive assessments were conducted at baseline, and 18- and 36-month follow-up assessments. Compared with amyloid-negative healthy older adults, amyloid-positive healthy older adults, and amyloid-positive individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease showed moderate and equivalent decline in verbal and visual episodic memory over 36 months (d's = 0.47-0.51). Relative to amyloid-negative healthy older adults, amyloid-positive healthy older adults showed no decline in non-memory functions, but amyloid-positive individuals with mild cognitive impairment showed additional moderate decline in language, attention and visuospatial function (d's = 0.47-1.12), and amyloid-positive individuals with Alzheimer's disease showed large decline in all aspects of memory and non-memory function (d's = 0.73-2.28). Amyloid negative individuals with mild cognitive impairment did not show any cognitive decline over 36 months. When non-demented individuals (i.e. healthy older adults and adults with mild cognitive impairment) were further dichotomized, high amyloid-positive non-demented individuals showed a greater rate of decline in episodic memory and language when compared with low amyloid positive non-demented individuals. Memory decline does not plateau with increasing disease severity, and decline in non

  13. The Effects of Lei Gong Teng on Reproductive Hormones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江红; 朱彩凤; 王蔚; 王联欢

    2001-01-01

    The serum reproductive hormone levels were examined with radioimmunoassay in women of child-bearing age before and after treatment with the prescriptions containing Lei Gong Teng (雷公藤Radix Tripterygii Wilfordii). The results showed that Lei Gong Teng could induce amenorrhea, but it was reversible.

  14. A category approach for reproductive effects of phthalates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabjan, Evelin; Hulzebos, Etje; Mennes, W; Piersma, Aldert H

    2006-01-01

    In regulatory toxicology, the experimental assessment of reproductive toxicity is one of the most costly endpoints to perform. Categorizing chemicals is an approach that can be used to reduce animal tests in risk assessments of chemicals, for example, via REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authori

  15. Effect of Delayed Insemination on Holstein Cows’ Reproductive Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaillard, Charlotte; Sehested, Jakob; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Holstein cows’ fertility has decreased in the last decade, creating a need for new management methods to improve the reproductive performance which in this case was defined by pregnancy rates and number of artificial inseminations (AI) per pregnancy. Previous studies showed that deliberately...

  16. 40 CFR 799.9380 - TSCA reproduction and fertility effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Toxicity Study, Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals. (1983). (7) Pederson, T. and Peters, H. Proposal for... (1988). (8) Seed, J., Chapin, R.E. E.D. Clegg, L.A. Dostal, R.H. Foote, M.E. Hurtt, G.R. Klinefelter, S... dog: a consensus report. Reproductive Toxicology. 10(3):237-244 (1996). (9) Smith, B.J. et al...

  17. Cerebrovascular resistance: effects on cognitive decline, cortical atrophy, and progression to dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Belinda; Nation, Daniel A

    2017-07-01

    resistance index was significantly elevated in amyloid-positive versus amyloid-negative cases, with additional elevation in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, cerebrovascular resistance index group differences were of greater statistical effect size and encompassed a greater number of brain regions than those for cerebral blood flow alone. Cognitive decline over 2-year follow-up was accelerated by elevated baseline cerebrovascular resistance index, particularly for amyloid-positive individuals. Increased baseline cerebrovascular resistance index also predicted greater progression to dementia, beyond that attributable to amyloid-positivity. Finally, increased cerebrovascular resistance index predicted greater regional atrophy among non-demented older adults who were amyloid-negative. Findings suggest that increased cerebrovascular resistance may represent a previously unrecognized contributor to Alzheimer's disease that is independent of neuronal hypometabolism, predates changes in brain perfusion, exacerbates and works synergistically with amyloidosis to produce cognitive decline, and drives amyloid-independent brain atrophy during the earliest stage of disease. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Video Games as a Means to Reduce Age-related Cognitive Decline: Attitudes, Compliance, and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Boot

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a brain fitness game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants’ ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  19. Video games as a means to reduce age-related cognitive decline: attitudes, compliance, and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Walter R; Champion, Michael; Blakely, Daniel P; Wright, Timothy; Souders, Dustin J; Charness, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated broad benefits of video game play to perceptual and cognitive abilities. These broad improvements suggest that video game-based cognitive interventions may be ideal to combat the many perceptual and cognitive declines associated with advancing age. Furthermore, game interventions have the potential to induce higher rates of intervention compliance compared to other cognitive interventions as they are assumed to be inherently enjoyable and motivating. We explored these issues in an intervention that tested the ability of an action game and a "brain fitness" game to improve a variety of abilities. Cognitive abilities did not significantly improve, suggesting caution when recommending video game interventions as a means to reduce the effects of cognitive aging. However, the game expected to produce the largest benefit based on previous literature (an action game) induced the lowest intervention compliance. We explain this low compliance by participants' ratings of the action game as less enjoyable and by their prediction that training would have few meaningful benefits. Despite null cognitive results, data provide valuable insights into the types of video games older adults are willing to play and why.

  20. 肥胖对生殖影响的研究进展%Effects of Obesity on Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈蕾(综述); 丁之德(审校)

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of obesity increased almost two folds in the last decade,meanwhile the expense exhausted directly or indirectly by obesity and its complications reached about 10% of the overall state’s health expenditures. Besides its cardiovascular complications, obesity has significant negative effects on the reproductive system of both men and women,which was confirmed by animal experiments in male and female rodents. Obesity is a risk factor of prostatic cancer,sexual dysfunction, and the declined sperm quality, in males. Obesity is a risk factor of PCOS in females, the declined oocytes quality, and lowered fertile ability. Moreover,obesity has some severe detriments on the growth and development of children and teenagers. In this review,we elucidated the effects of obesity on reproductive endocrinology and metabolism,morphology of reproductive organs,sexual ability,and development of reproductive cells.%肥胖症的发病率在过去10年中几乎增加了1倍,而肥胖及其并发症所带来的直接或间接耗费约占国家卫生经费的10%。除心血管疾病等并发症外,近年来越来越多的研究结果发现,肥胖对男性、女性及雄、雌性实验鼠的生殖系统均有明显的负面效应。如肥胖可增加男性患前列腺癌的风险,并可引起性功能和精液质量的下降;对女性而言,肥胖可增加患多囊卵巢综合征的风险、并可引起生育力和卵细胞质量的下降;此外,肥胖还对儿童青少年的生长发育带来极大的危害。综述肥胖对生殖内分泌代谢、生殖器官形态学、性功能及生殖细胞发育等方面的影响。

  1. Effects of declining oak vitality on ecosystem functions: Lessons from a Spanish oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, Aida; Bareth, Georg; Bolten, Andreas; Linstädter, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean oak woodlands have a great ecological and socio-economic importance. Today, these fragile ecosystems are facing unprecedented degradation threats from Novel Oak Diseases (NODs). Among NOD drivers, maladapted land management practices and climate change are most important. Although it is generally believed that NOD-related declines in tree vitality will have detrimental effects on ecosystem functions, little is known on the magnitude of change, and whether different functions are affected in a similar way. Here we analyzed effects of tree vitality on various ecosystem functions, comparing subcanopy and intercanopy habitats across two oak species (Quercus ilex and Q. suber) in a Spanish oak woodland. We asked how functions - including aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), taxonomic diversity, and litter decomposition rates - were affected by oak trees' size and vitality. We also combined measurements in the ecosystem function habitat index (MEFHI), a proxy of ecosystem multifunctionality. Field research was carried out in 2016 on a dehesa in southern Spain. We used a stratified random sampling to contrast trees of different species affiliation, size and vitality. Tree vitality was estimated as crown density (assessed via hemispherical photography), and as tree vigor, which combines the grade of canopy defoliation with proxies for tree size (dbh, height, crown height and crown radius). For each tree (n = 34), two plots (50 x 50 cm) were located; one in the subcanopy habitat, and the other in the intercanopy area beyond the tree crown's influence. On all 68 plots, moveable cages were placed during the main growth period (March to May) to estimate ANPP under grazed conditions. Litter decomposition rates were assessed via the tea bag index. ANPP and the biomass of grasses, forbs and legumes were recorded via destructive sampling. To take plots' highly variable environmental conditions into account, we recorded a suite of abiotic and biotic

  2. Flutamide effects on morphology of reproductive organs and liver of Neotropical Anura, Rhinella schneideri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gregorio, Lara S; Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Gomes, Fernando R; de Oliveira, Classius

    2016-07-01

    Water contamination is one of the factors influencing the decline of amphibians. Flutamide is an antiandrogenic medicine that occurs as water contaminant. This compound especially affects the reproductive organs, but it can also show hepatotoxic effects. The Bufonidae family has a peculiar organ named Bidder's organ, considered by some authors as a rudimentary ovary, but capable to respond to some external stimuli. This study investigated flutamide effects on testes and Bidder's organ germ cells, liver pigmentation, and sexual hormones levels in Rhinella schneideri males. We randomly divided 15 males in three groups (N=5): two groups were injected with flutamide, at 1 and 5mg/kg, while the control group received only mineral oil, for 7days. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and the organs were sent to histological routine. In the testes, both treatments caused an increase in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, and a decrease in spermatozoa and locular area. In the Bidder's organ, the final diplotene oocytes increased, but the initial diplotene, degrading and atresic oocytes reduced in both treatments. The lipofuscin in the Bidder's organ was not affected. In the liver, melanin and lipofuscin increased only for the 1mg/kg flutamide treatment. The 5mg/kg treatment did not affect the liver. Serum testosterone and estradiol levels did not vary compared with the control group. This compound has antiandrogenic activity, which can affect the spermatogenetic process. The decrease in degrading and atresic Bidderian oocytes indicated that flutamide could stimulate the organ, retarding the degradation processes. The increase in liver melanin, which has protective role, and lipofuscin, a sign of degradation, indicates that flutamide cause hepatotoxic effects. So we conclude that flutamide negatively affects the testes, especially by reducing the sperm area, and the liver, inducing cell degradation and producing protective responses. Furthermore, the compound

  3. The effect of group size on the interplay between dominance and reproduction in Bombus terrestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsalem, Etya; Hefetz, Abraham

    2011-03-28

    Social insects provide good model systems for testing trade-offs in decision-making because of their marked reproductive skew and the dilemma workers face when to reproduce. Attaining reproductive skew requires energy investment in aggression or fertility signaling, creating a trade-off between reproduction and dominance. This may be density-dependent because the cost of achieving dominance may be higher in larger groups. We investigated the effect of group-size in B. terrestris queenless workers on two major reproduction-dominance correlates: between-worker aggression, and pheromone production, aiming at mimicking decision-making during the transition of worker behavior from cooperation and sterility to aggressive reproductive competition in whole colonies. Despite the competition, reproductive division of labor in colonies can be maintained even during this phase through the production of a sterility signal by sterile workers that has an appeasement effect on dominant nestmates. Worker-worker aggression, ovary activation, and production of sterility-appeasement signals may therefore constitute components of a trade-off affecting worker reproduction decisions. By constructing queenless groups of different size and measuring how this affected the parameters above, we found that in all groups aggression was not evenly distributed with the α-worker performing most of the aggressive acts. Moreover, aggression by the α-worker increased proportionally with group-size. However, while in small groups the α-worker monopolized reproduction, in larger groups several workers shared reproduction, creating two worker groups: reproductives and helpers. It appears that despite the increase of aggression, this was evidently not sufficient for the α-worker to monopolize reproduction. If we compare the α-worker to the queen in full-sized colonies it can be hypothesized that worker reproduction in B. terrestris colonies starts due to a gradual increase in the worker population

  4. Declining Petroleum Production and the Effect Upon Communities in New Mexico's Permian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Ryan D.

    The petroleum industry, a vital component of New Mexico's economy, is in a gradual decline. As petroleum production is primarily focused in the southeastern corner of the state, this decline phenomenon is particularly relevant to area residents. The problem addressed in this study was that little information is available regarding the lived experiences of business and community leaders concerning this phenomenon, particularly in terms of future economic sustainability. The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to interview a purposive sample of business and community leaders regarding their lived experiences and perceptions relating to the economic sustainability of the region. Research questions asked about the general awareness of the decline of oil production---data collected from federal and state databases---and potential options for alternative economic development. Coded data were analyzed and themes and patterns were identified. Findings included a general lack of awareness of area residents regarding a decline of production, assumed economic stability, and resistance to change based on a lack of incentive. Included in the findings were potential options for strategic economic diversification. Recommendations included a campaign to promote awareness of the decline of oil, provide incentives for change, and economic diversification as method of moving the local economy away from dependence upon the petroleum industry. Implications for positive social change were that the affected region can use the findings to identify sustainable alternative industries to support the communities into the future.

  5. YUCCA SCHIDIGERA AND ITS EFFECT ON RABBIT REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Földešiová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Yucca schidigera plant on rabbit reproduction parameters. Six weeks old New Zealand White rabbit females (n=36 and males (n=20 were used in the experiment. Animals in the control groups (C does; n=12 and C bucks; n=7 were fed with commercially available diet and the diet in the experimental groups was enriched with 5g/100kg (E1 does; n=12 and E1 bucks; n=7 or 20 g/100kg (E2 does; n=12 and E2 bucks; n=6 of Yucca schidigera powder extract. The rabbits were fed for 280 days and weighed weekly. The highest semen concentration was in the second experimental group E2 (3.80±0.57 x 109/ml compared to control group C (2.84±0.33 x 109/ml and experimental group E1 (1.9±0.35 x 109/ml. Semen motility (E2- 85.55±6.19 %; E1- 85.28±2.27% and progressive motility (E2; 73.45±9.63 %; E1; 71.16±3.43% were higher in the experimental groups compared to the control groups (motility -78.69±5.17 %; progressive motility - 61.34±6.69 %. The highest conception and kindling rate was found out in the control group C (83 % and 83 %, respectively, slightly lower values were reported in the both experimental groups E1 and E2 (for conception rate - 63% and 63%, respectively; and for kindling rate - 63% and 63%, respectively. Evaluation of the number of liveborn young rabbits showed, in the experimental group 2 the number of liveborn young rabbits (9.43±1.65 was higher than in the control (C; 8.0±0.97 and the experimental group 1 (6.0±1.

  6. Effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoving, L L; Soede, N M; Graat, E A M; Feitsma, H; Kemp, B

    2010-10-01

    An impaired reproductive performance in second parity compared to first parity sows, decreases reproductive efficiency and, perhaps, longevity of sows. This study aims to quantify the effect of live weight development and reproduction in first parity on reproductive performance of second parity sows, i.e. pregnancy rate as well as litter size. Measures of sow development (live weight at first insemination, farrowing and weaning) and reproduction (total number of piglets born, weaning to insemination interval, lactation period, number piglets weaned) were recorded on two experimental farms. Logistic regression analysis was done for the binary outcome 'non-pregnancy from first insemination after first weaning' (yes/no). General linear regression analysis was used for litter size from 1st insemination in second parity. Repeat breeders were omitted from the analysis on litter size in second parity, since a prolonged period between weaning and conception can positively influence litter size. Farms differed significantly in measures of sow live weight development and therefore data were analyzed per farm. Compared with gilts from farm A, gilts from farm B were older and heavier at: first insemination (275±0.9 days and 145±0.8kg for farm B vs. 230±0.6 days and 124±0.5kg for farm A), first farrowing (resp. 189±1.1 vs. 181±0.9kg) and first weaning (resp. 165±1.1 vs. 156±0.9kg). Weight loss during pregnancy was similar for both farms (resp. 24.9±0.7 and 23.7±1.0kg). Gilts from farm A, however, gained more weight in the period between first insemination and first weaning compared with gilts from farm B (resp. 36.1±0.8 and 20.9±1.3kg). Non-pregnancy in second parity was 11% for farm A and 15% for farm B. Litter sizes in first and second parity were, respectively, 10.7±0.1 and 11.6±0.2 for farm A and 11.8±0.1 and 11.6±0.1 for farm B. Variables associated with non-pregnancy and litter size in second parity differed between farms. On farm A, mainly sow live weight

  7. Endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity of low dose MCLR on male frogs (Rana nigromaculata) in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Xiuying; Cai, Chenchen; Wang, Jia; Gao, Nana; Zhang, Hangjun, E-mail: zhanghangjun@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Low-dose MCLR (1 μg/L) elicits a potential ecological effect on amphibian populations. • MCLR can induce abnormal sperm morphologies and activities on male frogs. • MCLR can induce a decrease in serum testosterone and an increase in serum estradiol of male frogs. • MCLR can increase SF-1 protein levels and decrease P450 aromatase levels in the gonads of frogs. - Abstract: Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are potential global threats to aquatic ecosystems and human health. The World Health Organization has set a provisional guideline limit of 1 μg/L microcystin-LR (MCLR) in freshwater. However, MCLR concentrations in several water bodies have exceeded this level. Despite this recommended human safety standard, MCLR-induced endocrine-disrupting effects and reproductive toxicity on male frog (Rana nigromaculata) were demonstrated in this study. Results showed that sperm motility and sperm count were significantly and negatively correlated with exposure time and concentration. By contrast, abnormal sperm rate was positively correlated with both parameters. Ultrastructural observation results revealed abnormal sperm morphologies, vacuoles in spermatogenic cells, cell dispersion, incomplete cell structures, and deformed nucleoli. These results indicated that MCLR could induce toxic effects on the reproductive system of frogs, significantly decrease testosterone content, and rapidly increase estradiol content. Prolonged exposure and increased concentration enhanced the relative expression levels of P450 aromatase and steroidogenic factor 1; thus, endocrine function in frogs was disrupted. This study is the first to demonstrate in vivo MCLR toxicity in the reproductive system of male R. nigromaculata. This study provided a scientific basis of the global decline in amphibian populations.

  8. Effects of shallow natural gas well structures and associated roads on grassland songbird reproductive success in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jenny; Koper, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Grassland songbird populations across North America have experienced dramatic population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. In Canada, energy development continues to fragment and disturb prairie habitat, but effects of oil and gas development on reproductive success of songbirds in North American mixed-grass prairies remains largely unknown. From 2010-2012, in southeastern Alberta, Canada, we monitored 257 nests of two ground-nesting grassland songbird species, Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) and chestnut-collared longspur (Calcarius ornatus). Nest locations varied with proximity to and density of conventional shallow gas well structures and associated roads in forty-two 258-ha mixed-grass prairie sites. We estimated the probabilities of nest success and clutch size relative to gas well structures and roads. There was little effect of distance to or density of gas well structure on nest success; however, Savannah sparrow experienced lower nest success near roads. Clutch sizes were lower near gas well structures and cattle water sources. Minimizing habitat disturbance surrounding gas well structures, and reducing abundance of roads and trails, would help minimize impacts on reproductive success for some grassland songbirds.

  9. Strong families and declining fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilevych, Yuliya

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the role of family and social relationships in individuals’ reproductive careers during the fertility decline in Soviet Ukraine from around 1950 to 1975. These three decades after the Second World War signified the end of the First Demographic Transition in Ukraine

  10. Effects of soybean isoflavones on reproductive parameters in Chinese mini-pig boars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xiao-xue

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybean isoflavones are structurally similar to mammalian estrogens and therefore may act as estrogen agonists or antagonists. However, it has not been determined if they have any negative effects on reproductive parameters in male livestock. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of soybean isoflavones on male reproduction using Chinese mini-pig boars as a model. Fifty Xiang boars were randomly divided into five groups and fed diets containing 0, 125, 250, or 500 ppm soybean isoflavones or 0.5 ppm diethylstilbestrol for 60 days. Results Dietary supplementation with 250 ppm of soy isoflavones markedly increased the testis index (P P P P P P P P P P P Conclusions The results of this study indicate that consumption of soy isoflavones at dietary levels up to 250 ppm did not adversely affect reproductive parameters in Chinese mini-pig boars whereas higher levels of soy isoflavones may adversely affect male reproduction.

  11. Effect of supplemented ration on some reproductive traits in Azeri Buffaloes of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Razzagzadeh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction efficiency is one of the most important factors for productivity and profitably of dairy animals. Late or delayed oestrus in buffalo heifers is one of the major factors limiting its overall productive and reproductive performance. Feeding and general management have been reported to improve reproduction efficiency of buffaloes. Reproduction is partly affected by nutrition supplementation. Thus the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of supplemented ration on some reproductive traits in Azeri buffaloes. One hundred and twenty female buffalo calves with 8 months age were randomly divided into four groups (30 calves in each group. Calves received I traditional ration (TR II TR plus 0.5 kg concentrate III TR plus 1 kg concentrate IV TR plus 1.5 kg concentrates till the age at first estrous. There was no difference between initial weights of calves before the treatments. The reproductive traits considered were age at first oestrus, weight at first oestrus, number of oestruses before gestation, age at gestation, age at calving. Although there were no significant differences between the all studied traits among treatments, the supplementation in Group 4 improved the traits somehow; in particular, treatment 4 decreased by 70 days the age at calving compared to treatment 1. This indicates that the W. Azerbaijan buffaloes suffer a nutritional deficiency in their lifetime and that quality /quantity supplementation of ration can improve their reproductive performance.

  12. A review on the effects of PBDEs on thyroid and reproduction systems in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liqin; Han, Zhihua; Liu, Chunsheng

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this review was to summarize and discuss the effects of Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on thyroid and reproduction systems in fish. We reviewed the evidences and mechanisms for PBDEs-induced thyroid and reproduction disruption, as well as the cross-talk between the two systems in fish. In thyroid disruption, we mainly paid attention to the effects of PBDEs on hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis, thyroid hormones (THs) transport and metabolism, thyroid receptors (TRs) and thyroid follicle histology. In reproduction disruption, we focused on the effects of PBDEs on steroid hormone production, expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis, and gonadal development. Despite that there is an interaction between thyroid and reproductive systems in fish, it is still remains unclear that PBDE-induced reproductive impairments are caused by direct effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) functioning or by indirect action through cross-talk between the two systems. Future studies are needed to explore the relationships between reproductive toxicity and thyroid system disruption after PBDEs exposure.

  13. Effects of biodiversity strengthen over time as ecosystem functioning declines at low and increases at high biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, S.; Ebeling, A.; Eisenhauer, Nico; Mommer, L.; Ravenek, Janneke M.; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Human-caused declines in biodiversity have stimulated intensive research on the consequences
    of biodiversity loss for ecosystem services and policy initiatives to preserve the functioning of
    ecosystems. Short-term biodiversity experiments have documented positive effects of plant s

  14. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effect of physical exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline. Data sources: Randomized controlled trials were identified by literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and AgeLine. Study selection: Papers were inclu

  15. Advances of Air Pollution Science: From Forest Decline to Multiple-Stress Effects on Forest Ecosystem Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Paoletti; M. Schaub; R. Matyssek; G. Wieser; A. Augustaitis; A. M. Bastrup-Birk; A. Bytnerowicz; M. S. Gunthardt-Goerg; G. Muller-Starck; Y. Serengil

    2010-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of...

  16. Effects of biodiversity strengthen over time as ecosystem functioning declines at low and increases at high biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, S.; Ebeling, A.; Eisenhauer, Nico; Mommer, L.; Ravenek, Janneke M.; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Human-caused declines in biodiversity have stimulated intensive research on the consequences of biodiversity loss for ecosystem services and policy initiatives to preserve the functioning of ecosystems. Short-term biodiversity experiments have documented positive effects of plant species richness on

  17. Comparing the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers on renal function decline in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Yunyu; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.; Voorham, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare effectiveness of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis)/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for protecting Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients from renal function decline in a real-world setting. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of new ACEi/ARB users in 2007-2012 in

  18. The effects of exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, J.G.Z. van; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Mechelen, W. van

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effect of physical exercise on cognition in older adults with and without cognitive decline. Data sources: Randomized controlled trials were identified by literature searches in PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, and AgeLine. Study selection: Papers were

  19. Social Participation and the Prevention of Decline in Effectance among Community-Dwelling Elderly: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimiko Tomioka

    Full Text Available We examined the association between a decline in effectance and social participation (SP from the perspective of the number and the type of SP in a prospective cohort study.Included in this analysis were community-dwelling elderly aged ≥ 65 without dependency on the basic activities of daily living and reporting a perfect baseline effectance score (n = 4,588; mean age 72.8 ± 5.7. SP was categorized into 5 types: neighborhood associations, hobby groups, local event groups, senior citizen clubs, and volunteer groups. Effectance was evaluated using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence. Using logistic regression analysis, odds ratio (OR and a 95% confidence interval (CI for a decline in effectance were calculated. Age, family, BMI, pensions, medical history, medications, alcohol, smoking, cognitive function, depression, social support, ADL, and IADL were used as covariates.During the 3-year follow-up, 17.8% of eligible participants reported a decline in effectance. After adjustment for covariates, participation in various groups was associated with the preservation of effectance for both genders. Regarding the type of SP, among females, participation in neighborhood associations (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.48-0.81, hobby groups (0.58, 0.43-0.77, local event groups (0.63, 0.47-0.86, and volunteer groups (0.53, 0.35-0.82 was inversely associated with a decline in effectance. Among males, the beneficial effect was more likely limited to hobby groups (0.59, 0.43-0.81 and volunteer groups (0.57, 0.39-0.83.Our results suggest that participation in a variety of social groups is effective for maintenance of older people's effectance, while the beneficial effect of each type of SP on effectance is stronger for females than for males. Recommending community-dwelling elderly to participate in social groups appropriate for their gender may be effective for successful aging.

  20. Effects of Water Quality on Survival and Reproduction of Four Species of Planaria (Turbellaria: Tricladida)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    EB 24 ’ L Effects of water quality on survival and reproduction of four species of planaria ( Turbellaria : Tricladida)" V.R. RIVERAI and M.J. PERICH2...Introduction Historically, researchers have investigated planar- ians for their regeneration, physiology, memory and Planaria ( Turbellaria : Tricladida) are...determined to be the most adaptable and tolerant of the species evaluated. _ Key words: Planaria , water quality, survival, reproduction 0

  1. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on alveolar lung macrophage survival and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Nielsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) recently emerged as an important cause of reproductive disorders and pneumonia in domestic pigs throughout the world. Acute cytocidal replication of PRRSV in alveolar lung macrophages causes the acute pneumonia; however, it remains largely...... infection in this system. In short, in our minimal system containing only a single cell type, phagocytosis-suppressive effects of PRRSV infection were detected, that acted at the culture level by reducing the total number of alveolar lung macrophages....

  2. Effects of stillbirth and dystocia on subsequent reproductive performance in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yosuke; Uematsu, Mizuho; Kitahara, Go; Osawa, Takeshi; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of stillbirth and dystocia on subsequent reproductive performance in Japanese Black cattle. Data were collected for 34,763 calvings from 13,186 animals on 826 farms. Stillbirth was associated with a decreased first service conception rate compared to cows with a normal calving (44.4 versus 54.0%, respectively, P dystocia (P dystocia had inferior subsequent reproductive performance compared with those with a normal calving.

  3. Protective effect of melatonin against zonisamide-induced reproductive disorders in male rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wagdy K.B. Khalil; Abdu, Faiza

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Zonisamide (ZNS) is a modern antiepileptic drug (AED) that is distinguished from other AEDs by its unique structure and broad mechanistic profile. The pineal hormone melatonin is involved in the regulation of reproductive function, including the timing of the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of the present work was to study the protective effect of melatonin against the potential suppression impact of ZNS on reproductive activity. Material and methods Ninety adult albino m...

  4. What Makes Clusters Decline?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark....... The longitudinal study on the high-tech cluster reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to decline. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on the cluster’s adaptive capabilities, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing in new resources to the cluster...

  5. Regular and Moderate Exercise Counteracts the Decline of Antioxidant Protection but Not Methylglyoxal-Dependent Glycative Burden in the Ovary of Reproductively Aging Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordone, V.; Grannonico, M.; Cacchio, M.

    2016-01-01

    Population aging results in urgent needs of interventions aimed at ensuring healthy senescence. Exercise often results in healthy aging, yet many molecular mechanisms underlying such effects still need to be identified. We here investigated whether the age-dependent accumulation of oxidative and methylglyoxal- (MG-) related molecular damage could be delayed by moderate exercise in the mouse ovary, an organ that first exhibits impaired function with advancing age in mammals. CD1 female mice underwent two- or four-month treadmill-based running through the transition from adult to middle age, when ovaries show signs of senescence, and markers of protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and MG were measured. The long-term exercise reduced the protein oxidative damage in the ovaries (P < 0.01), and this was linked to the preservation of the glutathione peroxidase protection against ROS (P < 0.001), as well as to the increased glutathione availability (P < 0.001). Conversely, even though the age-related deactivation of the MG-targeting systems was partially prevented by the long-term running programme (P < 0.001), exercised mice were not protected from the age-dependent glycative burden. In summary, lately initiated regular and moderate exercise limited some changes occurring in the ovaries of middle-aged mice, and this might help to develop nonpharmacological cointerventions to reduce the vulnerability of mammalian ovaries towards redox dysfunctions. PMID:28116035

  6. Regular and Moderate Exercise Counteracts the Decline of Antioxidant Protection but Not Methylglyoxal-Dependent Glycative Burden in the Ovary of Reproductively Aging Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Falone

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Population aging results in urgent needs of interventions aimed at ensuring healthy senescence. Exercise often results in healthy aging, yet many molecular mechanisms underlying such effects still need to be identified. We here investigated whether the age-dependent accumulation of oxidative and methylglyoxal- (MG- related molecular damage could be delayed by moderate exercise in the mouse ovary, an organ that first exhibits impaired function with advancing age in mammals. CD1 female mice underwent two- or four-month treadmill-based running through the transition from adult to middle age, when ovaries show signs of senescence, and markers of protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS and MG were measured. The long-term exercise reduced the protein oxidative damage in the ovaries (P<0.01, and this was linked to the preservation of the glutathione peroxidase protection against ROS (P<0.001, as well as to the increased glutathione availability (P<0.001. Conversely, even though the age-related deactivation of the MG-targeting systems was partially prevented by the long-term running programme (P<0.001, exercised mice were not protected from the age-dependent glycative burden. In summary, lately initiated regular and moderate exercise limited some changes occurring in the ovaries of middle-aged mice, and this might help to develop nonpharmacological cointerventions to reduce the vulnerability of mammalian ovaries towards redox dysfunctions.

  7. The effect of new business creation on employment growth in regions facing population decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delfmann, Heike; Koster, Sierdjan

    Particularly in declining regions, new businesses creation is seen as a means to secure (future) employment opportunities. However, the way in which new business creation exerts its influence on employment is not evident. Do start-ups in these areas influencing employment change as they do in growth

  8. Effect of passive acoustic sampling methodology on detecting bats after declines from white nose syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Laci S.; Ford, W. Mark; Dobony, Christopher A.; Britzke, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Concomitant with the emergence and spread of white-nose syndrome (WNS) and precipitous decline of many bat species in North America, natural resource managers need modified and/or new techniques for bat inventory and monitoring that provide robust occupancy estimates. We used Anabat acoustic detectors to determine the most efficient passive acoustic sampling design for optimizing detection probabilities of multiple bat species in a WNS-impacted environment in New York, USA. Our sampling protocol included: six acoustic stations deployed for the entire duration of monitoring as well as a 4 x 4 grid and five transects of 5-10 acoustic units that were deployed for 6-8 night sample durations surveyed during the summers of 2011-2012. We used Program PRESENCE to determine detection probability and site occupancy estimates. Overall, the grid produced the highest detection probabilities for most species because it contained the most detectors and intercepted the greatest spatial area. However, big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and species not impacted by WNS were detected easily regardless of sampling array. Endangered Indiana (Myotis sodalis) and little brown (Myotis lucifugus) and tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus) showed declines in detection probabilities over our study, potentially indicative of continued WNS-associated declines. Identification of species presence through efficient methodologies is vital for future conservation efforts as bat populations decline further due to WNS and other factors.   

  9. Context-dependent effects of large-wildlife declines on small-mammal communities in central Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Hillary S; McCauley, Douglas J; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Goheen, Jacob R; Agwanda, Bernard; Brook, Cara; Otarola-Castillo, Erik; Ferguson, Adam W; Kinyua, Stephen N; McDonough, Molly M; Palmer, Todd M; Pringle, Robert M; Young, Truman P; Helgen, Kristofer M

    2015-03-01

    Many species of large wildlife have declined drastically worldwide. These reductions often lead to profound shifts in the ecology of entire communities and ecosystems. However, the effects of these large-wildlife declines on other taxa likely hinge upon both underlying abiotic properties of these systems and on the types of secondary anthropogenic changes associated with wildlife loss, making impacts difficult to predict. To better understand how these important contextual factors determine the consequences of large-wildlife declines on other animals in a community, we examined the effects of three common forms of large-wildlife loss (removal without replacement [using fences], removal followed by replacement with domestic stock, and removal accompanied by crop agricultural use) on small-mammal abundance, diversity, and community composition, in landscapes that varied in several abiotic attributes (rainfall, soil fertility, land-use intensity) in central Kenya. We found that small-mammal communities were indeed heavily impacted by all forms of large-wildlife decline, showing, on average: (1) higher densities, (2) lower species richness per site, and (3) different species assemblages in sites from which large wildlife were removed. However, the nature and magnitude of these effects were strongly context dependent. Rainfall, type of land-use change, and the interaction of these two factors were key predictors of both the magnitude and type of responses of small mammals. The strongest effects, particularly abundance responses, tended to be observed in low-rainfall areas. Whereas isolated wildlife removal primarily led to increased small-mammal abundance, wildlife removal associated with secondary uses (agriculture, domestic stock) had much more variable effects on abundance and stronger impacts on diversity and composition. Collectively, these results (1) highlight the importance of context in determining the impacts of large-wildlife decline on small

  10. Analysis of environmental and pecies effects on the magnitude of biomass investment in the reproductive effort of annual pasture plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de N.; Seligman, N.G.; Keulen, van H.

    1981-01-01

    In annual pastures utilized for grazing, the amount and quality of the standing dry matter in the dry season is of importance for the performance of the animals. Often both characteristics decline at the end of the green season. It is shown, that dispersal of the reproductive structures of the veget

  11. Effects of Fetal Exposure to Asian Sand Dust on Development and Reproduction in Male Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Seiichi; Ichinose, Takamichi; Arashidani, Keiichi; He, Miao; Takano, Hirohisa; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-11-23

    In recent experimental studies, we reported the aggravating effects of Asian sand dust (ASD) on male reproduction in mice. However, the effects of fetal ASD exposure on male reproduction have not been investigated. The present study investigated the effects of fetal ASD exposure on reproduction in male offspring. Using pregnant CD-1 mice, ASD was administered intratracheally on days 7 and 14 of gestation, and the reproduction of male offspring was determined at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after birth. The secondary sex ratio was significantly lower in the fetal ASD-exposed mice than in the controls. Histologic examination showed partial vacuolation of seminiferous tubules in immature mice. Moreover, daily sperm production (DSP) was significantly less in the fetal ASD-exposed mice than in the controls. DSP in the fetal ASD-exposed mice was approximately 10% less than the controls at both 5 and 10 weeks. However, both the histologic changes and the DSP decrease were reversed as the mice matured. These findings suggest that ASD exposure affects both the fetal development and the reproduction of male offspring. In the future, it will be necessary to clarify the onset mechanisms of ASD-induced male fetus death and male reproductive disorders.

  12. Effects of main reproductive and health problems on the performance of dairy cows: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ghavi Hossein-Zadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the potential effects of twinning, dystocia, stillbirth, abortion, retained placenta and metritis on the productive and reproductive performances in dairy cattle. These are diverse disorders that are similar in that they all can result in impaired performance of dairy cows. Reproductive problems occur frequently in lactating dairy cows and can dramatically affect reproductive efficiency in a dairy herd. Poor reproductive performance is a major cause of involuntary culling and therefore reduces the opportunity for voluntary culling and has a negative influence on the subsequent productivity of a dairy herd. Reproductive performance is influenced by the interactive effect of environment, management, health, and genetic factors. In addition, diseases mainly affect dairy cow productivity by decreasing reproductive efficiency, shortening the expected length of productive life and by lowering milk production. Deciding whether to breed, treat, or cull dairy cows showing one or more of these problems is a challenge for both veterinarians and dairy producers. In addition, there is considerable debate among dairy scientists and bovine practitioners regarding the economic impact of these problems in a dairy operation and the most effective management or therapeutic intervention for treating them. Because of this controversy, dairy managers should focus on prevention and control of risk factors associated with each problem rather than on prescriptive therapeutic interventions.

  13. Effects of obesity on women's reproduction and complications during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linné, Y

    2004-08-01

    Obesity is increasing rapidly among women all over the world, and more women in fertile ages become overweight and obese. Among all other problems, women who are obese have higher rates of amenorrhoea and infertility. Obese women have a higher risk of complications during pregnancy such as hypertensive diagnoses and gestational diabetes, and delivery complications such as higher rates of caesarean sections and prolonged time of delivery. The aim of this article is to review the consequences of being obese during the reproductive life of a woman.

  14. Effects of atrazine exposure on male reproductive performance in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andrea; Jocque, Harper; Sirot, Laura K.; Fiumera, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine is a commonly utilized herbicide to control broadleaf weeds in the agricultural setting. It can, however, have negative effects on male reproductive performance in a variety of vertebrate species. Much less is known, however, about the effects of atrazine on invertebrates. In this study, we investigated the effects of several different concentrations of larval atrazine exposure on measures of reproductive performance in adult male Drosophila melanogaster. Atrazine exposure had significant effects on a male’s mating ability and the number of eggs his partner lays when he was successful at mating. Exposed males also sired a smaller proportion of the offspring under competitive conditions when they were the first male to mate to a doubly mated female. Atrazine exposure had no measurable effect on a male’s ability to prevent a mated female from mating to another male or on the proportion of offspring sired when the exposed males were the second male to mate. Exposure upregulated expression of one male reproductive gene, ovulin, but had no effect on expression of another, sex peptide. Exposed males produced and transferred more sex peptide protein to the female during mating but ovulin protein levels were not affected. In general, we observed non-monotonic responses such that the intermediate exposure levels showed the largest reduction in male reproductive performance. This study suggests that atrazine exposure affects male reproductive performance in insects and future studies should aim to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the fitness effects of exposure. PMID:25445663

  15. Inhibitional effects of metal Zn²⁺ on the reproduction of Aphis medicaginis and its predation by Harmonia axyridis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contamination, including metals, can disturb the reproductive processes of many organisms, including both prey and predatory insects. However, there is virtually no information on the effects of high level Zinc (Zn pollution on aphids and ladybirds. The high concentrations of Zn²⁺ or Zn pollution inhibit reproduction in the phytophagous aphid, Aphis medicaginis, and the predatory ladybird Harmonia axyridis could provide important information. RESULTS: It was observed in this study that Zn concentrations in Vicia faba (broad bean seeds and seedlings in all Zn²⁺ treatments were significantly higher than that in the control group, and increased with increasing Zn²⁺ concentrations in the solution. The rate of reproduction in A. medicaginis declined significantly (p<0.05 over time in the five groups fed on broad bean seedlings treated with different concentrations of Zn²⁺ solution compared with the control group. These results showed that higher concentrations of Zn²⁺ significantly inhibited the reproductive capacity of A. medicaginis. We also cloned and identified a gene encoding vitellogenin (Vg from A. medicaginis, which has an important role in vitellogenesis, and therefore, reproduction was affected by exposure to Zn²⁺. Expression of AmVg was reduced with increasing exposure to Zn²⁺ and also in the F1-F3 generations of aphids exposed to different Zn²⁺ concentrations. Predation by H. axyridis was also reduced in aphids exposed to high-levels of Zn²⁺. Similarly, ovipositioning by H. axyridis was also reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that Zn²⁺ can significantly affect the reproductive capacity of both A. medicaginis and its predator H. axyridis, the former through effects on the expression of AmVg and the latter through avoidance of aphids containing high levels of Zn²⁺.

  16. Effect of peer education intervention on secondary school adolescents' reproductive health knowledge in Saki, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanlawon, F A; Asuzu, M C

    2011-12-01

    Adolescents' reproductive health needs and problems have become contemporary concerns globally. Of great concern is the high rate of sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS arguably influenced by lack of reproductive health knowledge. The study aimed at examining the effect of peer education on school adolescents' reproductive health knowledge in Saki, Southwestern, Nigeria, in a nurse-led concurrently controlled community interventional study. The study employed pre - and post - intervention (quasi - experimental) design. The experimental group was exposed to the peer education programme for six months. Pre and post differential data in the experimental and control groups were compared and analysed using analysis of covariance. The intervention had significant effect on adolescents in the experimental group compared with the control group in the area of knowledge of reproductive health issues (F1,519) = 37.117, (p reproductive health knowledge. It is recommended that community health nurses as well as other community workers should embrace peer education approach as a strategy to empower adolescents with reproductive health knowledge.

  17. Effectiveness of a reproductive sexual health education package among school going adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K C; Paul, Mini K; Leena, M L; Thankachi, Yamini; George, Babu; Russell, P S; Pillai, H Vijayan

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a school based "Adolescent Reproductive Sexual Health Education (ARSHE) Package" in improving students' knowledge on reproductive sexual health matters. An ARSHE package originally developed at Child Development Centre, Kerala, modified and approved by ICMR taskforce group was administered in three urban schools (One boys only, one girls only and one co-education) and one co-education rural school at Thiruvananthapuram district, Kerala. The study sample consisted of 1,586 adolescents including 996 boys and 560 girls of class IX and XI. Pre and post intervention knowledge regarding reproductive sexual health matters was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. In the pre-intervention period, it was observed that majority of adolescents were poorly informed about reproductive sexual health matters, particularly about contraceptives. As compared to boys, girls had much poorer knowledge about prevention of pregnancy and after intervention; there was a statistically significant increase in the knowledge in both boys and girls. Among girls percentage of poor knowledge had reduced significantly from 64.1% to 8.3% and among boys from 37.7% to 3.5%. Similarly, increase in knowledge level was also observed in various other aspects of reproductive and sexual health including, STI, HIV/AIDS and perceptions about premarital sex. The study results revealed the feasibility and effectiveness of school based reproductive and sexual health education intervention programs for adolescents.

  18. Genetic and pharmacological factors that influence reproductive aging in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie E Hughes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related degenerative changes in the reproductive system are an important aspect of aging, because reproductive success is the major determinant of evolutionary fitness. Caenorhabditis elegans is a prominent organism for studies of somatic aging, since many factors that extend adult lifespan have been identified. However, mechanisms that control reproductive aging in nematodes or other animals are not well characterized. To use C. elegans to measure reproductive aging, we analyzed mated hermaphrodites that do not become sperm depleted and monitored the duration and level of progeny production. Mated hermaphrodites display a decline of progeny production that culminates in reproductive cessation before the end of the lifespan, demonstrating that hermaphrodites undergo reproductive aging. To identify factors that influence reproductive aging, we analyzed genetic, environmental, and pharmacological factors that extend lifespan. Dietary restriction and reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling delayed reproductive aging, indicating that nutritional status and a signaling pathway that responds to environmental stress influence reproductive aging. Cold temperature delayed reproductive aging. The anticonvulsant medicine ethosuximide, which affects neural activity, delayed reproductive aging, indicating that neural activity can influence reproductive aging. Some of these factors decrease early progeny production, but there is no consistent relationship between early progeny production and reproductive aging in strains with an extended lifespan. To directly examine the effects of early progeny production on reproductive aging, we used sperm availability to modulate the level of early reproduction. Early progeny production neither accelerated nor delayed reproductive aging, indicating that reproductive aging is not controlled by use-dependent mechanisms. The implications of these findings for evolutionary theories of aging are discussed.

  19. Effect of RFRP-3 on reproduction is sex- and developmental status-dependent in the striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Zhong, Min; Xue, Hui-Liang; Ding, Ji-Shun; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Jin-Hui; Chen, Lei; Xu, Lai-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    RFamide-related peptides (RFRPs) are orthologous to gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) inhibiting gonadotropin release. There are only two RFRP sequences (RFRP-1 and RFRP-3) encoded in rodents. RFRP-3, which was considered as a hypothetical inhibitor on GnRH, shows a stimulatory effect on the male Syrian and male Siberian hamster in short days. As a dominant rodent pest in northern China farmland, the striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis) has higher reproductive activities and could act as a model to study the mechanism of reproduction. However, the effect of RFRP-3 on the reproductive activity for the striped hamster is less understood. In the study, we cloned 643 bp RFRP cDNA from the striped hamster hypothalamus, which contained an ORF of 570 bp encoding two RFamide-related peptide (RFRP) sequences: SPAPANKVPHSAANLPLRF-NH2 (C. barabensis RFRP-1) and TLSRVPSLPQRF-NH2 (C. barabensis RFRP-3). We also investigated the expression variation of RFRP mRNA and GnRH mRNA in the hypothalamus from hamsters with different developmental statuses (7-week-, 13-week- and 1.5-year-olds) using FQ-PCR, in which the 13-week-old female individuals were in estrous. The striped hamsters that are 7 weeks and 1.5 years old are non-breeding individuals, and those that are 13-week hamsters have breeding phenomena. The highest hypothalamus RFRP mRNA level was found in breeding males as compared to non-breeding males. Conversely, the lowest RFRP mRNA level in the hypothalamus was observed in breeding females, with no significant level when the breeding females were compared to the 7-week-old individuals. Additionally, the investigation of GnRH expression level showed a declining expression trend across the developmental stages (7-week-, 13-week- and 1.5-year-olds) in both sexes. Significant negative and positive relationships were detected in the 13-week estrous female (r=-0.997, P=0.035) and the 13-week male (r=0.998, P=0.029) striped hamsters respectively, which suggest that RFRP-3

  20. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on nursing facility resident mortality, hospitalization, and functional decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosa, David; Feng, Zhanlian; Hyer, Kathy; Brown, Lisa M; Thomas, Kali; Mor, Vincent

    2010-09-01

    The study was designed to examine the 30- and 90-day mortality and hospitalization rates among nursing facility (NF) residents in the affected areas of Louisiana and Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina and to assess the rate of significant posthurricane functional decline. A secondary data analysis was conducted using Medicare claims merged with NF resident data from the Minimum Data Set. Thirty- and 90-day mortality and hospitalization rates for long-stay (>90 days) residents residing in 141 at-risk NFs during Hurricane Katrina were compared to rates for residents residing at the same facilities during the same time period in prior nonhurricane years (2003 and 2004). Functional decline was assessed as a 4+ drop in function using a 28-point Minimum Data Set Activities of Daily Living Scale. There were statistically significant differences (all P Hurricane Katrina. At 30 days, the mortality rate was 3.88% among the exposed cohort compared with 2.10% and 2.28% for residents in 2003 and 2004, respectively. The 90-day mortality rate was 9.27% compared with 6.71% and 6.31%, respectively. These mortality differences translated into an additional 148 deaths at 30 days and 230 deaths at 90 days. The 30-day hospitalization rate was 9.87% compared with 7.21% and 7.53%, respectively. The 90-day hospitalization rate was 20.39% compared with 18.61% and 17.82%, respectively. Finally, the rate of significant functional decline among survivors was 6.77% compared with 5.81% in 2003 and 5.10% in 2004. NF residents experienced a significant increase in mortality, hospitalization, and functional decline during Hurricane Katrina.

  1. Effects of supplemental feeding on survivorship, reproduction, and dispersal in San Joaquin kit foxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    Previous field studies at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California indicated that a decline in tie population size of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox might be linked to declining prey abundance. To evaluate whether kit fox populations we limited by food resources; survival probabilities, sources of mortality, reproductive success, and dispersal rates were compared between foxes with access to supplemental food and foxes without access to supplemental food (controls). Of foxes born in 1988, the probabilities of supplementary fed foxes surviving to age one and age two were higher than corresponding probabilities of control foxes. Survival probabilities of fed foxes from the 1988 cohort also were higher than the average survival probabilities of foxes born in the previous eight years. Most foxes that died during their first year of life died in June, July, or August. Monthly probabilities of survival were higher for fed pups than control pups curing the months of July and August of 1988. Survival probabilities of fed foxes originally r captured as adults and fed foxes born in 1989 were not significantly different than survival probabilities of corresponding control groups. Most foxes for which a cause of death could be determined were lolled by predators. Average dispersal distances were not significantly different between fed and control groups but the two longest dispersal distances were made by control foxes. These results indicate that food availability affects survival, reproduction, and dispersal by kit foxes and provides evidence that kit fox populations may at times be limited by food abundance.

  2. Arctic sea ice decline and continental cold anomalies: Upstream and downstream effects of Greenland blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodan; Luo, Dehai

    2017-04-01

    The influence of Greenland blocking on continental cold anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere is examined. It is found that westward moving Greenland blocking (WGB) events in the recent decade are more strongly related to the sea ice decline over the Baffin Bay, Davis Strait, and Labrador Sea (BDL), while the quasi-stationary Greenland blocking (QGB) events are more strongly related to the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. The frequency of WGB events is significantly increased owing to reduced mid-high-latitude westerly winds in the North Atlantic and its upstream region because of intensified Arctic warming related to the large BDL sea ice decline. It is further revealed that North American low temperatures are more sensitive to the WGB, while European low temperatures are more sensitive to the QGB. For the WGB, an intense cold anomaly is seen over the eastern North America. But for the QGB, strong cold anomalies appear over the North Europe and eastern Asia. Thus, it is concluded that more winter cold air outbreaks should occur over the eastern North America, if large BDL sea ice decline continues in the recent decade.

  3. Simulating the effects of fluctuating dissolved oxygen on growth, reproduction, and survival of fish and shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth

    2014-02-21

    Individuals are commonly exposed to fluctuating levels of stressors, while most laboratory experiments focus on constant exposures. We develop and test a mathematical model for predicting the effects of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) on growth, reproduction, and survival using laboratory experiments on fish and shrimp. The exposure-effects model simulates the hourly reductions in growth and survival, and the reduction in reproduction (fecundity) at times of spawning, of an individual as it is exposed to constant or hourly fluctuating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was applied to seven experiments involving fish and shrimp that included constant and fluctuating DO exposures, with constant exposures used for parameter estimation and the model then used to simulate the growth, reproduction, and survival in the fluctuating treatments. Cumulative effects on growth, reproduction, and survival were predicted well by the model, but the model did not replay the observed episodic low survival days. Further investigation should involve the role of acclimation, possible inclusion of repair effects in reproduction and survival, and the sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the immediate effects function. Additional testing of the model with other taxa, different patterns of fluctuating exposures, and different stressors is needed to determine the model's generality and robustness.

  4. [Effects of multi-genes for reproductive traits in Tibet pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Chamba, Yangzom; Wang, Qiang; Ling, Yao; Gu, Xue-Dong; Wu, Ke-Liang; Zhang, Hao

    2010-05-01

    Tibet pig is a unique native breed in the plateau of China, which has good adaptation to the harsh climate of high land and resistance to diseases and crude feeding. However, its reproductive rate is low. The objectives of this study were to search for the polymorphisms of estrogen receptor (ESR), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSHb), prolactin receptor (PRLR), and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) in Tibet pig and to analyze the effects of these variants and their combination genotypes on reproductive traits. The results showed that the effects of FSHb, ESR, and PRLR genes were significant in the Tibet pig population, and the effective genotypes of the three genes for reproductive traits were BB, BB, and AA, respectively. There were two genotypes for RBP4 gene in Tibet pig, which did not have significant effect on the reproductive traits. The optical genotype of FSHb-ESR-PRLR is BB-BB-AA, which is more effective on reproductive traits than any single gene in Tibet pig.

  5. Effects of flavonoids from Semen Cuscutae on the reproductive system in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-NianQIN; Bai-RongSHE; Yun-ChuSHE; Jian-HongWANG

    2000-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of the flavonoids extracted from the Semen Cuscutae (FSC) on the reproductive and endocrine functions in male rats. Methods: (1) FSC were obtained from the semen of Cuscuta sinensis l_;am through solvent extraction and polyamide columnar chromatography; (2) Effect of FSC on the reproductive organs was assessed in immature rats. Rats were administered FSC through gastric garage at a dose of 300 mg/kg per day for 7 days and the weights of testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle and pituitary gland were then observed; (3) To observe the effect of FSC on the reproductive endocrine function: same dose level of FSC was given to male rats of different age groups for 7days; on day 8, the plasma testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and LH were determined by RIA, the specific binding of LH was estimated and the testes were weighed. (4) Effect of FSC on LH secretion was assessed in vitro on cultured adenohypophysis. (5) Effect of FSC on T secretion was assessed in vitro on Leydig cell culture. Results: FSC increased the weights of testis, epididymis and pituitary gland, and stimulated T and LH secretion both in vitro and in immature rats. Conclusion: FSC invigorates the reproductive system and reproductive endocrine function in male rats.

  6. Effects of habitat fragmentation and soil quality on reproduction in two heathland Genista species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaliki, M; Diekmann, M

    2010-07-01

    Habitat fragmentation decreases plant population size and increases population isolation, as well as altering patterns of plant-animal interactions, all of which may reduce plant fitness. Here, we studied effects of habitat fragmentation (in terms of population size and isolation) and soil quality on the reproduction of two rare legume species, Genista anglica (13 populations) and Genista pilosa (14 populations), confined to remnants of acidic and nutrient-poor Calluna heathlands. Single individuals of the Genista plants are impossible to distinguish; population size was therefore estimated according to the area occupied (referred to as population size hereafter). We collected soil samples in all heathland sites to determine content of soil water, C, N, P, Ca, K and Mg. In both species values of soil pH and C/N ratio, as well as content of soil P and base cations, reflected the highly acidic and nutrient-poor environment of the heathlands. Population sizes were unrelated to soil quality. Although the two Genista species are similar in morphology and ecology, effects of explanatory variables on reproduction were largely inconsistent across species. In G. anglica, population size had a positive impact on all reproductive variables except germination rate, which, in contrast, was the only variable affected positively by population size in G. pilosa. In both species, mean total reproductive output, calculated as the product of total seed mass per shoot and total germination, increased with increasing water content and decreased with increasing P. In G. anglica, we found positive effects of the C/N ratio on all reproductive variables except mean single and total seed mass per shoot. In summary, in both species reproductive success per shoot decreased with increasing soil nutrient availability in the heathland sites. The infestation of two large populations of G. pilosa with the pre-dispersal, seed-predating weevil Apion compactum had no significant effect on

  7. Effects of Reproductive Health Education on Knowledge and Attitudes Among Female Adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tork, Hanan Mohamed Mohamed; Al Hosis, Khalid Fahad

    2015-09-01

    For many girls, the onset of puberty that occurs during adolescence marks a time of heightened vulnerability to early pregnancy, with its attendant complications and heightened risk of maternal mortality. National and international forums have recognized the need to address these problems through reproductive health education. This article assesses the reproductive-health-related knowledge and attitudes of female adolescents aged between 14 and 19 years. In addition, the authors assess the effectiveness of a reproductive health education program in improving the related knowledge of female adolescents. The study was conducted on female students in three secondary schools and in the preparatory year at Qassim University (N = 309). A 59-item structured questionnaire was used to test the knowledge and attitudes of all participants regarding reproductive health before and after the intervention program. Data collection was carried out between September and November 2012. A significant increase for the total sample in knowledge regarding puberty and menstruation was observed (p reproductive health education program improves knowledge among adolescent girls regarding reproductive health.

  8. Effects of precocene and azadirachtin in Rhodnius prolixus: some data on development and reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloi S. Garcia

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The results presented in this paper clearly indicate that precocene and azadirachtin are effective inhibitors of moulting and reproduction in the hemipteran Rhodnius prolixus. The time of application is important and only applications of these substances early in the intermoulting period cause their effects in nymphs. The inhibition of moulting is fully reversed by ecdysone therapy. Precocene and azadirachtin also affected drastically the oogenesis and egg deposition in this insect. Precocene-induced sterilization is reversed by application of juvenile hormone III. However, this hormone is unable to reverse the effect of azadirachtin on reproduction. Ecdysteroid titers in nymphs and adult females are decreased by these treatments. In vitro analysis suggest that precocene and azadirachtin may act directly on the prothoracic glands and ovaries producing ecdysteroids. Based on these and other findings the possible mode of action of these compounds on the development and reproduction of Rhodnius prolixus is discussed.

  9. Declining global warming effects on the phenology of spring leaf unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongshuo H; Zhao, Hongfang; Piao, Shilong; Peaucelle, Marc; Peng, Shushi; Zhou, Guiyun; Ciais, Philippe; Huang, Mengtian; Menzel, Annette; Peñuelas, Josep; Song, Yang; Vitasse, Yann; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Janssens, Ivan A

    2015-10-01

    Earlier spring leaf unfolding is a frequently observed response of plants to climate warming. Many deciduous tree species require chilling for dormancy release, and warming-related reductions in chilling may counteract the advance of leaf unfolding in response to warming. Empirical evidence for this, however, is limited to saplings or twigs in climate-controlled chambers. Using long-term in situ observations of leaf unfolding for seven dominant European tree species at 1,245 sites, here we show that the apparent response of leaf unfolding to climate warming (ST, expressed in days advance of leaf unfolding per °C warming) has significantly decreased from 1980 to 2013 in all monitored tree species. Averaged across all species and sites, ST decreased by 40% from 4.0 ± 1.8 days °C(-1) during 1980-1994 to 2.3 ± 1.6 days °C(-1) during 1999-2013. The declining ST was also simulated by chilling-based phenology models, albeit with a weaker decline (24-30%) than observed in situ. The reduction in ST is likely to be partly attributable to reduced chilling. Nonetheless, other mechanisms may also have a role, such as 'photoperiod limitation' mechanisms that may become ultimately limiting when leaf unfolding dates occur too early in the season. Our results provide empirical evidence for a declining ST, but also suggest that the predicted strong winter warming in the future may further reduce ST and therefore result in a slowdown in the advance of tree spring phenology.

  10. Effects of education and race on cognitive decline: An integrative study of generalizability versus study-specific results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alden L; Mungas, Dan M; Crane, Paul K; Gibbons, Laura E; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Manly, Jennifer J; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Romero, Heather; Sachs, Bonnie; Thomas, Michael; Potter, Guy G; Jones, Richard N

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the study was to examine variability across multiple prospective cohort studies in level and rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and years of education. We compare data across studies, we harmonized estimates of common latent factors representing overall or general cognitive performance, memory, and executive function derived from the: (a) Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, Inwood Columbia Aging Project (N = 4,115), (b) Spanish and English Neuropsychological Assessment Scales (N = 525), (c) Duke Memory, Health, and Aging study (N = 578), and (d) Neurocognitive Outcomes of Depression in the Elderly (N = 585). We modeled cognitive change over age for cognitive outcomes by race, education, and study. We adjusted models for sex, dementia status, and study-specific characteristics. The results found that for baseline levels of overall cognitive performance, memory, and executive function, differences in race and education tended to be larger than between-study differences and consistent across studies. This pattern did not hold for rate of cognitive decline: effects of education and race/ethnicity on cognitive change were not consistently observed across studies, and when present were small, with racial/ethnic minorities and those with lower education declining at faster rates. In this diverse set of datasets, non-Hispanic Whites and those with higher education had substantially higher baseline cognitive test scores. However, differences in the rate of cognitive decline by race/ethnicity and education did not follow this pattern. This study suggests that baseline test scores and longitudinal change have different determinants, and future studies to examine similarities and differences of causes of cognitive decline in racially/ethnically and educationally diverse older groups is needed.

  11. Nutritional decline in cystic fibrosis related diabetes: the effect of intensive nutritional intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, H

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Reports indicate that nutritional and respiratory decline occur up to four years prior to diagnosis of cystic fibrosis related diabetes (CFRD). Our aim was to establish whether intensive nutritional intervention prevents pre-diabetic nutritional decline in an adult population with CFRD. METHODS: 48 adult patients with CFRD were matched to 48 controls with CF, for age, gender and lung pathogen status. Nutritional and other clinical indices were recorded at annual intervals from six years before until two years after diagnosis. Data were also analysed to examine the impact of early and late acquisition of CFRD. RESULTS: No important differences in weight, height, body mass index (BMI), lung function or intravenous treatment were found between groups in the six years prior to diagnosis, nor any significant deviation over time. In those who developed diabetes, use of overnight enteral tube feeding (ETF) was four times as likely at the time of diagnosis, compared to controls [ETF 43.8% (CFRD) v 18.8% (CF Controls), OR 4.0, CI 1.3 to 16.4, p=0.01]. Age at onset of CFRD played a significant role in determining the pre-diabetic clinical course. Younger diabetics with continued growth at study onset (n=17) had a lower BMI from 2 years prior to diagnosis compared to controls [BMI 18.9 kg\\/m(2) (CFRD) v 20.8 kg\\/m(2) (CF Controls), diff=1.9, CI -0.1 to 3.7 p=0.04]. The BMI of older diabetics (completed growth at study onset) was equal to that of controls throughout. CONCLUSION: Pre-diabetic nutritional decline is not inevitable in adults with CFRD, but is influenced by age of onset. In the group overall, those with CFRD are more likely to require ETF from 2 years prior to diagnosis. Despite intensive nutritional intervention, patients who continue to grow throughout the pre-diabetic years, show a level of nutritional decline absent in older adults.

  12. Reproductive effects of two neonicotinoid insecticides on mouse sperm function and early embryonic development in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hua Gu

    Full Text Available Acetamiprid (ACE and imidacloprid (IMI are two major members in the family of neonicotinoid pesticides, which are synthesized with a higher selectivity to insects. The present study determined and compared in vitro effects of ACE, IMI and nicotine on mammalian reproduction by using an integrated testing strategy for reproductive toxicology, which covered sperm quality, sperm penetration into oocytes and preimplantation embryonic development. Direct chemical exposure (500 µM or 5 mM on spermatozoa during capacitation was performed, and in vitro fertilization (IVF process, zygotes and 2-cell embryos were respectively incubated with chemical-supplemented medium until blastocyst formation to evaluate the reproductive toxicity of these chemicals and monitor the stages mainly affected. Generally, treatment of 500 µM or 5 mM chemicals for 30 min did not change sperm motility and DNA integrity significantly but the fertilization ability in in vitro fertilization (IVF process, indicating that IVF process could detect and distinguish subtle effect of spermatozoa exposed to different chemicals. Culture experiment in the presence of chemicals in medium showed that fertilization process and zygotes are adversely affected by direct exposure of chemicals (PIMI>ACE, whereas developmental progression of 2-cell stage embryos was similar to controls (P>0.05. These findings unveiled the hazardous effects of neonicotinoid pesticides exposure on mammalian sperm fertilization ability as well as embryonic development, raising the concerns that neonicotinoid pesticides may pose reproductive risks on human reproductive health, especially in professional populations.

  13. The effects of perceived mating opportunities on patterns of reproductive investment by male guppies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke T Barrett

    Full Text Available Males pay considerable reproductive costs in acquiring mates (precopulatory sexual selection and in producing ejaculates that are effective at fertilising eggs in the presence of competing ejaculates (postcopulatory sexual selection. Given these costs, males must balance their reproductive investment in a given mating to optimise their future reproductive potential. Males are therefore expected to invest in reproduction prudently according to the likelihood of obtaining future matings. In this study we tested this prediction by determining whether male reproductive investment varies with expected future mating opportunities, which were experimentally manipulated by visually exposing male guppies (Poecilia reticulata to high or low numbers of females in the absence of competing males. Our experiment did not reveal consistent effects of perceived future mating opportunity on either precopulatory (male mate choice and mating behaviour or postcopulatory (sperm quality and quantity investment. However, we did find that male size and female availability interacted to influence mating behaviour; large males visually deprived of females during the treatment phase became more choosy and showed greater interest in their preferred female than those given continuous visual access to females. Overall, our results suggest males tailor pre- rather than postcopulatory traits according to local female availability, but critically, these effects depend on male size.

  14. ROBUST DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutawanir Darwis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Empirical decline curve analysis of oil production data gives reasonable answer in hyperbolic type curves situations; however the methodology has limitations in fitting real historical production data in present of unusual observations due to the effect of the treatment to the well in order to increase production capacity. The development ofrobust least squares offers new possibilities in better fitting production data using declinecurve analysis by down weighting the unusual observations. This paper proposes a robustleast squares fitting lmRobMM approach to estimate the decline rate of daily production data and compares the results with reservoir simulation results. For case study, we usethe oil production data at TBA Field West Java. The results demonstrated that theapproach is suitable for decline curve fitting and offers a new insight in decline curve analysis in the present of unusual observations.

  15. Non-consumptive effects of predator presence on copepod reproduction: insights from a mesocosm experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Ceballos, Sara; Borg, Marc Andersen;

    2014-01-01

    Reproduction in planktonic animals depends on numerous biotic and abiotic factors. One of them is predation pressure, which can have both direct consumptive effects on population density and sex ratio, and non-consumptive effects, for example on mating and migration behaviour. In copepods, predat...

  16. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  17. Effects of substorm electrojet on declination along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes in the northern auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Inge; Johnsen, Magnar G.; Løvhaug, Unni P.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic field often experiences large fluctuations, especially at high latitudes in the auroral zones. We have found, using simulations, that there are significant differences in the substorm signature, in certain coordinate systems, as a function of longitude. This is confirmed by the analysis of real, measured data from comparable locations. Large geomagnetic fluctuations pose challenges for companies involved in resource exploitation since the Earth's magnetic field is used as the reference when navigating drilling equipment. It is widely known that geomagnetic activity increases with increasing latitude and that the largest fluctuations are caused by substorms. In the auroral zones, substorms are common phenomena, occurring almost every night. In principle, the magnitude of geomagnetic disturbances from two identical substorms along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes around the globe, at different local times, will be the same. However, the signature of a substorm will change as a function of geomagnetic longitude due to varying declination, dipole declination, and horizontal magnetic field along constant geomagnetic latitudes. To investigate and quantify this, we applied a simple substorm current wedge model in combination with a dipole representation of the Earth's magnetic field to simulate magnetic substorms of different morphologies and local times. The results of these simulations were compared to statistical data from observatories and are discussed in the context of resource exploitation in the Arctic. We also attempt to determine and quantify areas in the auroral zone where there is a potential for increased space weather challenges compared to other areas.

  18. Moving Forward: Age Effects on the Cerebellum Underlie Cognitive and Motor Declines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2014-01-01

    Though the cortical contributions to age-related declines in motor and cognitive performance are well-known, the potential contributions of the cerebellum are less clear. The diverse functions of the cerebellum make it an important structure to investigate in aging. Here, we review the extant literature on this topic. To date, there is evidence to indicate that there are morphological age differences in the cerebellum that are linked to motor and cognitive behavior. Cerebellar morphology is often as good as -- or even better -- at predicting performance than the prefrontal cortex. We also touch on the few studies using functional neuroimaging and connectivity analyses that further implicate the cerebellum in age-related performance declines. Importantly, we provide a conceptual framework for the cerebellum influencing age differences in performance, centered on the notion of degraded internal models. The evidence indicating that cerebellar age differences associate with performance highlights the need for additional work in this domain to further elucidate the role of the cerebellum in age differences in movement control and cognitive function. PMID:24594194

  19. Effect of Ubiquinol on Serum Reproductive Hormones of Amenorrhic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, A S; Littaru, G P; Funahashi, I; Painkara, U S; Dange, N S; Chauhan, P

    2016-07-01

    In neuroendocrine system the increase in oxidative status is produced by a glucocorticoid-dependent and transcriptional increase in pro-oxidative drive, with concurrent inhibition of the antioxidant defense system, ultimately leading to increased neuronal cell death. Functional hypothalamic disturbances and neuroendocirne aberrations have both short and long term consequences for reproductive health. Understandably, an impaired or diminished hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis leads to anovulation and hypoestrogenism. Anovulation is directly linked to the neurohormonal and hormonal background of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea. Impairment of pulsatile Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone secretion causes the impairment of pulsatile Lutenizing Hormone (LH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) secretion. The importance of oxidative stress in various pituitary disorders suggesting a possible clinical usefulness of antioxidant molecules like the lipophilic antioxidant Ubiquinol. Coenzyme Q10 or Ubiquinol is an essential part of the cell energy-producing system of mitochondria. However, it is also a powerful lipophilic antioxidant, protecting lipoproteins and cell membranes from autooxidation. Due to these unique actions Ubiquinol is used in clinical practice as an antioxidants for neurodegenerative diseases. So to identify the role of Ubiquinol on reproductive hormones FSH and LH, we have included 50 infertile patients of age group of 20-40, which are mostly amenorrhic. Out of 50 only 30 patients were in continuous follow up after supplementing them with 150 mg of Ubiquinol every day for 4 months. The hormonal levels were estimated by Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay technique at follicular phase. The result suggests that FSH concentration is increased up to three times (from 3.10 ± 2.70 to 10.09 ± 6.93) but remains within the normal limit (P  0.05). The supplementation of 150 mg of Ubiquinol may reduce the oxidative stress in neuroendocrine system which

  20. [Effect of energy intake on production and reproduction characteristics in (breeding) sows].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, L A

    1985-04-01

    A total number of 113 first-litter sows and 680 gilts of the Dutch Landrace were used in order to study the effect of energy intake on productive and reproductive characteristics. A high feeding level in normal sows after weaning is essential, not to increase the ovulation rate but rather to improve the condition of the sow and advance oestrus. The experiment with the gilts showed that from the point of view of the cost of the feed consumed and reproductive performance, an energy intake during rearing of more than 2.1 times maintenance will have an adverse effect when adequate protein is given.

  1. Effects of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA on the Reproductive Axis Pituitary, Thyroid, Testes of Ram in Non-reproductive Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Mahdavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Conjugated Linoleic Acid is a group of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids with more than one double bond and a mixture of 28 isomers of Linoleic acid (C 18:2 and it is counted as one of the essential acids. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of CLA on some reproductive hormones in rams. In this study, six rams 3 to 4 years old with an average weight of 90 kg were selected. Rams were randomly divided into 3 groups and were treated by CLA treatment for 30 days. The first group (as a control group didn’t receive CLA, The second group received 0.5 g and the third group received 1 g of CLA. The blood testing was done on rams every 15 days using a 20 mL syringe. Data analysis was performed by SAS software. Also mean comparison was done using Duncan's test method (p<0.05. Obtained results showed that the serum concentration of testosterone hormone was decreased numerically as well as the concentration of FSH hormone however the concentration of LH was increased. Also the CLA had a significant effect on Leptin concentration. CLA in oral form can reduce the concentration of testosterone in rams.

  2. Effect of clove oil on the Albumen gland and reproductive potential of Achatina fulica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadnya A Parvate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Achatina fulica is a pestiferous land snail causing extensive agri-horticultural damage across the globe including India. A hermaphroditic land snail Achatina fulica exhibits protandrous reproduction which is one of the major causes of its rapid population explosion. Albumen gland which is a part of the female reproductive organs of the snail enlarges in size during the breeding season and secretes the perivitelline fluid which nourishes the developing embryo. Its quality and quantity determines the number of eggs laid by the snail. This study aimed at exploring the effect of clove oil (essential oil of clove on the histology of albumen gland by subjecting the animals to its subacute doses (20% and 60% of LD 50 value/ 24 hr, by topical application, and comparing it with the control and vehicle treated group. The effect of these doses on the galactogen content, chief component of perivitelline fluid of albumen gland, was also determined by using the technique of immunohistochemistry. The reproductive efficiency of the snails, w.r.to their fecundity, hatchability and survivability of hatchlings up to 72 hrs were also studied across the controls and treated groups. The results revealed alterations in the cyto - architechture of albumen gland of the treated snails, substantial reduction in its galactogen content and also a marked reduction in their reproductive efficiency as compared to the control snails. Thus this study indicated that clove oil severely affects the reproductive potential of the snail and hence can be used as a potential molluscicide in its population control.

  3. Effect of honey on the reproductive system of male rat offspring exposed to prenatal restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, M N; Mohamed, M

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to prenatal stress is associated with impaired reproductive function in male rat offspring. Honey is traditionally used by the Malays for enhancement of fertility. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of honey on reproductive system of male rat offspring exposed to prenatal restraint stress. Dams were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): control, honey, stress and honey + stress groups. Dams from honey and honey + stress groups received oral honey (1.2 g kg(-1) body weight) daily from day 1 of pregnancy, meanwhile dams from stress and honey + stress groups were subjected to restraint stress (three times per day) from day 11 of pregnancy until delivery. At 10 weeks old, each male rat offspring was mated with a regular oestrus cycle female. Male sexual behaviour and reproductive performance were evaluated. Then, male rats were euthanised for assessment on reproductive parameters. Honey supplementation during prenatal restraint stress significantly increased testis and epididymis weights as well as improved the percentages of abnormal spermatozoa and sperm motility in male rat offspring. In conclusion, this study might suggest that supplementation of honey during pregnancy seems to reduce the adverse effects of restraint stress on reproductive organs weight and sperm parameters in male rat offspring.

  4. Local density regulates migratory songbird reproductive success through effects on double-brooding and nest predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Bradley K; Wheelwright, Nathaniel T; Newman, Amy E M; Norris, D Ryan

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge of the density-dependent processes that regulate animal populations is key to understanding, predicting, and conserving populations. In migratory birds, density-dependence is most often studied during the breeding season, yet we still lack a robust understanding of the reproductive traits through which density influences individual reproductive success. We used 27-yr of detailed, individual-level productivity data from an island-breeding population of Savannah sparrows Passerculus sandwichensis to evaluate effects of local and total annual population density on female reproductive success. Local density (number of neighbors within 50 m of a female's nest) had stronger effects on the number of young fledged than did total annual population density. Females nesting in areas of high local density were more likely to suffer nest predation and less likely to initiate and fledge a second clutch, which led to fewer young fledged in a season. Fledging fewer young subsequently decreased the likelihood of a female recruiting offspring into the breeding population in a subsequent year. Collectively, these results provide insight into the scale and reproductive mechanisms mediating density-dependent reproductive success and fitness in songbirds. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. Condition dependent effects on sex allocation and reproductive effort in sequential hermaphrodites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lock Rogers

    Full Text Available Theory predicts the optimal timing of sex change will be the age or size at which half of an individual's expected fitness comes through reproduction as a male and half through reproduction as a female. In this way, sex allocation across the lifetime of a sequential hermaphrodite parallels the sex allocation of an outbreeding species exhibiting a 1:1 ratio of sons to daughters. However, the expectation of a 1:1 sex ratio is sensitive to variation in individual condition. If individuals within a population vary in condition, high-condition individuals are predicted to make increased allocations to the sex with the higher variance in reproductive success. An oft-cited example of this effect is seen in red deer, Cervus elaphus, in which mothers of high condition are more likely to produce sons, while those in low condition are more likely to produce daughters. Here, we show that individual condition is predicted to similarly affect the pattern of sex allocation, and thus the allocation of reproductive effort, in sequential hermaphrodites. High-condition sex-changers are expected to obtain more than half of their fitness in the high-payoff second sex and, as a result, are expected to reduce the allocation of reproductive effort in the initial sex. While the sex ratio in populations of sequential hermaphrodites is always skewed towards an excess of the initial sex, condition dependence is predicted to increase this effect.

  6. Effect of climatic variables on production and reproduction traits of colored broiler breeder poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, G D; Behura, N C; Sardar, K K; Mishra, P K

    2015-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the important climatic variables affecting production and reproduction in a broiler breeder flock. The experiment was conducted for a period of 1 year on colored synthetic female line male and female poultry birds. 630 female progeny and 194 male progenies from 69 sires and 552 dams produced in four consecutive hatches at an interval of 10 days were used for the present study. Each of the seven, body weight and reproduction traits were regressed with nine environmental variables. Initially, the data were subjected to hatch effect and sire effect corrections through best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) method and, then, multiple linear regressions of environmental variables on each trait were applied. The overall regression was significant (pvariables except maximum temperature and minimum temperature were significant (pvariables play a significant role in production and reproduction of breeder broiler poultry. Controlling these variables in adverse weathers may increase production.

  7. Fusarium mycotoxins: effects on reproductive function in domestic animals--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Pizzo, Fabiola; Spicer, Leon J; Caloni, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    On a global scale, cereal grains and animal feed may be contaminated with trichothecenes, such as deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin, zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisins, the major mycotoxins of Fusarium fungi. Of these mycotoxins, ZEA is unequivocally implicated in reproductive disorders of swine and other domestic animals. Experiments in vivo and in vitro indicate that ZEA and its metabolites exert estrogenic effects resulting in functional and morphological alterations in reproductive organs. Recently, the potential of trichothecenes and fumonisins to cause reproductive disorders in domestic animals has been investigated. The present review summarizes the toxicological data on the effects of Fusarium mycotoxins on ovarian function, testicular function, placenta and fetus, and puberty/sexual maturity of domestic animals. The results of in vivo animal studies and in vitro tests are reported and discussed.

  8. Effect of reproductive ageing on pregnant mouse uterus and cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rima; Moffatt, James D.; Mourmoura, Evangelia; Demaison, Luc; Seed, Paul T.; Poston, Lucilla

    2017-01-01

    Key points Older pregnant women have a greater risk of operative delivery, still birth and post‐term induction.This suggests that maternal age can influence the timing of birth and processes of parturition.We have found that increasing maternal age in C57BL/6J mice is associated with prolongation of gestation and length of labour.Older pregnant mice also had delayed progesterone withdrawal and impaired myometrial function.Uterine ageing and labour dysfunction should be investigated further in older primigravid women. Abstract Advanced maternal age (≥35 years) is associated with increased rates of operative delivery, stillbirth and post‐term labour induction. The physiological causes remain uncertain, although impaired myometrial function has been implicated. To investigate the hypothesis that maternal age directly influences successful parturition, we assessed the timing of birth and fetal outcome in pregnant C57BL/6J mice at 3 months (young) and 5 months (intermediate) vs. 8 months (older) of age using infrared video recording. Serum progesterone profiles, myometrium and cervix function, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex enzymatic activities were also examined. Older pregnant mice had a longer mean gestation and labour duration (P changes to the enzymatic activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. In conclusion, 8‐month‐old mice provide a useful model of reproductive ageing. The present study has identified potential causes of labour dysfunction amenable to investigation in older primigravid women. PMID:28083928

  9. Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in stable myocardial infarction patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Giltay, E.J.; Kromhout, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies suggest a protective effect of n-3 fatty acids derived from fish (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) against cognitive decline. For a-linolenic acid (ALA) obtained from vegetable sources, the effect on cognitive decline is unknown. We exami

  10. Effect of light intensity on ovarian gene expression, reproductive performance and body weight of rabbit does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liangzhan; Wu, Zhenyu; Li, Fuchang; Liu, Lei; Li, Jinglin; Zhang, Di; Sun, Chaoran

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the experiment was to find the minimum light intensity which could improve reproduction by examining its effect on ovarian gene expression, reproductive performance and body weight of rabbit does with three different light intensities: 60 (L), 80 (M), and 100 (H)lx. A total of 144 Rex-rabbits submitted to a 49-day reproductive regimen were used in this study. Ovaries were collected and relative abundance of mRNA for ovarian proteins of interest was examined with real-time PCR. Amount of protein for proteins of interest was examined by immunohistochemistry. Reproductive performance and doe bodyweight of the first three consecutive reproductive periods after initiation of the light intensity treatments were evaluated. The results provided evidence that light intensity had no effect on relative abundance of estradiol receptor-α (ER-α), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (GnRHR1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) mRNA. The relative abundance of growth hormone receptor (GHR) mRNA was, however, greater in Group L than M and H (P0.05). The bodyweight of the does in Group L was greater than the other two groups at first insemination, second insemination and the second postpartum period (P0.05). These observations suggest that light intensity between 60 and 100lx has no effect on the reproductive performance of rabbit does, however, the amounts of GHR mRNA and growth hormone (GH) protein were affected and the greater light intensity had a negative effect on bodyweight between the time of the first insemination and the second partum period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Factors affecting the reproductive success of dominant male meerkats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Göran F; Hodge, Sarah J; Young, Andrew J; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2008-05-01

    Identifying traits that affect the reproductive success of individuals is fundamental for our understanding of evolutionary processes. In cooperative breeders, a dominant male typically restricts mating access to the dominant female for extended periods, resulting in pronounced variation in reproductive success among males. This may result in strong selection for traits that increase the likelihood of dominance acquisition, dominance retention and reproductive rates while dominant. However, despite considerable research on reproductive skew, few studies have explored the factors that influence these three processes among males in cooperative species. Here we use genetic, behavioural and demographic data to investigate the factors affecting reproductive success in dominant male meerkats (Suricata suricatta). Our data show that dominant males sire the majority of all offspring surviving to 1 year. A male's likelihood of becoming dominant is strongly influenced by age, but not by weight. Tenure length and reproductive rate, both important components of dominant male reproductive success, are largely affected by group size and composition, rather than individual traits. Dominant males in large groups have longer tenures, but after this effect is controlled, male tenure length also correlates negatively to the number of adult females in the group. Male reproductive rate also declines as the number of intra- and extra-group competitors increases. As the time spent in the dominant position and reproductive rate while dominant explain > 80% of the total variance in reproductive success, group composition thus has major implications for male reproductive success.

  12. Reproductive strategies and seasonal changes in the somatic indices of seven small-bodied fishes in Atlantic Canada in relation to study design for environmental effects monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Timothy J; Brasfield, Sandra M; Carroll, Leslie C; Doyle, Meghan A; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Munkittrick, Kelly R

    2015-05-01

    Small-bodied fishes are more commonly being used in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) studies. There is a lack of understanding of the biological characteristics of many small-bodied species, which hinders study designs for monitoring studies. For example, 72% of fish population surveys in Canada's EEM program for pulp and paper mills that used small-bodied fishes were conducted outside of the reproductive period of the species. This resulted in an inadequate assessment of the EEM program's primary effect endpoint (reproduction) for these studies. The present study examined seasonal changes in liver size, gonad size, and condition in seven freshwater and estuarine small-bodied fishes in Atlantic Canada. These data were used to examine differences in reproductive strategies and patterns of energy storage among species. Female gonadal recrudescence in all seven species began primarily in the 2-month period in the spring before spawning. Male gonadal development was concurrent with females in five species; however, gonadal recrudescence began in the fall in male three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) and slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). The spawning period for each species was estimated from the decline in relative ovary size after its seasonal maximum value in spring. The duration of the spawning period reflected the reproductive strategy (single vs multiple spawning) of the species. Optimal sampling periods to assess reproductive impacts in each species were determined based on seasonal changes in ovary size and were identified to be during the prespawning period when gonads are developing and variability in relative gonad size is at a minimum.

  13. Bayesian framework to identify the main effects of long term climatic constraints on soil moisture decline in conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, M.; Vargas, R.

    2016-12-01

    We used a Bayesian regression framework based on Hamiltonian Monte Carlo simulations to identify the main effects of mean annual soil moisture, temperature, evapotranspiration, and precipitation, on long-term soil moisture decline across conterminous United States based on 36 years of remotely sensed available data. We found that mean soil moisture was a positive control of soil moisture decline in areas with long-term high precipitation but low evapotranspiration. Furthermore, mean soil moisture is a negative control on soil moisture decline in areas with long-term low precipitation and low evapotranspiration. In contrast, mean soil moisture had no effect on soil moisture decline in areas with long-term low precipitation and high evapotranspiration. These results highlight the importance of having accurate spatial soil moisture information to better inform earth system models to predict regional to global water balance and climate trends. These results support the current understanding of the basic physical mechanisms governing the coupling of soil moisture with temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration, but bring attention to high spatial heterogeneity in the constraints of soil moisture at the continental scale. The response of soil moisture to climate variability is considered to be one of the largest uncertainties for global land surface models, and resolving high spatial resolution of soil moisture is an ongoing challenge. Independent estimates of high spatial resolution of soil moisture could improve parameterizations of land surface models and cross-validate the current functions that mainly relay on precipitation, aerodynamic representation of the latent and sensible heat fluxes, and land surface cover type.

  14. The Decline of University Patenting and the End of the Bayh-Dole Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2010-01-01

    University patenting has been heralded as a symbol of changing relations between universities and their social environments. The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 in the USA was eagerly promoted by the OECD as a recipe for the commercialization of university research, and the law was imitated by a number of national governments. However, since the 2000s university patenting in the most advanced economies has been on the decline both as a percentage and in absolute terms. We suggest that the institutional incentives for university patenting have disappeared with the new regime of university ranking. Patents and spin-offs are not counted in university rankings. In the new arrangements of university-industry-government relations, universities have become very responsive to changes in their relevant environments.

  15. Fertility decline in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Kanako; Stupp, Paul; Melian, Mercedes

    2009-09-01

    Recent reproductive health surveys show that the fertility rate in Paraguay decreased precipitously from 4.3 lifetime births per woman in 1995-98 to 2.9 births in 2001-04. In this study, we establish data consistency between the 1998 and 2004 surveys by comparing a series of cohort-specific period rates and use the Bongaarts framework of proximate determinants of fertility to demonstrate that an increase in the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) between 1998 and 2004 fully accounts for the fertility decline. Decomposition of rates shows that changes in group-specific CPRs explain a greater proportion of the change in the overall CPR than do changes in population composition by educational attainment, urban residence, region, and language spoken at home. Finally, we show that younger cohorts of women in 2004 reported ideal completed fertility desires of less than 2.9 births, suggesting that the fertility rate is likely to continue to decrease.

  16. Selenium and mercury have a synergistic negative effect on fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penglase, S; Hamre, K; Ellingsen, S

    2014-04-01

    Selenium (Se) can reduce the negative impacts of mercury (Hg) toxicity on growth and survival, but little is known about how these two elements interact in reproduction. In the following study we explored the effects of organic Hg and Se on the growth, survival and reproduction of female zebrafish (Danio rerio). Fish were fed one of four diets from 73 until 226 dpf in a 2 × 2 factorial design, using selenomethionine (SeMet) and methylmercury (MeHg) as the Se and Hg sources, respectively. Each diet contained Se at either requirement (0.7 mg Se/kg DM) or elevated levels (10 mg Se/kgDM), and Hg at either low (0.05 mg Hg/kg DM) or elevated (12 mg Hg/kg DM) levels. Between 151 and 206 dpf the female fish were pairwise crossed against untreated male fish and the mating success, fecundity, embryo survival, and subsequent overall reproductive success were measured. Elevated dietary Se reduced Hg levels in both the adult fish and their eggs. Elevated dietary Hg and Se increased egg Se levels to a greater extent than when dietary Se was elevated alone. At elevated maternal intake levels, egg concentrations of Se and Hg reflected the maternal dietary levels and not the body burdens of the adult fish. Elevated dietary Hg reduced the growth and survival of female fish, but these effects were largely prevented with elevated dietary Se. Elevated dietary Se alone did not affect fish growth or survival. Compared to other treatments, elevated dietary Hg alone increased both mating and overall reproductive success with 100 days exposure. Elevated dietary Se decreased fecundity, embryo survival, and overall reproductive success. The combination of elevated Se and Hg had a synergistic negative effect on all aspects of fish reproduction compared to those groups fed elevated levels of either Se or Hg. Overall the data demonstrate that while increased dietary Se may reduce adverse effects of Hg on the growth and survival in adult fish, it can negatively affect fish reproductive potential

  17. Biophysical evaluation of radiofrequency electromagnetic field effects on male reproductive pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Nirala, Jayprakash; Siddiqui, Mohd Haris; Behari, Jitendra

    2013-03-01

    There are possible hazardous health effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiations emitted from mobile phone on the human reproductive pattern. It is more effective while keeping mobile phones in pocket or near testicular organs. Present review examines the possible concern on radio frequency radiation interaction and biological effects such as enzyme induction, and toxicological effects, including genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, testicular cancer, and reproductive outcomes. Testicular infertility or testicular cancer due to mobile phone or microwave radiations suggests an increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Though generation of ROS in testis has been responsible for possible toxic effects on physiology of reproduction, the reviews of last few decades have well established that these radiations are very harmful and cause mutagenic changes in reproductive pattern and leads to infertility. The debate will be focused on bio-interaction mechanism between mobile phone and testicular cancer due to ROS formation. This causes the biological damage and leads to several changes like decreased sperm count, enzymatic and hormonal changes, DNA damage, and apoptosis formation. In the present review, physics of mobile phone including future research on various aspects has been discussed.

  18. Reproductive effects of lipid soluble components of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud in male mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Kumar Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The flower buds of Syzygium aromaticum (clove have been used in indigenous medicines for the treatment of male sexual disorders in Indian subcontinent. Objective: To evaluate the effect of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud on male reproduction, using Parkes (P strain mice as animal model. Materials and Methods: Mice were orally administered lipid soluble components of Syzygium aromaticum flower bud in doses of 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg body weight for 35 days, and several male reproductive endpoints were evaluated. Results: Treatment with lower dose (15 mg of Syzygium increased the motility of sperm and stimulated the secretory activities of epididymis and seminal vesicle, while higher doses (30 and 60 mg had adverse effects on sperm dynamics of cauda epididymidis and on the secretory activities of epididymis and seminal vesicle. Libido was not affected in treated males; however, a significant decrease in litter in females sired by males treated with higher doses of Syzygium was recorded. Conclusion: Treatment with Syzygium aromaticum flower bud causes dose-dependent biphasic effect on male reproductive indices in P mice; lower dose of Syzygium appears stimulatory, while the higher doses have adverse effect on male reproduction. The results suggest that the lower dose of Syzygium may have androgenic effect, but further studies are needed to support this contention.

  19. Effects of extreme weather on reproductive success in a temperate-breeding songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipoly, Ivett; Bókony, Veronika; Seress, Gábor; Szabó, Krisztián; Liker, András

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of extreme meteorological events such as heat waves and rainstorms is predicted to increase with climate change. However, there is still little information about how extreme weather influences reproduction in animals. It may not only affect breeding success but might also alter offspring sex ratio if males and females are differentially sensitive to meteorological conditions during development. We investigated the relationship between meteorological conditions and reproductive success over 6 years in a house sparrow population in central Europe. We found that hatching success increased with the number of extremely hot days (daily maximum >31°C) and decreased with the number of extremely cold days (success was unrelated to weather variables. However, the frequency of extremely hot days had a negative effect on fledglings' body mass and tarsus length, although both of these traits were positively related to average temperature. Additionally, fledglings' body mass increased with the length of period without rainfall before fledging. Male to female ratio among fledglings did not differ from 1:1 and did not vary with weather variables. The magnitude of the effects of extreme meteorological events was usually small, although in some cases comparable to those of ecologically relevant predictors of reproductive success. Our results indicate that meteorological conditions have complex effects on breeding success, as the effects of extreme weather can differ between different aspects of reproduction and also from the effects of overall meteorological conditions.

  20. The Effect of Interprofessional Student-Led Reproductive Health Education on Youths in Juvenile Detention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ji; Miller, Willa M; Tossone, Krystel; Butcher, Fredrick; Kuo, Kelly

    2017-06-01

    To assess the effects of an interprofessional student-led comprehensive sexual education curriculum in improving the reproductive health literacy among at-risk youths in detention. We performed a prospective cohort study involving 134 incarcerated youth and an interprofessional team of 23 medical, nursing, and social work students, who participated in a comprehensive reproductive health curriculum over the course of 3 days. Basic reproductive health knowledge, confidence in condom use with a new partner, and self-efficacy with regard to contraception use and sexual autonomy were assessed before and after completion of the curriculum. We also assessed the student teachers' level of comfort with teaching reproductive health to adolescents and their perception of interprofessionalism. Incarcerated youth showed a statistically significant increase in knowledge regarding sexually transmitted infections as well as self-reported confidence in condom use (P = .002). Self-efficacy in contraception use and sexual autonomy did not show significant improvement. Qualitative analysis of student teachers' surveys revealed theme categories regarding perception of youth, perception of self in teaching youth, perception of interacting with youth, and perception of working in interprofessional teams. Our program might represent a mutually beneficial community relationship to improve reproductive health literacy in this high-risk youth population. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of inbreeding on reproductive success, performance, litter size, and survival in captive red wolves (Canis rufus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabon, David R; Waddell, William

    2010-01-01

    Captive-breeding programs have been widely used in the conservation of imperiled species, but the effects of inbreeding, frequently expressed in traits related to fitness, are nearly unavoidable in small populations with few founders. Following its planned extirpation in the wild, the endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) was preserved in captivity with just 14 founders. In this study, we evaluated the captive red wolf population for relationships between inbreeding and reproductive performance and fitness. Over 30 years of managed breeding, the level of inbreeding in the captive population has increased, and litter size has declined. Inbreeding levels were lower in sire and dam wolves that reproduced than in those that did not reproduce. However, there was no difference in the inbreeding level of actual litters and predicted litters. Litter size was negatively affected by offspring and paternal levels of inbreeding, but the effect of inbreeding on offspring survival was restricted to a positive influence. There was no apparent relationship between inbreeding and method of rearing offspring. The observable effects of inbreeding in the captive red wolf population currently do not appear to be a limiting factor in the conservation of the red wolf population. Additional studies exploring the extent of the effects of inbreeding will be required as inbreeding levels increase in the captive population.

  2. Long-term effects of valproic acid on reproductive endocrine functions in Turkish women with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkemli, Huseyin; Genc, Bulent Oguz; Dogan, Ebru Apaydin; Genc, Emine; Ozdemir, Suna

    2009-01-01

    The long-term effects of valproic acid (VPA) on reproductive endocrine functions in women with epilepsy (WWE) were studied. Serum reproductive hormone concentrations, clinical findings and ovarian morphology were analyzed in 71 WWE who had been receiving antiepileptic drugs (AED) for a minimum of 2 years. Of the 71 WWE, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) (p = 0.011) and menstrual irregularities (p = 0.009) were found to be more prevalent in women receiving VPA treatment when compared to women on non-VPA treatment. There was no statistically significant dose or duration-related rise of risk for patients who developed PCOS and menstrual irregularities and those who were not on long-term VPA therapy. The lack of a duration-related reproductive dysfunction in this patient population may support the hypothesis of early occurring VPA-associated metabolic and endocrine changes.

  3. Cluster Decline and Resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Christian Richter; Park, Eun Kyung

    -2011. Our longitudinal study reveals that technological lock-in and exit of key firms have contributed to impairment of the cluster’s resilience in adapting to disruptions. Entrepreneurship has a positive effect on cluster resilience, while multinational companies have contradicting effects by bringing......Most studies on regional clusters focus on identifying factors and processes that make clusters grow. However, sometimes technologies and market conditions suddenly shift, and clusters decline. This paper analyses the process of decline of the wireless communication cluster in Denmark, 1963...

  4. Quantifying the effects of pesticide exposure on annual reproductive success of birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) was developed for quantifying the effects of specific pesticide-use scenarios on the annual reproductive success of simulated populations of birds. Each nesting attempt is divided into a series of discrete phases (e.g., egg layin...

  5. Quantifying the effects of pesticide exposure on annual reproductive success of birds (presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Markov chain nest productivity model (MCnest) was developed for quantifying the effects of specific pesticide‐use scenarios on the annual reproductive success of simulated populations of birds. Each nesting attempt is divided into a series of discrete phases (e.g., egg ...

  6. Effects of postweaning dietary energy source on reproductive traits in primiparous sows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Langendijk, P.; Soede, N.M.; Kemp, B.

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of major dietary energy source fed from weaning to ovulation or from ovulation to d 35 of pregnancy on reproductive traits in primiparous sows. Dietary energy sources were used to manipulate the plasma insulin concentration. One hundred thirteen sows

  7. Effect of pyridoxine on the reproduction of the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI Faruki

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation reports the effects of vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine supplementedfeed on the reproductive potential of Bombyx mori L. All the concentrations of the vitamin significantlyreduced the fecundity. Egg-viability was also reduced at all the concentrations, but the differences werenot significant in comparison to control.

  8. Effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive performance of dairy cattle in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, J.J.; Breda, van S.; Vargas, B.; Dolz, G.; Frankena, K.

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive parameters in dairy cows. Cows (n = 2743) from 94 farms located in the most important dairy areas in Costa Rica were used in the study. The size of the herds ranged from 32 to 379 females (mean =

  9. Effect of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on reproductive performance of sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekoya, A.; Oosting, S.J.; Fernandez-Rivera, S.; Tamminga, S.; Tegegne, A.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Two successive experiments were conducted to investigate the long-term effects of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on reproductive performance of Ethiopian Menz sheep. Forty ewes and 40 rams ranging in weight and age between 16¿20 kg and 14¿15 months respectively were fed a teff straw basal diet a

  10. MALE REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLVENT AND FUEL EXPOSURE DURING AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few studies have addressed the effects of mixed, low level exposures to complex mixtures on a man's reproductive potential. In this prospective study, each subject was evaluated prior to first exposure and at 15 and 30 weeks after exposures had begun. A total of 50 men working ...

  11. Exposure to pesticides of fruit growers and effects on reproduction: an epidemiological approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cock, de J.S.

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis the exposure to pesticides of fruit growers in The Netherlands was studied as well as its relation to reproductive health effects. The most commonly used fungicide, captan, was used as a marker for exposure. Several exposure studies were carried out during application of captan, and w

  12. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) greenhouse tuber production as an assay for asexual reproduction effects from herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study determined whether young potato plants can be used as an assay to indicate potential effects of pesticides on asexual reproduction. Solanum tuberosum (Russet Burbank) plants were grown from seed pieces in a mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plant...

  13. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) greenhouse tuber production as an assay for asexual reproduction effects from herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study determined whether young potato plants can be used as an assay to indicate potential effects of pesticides on asexual reproduction. Solanum tuberosum (Russet Burbank) plants were grown from seed pieces in a mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plant...

  14. Toxicity of Methylcyclohexane and Its Effect on the Reproductive System in SD Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Yeong Kim

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: When injected repeatedly for 13 weeks, methylcyclohexane proved to be toxic for the liver, heart, and kidney at a high dose. The absolute toxic dose was 1,000 mg/kg/day, while the no observed adverse effect level was less than 100 mg/kg/day. The substance exerted little influence on the reproductive system.

  15. Effect of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on reproductive performance of sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekoya, A.; Oosting, S.J.; Fernandez-Rivera, S.; Tamminga, S.; Tegegne, A.; Zijpp, van der A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Two successive experiments were conducted to investigate the long-term effects of supplementation of Sesbania sesban on reproductive performance of Ethiopian Menz sheep. Forty ewes and 40 rams ranging in weight and age between 16¿20 kg and 14¿15 months respectively were fed a teff straw basal diet

  16. Distinct hypothalamic neurons mediate estrogenic effects on energy homeostasis and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogens regulate body weight and reproduction primarily through actions on estrogen receptor-a(ERa). However, ERalpha-expressing cells mediating these effects are not identified. We demonstrate that brain-specific deletion of ERalapha in female mice causes abdominal obesity stemming from both hype...

  17. Menopause Is Associated with Accelerated Lung Function Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebner, Kai; Matulonga, Bobette; Johannessen, Ane; Suske, Sandra; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Demoly, Pascal; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Franklin, Karl A; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gullón Blanco, José Antonio; Heinrich, Joachim; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Debbie; Jõgi, Rain; Lindberg, Eva; Moratalla Rovira, Jesús Martínez; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea; Pin, Isabelle; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puggini, Luca; Raherison, Chantal; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2017-04-15

    Menopause is associated with changes in sex hormones, which affect immunity, inflammation, and osteoporosis and may impair lung function. Lung function decline has not previously been investigated in relation to menopause. To study whether lung function decline, assessed by FVC and FEV1, is accelerated in women who undergo menopause. The population-based longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided serum samples, spirometry, and questionnaire data about respiratory and reproductive health from three study waves (n = 1,438). We measured follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and added information on menstrual patterns to determine menopausal status using latent class analysis. Associations with lung function decline were investigated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for age, height, weight, pack-years, current smoking, age at completed full-time education, spirometer, and including study center as random effect. Menopausal status was associated with accelerated lung function decline. The adjusted mean FVC decline was increased by -10.2 ml/yr (95% confidence interval [CI], -13.1 to -7.2) in transitional women and -12.5 ml/yr (95% CI, -16.2 to -8.9) in post-menopausal women, compared with women menstruating regularly. The adjusted mean FEV1 decline increased by -3.8 ml/yr (95% CI, -6.3 to -2.9) in transitional women and -5.2 ml/yr (95% CI, -8.3 to -2.0) in post-menopausal women. Lung function declined more rapidly among transitional and post-menopausal women, in particular for FVC, beyond the expected age change. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health often deteriorates during reproductive aging.

  18. Effects of test media on reproduction in Potamopyrgus antipodarum and of pre-exposure population densities on sensitivity to cadmium in a reproduction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieratowicz, Agnes; Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike; Wigh, Adriana; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Molluscan species can be affected by various anthropogenic substances. Yet, these effects are disregarded in chemical risk assessment as molluscs are unrepresented in standard OECD guidelines. The project "validation of a mollusc reproduction test" (Federal Environment Agency, code 371165417) deals with the development of a test method with the mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum for OECD purposes. In this context, the influence on reproduction of both, different media and varying snail density, has been observed in independent experiments. Further, the impact of density on the outcome of subsequent cadmium (Cd) toxicity in a test has been investigated to refine the existing methodology. First, adult snails were kept in different test media for 12 weeks. Second, snail density was increased for 4 weeks to induce stress. Snails from each density scenario were used for another 4 weeks in a reproduction test at an equal density with 12 μg Cd/L, respectively. Significant differences in reproduction between medium groups were noted after 4 and 8, but not 12, weeks. Further, reproduction was significantly altered by snail density in the beakers but after subsequent 4 weeks at a constant density, no differences were observed between control groups. Cd reduced reproduction and this effect increased with snail density in the pre-exposure period, demonstrating that a previous stress factor may result in increased sensitivity to chemicals and underlines the need for more standardized breeding conditions to minimize effect variations. Based on the outcome of this study, an acclimatization period of 12 weeks must be guaranteed for specimens transferred to another medium. Further, 4 weeks of acclimatization are necessary after density stress. An additional 12 weeks density experiment showed that medium volume in each replicate can be decreased by half to save on chemicals, water and space during tests.

  19. Effects of food variability on growth and reproduction of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Michael; Koella, Jacob C

    2016-01-01

    Despite a large body of knowledge about the evolution of life histories, we know little about how variable food availability during an individual's development affects its life history. We measured the effects of manipulating food levels during early and late larval development of the mosquito Aedes aegypti on its growth rate, life history and reproductive success. Switching from low to high food led to compensatory growth: individuals grew more rapidly during late larval development and emerged at a size close to that of mosquitoes consistently reared at high food. However, switching to high food had very little effect on longevity, and fecundity and reproductive success were considerably lower than in consistently well-fed mosquitoes. Changing from high to low food led to adults with similar size as in consistently badly nourished mosquitoes, but even lower fecundity and reproductive success. A rapid response of growth to changing resources can thus have unexpected effects in later life and in lifetime reproductive success. More generally, our study emphasizes the importance of varying developmental conditions for the evolutionary pressures underlying life-history evolution.

  20. Effect of dietary phytoestrogens, feed restriction, and their interaction on reproductive status of broiler pullets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Madnurkar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: A major problem faced by the broiler industry around the world is a lowered reproductive fitness of breeding hens which can cause major economic impact in terms of lowered hatchable egg production. In broiler breeders, a lot of the selection pressure has been exerted on growth, conformation and feed efficiency as a result broiler breeder hens are prone to several metabolic disorders and reproductive anomalies. Present study was conducted to assess the effect of phytoestrogen, feed restrictions (75% of their control ad libitum, and their interaction on reproductive parameters in high and low body weight broiler breeder hens. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty-eight healthy female broiler breeder pullets were divided randomly into eight groups from the same hatch and strain. They were transferred to individual laying cages. Birds received ad libitum drinking water and feeding, depend on divided group i.e., ad libitum or restricted feeding (75% of control ad libitum counterpart separately for heavy or low body weight till first egg laid in respective groups. Experimental diets made with practical feed ingredients as per institution recommendation (broiler breeder ration as per experimental planning. Results: Phytoestrogen significantly (p<0.05 improved egg number and size in broiler breeding hens by checking reproductive anomalies (internal laying, double hierarchy, and follicular atresia, restructuring ovarian, and oviductal functional development besides improved physiological maturation of infundibulum. Unlike phytoestrogen, feed restriction as expected delayed the age of sexual maturity but helped in a reduction of ovary weight, number of yellow follicle, number of atretic yellow follicle, incidence of double hierarchy, and internal ovulation. Interaction between phytoestrogen and feed restriction did not give any additional remunerative advantage. Conclusions: It is concluded that phytoestrogens and limited feed

  1. The effect of TiO{sub 2} and Ag nanoparticles on reproduction and development of Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbrook, Nicola A., E-mail: 3nap@queensu.ca [School of Environmental Studies, Biosciences Complex, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Botterell Hall, 5th Floor, Queen' s University, 18 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Winn, Louise M., E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca [School of Environmental Studies, Biosciences Complex, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Botterell Hall, 5th Floor, Queen' s University, 18 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Afrooz, A.R.M. Nabiul [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Saleh, Navid B., E-mail: salehn@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Walker, Virginia K., E-mail: walkervk@queensu.ca [School of Environmental Studies, Biosciences Complex, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Biology, Biosciences Complex, Queen' s University, 116 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    In the last two decades, nanoparticles (NPs) have found applications in a wide variety of consumer goods. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and silver (Ag) NPs are both found in cosmetics and foods, but their increasing use is of concern due to their ability to be taken up by biological systems. While there are some reports of TiO{sub 2} and Ag NPs affecting complex organisms, their effects on reproduction and development have been largely understudied. Here, the effects of orally administered TiO{sub 2} or Ag NPs on reproduction and development in two different model organisms were investigated. TiO{sub 2} NPs reduced the developmental success of CD-1 mice after a single oral dose of 100 or 1000 mg/kg to dams, resulting in a statistically significant increase in fetal deformities and mortality. Similarly, TiO{sub 2} NP addition to food led to a significant progeny loss in the fruit fly, Drosophila, as shown by a decline in female fecundity. Ag NP administration resulted in an increase in the mortality of fetal mice. Similarly in Drosophila, Ag NP feeding led to a significant decrease in developmental success, but unlike TiO{sub 2} NP treatment, there was no decline in fecundity. The distinct response associated with each type of NP likely reflects differences in NP administration as well as the biology of the particular model. Taken together, however, this study warns that these common NPs could be detrimental to the reproductive and developmental health of both invertebrates and vertebrates.

  2. Multigenerational Effects of Heavy Metals on Feeding, Growth, Initial Reproduction and Antioxidants in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, ZhenYang; Zhang, Jing; Yin, DaQiang

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies showed that toxicities of excessive metals lasted over generations. Yet, these studies mainly employed one-generation exposure, and the effects of multigenerational challenges need further studies. Presently, Caenorhabditis elegans were exposed to cadmium, copper, lead and zinc for four consecutive generations (G1 to G4) at environmental concentrations. The feeding, growth, initial reproduction, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were determined. All data were represented in the percentage of that in control (POC), and POC in the control was normalized to 100%. In G1 and G2, the POC values in feeding, growth and initial reproduction were generally within 10% of the control (100%), indicating non-significant effects. The POC values in SOD and CAT were significantly higher than 100%, showing stimulatory effects. In G3 and G4, the POC values in feeding, growth and initial reproduction were significantly lower than 100%, showing inhibitory effects which were more severe in G4 than in G3. Meanwhile, SOD and CAT continuously showed stimulatory effects, and the stimulatory effects on SOD increased from G1 to G4. The effects with multigenerational challenges were different from those in one-generation exposure. The effects in later generations demonstrated the importance of multigenerational challenges in judging long-term influences of metals. PMID:27116222

  3. Effects of sludge filtrate on the survival and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerina, S.S.; Parker, N.C.; Fedler, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the runoff from croplands fertilized with municipal sludge was toxic to aquatic biota and, therefore, a potential threat to either public health or the environment. Seven-day bioassays with Ceriodaphnia dubia showed that the No-Observed-Effect-Concentration (NOEC) was 24 g/L and the Lowest-Observed-Effect-Concentration (LOEC) for survival was 30 g/L for soil samples treated with 35.2 metric tonnes (MT)/ha of municipal sludge. For soil samples treated with 0 and 17.6 MT/ha of sludge, the survival rates of C. dubia were not significantly affected at concentrations of 6-30 g/L of soil. Reproduction was suppressed by 25% when daphnids were exposed to 3.3 g/L concentration of soil treated with sludge at 35.2 MT/ha. A 50% suppression of reproduction occurred when daphnids were exposed to 15 g/L concentration of soil treated with sludge at 17.6MT/ha. A sludge application rate of 17.6MT/ha suppressed reproduction at a treatment concentration of 18g/L. These data indicate that the runoff from agricultural lands treated with municipal sludge has the potential to affect reproduction in daphnids and, therefore, the environment through the aquatic food chain.

  4. Long-term effects of environmental endocrine disruptors on reproductive physiology and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather B Patisaul

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that, over the course of development, hormones shape the vertebrate brain such that sex specific physiology and behaviors emerge. Much of this occurs in discrete developmental windows that span gestation through the prenatal period, although it is now becoming clear that at least some of this process continues through puberty. Perturbation of this developmental progression can permanently alter the capacity for reproductive success. Wildlife studies have revealed that exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs, either naturally occurring or man made, can profoundly alter reproductive physiology and ultimately impact entire populations. Laboratory studies in rodents and other species have elucidated some of the mechanisms by which this occurs and strongly indicate that humans are also vulnerable to disruption. Use of hormonally active compounds in human medicine has also unfortunately revealed that the developing fetus can be exposed to and affected by endocrine disruptors, and that it might take decades for adverse effects to manifest. Research within the field of environmental endocrine disruption has also contributed to the general understanding of how early life experiences can alter reproductive physiology and behavior through non-genomic, epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone acetylation. These types of effects have the potential to impact future generations if the germ line is affected. This review provides an overview of how exposure to EDCs, particularly those that interfere with estrogen action, impacts reproductive physiology and behaviors in vertebrates.

  5. Effect of Digestarom® dietary supplementation on the reproductive performances of rabbit does: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Celia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of Digestarom® dietary supplementation on the reproductive performances of rabbit does. Pannon Ka (maternal line multiparous does were randomly divided into two dietary groups since insemination and fed ad libitum. In the first group (n=51, rabbit does were fed with a commercial diet (C, whereas in the other group (n=52 they received the same diet supplemented with 300 mg/kg of Digestarom® (D. The experiment lasted for two reproductive cycles (kindling 1=K1; kindling 2=K2. Body weight of does and litter size (kits born total, alive, stillborn were recorded at kindling. Litter size and litter weight were registered at 7, 14, 21 days of age after nursing, and the average individual weight of kits was calculated. Kits’ mortality was recorded daily. At K1, rabbit does performances were unaffected by dietary treatments. During K2, D does were significantly lighter than C ones (P<0.05 and displayed a lower kindling rate (P<0.05. Digestarom® did not improve the reproductive performance of rabbit does. They seemed to dislike the D diet in K1 and such behavior could have led to the negative results in K2. Further studies should focus on feed acceptance, dose-dependent effect, physiological adaptation and in vivo oxidative status of does. Finally, several consecutive reproductive cycles are recommended to test the efficacy of new feed supplements.

  6. Testing Potential Effect of Environmental Endocrine Disruptors in Cow Milk on Reproductive Index in Female Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG-MING LI; DAVAASAMBUU GANMAA; LI-QIANG QIN; AKIO SATO

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of endocrine disruptor chemicals in cow milk on female reproductive system. Methods A two-generation reproduction was conducted according to U. S. FDA standard. Milk was fed in special bottle to Wistar rats of both sexes through two successive generations (F0 and F1) in the milk group while artificial milk was fed to rats in the control group. Twenty-four rats of each sex were mated in each group. Measurements were made according to this guideline. Results Reproductive parameters in the milk group such as fertility index, gestation index, weights of uterus and ovary, days of vaginal opening, estrous cycles, histological morphological changes were comparable to those in the control group. However, the means of body weight had some differences. The body weight gains increased significantly in the milk-treated group in F1 and F2 generation compared with those in the control group. The concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in blood in the milk group was comparable to that in the control group, but the standard deviation changed greatly in the milk-treated rats. Conclusion Endocrine disruptor chemicals in milk have no severe effects on the female reproductive system.

  7. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-02-15

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK's effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  8. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Loren; Vasquez-Soltero, Jessica Michelle; Margolina, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine) is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue), increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function. PMID:28212278

  9. The Effect of the Human Peptide GHK on Gene Expression Relevant to Nervous System Function and Cognitive Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren Pickart

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration, the progressive death of neurons, loss of brain function, and cognitive decline is an increasing problem for senior populations. Its causes are poorly understood and therapies are largely ineffective. Neurons, with high energy and oxygen requirements, are especially vulnerable to detrimental factors, including age-related dysregulation of biochemical pathways caused by altered expression of multiple genes. GHK (glycyl-l-histidyl-l-lysine is a human copper-binding peptide with biological actions that appear to counter aging-associated diseases and conditions. GHK, which declines with age, has health promoting effects on many tissues such as chondrocytes, liver cells and human fibroblasts, improves wound healing and tissue regeneration (skin, hair follicles, stomach and intestinal linings, boney tissue, increases collagen, decorin, angiogenesis, and nerve outgrowth, possesses anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-pain and anti-anxiety effects, increases cellular stemness and the secretion of trophic factors by mesenchymal stem cells. Studies using the Broad Institute Connectivity Map show that GHK peptide modulates expression of multiple genes, resetting pathological gene expression patterns back to health. GHK has been recommended as a treatment for metastatic cancer, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease, inflammation, acute lung injury, activating stem cells, pain, and anxiety. Here, we present GHK’s effects on gene expression relevant to the nervous system health and function.

  10. Correcting Bias Caused by Missing Data in the Estimate of the Effect of Apolipoprotein ε4 on Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles B; Lipton, Richard B; Katz, Mindy J; Wang, Cuiling

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal administration of neuropsychological instruments are often used to assess age-related changes in cognition. Informative loss to follow-up may bias the results of these studies. Herein, we use auxiliary data to adjust for informative loss to follow-up. In the Einstein Aging Study, memory was assessed annually in a community sample of adults age 70+, free of dementia at baseline, using the free recall from the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test, and via telephone using the Memory Impairment Screen for Telephone (the auxiliary data). Joint linear mixed models were used to assess how the effect of the APOE ε4 genotype may be affected by informative missingness in the in-person data. A total of 620 EAS participants contributed 2085 person years of follow-up to the analyses. Memory decline rates estimated in joint models were 19% greater in ε4 negative participants and 27% greater in ε4 positive participants compared to traditional approaches; the effect of APOE ε4 on memory decline was 37% greater. Joint modeling methods can help address bias caused by informative missing data in the estimation of the effect of risk factors on cognitive change, and may be applicable to a broader range of outcomes in longitudinal aging studies.

  11. Effects of dietary soybean isoflavones (SI) on reproduction in the young breeder rooster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Dai; Zhang, Tao; Tian, Ye; Yu, Shangyu; Liu, Wenbo; Xu, Kaili; Liu, Juan; Ding, Yu; Zhu, Baochang; Yang, Yanzhou; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Soybean isoflavones (SIs) are phytoestrogens that competitive with estrogens in body. Although SIs play an important role in reproduction, their role in testicular development in roosters is unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of SIs on testicular development and serum reproductive hormone profiles in young breeder roosters (70-133days old). Gene expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which are related to testosterone synthesis, in rooster testis were also evaluated after treatment with different SI doses. Although SIs had no significant effect on body weight, 5mg/kg SIs significantly increased the testis index and serum levels of reproductive hormones (gonadotropin releasing hormone, follicle- stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, and testosterone).To further investigate whether SIs regulate hormone synthesis via StAR, p450scc, 3β-HSD, real time-PCR was performed to measure the mRNA levels of the corresponding genes. The results showed that 5mg/kg of SIs significantly increased StAR mRNA levels. However, there were no significant effects on p450scc or 3β-HSD mRNA levels. Moreover, the spermatogonial development and the number of germ cell layers were increased by treatment with 5mg/kg of SIs. These results suggest that SIs promote testicular growth by increasing reproductive hormone secretion, which is closely related to StAR expression, to positively regulate reproduction in young roosters.

  12. Reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects of triclosan: Population exposure, present evidence and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-Feng; Tian, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Triclosan has been used as a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for over 40 years worldwide. Increasing reports indicate frequent detection and broad exposure to triclosan in the natural environment and the human body. Current laboratory studies in various species provide strong evidence for its disrupting effects on the endocrine system, especially reproductive hormones. Multiple modes of action have been suggested, including disrupting hormone metabolism, displacing hormones from hormone receptors and disrupting steroidogenic enzyme activity. Although epidemiological studies on its effects in humans are mostly negative but conflicting, which is typical of much of the early evidence on the toxicity of EDCs, overall, the evidence suggests that triclosan is an EDC. This article reviews human exposure to triclosan, describes the current evidence regarding its reproductive endocrine-disrupting effects, and discusses potential mechanisms to provide insights for further study on its endocrine-disrupting effects in humans.

  13. Expression of NMS and NMU2R in the pig reproductive axis during the estrus cycle and the effect of NMS on the reproductive axis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guihong; Su, Juan; Li, Xun; Yao, Yuan; Lei, Zhihai; Yang, Xizhi; Kou, Rui; Liu, Yanpeng

    2009-12-01

    Evidence has revealed that neuromedin S (NMS) and neuromedin U-receptor type-2 (NMU2R) mRNAs are expressed in the central nervous system and reproductive organs. Previous data indicated that variation of NMS and NMU2R was due to the phases of the adult rat hypothalamus estrus cycle. However, the expression and function of NMS in the pig reproductive axis remains unexplored. In this study, 16 virginal gilts were classified into four groups: proestrus, estrus, diestrus 1, and diestrus 2; the expression of NMS and NMU2R in the cyclic pig hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axis was studied by reverse transcriptaion-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the effect of NMS on the reproductive axis in vitro was detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The cloned pig NMS and NMU2R sequences were 82% and 90.2% identical to those of the corresponding human homologues, respectively. RT-PCR showed that NMS and NMU2R mRNA expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary changed with the estrus cycle, i.e., with the highest level in the proestrus group and the lowest in the estrus group. In the ovary, NMS and NMU2R expression was highest in the diestrus 2 group and the lowest in the proestrus group. In the in vitro study, different concentrations of NMS induced the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and estradiol at different levels of the reproductive axis. Taken together, the expression pattern of NMS during the estrus cycle and its role in reproductive hormones in vitro provide novel evidences of the potential roles of NMS in the regulation of pig reproduction.

  14. Protective Effect of Lavandula stoechas and Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils against reproductive damage and oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebai, Hichem; Selmi, Slimen; Rtibi, Kais; Gharbi, Najoua; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-02-01

    The authors aimed in the present study to assess the protective effect of Rosmarinus officinalis essential oils (ROEO) and Lavandula stoechas essential oils (LSEO) against reproductive damage and oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic male rats. Essential oil samples were obtained from the aerial parts of the plants by hydrodistillation and analyzed by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Rats were divided into four groups: healthy control (HC); diabetic control (DC); healthy+ROEO (H+ROEO), healthy+LSEO (H+LSEO), diabetic+ROEO (D+ROEO), and diabetic+LSEO (D+LSEO). The use of GC-MS allowed to the identification of 15 and 22 compounds in ROEO and LSEO, respectively. In addition, the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test showed that ROEO and LSEO had an important antioxidant capacity. In vivo, we initially found that ROEO and LSEO treatment protected against the decrease in alloxan-induced body weight gain, relative reproductive organ weights, testosterone level, as well as sperm quality decline. On the other hand, we showed that alloxan administration was accompanied by an oxidative stress status assessed by an increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels, as well as a depletion of sulfhydril group content (-SH) and antioxidant enzyme activities as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in testis, epididymis, and sperm. More importantly, ROEO and LSEO treatment significantly protected against oxidative damage of the male reproductive organ systems in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. These findings suggested that ROEO and LSEO exerted a potential protective effect against alloxan-induced reproductive function damage and oxidative stress in male rat. The beneficial effect of ROEO and LSEO might be related, in part, to their antioxidant properties.

  15. NATURAL PLANT TOXICANT – CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDE AMYGDALIN: CHARACTERISTIC, METABOLISM AND THE EFFECT ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Eduard Kolesár; Marek Halenár; Adriana Kolesárová; Peter Massányi

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cyanogenic glycosides, as natural plant toxicants, in plants varies with plant species and environmental effects. Cyanogenic glycoside as an amygdalin was detected in apricot kernels, bitter almonds and peach, plum, pear and apple seeds. Amygdalin itself is non-toxic, but its HCN production decomposed by some enzymes is toxic substance. Target of this review was to describe the characteristic, metabolism and possible effects of amygdalin on reproductive processes. Previous studi...

  16. Reproductive and behavioral effects of diisononyl phthalate (DINP) in perinatally exposed rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boberg, Julie; Christiansen, Sofie; Petersen, Marta Axelstad

    2011-01-01

    studied.Pregnant Wistar rats were gavaged from gestation day 7 to postnatal day (PND) 17 with vehicle, 300, 600, 750 or 900mg DINP/kg bw/day.In fetal testes histopathological effects typical of phthalates were observed. In male offspring, DINP caused increased nipple retention, reduced anogenital distance......-androgenic effects on reproductive development, though less potent than DEHP, DBP and BBP, and further safety evaluation of DINP appears warranted....

  17. Assessment of reproductive effects in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Ruessler, D.S.; Denslow, N.D.; Holm, S.E.; Schoeb, T.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential effects of different concentrations of bleached/unbleached kraft mill effluent (B/UKME) on several reproductive endpoints in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The kraft mill studied produces a 50/50 mix of bleached/unbleached market pulp with an estimated release of 36 million gal of efffluent/day. Bleaching sequences were C90d10EopHDp and CEHD for softwood (pines) and hardwoods (mainly tupelo, gums, magnolia, and water oaks), respectively. Bass were exposed to different effluent concentrations (0 [controls, exposed to well water], 10, 20, 40, or 80%) for either 28 or 56 days. At the end of each exposure period, fish were euthanized, gonads collected for histological evaluation and determination of gonadosomatic index (GSI), and plasma was analyzed for 17??-estradiol, 11-ketotestosterone, and vitellogenin (VTG). Largemouth bass exposed to B/UKME responded with changes at the biochemical level (decline in sex steroids in both sexes and VTG in females) that were usually translated into tissue/organ-level responses (declines in GSI in both sexes and in ovarian development in females). Although most of these responses occurred after exposing fish to 40% B/UKME concentrations or greater, some were observed after exposures to 20% B/UKME. These threshold concentrations fall within the 60% average yearly concentration of effluent that exists in the stream near the point of discharge (Rice Creek), but are above the <10% effluent concentration present in the St. Johns River. The chemical(s) responsible for such changes as well as their mode(s) of action remain unknown at this time.

  18. Effect of Repeated Stress Treatments During the Follicular Phase and Early Pregnancy on Reproductive Performance of Gilts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soede, N.M.; Roelofs, J.B.; Verheijen, R.J.E.; Schouten, W.G.P.; Hazeleger, W.; Kemp, B.

    2007-01-01

    In pig husbandry, stress is being considered an important cause of impaired reproductive performance. Therefore, an experiment was performed to quantify effects of repeated stressors during the follicular phase and/or during early pregnancy on reproductive performance of gilts. Eighty-one cyclic

  19. [Study protocol on the effect of the economic crisis on mortality and reproductive health and health inequalities in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Glòria; Gotsens, Mercè; Palència, Laia; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; Puig, Vanessa; Bartoll, Xavier; Gandarillas, Ana; Martín, Unai; Bacigalupe, Amaia; Díez, Elia; Ruiz, Miguel; Esnaola, Santiago; Calvo, Montserrat; Sánchez, Pablo; Luque Fernández, Miguel Ángel; Borrell, Carme

    The aim is to present the protocol of the two sub-studies on the effect of the economic crisis on mortality and reproductive health and health inequalities in Spain. Substudy 1: describe the evolution of mortality and reproductive health between 1990 and 2013 through a longitudinal ecological study in the Autonomous Communities. This study will identify changes caused by the economic crisis in trends or reproductive health and mortality indicators using panel data (17 Autonomous Communities per study year) and adjusting Poisson models with random effects variance. Substudy 2: analyse inequalities by socioeconomic deprivation in mortality and reproductive health in several areas of Spain. An ecological study analysing trends in the pre-crisis (1999-2003 and 2004-2008) and crisis (2009-2013) periods will be performed. Random effects models Besag York and Mollié will be adjusted to estimate mortality indicators softened in reproductive health and census tracts.

  20. The Effect of Brucellosis on Women’s Health and Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertihan Kurdoglu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its potential harmful effects on the general health and reproductive life of the women, in the light of available literature, it was aimed to review the effect of human brucellosis on women’s health and reproduction. Data from 75 reports belonging to the years 1917 through 2015, obtained via a search on various internet sources by the words “Brucella”, “brucellosis,” “women’s health,” “human pregnancy,” “human reproduction,” “abortion,” “preterm birth,” “intrauterine fetal demise,” and “intrauterine fetal death” were used to characterize basic microbiological features together with the risk factors, clinical presentations and complications of the human brucellosis related to various aspects of reproductive well-being. A high rate of spontaneous abortion was a more consistent finding rather than high rates of preterm delivery and intrauterine fetal death in pregnant women with brucellosis. The occurrence of abortion was not associated with the magnitude of serum agglutination titre or the clinical type of disease. The novel replication profiles of Brucella in human trophoblasts give insights into the pathogenesis of infectious abortion. Brucellosis is a risk factor for women’s general health and reproduction as well as for many obstetric complications during pregnancy, of which spontaneous abortion is the mostly known. In order to prevent the disease and these complications, education of the women, especially the poor ones of childbearing age with low educational level is strongly advised. When the infected women present for medical care, an appropriate antimicrobial therapy should be started promptly.

  1. Advances of air pollution science: from forest decline to multiple-stress effects on forest ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoletti, E; Schaub, M; Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Augustaitis, A; Bastrup-Birk, A M; Bytnerowicz, A; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Müller-Starck, G; Serengil, Y

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 20 years, the focus of forest science on air pollution has moved from forest decline to a holistic framework of forest health, and from the effects on forest production to the ecosystem services provided by forest ecosystems. Hence, future research should focus on the interacting factorial impacts and resulting antagonistic and synergistic responses of forest trees and ecosystems. The synergistic effects of air pollution and climatic changes, in particular elevated ozone, altered nitrogen, carbon and water availability, must be key issues for research. Present evidence suggests air pollution will become increasingly harmful to forests under climate change, which requires integration amongst various stressors (abiotic and biotic factors, including competition, parasites and fire), effects on forest services (production, biodiversity protection, soil protection, sustained water balance, socio-economical relevance) and assessment approaches (research, monitoring, modeling) to be fostered.

  2. Effects of the Hormone Kisspeptin on Reproductive Hormone Release in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L. Calley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kisspeptins are a family of neuropeptides which act as upstream stimulators of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons. Kisspeptin signalling is prerequisite to establishing the normal human reproductive phenotype; loss of function mutations in the KISS1 or KISS1R gene produces normosmic hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in humans and mice, whilst increased activation of KISS1R causes precocious puberty. Administration of exogenous kisspeptin to human subjects stimulates an acute gonadotrophin rise. Serum kisspeptin levels also markedly increase during pregnancy. The identification of kisspeptin has been one of the biggest discoveries in the field of reproductive endocrinology, since the isolation and sequencing of GnRH in 1977, and has generated a novel research avenue which has received much attention over the past decade. This research has delineated many properties of the KISS1-KISS1R system, but there is still further work to do. Understanding kisspeptin’s role throughout our reproductive lifetime should help us better understand—and therefore treat—disorders of reproductive function. Promisingly, the current data supports the potential to develop kisspeptin based therapies. As an outlook article this paper focusses predominantly on our groups recent investigations into the effects of kisspeptin administration to humans and the potential therapeutic role of kisspeptin.

  3. The adverse effects of high fat induced obesity on female reproductive cycle and hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthireddy, Laxminarasimha Reddy

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk and progression factor for abnormal reproductive cycle and tissue damage in female mice. It leads to earlier puberty, menarche in young females and infertility. There are extensive range of consequences of obesity which includes type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Obesity is the interaction between dietary intake, genes, life style and environment. The interplay of hormones estrogen, insulin, and leptin is well known on energy homeostasis and reproduction. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of high fat induced obesity on reproductive cycles and its hormonal abnormalities on mice model. Two week, 3 month and 8 month long normal (WT) and very high fat diet (VHFD) diet course is followed. When mice are fed with very high fat diet, there is a drastic increase in weight within the first week later. There was a significant (pleptin levels in 6 month VHFD treated animals. 2 week, 3 month and 6 month time interval pap smear test results showed number of cells, length of estrous cycle and phases of the estrous cycle changes with VHFD mice(n=30) compared to normal diet mice(n=10). These results also indicate that the changes in the reproductive cycles in VHFD treated female mice could be due to the changes in hormones. Histo-pathological analyses of kidney, ovary, liver, pancreas, heart and lungs showed remarkable changes in some tissue on exposure to very high fat. Highly deposited fat packets observed surrounding the hepatocytes and nerve cells.

  4. Effects of different gamma exposure regimes on reproduction in the earthworm Eisenia fetida (Oligochaeta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel-Aas, Turid, E-mail: turid.hertel-aas@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Brunborg, Gunnar, E-mail: Gunnar.Brunborg@fhi.no [Department of Chemical Toxicology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404 Nydalen, 0403 Oslo (Norway); Jaworska, Alicja, E-mail: Alicja.Jaworska@nrpa.no [Department of Emergency Preparedness and Environmental Radioactivity, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, 1332, Osteraas (Norway); Salbu, Brit, E-mail: brit.salbu@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Oughton, Deborah Helen, E-mail: deborah.oughton@umb.no [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway)

    2011-12-15

    Ecological risk assessment of ionising radiation requires knowledge about the responses of individuals and populations to chronic exposures, including situations when exposure levels change over time. The present study investigated processes such as recovery and the adaptive response with respect to reproduction endpoints in the earthworm Eisenia fetida exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation. Furthermore, a crossed experiment was performed to investigate the influence of F0 parental and F1 embryonic irradiation history on the response of irradiated or non-irradiated F1 offspring. Recovery: The sterility induced by sub-chronic exposure at 17 mGy/h (accumulated dose: 25 Gy) was temporary, and 8 weeks after irradiation the worms had regained their reproductive capacity (number of viable offspring produced per adult per week). Adaptive response: Adult worms were continuously exposed at a low priming dose rate of 0.14 mGy/h for 12 weeks (accumulated dose: 0.24 Gy), followed by 14 weeks exposure at a challenge dose rate of 11 mGy/h. The results suggest a lack of adaptive response, since there were no significant differences in the effects on reproduction capacity between the primed and the unprimed groups after challenge doses ranging from 7.6 to 27 Gy. Crossed experiment: The effects of exposure at 11 mGy/h for 21 weeks on growth, sexual maturation and reproduction of offspring, derived either from parent worms and cocoons both exposed at 11 mGy/h, or from non-irradiated parents and cocoons (total accumulated dose 44 and 38 Gy, respectively) were compared. There were no significant differences between the two exposed offspring groups for any of the endpoints. The reproduction capacity was very low for both groups compared to the controls, but the reproduction seemed to be maintained at the reduced level, which could indicate acclimatisation or stabilisation. Finally, parental and embryonic exposures at 11 mGy/h did not affect reproduction in the F1 offspring as adults.

  5. NATURAL PLANT TOXICANT – CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDE AMYGDALIN: CHARACTERISTIC, METABOLISM AND THE EFFECT ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Kolesár

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The amount of cyanogenic glycosides, as natural plant toxicants, in plants varies with plant species and environmental effects. Cyanogenic glycoside as an amygdalin was detected in apricot kernels, bitter almonds and peach, plum, pear and apple seeds. Amygdalin itself is non-toxic, but its HCN production decomposed by some enzymes is toxic substance. Target of this review was to describe the characteristic, metabolism and possible effects of amygdalin on reproductive processes. Previous studies describe the effects of natural compound amygdalin on female and male reproductive systems focused on process of steroidogenesis, spermatozoa motility and morphological abnormalities of spermatozoa. In accordance to the previous studies on amygdalin its benefit is controversial.

  6. The long-term effect of the timing of fertility decline on population size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Neill, BC; Scherbov, S; Lutz, W

    1999-01-01

    Existing long-range population projections imply that the timing of the fertility transition has a relatively unimportant effect on long-term population size when compared with the impact of the level at which fertility is assumed eventually to stabilize. However, this note shows that the effect of

  7. The long-term effect of the timing of fertility decline on population size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Neill, BC; Scherbov, S; Lutz, W

    1999-01-01

    Existing long-range population projections imply that the timing of the fertility transition has a relatively unimportant effect on long-term population size when compared with the impact of the level at which fertility is assumed eventually to stabilize. However, this note shows that the effect of

  8. Effects of extreme weather on reproductive success in a temperate-breeding songbird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivett Pipoly

    Full Text Available The frequency of extreme meteorological events such as heat waves and rainstorms is predicted to increase with climate change. However, there is still little information about how extreme weather influences reproduction in animals. It may not only affect breeding success but might also alter offspring sex ratio if males and females are differentially sensitive to meteorological conditions during development. We investigated the relationship between meteorological conditions and reproductive success over 6 years in a house sparrow population in central Europe. We found that hatching success increased with the number of extremely hot days (daily maximum >31°C and decreased with the number of extremely cold days (<16°C during incubation, although the latter effect held only for clutches with relatively short incubation periods. Fledging success was unrelated to weather variables. However, the frequency of extremely hot days had a negative effect on fledglings' body mass and tarsus length, although both of these traits were positively related to average temperature. Additionally, fledglings' body mass increased with the length of period without rainfall before fledging. Male to female ratio among fledglings did not differ from 1:1 and did not vary with weather variables. The magnitude of the effects of extreme meteorological events was usually small, although in some cases comparable to those of ecologically relevant predictors of reproductive success. Our results indicate that meteorological conditions have complex effects on breeding success, as the effects of extreme weather can differ between different aspects of reproduction and also from the effects of overall meteorological conditions.

  9. Effect of some hormones on reproductive performance and some

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Juma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In randomized block design, 58 indigenous black mountain goats were examined for the effect of different hormonal treatments in inducing oestrus on selected biochemical characteristics of blood serum that were (aspartate transaminase, AST. Alanine transaminase ALT, Akaline phosphatase, ALP, total protein, albumin and total cholesterol. The animals were randomly assigned into four groups according to their treatment. The control group (C consisted of 10 females whereas the rest of the groups, each consisted of 12 females. The treatments included a double PGF2α (Dinoprost tromethamine intramuscular injection (5 mg at a time interval of 11 days plus an intramuscular injection of pregnant mare serum (PMSG (400I. Uand 600I. U. two days before second injection for (treatments, TI, T2 respectively. Treatment (T3 was as that of T1 except PMSG was not injected. T4 was treated as T3 plus an intramuscular injection of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH (12. 5µg after 24 hours of second injection of PGF2α was added. The results indicated that oestrus was higher (P<0.05 in all treatment groups (100%, 91%, 100%, 100% respectively than that of control group (70%. There was a significant effect (P<0.05 of hormonal treatment on kidding rate in which the ratio were (116%, 115%, 75% and 83% for treatment groups respectively in comparison with 70% for control group, also there was significant effect (P<0.05 of hormonal treatment on litter size in (T3. There were significant increases in activity of AST, ALT, during late pregnancy and the first week of parturition, whereas the activity of ALP enzyme was increased during early pregnancy. The concentration of total protein, total cholesterol and albumin were increased (P<0.05 during late stage of pregnancy and then decreased during the first week after parturition. It was concluded that administrating of PGF2α to does on this synchronization regimen in the natural breeding season is desirable.

  10. Effectiveness of Hysteroscopic Repair of Uterine Lesions in Reproductive Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Cheraghi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have demonstrated the efficacy of metformin (MTF in reducing insulin resistance and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC in inhibiting oxidative stress which are involved in the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. We aimed to compare the effects of MTF and NAC combination on serum metabolite and hormonal levels during the course of ovulation induction in PCOS individual candidates of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized clinical trial, placebo controlled pilot study, 80 patients of polycystic ovarian syndrome at the age of 25-35 years were divided into 4 groups (n=20: i. NAC=treated with N-acetyl cysteine (600 mg three times daily, ii. MTF=treated with metformin (500 mg three times daily, iii. MTF+NAC=treated with N-acetyl cysteine plus metformin (the offered doses and iv. placebo (PLA. A total number of 20 patients (6 from MTF group, 4 from NAC group, 6 from MTF+NAC group and 4 from PLA group were dropped of the study. The drugs were administrated from day 3 of menses of previous cycle until ovum pick-up. Results: Serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH, total testosterone, cholesterol and triglyceride, insulin and leptin significantly reduced in the MTF and NAC groups compared to the placebo (p<0.01. But levels of LH, total testosterone, cholesterol and triglyceride had no significant reduction in the MTF+NAC groups compared to the placebo. The serum levels of malonyldialdehyde (MDA, insulin and leptin reduced significantly after treatment in the MTF+NAC group compared to the placebo (p<0.05. Conclusion: Considering the adverse effect of combination therapy, we proposed the conadministration might have no beneficial effect for PCOS patient during course of ovulation induction of ICSI (Registration Number: IRCT201204159476N1.

  11. Effect of different light sources on reproductive anatomy and physiology of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadilla-Mendez, M F; Rojas-Granados, C P; Andrade, E F; Retes, P L; Ferreira, L G; Alvarenga, R R; Rodriguez-Gil, J E; Fassani, E J; Zangeronimo, M G

    2016-05-01

    Artificial lights are essential for controlling the reproductive tract development of birds during puberty and therefore influence reproductive quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different light sources on reproductive anatomic and physiological characteristics of female Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica). A total of 270 birds from one day of age were housed in a masonry shed divided into six rooms with light isolation. Each room was equipped with a different type of light bulb and contained seven cages with five birds in each. The light bulbs tested were: incandescent; compact fluorescent; and light-emitting diode (LED) in the colors white, blue, red and green. The experimental design was completely randomized with six treatments and seven replications of individual birds each. The anatomic and physiological condition of the birds was evaluated at four, eight and 12 weeks of age. The white LED bulb advanced (P<0.05) the sexual maturity by one week, resulted (P<0.05) in higher live weights and greater weight and relative percentage of ovarian stroma, oviduct and ovarian tissue at eight weeks of age. Higher plasma concentrations of estradiol and lipids were also observed (P<0.05) at eight weeks under the white LED bulb. At 12 weeks of age, the magnum and isthmus folding characteristics were better (P<0.05) with the red LED bulb. In conclusion, the photostimulation with the white LED bulb was more efficient at activating the reproductive cycle, hastening the onset of sexual maturity and increasing the development of reproductive organs after puberty.

  12. Effect of dietary vitamin A on reproductive performance and immune response of broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianmin; Roshdy, Abdelfatah Rashad; Guo, Yuming; Wang, Yongwei; Guo, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-01

    The effects of dietary vitamin A supplementation on reproductive performance, liver function, fat-soluble vitamin retention, and immune response were studied in laying broiler breeders. In the first phase of the experiment, 1,120 Ross-308 broiler breeder hens were fed a diet of corn and soybean meal supplemented with 5,000 to 35,000 IU/kg vitamin A (retinyl acetate) for 20 weeks. In the second phase, 384 Ross-308 broiler breeder hens were fed the same diet supplemented with 5,000 to 135,000 IU/kg vitamin A (retinyl acetate) for 24 weeks. The hens' reproductive performance, the concentrations of vitamins A and E in liver and egg yolk, liver function, mRNA expression of vitamin D receptor in duodenal mucosa, antibody titers against Newcastle disease virus vaccine, and T-cell proliferation responses were evaluated. Supplementation of vitamin A at levels up to and including 35,000 IU/kg did not affect reproductive performance and quadratically affected antibody titer to Newcastle disease virus vaccine (pvitamin A linearly increased vitamin A concentration in liver and yolk and linearly decreased α-, γ-, and total tocopherol concentration in yolk (pvitamin A at doses of 45,000 IU/kg and above significantly decreased egg weight, yolk color, eggshell thickness and strength, and reproductive performance. Dietary vitamin A significantly increased mRNA expression of vitamin D receptor in duodenal mucosa (pvitamin A at 135,000 IU/kg decreased the proliferation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (pvitamin A for broiler breeders appears to be 35,000 IU/kg, as excessive supplementation has been shown to impair liver function, reproductive performance, and immune response.

  13. Effects of population based screening for Chlamydia infections in the Netherlands limited by declining participation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris V Schmid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large trial to investigate the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections was conducted in the Netherlands in 2008-2012. The trial was register based and consisted of four rounds of screening of women and men in the age groups 16-29 years in three regions in the Netherlands. Data were collected on participation rates and positivity rates per round. A modeling study was conducted to project screening effects for various screening strategies into the future. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a stochastic network simulation model incorporating partnership formation and dissolution, aging and a sexual life course perspective. Trends in baseline rates of chlamydia testing and treatment were used to describe the epidemiological situation before the start of the screening program. Data on participation rates was used to describe screening uptake in rural and urban areas. Simulations were used to project the effectiveness of screening on chlamydia prevalence for a time period of 10 years. In addition, we tested alternative screening strategies, such as including only women, targeting different age groups, and biennial screening. Screening reduced prevalence by about 1% in the first two screening rounds and leveled off after that. Extrapolating observed participation rates into the future indicated very low participation in the long run. Alternative strategies only marginally changed the effectiveness of screening. Higher participation rates as originally foreseen in the program would have succeeded in reducing chlamydia prevalence to very low levels in the long run. CONCLUSIONS: Decreasing participation rates over time profoundly impact the effectiveness of population based screening for chlamydia infections. Using data from several consecutive rounds of screening in a simulation model enabled us to assess the future effectiveness of screening on prevalence. If participation rates cannot be kept at a sufficient level

  14. The cause of global amphibian declines: a developmental endocrinologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, T B; Falso, P; Gallipeau, S; Stice, M

    2010-03-15

    Greater than 70% of the world's amphibian species are in decline. We propose that there is probably not a single cause for global amphibian declines and present a three-tiered hierarchical approach that addresses interactions among and between ultimate and proximate factors that contribute to amphibian declines. There are two immediate (proximate) causes of amphibian declines: death and decreased recruitment (reproductive failure). Although much attention has focused on death, few studies have addressed factors that contribute to declines as a result of failed recruitment. Further, a great deal of attention has focused on the role of pathogens in inducing diseases that cause death, but we suggest that pathogen success is profoundly affected by four other ultimate factors: atmospheric change, environmental pollutants, habitat modification and invasive species. Environmental pollutants arise as likely important factors in amphibian declines because they have realized potential to affect recruitment. Further, many studies have documented immunosuppressive effects of pesticides, suggesting a role for environmental contaminants in increased pathogen virulence and disease rates. Increased attention to recruitment and ultimate factors that interact with pathogens is important in addressing this global crisis.

  15. Effects of fluoxetine on the reproduction of two prosobranch mollusks: Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Valvata piscinalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gust, M. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: marion.gust@cemagref.fr; Buronfosse, T. [Laboratoire d' endocrinologie, Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Lyon, avenue Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France)], E-mail: thierry.buronfosse@inserm.fr; Giamberini, L. [Laboratoire des interactions Ecotoxicologie, Biodiversite, Ecosystemes, CNRS UMR 7146, campus Bridoux, 57000 Metz (France)], E-mail: giamb@sciences.univ-metz.fr; Ramil, M. [Federal Institute of Hydrology (BFG), D-56068 Koblenz, Am Mainzer Tor 1 (Germany)], E-mail: mramil@usc.es; Mons, R. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: raphael.mons@cemagref.fr; Garric, J. [Laboratoire d' ecotoxicologie, Cemagref, 3b quai Chauveau, CP 220, 69336 Lyon Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: jeanne.garric@cemagref.fr

    2009-02-15

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant, frequently found in aquatic ecosystems. We investigated its effects on two freshwater prosobranch gastropods: Valvata piscinalis (European valve snail) and Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New Zealand mudsnail), which have different reproductive modes. The fecundity of V. piscinalis (cumulate number of eggs at day 42) was not affected with an NOEC of 100 {mu}g/L nominal concentration (69 {mu}g/L measured concentration). The mudsnail P. antipodarum responded in a biphasic dose-effect curve at low concentrations. The cumulate number of neonates at day 42 had an LOEC of 100 {mu}g/L (69 {mu}g/L) and an NOEC of 33.3 {mu}g/L (13 {mu}g/L), whereas the embryos in the brood pouch at day 42 only showed an LOEC of 3.7 {mu}g/L (1 {mu}g/L). We also observed histological effects in P. antipodarum (gonadal thickness). Among the sexual steroids we measured only testosterone which varied, independent of reproduction. Moreover the use of two closely related species highlights the interspecific variability. - Fluoxetine has significant effects on the reproduction and development of some freshwater snails.

  16. Effects of high dose rate gamma radiation on survival and reproduction of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantinha, Rebeca S.; Nakano, Eliana [Instituto Butantan, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Parasitologia], e-mail: rebecanuclear@gmail.com, e-mail: eliananakano@butantan.gov.br; Borrely, Sueli I. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia das Radiacoes], e-mail: sborrely@ipen.br; Amaral, Ademir; Melo, Ana M.M.A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia (GERAR)], e-mail: amaral@ufpe.br; Silva, Luanna R.S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia. Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: amdemelo@hotmail.com, e-mail: luannaribeiro_lua@hotmail.com

    2009-07-01

    Ionizing radiations are known as mutagenic agents, causing lethality and infertility. This characteristic has motivated its application on animal biological control. In this context, the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata can be considered an excellent experimental model to study effects of ionizing radiations on lethality and reproduction. This work was designed to evaluate effects of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation at high dose rate (10.04 kGy/h) on B. glabrata. For this purpose, adult snails were selected and exposed to doses ranging from 20 to 100 Gy, with 10 Gy intervals; one group was kept as control. There was not effect of dose rate in the lethality of gamma radiation; the value of 64,3 Gy of LD{sub 50} obtained in our study was similar to that obtained by other authors with low dose rates. Nevertheless, our data suggest that there was a dose rate effect in the reproduction. On all dose levels, radiation improved the production of embryos for all exposed individuals. However, viability indexes were below 6% and, even 65 days after irradiation, fertility was not recovered. These results are not in agreement with other studies using low dose rates. Lethality was obtained in all groups irradiated, and the highest doses presented percentiles of dead animals above 50%. The results demonstrated that doses of 20 and 30 Gy were ideal for population control of B. glabrata. Further studies are needed; nevertheless, this research evidenced great potential of high dose rate gamma radiation on B. glabrata reproductive control. (author)

  17. Effects of low dose acrylamide on the rat reproductive organs structure, fertility and gene integrity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saleh Alkarim; Sufyan Elassouli; Soad Ali; Nasra Ayuob; Zaki Elassouli

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To assesses the effects of long term exposure to low dose of acrylamide (0.4 μg /g) in post-weaning Sprague-Dawley rats on the structure of the reproductive organ as well as DNA integrity. Methods:The histological changes in the male and female reproductive organs the morphological changes in sperms as well as the genotoxic effect of acrylamide were assessed. The effect acrylamide on pregnancy outcome was evaluated.Results:Testes of acrylamide-fed rats showed decreased number of seminiferous tubules containing mature sperms and degenerative changes in sperm germ cell layers. Some sperms of epididymal cauda showed head deformity. In female, acrylamide included cystic ovarian changes, degenerative changes of zona pelluida, granulosa cells and oocytes. Post implantation loss and decrease in the number of full term fetuses were detected. Resorption sites showed necrotic fetal tissue with vacuolation of amniotic cells.Conclusion:Acrylamide cause harmful effect on the reproductive organ structure, fertility and cause extensive DNA damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  18. Age-related decline in brain resources modulates genetic effects on cognitive functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulman Lindenberger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging.Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008, who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed.

  19. Age-Related Decline in Brain Resources Modulates Genetic Effects on Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Ulman; Nagel, Irene E.; Chicherio, Christian; Li, Shu-Chen; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Bäckman, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive performance increase from early to late adulthood, likely reflecting influences of a multitude of factors. We hypothesize that losses in neurochemical and anatomical brain resources in normal aging modulate the effects of common genetic variations on cognitive functioning. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that the function relating brain resources to cognition is nonlinear, so that genetic differences exert increasingly large effects on cognition as resources recede from high to medium levels in the course of aging. Direct empirical support for this hypothesis comes from a study by Nagel et al. (2008), who reported that the effects of the Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT) gene on cognitive performance are magnified in old age and interacted with the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene. We conclude that common genetic polymorphisms contribute to the increasing heterogeneity of cognitive functioning in old age. Extensions of the hypothesis to other polymorphisms are discussed. (150 of 150 words) PMID:19225597

  20. Effect of forage:concentrate ratio on digestion and reproduction in primiparous beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B K; Hunt, C W; Sasser, R G; Momont, P A; Rode, L M; Kastelic, J P

    1997-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of high- (HF) and moderate- (MF) forage diets on digestive and reproductive characteristics in beef heifers. Thirty primiparous beef heifers were allotted by weight and backfat thickness to receive either 80:20 (HF) or 50: 50 (MF) forage:concentrate ratio diets from parturition to at least 90 d postpartum. Alfalfa hay and wheat straw were the forage sources and barley was the concentrate source. Equal daily amounts of ME were provided to all heifers by restricting intake of the MF diet. Digestibility of DM was greater (P wave dynamics and the intervals from parturition to first and second ovulation, first estrus, first service, and conception were not different between treatments. Shifts in energy supply from forage to concentrate had minimal effect on digestion and reproduction in first-calf beef heifers in this study.

  1. EFFECTS OF CARBOFURAN ON THE REPRODUCTIVE CAPACITY OF A FRESHWATER SNAIL, RADIX QUADRASI, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIRGINIA S. CARING

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of 4 sublethal concentrations of carbofuran (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm on the reproductive capacity of R. quadrasi was determined. Results showed that incubation period is delayed and inhibited by 1000 and 2000 ppm carbofuran but not by lower concentrations. The hatching period is longer in treated snails and not all eggs hatch in the 1000 and 2000 ppm treatment. The percentage of hatching is inversely proportional to the carbofuran concentration. Oviposition was delayed in all the treated stages and at all dosages. The higher the carbofuran concentration, the later the onset of oviposition. The reproductive period is shortened. Fecundity was decreased in snails treated at EMB and SM. However, only the 2000 ppm carbofuran concentration showed an adverse effect on the snails exposure at PSM.

  2. Direct and indirect genetic effects of sex-specific mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immonen, Elina; Collet, Marie; Goenaga, Julieta

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in ageing and their function requires coordinated action of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Epistasis between the two genomes can influence lifespan but whether this also holds for reproductive senescence is unclear. Maternal inheritance of mitochondria predicts sex...... to slower senescence relative to novel mitonuclear combinations. We found no evidence for mitonuclear coadaptation in males. Mitonuclear epistasis not only affected age-specific ejaculate weight, but also influenced male age-dependent indirect effects on traits expressed by their female partners (fecundity...... beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, using introgression lines harbouring distinct mitonuclear genotypes. Our results reveal both direct and indirect sex-specific effects of mitonuclear epistasis on reproductive ageing. Females harbouring coadapted mitonuclear genotypes showed higher lifetime fecundity due...

  3. Effect of zearalenone on reproductive parameters and expression of selected testicular genes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatecka, E; Ded, L; Elzeinova, F; Kubatova, A; Dorosh, A; Margaryan, H; Dostalova, P; Korenkova, V; Hoskova, K; Peknicova, J

    2014-06-01

    We tested the effect of two different concentrations (150μg/l and 0.15μg/l) of mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) on the reproductive parameters and expression of testicular genes in male mice. In adult males, no reduction of body or reproductive organ weight was observed, and the seminiferous tubules were morphologically normal with ongoing spermatogenesis. However, we found decreased sperm concentration, increase of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa and increased binding of apoptotic marker annexin V. This study was also focused on the evaluation of gene expression profiles of 28 genes playing important roles during the processes occurring in the testicular tissue. We detected changes in the expression of genes important for proper spermatogenesis. Surprisingly, we observed a stronger effect after exposure to the lower dose of ZEA.

  4. Comparative effects of dimethoate and deltamethrin on reproductive system in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, F Ben; Slima, A Ben; Dammak, I; Keskes-Ammar, L; Mallek, Z

    2010-06-01

    The effects of dimethoate (5, 15 and 28 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), deltamethrin (5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and their mixture (5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) on male reproduction in mice were studied. The insecticides were given orally by gavage to male mice for 21 days. At the end of the treatment period, body, testes and epididymides weights and sperm parameters were determined. Alone mixture treatment has significantly decreased body weights. Dimethoate at 28 mg kg(-1) day(-1), deltamethrin at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and their mixture at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) were associated with a significantly decreased sperm count, motility and viability and significantly increased percent morphologically abnormal spermatozoa compared with the controls. This study demonstrated the adverse effects of dimethoate at high dose, deltamethrin and their combining at 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) on reproductive system and sperm parameters in male mice.

  5. Dystocia in Friesian cows and its effects on postpartum reproductive performance and milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaafar, H M A; Shamiah, Sh M; El-Hamd, M A Abu; Shitta, A A; El-Din, M A Tag

    2011-01-01

    A total of 1,243 records for 585 dairy Friesian cows from 1997-2004 were used to study the factors affecting dystocia and its effects on reproductive performance and milk production. The overall incidence of dystocia was 6.9%. The percentage of dystocia decreased with increasing live body weight, age, and parity of cows (P dystocia was detected in winter season, but the least percentage was in summer season (P dystocia was significantly (P dystocia was significantly (P dystocia had adverse effects on reproductive performance and milk yield. The service interval, service period, days open, and calving interval were significantly (P dystocia compared to normal cows. The conception rate was lower (P dystocia compared to normal cows (60.5% vs. 73.0% and 3.4 vs. 2.7, respectively). Average daily milk yield was lower (P dystocia compared to normal cows.

  6. The effect of carbadox on reproduction when fed to Swine up to 60 kilograms body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, B I; Flipot, P M; Hartsock, T G; Vlielander, L C

    1983-05-01

    Forty female and ten male pigs were used to study the effect of carbadox on reproductive performance when included in the diet at a level of 55 mg/kg from one week of age through approximately 60 kg body weight. Five replicates, each consisting of eight females and a pair of littermate boars, all crossfostered, were used. One boar reared on medicated feed and another on an unmedicated diet, were bred to two groups of four littermates. One female in each pair had been fed the medicated diet, and the other the unmedicated diet. The same breeding scheme was carried out for two parities. The following observations were made: length of estrous cycle, weaning-to-estrus interval; conception rate; age and weight at first estrus, at breeding, at 109 days of gestation, at farrowing and after farrowing; gestation length; and litter size and weights at birth and 28 days. The results showed that carbadox had no apparent effect on reproductive performance.

  7. Reproductive toxicity of bisphenol A and cadmium in Potamopyrgus antipodarum and modulation of bisphenol A effects by different test temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sieratowicz, Agnes, E-mail: A.Sieratowicz@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Stange, Daniela, E-mail: stange@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Schulte-Oehlmann, Ulrike, E-mail: schulte-oehlmann@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany); Oehlmann, Joerg, E-mail: oehlmann@bio.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Department of Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Siesmayerstrasse 70, 60323 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    An OECD initiative for the development of mollusc-based toxicity tests for endocrine disrupters and other chemicals has recommended three test species with respective test designs for further standardisation. Preparing a subsequent pre-validation study we performed a reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum, determining the concentration range of the selected test substances, bisphenol A (BPA) and cadmium (Cd). At 16 deg. C, the recommended test temperature, the number of embryos in the brood pouch was increased by BPA and decreased by Cd (NOEC: 20 {mu}g BPA/L and 1 {mu}g Cd/L). Coinstantaneous BPA tests at 7 deg. C and 25 deg. C demonstrated a temperature dependency of the response, resulting in lower NOECs (5 {mu}g/L respectively). As expected, reproduction in control groups significantly varied depending on temperature. Additional observations of the brood stock showed seasonal fluctuations in reproduction under constant laboratory conditions. The recommended temperature range and test conditions have to be further investigated. - Highlights: > We performed a reproduction test with the mollusc Potamopyrgus antipodarum. > We defined the test substance concentration range for a pre-validation study. > The bisphenol A effect (increased reproduction) depends on the test temperature. > Reproduction of control groups significantly varies depending on temperature. > The brood stock shows seasonal fluctuations in reproduction at constant conditions. - A reproduction test with Potamopyrgus antipodarum with 2 substances for subsequent pre-validation is presented and bisphenol A effects show a temperature dependency.

  8. The effects of bovine necrotic vulvo-vaginitis on reproductive and production performance of Israeli 1st calf heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshen, T; Ben-Gera, J; Koren, O; Bdolah-Abram, T; Elad, D

    2012-04-01

    Bovine necrotic vulvovaginitis (BNVV) is a syndrome unique to Israel characterized by necrotic lesion in the caudal vagina mainly in first calf heifers after calving, associated with Porphyromonas levii. The objectives of this study were to analyze the impact of BNVV on reproductive performance, milk production and survival in the heard of first calf dairy heifers in affected farms, and to verify if the effects of BNVV are severity-dependent. For assessment of the severity level a scale of 4 degrees was formed, and cows were scored 4 to 6 d after calving. Data were obtained from two dairy farms during 2006-07, consisting of 603 lactations. The incidence and the severity of BNVV declined between 2006 and 2007, and severe BNVV tended to be more prevalent in the summer. The odds to conceive in the first artificial insemination of BNVV cow tended to be lower than healthy cows (OR = 0.676, P = 0.052). Cows with BNVV had longer empty period (145.8 d vs. 135.1 d of healthy cows, P = 0.031), but only severe BNVV had a negative effect on the odds of the cow to be empty at 150 d in milk (DIM) (OR = 2.05, P = 0.052). Severe BNVV also affected the mean survival time to conception (155.9 d vs. 142.3 d, P = 0.042). All BNVV severity degrees had a negative effect on milk production. The effect on milk production was not limited only to the beginning of the lactation, cows with BNVV produced 338.1 kg milk less than healthy cows (P = 0.016) in 305 d corrected lactation. The effect on milk production was not severity depended. No effect on survival time in the herd was demonstrated.

  9. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

    1983-11-01

    Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam

  10. Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanwei Wang; Harvey Risch; Lingeng Lu; Irwin, Melinda L.; Susan Mayne; Peter Schwartz; Thomas Rutherford; Immaculata De Vivo; Herbert Yu

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged estrogen exposure is believed to be the major cause of endometrial cancer. As possible markers of estrogen exposure, various menstrual and reproductive features, e.g., ages at menarche and menopause, are found to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. In order to assess their combined effects on endometrial cancer, we created the total number of menstrual cycles (TNMC) that a woman experienced during her life or up to the time of study and two genetic risk scores, GRS1 for age ...

  11. Effects of dystocia on milk production and reproduction in subsequent lactation in a Turkish Holstein herd

    OpenAIRE

    İbrahim KAYA; UZMAY, Can; AYYILMAZ, Tarık

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated effects of dystocia on milk production, reproduction, calf loss, and cow culling in a Turkish Holstein herd at the Agricultural Faculty, Ege University, İzmir, Turkey. Data were from 653 single calvings between 2006 and 2010. Considering a greater dystocia incidence in primiparous cows, data was divided in two; 223 primiparous and 430 multiparous calvings scored on a 1-to-5 scale. Scores were categorized into no dystocia and dystocia. With few related observations, all ...

  12. Effects of Elevated Ambient Temperature on Reproductive Outcomes and Offspring Growth Depend on Exposure Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Yahia Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive performance has been shown to be greatly affected by changes in environmental factors, such as temperature. However, it is also crucial to identify the particular stage of pregnancy that is most adversely affected by elevated ambient temperature. The aims of this study were to determine the effect on reproductive outcomes of exposure to elevated ambient temperature during different stages of pregnancy and to determine the effect of prenatal heat stress on offspring growth. Sixty pregnant rats were used in this study. The rats were divided equally into four groups as group 1 (control, group 2 (exposed to elevated temperature following implantation, group 3 (exposed to elevated temperature during pre- and periimplantation, and group 4 (exposed to elevated temperature during pre- and periimplantation and following implantation. Groups 3 and 4 had prolonged gestation periods, reduced litter sizes, and male-biased sex ratios. Moreover, the growth patterns of group 3 and 4 pups were adversely affected by prenatal exposure to elevated temperature. The differences between group 1 and group 3 and between group 1 and group 4 were highly significant. However, no significant differences were observed between groups 1 and 2 in the gestation length, sex ratios, and growth patterns. Thus, it can be concluded that exposure to elevated ambient temperature during pre- and periimplantation has stronger adverse effects on reproductive outcomes and offspring growth than postimplantation exposure.

  13. Estimate of Inbreeding Coefficient and Its Effects on Reproductive Traits of Dairy Herds in Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gholizadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to study the inbreeding coefficient and its effect on reproductive performance of dairy cows (age at first calving, calving interval and open days in Isfahan province. Records of 31,977 (primiparous cows, 36,982 and 51,423 (multiparous cows for age at first calving, calving interval and open days were used, respectively. The inbreeding coefficients of animals were calculated using pedigree information of 78,425 females and 8,056 males, which were born from 1963 to 2009. The overall mean and maximum inbreeding coefficients in Holstein cows were 2.33% and 31.30%, respectively. The results showed that 57,234 animals were inbred with 3.57% inbreeding coefficient. Regression coefficients on inbreeding coefficient for age at first calving, calving interval and open days were 0.589±0.21, 1.08±0.15 and 0.27±12, respectively. Estimated inbreeding indicated significantly negative effect on the reproductive traits in different parturition periods. The results revealed that the average inbreeding trend was increased in the dairy herds. The increased inbreeding was due to close mating systems between the candidates, and it showed negative effects on the reproductive traits in Isfahan dairy herds.

  14. Well production decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvetkovic, Branimir

    2008-12-15

    Effective rate-time analysis during a declining production in an oil or gas wells is an important tool for establishing a successful management. The reasons behind the production decline include reservoir, fracture and well conditions. A well's decline rate is transient, signifying that the pressure wave propagates freely from the wellbore, leading to depletion when the outer boundary for the well is reached and to the wave propagation coming to a halt. This thesis studies the transient decline, with emphasis on a horizontal well with fracture wellbore responses. It also deals with the depletion decline, investigating the wellbore pressure responses for a vertical well producing under variable rate conditions of Arps decline. The well decline model solutions are analytical, and the modelling itself is carried out in two steps. The first step involves modelling the transient well responses of a multi fractured horizontal well. These responses originate from an infinitive reservoir and are considered as full-time rate-time responses. Multi-fractured horizontal well rate-time responses represent the solutions to a diffusion equation with varying boundary conditions and different fracture options (i.e., with or without fracture, a variety of fracture orientations, various fracture lengths, etc). The transient model calculates individual fracture rates, productivity indexes and an equivalent wellbore radius for the multi-fractured well. For the transient decline of a fractured-horizontal well model, well data is matched and the reservoir diagnosis and production prognosis are improved through the individual fracture production, with a model screening ability, and novel model features that can handle wellbore conditions changing from rate-to-pressure. Screening analyses can generate valuable information for fracture diagnosis in addition to a well and fracture production prognosis. Further model runs are carried out to match the real well data. The model solution is

  15. Effects of a computer-based cognitive exercise program on age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoki, Andrea; Radovanovic, Mirjana; Winn, Brian; Heeter, Carrie; Anthony, James C

    2013-01-01

    We developed a 'senior friendly' suite of online 'games for learning' with interactive calibration for increasing difficulty, and evaluated the feasibility of a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that seniors aged 60-80 can improve key aspects of cognitive ability with the aid of such games. Sixty community-dwelling senior volunteers were randomized to either an online game suite designed to train multiple cognitive abilities, or to a control arm with online activities that simulated the look and feel of the games but with low level interactivity and no calibration of difficulty. Study assessment included measures of recruitment, retention and play-time. Cognitive change was measured with a computerized assessment battery administered just before and within two weeks after completion of the six-week intervention. Impediments to feasibility included: limited access to in-home high-speed internet, large variations in the amount of time devoted to game play, and a reluctance to pursue more challenging levels. Overall analysis was negative for assessed performance (transference effects) even though subjects improved on the games themselves. Post hoc analyses suggest that some types of games may have more value than others, but these effects would need to be replicated in a study designed for that purpose. We conclude that a six-week, moderate-intensity computer game-based cognitive intervention can be implemented with high-functioning seniors, but the effect size is relatively small. Our findings are consistent with Owen et al. (2010), but there are open questions about whether more structured, longer duration or more intensive 'games for learning' interventions might yield more substantial cognitive improvement in seniors.

  16. Effect of Maytenus macrocarpa“Chuchuhuasi” in the male system reproductive of mouse (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Láyonal G. Acosta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maytenus macrocarpa(chuchuhuasi is native tree of the Peruvian Amazon used as traditional medicine for the treatment of many diseases, but its effect on the male reproductive system has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study is evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of M. macrocarpa in daily doses for 7 days on reproductive parameters of male mice. We used C57BL mature male mice divided into 2 groups (n= 10, Control Group (C: 0.9% NaCl and Treatment group (T: Aqueous extract of Chuchuhuasi, both supplied daily via oral gavages. At the eight day of treatment the mice were euthanized. The weight of the body and reproductive organs: testis, epididymis and vas deferens, were registered. Concentration, motility and sperm morphology were evaluated. The results showed significantly differences (t- Student test P<0.05 in the weight of the head and body epididymis (C: 19.25±1.1 vs T: 21.26±2.0, vas deferens (C: 10.61±0.7 vs T: 11.75±0.5, progressive sperm motility (C: 42.16±5.2 vs T: 25.82±8.4 and immobile sperm (C: 36.05±4.9 vs T: 48.51±7.2. No difference in sperm count was observed. The sperm normal morphology diminished with ingest of M. macrocarpa(tStudent test p <0.05 (C: 39.72±1.3 vs T: 30.78±4.9. We conclude that the aqueous extract of chuchuhuasi, has a negative effect on the male reproductive system of mice.

  17. Use of captive starlings to determine effects of pollutants on passerine reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, C.E.; Christian, C.L.; Lamb, D.W.; Kenaga, E.E.

    1981-01-01

    Three reproductive trials were conducted to develop techniques for propagation of captive starlings (Stumus vulgaris) which could determine the effects of environmental contaminants on passerine reproduction. Trials were conducted during the spring of 1979 in five adjacent 2.4 by 3 by 12-m outdoor wire pens containing four or ten pairs of starlings, a similar number of nest boxes, perches, water, commercial turkey starter, and alfalfa hay as nesting material. Nestling diets consisted of combinations of Nebraska Brand bird of prey diet, live or frozen mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) and crickets (Acheta domestica), or live earthworms (Pheretima sp.). Starlings reproduced successfully when the number of breeding pairs per pen was reduced from ten to four. The average clutch sizes for each pen (4.3 to 4.9) were similar to those reported for wild starlings. Hatching (60 to 90.4 percent) and fledging (0 to 100 percent) success varied among pens. The fledging success was greatest in the pens which received the most diverse nestling diets: Nebraska Brand diet plus frozen or live mealworms and crickets. Whether the insects were presented alive or frozen appeared to have little effect on the reproductive success. The starlings did not consume or carry earthworms to their young. The body weights of 20-day-old nestlings raised in captivity (X=73.9 g) were similar to those of starlings in the wild. The use of single pairs per pen may eliminate problems in presentation of nestling diets due to asynchrony in breeding between pairs and excessive interactions among individuals, which may interfere with parental care. The starling appears to be an excellent model for examining the effects of environmental contaminants on the reproduction of songbirds in captivity.

  18. Declining Dioxin concentrations in the Rhone River, France, attest to the effectiveness of emissions controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Babut, Marc; Mourier, Brice; Mahler, Barbara J.; Roux, Gwenaelle; Desmet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Emission-control policies have been implemented in Europe and North America since the 1990s for polychlorodibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and furans (PCDFs). To assess the effect of these policies on temporal trends and spatial patterns for these compounds in a large European river system, sediment cores were collected in seven depositional areas along the Rhone River in France, dated, and analyzed for PCDDs and PCDFs. Results show concentrations increase in the downstream direction and have decreased temporally at all sites during the last two decades, with an average decrease of 83% from 1992 to 2010. The time for a 50% decrease in concentrations (t1/2) averaged 6.9 ± 2.6 and 9.1 ± 2.9 years for the sum of measured PCDDs and PCDFs, respectively. Congener patterns are similar among cores and indicate dominance of regional atmospheric deposition and possibly weathered local sources. Local sources are clearly indicated at the most downstream site, where concentrations of the most toxic dioxin, TCDD, are about 2 orders of magnitude higher than at the other six sites. The relatively steep downward trends attest to the effects of the dioxin emissions reduction policy in Europe and suggest that risks posed to aquatic life in the Rhone River basin from dioxins and furans have been greatly reduced.

  19. The effects of patch shape and connectivity on nest site selection and reproductive success of the Indigo Bunting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weldon, Aimee Jean

    2004-07-01

    Description – Ph.D Dissertation. North Carolina State University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 135 pp. Abatract - Habitat fragmentation and its associated effects have been blamed for the recent population declines of many Neotropical migratory bird species. Increased predation and parasitism resulting from edge-related effects have been implicated for poor nesting success in many studies, mostly of forest interior species. However, little attention has been devoted to disturbance-dependent birds. In this study, I examine how patch shape and connectivity in fragmented landscapes affects the reproductive success of disturbance-dependent bird species, specifically the Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea). I conducted my study in a landscape-scale experimental system of similar-area habitat patches that differed in connectivity and in shape. Shapes differed between edgy and rectangular forms, where edgy patches contained 50% more edge than rectangular patches. I tested whether edgy patches function as ecological traps for species with strong edge preferences, by leading them to select dangerous habitats. Indigo Buntings preferentially selected edgy patches over rectangular patches, but experienced significantly lower reproductive success in edgy patches early in the season. Although predation pressure intensified in rectangular patches late in the season, seasonal fecundity was still significantly lower in edgy patches, providing the first empirical evidence that edges can function as ecological traps for Indigo Buntings. A second objective of my study was to evaluate the efficacy of conservation corridors for disturbance-dependent bird species. Conservation corridors have become a popular strategy to preserve biodiversity and promote gene flow in fragmented landscapes, but corridors may also have negative consequences. I tested the hypothesis that corridors can increase nest predation risk in connected patches relative to unconnected patches. Nest predation rates

  20. Effects of climate warming and declining species richness in grassland model ecosystems: acclimation of CO2 fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kowalski

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of warming and declining species richness on the carbon balance of grassland communities, model ecosystems containing one, three or nine species were exposed to ambient and elevated (ambient +3°C air temperature. In this paper, we analyze measured ecosystem CO2 fluxes to test whether ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration had acclimated to warming after 28 months of continuous heating, and whether the degree of acclimation depended on species richness. At first sight, we found no signs of acclimation in photosynthesis or respiration. However, because plant cover was significantly higher in the heated treatment, normalization for plant cover revealed down-regulation of both photosynthesis and respiration. Although CO2 fluxes were larger in communities with higher species richness, species richness did not affect the degree of acclimation to warming. These results imply that models need to take into account thermal acclimation to simulate photosynthesis and respiration in a warmer world.

  1. Brewer's Grain from Cameroon Brewery in Breeder Chicken Rations : Effect on Productive and Reproductive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafeni, MJ.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of brewer's dried grain (BDG on the productive and reproductive traits in breeder chickens, 120 laying hens and 12 cocks of ISA commercial breed were subjected to dietary treatments containing 0, 10, 20, and 30 % levels of BDG. Feed and water were provided ad libitum over the 5-months experimental period. Reproductive and productive traits such as egg production, egg weight, albumen height, shell weight, semen quantity fertility and hatchability of fertile eggs were measured. Results indicated that when BDG was fed at the 30 % level in the ration, the hen-day egg production (50.6 % was significantly (P of inclusion. There was a significant (P 0.05 was noticed between treatments for ratio of shell weight to egg weight, albumen height, semen quantity and fertility. The results suggest that although the 30 % level of BDG can be tolerated, the 20 %, level of BDG inclusion is more appropriate for breeder birds.

  2. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated

  3. [Bacteriospermia in Assisted Reproductive Techniques: effects of bacteria on spermatozoa and seminal plasma, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitrelle, F; Robin, G; Lefebvre, C; Bailly, M; Selva, J; Courcol, R; Lornage, J; Albert, M

    2012-04-01

    The presence of bacteria in semen could induce impairment of sperm morphology, alteration of sperm function and mechanical or functional obstruction of the seminal tract. The term of bacteriospermia does not signify infection. Bacteriospermia and male accessory gland infection (MAGI) have indeed to be distinguished. They may lead both to male infertility but their diagnosis and treatment options differ. This review summarizes effects of bacteria and leucocytospermia on sperm parameters and functions. Then, indications, benefits and risks of treatment of bacteriospermia and MAGI, in assisted reproductive techniques (ART) will be discussed. For bacteria commonly observed in semen, this review aims at defining some thresholds above which a treatment is required. These thresholds were established according to literature, according to French microbiology society and in function of our usual practice. This review should help practitioners of reproductive medicine to take care of bacteriospermia in semen.

  4. Permanently effective in health development. JICA Reproductive Health Project. Nghi Loc district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Huy Huyen

    1999-01-01

    The most common health problems in Nghi Trong in Vietnam include reproductive tract infections, children's diseases such as diarrhea, and acute bronchitis. Reproductive tract infections take place because of unsanitary water and acute bronchitis is rampant because of the cold weather. Although no HIV/AIDS cases have been reported in the commune, the Nghi Trong Commune Health Center (CHC) is making every effort to prevent HIV infection while providing other services. Under the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) project, information, education and communication activities have been implemented in the district. These activities are important because they have been helping commune people identify and understand common health problems, how to prevent them, and how to get timely treatment. It is not only temporary, but it is permanently effective in health development. In addition, health staff workers at the CHCs are benefiting from the training program provided by the JICA project. More commune people are also visiting the CHCs for examination and treatment.

  5. [Effect of p-chlorophenylalanine on the reproduction of the rat (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Barón, S; Jiménez-Vargas, J; Marcó, J

    1975-03-01

    The effect of p-chlorophenylalanie (p-CPA) --300 mg/kg-- on reproduction has been studied in the female rat. Groups of animals were injected with a dose of 300 mg/kg of p-CPA 48 hours before proper copulation conditions at different moments along the ovarian cycle. Presence of spermatozoa in the vaginal frotis was negative in treated rats; in the control groups however, positivity was found in variable proportions according to the phase of the ovarian cycle: 30 ad 90% in diestrus and proestrus respectively. Treated animals showed continuous diestrus phases and diffuse luteinitation of the ovary. The results may indicate that a decrease of cerebral 5-HT, caused by p-CPA, lessens the reproductive behaviour of the female rat through mechanisms depending probably on the liberation of gonadrotrophins.

  6. Effect of malathion on the male reproductive organs of earthworms, Eisenia foetida

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Omar Espinoza-Navarro; Eduardo Bustos-Obregón

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To observe the cytotoxic effect of the organophosphate insecticide malathion in the reproductive tissues of the earthworms, Eisenia foetida. Methods: Worms were nourished in soil treated with malathion at single sub-lethal exposure. The body weights were recorded and male reproductive organs evaluated. Results: Malathion-treated animals showed a significant reduction in body weight in a dose-dependent manner. Malathion treatment modified the disposition of spermatozoa in the basal epithelium of the spermatheca. The Br-deoxyuridine test showed a significant rise in cells in phase S on days 5 and 15. Also, a higher percentage of spermatogonia with fragmented DNA were observed by means of the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique in the spermatheca of treated animals. Conclusion: Treatment with malathion decreased the body weight and the spermatic viability in spermatheca,altering the cell proliferation and modifying the DNA structure of spermatogonia.

  7. Mistletoe effects on Scots pine decline following drought events: insights from within-tree spatial patterns, growth and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangüesa-Barreda, Gabriel; Linares, Juan Carlos; Camarero, J Julio

    2012-05-01

    Forest decline has been attributed to the interaction of several stressors including biotic factors such as mistletoes and climate-induced drought stress. However, few data exist on how mistletoes are spatially arranged within trees and how this spatial pattern is related to changes in radial growth, responses to drought stress and carbon use. We used dendrochronology to quantify how mistletoe (Viscum album L.) infestation and drought stress affected long-term growth patterns in Pinus sylvestris L. at different heights. Basal area increment (BAI) trends and comparisons between trees of three different infestation degrees (without mistletoe, ID1; moderately infested trees, ID2; and severely infested trees, ID3) were performed using linear mixed-effects models. To identify the main climatic drivers of tree growth tree-ring widths were converted into indexed chronologies and related to climate data using correlation functions. We performed spatial analyses of the 3D distribution of mistletoe individuals and their ages within the crowns of three severely infested pines to describe their patterns. Lastly, we quantified carbohydrate and nitrogen concentrations in needles and sapwood of branches from severely infested trees and from trees without mistletoe. Mistletoe individuals formed strongly clustered groups of similar age within tree crowns and their age increased towards the crown apex. Mistletoe infestation negatively impacted growth but this effect was stronger near the tree apex than in the rest of sampled heights, causing an average loss of 64% in BAI (loss of BAI was ∼51% at 1.3 m or near the tree base). We found that BAI of severely infested trees and moderately or non-infested trees diverged since 2001 and such divergence was magnified by drought. Infested trees had lower concentrations of soluble sugars in their needles than non-infested ones. We conclude that mistletoe infestation causes growth decline and increases the sensitivity of trees to drought

  8. Effects of a glucocorticoid receptor agonist, dexamethasone, on fathead minnow reproduction, growth, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLone, Carlie A; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Olmstead, Allen W; Medlock, Elizabeth K; Kahl, Michael D; Jensen, Kathleen M; Durhan, Elizabeth J; Makynen, Elizabeth A; Blanksma, Chad A; Cavallin, Jenna E; Thomas, Linnea M; Seidl, Sara M; Skolness, Sarah Y; Wehmas, Leah C; Johnson, Rodney D; Ankley, Gerald T

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic glucocorticoids are pharmaceutical compounds prescribed in human and veterinary medicine as anti-inflammatory agents and have the potential to contaminate natural watersheds via inputs from wastewater treatment facilities and confined animal-feeding operations. Despite this, few studies have examined the effects of this class of chemicals on aquatic vertebrates. To generate data to assess potential risk to the aquatic environment, we used fathead minnow 21-d reproduction and 29-d embryo-larvae assays to determine reproductive toxicity and early-life-stage effects of dexamethasone. Exposure to 500 µg dexamethasone/L in the 21-d test caused reductions in fathead minnow fecundity and female plasma estradiol concentrations and increased the occurrence of abnormally hatched fry. Female fish exposed to 500 µg dexamethasone/L also displayed a significant increase in plasma vitellogenin protein levels, possibly because of decreased spawning. A decrease in vitellogenin messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression in liver tissue from females exposed to the high dexamethasone concentration lends support to this hypothesis. Histological results indicate that a 29-d embryo-larval exposure to 500 µg dexamethasone/L caused a significant increase in deformed gill opercula. Fry exposed to 500 µg dexamethasone/L for 29 d also exhibited a significant reduction in weight and length compared with control fry. Taken together, these results indicate that nonlethal concentrations of a model glucocorticoid receptor agonist can impair fish reproduction, growth, and development. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  9. Plasticizer endocrine disruption: Highlighting developmental and reproductive effects in mammals and non-mammalian aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu-Denoncourt, Justine; Wallace, Sarah J; de Solla, Shane R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-08-01

    Due to their versatility, robustness, and low production costs, plastics are used in a wide variety of applications. Plasticizers are mixed with polymers to increase flexibility of plastics. However, plasticizers are not covalently bound to plastics, and thus leach from products into the environment. Several studies have reported that two common plasticizers, bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, induce adverse health effects in vertebrates; however few studies have addressed their toxicity to non-mammalian species. The aim of this review is to compare the effects of plasticizers in animals, with a focus on aquatic species. In summary, we identified three main chains of events that occur in animals exposed to BPA and phthalates. Firstly, plasticizers affect development by altering both the thyroid hormone and growth hormone axes. Secondly, these chemicals interfere with reproduction by decreasing cholesterol transport through the mitochondrial membrane, leading to reduced steroidogenesis. Lastly, exposure to plasticizers leads to the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, the increase of fatty acid oxidation, and the reduction in the ability to cope with the augmented oxidative stress leading to reproductive organ malformations, reproductive defects, and decreased fertility. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Perfluorooctane sulfonate on immobilization, heartbeat, reproductive and biochemical performance of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ruoyu; He, Jiao; Shi, Yajuan; Li, Zhifen; Sarvajayakesavalu, Suriyanarayanan; Baninla, Yvette; Guo, Feifan; Chen, Juan; Xu, Xiangbo; Lu, Yonglong

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was widely detected in Yellow-Bohai Sea and other areas, causing a series of adverse effects in aquatic organisms. However, present studies of its chronic and acute toxicity on aquatic organisms were far more inadequate. Therefore, in the present study, Daphnia magna was used to investigate PFOS toxicity on their immobilization, heartbeat, reproductive and biochemical performance in acute, subchronic and chronic exposure. The results showed that the 48h-EC50 value for immobilization was 79.35 mg L(-1) and the toxicity was classified as intermediate. Heartbeat was significantly stimulated and reproductive parameters were significantly suppressed by PFOS, which can be used to reflect the toxicological effects on individuals. On the other hand, intrinsic rate of natural increase was more sensitive than reproductive parameters, which indicated negative responses on population dynamics of Daphnia magna. In addition, there were different degrees of inhibition on GST, CAT and ChE activity, which indicated three types of enzyme could become biomarkers to chronic PFOS exposure. Most of selected and evaluated endpoints have significant sensitivity to PFOS at the concentration of 8 mg L(-1) during subchronic and chronic exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of feed intake restriction on reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Hassan Ali; Abdel-Raheem, Sherief Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present experiment is to study the effect of feed intake restriction on the reproductive performance and pregnancy rate in Egyptian buffalo heifers. Thirty anestrus buffalo heifers were randomly divided into two equal groups. The low feed intake (LFI, n=15, 50 % restriction) group was fed a diet that consists of 3 kg concentrate, 1 kg wheat straw, and 3 kg fresh alfalfa, while the high feed intake (HFI, n=15) group was fed double the amount given to the LFI group for 4 months. All animals were weighed, transrectally examined, and visually checked for the signs of estrus, and blood samples were collected. Heifers in heat were mated with one fertile bull. The number of heifers showing estrus activity was 93.3 % in HFI vs. 20 % in LFI (Prate, and overall mean of progesterone and estrogen concentrations were significantly higher (Pglucose, total cholesterol, and calcium were significantly higher (Pfeed intake to 50 % from NRC recommendations impair reproductive performance in terms of increasing the age at first service and reducing the pregnancy rate in buffalo heifers. In conclusion, feed intake could be effective in improvement of reproductive performance in buffalo heifers and further studies should be done on large scale of buffaloes in this point.

  12. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, Peter J; Winger, Parley V; Hardin, Ian R

    2006-10-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO4(2-), and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO4(2-), with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO4(2-) toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  13. Effect of Sleep Deprivation on the Male Reproductive System in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Ho; Lee, Seung Hoon; Bae, Jae Hyun; Shim, Ji Sung; Park, Hong Seok; Kim, Young Sik; Shin, Chol

    2016-10-01

    There has been no study reporting on the influence of sleep deprivation on the male reproductive system including sperm quality. In this study, we hypothesized that sleep deprivation could lead to adverse effect on the male reproductive system. The rats were divided into three groups: 1) control (home-cage, n = 10); 2) SD4 (sleep deprivation for 4 days, n = 10); and 3) SD7 (sleep deprivation for 7 days, n = 10). Sleep deprivation was performed by a modified multiple platform method. Sperm quality (sperm motion parameters and counts), hormone levels (corticosterone and testosterone), and the histopathology of testis were evaluated and compared between the three groups. A statistically significant reduction (P = 0.018) was observed in sperm motility in the SD7 group compared to those of the control group. However, there were no significant differences in other sperm motion parameters, or in sperm counts of the testis and cauda epididymis between three groups. Compared with the control group, the SD4 (P = 0.033) and SD7 (P = 0.002) groups exhibited significant increases of corticosterone levels, but significant decreases of testosterone levels were found in the SD4 (P = 0.001) and SD7 (P Sleep deprivation may have an adverse effect on the male reproductive system in rats.

  14. Effects of hardness and alkalinity in culture and test waters on reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, P.J.; Winger, P.V.; Hardin, I.R.

    2006-01-01

    Ceriodaphnia dubia were cultured in four reconstituted water formulations with hardness and alkalinity concentrations ranging from soft to the moderately hard water that is required by whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing methods for culturing test organisms. The effects of these culture formulations alone and in combination with two levels of Cl-, SO42, and HCO3- on reproduction of C. dubia were evaluated with the standard three-brood test. Reproduction was significantly reduced when test waters had lower hardness than culture waters. However, reproduction was not significantly different when animals cultured in low-hardness waters were exposed to moderately hard waters. The hardness of the culture water did not significantly affect the sensitivity of C. dubia to the three anions. Conversely, increased hardness in test waters significantly reduced the toxicities of Cl- and SO42-, with HCO3- toxicity following the same pattern. Alkalinity exhibited no consistent effect on Cl- and SO42- toxicity. The physiological stress of placing animals cultured in moderately hard water into softer test waters might contribute to marginal failures of otherwise nontoxic effluents. The standard WET protocol should be revised to allow the culture of C. dubia under lower hardness conditions to better represent local surface water chemistries.

  15. Effects of Male on Reproductive Behavior of Markhoz Female Goats in Breeding Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Daghigh Kia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of male on reproductive behavior of female goats, 88 Markhoz breed goats with initial body weight of 42±2kg, 3.5 year old, and 10 male goats were used for 6 weeks. This study was conducted in two phases. In the first experiment 48 female goats were allocated in three groups, each group included eight animals with 2 replicate on both sides of male goats, respectively, at intervals of 0-5, 10-15 and 25-30 meters. In the second experiment, 24 female goats having CIDR were used in an order similar to that of first group. However, the goats were located only in one side of the males. The third group was the control group which was treated in a separate saloon in two groups, each of them having eight animals in it. Results showed a significant effect of male animal in estrus synchronization, the earlier beginning of the reproductive cycle and fertility in the early reproductive season. The first group showed better results in creation and synchronization of estrus in comparison to CIDR received animals (respectively 116.7 vs. 91.6%.

  16. Investigating the effects of nanoparticles on reproduction and development in Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbrook, Nicola Anne

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) are a class of small (≤ 100 nm) materials that are being used for a variety of purposes, including industrial lubricants, food additives, antibacterial agents, as well as delivery systems for drug and gene therapies. Their unique characteristics due to their small size as well as their parent materials allow them to be exploited in convenience applications; however, some of these properties also allow them to interact with and invade biological systems. Few studies have been performed to determine the potential harm that NPs can inflict on reproductive and developmental processes in organisms. In this study, Drosophila melanogaster and CD-1 mice were orally exposed to varying doses of titanium dioxide (TiO 2) NPs, silver (Ag) NPs, or hydroxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes (fCNTs) and Drosophila were also exposed to microparticles (MPs) as a control for particle size. The subsequent effect of these materials on reproduction and development were evaluated. Strikingly, each type of NP studied negatively affected either reproduction or development in one or both of the two model systems. TiO2 NPs significantly negative effected both CD-1 mouse development (100 mg/kg or 1000 mg/kg) as well as Drosophila female fecundity (0.005%-0.5% w/v). Ag NPs significantly reduced mouse fetus viability after prenatal exposure to10 mg/kg. Ag NPs also significantly decreased the developmental success of Drosophila when they were directly exposed to these NPs (0.05% - 0.5% w/v) compared to both the vehicle and MP controls. fCNTs significantly increased the presence of morphological defects, resorptions and skeletal abnormalities in CD-1 mice, but had little effect on Drosophila. We speculate that the differences seen in the effects of NP types may be partially due to differences in reproductive physiology as well as each organism's ability to internalize these NPs. Whereas the differing response of each organism to a NP type was likely due in part to

  17. Effect of the U.S. embargo and economic decline on health in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, M

    2000-01-18

    This article describes the ways in which economic crisis and the U.S. embargo have affected Cuba's health care system during the past 15 years. With the demise of subsidized trade, the absence of aid from the former Soviet Union, and the progressive tightening of U.S. sanctions, Cuba's model health care system has become threatened by serious shortages of medical supplies. Several public health catastrophes have occurred, including an epidemic of blindness that was partially attributed to a dramatic decrease in access to nutrients; an outbreak of the Guillain-Barré syndrome caused by lack of chlorination chemicals; and an epidemic of lye ingestion in toddlers due to severe shortages of soap. The policy of mandatory quarantine for HIV-infected Cubans has evolved into a less rigid system. Although the prevalence of HIV infection in Cuba is low compared with that in the United States and other Caribbean nations, it is threatened by prostitution, which has increased along with tourism. In general, economic sanctions may have an unintended but profound effect on the health and nutrition of vulnerable populations.

  18. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on reproductive capacity in several generations of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Changqing; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    In utero bisphenol A (BPA) exposure affects reproductive function in the first generation (F1) of mice; however, not many studies have examined the reproductive effects of BPA exposure on subsequent generations. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were orally dosed with vehicle, BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 µg/kg/day) or diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 µg/kg/day) daily from gestation day 11 until birth. F1 females were used to generate the F2 generation, and F2 females were used to generate the F3 generation. Breeding studies at the ages of 3, 6, and 9 months were conducted to evaluate reproductive capacity over time. Further, studies were conducted to evaluate pubertal onset, litter size, and percentage of dead pups; and to calculate pregnancy rate, and mating, fertility, and gestational indices. The results indicate that BPA exposure (0.5 and 50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. Both DES (0.05 μg/kg/day) and BPA (50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at first estrus in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. BPA exposure reduced gestational index in the F1 and F2 generations compared to control. Further, BPA exposure (0.5 μg/kg/day) compromised the fertility index in the F3 generation compared to control. Finally, in utero BPA exposure reduced the ability of female mice to maintain pregnancies as they aged. Collectively, these data suggest that BPA exposure affects reproductive function in female mice and that some effects may be transgenerational in nature. PMID:25771130

  19. Effects of Pyriproxyfen on Female Reproduction in the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura (F. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xu

    Full Text Available The common cutworm, Spodoptera litura, is a rapidly reproducing pest of numerous agricultural ecosystems worldwide. The use of pesticides remains the primary means for controlling S. litura, despite their negative ecological impact and potential threat to human health. The use of exogenous hormone analogs may represent an alternative to insecticides. Juvenile hormones (JHs play an important role in the reproductive systems of female insects, but the effects of pyriproxyfen, a JH analog, on reproduction in S. litura were poorly understood. In this paper, we topically treated the newly emerged females with 20, 60, or 100 μg of pyriproxyfen to determine its effects on reproduction. Then, we examined the expression of vitellogenin (Vg and three hormone receptors, USP, HR3, and EcR, using quantitative reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, and found that pyriproxyfen up-regulated the expression of Vg, USP, and HR3, whereas the expression of EcR was unaffected. An analysis of fecundity showed that the peak oviposition day, lifespan, and oviposition period were progressively shortened as the pyriproxyfen dosage increased. We also found that pyriproxyfen decreased egg laying amount, whereas the number of mature eggs that remained in the ovarioles of dead females increased as the pyriproxyfen dosage increased. We examined oocytes using transmission electron microscopy and found that treatment with 100 μg of pyriproxyfen increased the metabolism by increasing the amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in the primary oocytes. Our results suggest that the topical application of pyriproxyfen on newly emerged females can efficiently reduce reproduction in S. litura and may represent an alternative to the use of insecticides for controlling the agricultural pest.

  20. Effects of Pyriproxyfen on Female Reproduction in the Common Cutworm, Spodoptera litura (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Tang, Bin; Zou, Qi; Zheng, Huizhen; Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Shigui

    2015-01-01

    The common cutworm, Spodoptera litura, is a rapidly reproducing pest of numerous agricultural ecosystems worldwide. The use of pesticides remains the primary means for controlling S. litura, despite their negative ecological impact and potential threat to human health. The use of exogenous hormone analogs may represent an alternative to insecticides. Juvenile hormones (JHs) play an important role in the reproductive systems of female insects, but the effects of pyriproxyfen, a JH analog, on reproduction in S. litura were poorly understood. In this paper, we topically treated the newly emerged females with 20, 60, or 100 μg of pyriproxyfen to determine its effects on reproduction. Then, we examined the expression of vitellogenin (Vg) and three hormone receptors, USP, HR3, and EcR, using quantitative reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and found that pyriproxyfen up-regulated the expression of Vg, USP, and HR3, whereas the expression of EcR was unaffected. An analysis of fecundity showed that the peak oviposition day, lifespan, and oviposition period were progressively shortened as the pyriproxyfen dosage increased. We also found that pyriproxyfen decreased egg laying amount, whereas the number of mature eggs that remained in the ovarioles of dead females increased as the pyriproxyfen dosage increased. We examined oocytes using transmission electron microscopy and found that treatment with 100 μg of pyriproxyfen increased the metabolism by increasing the amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in the primary oocytes. Our results suggest that the topical application of pyriproxyfen on newly emerged females can efficiently reduce reproduction in S. litura and may represent an alternative to the use of insecticides for controlling the agricultural pest.

  1. Effects of environmental mercury exposure on reproduction, health and survival of wading birds in the Florida Everglades

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report documents the results of investigations of the effects of environmental methylmercury on the health, development, survival, and reproduction of...

  2. An evaluation of biomarkers of reproductive function and potential contaminant effects in Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) sampled from the St. Johns River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, M.S.; Johnson, W.E.; Higman, J.C.; Denslow, N.D.; Schoeb, T.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and compare several reproductive parameters for Florida largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides floridanus) inhabiting the St. Johns River and exposed to different types and/or degrees of contamination. Welaka was selected as the reference site in this study because of its low urban and agricultural development, Palatka is in close proximity to a paper mill plant, the Green Cove site is influenced by marine shipping activities and Julington Creek site receives discharges of domestic wastewater and storm water runoff from recreational boating marinas. For this study, bass were sampled both prior to (September 1996) and during the spawning season (February 1997). In order to characterize chemical exposure, bass livers were analyzed for up to 90 trace organics and 11 trace metal contaminants. Reproductive parameters measured included gonadosomatic index (GSI), histological evaluation of gonads and plasma concentrations of vitellogenin (VTG), 17??-estradiol (E2) and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT). In general, the sum of organic chemicals was highest in livers from Palatka bass and bass from Green Cove and Julington Creek had higher hepatic concentrations of low molecular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls when compared to fish from Welaka. Metals were more variable across sites, with highest mean concentrations found in bass from either Julington Creek (Ag, As, Cr, Cu, Zn) or Welaka (Cd, Hg, Pb, Se, Tn). Female bass from Palatka and Green Cove had lower concentrations of E2, VTG and lower GSI in relation to Welaka. Males from Palatka and Green Cove showed comparable declines in 11-KT in relation to males from Julington Creek and GSI were decreased only in Palatka males. These results indicate a geographical trend in reproductive effects, with changes being most pronounced at the site closest to the paper mill (Palatka) and decreasing as the St. Johns River flows downstream. Since reproductive

  3. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  4. Effect of SqVYV-resistant pollenizers on development and spread of watermelon vine decline in seedless watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon vine decline (WVD) caused by the whitefly-transmitted Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) has been a major limiting factor in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) production in south Florida for the past several years. The disease causes sudden decline of the vines and affects the internal fru...

  5. Effects of maternal exposure to the galactagogue Sulpiride on reproductive parameters in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo Camin, Nathália; Vieira, Milene Leivas; Montagnini, Bruno Garcia; Kiss, Ana Carolina Inhasz; Gerardin, Daniela Cristina Ceccatto

    2015-03-01

    The antipsychotic Sulpiride has been documented as an effective galactagogue that acts blocking dopamine receptors, increasing prolactin concentrations. However, this drug passes through the milk exposing neonates during postnatal development, which may result in functional and morphological alterations in adult life. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal exposure to Sulpiride during lactation could impair reproductive development of female offspring. The dams were treated daily by gavage with Sulpiride doses of 2.5mg/Kg (SUL 2.5mg group) and 25mg/Kg (SUL 25mg group), or distilled water (Control group) throughout the lactation period. During early life, body weight, anogenital distance, and vaginal opening were analyzed on the female offspring. In adulthood, estrous cycle, sexual behavior, estrogen levels as well as the weight of the reproductive organs were evaluated. There were no differences regarding body weight, anogenital distance, puberty onset, frequency and duration of the estrous cycle and estradiol levels on female offspring. Nonetheless, there were changes in sexual behavior. There was an increase in the number of observations in reflex magnitude 0 (absence of lordosis) and reflex magnitude 2 as well as a reduction of reflex magnitude 3 in the rats of SUL 25mg group in relation to the Control group, suggesting a decrease in sexual receptivity of these animals. These results demonstrate that maternal exposure to Sulpiride can alter reproductive function in female offspring rats.

  6. Effect of waste anesthetic gas and vapor exposure on reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate potential adverse reproductive outcome in veterinary personnel who are exposed to waste anesthetic gas and vapor at levels near the NIOSH recommended standards. Subjects for this case-control study of births with congenital abnormalities and spontaneous abortion, selected from the American Veterinary Medical Association roster, were contacted by mail and asked to complete a screening questionnaire regarding reproductive history. Crude prevalence rates for spontaneous abortion, births with congenital abnormalities and stillbirths, determined on the basis of the responses to the screening questionnaire, showed no excess rates when compared with national statistics. All pregnancies resulting in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, or birth with congenital abnormality were selected as cases. Controls were selected from the reported normal births on a stratified random basis to match maternal age and pregnancy number for cases. Occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gas and vapor in general was not found to be significantly associated with adverse reproductive outcome when adjustment was made for radiation exposure. For nitrous oxide exposure, however, an odds ratio significantly greater than one was found for spontaneous abortion among female veterinary assistants and wives of exposed male veterinarians. Use of diagnostic x-rays in veterinary practice was associated with spontaneous abortion in exposed females with a statistically significant dose response effect observed in female veterinarians.

  7. Effects of Gestational Housing on Reproductive Performance and Behavior of Sows with Different Backfat Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K H; Hosseindoust, A; Ingale, S L; Lee, S H; Noh, H S; Choi, Y H; Jeon, S M; Kim, Y H; Chae, B J

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of back-fat thickness at d 107 of gestation and housing types during gestation on reproductive performance and behavior of sows. A total of 64 crossbred sows (Landrace×Yorkshire) in their 3 to 4 parities were allotted to one of four treatments (n = 16) over two consecutive parities. During each parity, sows were assigned to two gestational housing types (stall or group housing) and two level of back-fat thickness (sows were transferred from gestational crates to stalls or pens (group housing) 5 weeks before farrowing. All sows were moved to farrowing crates on d 109 of gestation. At weaning, back-fat thickness changes were lesser (psows having back-fat thickness sows with ≥20 mm back-fat thickness at 107 d of gestation. Group housed sows had greater (psows in stalls. At weaning, back-fat thickness changes were lesser (psows than that of sows in stalls. The number of piglets at weaning, growth rate and average daily gain were greater (psows than that of sows in stalls. During gestation, walking duration was more (psows. Group housed sows had lesser (psows in stalls. Result obtained in present study indicated that sows with ≥20 mm back-fat thickness at 107 days had better reproductive performance. Additionally, group housing of sows during last five week of gestation improved the performance and behavior and reproductive efficiency of sows.

  8. Effects of photoperiod on reproduction of Siamese fighting fish Betta splendens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo Giannecchini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of different photoperiods (24 h of light (L:0 h of darkness (D; 20L:4D; 16L:8D; 12L:12D; and 8L:16D on the reproduction and growth of Betta splendens. The results showed that spawning frequency was significantly higher in couples reared under 16L:8D and 12L:12D, in comparison with other treatments. The highest number of eggs per spawn was obtained under 16L:8D (544.76±375.23 and 12L:12D (471.13±261.52, and the lowest values were detected for 24L:0D (128.55±58.14 and 20L:4D (187.87±103.84. Fertility and fecundity also showed significantly higher average values in 16L:8D and 12L:12D when compared with 24L:0D and 20L:4D treatments. Egg volume and perivitelline space were significantly higher in 24L:0D treatments that showed the lowest numbers of eggs per spawn, while the vitelline volume did not show significant differences. Other variables such as breeders weight gain and condition factor (K were not statistically different. Moreover, the final length varies according to photoperiod and gender. These results demonstrated a key role for the photoperiod upon B. splendens reproduction. The best reproductive performance is achieved under the photoperiods that best approached those that occur in spring and summer (16L:8D and 12L:12D, coinciding with their best seasons for reproduction.

  9. The effect of female quality on male ejaculatory expenditure and reproductive success in a praying mantid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaweera, Anuradhi; Barry, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Strategic ejaculation is a behavioural strategy shown by many animals as a response to sperm competition and/or as a potential mechanism of cryptic male choice. Males invest more mating resources when the risk of sperm competition increases or they invest more in high quality females to maximize their reproductive output. We tested this hypothesis in the false garden mantid Pseudomantis albofimbriata, where females are capable of multiply mating and body condition is an indicator of potential reproductive fitness. We predicted male mantids would ejaculate strategically by allocating more sperm to high quality females. To determine if and how males alter their ejaculate in response to mate quality, we manipulated female food quantity so that females were either in good condition with many eggs (i.e. high quality) or poor condition with few eggs (i.e. low quality). Half of the females from each treatment were used in mating trials in which transferred sperm was counted before fertilisation occurred and the other half of females were used in mating trials where fertilisation occurred and ootheca mass and total eggs in the ootheca were recorded. Opposed to our predictions, the total number of sperm and the proportion of viable sperm transferred did not vary significantly between female treatments. Male reproductive success was entirely dependent on female quality/fecundity, rather than on the number of sperm transferred. These results suggest that female quality is not a major factor influencing postcopulatory male mating strategies in P. albofimbriata, and that sperm number has little effect on male reproductive success in a single mating scenario.

  10. The effect of female quality on male ejaculatory expenditure and reproductive success in a praying mantid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradhi Jayaweera

    Full Text Available Strategic ejaculation is a behavioural strategy shown by many animals as a response to sperm competition and/or as a potential mechanism of cryptic male choice. Males invest more mating resources when the risk of sperm competition increases or they invest more in high quality females to maximize their reproductive output. We tested this hypothesis in the false garden mantid Pseudomantis albofimbriata, where females are capable of multiply mating and body condition is an indicator of potential reproductive fitness. We predicted male mantids would ejaculate strategically by allocating more sperm to high quality females. To determine if and how males alter their ejaculate in response to mate quality, we manipulated female food quantity so that females were either in good condition with many eggs (i.e. high quality or poor condition with few eggs (i.e. low quality. Half of the females from each treatment were used in mating trials in which transferred sperm was counted before fertilisation occurred and the other half of females were used in mating trials where fertilisation occurred and ootheca mass and total eggs in the ootheca were recorded. Opposed to our predictions, the total number of sperm and the proportion of viable sperm transferred did not vary significantly between female treatments. Male reproductive success was entirely dependent on female quality/fecundity, rather than on the number of sperm transferred. These results suggest that female quality is not a major factor influencing postcopulatory male mating strategies in P. albofimbriata, and that sperm number has little effect on male reproductive success in a single mating scenario.

  11. Moisture effect on polyether and polyvinylsiloxane dimensional accuracy and detail reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mary P; Petrie, Cynthia S; Haj-Ali, Reem; Spencer, Paulette; Dumas, Chris; Williams, Karen

    2005-09-01

    This investigation evaluated and compared the dimensional accuracy and surface detail reproduction of two hydrophilic polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) and two polyether (PE) impression materials when used under dry and moist conditions. Impressions were made of stainless steel dies as described in ANSI/ADA specification no. 19, with two vertical and three horizontal lines inscribed on the die superior surface. Impressions were made under dry and moist conditions (17 impressions per condition for each material). Dimensional accuracy was measured by comparing the average length of the middle horizontal line in each impression with the same line on the metal die using a measuring microscope with an accuracy of 0.001 mm. Surface detail reproduction was evaluated by using criteria similar to ADA specification no. 19: continuous replication of at least two of the three horizontal lines. The mean percent dimensional change and SD values ranged from -0.135% (0.035) to 0.053% (0.031). A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that moisture did not cause significant adverse effects on the dimensional accuracy of any material (p > 0.05); however, significant differences were found between the materials (p Aquasil and Genie Ultra PVS impressions produced satisfactory detail reproduction, while 100% of Permadyne Garant and Impregum Penta Soft PE impressions still met the surface detail criteria. Although moisture may not adversely affect the dimensional accuracy of either PE or hydrophilic PVS material, the evidence suggests that PE material is more likely to produce impressions with superior detail reproduction in the presence of moisture.

  12. Effects of Antiepileptic Drugs on Sexual Function and Reproductive Hormones of Male Epileptic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sonbolestan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diminished libido and sexual dysfunction are unusually common among male epileptic patients. The most important etiologic factor may be antiepileptic drugs (AEDs-induced androgen deficiency. We compared reproductive hormone levels among men with epilepsy taking various AEDs and normal controls. Methods: Subjects were 59 male epileptic patients who aged 24 ± 5 years. They had been receiving lamotrigine (LTG (n = 17, carbamazepine (CBZ (n = 18, and sodium valproate (VPA (n = 15 for at least 6 months. We also recruited 23 healthy controls. Testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, androstenedione (AND, luteinizing hormone (LH, and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels and gonadal efficiency (testosterone/LH were compared between the four groups. The patients and the control group were examined and evaluated for male reproduction by urology and endocrinology services. Results: Subjects receiving CBZ, VPA, and LTG had significantly lower mean testosterone levels than the control group (P < 0.01. In addition, patients receiving LTG had significantly higher mean testosterone levels than CBZ and VPA groups (P < 0.01 and controls (P < 0.05. There were not any significant differences between the groups in mean estradiol levels. The mean and level in VPA was higher than CBZ, LTG, and control groups (P < 0.01. Men receiving CBZ had significantly lower DHEAS levels than the other groups (P < 0.01. Testosterone/LH ratio in the control group was more than other groups (P < 0.01. On the other hand, this value in LTG group was higher than CBZ and VPA groups (P < 0.01. However, CBZ and VPA groups were not significantly different in terms of testosterone/LH ratio. Conclusion: Although the mean levels of reproductive hormones were lower in the LTG group compared to the controls, among traditional antiepileptic drugs, LTG had fewer side effects on reproductive hormones. Therefore, it is a good

  13. TGF-beta Sma/Mab signaling mutations uncouple reproductive aging from somatic aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijing Luo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Female reproductive cessation is one of the earliest age-related declines humans experience, occurring in mid-adulthood. Similarly, Caenorhabditis elegans' reproductive span is short relative to its total life span, with reproduction ceasing about a third into its 15-20 day adulthood. All of the known mutations and treatments that extend C. elegans' reproductive period also regulate longevity, suggesting that reproductive span is normally linked to life span. C. elegans has two canonical TGF-beta signaling pathways. We recently found that the TGF-beta Dauer pathway regulates longevity through the Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling (IIS pathway; here we show that this pathway has a moderate effect on reproductive span. By contrast, TGF-beta Sma/Mab signaling mutants exhibit a substantially extended reproductive period, more than doubling reproductive span in some cases. Sma/Mab mutations extend reproductive span disproportionately to life span and act independently of known regulators of somatic aging, such as Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling and Dietary Restriction. This is the first discovery of a pathway that regulates reproductive span independently of longevity and the first identification of the TGF-beta Sma/Mab pathway as a regulator of reproductive aging. Our results suggest that longevity and reproductive span regulation can be uncoupled, although they appear to normally be linked through regulatory pathways.

  14. Chinese culture and fertility decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C; Jia, S

    1992-01-01

    Coale has suggested that cultural factors exert a significant influence on fertility reduction; countries in the "Chinese cultural circle" would be the first to show fertility decline. In China, the view was that traditional Chinese culture contributed to increased population. This paper examines the nature of the relationship between Chinese culture and fertility. Attention was directed to a comparison of fertility rates of developing countries with strong Chinese cultural influence and of fertility within different regions of China. Discussion was followed by an explanation of the theoretical impact of Chinese culture on fertility and direct and indirect beliefs and practices that might either enhance or hinder fertility decline. Emigration to neighboring countries occurred after the Qing dynasty. Fertility after the 1950s declined markedly in Japan, Singapore, Hong Kong, South Korea, Taiwan, and mainland China: all countries within the Chinese cultural circle. Other countries within the Chinese circle which have higher fertility, yet lower fertility than other non-Chinese cultural countries, are Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia. Within China, regions with similar fertility patterns are identified as coastal regions, central plains, and mountainous and plateau regions. The Han ethnic group has lower fertility than that of ethnic minorities; regions with large Han populations have lower fertility. Overseas Chinese in East Asian countries also tend to have lower fertility than their host populations. Chinese culture consisted of the assimilation of other cultures over 5000 years. Fertility decline was dependent on the population's desire to limit reproduction, favorable social mechanisms, and availability of contraception: all factors related to economic development. Chinese culture affects fertility reduction by affecting reproductive views and social mechanisms directly, and indirectly through economics. Confucianism emphasizes collectivism, self

  15. The effect of fipronil on some reproduction parameters of zebrafish (Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Boaru

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Our research investigated the effects of fipronil on the reproduction dynamics and parametersof the zebrafish (Danio rerio. The experiment consisted in exposing ready to spawn fish and the spawnitself to three different concentrations of the test substance. The survival rate over the 21 days ofexposure was 100% in both the three experimental groups and control group. However, the effects onreproductive parameters were evident even at the lowest concentration of fipronil applied while exposureto the highest dose of fipronil decreased the spawn obtained considerably and as well the fecundationand hatching percentages, compared to the control group.

  16. The effects of food availability on growth and reproduction of Daphnia magna exposed to silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackevica, Aiga; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Gergs, A.

    The number of available studies on the acute effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) on aquatic organisms has increased dramatically in recent years, but there is still very limited information available on chronic effects. In this study, a series of Daphnia magna 21-days reproduction test (OECD 211......Ag/L, and the test animals were fed with green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in amounts of approximately 0.12 mgC/Daphnia/day for standard treatment or 0.36 mgC/Daphnia/day for high food availability treatment. The parameters of interest were survival, growth rate of mother animals, days to first live...

  17. The effects of ischemia with and without remote conditioning on hyperemia induced decline in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onegbu, Nwamaka; Kamran, Haroon; Sharma, Bhawna; Bapat, Manasi; Littman, Stephen; Warrier, Nikhil; Patel, Rinkesh; Khalid, Muhammad Tanweer; Salciccioli, Louis; Lazar, Jason M

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic conditioning has long held promise for preventing ischemic-reperfusion (I-R) injury. Although a number of studies have evaluated the effects of brief repeated episodes of ischemia before a prolonged ischemic episode on the cardiovascular system using clinical endpoints, more sensitive techniques by which to measure its effects are lacking. Since endothelial function is sensitive to I-R injury, flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery has been proposed for this purpose, but has significant limitations. Hyperemia normally decreases carotid to radial pulse wave velocity (PWV). Accordingly, we sought to determine the effects of I-R injury and ischemic conditioning on the hyperemic change (Δ) in PWV. We induced hyperemia by release of arterial cuff occlusion before and after ipsilateral arm I-R injury (7.5min occlusion) in 25 healthy males, age 29±6 years. The protocol was repeated on 2 occasions in combination with either pre- or post- conditioning stimuli (3× 30s contralateral arm occlusions). Hyperemia resulted in a significant decrease (-13.7%, pconditioning restored the PWV decline (pre: -11.0%, pconditioning restores this response. This technique may be useful for the assessment of novel treatment strategies and mechanisms underlying remote pre- and post-ischemic conditioning in protecting the cardiovascular system.

  18. Modelling the effects of environmental and individual variability when measuring the costs of first reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbraud, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available How do animals balance their investment in young against their own chances to survive and reproduce in the future? This life–history trade–off, referred to as the cost of reproduction (Williams, 1966, holds a central place in life–history theory (Roff, 1992; Stearns, 1992; McNamara & Houston, 1996. Because individuals can only acquire a limited amount of energy, reproduction and survival as well as current and future reproduction are considered as functions competing for the same resources. In this framework, individuals may optimise life–history decisions. If the reproductive effort in one year leads to a loss in future reproductive output through decreased adult survival or reduced fecundity, then the optimal effort in the current season is less than the effort that would maximize the number of offspring produced in that season (Charnov & Krebs, 1974. There are at least two kinds of factors likely to confound the measurement of the costs of reproduction in the wild. First, there could be differences in the amount of energy individuals acquire and allocate to various functions. This phenotypic heterogeneity can mask or exacerbate individual allocation patterns when trends are averaged across a population (Vaupel & Yashin, 1985; McDonald et al., 1996; Cam & Monnat, 2000. Second, there could be variations in resource availability affecting energy acquisition and allocation. Theoretical models examining the optimal phenotypic balance between reproduction and survival under variable breeding conditions have investigated the influence of environmental stochasticity on the cost of reproduction in birds (Erikstad et al., 1998; Orzack & Tuljapurkar, 2001. However, there is little empirical evidence supporting these theoretical models. Here, we present analysis of the influence of experience, but also of the differential effects of environmental and individual variation on survival and future breeding probability. We address the question of the

  19. Effects of a constructed Technosol on mortality, survival and reproduction of earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Benjamin; Cortet, Jerome; Capowiez, Yvan; Mignot, Lenaic; Nahmani, Johanne; Watteau, Francoise; Schwartz, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Soils, whose properties and pedogenesis are dominated by artificial materials or transported materials, are classified as Technosols. Some of these Technosols are used in soil engineering, which is the voluntary action to combine technical materials in a given objective to restore an ecosystem. Primary by products that are used to build these Technosols need to be assessed on an ecotoxicological point of view. The following study aims to assess the effects of a constructed Technosol made from different primary by-products on the mortality, survival and reproductions of two earthworm species. The model of Technosol used here is a combination of green-waste compost (GWC) and papermill sludge (PS) mixed with thermally treated industrial soil (TIS). OECD soil is used as a control soil. Three different experiments have been managed: i) the first, to assess the potential toxicity effect on Eisenia foetida biomass (28 days) and reproduction (56 days), ii) the second to assess the short-term effect (7 days) on Lumbricus terrestris biomass, iii) and the third to assess the medium-term effect (30 days) on L. terrestris biomass. Reproduction of E. foetida is enhanced with high proportions of GWC. For biomass, GWC seems to improve body mass contrary to other materials which lead to losses of body mass. Thus, for E. foetida, GWC seems to be a high-quality and long-term source of food. Body mass of L. terrestris decreased with GWC and OECD. At short-term only, TIS/PS leads to a gain of body mass. Only equilibrium of 25% GWC - 75% TIS/PS allows a gain of body mass at medium term. TIS/PS appears to be a low-quality and short-term food resource but an excellent water tank. It can be concluded that the constructed Technosol is not toxic for fauna but some differences appear between different tested material combinations, depending on nature, proportion and trophic properties of materials.

  20. Comparing Betamethasone and Dexamethasone Effects on Concentration of Male Reproductive Hormones in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalaldin Gooyande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of chemical drugs have side effects on various parts of body. It is necessary to identify these effects to better use of drugs. Betamethasone and Dexamethasone are two of the most usual drugs in human and animal medication. The effect of these drugs on concentration of male reproductive hormones of mice was the goal of this study. Eighteen matured male mice were divided into eight groups including control, placebo and six treatment groups. Placebo group was received physiological serum only and treatments were Betamethasone (0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg and Dexamethasone (0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg which were injected in peritoneum every other day and for twenty days. After 20 days, blood samples were taken and FSH, LH and testosterone levels were measured using Eliza test method. Obtained data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance and mean comparison was done using Duncan's multiple ranges test and SPSS program. Results showed that 0.5 mg/kg of Betamethasone and all levels of dexamethasone caused significant increase in FSH concentration. For LH hormone, 1 mg/kg of Betamethasone and 0.1 mg/kg of Dexamethasone caused significant decrease whereas 1 mg/kg of Dexamethasone increased it significantly. Testosterone was increased significantly by 1 mg/kg of Dexamethasone. So, mentioned drugs are effective on hormone action of reproductive system dose dependently and probable effect of them must be considered in time of using.

  1. Does alcohol have any effect on male reproductive function? A review of literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandro La Vignera; Rosita A Condorelli; Giancarlo Balercia; Enzo Vicari; Aldo E Calogero

    2013-01-01

    Although alcohol is widely used,its impact on the male reproductive function is still controversial.Over the years,many studies have investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on sperm parameters and male infertility.This article reviews the main preclinical and clinical evidences.Studies conducted on the experimental animal have shown that a diet enriched with ethanol causes sperm parameter abnormalities,a number of alterations involving the reproductive tract inhibition,and reduced mouse oocyte in vitro fertilization rate.These effects were partly reversible upon discontinuation of alcohol consumption.Most of the studies evaluating the effects of alcohol in men have shown a negative impact on the sperm parameters.This has been reported to be associated with hypotestosteronemia and low-normal or elevated gonadotropin levels suggesting a combined central and testicular detrimental effect of alcohol.Nevertheless,alcohol consumption does not seem to have much effect on fertility either in in vitro fertilization programs or population-based studies.Finally,the genetic background and other concomitant,alcohol consumption-related conditions influence the degree of the testicular damage.In conclusion,alcohol consumption is associated with a deterioration of sperm parameters which may be partially reversible upon alcohol consumption discontinuation.

  2. Doping with anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS): Adverse effects on non-reproductive organs and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Vorona, Elena

    2015-09-01

    Since the 1970s anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused at ever increasing rates in competitive athletics, in recreational sports and in bodybuilding. Exceedingly high doses are often consumed over long periods, in particular by bodybuilders, causing acute or chronic adverse side effects frequently complicated by additional polypharmacy. This review summarizes side effects on non-reproductive organs and functions; effects on male and female reproduction have been recently reviewed in a parallel paper. Among the most striking AAS side effects are increases in haematocrit and coagulation causing thromboembolism, intracardiac thrombosis and stroke as well as other cardiac disturbances including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies and possibly sudden death. 17α-alkylated AAS are liver toxic leading to cholestasis, peliosis, adenomas and carcinomas. Hyperbilirubinaemia can cause cholemic nephrosis and kidney failure. AAS abuse may induce exaggerated self-confidence, reckless behavior, aggressiveness and psychotic symptoms. AAS withdrawal may be accompanied by depression and suicidal intentions. Since AAS abuse is not or only reluctantly admitted physicians should be aware of the multitude of serious side effects when confronted with unclear symptoms.

  3. NTP-CERHR monograph on the potential human reproductive and developmental effects of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Michael D

    2008-09-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) conducted an evaluation of the potential for bisphenol A to cause adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans. The CERHR Expert Panel on Bisphenol A completed its evaluation in August 2007. CERHR selected bisphenol A for evaluation because of the: widespread human exposure; public concern for possible health effects from human exposures; high production volume; evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity in laboratory animal studies Bisphenol A (CAS RN: 80-05-7) is a high production volume chemical used primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastics are used in some food and drink containers; the resins are used as lacquers to coat metal products such as food cans, bottle tops, and water supply pipes. To a lesser extent bisphenol A is used in the production of polyester resins, polysulfone resins, polyacrylate resins, and flame retardants. In addition, bisphenol A is used in the processing of polyvinyl chloride plastic and in the recycling of thermal paper. Some polymers used in dental sealants and tooth coatings contain bisphenol A. The primary source of exposure to bisphenol A for most people is assumed to occur through the diet. While air, dust, and water (including skin contact during bathing and swimming) are other possible sources of exposure, bisphenol A in food and beverages accounts for the majority of daily human exposure. The highest estimated daily intakes of bisphenol A in the general population occur in infants and children. The results of this bisphenol A evaluation are published in an NTP-CERHR Monograph that includes the (1) NTP Brief and (2) Expert Panel Report on the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Bisphenol A. Additional information related to the evaluation process, including the peer review report for the NTP Brief and public comments received on the draft NTP

  4. Social genetic effects influence reproductive performance of group-housed sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunter, K L; Lewis, C R G; Newman, S

    2015-08-01

    Group housing of gestating sows has implications for reproductive performance due to detrimental interactions between sows within groups. Reproductive records ( = 10,748) were obtained for 8,444 pedigreed nucleus sows housed in a single facility, formed into 1,827 static groups during gestation. Only data from complete groups were used to estimate genetic parameters for total born (TB), number born alive (NBA), and gestation length (GL) and to compare models extended to account for group effects. Censored data for sows which did not farrow (0.8% of records) were augmented with biologically meaningful values. Group sizes ranged from 2 to 10, in pens designed to hold 4, 8, or 10 sows per pen. Sows were grouped by parity, line, and mating date after d 35 of pregnancy. Heritability estimates were generally constant across all model alternatives at 0.11 ± 0.02 for TB and NBA and 0.32 ± 0.03 for GL. However, models for all traits were significantly ( < 0.05) improved through inclusion of terms for nongenetic group and social genetic effects (SGE). Group effects were no longer significant in models containing both terms. The proportional contributions of SGE () to phenotypic variances were very low (≤0.002 across traits), but their contributions to calculated total genetic variance (T) were significant. The differences between h and T ranged between 3 and 5% under simple models, increasing to 8 to 14% in models accounting for both covariances between additive direct (A) and SGE and the effects of varying group size on the magnitude of estimates for SGE. Estimates of covariance between A and SGE were sensitive to the modeling of dilution factors for group size. The models of best fit for litter size traits used a customized dilution based on sows/pen relative to the maximum sows/pen. The best model supported a reduction in SGE with increased space per sow, independent of maximum group size, and no significant correlation between A and SGE. The latter is expected if A

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Memantine on Streptozotocin-Induced Insulin Receptor Dysfunction, Neuroinflammation, Amyloidogenesis, and Neurotrophic Factor Decline in Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekar, N; Nath, Chandishwar; Hanif, Kashif; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-12-01

    Our earlier studies showed that insulin receptor (IR) dysfunction along with neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis played a major role in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced toxicity in astrocytes. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist-memantine shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. However, the protective molecular and cellular mechanism of memantine in astrocytes is not properly understood. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of memantine on insulin receptors, neurotrophic factors, neuroinflammation, and amyloidogenesis in STZ-treated astrocytes. STZ (100 μM) treatment for 24 h in astrocytes resulted significant decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) expression in astrocytes. Treatment with memantine (1-10 μM) improved STZ-induced neurotrophic factor decline (BDNF, GDNF) along with IR dysfunction as evidenced by a significant increase in IR protein expression, phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and GSK-3 α/β in astrocytes. Further, memantine attenuated STZ-induced amyloid precursor protein (APP), β-site APP-cleaving enzyme-1 and amyloid-β1-42 expression and restored IDE expression in astrocytes. In addition, memantine also displays protective effects against STZ-induced astrocyte activation showed by reduction of inflammatory markers, nuclear factor kappa-B translocation, glial fibrillary acidic protein, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-α level, and oxidative-nitrostative stress. The results suggest that besides the NMDA receptor antagonisic activity, effect on astroglial IR and neurotrophic factor may also be an important factor in the beneficial effect of memantine in AD pathology. Graphical Abstract Novel neuroprotective mechanisms of memenatine in streptozotocin-induced toxicity in astrocytes.

  6. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Miao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes. The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration. Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm are similar to those of controls. The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen.

  7. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Miao Liu; Yuan-Zheng Zhou; Han-Bi Wang; Zheng-Yi Sun; Jing-Ran Zhen; Keng Shen; Cheng-Yan Deng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thin endometrium is associated with poor reproductive outcomes;estrogen treatment can increase endometrial thickness (EMT).The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the factors influencing the effectiveness of estrogen treatment and reproductive outcomes after the treatment in patients with thin endometrium.Methods: Relevant clinical data of 101 patients with thin endometrium who had undergone estrogen treatment were collected.Possible factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment were analyzed retrospectively by logistic regression analysis.Eighty-seven infertile women without thin endometrium who had undergone assisted reproduction served as controls.The cases and controls were matched for age, assisted reproduction method, and number of embryos transferred.Reproductive outcomes of study and control groups were compared using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test.Results: At the end of estrogen treatment, EMT was ≥8 mm in 93/101 patients (92.1%).Effectiveness of treatment was significantly associated with maximal pretreatment EMT (P =0.017) and treatment duration (P =0.004).The outcomes of assisted reproduction were similar in patients whose treatment was successful in increasing EMT to ≥8 mm and the control group.The rate of clinical pregnancy in patients was associated with the number of good-quality embryos transferred in both fresh (P =0.005) and frozen-thawed (P =0.000) embryo transfer cycles.Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes.The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration.Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm) are similar to those of controls.The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen.

  8. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajumoke Omolara Ojo

    Full Text Available Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1 were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of

  9. Sex-specific prenatal stress effects on the rat reproductive axis and adrenal gland structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Susan O; Hogg, Charis O; Lai, Yu-Ting; Brunton, Paula J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Social stress during pregnancy has profound effects on offspring physiology. This study examined whether an ethologically relevant social stress during late pregnancy in rats alters the reproductive axis and adrenal gland structure in post-pubertal male and female offspring. Prenatally stressed (PNS) pregnant rats (n=9) were exposed to an unfamiliar lactating rat for 10 min/day from day 16 to 20 of pregnancy inclusive, whereas control pregnant rats (n=9) remained in their home cages. Gonads, adrenal glands and blood samples were obtained from one female and one male from each litter at 11 to 12-weeks of age. Anogenital distance was measured. There was no treatment effect on body, adrenal or gonad weight at 11–12 weeks. PNS did not affect the number of primordial, secondary or tertiary ovarian follicles, numbers of corpora lutea or ovarian FSH receptor expression. There was an indication that PNS females had more primary follicles and greater ovarian aromatase expression compared with control females (both P=0.09). PNS males had longer anogenital distances (0.01±0.0 cm/g vs 0.008±0.00 cm/g; P=0.007) and higher plasma FSH concentrations (0.05 ng/mL vs 0.006 ng/mL; s.e.d.=0.023; P=0.043) compared with control males. There were no treatment effects on the number of Sertoli cells or seminiferous tubules, seminiferous tubule area, plasma testosterone concentration or testis expression of aromatase, FSH receptor or androgen receptor. PNS did not affect adrenal size. These data suggest that the developing male reproductive axis is more sensitive to maternal stress and that PNS may enhance aspects of male reproductive development. PMID:27026714

  10. Developmental exposure to a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71: neurobehavioral, hormonal, and reproductive effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodavanti, Prasada [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Durham, North Carolina; Coburn, Cary [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Durham, North Carolina; Moser, Virginia [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Durham, North Carolina; MacPhail, Robert [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Durham, North Carolina; Fenton, Suzanne [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Stoker, Tammy [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Durham, North Carolina; Birnbaum, Linda [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

    2010-06-01

    Developmental effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been suspected due to their structural similarities to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This study evaluated neurobehavioral, hormonal, and reproductive effects in rat offspring perinatally exposed to a widely used pentabrominated commercial mixture, DE-71. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to 0, 1.7, 10.2, or 30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 in corn oil by oral gavage from gestational day 6 to weaning. DE-71 did not alter maternal or male offspring body weights. However, female offspring were smaller compared with controls from postnatal days (PNDs) 35-60. Although several neurobehavioral endpoints were assessed, the only statistically significant behavioral finding was a dose-by-age interaction in the number of rears in an open-field test. Developmental exposure to DE-71 caused severe hypothyroxinemia in the dams and early postnatal offspring. DE-71 also affected anogenital distance and preputial separation in male pups. Body weight gain over time, reproductive tissue weights, and serum testosterone concentrations at PND 60 were not altered. Mammary gland development of female offspring was significantly affected at PND 21. Congener-specific analysis of PBDEs indicated accumulation in all tissues examined. Highest PBDE concentrations were found in fat including milk, whereas blood had the lowest concentrations on a wet weight basis. PBDE concentrations were comparable among various brain regions. Thus, perinatal exposure to DE-71 leads to accumulation of PBDE congeners in various tissues crossing blood-placenta and blood-brain barriers, causing subtle changes in some parameters of neurobehavior and dramatic changes in circulating thyroid hormone levels, as well as changes in both male and female reproductive endpoints. Some of these effects are similar to those seen with PCBs, and the persistence of these changes requires further investigation.

  11. Effects of sex and reproductive state on interactions between free-roaming domestic dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Sparkes

    Full Text Available Free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris are common worldwide, often maintaining diseases of domestic pets and wildlife. Management of these dogs is difficult and often involves capture, treatment, neutering and release. Information on the effects of sex and reproductive state on intraspecific contacts and disease transmission is currently lacking, but is vital to improving strategic management of their populations. We assessed the effects of sex and reproductive state on short-term activity patterns and contact rates of free-roaming dogs living in an Australian Indigenous community. Population, social group sizes and rates of contact were estimated from structured observations along walked transects. Simultaneously, GPS telemetry collars were used to track dogs' movements and to quantify the frequency of contacts between individual animals. We estimated that the community's dog population was 326 ± 52, with only 9.8 ± 2.5% confined to a house yard. Short-term activity ranges of dogs varied from 9.2 to 133.7 ha, with males ranging over significantly larger areas than females. Contacts between two or more dogs occurred frequently, with entire females and neutered males accumulating significantly more contacts than spayed females or entire males. This indicates that sex and reproductive status are potentially important to epidemiology, but the effect of these differential contact rates on disease transmission requires further investigation. The observed combination of unrestrained dogs and high contact rates suggest that contagious disease would likely spread rapidly through the population. Pro-active management of dog populations and targeted education programs could help reduce the risks associated with disease spread.

  12. Developmental exposure to a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71: neurobehavioral, hormonal, and reproductive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S; Coburn, Cary G; Moser, Virginia C; MacPhail, Robert C; Fenton, Suzanne E; Stoker, Tammy E; Rayner, Jennifer L; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Birnbaum, Linda S

    2010-07-01

    Developmental effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been suspected due to their structural similarities to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This study evaluated neurobehavioral, hormonal, and reproductive effects in rat offspring perinatally exposed to a widely used pentabrominated commercial mixture, DE-71. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to 0, 1.7, 10.2, or 30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 in corn oil by oral gavage from gestational day 6 to weaning. DE-71 did not alter maternal or male offspring body weights. However, female offspring were smaller compared with controls from postnatal days (PNDs) 35-60. Although several neurobehavioral endpoints were assessed, the only statistically significant behavioral finding was a dose-by-age interaction in the number of rears in an open-field test. Developmental exposure to DE-71 caused severe hypothyroxinemia in the dams and early postnatal offspring. DE-71 also affected anogenital distance and preputial separation in male pups. Body weight gain over time, reproductive tissue weights, and serum testosterone concentrations at PND 60 were not altered. Mammary gland development of female offspring was significantly affected at PND 21. Congener-specific analysis of PBDEs indicated accumulation in all tissues examined. Highest PBDE concentrations were found in fat including milk, whereas blood had the lowest concentrations on a wet weight basis. PBDE concentrations were comparable among various brain regions. Thus, perinatal exposure to DE-71 leads to accumulation of PBDE congeners in various tissues crossing blood-placenta and blood-brain barriers, causing subtle changes in some parameters of neurobehavior and dramatic changes in circulating thyroid hormone levels, as well as changes in both male and female reproductive endpoints. Some of these effects are similar to those seen with PCBs, and the persistence of these changes requires further investigation.

  13. Effects of sex and reproductive state on interactions between free-roaming domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Jessica; Körtner, Gerhard; Ballard, Guy; Fleming, Peter J S; Brown, Wendy Y

    2014-01-01

    Free-roaming dogs (Canis familiaris) are common worldwide, often maintaining diseases of domestic pets and wildlife. Management of these dogs is difficult and often involves capture, treatment, neutering and release. Information on the effects of sex and reproductive state on intraspecific contacts and disease transmission is currently lacking, but is vital to improving strategic management of their populations. We assessed the effects of sex and reproductive state on short-term activity patterns and contact rates of free-roaming dogs living in an Australian Indigenous community. Population, social group sizes and rates of contact were estimated from structured observations along walked transects. Simultaneously, GPS telemetry collars were used to track dogs' movements and to quantify the frequency of contacts between individual animals. We estimated that the community's dog population was 326 ± 52, with only 9.8 ± 2.5% confined to a house yard. Short-term activity ranges of dogs varied from 9.2 to 133.7 ha, with males ranging over significantly larger areas than females. Contacts between two or more dogs occurred frequently, with entire females and neutered males accumulating significantly more contacts than spayed females or entire males. This indicates that sex and reproductive status are potentially important to epidemiology, but the effect of these differential contact rates on disease transmission requires further investigation. The observed combination of unrestrained dogs and high contact rates suggest that contagious disease would likely spread rapidly through the population. Pro-active management of dog populations and targeted education programs could help reduce the risks associated with disease spread.

  14. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Olajumoke Omolara; Bhadauria, Smrati; Rath, Srikanta Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1) were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of steroidogenesis

  15. The effect of subclinical ketosis on activity at estrus and reproductive performance in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Andrew J; Oikonomou, Georgios; Smith, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Our aims were to investigate the influence of subclinical ketosis (SCK) on physical activity at estrus using a neck accelerometer device and on future reproductive performance. Two hundred three Holstein-Friesian cows were studied on 3dairy farms in Northwest England between September 2013 and March 2014. Seventeen percent (35 of 203) of the enrolled cows were affected with SCK between 7 and 21d in milk, defined as a blood β-hydroxybutyrate concentration of 1.2 to 2.9mmol/L. Time to event analyses and multivariable regression analyses were used to assess the effect of SCK on reproductive performance and activity at estrus. The SCK cows exhibited a lower peak activity (measured as the number of standard deviations above mean activity) and shorter duration in activity clusters associated with first estrus and first insemination postpartum, compared with non-SCK cows. Peak activity and cluster duration associated with the insemination that led to a pregnancy were not different between SCK and non-SCK cows. Calving to first estrus, calving to first insemination, and calving to pregnancy intervals were prolonged in SCK cows. First insemination was 4.3 times (95% confidence interval=1.6 to 15.0) less likely to be successful in SCK cows compared with non-SCK cows. Adjusted mean number of inseminations per pregnancy was 2.8 for SCK cows and 2.0 for non-SCK cows. The current study confirms the long-lasting effects of SCK on reproductive efficiency. Furthermore, it is indicated that physical activity around estrus is reduced by SCK in early lactation, but this negative effect appears to diminish as cows progress through lactation.

  16. Effects of ammonium perchlorate on the reproductive performance and thyroid follicle histology of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, R.; Wainscott, M.R.; Cruz-Li, E. I.; Balakrishnan, S.; McMurry, C.; Blazer, V.S.; Anderson, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Adult zebrafish were reared up to eight weeks in control water or in water containing ammonium perchlorate (AP) at measured perchlorate concentrations of 18 (environmentally relevant, high) and 677 ppm. Groups of eight females were paired with four males on a weekly basis to assess AP effects on spawned egg volume, an index of reproductive performance. All treatments were applied to four to five spawning replicates. At 677 ppm, spawn volume was reduced within one week and became negligible after four weeks. At 18 ppm, spawn volume was unaffected even after eight weeks. Also, perchlorate at 18 ppm did not affect percentage egg fertilization. Fish were collected at the end of the exposures (677 ppm, four weeks; control and 18 ppm, eight weeks) for whole-body perchlorate content and thyroid histopathological analysis. Fish perchlorate levels were about one-hundredth of those of treatment water levels, indicating that waterborne perchlorate does not accumulate in whole fish. At 677 ppm for four weeks, perchlorate caused thyroid follicle cell (nuclear) hypertrophy and angiogenesis, whereas at 18 ppm for eight weeks, its effects were more pronounced and included hypertrophy, angiogenesis, hyperplasia, and colloid depletion. In conclusion, an eight-week exposure of adult zebrafish to 18 ppm perchlorate (high environmentally relevant concentrations) affected the histological condition of their thyroid follicles but not their reproductive performance. The effect of 677 ppm perchlorate on reproduction may be due to extrathyroidal toxicity. Further research is needed to determine if AP at lower environmentally relevant concentrations also affects the thyroid follicles of zebrafish.

  17. Infanticide as a male reproductive strategy has a nutritive risk effect in brown bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, S M J G; Reusch, C; Brunberg, S; Swenson, J E; Hackländer, K; Zedrosser, A

    2013-10-23

    Behavioural strategies to reduce predation risk can incur costs, which are often referred to as risk effects. A common strategy to avoid predation is spatio-temporal avoidance of predators, in which prey typically trade optimal resources for safety. Analogous with predator-prey theory, risk effects should also arise in species with sexually selected infanticide (SSI), in which females with dependent offspring avoid infanticidal males. SSI can be common in brown bear (Ursus arctos) populations and explains spatio-temporal segregation among reproductive classes. Here, we show that in a population with SSI, females with cubs-of-the-year had lower quality diets than conspecifics during the SSI high-risk period, the mating season. After the mating season, their diets were of similar quality to diets of their conspecifics. Our results suggest a nutritive risk effect of SSI, in which females with cubs-of-the-year alter their resource selection and trade optimal resources for offspring safety. Such risk effects can add to female costs of reproduction and may be widespread among species with SSI.

  18. Multigeneration reproduction ratios and the effects of clustered unvaccinated individuals on epidemic outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Michaud, Isaac J; Ackerman, Hamilton Hoxie; Reed Iosevich, Shannon; Robinson, Andre

    2011-12-01

    An SIR epidemiological community-structured model is constructed to investigate the effects of clustered distributions of unvaccinated individuals and the distribution of the primary case relative to vaccination levels. The communities here represent groups such as neighborhoods within a city or cities within a region. The model contains two levels of mixing, where individuals make more intra-group than inter-group contacts. Stochastic simulations and analytical results are utilized to explore the model. An extension of the effective reproduction ratio that incorporates more spatial information by predicting the average number of tertiary infections caused by a single infected individual is introduced to characterize the system. Using these methods, we show that both the vaccination coverage and the variation in vaccination levels among communities affect the likelihood and severity of epidemics. The location of the primary infectious case and the degree of mixing between communities are also important factors in determining the dynamics of outbreaks. In some cases, increasing the efficacy of a vaccine can in fact increase the effective reproduction ratio in early generations, due to the effects of population structure on the likely initial location of an infection.

  19. The Relationship Between Organic Loading and Effects on Fish Reproduction for Pulp Mill Effluents Across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; O'Connor, Brian I; Kovacs, Tibor G; Van Den Heuvel, Michael R; Parrott, Joanne L; McMaster, Mark E; MacLatchy, Deborah L; Van Der Kraak, Glen J; Hewitt, L Mark

    2017-02-21

    This study builds upon the work of a multiagency consortium tasked with determining cost effective solutions for the effects of pulp mill effluents on fish reproduction. A laboratory fathead minnow egg production test and chemical characterization tools were used to benchmark eighty-one effluents from twenty mills across Canada, representing the major pulping, bleaching and effluent treatment technologies. For Kraft and mechanical pulp mills, effluents containing less than 20 mg/L BOD5 were found to have the greatest probability of having no effects. Organic loading, expressed as the total detected solvent-extractable components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), also correlate with decreased egg laying. Exceptions were found for specific Kraft, mechanical and sulfite mills, suggesting yet unidentified, causative agents are involved. Recycled fibre mill effluents, tested for the first time, were found to have little potential for reproductive effects despite large variations in BOD5 and the GC/MS profiles. Effluent treatment systems across all production types were generally efficient, achieving a combined 82-98 % BOD5 removal. Further reductions of final effluent organic loadings towards the target of less than 20 mg/L are recommended and can be realized through biotreatment optimization, the reduction of organic losses associated with production upsets and selecting best available technologies that reduce organic loadings to biotreatment.

  20. Protective Effect of Vitamins E and C on Endosulfan-Induced Reproductive Toxicity in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Kargar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of oxidative stress in endosulfan-induced reproductive toxicity has been implicated. This study was performed to evaluate the possible protective effect of vitamins E and C, against endosulfan-induced reproductive toxicity in rats.Methods: Fifty adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n=10 each. The groups included a control receiving vehicle, a group treated with endosulfan (10 mg/kg/day alone, and three endosulfan-treated group receiving vitamin C (20 mg/kg/day, vitamin E (200 mg/kg/day, or vitamine C+vitamin E at the same doses. After 10 days of treatment, sperm parameters, plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, plasma testosterone and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in the testis were determined. Results: Oral administration of endosulfan caused a reduction in the sperm motility, viability, daily sperm production (DSP and increased the number of sperm with abnormal chromatin condensation. Endosulfan administration increased testis MDA and plasma LDH. Supplementation of vitamin C and vitamin E to endosulfan-treated rats reduced the toxic effect of endosulfan on sperm parameters and lipid peroxidation in the testis. Vitamin E was more protective than vitamin C in reducing the adverse effects of the endosulfan.Conclusion: The findings data suggest that administration of vitamins C and E ameliorated the endosulfan-induced oxidative stress and sperm toxicity in rat. The effect of vitamin E in preventing endosulfan-induced sperm toxicity was superior to that of vitamin C.

  1. Effects of herbivory on the reproductive effort of 4 prairie perennials

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    Bradley Kate L

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbivory can affect every aspect of a plant's life. Damaged individuals may show decreased survivorship and reproductive output. Additionally, specific plant species (legumes and tissues (flowers are often selectively targeted by herbivores, like deer. These types of herbivory influence a plant's growth and abundance. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of leaf and meristem removal (simulated herbivory within an exclosure on fruit and flower production in four species (Rhus glabra, Rosa arkansana, Lathyrus venosus, and Phlox pilosa which are known targets of deer herbivory. Results Lathyrus never flowered or went to seed, so we were unable to detect any treatment effects. Leaf removal did not affect flower number in the other three species. However, Phlox, Rosa, and Rhus all showed significant negative correlations between seed mass and leaf removal. Meristem removal had a more negative effect than leaf removal on flower number in Phlox and on both flower number and seed mass in Rosa. Conclusions Meristem removal caused a greater response than defoliation alone in both Phlox and Rosa, which suggests that meristem loss has a greater effect on reproduction. The combination of leaf and meristem removal as well as recruitment limitation by deer, which selectively browse for these species, is likely to be one factor contributing to their low abundance in prairies.

  2. Effect of microclimatic conditions on the reproductive behavior of the Helix aspersa

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    Hugo Ángel Fernández Cabrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of microclimatic conditions (temperature and relative humidity on the reproduction of land snails (Helix aspersa. For this, incubation’s chambers were conditioned with different four levels of relative humidity and temperature. Posture, length of incubation and hatching rate were evaluated. It was concluded that 81.0 ± 0.63% of relative humidity and 23.9 ± 0.39 °C of temperature the best results are achieved.

  3. Effects of small spatial variation of the reproduction rate in a two species competition model

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    Georg Hetzer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Of concern is the effect of a small spatially inhomogeneous perturbation of the reproduction rate of the first species in a two-species Lotka-Volterra competition-diffusion problem with spatially homogeneous reaction terms. Apart from this perturbation and the diffusion rates, the two species are assumed to be identical. Our main result shows that the first species can always invade, whereas the second species can only invade under certain conditions which yield uniform persistence of both species. The proof relies on comparison techniques and properties of the principal eigenvalue of reaction-diffusion equations.

  4. Effects of Atrazine on Reproductive Health of Nondiabetic and Diabetic Male Rats

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    Jestadi, Dinesh Babu; Phaniendra, Alugoju; Babji, Undru; Shanmuganathan, Bhavatharini; Periyasamy, Latha

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of low dose of atrazine on reproductive system of male Wistar rats. 16 rats were divided into four groups of four animals each. Group I (nondiabetic) and group III (diabetic) animals served as controls that received safflower oil (300 μL/kg bw/day), respectively. Group II (nondiabetic) and group IV (diabetic) animals received atrazine (300 μg/kg bw/day). Nonsignificant decrease in the activities of antioxidant and steroidogenic enzym...

  5. NON GENETIC FACTORS EFFECT ON REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE AND PREWEANING MORTALITY FROM ARTIFICIALLY AND NATURALLY BRED IN BALI CATTLE

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    A. Gunawan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of non genetic factors on reproductive performance of Bali cattle. Data on reproduction performance were collected from Breeding Centre of Bali Cattle in Denpasar-Bali. Reproductive traits studied were age at first calving (AFC, calving interval (CI and pregnancy rate (PR. To observe the effect of non genetic factors on the reproductive traits, a mixed model was used because all of the traits studied were measured repeatedly in individuals. The overall means for AFC, CI, PR and preweaning mortality were 43.86±0.70 months, 360.93±4.47 days, 88.44±1.91% and 7.58±1.07%, respectively. The results showed that AFC and PR were significantly (P0.05 effect. With regard to CI, dam year of birth and parity affected CI while mating system had no significantly affect (P>0.05 on CI. The preweaning mortality was only affected by the age of dam significantly (P<0.01. The average of reproductive performance and preweaning mortality in Bali Cattle were not depended remarkably on the mating system being practiced. It might be concluded that an improvement in Bali cattle reproductive traits is possible through improving management systems and utilisation of controlled breeding techniques.

  6. NON GENETIC FACTORS EFFECT ON REPRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE AND PREWEANING MORTALITY FROM ARTIFICIALLY AND NATURALLY BRED IN BALI CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gunawan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of non genetic factors on reproductive performance ofBali cattle. Data on reproduction performance were collected from Breeding Centre of Bali Cattle inDenpasar-Bali. Reproductive traits studied were age at first calving (AFC, calving interval (CI andpregnancy rate (PR. To observe the effect of non genetic factors on the reproductive traits, a mixedmodel was used because all of the traits studied were measured repeatedly in individuals. The overallmeans for AFC, CI, PR and preweaning mortality were 43.86±0.70 months, 360.93±4.47 days,88.44±1.91% and 7.58±1.07%, respectively. The results showed that AFC and PR were significantly(P<0.01 influenced by dam year of birth but mating system had no significant (P>0.05 effect. Withregard to CI, dam year of birth and parity affected CI while mating system had no significantly affect(P>0.05 on CI. The preweaning mortality was only affected by the age of dam significantly (P<0.01.The average of reproductive performance and preweaning mortality in Bali Cattle were not dependedremarkably on the mating system being practiced. It might be concluded that an improvement in Balicattle reproductive traits is possible through improving management systems and utilisation ofcontrolled breeding techniques.

  7. NTP-CERHR monograph on the potential human reproductive and developmental effects of hydroxyurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (CERHR) conducted an evaluation of the potential for hydroxyurea to cause adverse effects on reproduction and development in humans. Hydroxyurea is a drug used to treat cancer, sickle cell disease, and thalassemia. It is the only treatment for sickle cell disease in children, aside from blood transfusion and, in severe cases, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hydroxyurea is FDA-approved for use in adults with sickle cell anemia to reduce the frequency of painful crises and the need for blood transfusions. Hydroxyurea may be given to children and adults with sickle cell disease for an extended period of time or for repeated cycles of therapy. Treatment with hydroxyurea is associated with known side effects such as cytotoxicity and myelosuppression, and hydroxyurea is genotoxic (can damage DNA). CERHR selected hydroxyurea for evaluation because of: its increasing use for treatment of sickle cell disease in children and adults, knowledge that it inhibits DNA synthesis and is cytotoxic, and published evidence of reproductive and developmental toxicity in rodents. The results of this evaluation are published in the NTP-CERHR Monograph on Hydroxyurea, which includes the NTP Brief and Expert Panel Report on the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity of Hydroxyurea. Additional information related to the evaluation process, including public comments received on the draft NTP Brief and the final expert panel report, are available on the CERHR website (http:// cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/). See hydroxyurea under "CERHR Chemicals" on the homepage or go directly to http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/chemicals/hydroxyurea/hydroxyurea-eval.html). The NTP reached the following conclusions on the possible effects of exposure to hydroxyurea on human reproduction or development. The possible levels of concern, from lowest to highest, are negligible concern, minimal concern, some concern, concern

  8. Long-term decline in the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in central Chesapeake Bay, USA: An indirect effect of eutrophication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, David G.; Boynton, Walter R.; Roman, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term abundance record of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay was compiled from 1966 to 2002. A significant downward trend in the summertime abundance of Acartia tonsa was found in central Chesapeake Bay. We propose that environmental and food web changes occurred as the Chesapeake Bay became increasingly impacted by human activity which eventually led to the overall decline of A. tonsa. Environmental changes included a long-term rise in water temperature and the volume of hypoxic water during the summer. These changes occurred during the same time period as increases in chlorophyll a concentration, declines in the landings of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, and declines in abundance of the sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha. A CUSUM analysis showed that each time-series experienced a change point during over the past 50 years. These changes occurred sequentially, with chlorophyll a concentration increasing beginning in 1969, water temperature and hypoxic volume increasing beginning in the early 1980s, more recent Maryland C. virginica landings begin declining in the early 1980s and A. tonsa and C. quinquecirrha declining starting in 1989. A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the reduction in A. tonsa abundance appeared to be most associated with a decreasing trend in C. quinquecirrha abundance, though only when trends in the two time-series were present. The drop in C. quinquecirrha abundance is associated with reduced predation on the ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a key predator of A. tonsa. The long-term decline of A. tonsa has likely impacted trophic transfer to fish, particularly the zooplanktivorous bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). A time-series of bay anchovy juvenile index showed a negative trend and the CUSUM analysis revealed 1993 as its starting point. Total fisheries landings, excluding menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), in Chesapeake Bay have also declined during the same period and this

  9. Effect of restricted preen-gland access on maternal self maintenance and reproductive investment in mallards.

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    Mathieu Giraudeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As egg production and offspring care are costly, females should invest resources adaptively into their eggs to optimize current offspring quality and their own lifetime reproductive success. Parasite infections can influence maternal investment decisions due to their multiple negative physiological effects. The act of preening--applying oils with anti-microbial properties to feathers--is thought to be a means by which birds combat pathogens and parasites, but little is known of how preening during the reproductive period (and its expected disease-protecting effects influences maternal investment decisions at the level of the egg. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we experimentally prevented female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos from accessing their preen gland during breeding and monitored female immunoresponsiveness (e.g., plasma lysozyme concentration as well as some egg traits linked to offspring quality (e.g., egg mass, yolk carotenoid content, and albumen lysozyme levels. Females with no access to their preen gland showed an increase in plasma lysozyme level compared to control, normally preening females. In addition, preen-gland-restricted females laid significantly lighter eggs and deposited higher carotenoid concentrations in the yolk compared to control females. Albumen lysozyme activity did not differ significantly between eggs laid by females with or without preen gland access. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results establish a new link between an important avian self-maintenance behaviour and aspects of maternal health and reproduction. We suggest that higher yolk carotenoid levels in eggs laid by preen-gland-restricted females may serve to boost health of offspring that would hatch in a comparatively microbe-rich environment.

  10. Effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice

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    Taher Akbari Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: There is concern that leached components from dental composites may cause adverse changes in the reproductive health. This study aimed to assess the effects of leached components from a hybrid resin composite on the reproductive system of male mice.Materials and Methods: In the present animal study, twenty adult Syrian male mice were divided into two groups of 10 mice each. In the test group, components which leached from samples made from Filtek Z250 resin composite into 75% ethanol were daily administered to the mice for 28 days. In the control group, the procedure was repeated in the same way as the test group but without placing composite samples in the solution. Then, the body weight, weights of paired testes, Gonado Somatic Index, sperm viability, sperm motility, epididymal sperm reserve and daily sperm production were recorded. Four male mice in each group were mated with untreated female mice for 10 days. After that, the number of pregnant females and number of infants were recorded. The data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA, Chi-square test and t-test.Results: There was a significant reduction in the sperm viability and sperm motility of male mice in the test group compared to the control group (P=0.001. There was no any significant differences in other parameters between two groups (P>0.05.Conclusion: This study showed that the leached components from resin composites cannot cause infertility but they could potentially cause some adverse effects on the reproductive system of male mice.

  11. Developmental programming: differential effects of prenatal exposure to bisphenol-A or methoxychlor on reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savabieasfahani, Mozhgan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Astapova, Olga; Evans, Neil P; Padmanabhan, Vasantha

    2006-12-01

    Increased occurrence of reproductive disorders has raised concerns regarding the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals on reproductive health, especially when such exposure occurs during fetal life. Prenatal testosterone (T) treatment leads to growth retardation, postnatal hypergonadotropism, compromised estradiol-positive feedback, polycystic ovaries, and infertility in the adult. Prenatal dihydrotestosterone treatment failed to affect ovarian morphology or estradiol-positive feedback, suggesting that effects of prenatal T may be facilitated via conversion of T to estradiol, thus raising concerns regarding fetal exposure to estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemicals. This study tested whether fetal exposure to methoxychlor (MXC) or bisphenol A (BPA) would disrupt cyclicity in the ewe. Suffolk ewes were administered MXC (n=10), BPA (n=10) (5 mg/kg.d sc in cotton seed oil) or the vehicle (C; n=16) from d 30 to 90 of gestation. On d 60 of treatment, maternal MXC concentrations in fat tissue and BPA in blood averaged approximately 200 microg/g fat and 37.4+/-3.3 ng/ml, respectively. Birth weights of BPA offspring were lower (P<0.05) relative to C. There was no difference in the time of puberty between groups. BPA females were hypergonadotropic during early postnatal life and ended their breeding season later, compared with C. Characterization of cyclic changes after synchronization with prostaglandin F2alpha in five C, six MXC, and six BPA females found that the onset of the LH surge was delayed in MXC (P<0.05) and the LH surge magnitude severely dampened (P<0.05) in BPA sheep. These findings suggest that prenatal BPA and MXC exposure have long-term differential effects on a variety of reproductive endocrine parameters that could impact fertility.

  12. Effects of temperature and moisture on Mormon cricket reproduction with implications for responses to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srygley, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    During the last decade, populations of flightless Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) increased suddenly over vast areas of the Western United States, suggesting that climate is an important factor driving outbreaks. Moreover summer temperatures are predicted to increase and precipitation is expected to decrease in most areas of the U.S. Great Basin, but little is known of the response of Mormon crickets to changes in temperature and soil moisture. In a laboratory study, we varied ambient temperature and lighting and measured the propensity of mating pairs to mate, and the proportion of eggs that developed into embryos. We found that reproduction was optimal when ambient temperature reached 30°C and the insects were beneath broad-spectrum lights such that maternal body and soil temperatures reached 35°C. Fewer eggs that developed fully were laid when maternal body and soil temperatures reached 30°C or 37-39°C. We also varied initial soil moisture from 0% to 100% saturated and found that more eggs reached embryonic diapause when initial soil moisture was 25% or 50% of saturated volume. However more of the developed eggs hatched when treated in summer soils with 0-25% of saturated moisture. We conclude that small changes in temperature had large effects on reproduction, whereas large changes in moisture had very small effects on reproduction. This is the first report of Mormon crickets mating in a laboratory setting and laying eggs that hatched, facilitating further research on the role of maternal and embryonic environments in changes in population size.

  13. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on reproductive capacity in several generations of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet, E-mail: zivgal1@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang2@illinois.edu; Zhou, Changqing, E-mail: czhou27@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-05-01

    In utero bisphenol A (BPA) exposure affects reproductive function in the first generation (F1) of mice; however, not many studies have examined the reproductive effects of BPA exposure on subsequent generations. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were orally dosed with vehicle, BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 μg/kg/day) or diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 μg/kg/day) daily from gestation day 11 until birth. F1 females were used to generate the F2 generation, and F2 females were used to generate the F3 generation. Breeding studies at the ages of 3, 6, and 9 months were conducted to evaluate reproductive capacity over time. Further, studies were conducted to evaluate pubertal onset, litter size, and percentage of dead pups; and to calculate pregnancy rate, and mating, fertility, and gestational indices. The results indicate that BPA exposure (0.5 and 50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. Both DES (0.05 μg/kg/day) and BPA (50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at first estrus in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. BPA exposure reduced gestational index in the F1 and F2 generations compared to control. Further, BPA exposure (0.5 μg/kg/day) compromised the fertility index in the F3 generation compared to control. Finally, in utero BPA exposure reduced the ability of female mice to maintain pregnancies as they aged. Collectively, these data suggest that BPA exposure affects reproductive function in female mice and that some effects may be transgenerational in nature. - Highlights: • In utero BPA delayed vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA delayed estrus in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA reduced the ability of F1 and F2 female mice to maintain pregnancies. • In utero BPA compromised the ability of F3 female mice to become pregnant. • Some effects of in utero BPA may be transgenerational in nature.

  14. Effects of Gladiolus dalenii on the Stress-Induced Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Reproductive Changes in Rats

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    David Fotsing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gladiolus dalenii is a plant commonly used in many regions of Cameroon as a cure for various diseases like headaches, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. Recent studies have revealed that the aqueous extract of G. dalenii (AEGD exhibited antidepressant-like properties in rats. Therefore, we hypothesized that the AEGD could protect from the stress-induced behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive changes in rats. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of the AEGD on behavioral, neurochemical, and reproductive characteristics, using female rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress. The chronic immobilization stress (3 h per day for 28 days was applied to induce female reproductive and behavioral impairments in rats. The immobilization stress was provoked in rats by putting them separately inside cylindrical restrainers with ventilated doors at ambient temperature. The plant extract was given to rats orally everyday during 28 days, 5 min before induction of stress. On a daily basis, a vaginal smear was made to assess the duration of the different phases of the estrous cycle and at the end of the 28 days of chronic immobilization stress, the rat’s behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze. They were sacrificed by cervical disruption. The organs were weighed, the ovary histology done, and the biochemical parameters assessed. The findings of this research revealed that G. dalenii increased the entries and the time of open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze. Evaluation of the biochemical parameters levels indicated that there was a significant reduction in the corticosterone, progesterone, and prolactin levels in the G. dalenii aqueous extract treated rats compared to stressed rats whereas the levels of serotonin, triglycerides, adrenaline, cholesterol, glucose estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were significantly increased in the stressed rats treated with, G. dalenii

  15. Effects of climate warming and declining species richness in grassland model ecosystems: acclimation of CO2 fluxes

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    S. Vicca

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of warming and declining species richness on the carbon balance of grassland communities, model ecosystems containing one, three or nine species were exposed to ambient and elevated (ambient +3°C air temperature. In this paper, we analyze measured ecosystem CO2 fluxes to test whether ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration had acclimated to warming after 28 months of continuous heating, and whether the degree of acclimation depended on species richness. In order to test whether acclimation occurred, short term temperature response curves were established for all communities in both treatments. At similar temperatures, lower flux rates in the heated communities as compared to the unheated communities would indicate thermal acclimation. Because plant cover was significantly higher in the heated treatment, we normalized the data for plant cover. Subsequently, down-regulation of both photosynthesis and respiration was observed. Although CO2 fluxes were larger in communities with higher species richness, species richness did not affect the degree of acclimation to warming. These results imply that models need to take thermal acclimation into account to simulate photosynthesis and respiration in a warmer world.

  16. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Anne E.; Routledge, Edwin J.; Jones, Catherine S.; Noble, Leslie R.; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment. PMID:27448327

  17. Masculinization and reproductive effects in western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) after long-term exposure to androstenedione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li-Ping; Yang, Yang; Shu, Hu; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Fang, Gui-Zhen; Xin, Li; Shi, Wen-Jun; Yao, Li; Cheng, Xue-Mei

    2017-09-12

    Androstenedione (AED) is a naturally occurring steroid hormone. It is metabolized to potent androgens, which may induce androgenic effects in fish. However, little is known whether and how the androgens interfere with the fish gonadal development and reproduction. This study aimed at demonstrating the effects of long-term AED exposure on reproduction and development in mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). The growth, development and several morphological endpoints, including the segment number and length of anal fin, histological changes of gonads and liver, were evaluated in mosquitofish during development from fertilized embryo to adulthood (180 days) after exposure of AED at environmentally relevant concentrations. We found that the growth (length, body weight and condition factor) of fish was negatively correlated with AED concentration in females, but not in males. The significant elongation of the ray and increment of segment numbers in the anal fin, were detected in all mosquitofish after exposure. Moreover, AED exposure (0.4gµ/L) caused damages in gonads and reduced the number of pregnant females. These findings indicate that AED has adverse effects on the growth and development of the western mosquitofish after long-term exposure (180d). Long-term exposure (180d) to AED, including environmentally relevant concentration (0.4µg/L and 4µg/L), induced masculinization in female mosquitofish under the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Kaur

    Full Text Available Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT, under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  19. An X chromosome effect responsible for asymmetric reproductive isolation between male Drosophila virilis and heterospecific females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Desirée; Civetta, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive isolation between closely related species is expressed through uncoordinated courtship, failed fertilization, and (or) postzygotic barriers. Behavioural components of mating often form an initial barrier to hybridization between species. In many animals, females are responsible for mating discrimination in both intra- and interspecific crosses; males of Drosophila virilis group represent an exception to this trend. Using overall productivity tests, we show that a lower proportion of D. virilis males sire progeny when paired with a heterospecific female (Drosophila novamexicana or Drosophila americana texana) for 2 weeks. This suggests male mate discrimination or some other kind of asymmetrical incompatibility in courtship and mating or early zygote mortality. We used males from D. virilis-D. novamexicana and from D. virilis-D. a. texana backcross populations to map chromosome effects responsible for male reproductive isolation. Results from the analysis of both backcross male populations indicate a major X chromosome effect. Further, we conduct a male behavioural analysis to show that D. virilis males significantly fail to continue courtship after the first step of courtship, when they tap heterospecific females. The combined results of a major X chromosome effect and the observation that D. virilis males walk away from females after tapping suggest that future studies should concentrate on the identification of X-linked genes affecting the ability of males to recognize conspecific females.

  20. Application of failure mode and effect analysis in an assisted reproduction technology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Giulia; Alteri, Alessandra; Corti, Laura; Rabellotti, Elisa; Papaleo, Enrico; Restelli, Liliana; Biondo, Stefania; Garancini, Maria Paola; Candiani, Massimo; Viganò, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Assisted reproduction technology laboratories have a very high degree of complexity. Mismatches of gametes or embryos can occur, with catastrophic consequences for patients. To minimize the risk of error, a multi-institutional working group applied failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to each critical activity/step as a method of risk assessment. This analysis led to the identification of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk priority number (RPN) scoring system. In total, 11 individual steps and 68 different potential failure modes were identified. The highest ranked failure modes, with an RPN score of 25, encompassed 17 failures and pertained to "patient mismatch" and "biological sample mismatch". The maximum reduction in risk, with RPN reduced from 25 to 5, was mostly related to the introduction of witnessing. The critical failure modes in sample processing were improved by 50% in the RPN by focusing on staff training. Three indicators of FMEA success, based on technical skill, competence and traceability, have been evaluated after FMEA implementation. Witnessing by a second human operator should be introduced in the laboratory to avoid sample mix-ups. These findings confirm that FMEA can effectively reduce errors in assisted reproduction technology laboratories.

  1. Steroid Androgen Exposure during Development Has No Effect on Reproductive Physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Satwant; Baynes, Alice; Lockyer, Anne E; Routledge, Edwin J; Jones, Catherine S; Noble, Leslie R; Jobling, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Gastropod mollusks have been proposed as alternative models for male reproductive toxicity testing, due to similarities in their reproductive anatomy compared to mammals, together with evidence that endocrine disrupting chemicals can cause effects in some mollusks analogous to those seen in mammals. To test this hypothesis, we used the freshwater pulmonate snail, Biomphalaria glabrata, for which various genetic tools and a draft genome have recently become available, to investigate the effects of two steroid androgens on the development of mollusk secondary sexual organs. Here we present the results of exposures to two potent androgens, the vertebrate steroid; 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the pharmaceutical anabolic steroid; 17α-methyltestosterone (MT), under continuous flow-through conditions throughout embryonic development and up to sexual maturity. Secondary sexual gland morphology, histopathology and differential gene expression analysis were used to determine whether steroid androgens stimulated or inhibited organ development. No significant differences between tissues from control and exposed snails were identified, suggesting that these androgens elicited no biologically detectable response normally associated with exposure to androgens in vertebrate model systems. Identifying no effect of androgens in this mollusk is significant, not only in the context of the suitability of mollusks as alternative model organisms for testing vertebrate androgen receptor agonists but also, if applicable to other similar mollusks, in terms of the likely impacts of androgens and anti-androgenic pollutants present in the aquatic environment.

  2. Developmental and Reproductive Effects of SE5-OH: An Equol-Rich Soy-Based Ingredient

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    Ray A. Matulka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of the isoflavones daidzein, genistein, glycitein, and their structural analogues is generally considered beneficial to human health. Equol is not found in soy, but is converted from daidzein by human gut bacterial flora. Research indicates that between 30–50% of the population is capable of converting daidzein to equol; therefore, there has been recent development of a new equol-rich functional food that relies on bacterial conversion of daidzein to equol under strictly controlled conditions. Therefore, a new equol-rich soy product (SE5-OH has been developed, based on the bacterial conversion of daidzein; and its reproductive and developmental toxicity has been evaluated in a two-generation study and a developmental toxicity study with Sprague-Dawley rats at dose levels of 200, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg/day by gavage. SE5-OH contains approximately 0.65% equol, 0.024% daidzein, 0.022% genistein, and 0.30% glycitein. From the reproductive study, the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL for SE5-OH determined for both male and female rats is 1000 mg/kg/day (6.5 mg equol/kg/day. In the developmental toxicity phase of the study, no effects by SE5-OH were found in the embryo-fetus at any of the doses tested. The NOAEL for developmental effects of SE5-OH is 2000 mg/kg/day (13 mg equol/kg/day.

  3. Effect of gossypol on survival and reproduction of the zoophytophagous stinkbug Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas

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    Walter S. Evangelista Junior

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of gossypol on survival and reproduction of the zoophytophagous stinkbug Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas. Gossypol is a sesquiterpene aldehyde found in cotton plants conferring resistance against herbivory. Although the effect of this sesquiterpenoid on insect pests of cotton is known, the interaction of this compound with zoophytophagous predators such as Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Hemiptera, Pentatomidae has not been studied so far. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the purified gossypol on nymphs and adults of P. nigrispinus. Nymphs and adults of this predator were fed on Tenebrio molitor pupae and supplemented with solutions of gossypol at concentrations of 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.20% (w/v during the nymphal and adult stages or, only during the adult stage of P. nigrispinus. The nymphal stage of the predator was, on average, two days longer when suplemmented with gossypol. Emerged adults had lower fecundity and egg hatching, especially at the highest gossypol concentration (0.20% ingested during the nymphal and adult stages. However, this predator was not affected when it ingested the compound only during the adult stage. P. nigrispinus can have delayed nymphal development and lower reproductive performance when ingesting the gossypol during the nymphal and adult stages, but only at higher concentrations of gossypol than that produced by cotton plants.

  4. Bisphenol-A: Epigenetic Reprogramming and Effects on Reproduction and Behavior

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    Guergana Mileva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a synthetic compound used in the production of many polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It is one of the most widely produced chemicals in the world today and is found in most canned goods, plastics, and even household dust. Exposure to BPA is almost universal: most people have measurable amounts of BPA in both urine and serum. BPA is similar in structure to estradiol and can bind to multiple targets both inside and outside the nucleus, in effect acting as an endocrine disruptor. Research on BPA exposure has accelerated in the past decade with findings suggesting that perinatal exposure to BPA can negatively impact both male and female reproduction, create alterations in behavior, and act as a carcinogen. BPA can have both short term and long term effects with the latter typically occurring through epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. This review will draw on both human and animal studies in an attempt to synthesize the literature and examine the effects of BPA exposure on reproduction, behavior, and carcinogenesis with a focus on the potential epigenetic mechanisms by which it acts.

  5. Effect of embryo freezing on perinatal outcome after assisted reproduction techniques: lessons from the Latin American Registry of Assisted Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Juan-Enrique; Crosby, Javier A; Zegers-Hochschild, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Embryo cryopreservation is an integral part of assisted reproduction techniques; it allows the sequential transfer of all embryos, thus diminishing the risk of multiple pregnancies and associated perinatal complications. To address concerns about the safety of this procedure, neonatal outcome after 43,070 fresh embryo transfers was compared with 12,068 frozen-thawed embryo transfers (FET). After adjusting for maternal age, gestational age, embryo development at time of transfer, number of babies born and gestational order, FET was not found to be associated with an increase in perinatal mortality (odds ratio [OR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81 to 3.62); preterm birth (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.18); or extreme preterm birth (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.06). Furthermore, after correcting for known confounding factors, FET was found to be associated with an increase in neonatal weight of 39.7 g (95% CI 1.54 to 64.10; P < 0.0001). Embryo cryopreservation was, therefore, not associated with an increase in the risk of poor perinatal outcome.

  6. Acute, chronic and reproductive effects of petroleum and two petroleum substitutes on the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, E.R.; Walton, B.T.

    1983-12-01

    Effects of petroleum and two synthetic oils on mortality and reproduction of the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas), were compared. Reproduction was investigated because of its importance in the maintenance of population levels and the sensitivity of the reproductive system to toxicants. Adult milkweed bugs were dosed topically with the test oils to measure acute toxicity. Chronic toxicity was determined by mean survival after chronic exposure, starting with the fifth instar. The ability of sublethal levels of the test oils to affect reproduction was measured by the number of eggs laid and their percent hatch. The two synthetic oils were found to be more acutely and chronically toxic than petroleum. Egg production was not affected by petroleum but was reduced approximately 20% by sublethal levels of both synthetic oils. Egg viability was not affected.

  7. Toxic plants: Effects on reproduction and fetal and embryonic development in livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reproductive success is dependent on a large number of carefully orchestrated biological events that must occur in a specifically timed sequence. The interference with one of more of these sequences or events may result in total reproductive failure or a more subtle reduction in reproductive potent...

  8. Reproductive rights approach to reproductive health in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research on reproductive health in developing countries focuses mostly on the role of economic development on various components of reproductive health. Cross-sectional and empirical research studies in particular on the effects of non-economic factors such as reproductive rights remain few and far between. Objective: This study investigates the influence of two components of an empowerment strategy, gender equality, and reproductive rights on women’s reproductive health in develo...

  9. Effect of feeding frequency on the reproductive efficiency of two species of Triatoma with different epidemiological importance

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    Claudia Rodríguez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In Triatominae, reproductive efficiency is an important factor influencing population dynamics, and a useful parameter in measuring a species' epidemiological significance as a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909. The reproductive efficiency of triatomines is affected by food availability; hence, we measured and compared the effects of feeding frequency on the reproductive parameters of Triatoma patagonica (Del Ponte, 1929 and Triatoma infestans (Klug, 1934, and the effects of starvation on T. patagonica. Methods Couples from both species were fed weekly, or every 3 weeks; in addition, females in couples of T. patagonica were not fed. Each couple was observed weekly and reproductive efficiency was assessed on the following parameters: fecundity (eggs/female, fertility (eggs hatched/eggs laid, initiation and end of oviposition, initiation of mating, number of matings/week, and number of reproductive weeks. Relative meal size index (RMS, blood consumption index (CI, and E values (eggs/mg blood were also calculated. Results Changes in feeding frequency affected the reproductive parameters of T. patagonica only, with a decrease in fecundity and number of reproductive weeks for those fed every 3 weeks, or not fed. The reproductive period, RMS index, and CI were lower for T. patagonica than T. infestans. However, despite the lower fecundity of T. patagonica, this species required less blood to produce eggs, with an E values of 2 compared to 2.94 for T. infestans. Conclusions Our results suggest that the differences in fecundity observed between species reflect the availability of food in their natural ecotopes.

  10. Effects of different iron supply to pregnant sows (Sus scrofa domestica L.) on reproductive performance as well as iron status of new-born piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffler, Marzell; Becker, Christiane; Windisch, Wilhelm M

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different iron (Fe) supply to sows during gestation on their reproductive performance and placental Fe load. Additionally, the Fe status of the corresponding offspring was assessed. Twenty multiparous sows were fed from insemination to farrowing with isoenergetic and isonitrogenic balanced diets differing in Fe content. The diet low in Fe (Group -Fe) was mainly composed of soybean meal and maize meal and had a Fe content of 114 mg/kg DM. For the diet high in Fe (Group +Fe), the diet was supplemented with Fe(II)SO4 · 7H2O to a total Fe content of 256 mg/kg. Blood characteristics (haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular haem concentration, total Fe-binding capacity, transferrin saturation) of all sows were measured at the beginning and at the end of gestation. Daily Fe retention was calculated at the day of farrowing. After birth, reproductive performance (litter size, piglet weight, litter weight), placental Fe content and Fe blood characteristics of the piglets were determined. Apparent daily Fe retention tended to be greater in Group +Fe (p sows did not show any variations between feeding groups, neither at the beginning nor at the end of pregnancy, whereas placental Fe content was lower in Group -Fe (p sows were supplied according to the current Fe recommendations, a significant decline in reproductive performance of Group -Fe was recognised. Therefore, it was concluded that the re-evaluation of the gross Fe requirements of pregnant sows is inevitable to accommodate the current feeding recommendations.

  11. Effects of endocrine disruptors in the development of the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Elaine Maria Frade; Spritzer, Poli Mara; Hohl, Alexandre; Bachega, Tânia A S S

    2014-03-01

    Environmental agencies have identified a growing number of environmental contaminants that have endocrine disrupting activity, and these can become a major public health problem. It is suggested that endocrine disruptors could account for the higher-than-expected increase in the prevalence of some non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, thyroid diseases, and some cancers. Several endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs), such as pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates, dioxins, and phytoestrogens, can interact with the female reproductive system and lead to endocrine disruption. Initially, it was assumed that EDCs exert their effects by binding to hormone receptors and transcription factors, but it is currently known that they may also alter the expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis or catabolism of steroids. Biomonitoring studies have identified these compounds in adults, children, pregnant women, and fetuses. Among the diseases of the female reproductive tract associated with EDCs exposure are the following: precocious puberty, polycystic ovary syndrome, and premature ovarian failure. The different populations of the world are exposed to a great number of chemicals through different routes of infection; despite the various available studies, there is still much doubt regarding the additive effect of a mixture of EDCs with similar mechanisms of action.

  12. Effects of diet-induced obesity on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell-Fugate, Annie E; Taibl, Jessica N; Clark, Sherrie G; Alloosh, Mouhamad; Sturek, Michael; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2014-02-01

    This study characterizes the effect of an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet on metabolic parameters and reproductive function in female Ossabaw minipigs. Cycling sows were fed a hypercaloric, high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-fructose diet (obese, n = 4) or a control diet (control, n = 5) for 13 mo. During the final 4 mo, ovarian ultrasonography was done, blood was collected, and weights and measures were taken. Pigs then underwent ovarian stimulation. Cycle length and androstenedione, total testosterone, progesterone, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin, fructosamine, lipid, and glucose levels were measured. In addition, adipose tissue aromatase gene expression was assessed. As compared with control pigs, obese pigs were hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic; had elevated total cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin levels, and demonstrated abdominal adiposity. Visceral adipose tissue of obese pigs, as compared with control pigs, showed increased aromatase gene expression. Obese pigs had longer estrous cycles, higher serum androstenedione, and higher luteal phase serum luteinizing hormone, compared with control pigs. During the luteal phase, obese pigs had more medium, ovulatory, and cystic ovarian follicles, whereas control pigs had more small ovarian follicles. When fed an excess-calorie, high-fat, high-cholesterol, high-fructose diet, female Ossabaw minipigs develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, and abnormal reproductive function. This animal model may be applicable to studies of the effects of obesity on fertility in women.

  13. Sublethal Effects of Methanolic Extract of Raphia hookeri on the Reproductive Capacity of Clarias gariepinus

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    Adedotun O. Afolayan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raphia hookeri fruits are used for fishing in Nigeria due to their ichthyotoxic properties. This study investigated the toxic effects of R. hookeri on the reproductive capacity of Clarias gariepinus. The results from both short-term (96-hour test and long-term (3-month sublethal test bioassays revealed a linear relationship between R. hookeri extract dose and negative effects on the catfish. The percentage survival of both sexes of the catfish decreased with increasing extract concentration at short-term exposure, with LC50 values of 600 mg/L and 800 mg/L for male and female, respectively. At long-term exposure, the reproductive capacity of 10–12-month-old male and female brood-stocks diminished at relatively higher concentrations of R. hookeri fruit extract, with the gravid females producing fewer and mostly unviable eggs. The fruit extract also affected the eggs’ hatchability and fry survival when the exposed gravid females were treated with pituitary hormone and sperms from unexposed males, while the exposed males were unable to sexually stimulate female brooders. Sperms and pituitary hormone from exposed males were infertile, leading to low percentage of hatched eggs and mortality of the few hatched fries within 24 hours. These results confirmed the ethnobotanical use of this fruit extract for fishing in Nigeria.

  14. Reproductive and developmental effects and physical and chemical properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Michael J; Crouse, Lee C B; McFarland, Craig A; LaFiandra, Emily M; Johnson, Mark S

    2009-02-01

    Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is an explosive chemical that has been detected in environmental media. Although previous toxicology studies have shown PETN to be relatively benign, a lack of available information concerning developmental and reproductive effects from oral PETN exposure was needed. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to oral daily adjusted volumetric doses of 0, 100, 500, or 1,000 mg PETN/kg body mass in a corn oil vehicle for up to 56 days. Mating, duration of gestation, body weight, feed consumption, overall condition of adults, and the number, sex, and condition of pups were recorded. Histological examinations were also performed on the ovaries, testes, and epididymides of animals from the control and the highest dose groups. Other environmental criteria, water solubility, octanol/water partition coefficient, and biodegradation rates of neat PETN were also determined. Only body weights and feed consumption were affected by treatment; however, these differences may be attributed more to volumetric adjustments of vehicle in the control and high-dose groups than to PETN toxicity. No adverse effects on development or reproduction from PETN exposure were observed. Water solubility, octanol water partition coefficient, and water suspension and biodegradation rates suggest PETN is unlikely to transport or bioaccumulate in the environment to any appreciable extent. Additionally, biotic processes are most likely faster in breaking down PETN than the abiotic processes involved in dissolving PETN in water. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Smoking and reproduction. Short and long term effects and benefits of smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredricsson, B; Gilljam, H

    1992-12-01

    There have been many attempts during the last years to restrict smoking because of the significant health hazards. In particular the high prevalence of smoking among women in their reproductive years has been a matter of concern. This review was prompted in order to make the medical profession, and gynecologists in particular, confident with the underlying data. This will hopefully result in enabling them to provide balanced information to their patients, not overemphasizing the dangers of smoking, but rather presenting ways to properly recognize and treat tobacco dependence. It is a widely held view that the various risks imposed by smoking are very modest. A doubling of the risk for a rare problem may not prevent many women from continuing to smoke. However, a doubling of the risk for early miscarriage or a significant reduction of success rate in the treatment of infertility may be much more discouraging. The purpose of this review is to list the various effects smoking may have on the different phases of reproduction and to present an overview of the explanation models which have been suggested. Late effects on the child and its development will also be discussed. Hopefully, this will lead to proper concern about the problems and thus increase the motivation to quit smoking even before attempting a pregnancy. In addition, we give some hints on smoking cessation programs.

  16. EFFECT OF A BIODEGRADABLE DETERGENT IN WATER ON DAPHNIA MAGNA REPRODUCTION

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    Castiglioni, M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic ecosystems near to urban zone have a constant risk by several physical and chemical factors relative to human activities. This provokes synergic effects on aquatic organisms, being the domestic sewage an important factor to assess, highlighting the detergents. The cladocerans Daphnia magna, there is not originate in the Neotropical region, is a specie more used in ecotoxicological assays in the world by its easy culture and short life cycle. The aim of the work is observe as affect the commercial detergent on D. magna and their reproductive fitness. This was realized with chronic assays of isolated and grouped individuals using three sublethal concentrations of anionic detergent, previously the C was determined. The assays lasted 21 days, daily the 50 neonates were registered. These were counted and measured. In the chronic assays, the isolated individuals produced 262 embryos in the control group, being alike to two lower concentrations. The neonates were more abundant in the higher concentration than in lower and control ones. In the grouped animal experience, the increase in the egg number was progressive to detergent concentration. In this study, the detergent could be induced a production of more abundant and viable offspring. This could be associated with that the detergent permit an effective use of trophic resource and bioavailability of energy to reproduction, when the detergent discharge breaks down the particles or algal cells offered as food.

  17. Tamoxifen as an emerging endocrine disruptor. effects on fish reproduction and detoxification target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradonna, Francesca; Batti, Stefania; Marino, Maria; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Carnevali, Oliana

    2009-04-01

    The effect of tamoxifen (TAM) on the black goby Gobius niger exposed to different contaminants was analyzed by investigating the response of a set of biomarkers involved in reproduction and cell recovery. While the effects of TAM are well known in mammalian breast and endometrial cells (with severe consequences on physiology), few contrasting data are available for fish. In this work the expression of vitellogenin (vtg), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) genes was evaluated in fish treated with TAM alone or co-injected with nonylphenol, estradiol, and beta-naphtoflavone. The induction of vtg observed in male fish treated with estrogens was significantly lowered by the co-injection of TAM. ERalpha and HSP70 gene expressions were significantly upregulated in all experimental groups; however, TAM treatment did not change CYP1A1 gene expression. Together these data confirm the mixed estrogenic/anti-estrogenic action of TAM, indicating its interference in fish reproduction and physiology.

  18. Effects of environmental exposure to diazepam on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Varenka; Choe, Ree; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Pharmaceutical drugs are continuously discharged into the aquatic environment primarily through wastewater discharge; therefore, their possible effects on wildlife is a reason of concern. Diazepam is a widely prescribed benzodiazepine drug used to treat insomnia and anxiety disorders, and it has been found in wastewater effluents worldwide. The present study tested the effects of diazepam on fecundity and the reproductive behavior of the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a fish that exhibits male parental care. Sexually mature fathead minnows were housed at a ratio of one male and two females per tank and exposed to nominal (measured) concentrations of 0, 0.1 (0.14 ± 0.06), 1.0 (1.04 ± 0.15), 10 (13.4 ± 1.5) µg L(-1) for 21 days. Fish receiving the low diazepam treatment had significantly larger clutches than fish receiving the highest concentration but neither were different from controls. Diazepam exposure was not associated with a significant change in fertilization rate, hatchability or time to hatch, but a trend toward a higher number of eggs/day was observed in fish exposed to the low diazepam concentration relative to those exposed to the medium concentration. There were no significant differences in any of the behaviors analyzed when responses were averaged over time. The results showed that exposure to diazepam at concentrations as high as 13 µg L(-1) did not significantly impact the reproductive behavior of fathead minnow.

  19. Effects of the neonicotinoid insecticide, clothianidin, on the reproductive organ system in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Ramazan; Türk, Gaffari; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Yılmaz, Ökkes; Kuloğlu, Tuncay; Baydaş, Gıyasettin; Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Yener, Zabit; Etem, Ebru; Tuzcu, Zeynep

    2013-10-01

    Clothianidin (CTD) is a novel, broad-spectrum insecticide. In the current study, it was aimed to study the effect of subchronic exposure to low doses of CTD (2, 8 and 24 mg/kg body weight/day) on the reproductive system in adult rats. CTD treatment did not significantly change serum testosterone level or sperm parameters (e.g. concentration, motility and morphology), but caused significant decreases in weights of epididymis, right cauda epididymis and seminal vesicles. CTD treatment did not cause sperm DNA fragmentation and did not change the apoptotic index in the seminiferous tubules and levels of α-tocopherol and glutathione, but increased the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and cholesterol levels significantly at all doses. CTD exposure caused significant elevations in palmitic, linoleic and arachidonic acids in testis in all CTD-exposed groups. There was a drop in 20:4/18:2 (arachidonic acid/linoleic acid) ratio and an increase in 18:1n-9/18:0 (oleic acid/stearic acid) ratios in all CTD groups, in comparison to the control group. In conclusion, CTD had little detectable detrimental effects on the reproductive system of male rats over the measured parameters.

  20. The effectiveness of an adolescent reproductive health education intervention in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Hilary T; Teich, Hayley G; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L; Murphy, Ramon J; Anandaraja, Natasha; Stone, Jessie; Kalumuna, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Ugandan adolescents lack sufficient reproductive health knowledge, which accounts in part for the staggering rates of teen pregnancies and sexually transmitted (STI) infections in this population. This study aimed to (1) examine Ugandan adolescents' baseline STI and contraceptive knowledge; (2) determine whether this knowledge varies by demographic factors, prior sexual experience or school grade; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of an educational program to increase and retain STI and contraceptive knowledge among Ugandan adolescents. This study surveyed 129 adolescents (ages 15-19) regarding knowledge of STIs and contraceptive methods at schools and community non-governmental organizations at three time points. Findings demonstrated that at baseline the mean test scores for contraceptive knowledge and STI knowledge were 44% and 72%, respectively. Participants in higher secondary school grade-levels had greater odds of having prior STI knowledge (OR=19.6, 95% CI 2.0-187.6); participants who had previously engaged in sex had greater odds of having prior contraceptive knowledge (OR=4.62, 95% CI 1.45-14.72). A higher grade level was not associated with better knowledge of contraception; and being sexually active was not associated with better knowledge of STI information. Participants' knowledge of STIs and contraceptives improved after the education session (peducation regarding contraceptive methods and that implementation of reproductive health modules by an outside party can be effective in improving knowledge.

  1. Effects on the reproductive system of young male rats of subcutaneous exposure to n-butylparaben.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Tania; Schreiber, Elga; Kumar, Vikas; Prasad, Raju; Sirvent, Juan J; Domingo, Jose L; Gómez, Mercedes

    2017-08-01

    This study was aimed at determining whether an in vivo subcutaneous exposure to n-butylparaben (n-ButP) during one complete spermatogenic cycle could be harmful to the reproductive system of young male rats. Animals were subcutaneously given 0, 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg/day of n-ButP with vehicle (peanut oil). Body and organ weights, n-ButP excretion, biochemical parameters, sperm and spermatid count, sperm motility, viability, maturity and morphology were examined. Results showed that after a completed spermatogenic cycle, although n-ButP did not induce dose-related changes in the different biochemical parameters, a significant decrease of triacylglicerides (TAG) -due to the vehicle-was found. Furthermore, no effects of n-ButP on body weight gain and relative organ weight changes were noted. Regarding sexual organs, prostate relative weight was significantly increased at the high dose of n-ButP. On the other hand, a significant increase of abnormal sperm morphology due to n-ButP exposure, accompanied by different alterations in sexual organs histopathology, was found. The current results indicate that subcutaneous exposure of n-ButP in young male rats induced toxic effects on the reproductive system, which could affect the capacity of fertilization of animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of sesame oil on the reproductive parameters of diabetes mellitus-induced male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Zahra; Tabatabaei, Seyed Reza Fatemi; Mazaheri, Yazdan; Barati, Farid; Morovvati, Hasan

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of sesame oil on the reproductive parameters of diabetic male Wistar rats. The adult male rats in a split plot design were divided into normal (n=10), normal 5% (n=5; 5% sesame oil enriched diet), diabetic (Streptozocin induced diabetes; n=9), diabetic 5% (n=9; 5% sesame oil enriched diet), and diabetic 10% (n=9; 10% sesame oil enriched diet) groups. Diet supplementation continued for 56 days. Sesame oil supplementation did not reduce the plasma glucose concentration of rats in the diabetic groups (p>0.05). The total spermatogonia, spermatocytes, Leydig cells/tubule, and the germ cell to Sertoli cell ratio were lower in the diabetic rats than the normal ones (psesame oil to the diet (psesame oil supplementation did not improve them. Incorporation of sesame oil into the diet improved the plasma testosterone concentration of the diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner (psesame oil supplementation improved the reproductive parameters of diabetic rats at the levels of the testicular microstructure and function, but was not effective in protecting the epididymal sperm.

  3. Effect of 17β-trenbolone on male and female reproduction in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Paula F.P.; Akuffo, Valorie G.; Chen, Yu; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Sprague, Daniel T.; Bakst, Murray R.

    2012-01-01

    The anabolic steroid 17β trenbolone (17β-TB), a known endocrine disrupting chemical, may influence reproductive functions in avian wildlife. We evaluated the effects of dietary exposure to 17β-TB at 5 and 20 ppm on reproductive functional endpoints in Japanese quail during and after sexual maturation. In the male, 5 and 20 ppm treatments revealed no differences in body and testes weight, testes histology, plasma testosterone concentrations, or size and weight of the foam glands. However, the onset of foam production was significantly earlier (days of age) in the 20 ppm males. In females, dietary 17β-TB at 20 ppm caused a reduction in the number of maturing yellow yolk follicles and overall egg production. Plasma testosterone concentrations were reduced compared to controls. Histology of the oviductal sperm storage tubules was normal in all treatments. The number of sperm holes, sites on the perivitelline layer (PVL) where sperm bound and hydrolyzed a path through the PVL, was significantly greater in the 10th egg laid compared to the 1st egg laid in the 20 ppm treatment. Potential effects, albeit transient, on endpoints associated with male maturation warrant further investigation into the sensitivity of these measures in the event of embryonic and/or trans-generational exposure to 17β-TB.

  4. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, R L; Crayon, J J; Law, M A

    2006-11-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels--black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)--generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  5. Crude protein and rumen undergradable protein effects on reproduction and lactation performance of Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M E; French, D D; Brown, T F; Cuomo, G J; Chapa, A M; Fernandez, J M; Beatty, J F; Blouin, D C

    1999-12-01

    We conducted a study to determine the effects of excess dietary crude protein (CP) and rumen undegradable protein (RUP) on reproduction and lactation performance of Holstein cows. During each of three yearly replicates, cows were blocked by previous mature equivalent milk production and randomly assigned at calving (n = 47; partum group) or at 42 +/- 21 d postpartum (n = 134; postpartum group) to the following dietary treatments: 1) ryegrass pasture supplemented with a corn and soybean meal grain mix (high CP, moderate RUP); 2) ryegrass pasture mornings and corn silage evenings, supplemented with grain as in diet 1 (moderate CP, moderate RUP control diet), and 3) ryegrass pasture mornings and corn silage evenings, supplemented with a grain mix containing corn, soybean meal, corn gluten meal, and blood meal (moderate CP, high RUP). Dietary CP and RUP concentrations were approximately 23.1, 5.8; 17.7, 5.0; and 17.2, 6.8% of dry matter for diets 1 to 3, respectively. Plasma urea N concentrations were highest in cows fed diet 1 (25.0 mg/dl), intermediate in cows on diet 2 (20.1 mg/dl), and lowest in cows on diet 3 (18.5 mg/dl). Cows fed excess dietary protein (diet 1) exhibited lower first breeding pregnancy rates (24.1 vs. 41.0%) and lower overall pregnancy rates (53.4 vs. 75.4%) than did cows fed diet 2, increasing time nonpregnant by an average of 15.1 d per cow. Reproductive performance was similar between cows fed diets 2 and 3. Mean fat-corrected milk (FCM) yield was not affected by protein concentration (diet 1 vs. 2); however, partum group cows that received supplemental RUP (diet 3) produced more 3.5% FCM than controls in early lactation. Feeding grain diets that contained excess dietary protein impaired the reproductive performance of dairy cows grazing ryegrass.

  6. Effects of the phytoestrogen genistein on the development of the reproductive system of Sprague Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Rosmani Md Zin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Genistein is known to influence reproductive system development through its binding affinity for estrogen receptors. The present study aimed to further explore the effect of Genistein on the development of the reproductive system of experimental rats. METHODS: Eighteen post-weaning female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the following groups: (i a control group that received vehicle (distilled water and Tween 80; (ii a group treated with 10 mg/kg body weight (BW of Genistein (Gen 10; and (iii a group treated with a higher dose of Genistein (Gen 100. The rats were treated daily for three weeks from postnatal day 22 (P22 to P42. After the animals were sacrificed, blood samples were collected, and the uteri and ovaries were harvested and subjected to light microscopy and immunohistochemical study. RESULTS: A reduction of the mean weekly BW gain and organ weights (uteri and ovaries were observed in the Gen 10 group compared to the control group; these findings were reversed in the Gen 100 group. Follicle stimulating hormone and estrogen levels were increased in the Gen 10 group and reduced in the Gen 100 group. Luteinizing hormone was reduced in both groups of Genistein-treated animals, and there was a significant difference between the Gen 10 and control groups (p<0.05. These findings were consistent with increased atretic follicular count, a decreased number of corpus luteum and down-regulation of estrogen receptors-a in the uterine tissues of the Genistein-treated animals compared to the control animals. CONCLUSION: Post-weaning exposure to Genistein could affect the development of the reproductive system of ovarian-intact experimental rats because of its action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis by regulating hormones and estrogen receptors.

  7. Protective effect of Cordyceps militaris extract against bisphenol A induced reproductive damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Chen; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Jiang, Hai; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Cordyceps militaris (C. militaris) against reproductive damage induced by bisphenol A (BPA). Rats were administrated 200 mg/kg BPA for 4 weeks and treated with C. militaris (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg body weight/day). By the end of the fourth week, the level of oxidative damage, sperm parameters, hormone levels, and histopathological changes were examined. In the group that only received BPA, there was a significant decrease in body weight compared with the normal control (NC) group. C. militaris significantly alleviated the BPA-induced reproductive damage by increasing testicular superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), and glutathione (GSH); as well as by reducing serum malondialdehyde (MDA). C. militaris not only obviously enhanced the levels of serum LH and T, but it also improved the sperm count and motility compared to the BPA-treated group. These results suggest that C. militaris could be used as a potential natural substance for preventing BPA induced reproductive damage. Abbreviations BPA: bisphenol A; SOD: superoxide dismutase; GSH: glutathione; GSH-PX: glutathione peroxidase; MDA: malondialdehyde; ROS: reactive oxygen species; T: testosterone; LH: luteinizing hormone; FSH: follicle-stimulating hormone; UPLC: ultra performance liquid chromatography; RIA: radioimmunoassay; q quantitative real time PCR; NC: normal control group; BPA: 200 mg/kg BPA administered group; H: 800 mg/kg C. militaris extract administered group; LB, MB, and HB: 200 mg/kg BPA + 200 mg/kg, 400 mg/kg, and 800 mg/kg C. militaris administered group, respectively; VeB: 200 mg/kg BPA + 300 mg/kg Vitamin E administered group; Star: steroidogenic acute regulatory protein; 3β-HSD: 3beta-hydroxyl-delta-5-steroid dehydrogenase; CYP11A1: cytochrome P 450 family 11 subfamily A member 1; CYP17A1: cytochrome P 450 family 17 subfamily A member 1.

  8. Effect of methanol extract of Ricinus communis seed on reproduction of male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinusa Raji; Ahmed Kolade Oloyo; Ayodele Olufemi Morakinyo

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of methanol extract of Ricinus communis seed (RCE) on male rats reproductive functions. Methods: Thirty-two male albino rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1, 2 and 3 were gavaged with 0.2 mL of 2.5 % tween 80 (RCE vehicle; control) or 20 mg/(kg.d) and 40 mg/(kg.d) of RCE, respectively, for 30 days, and group 4 was also gavaged with 40 mg/(kg·d) of RCE, but was allowed a recovery periold of 30 days.Five untreated female rats were cohabited with male rats in each group from day 25 of RCE treatment for 5 days,except group 4, where cohabitation began on day 25 of the recovery period. All male rats were sacrificed 24 h after the experiments. The female rats were laparatomized on day 19 of pregnancy and the number and weight of litters were recorded. Results: There was a significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the weight of the reproductive organs,sperm functions and serum levels of testosterone in RCE treated rats. There was disorganization in the cytoarchitecture of the testes, disruption of the seminiferous tubules and erosion of the germinal epithelium. The number and weight of litters of rats in groups 2 and 4 decreased significantly (P < 0.05) but no changes were observed in group 3. RCE caused no changes in liver, kidney, heart or body weights in male rats. Conclusion: RCE has a reversible negative impact on male reproductive functions, which appears to be mediated via gonadal disruption in testosterone secretion.

  9. Effects of algal food quality on sexual reproduction of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong-Yun; Kim, Seong-Ki; La, Geung-Hwan; Chang, Kwang-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Kyun; Jeong, Keon-Young; Park, Min S; Joo, Gea-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Kwang-Seuk

    2016-05-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate sexual reproduction of Daphnia magna associated with mating behaviors and hatching rates, according to different algal food sources. Since a diatom is known to contain more abundant long-chain poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), we hypothesized that the diatom-consuming D. magna would exhibit more successful reproduction rates. Upon the hypothesis, we designed three experiments using two algal species, a green alga (Chlorella vulgaris) and a diatom (Stephanodiscus hantzschii). From the results, we found that the mating frequency and copulation duration increased in the treatment with S. hantzschii, resulting in a significant increase of hatching rates of resting eggs. In the other two repetitive mating strategies (e.g., one female vs. multiple males, and one male vs. multiple females), we found that the hatching rates of resting eggs were greater in the S. hantzschii treatment. In addition to the mating strategy, male body size significantly increased in the diatom treatment, hence average diameter of penis was also statistically different among the treatments (greater diameter in the S. hantzschii treatment). To examine the effect of algal food quality, we estimated quantity of fatty acids in the two algal species. Our result showed that S. hantzschii had a higher proportion of long-chain PUFAs than C. vulgaris. Furthermore, a stable isotope analysis revealed that carbon and nitrogen originated from S. hantzschii were more assimilated to D. magna. In summary, our study manifested that diatom consumption of D. magna leads to more successful sexual reproduction. We then discussed how the diatom consumption of zooplankton influences food web dynamics in a freshwater ecosystem.

  10. Effect of nitrofurazone on the reproductive organs in adult male mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shio Kumar Singh; Sumana Chakravarty

    2001-01-01

    To study the effect of 5-nitro-2-furaldehyde semicarbazone (nitrofurazone), a derivative of nitrofuran, on male reproductive organs of Parkes (P) strain mice. Methods: Mice were given nitrofurazone orally at a dose of 64mg/kg body weight per day, for 10 and 20 days, and were killed 24 h and/or 56 days after the last treatment. Histological appearance of testis, motility and number of spermatozoa in cauda epididymidis, and biochemical indices in epididymis and seminal vesicle were evaluated. Results: Histologically, testis showed marked regressive changes in the seminiferous tubules in mice treated with nitrofurazone. Ten days after treatment, there was much depletion of germ cells in the seminiferous tubules, and the germinal epithelium was lined mainly with Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and a few round spermatids; intraepithelial vacuoles and multinucleated giant cells were also observed in tubules. By 20 days, regressive changes in the seminiferous tubules were further pronounced, and pachytene spermatocytes were the most advanced germ cells noticed in the tubules. In severe cases, the tubules were lined with a thin layer of Sertoli cells and spennatogonia. The treatment also caused marked reductions in the motility and number of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymidis, in weight and the level of fructose in the seminal vesicle, and in sialic acid level in the epididymis. Fifty six days after drug withdrawal, the alterations induced in the reproductive organs returned to control levels. Conclusion: Our results suggest that nitrofurazone treatment in P mice induces marked alterations in the male reproductive organs, and that the alterations are reversible following cessation of treatment.

  11. Effects of contaminants on reproductive success of aquatic birds nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hothem, R.L.; Crayon, J.J.; Law, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects on avian populations. From 1996 to 1999, we conducted studies at the Piute Ponds area of EAFB to evaluate the impacts of contaminants on nesting birds. Avian reproduction was evaluated in 1999. Eggs were collected for chemical analyses in 1996 and 1999, and African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), a likely food source, were collected for chemical analyses in 1998. Avian species occupying the higher trophic levels-black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), white-faced ibis (Plegadis chihi), and American avocet (Recurvirostra americana)-generally bioaccumulated higher concentrations of contaminants in their eggs. Reproductive success and egg hatchability of night-herons and white-faced ibises in the Piute Ponds were similar to results observed at other western colonies. Deformities were observed in only one embryo in this study, but concentrations of contaminants evaluated in this ibis embryo were considered insufficient to have caused the deformities. Because clawed frogs, a primary prey item for night-herons at Piute Ponds, had no detectable levels of any OCs, it is likely that OCs found in night-heron eggs were acquired from the wintering grounds rather than from EAFB. The presence of isomers of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in ibis eggs indicated recent exposure, but invertebrates used for food by ibises were not sampled at Piute Ponds, and conclusions about the source of OCs in ibis eggs could not be made. Concentrations of contaminants in random and failed eggs of individual species were not different, and we concluded

  12. Assessment of Pradosia huberi effects on the reproductive system of male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Priscylla Silva; dos Santos, Flávia Luana Pereira; Rocha, Aldeíde de Oliveira Batista; Pita, João Carlos Lima Rodrigues; Xavier, Aline Lira; Macêdo, Cibério Landim; Jacob, Kerollayne Christtine; de Oliveira, Nayara Alves; de Medeiros, Alessandra Azevedo Nascimento; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; de Cássia da Silveira e Sá, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Pradosia huberi is a species found in the Amazon region and used as an antiulcerogenic and gastroprotective agent; however, phytochemical analysis has revealed the presence of compounds with potential toxic effects on the reproductive system. For the evaluation of the toxicity of P. huberi on male fertility, male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: one control (distilled water p.o.) and three treated (hydroalcoholic extract of the stem bark of P. Huberi (PH-HAE) at doses of 1.22, 6.1, and 30.5 mg/kg p.o.) once daily, for 63 days. In the last week of treatment (from the 57th to the 63rd day), the rats were mated with untreated virgin females (n = 30/group) and were killed on day 64. To investigate the toxic potential of PH-HAE on the reproductive system of rats the following parameters were evaluated: sperm production, genotoxicity, and general development. The production of gametes and their morphology did not differ between control and treated groups. Treatment with PH-HAE did not result in fewer vaginal plugs formed, indicating that the ability to mate was not impaired, but caused an increase of 14.3 and 10.8% in the preimplantation loss index, a reduction of 14.3 and 10.8% in the implantation index, and a reduction of 5.6 and 8.2% in the postimplantation loss index of female rats mated with rats treated with 6.1 and 30.5 mg/kg, respectively, indicating a possible toxic action of PH-HAE on the reproductive system of rats. PMID:26746900

  13. Chemoprotective effect of Crataegus monogyna aqueous extract against cyclophosphamide-induced reproductive toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shalizar Jalali

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCyclophosphamide (CP is extensively used as an antineoplastic agent for treatment of various cancers, as well as an immunosuppressive agent. However, despite its wide spectrum of clinical uses, CP is known to cause several adverse effects including reproductive toxicity in humans and experimental animals. Crataegus monogyna is one of the oldest medicinal plant has been shown to be cytoprotective by scavenging free radicals. The present study was conducted to assess whether Crataegus monogyna fruits aqueous extract with anti-oxidant properties could serve as a protective agent against reproductive toxicity during CP treatment in a rat model. Male Wistar rats were categorized into four groups. Two groups of rats were administered CP at a dose of 5 mg in 5 mL saline kg-1 per day for 28 days by oral gavages. One of the groups received Crataegus monogyna aqueous extract at a dose of 20 mg kg-1 per day orally four hours after cyclophosphamide administration. A vehicle-treated control group and a Crataegus monogyna control group were also included. The CP-treated group showed significant decreases in the body and organ weights and spermatogenic activities as well as many histological alterations. CP treatment also caused a significant decrease in sperm count and motility with an increase in dead and abnormal sperms. Moreover, significant decrease in serum levels of testosterone and increased serum concentrations of FSH, LH, LDH, CPK and SGOT were observed in CP-treated rats. Notably, Crataegus coadministration caused a partial recovery in above-mentioned parameters. These findings indicated that Crataegus might be partially protective against CP-induced reproductive toxicity.

  14. Reproductive Life Plan Counseling and Effective Contraceptive Use among Urban Women Utilizing Title X Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommaraju, Aalap; Malat, Jennifer; Mooney, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs recommend inclusion of reproductive life plan counseling (RLPC) in all well-woman health care visits, no studies have examined the effect of RLPC sessions on the decision to use effective contraception at publicly funded family planning sites. RLPC could be a particularly impactful intervention for disadvantaged social groups who are less likely to use the most effective contraceptive methods. Using data from 771 nonpregnant, non-pregnancy-seeking women receiving gynecological services in the Cincinnati-Hamilton County Reproductive Health and Wellness Program, multinomial logistic regression models compared users of nonmedical/no method with users of 1) the pill, patch, or ring, 2) depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and 3) long-acting reversible contraception (LARC). The effect of RLPC on the use of each form of contraception, and whether it mediated the effect of race/ethnicity and education on contraceptive use, was examined while controlling for age, insurance status, and birth history. The interaction between RLPC and race/ethnicity and the interaction between RLPC and educational attainment was also assessed. RLPC was not associated with contraceptive use. The data suggested that RLPC may increase LARC use over nonmedical/no method use. RLPC did not mediate or moderate the effect of race/ethnicity or educational attainment on contraceptive use in any comparison. In this system of publicly funded family planning clinics, RLPC seems not to encourage effective method use, providing no support for the efficacy of the RLPC intervention. The results suggest that this intervention requires further development and evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Is binding decline the main source of the ageing effect on prospective memory? A ride in a virtual town.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecouvey, Grégory; Gonneaud, Julie; Piolino, Pascale; Madeleine, Sophie; Orriols, Eric; Fleury, Philippe; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to improve our understanding of prospective memory (PM) changes in ageing, and to identify the cognitive correlates of PM decline, using a virtual environment, to provide a more realistic assessment than traditional laboratory tasks. Design: Thirty-five young and 29 older individuals exposed to a virtual town were asked to recall three event-based intentions with a strong link between prospective and retrospective components, three event-based intentions with a weak link, and three time-based intentions. They also underwent retrospective episodic memory, executive functions, binding in working memory, processing speed, and time estimation assessments. Results: Older individuals recalled fewer intentions than young adults. While age-related PM decline affected the recall of both prospective and retrospective components, the recall of the latter seemed more challenging for older individuals when the link was weak. This PM decline was linked to an age-related decline in the binding process in working memory, as well as in processing speed, executive functioning, and episodic memory, depending on the nature of intentions. Conclusion: PM appears to be sensitive to ageing, even when the device is thought to be ecological. This decline is particularly pronounced when controlled processes are needed.

  16. Effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive performance of dairy cattle in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J J; Breda, S Van; Vargas, B; Dolz, G; Frankena, K

    2005-12-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the effect of neosporosis on productive and reproductive parameters in dairy cows. Cows (n=2743) from 94 farms located in the most important dairy areas in Costa Rica were used in the study. The size of the herds ranged from 32 to 379 females (mean=110, median=125). An indirect ELISA was used to determine the serostatus of the cows towards Neospora caninum. The effect of neosporosis on milk production was analysed by a mixed linear model. In addition, the effects on calving interval (days) and calving to conception interval (days) were analysed by survival analysis. The risk of abortion in relation to N. caninum serostatus was assessed by logistic regression, with herd as a random effect. Overall, 1185 of 2743 cows (43.3%) were seropositive for Neospora. Eighty-nine of 94 (94.7%) farms were classified as Neospora-seropositive. It was estimated that cows seronegative to Neospora produced an additional 84.7L of milk (P=0.6). Serostatus did not have a significant effect on the length of the calving interval in the Cox proportional hazard survival analysis (Hazard ratio=1.2, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.4). The logistic regression model had a weak positive association between serostatus and abortion (OR 1.7, 95% CI: 0.8, 3.9), but did not show a strong association between serostatus and the number of services per conception (OR=0.95, 95% CI: 0.7, 1.3). In conclusion, there were no significant effects of Neospora serostatus on production and reproductive performance in this study.

  17. Effects of adult-derived carbohydrates, amino acids and micronutrients on female reproduction in a fruit-feeding butterfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerfeind, Stephanie S; Fischer, Klaus

    2005-05-01

    It is generally believed that butterflies (and other holometabolous insects) rely primarily on reserves accumulated during the larval stage for reproduction, whereas the carbohydrate-rich adult diet is thought to mainly cover energy requirements. In at least some species though, realization of the full reproductive potential is extensively affected by post-eclosion nutrition. While the importance of carbohydrates is fairly well understood, the role of adult-derived amino acids and micronutrients is controversial and largely unknown, respectively. We here focus on the effects of different adult diets on female reproduction in the tropical, fruit-feeding butterfly Bicyclus anynana (Nymphalidae). Carbohydrates were the most important adult-derived nutrients affecting reproduction. Adding amino acids, vitamins or minerals to sucrose-based solutions did not yield a reproductive output equivalent to that of fruit-fed females, which showed the highest performance throughout. This suggests that either not yet identified compounds of fruit substantially contribute to reproduction, or that resource congruence (the use of nutrient types in a specified ratio) rather than any specific nutrient component is of key importance. Apart from adult income, realized fecundity depended on egg size and longevity, with the former dominating when dietary quality was low, but the latter when quality was high. Thus, the egg size-number trade-off seems to be affected by female nutrition.

  18. Effects of within-colony competition on body size asymmetries and reproductive skew in a social spider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinsted, L; Bilde, T

    2013-03-01

    Reproductive partitioning is a key component of social organization in groups of cooperative organisms. In colonies of permanently social spiders of the genus Stegodyphus less than half of the females reproduce, while all females, including nonreproducers, perform suicidal allo-maternal care. Some theoretical models suggest that reproductive skew is a result of contest competition within colonies, leading to size hierarchies where only the largest females become reproducers. We investigated the effect of competition on within-group body size variation over six months in S. dumicola, by manipulating food level and colony size. We found no evidence that competition leads to increased size asymmetry within colonies, suggesting that contest competition may not be the proximate explanation for reproductive skew. Within-colony body size variation was high already in the juvenile stage, and did not increase over the course of the experiment, suggesting that body size variation is shaped at an early stage. This might facilitate task specialization within colonies and ensure colony-level reproductive output by early allocation of reproductive roles. We suggest that reproductive skew in social spiders may be an adaptation to sociality selected through inclusive fitness benefits of allo-maternal care as well as colony-level benefits maximizing colony survival and production.

  19. Djungarian hamsters ( Phodopus sungorus) are not susceptible to stimulating effects of 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone on reproductive organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Victoria; Scherbarth, Frank; Jähnig, Susanne; Kastens, Sabine; Steinlechner, Stephan

    2014-02-01

    The secondary plant metabolite 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (6-MBOA) is abundant in vegetative parts of monocotyledons emerging in spring. This grazing protective has been shown to promote gonadal growth and, thus enable precise alignment of reproductive activity with favorable environmental conditions in a variety of seasonally breeding rodent species. Feeding and breeding ecology make the Djungarian hamster ( Phodopus sungorus) a potential candidate using 6-MBOA as an acute environmental cue to optimize reproductive timing when photorefractoriness induces reproductive recrudescence. Therefore, four different experiments were designed to examine whether the hamsters' reproductive organs are responsive to oral 6-MBOA administration under different photoperiodic conditions. Only under a long photoperiod, we found a slight increase in uterine weights. In a short photoperiod, 6-MBOA-treated hamsters showed a slight body weight gain without a change in uterine weights. However, these marginal effects are likely not to be of ecophysiological significance for reproductive timing. The results are in agreement with the common view that the annual changes in photoperiod length are not only the predominant environmental cue for Djungarian hamsters, but are also sufficient to synchronize reproductive efforts with favorable breeding conditions in highly predictable climates like the continental Asian steppes.

  20. Effects of selection for blood serum IGF-I concentration on reproductive performance of female Angus beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Davis, M E; Moeller, S J; Ottobre, J S

    2013-09-01

    Reproductive performance of animals affects lifetime productivity. However, improvement of reproductive traits via direct selection is generally slow due to low heritability. Therefore, identification of indicator traits for reproductive performance may enhance genetic response. Previous studies showed that serum IGF-I concentration is a candidate indicator for growth and reproductive traits. The objective of our study was to estimate the variances or covariances of IGF-I concentration with reproductive traits. Data were collected from a divergent selection experiment for serum IGF-I concentration at the Eastern Agricultural Research Station owned by The Ohio State University. The study included a total of 2,662 calves in the 1989 to 2005 calf crops. Variance or covariance components were estimated for direct and maternal genetic effects, maternal environment effects, environment effects, and phenotypic effects using an animal model in a multiple-trait, derivative-free, restricted maximum likelihood (MTDFREML, Boldman et al., 1995) computer program. Direct additive genetic correlations suggest that selection for greater IGF-I concentration (heritability = 0.50 ± 0.07) could lead to increased conception rate (heritability = 0.11 ± 0.06, r = 0.32, P < 0.001) and calving rate (heritability = 0.13 ± 0.06, r = 0.43, P < 0.001) and decreased age at first calving in heifers (heritability = 0.35 ± 0.20, r = -0.40, P < 0.001).

  1. A Pilot Study: The Beneficial Effects of Combined Statin-exercise Therapy on Cognitive Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Mild Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Kensuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Oka, Hideki; Hamada, Mari; Iwasaki, Yuri; Horio, Eiji; Rokutanda, Taku; Nakamura, Shinichi; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S; Ogawa, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Objective Hypercholesterolemia, a risk factor in cognitive impairment, can be treated with statins. However, cognitive decline associated with "statins" (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors) is a clinical concern. This pilot study investigated the effects of combining statins and regular exercise on cognitive function in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with prior mild cognitive decline. Methods We recruited 43 consecutive CAD patients with mild cognitive decline. These patients were treated with a statin and weekly in-hospital aerobic exercise for 5 months. We measured serum lipids, exercise capacity, and cognitive function using the mini mental state examination (MMSE). Results Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly decreased, and maximum exercise capacity (workload) was significantly increased in patients with CAD and mild cognitive decline after treatment compared with before. Combined statin-exercise therapy significantly increased the median (range) MMSE score from 24 (22-25) to 25 (23-27) across the cohort (pcognition. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for age >65 years, sex, and presence of diabetes mellitus, a decrease in BMI during statin-exercise therapy was significantly correlated with an increase in the MMSE score (odds ratio: 4.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-20.0; ptherapy may help improve cognitive dysfunction in patients with CAD and pre-existing mild cognitive decline.

  2. Sex-specific effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on reproduction but not lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kim; McClure, Colin; Priest, Nicholas K; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    Modest dietary restriction extends lifespan (LS) in a diverse range of taxa and typically has a larger effect in females than males. Traditionally, this has been attributed to a stronger trade-off between LS and reproduction in females than in males that is mediated by the intake of calories. Recent studies, however, suggest that it is the intake of specific nutrients that extends LS and mediates this trade-off. Here, we used the geometric framework (GF) to examine the sex-specific effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on LS and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that LS was maximized at a high intake of C and a low intake of P in both sexes, whereas nutrient intake had divergent effects on reproduction. Male offspring production rate and LS were maximized at the same intake of nutrients, whereas female egg production rate was maximized at a high intake of diets with a P:C ratio of 1:2. This resulted in larger differences in nutrient-dependent optima for LS and reproduction in females than in males, as well as an optimal intake of nutrients for lifetime reproduction that differed between the sexes. Under dietary choice, the sexes followed similar feeding trajectories regulated around a P:C ratio of 1:4. Consequently, neither sex reached their nutritional optimum for lifetime reproduction, suggesting intralocus sexual conflict over nutrient optimization. Our study shows clear sex differences in the nutritional requirements of reproduction in D. melanogaster and joins the growing list of studies challenging the role of caloric restriction in extending LS. PMID:25808180

  3. Mobility of moose-comparing the effects of wolf predation risk, reproductive status, and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikenros, Camilla; Balogh, Gyöngyvér; Sand, Håkan; Nicholson, Kerry L; Månsson, Johan

    2016-12-01

    In a predator-prey system, prey species may adapt to the presence of predators with behavioral changes such as increased vigilance, shifting habitats, or changes in their mobility. In North America, moose (Alces alces) have shown behavioral adaptations to presence of predators, but such antipredator behavioral responses have not yet been found in Scandinavian moose in response to the recolonization of wolves (Canis lupus). We studied travel speed and direction of movement of GPS-collared female moose (n = 26) in relation to spatiotemporal differences in wolf predation risk, reproductive status, and time of year. Travel speed was highest during the calving (May-July) and postcalving (August-October) seasons and was lower for females with calves than females without calves. Similarly, time of year and reproductive status affected the direction of movement, as more concentrated movement was observed for females with calves at heel, during the calving season. We did not find support for that wolf predation risk was an important factor affecting moose travel speed or direction of movement. Likely causal factors for the weak effect of wolf predation risk on mobility of moose include high moose-to-wolf ratio and intensive hunter harvest of the moose population during the past century.

  4. Effect of time for mating and gestation length on reproductive efficiency in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimatsu, Y; Yuzawa, H; Aruga, K; Nakura, M

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of time for mating and gestation length on reproductive efficiency in dogs. Groups of eight, six and six beagle bitches were mated with a total of three sires on days 3, 5 and 7, respectively, after the luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. All the bitches whelped successfully. The gestation lengths (the intervals from the LH surge to the whelping) were 65.1 +/- 1.9, 65.5 +/- 1.9 and 68.0 +/- 1.8 days, respectively. This length of mating 7 days after the LH surge was significantly longer than that of mating 3 and 5 days after the LH surge (p < 0.05). The litter sizes were 5.5 +/- 2.2, 6.2 +/- 1.9 and 4.8 +/- 2.1, respectively and there was no significant difference between any of the groups. In conclusion, mating 3-7 days after a bitch's LH surge results in a good reproductive efficiency and the intervals from the LH surge to the whelping of mating 7 days after the LH surge shows a longer day significantly in comparison with mating 3 and 5 days after the LH surge.

  5. Social security survivors benefits: the effects of reproductive pathways and intestacy law on attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Jason D; Gillen, Martie

    2013-01-01

    Most minor children are eligible for Social Security survivors benefits if a wage-earning parent dies, but eligibility of children not in utero at the time of death is more nuanced. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes concerning access to Social Security survivors benefits in the context of posthumous reproduction. A probability sample of 540 Florida households responded to a multiple-segment factorial vignette designed to examine the effects of state intestacy laws and five reproductive pathways - normative, posthumous birth, cryopreserved embryo, cryopreserved gametes, and posthumous gamete retrieval - on attitudes toward eligibility for the Social Security survivors benefits. Broad support was found for the survivors benefits following normative and posthumous birth pathways, but attitudes were decidedly less favorable when the child was not in utero at the time of parental death. In addition, in stark contrast to the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in Astrue v. Capato, the vast majority of respondents did not believe state intestacy laws should determine eligibility for Social Security survivors benefits.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of varicocele surgery in the era of assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Chiles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of innovative techniques for addressing infertility has made for exciting times in the arena of andrology. The success of microTESE for retrieving sperm has enabled azoospermic men to have the opportunity to father biological children when it was previously impossible. The ability to offer a variety of assisted reproductive techniques that includes intracytoplasmic sperm injection has opened the door for couples with male factor infertility who were otherwise untreatable. With the multitude of options available to infertile couples, however, comes an unsurprising degree of controversy regarding what treatments should be offered and when. Complicating the picture is the question of if and when varicocele repair should be undertaken, and the financial implications of the treatment decisions that are made. The infertile couple with varicocele warrants careful consideration. The overall efficacy of varicocele repair as well as cost-effectiveness of repair compared to immediate microTESE in azoospermic men and assisted reproductive technology in men with suboptimal semen parameters will be reviewed.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of varicocele surgery in the era of assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiles, Kelly A; Schlegel, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    The advent of innovative techniques for addressing infertility has made for exciting times in the arena of andrology. The success of microTESE for retrieving sperm has enabled azoospermic men to have the opportunity to father biological children when it was previously impossible. The ability to offer a variety of assisted reproductive techniques that includes intracytoplasmic sperm injection has opened the door for couples with male factor infertility who were otherwise untreatable. With the multitude of options available to infertile couples, however, comes an unsurprising degree of controversy regarding what treatments should be offered and when. Complicating the picture is the question of if and when varicocele repair should be undertaken, and the financial implications of the treatment decisions that are made. The infertile couple with varicocele warrants careful consideration. The overall efficacy of varicocele repair as well as cost-effectiveness of repair compared to immediate microTESE in azoospermic men and assisted reproductive technology in men with suboptimal semen parameters will be reviewed.

  8. Effects of Low-Intensity Ultrasound on Cell Proliferation and Reproductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨春梅; 蒋学慧; 杜康; 蔡启亮

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound has been widely used in clinics. Cellular responses to low-intensity ultrasound are parame-ter-dependent. Proper parameter setting is vital to its exact use. To get guidelines for parameter setting, low-intensity ultrasound stimulation on the proliferation and reproductivity of HepG2 and 3T3 cells in vitro was exam-ined with a 1.06 MHz-generator by changing the parameters(including intensity, pulse repetition frequency and duty cycle)in a wide range. Cell viability and reproductivity at different time after sonication were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide(MTT)and colony formation assay to indicate time-related proliferation. The results illustrate that ultrasound irradiation at 0.4—0.8 W/cm2 and high pulse repetition frequency(100 Hz)can facilitate cell proliferation, while above 0.8 W/cm2 would resist it. The extent of resistance closely correlated with duty cycle and pulse repetition frequency. Resistance effect at low pulse repetition fre-quency(1 Hz)is greater than that at high pulse repetition frequency(100 Hz)and not time-related. The influence of high pulse repetition frequency is time-accumulated, indicating cellular process involved. These findings would provide valuable guidelines for the application of low-intensity ultrasound in stem cell transformation and tissue engineering.

  9. Inhibitory effects of salicylic acid on Meloidogyne javanica reproduction in tomato plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslemi, F.; Fatemy, S.; Bernard, F.

    2016-11-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), play a major role in loss of agricultural production. Natural substances, such as salicylic acid (SA) could possibly be involved in inducing host plant resistance against nematodes. The present study is concerned with exploring the effects of varying concentrations of SA as seed priming and soil drench on tomato growth parameters and the reproduction of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica. SA at 50 μM concentration caused only 2% of juvenile mortality under in vitro conditions. SA applied as 50 μM seed treatment caused 95% and, as a soil drench, 78% reduction in the number of egg masses that formed on tomato plants. The numbers of galls were reduced to a lesser extent. Final nematode density per gram of soil was reduced to less than 1 by the 50 μM SA seed treatment, and in other treatments decreased by between 70 and 88% compared with control plants. Our results indicate SA has potential to lower root knot nematode reproduction in tomato, and seed priming is a fairly easy method to work with. (Author)

  10. Effects of β-endosulfan on the growth and reproduction of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhihua; Jiao, Shaojun; Kong, Deyang; Shan, Zhengjun; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2011-11-01

    Because of persistent organic pollution in aquatic environments, the widely used organochlorine pesticide endosulfan, which is a potential endocrine disruptor, is expected to pose a significant risk to aquatic organisms. In the present study, we explored the potential endocrine-disrupting risk of β-endosulfan by investigating its effect on the growth, reproduction, plasma vitellogenin, and organ histology of adult zebrafish. We found that, although β-endosulfan did not significantly affect the growth of zebrafish, it greatly decreased the hatching rate, even at a concentration as low as 10 ng/L. Interestingly, the decrease of the hatching rate was highly correlated with pathological alterations of the testes. Additionally, the values of the gonadosomatic index were significantly reduced in female zebrafish treated with 200 ng/L β-endosulfan, which was also closely associated with ovarian histological changes. More importantly, a significant increase in the level of vitellogenin was observed in all male fish treated with β-endosulfan. Based on these findings, we conclude that β-endosulfan severely affects the reproductive function of zebrafish and the synthesis of vitellogenin in the liver, and thus, β-endosulfan has a serious endocrine disruption function in zebrafish.

  11. Effects of butachlor on reproduction and hormone levels in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhua; Liu, Shaoying; Zhou, Shengli; Wang, Minghua; Zhu, Guonian

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a chloracetamide herbicide, is widely used in China. In the present study, paired adult male and female zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to various concentrations of butachlor (0, 25, 50 and 100 μg/L) for 30 days, and the effects on reproduction and endocrine disruption were evaluated using fecundity, condition factor (CF), gonadosomatic index (GSI), liver somatic index (LSI), plasma vitellogenin (VTG), sex steroids and thyroid hormone levels as endpoints. Our results showed that the mean fecundity rates were significantly decreased at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor during the 30-day exposure period. At the end of the exposure period, no significant changes were observed in CF and LSI in both females and males, while GSI was significantly reduced in males at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor. At 100 μg/L butachlor, plasma testosterone (T) and 17β-estradiol (E2) levels were significantly decreased in females, while plasma VTG level was significantly increased in males. Plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) levels were significantly increased at 50 and 100 μg/L butachlor in males, and at 100 μg/L in females. This work demonstrated that butachlor adversely affected the normal reproductive success of zebrafish, and disrupted the thyroid and sex steroid endocrine systems, which provides the basis for the estimated ecological risk during butachlor exposure.

  12. Adverse Effect of Antifouling Compounds on the Reproductive Mechanisms of the Ascidian Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Gallo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization and embryo development that occur in sea water are sensitive to xenobiotics from anthropogenic sources. In this work, we evaluated the influence of two antifouling biocides, tributyltin (TBT and diuron, on the reproductive mechanisms of the marine invertebrate Ciona intestinalis. By using electrophysiological techniques, we examined the impact of these compounds on the electrical properties of the mature oocytes and of events occurring at fertilization. With different toxicity assays, we studied the effect of the two biocides on the gametes by evaluating fertilization rate and embryo development. Results show that sodium (Na+ currents were significantly reduced by either of the two biocides, whereas conductance was significantly increased. The fertilization current frequency and amplitude, fertilization rate and larval development were affected only by TBT. This study suggests that: (i the two biocides affect either the electrical properties of the oocyte plasma membrane and the reproductive success representing a risk factor for the survival of the species exposed to environmental pollution; (ii the ascidian Ciona intestinalis may represent a good model organism to test toxicity of marine pollutants. Possible mechanisms of action of the two biocides are discussed.

  13. The effects of phthalates in the cardiovascular and reproductive systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, Melissa; Feiteiro, Joana; Verde, Ignacio; Cairrao, Elisa

    2016-09-01

    Every year millions of tons of plastic are produced around the world and humans are increasingly exposed to them. This constant exposure to plastics has raised some concerns against human health, particularly when it comes to phthalates. These compounds have endocrine-disrupting properties, as they have the ability to bind molecular targets in the body and interfere with hormonal function and quantity. The main use of phthalates is to give flexibility to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) polymers. Phthalates are found in a variety of industrial and consumer products, and as they are not covalently bound to the plastic, phthalates contaminate the environment from which human exposure occurs. Studies in human and animal populations suggest a correlation between phthalate exposure and adverse health outcomes, particularly at the reproductive and cardiovascular systems, however there is much less information about the phthalate toxicity of the later. Thus, the main purpose of this review is to present the studies relating the effects already stated of phthalates on the cardiovascular and reproductive systems, and also present the link between these two systems.

  14. Effect of the dietary electrolyte balance on the reproductive response of rabbit does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rizzi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral requirements of rabbits have been recently reviewed (Mateos and de Blas, 1998, but there is limited information on some macroelements of the diet. Furthermore there is a lack of indications on the effect of the dietary electrolyte balance, dEB (dEB= Na+K-Cl, on the reproductive response of does and bucks and there are few works on the zootechnical performance of growing rabbits (Harris et al., 1984; Bonsembiante et al., 1989. Currently, only Ca, P and Na are taken into account in practical formulation of rabbit diets. Current estimates indicate a range of 6.5-10.0, 2.0-2.5 and 2.8-4.8 g/kg, respectively for K, Na and Cl. Rabbit presents differences from other mammals fed the same type of diet because it produces more alkaline urine. So the rabbit is particularly vulnerable to acid loads and therefore it is important to avoid imbalances among these three minerals that might induce problems to kidneys and reproductive response or decreasing of feed intake...

  15. Effects of individual and population parameters on reproductive success in three sexually deceptive orchid species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewoestijne, S; Róis, A S; Caperta, A; Baguette, M; Tyteca, D

    2009-05-01

    Reproductive success (RS) in orchids in general, and in non-rewarding species specifically, is extremely low. RS is pollinator and pollination limited in food deceptive orchids, but this has rarely been studied in sexually deceptive orchid species. Here, we tested the effects of several individual (plant height, inflorescence size, nearest neighbour distance and flower position) and population (patch geometry, population density and size) parameters on RS in three sexually deceptive Ophrys (Orchidaceae) species. Inter-specific differences were observed in RS of flowers situated in the upper versus the lower part of the inflorescence, likely due to species-specific pollinator behaviour. For all three species examined, RS increased with increasing plant height, inflorescence size and nearest neighbour distance. RS generally increased with decreasing population density and increasing patch elongation. Given these results, we postulate that pollinator availability, rather than pollinator learning, is the most limiting factor in successful reproduction for sexually deceptive orchids. Our results also suggest that olfactory 'display' (i.e. versus optical display), in terms of inflorescence size (and co-varying plant height), plays a key role in individual RS of sexually deceptive orchids. In this regard, several hypotheses are suggested and discussed.

  16. The effect of dry period length on productive, reproductive and health parameters of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Skrzypek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the analysis of effects of dry period length on milk performance, fertility and health of Polish Holstein-Friesian cows. The analysis was carried out on data from 426 cows, managed on a free-stall farm. All animals were dried off under the protection of antibiotics that were applied into mammary gland after the last milking. Cows with the shortest dry period (≤ 42 days produced least milk with the highest protein content and the highest somatic cell count, they also had most favourable reproduction parameters The middle-length dry period (43–70 days was associated with the highest milk production, and the longest period (> 70 days was associated with the lowest somatic cell count and the least favourable reproduction parameters. Results of this study show that there is no optimal universal length of dry period, and therefore in practical dairy farming it should be matched if possible to particular groups or even individual animals.

  17. Inhibitory effects of salicylic acid on Meloidogyne javanica reproduction in tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddigheh Fatemy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp., play a major role in loss of agricultural production. Natural substances, such as salicylic acid (SA could possibly be involved in inducing host plant resistance against nematodes. The present study is concerned with exploring the effects of varying concentrations of SA as seed priming and soil drench on tomato growth parameters and the reproduction of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne javanica. SA at 50 μM concentration caused only 2% of juvenile mortality under in vitro conditions. SA applied as 50 μM seed treatment caused 95% and, as a soil drench, 78% reduction in the number of egg masses that formed on tomato plants. The numbers of galls were reduced to a lesser extent. Final nematode density per gram of soil was reduced to less than 1 by the 50 μM SA seed treatment, and in other treatments decreased by between 70 and 88% compared with control plants. Our results indicate SA has potential to lower root knot nematode reproduction in tomato, and seed priming is a fairly easy method to work with.

  18. Effect of supplemented diet with maturation plant extract on reproductive performance of Etroplus suratansis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Albin Dhas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to understand the effect of herbal maturation diet on reproductive successes in Etroplus suratensis. Three herbal maturation diets (EXD1, EXD2, EXD3 and one control diet (EXD0 were prepared with different combinations of herbal ingredients and normal diet ingredients. The experimental animal were observed for the success in reproductive performance like Gonado Somatic Index (GSI, fecundity, striping response, percentage of fertilization, percentage of hatching, percentage of deformed and formed larvae, volume of milt, number of sperm cell, percentage of sperm motility, sperm survival time, percentage of active sperm. The EXD3 diet combination increased the GSI (3.14, fecundity (1325, striping responds (87.23, percentage of fertilization (96.45 percentage of hatching (91.89, percentage of formed larvae (87.53, volume of milt (287 μl, number of sperm cell per μl (1912 percentage of sperm motility (94.18, time of sperm survival (72′15″ and percentage of active sperm cells (92.27 and reduced deformed larva percentage (4.36. From this observation it is more evident that the combination of EXD3 was the best combination and it could be utilized for the formulation of maturation diets for E. suratensis.

  19. Bankruptcy prediction: The influence of the year prior to failure selected for model building and the effects in a period of economic decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pompe, P.P.M.; Bilderbeek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Using large amounts of data from small and medium-sized industrial firms, this study examines two aspects of bankruptcy prediction: the influence of the year prior to failure selected for model building and the effects in a period of economic decline. The results show that especially models

  20. Bankruptcy prediction: The influence of the year prior to failure selected for model building and the effects in a period of economic decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pompe, P.P.M.; Bilderbeek, J.

    2005-01-01

    Using large amounts of data from small and medium-sized industrial firms, this study examines two aspects of bankruptcy prediction: the influence of the year prior to failure selected for model building and the effects in a period of economic decline. The results show that especially models generate

  1. The effects of cues from kingsnakes on the reproductive effort of house mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Wallace STARKEⅢ; Michael H.FERKIN

    2013-01-01

    It is not clear if rodents express inducible defenses in response to reptilian predators such as snakes.We tested the hypothesis that adult house mice Mus musculus decrease aspects of their reproductive effort upon 1 hour of exposure every 48 hours for a 25-day period to the fecal material and shed skins of a euryphagous ophidian predator,the kingsnake Lampropeltis getula,that had been fed mice.We found no significant differences in the total number of offspring born,the number of pups per litter,and the mean weight of pups in litters born to male and female mice that were exposed to predator cues and those mice that were not exposed to such cues.The lack of an inducible response may be associated with the low cost of an effective defense,or the lack of an effective defense against a generalist snake predator [Current Zoology 59 (1):135-141,2013].

  2. Women on the Other Side of War and Poverty: Its Effect on the Health of Reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Cevirme

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available War and poverty are ‘extraordinary conditions created by human intervention’ and ‘preventable public health problems.’ War and poverty have many negative effects on human health, especially women’s health. Health problems arising due to war and poverty are being observed as sexual abuse and rape, all kinds of violence and subsequent gynecologic and obstetrics problems with physiological and psychological courses, and pregnancies as the result of undesired but forced or obliged marriages and even rapes. Certainly, unjust treatment such as being unable to gain footing on the land it is lived (asylum seeker, refugee, etc. and being deprived of social security, citizenship rights and human rights brings about the deprivation of access to health services and of provision of service intended for gynecology and obstetrics. The purpose of this article is to address effects of war and poverty on the health of reproduction of women and to offer scientific contribution and solutions.

  3. Effects of 4-nonylphenol in drinking water on the reproductive capacity of Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan; Shan, Zhengjun; Zhou, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Li, Pengfu; Lu, Shan

    2017-05-01

    4-nonylphenol (4-NP), a major degradation product of Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs), is widespread in environment. In this study, the effects of long-term 4-NP exposure in drinking water on Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica) were investigated. A total of 45 quails were evenly divided into 15 groups and administrated with various doses (0.1 μg L(-1), 1.0 μg L(-1), 10 μg L(-1) and 100 μg L(-1), which reflected the environmental concentrations of 4-NP) of 4-NP in drinking water. The results showed that 4-NP in drinking water had no effect on quails' food intake, but significantly decreased the quails' body weights (P water impaired the reproductive ability of Japanese quails, and led to pathological lesions in the male gonads. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Post-abortion contraception: effects of contraception services and reproductive intention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela

    2016-02-01

    Contraceptive counseling and the supply of contraceptive methods are part of post-abortion care and positively influence the subsequent use of contraceptive methods. Studies showing such evidence have been conducted predominantly in countries with no legal restrictions on abortion and with adequate care for women that terminate a pregnancy. However, little is known about contraceptive practices in contexts where abortion is illegal, as in Brazil, in which post-abortion contraceptive care is inadequate. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of contraceptive care on male condom use and oral and injectable contraceptives in the six months post-abortion, considering reproductive intention. The results showed that contraceptive care only has a positive effect on the use of oral contraceptives in the first six months post-abortion, as long as the woman had a medical consultation in the same month in which she received information on contraception. One or the other intervention alone had no significant impact.

  5. Effects of endosulfan and ethanol on the reproduction of the snail Biomphalaria tenagophila: a multigeneration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo Cyrino; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe; Paumgartten, Francisco Jose Roma

    2009-04-01

    Endosulfan (END) is an insecticide used in agriculture and as a wood preservative. Since END is practically insoluble in water, ethanol (ETOH) is often employed as a carrier solvent to spike it in the test medium in aquatic toxicity assays. In this study were investigated the effects of END and ETOH on the reproduction of the freshwater snail Biomphalaria tenagophila exposed over three successive generations. END (0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 mg L(-1)) was dissolved in the medium water using ETOH (up to 19.8 mg L(-1)) as carrier solvent. ETOH (19.8, 198, 1980 mg L(-1)) alone was tested as well. Adult snails (F(0)-generation) were exposed to END and ETOH for 8 weeks. The F(1)-generation continued to be exposed from embryo to reproductive maturity, while their descendants (F(2)) were exposed until day 10 after spawning. Effects on the fecundity (8-week production of eggs and egg-masses) of mature F(0) and F(1) snails were evaluated. Developmental toxicity was investigated in F(1) and F(2) embryos. END at the highest level tested (0.1 mg L(-1)) inhibited egg production by F(0) and F(1) snails. ETOH at levels 198 mg L(-1) also reduced fecundity of F(0) and F(1) an effect that was apparently aggravated by exposure over successive generations. END 0.1 mg L(-1) increased mortality and malformations and decreased hatching among F(1) embryos. ETOH drastically reduced the proportion of hatchings among F(2) embryos. The study-derived NOECs (no-observed-effect-concentrations) for END was 0.01 mg L(-1) (reduction in fecundity), and for ETOH were 19.8 mg L(-1) for reduction in fecundity and toxicity (hatching retardation).

  6. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) greenhouse tuber production as an assay for asexual reproduction effects from herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2010-01-01

    The present study determined whether young potato plants can be used as an assay to indicate potential effects of pesticides on asexual reproduction. Solanum tuberosum (Russet Burbank) plants were grown from seed pieces in a mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plants were treated with herbicides (cloransulam, dicamba, glyphosate, imazapyr, primsulfuron, sulfometuron, or tribenuron) at simulated drift levels [effective concentrations producing a 25% potato tuber fresh weight (EC25) of 0.00038, 0.0016, and 0.0021 x f.a.r. of 1,124, 52, and 9 g active ingredient hectare(-1) (g a.i. HA(-1)), respectively. Primisulfuron, dicamba, and cloransulam also significantly reduced tuber fresh weight, but with higher EC25 values of 0.011, 0.07, and 0.010 to 0.2 x f.a.r. of 40, 558, and 18 g a.i. HA(-1), respectively. Glyphosate had little effect on tuber fresh weight, with a significant reduction in only one experiment. Sulfometuron reduced tuber fresh weight at an EC25 value lower than the EC25 values for shoot dry weight or plant height. For other herbicides, the reduction in tuber fresh weight occurred within the range of EC25 values for other responses. Although additional experiments are required to develop further a phytotoxicity test, these results indicated that tuber production in young potato plants (harvested approximately 42 DAE) may be an effective assay for below-ground asexual reproductive responses to herbicides, especially acetolactate synthase inhibitors.

  7. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora extracts on reproductive parameters and spermatic blood flow in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturapanich, G; Chaiyakul, S; Verawatnapakul, V; Pholpramool, C

    2008-10-01

    Krachaidum (KD, Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker), a native plant of Southeast Asia, is traditionally used to enhance male sexual function. However, only few scientific data in support of this anecdote have been reported. The present study investigated the effects of feeding three different extracts of KD (alcohol, hexane, and water extracts) for 3-5 weeks on the reproductive organs, the aphrodisiac activity, fertility, sperm motility, and blood flow to the testis of male rats. Sexual performances (mount latency, mount frequency, ejaculatory latency, post-ejaculatory latency) and sperm motility were assessed by a video camera and computer-assisted sperm analysis respectively, while blood flow to the testis was measured by a directional pulsed Doppler flowmeter. The results showed that all extracts of KD had virtually no effect on the reproductive organ weights even after 5 weeks. However, administration of the alcohol extract at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight (BW)/day for 4 weeks significantly decreased mount and ejaculatory latencies when compared with the control. By contrast, hexane and water extracts had no influence on any sexual behavior parameters. All types of extracts of KD had no effect on fertility or sperm motility. On the other hand, alcohol extract produced a significant increase in blood flow to the testis without affecting the heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure. In a separate study, an acute effect of alcohol extract of KD on blood flow to the testis was investigated. Intravenous injection of KD at doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg BW caused dose-dependent increases in blood flow to the testis. The results indicate that alcohol extract of KD had an aphrodisiac activity probably via a marked increase in blood flow to the testis.

  8. Effluent monitoring at a bleached kraft mill: directions for best management practices for eliminating effects on fish reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Pierre H; Kovacs, Tibor G; O'connor, Brian I; Semeniuk, Sharon; Hewitt, L Mark; Maclatchy, Deborah L; McMaster, Mark E; Parrott, Joanne L; van den Heuvel, Michael R; Van Der Kraak, Glen J

    2011-01-01

    A long-term monitoring study was conducted on effluents from a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill located in Eastern Canada. The study was designed to gain insights into temporal effluent variability with respect to fish reproduction as it related to production upsets, mill restarts and conditions affecting biological treatment performance. Final effluent quality was monitored between February 2007 and May 2009 using biochemical and chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids, resin and fatty acids, a gas chromatographic profiling index, and the presence of methyl substituted 2-cyclopentenones. Selected effluent samples were evaluated for effects on fish reproduction (egg production) using a shortened version of the adult fathead minnow reproductive test. The events relating to negative effects on fish reproduction were upsets of the pulping liquor recovery system resulting in black liquor losses, operational upsets of the hardwood line resulting in the loss of oxygen delignification filtrates, and conditions that reduced the performance of biological treatment (e.g., mill shutdown and low ambient temperatures). The reductions in egg production observed in fathead minnow were associated with biochemical oxygen demand values > 20 mg/L, GC profiling indices > 1.2 and the presence of methyl-substituted 2-cyclopentenones at concentrations > 100 μg/L. This study demonstrated the importance of both in-plant measures for controlling the loss of organics as well as the optimum operation of biological effluent treatment for eliminating effluent-related effects on fish reproduction (egg production) in the laboratory.

  9. Estrogenic environmental endocrine-disrupting chemical effects on reproductive neuroendocrine function and dysfunction across the life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Sarah M; Gore, Andrea C

    2007-06-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are natural or synthetic compounds that interfere with the normal function of an organism's endocrine system. Many EDCs are resistant to biodegradation, due to their structural stability, and persist in the environment. The focus of this review is on natural and artificial EDCs that act through estrogenic mechanisms to affect reproductive neuroendocrine systems. This endocrine axis comprises the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), pituitary gonadotropins, and gonadal steroid hormones, including estrogens. Although it is not surprising that EDCs that mimic or antagonize estrogen receptors may exert actions upon reproductive targets, the mechanisms for these effects are complex and involve all three levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) system. Nevertheless, considerable evidence links exposure to estrogenic environmental EDCs with neuroendocrine reproductive deficits in wildlife and in humans. The effects of an EDC are variable across the life cycle of an animal, and are particularly potent when exposure occurs during fetal and early postnatal development. As a consequence, abnormal sexual differentiation, disrupted reproductive function, or inappropriate sexual behavior may be detected later in life. This review will cover the effects of two representative classes of estrogenic EDCs, phytoestrogens and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on neuroendocrine reproductive function, from molecules to behavior, across the vertebrate life cycle. Finally, we identify the gaps of knowledge in this field and suggest future directions for study.

  10. The Decline of Academic Motivation during Adolescence: An Accelerated Longitudinal Cohort Analysis on the Effect of Psychological Need Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnambs, Timo; Hanfstingl, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents typically exhibit a marked decline in academic intrinsic motivation throughout their school careers. Following self-determination theory, it is hypothesised that traditional school environments insufficiently satisfy three basic psychological needs of youths during maturation, namely the needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness.…

  11. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  12. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Har