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Sample records for reprocessing plant trp

  1. Safety evaluation of Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP). Report of safety evaluation of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Takamichi; Maki, Akira; Nojiri, Ichiro

    1999-02-01

    The fire and explosion incident of the bituminization facility happened in March 1997 although JNC had taken enough care of the safety of TRP. JNC reflected on it and decided to evaluate the safety of TRP voluntarily. This evaluation has included five activities, that is, (1) confirmation of the structure and organization of TRP, (2) research of the data for operation, radiation and maintenance of TRP, (3) research of reflection of the accidents and troubles which have happened at the past, (4) evaluation on the prevention system, (5) evaluation on the mitigation system. We publish this report to contribute to inheritance of accumulated knowledge and techniques from generation to generation, and remind us of lesson from the fire and explosion incident of the bituminization. (author)

  2. Evaluation on maintenance technology developed in Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) has been processing 1,140 tons of spent fuels, including 29tons of Fugen MOX fuels, since the beginning of its active operation in Sept.1977. For 30 years operation of TRP, many technological problems have been overcome to obtain the stable and reliable operation. This knowledge of maintenance technology could contribute to the safety and stable operation of Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP), as well as to the design and construction of the next reprocessing plant. (author)

  3. The 4th technological meeting of Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Tohru; Maki, Akira; Shibata, Satomi; Yatogi, Hideo; Nyui, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Takakazu; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Ohzeki, Tatsuya

    2001-11-01

    ''The 4th technological meeting of Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP)'' was held in JNFL Rokkasho site on October 11 th , 2001. The report contains the proceedings, transparencies and questionnaires of the meeting. This time, we reported about ''Maintenance and repair results of Tokai Reprocessing Plant'' based on technology and knowledge accumulated in Tokai Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  4. Reprocessing plants safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, A.G.; Leighton, C.; Millington, D.

    1989-01-01

    The reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel at British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) Sellafield site consists of a number of relatively self-contained activities carried out in separate plants across the site. The physical conditions and time scales applied in reprocessing and storage make it relatively benign. The potential for minor releases of radioactivity under fault conditioning is minimised by plant design definition of control procedures, training and supervision. The risks to both the general public and workforce are shown to be low with all the safety criteria being met. Normal operating conditions also have the potential for some occupational radiation exposure and the plant and workers are monitored continuously. Exposure levels have been reduced steadily and will continue to fall with plant improvements. (U.K.)

  5. PSA application on the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Michihiko; Nakano, Takafumi; Morimoto, Kazuyuki; Nojiri, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    The Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) has been carrying out to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety. As a part of the PSR, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methodology has been applied to evaluate the relative importance of safety functions that prevent the progress of events causing to postulated accidents. Based on the results of the safety reassessments of the TRP that was carried out in 1999, event trees were developed to model sequences of postulated accidents. Event trees were quantified by using the results of fault tree analysis and human reliability analysis. In the quantification, the reliability data generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants were mainly used. Operating experiences of the TRP were also utilized to evaluated both component/system reliability and human reliability. The relative importance of safety functions was evaluated by using two major importance measures, Fussell-Vesely and Risk Achievement Worth both generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants. Through these evaluations, some useful insights into the safety of the TRP have been obtained. The results of the relative importance measures would be utilized to qualify TRP component/equipment important to the safety. (author)

  6. Japanese national reference reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This paper gives a general description of the proposed Japanese national reprocessing plant and of the design philosophy. The plant is in most respects similar to the base case reprocessing plant, with an annual throughput of 100-1500 tU. The plant would be co-located with a fuel fabrication facility

  7. Maintenance experiences at analytical laboratory at the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hisanori; Nagayama, Tetsuya; Horigome, Kazushi; Ishibashi, Atsushi; Kitao, Takahiko; Surugaya, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) is developing the technology to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. There is an analytical laboratory which was built in 1977, as one of the most important facilities for process and material control analyses at the TRP. Samples taken from each process are analyzed by various analytical methods using hot cells, glove boxes and hume-hoods. A large number of maintenance work have been so far carried out and different types of experience have been accumulated. This paper describes our achievements in the maintenance activities at the analytical laboratory at the TRP. (author)

  8. Base case industrial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper briefly describes an industrial scale plant for reprocessing thermal oxide fuel. This description was used as a base case by the Group for their later assessments and for comparing actual national plans for reprocessing plants. The plant described uses the Purex process and assumes an annual throughput of 1000 t/U. The maintenance, safety and safeguards philosophy is described. An indication of the construction schedule and capital and operating costs is also given

  9. Computer aided radiation protection system at Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, J.; Saruta, J.; Yonezawa, R.

    1996-01-01

    Radiation control for workers and workforce has been carried out strictly and effectively taking into account ALARA principle at Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) which has treated about 860 tons of irradiated fuels by now since 1977. The outline of radiation control method at TRP has already been described. This paper briefly describes our experiences and the capabilities of Radiological Information Management System (RIMS) for the safety operation of TRP, followed by radiation exposure control and activity discharge control as examples. By operating the RIMS, the conditions of workplace such as dose equivalent rate and air-contamination are easily and rapidly grasped to take prompt countermeasures for radiological protection, localization and elimination of contamination, and also the past experience data are properly applied to new radiological works to reduce exposures associated with routine and special repetitive maintenance operations at TRP. Finally, authors would like to emphasize that the form and system for radiological control of reprocessing plant has been established throughout our 15-year-experience at TRP. (author)

  10. Radioactive wastes from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The lecture deals with definition, quantity and type of radioactive waste products occurring in a fuel reprocessing plant. Solid, liquid and gaseous fission and activation products are formed during the dissolution of the fuel and during the extraction process, and they must be separated from the fissionalble uranium and plutonium not spent. The chemical behaviour of these products (Zr, Ru, Np, gaseous substances, radiolysis products), which is sometimes very problematic, necessitates careful process control. However, the lifetime of nuclides is just as important for the conditions of the reprocessing procedure. The types of waste obtained after reprocessing are classified according to their state of aggregation and level of activity and - on the basis of the operational data of a prototype plant - they are quantitatively extrapolated for the operation of a large-scale facility of 1,400 tons of fuel annually. (RB) [de

  11. Dose evaluation for the public around the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeishi, Minoru; Furuta, Sadaaki; Miyabe, Kenjiro; Shinohara, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    The dose evaluations for the public around the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) have been carried out by using the mathematical models, because the effects on the environmental radiation due to the operation of the TRP are too small to separate from the background level. The models were developed by the site-specific investigations of the environment and reviewed in several times based on the latest scientific knowledge. The maximum annual effective dose through the whole period of the operation of the TRP was evaluated as 1.4 μSv with the data of the discharge monitoring and the meteorological observation in 1992. The evaluated doses revealed to be kept as far below the annual dose limit for the public as 1 mSv. (author)

  12. Waste management in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortreuil, M.

    1982-01-01

    This lecture will give a survey of the French policy for the management of wastes in reprocessing plants. In consideration of their radioactivity, they must be immobilized in matrix in such a manner that they are stored under optimal safety conditions. A general review on the nature, nucleide content and quantity of the various wastes arising from thermal nuclear fuel reprocessing is given in the light of the French plants UP1 at Marcoule and UP2 at La Hague. The procedures of treatment of such wastes and their conditioning into inert packages suitable for temporary or terminal storage are presented, especially concerning the continuous vitrification process carried out for fission product solutions. The requirements of each option are discussed and possible alternative solutions are exposed. (orig./RW)

  13. Remote handling in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streiff, G.

    1984-01-01

    Remote control will be the rule for maintenance in hot cells of future spent fuel reprocessing plants because of the radioactivity level. New handling equipments will be developed and intervention principles defined. Existing materials, recommendations for use and new manipulators are found in the PMDS' documentation. It is also a help in the choice and use of intervention means and a guide for the user [fr

  14. Tritium control in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goumondy, J.P.; Miquel, P.

    1977-01-01

    There is a danger that the T which is formed in water reactors will prove detrimental to the environment over the next few years, and studies have been undertaken to develop techniques to contain and process it where possible. In order to retain T, which is present largely in the fuel and on the possible to adapt for use in the conventional design of reprocessing plant. In this process T is maintained in the form of an aqueous solution in the high-active area of the plant. Control is achieved by restricting as far as possible the ingress of non-tritiated water into this area, and by setting up a tritiated water barrier at the first U and Pu extraction stage, stripping the tritium-containing solvent at that point with ordinary water. In this way the T can be extracted in a small volume of water with a view to intermediate storage, disposal at sea additional processing to remove the T from the water. Experiments carried out so far have demonstrated the effectiveness of the T barrier and have shown what equipment would be required for the application of the process in new reprocessing plants. (orig.) [de

  15. Management of radioactive waste from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanwar Raj

    2010-01-01

    Reprocessing and recycling of both fissile and fertile components back into appropriate reactor systems is an integral part of three stage nuclear energy programme of India. Different steps involved in processing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are decladding, dissolution and recovery of fissile and fertile materials. Reprocessing of SNF is a complex process involving handling of large quantity of radioactive materials and processing chemicals. There are three reprocessing plants in operation in the country at Trombay, Tarapur and Kalpakkam. Out of these plants, Trombay reprocessing plant is engaged in reprocessing of SNF from research reactors and other two plants are processing of SNF from PHWRs. A facility is being built for reprocessing of thorium based spent fuel at BARC, Trombay based on the experience of pilot plant scale. Like other industrial activities of nuclear fuel cycle, fuel reprocessing facilities too generate various types of radioactive waste streams. These are generated in all the three physical forms namely solid, liquid and gas. These waste streams are primarily categorized on the basis of concentration of radionuclides, their half lives and toxicity. Management of these wastes aims at (a) recovery and recycle of useful materials, (b) concentration and confinement of radioactivity in inert and stable matrices, (c) minimization of final waste volume for disposal, (d) decontamination of effluents following ALARA principle and (e) minimization of radioactive discharge to the environment. The present paper outlines the salient features of management of different types of radioactive waste generated in reprocessing plants handling SNF from research reactors and PHWR

  16. Discharges from a fast reactor reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the environmental impact of the calculated routine discharges from a fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant. These assessments have been carried out during the early stages of an evolving in-depth study which culminated in the design for a European demonstration reprocessing plant (EDRP). This plant would be capable of reprocessing irradiated fuel from a series of European fast reactors. Cost-benefit analysis has then been used to assess whether further reductions in the currently predicted routine discharges would be economically justified

  17. Refurbishment of the BNFL Magnox reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, V.M.; Edgar, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Magnox Reprocessing Plant was commissioned in 1964. Since then it has reprocessed more than 35,000 t of irradiated uranium metal fuel. The plant is subject to routine shutdowns to allow maintenance and project work to be undertaken. During the 1997 shutdown the opportunity was taken to replace several life limiting parts of the plant to ensure Magnox reprocessing capability well beyond the year 2010. This shutdown was the largest and most complex undertaken by Magnox Reprocessing, with a total committed value of 130 million UK pounds, 17.5 million UK pounds committed in the shutdown itself and the balance on installation, design and procurement preparing for the shutdown. The work was completed within safety targets, to programme and within budget. The lessons learned and experience gained have been fed into the methodologies and procedures for planning future project and shutdown work within BNFL. This report is part of the output from this process of continually improving performance. (author)

  18. Italian experience with pilot reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, S.; Dworschak, H.; Rolandi, G.; Simonetta, R.

    1977-01-01

    Problems and difficulties recently experienced in the reprocessing technology of high burnup power reactor fuel elements have shown the importance of pilot plant experiments to optimize the separation processes and to test advanced equipment on a representative scale. The CNEN Eurex plant, in Saluggia (Vercelli), with a 50 kg/d thruput, in operation since '71, has completed several reprocessing campaigns on MTR type fuel elements. Two different chemical flowsheets based respectively on TBP and tertiary amines were thoroughly tested and compared: a concise comparative evaluation of the results obtained with the two schemes is given. Extensive modifications have then been introduced (namely a new headend cell equipped with a shear) to make the plant suitable to reprocess power reactor fuels. The experimental program of the plant includes a joint CNEN-AECL reprocessing experiment on CANDU (Pickering) type fuel elements to demonstrate a two cycle, amine based recovery of the plutonium. Later, a stock of high burnup fuel elements from the PWR Trino power station will be reprocessed to recover Pu and U with a Purex type flowsheet. ITREC, the second CNEN experimental reprocessing plant located at Trisaia Nuclear Center (Matera), started active operation two years ago. In the first campaign Th-U mixed oxide fuel elements irradiated in the Elk River reactor were processed. Results of this experiment are reported. ITREC special design features confer a high degree of versability to the plant allowing for substantial equipment modification under remote control conditions. For this reason the plant will be principally devoted in the near future to advanced equipment testing. Along this line high speed centrifugal contactor of a new type developed in Poland will be tested in the plant in the frame of a joint experiment between CNEN and the Polish AEC. Later on the plant program will include experimental campaign on fast reactor fuels; a detailed study on this program is in

  19. Working conditions in nuclear reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    In the context of the project, the working conditions of workers in reprocessing plants and associated plant of the fuel circuit were thoroughly examined. The project design and course of the project are a good example of a precautionary technical assessment necessary for social policy reasons, which is in the public interest and is required by the Trade Unions. By working conditions, one means the whole set of scientific/technical, medical, legal, economic and political conditions for the permanent employment of workers in reprocessing plants including the associated parts of the fuel circuit. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Safeguarding a future industrial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-11-01

    This paper is submitted to Working Group 5, Sub-Group B for information. It is being submitted to Working Group 4 for discussion at their meeting in January 1979 and shows that by a combination of accountancy, surveillance and containment a reliable safeguards system can be designed for the reprocessing of fuels of the BWR and PWR type. Its arguments can, in general terms, be applied to plants for reprocessing LMFBR fuels, with due allowance for future advances which should improve our overall knowledge of the reliability of safeguards systems. In the reprocessing of fast reactor (LMFBR) fuels, as compared with LWR fuels, the main differences are the higher plutonium concentration and lower heavy metal throughput in the early stages of the reprocessing operations. At later stages in the process (after plutonium/uranium separation) the plants could be similar and have similar safeguarding problems. Plants for reprocessing LMFBR on a commercial scale will not be in operation for a number of years. In these plants greater attention may have to be paid to safeguards at the early stages, especially to waste/raffinate streams, than in the PWR/BWR reprocessing plant. The actual balance between containment, surveillance and accountancy adopted will depend on the status of the technology of safeguards and reprocessing. It can be anticipated that improvements to measurement systems will be made which may allow greater reliance on actual measurement. Treatment and recycle of solid wastes will advance and could therefore lead to improvements in accountancy in, for example, the ''head-end''

  1. Contamination of incinerator at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Mutsuo

    1994-01-01

    Originally, at Tokai Reprocessing Plant an incinerator was provided in the auxiliary active facility(waste treatment building). This incinerator had treated low level solid wastes generated every facilities in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant since 1974 and stopped the operation in March 1992 because of degeneration. The radioactivity inventory and distribution was evaluated to break up incinerator, auxiliary apparatuses(bag filter, air scrubbing tower, etc.), connecting pipes and off-gas ducts. This report deals with the results of contamination survey of incinerator and auxiliary apparatuses. (author)

  2. Nondestructive assay measurements applied to reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, Wayne D.; Lee, R. Stephen; Ottmar, Herbert; Guardini, Sergio

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive assay for reprocessing plants relies on passive gamma-ray spectrometry for plutonium isotopic and plutonium mass values of medium-to-low-density samples and holdup deposits; on active x-ray fluorescence and densitometry techniques for uranium and plutonium concentrations in solutions; on calorimetry for plutonium mass in product; and passive neutron techniques for plutonium mass in spent fuel, product, and waste. This paper will describe the radiation-based nondestructive assay techniques used to perform materials accounting measurements. The paper will also discuss nondestructive assay measurements used in inspections of reprocessing plants [ru

  3. Criticality safety evaluation in Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Nobutoshi; Nakajima, Masayoshi; Takaya, Akikazu; Ohnuma, Hideyuki; Shirouzu, Hidetomo; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Yoshikawa, Koji; Suto, Toshiyuki

    2000-04-01

    Criticality limits for equipments in Tokai Reprocessing Plant which handle fissile material solution and are under shape and dimension control were reevaluated based on the guideline No.10 'Criticality safety of single unit' in the regulatory guide for reprocessing plant safety. This report presents criticality safety evaluation of each equipment as single unit. Criticality safety of multiple units in a cell or a room was also evaluated. The evaluated equipments were ones in dissolution, separation, purification, denitration, Pu product storage, and Pu conversion processes. As a result, it was reconfirmed that the equipments were safe enough from a view point of criticality safety of single unit and multiple units. (author)

  4. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2, Tarapur: a benchmark in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-2 (PREFRE-2) is latest operating spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in India. This plant has improved design based on latest technology and feedback provided by the earlier plants. The design of PREFRE-2 plant is in five cycles of solvent extraction using TBP as extractant. The plant is commissioned in year 2011 after regulatory clearances

  5. Occupational dose at Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, F.; Taguchi, R.; Kano, M.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2008-01-01

    In Japan, Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is going to start the operation in service as the first large-scale commercial reprocessing plant of spent fuels that has annual reprocessing quantity of 800tU pr in maximum. The occupational external exposure is controlled for the purpose of keeping dose as low as reasonably achievable, and it is monitored by the personal dosimeter. On the other hand, the occupational internal exposure is controlled for the purpose of preventing, and it is monitored by the periodical evaluation of internal dose from the radioactive concentration in air of workplace. The individual doses of radiation workers are less than the dose limits in the statute and our lower management values enough. Dose data will be stored continuously and the rational management method will be examined. (author)

  6. EURATOM safeguards. Safeguards verifications in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heppleston, M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides a brief historical view of the legal basis for EURATOM. The specific application of safeguards to large scale reprocessing plants, from the theoretical model to the practical application of inspection is considered. The challenge to adequately safeguard major commercial reprocessing facilities has led to many novel approaches being developed. These lessons will also benefit other safeguard projects as a result. Good cooperation between the operator and regulator is essential for the satisfactory installation of adequate safeguard controls. The use of modern data processing technology combined with other diverse monitoring techniques has shown that a major industrial scale reprocessing plant can be controlled under international safeguards to provide a high level of assurance [ru

  7. UP3 plant first reprocessing campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leudet, A.; Hugelmann, D.; Fournier, W.; Dalverny, G.

    1991-01-01

    The UP3 plant start up has been achieved in two successive steps. The first one, from November 89 to April 90, involved all the facilities but T1, the head-end facility. During that period, shearing, dissolution and the first cycle extraction operations were performed in UP2 plant. 100 tons of fuel have been reprocessed that way. The second step began in August 1990, with the T1 facility start-up and the reprocessing of the resulting active solutions in the rest of the plant. This second phase involving the entire UP3 plant continued until the end of January 1991. At that time, 160 tons of fuel have been completely treated in UP3 plant

  8. Monitoring of low-level radioactive liquid effluent in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Tomoko; Koarashi, Jun; Takeishi, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP), the first reprocessing plant in Japan, has discharged low-level liquid wastes to the Pacific Ocean since the start of its operation in 1977. We have performed liquid effluent monitoring to realize an appropriate radioactive discharge control. Comparing simple and rapid analytical methods with labor-intensive radiochemical analyses demonstrated that the gross-alpha and gross-beta activities agreed well with the total activities of plutonium isotopes ( 238 Pu and 239+240 Pu) and major beta emitters (e.g., 90 Sr and 137 Cs), respectively. The records of the radioactive liquid discharge from the TRP showed that the normalized discharges of all nuclides, except for 3 H, were three or four orders of magnitude lower than those from the Sellafield and La Hague reprocessing plants. This was probably due to the installation of multistage evaporators in the liquid waste treatment process in 1980. The annual public doses for a hypothetical person were estimated to be less than 0.2 μSv y -1 from the aquatic pathway. Plutonium radioactivity ratios ( 238 Pu/ 239+240 Pu) of liquid effluents were determined to be 1.3-3.7, while those of the seabed sediment samples collected around the discharge point were 0.003-0.059, indicating no remarkable accumulation of plutonium in the regional aquatic environment. Thus, we concluded that there were no significant radiological effects on the public and the aquatic environment during the past 30-year operation of the TRP. (author)

  9. Nuclear safety in fuel-reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.; Koerting, K.

    1976-01-01

    The danger potential of nuclear power and fuel reprocessing plants in normal operation is compared. It becomes obvious that there are no basic differences. The analysis of possible accidents - blow-up of an evaporator for highly active wastes, zircaloy burning, cooling failure in self-heating process solutions, burning of a charged solvent, criticality accidents - shows that they are kept under control by the plant layout. (HP) [de

  10. Material control for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundquist, D.; Bray, G.; Donelson, S.; Glancy, J.; Gozani, T.; Harris, L.; McNamera, R.; Pence, D.; Ringham, M.

    1976-01-01

    Adequate control of special nuclear material (SNM) implies a basic knowledge of the quantities of SNM processed through or contained within a fuels processing facility with sufficient accuracy that diversion of the SNM for deleterious purposes can be detected in a timely manner. This report to the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) describes the primary process streams containing plutonium that are handled routinely within a spent fuel reprocessing plant and conversion facility. As an aid in implementing the objectives of the accountability system in a realistic situation, the Allied General Nuclear Services (AGNS) reprocessing plant now under construction near Barnwell, South Carolina, was chosen as the study model. The AGNS plant processes are discussed in detail emphasizing those portions of the process that contain significant quantities of plutonium. The unit processes within the separations plant, nitrate storage, plutonium product facility and the analytical laboratory are described with regard to the SNM control system currently planned for use in the facilities. A general discussion of laboratory techniques, nondestructive assay and process instrumentation for plutonium process and product material from a reprocessing plant is included. A comprehensive discussion is given of holdup measurements in plutonium recycle facilities. A brief preliminary overview is presented of alternative processing strategies for LWR fuel. An extensive review and summary of modeling efforts for liquid-liquid extraction cycles is included. A comprehensive bibliography of previous modeling efforts is covered

  11. Input measurements in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trincherini, P.R.; Facchetti, S.

    1980-01-01

    The aim of this work is to give a review of the methods and the problems encountered in measurements in 'input accountability tanks' of irradiated fuel treatment plants. This study was prompted by the conviction that more and more precise techniques and methods should be at the service of safeguards organizations and that ever greater efforts should be directed towards promoting knowledge of them among operators and all those general area of interest includes the nuclear fuel cycle. The overall intent is to show the necessity of selecting methods which produce measurements which are not only more precise but are absolutely reliable both for routine plant operation and for safety checks in the input area. A description and a critical evaluation of the most common physical and chemical methods are provided, together with an estimate of the precision and accuracy obtained in real operating conditions

  12. Safeguards for reprocessing and enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Agency safeguards are entering a new phase with the coming under active safeguards for the first time of reprocessing plants in several regions of the world. This is taking place at a time when not only the safeguards aspect itself is coming under international scrutiny, but also at a time when the necessity of reprocessing plants is being called into question. Attracting less attention at the moment, but potentially of equal significance, are the enrichment plants that soon will be coming under Agency safeguards. It is not unreasonable in view of the present controversies to ask what is the significance of these reprocessing and enrichment plants, what are the problems concerning safeguards that appear to have given rise to the controversies, and how these problems are to be solved. The question of significance is an easy one to answer. The output of these plants is material which some people consider can be used directly for military purposes, whereas the output from other plants, for instance, reactors, would require long and extensive processing before it could be used for military purposes. Like most short answers, this one is an over-simplification which requires some elaboration to make it strictly accurate. For example, the material output of a power reactor is in the form of irradiate assemblies containing plutonium which is potentially of military use if the irradiation had been within a certain range. However, to utilize this plutonium under clandestine conditions, the highly radioactive material would have to be secretly transported to a reprocessing plant and there would have to be simultaneous falsification of the reactor material accounts and the plant records. Such falsification would be difficult to conceal. The total time required to obtain usable plutonium would be many months. Diversion of material from a uranium fabrication plant making fuel for power reactors would be easier physically but strategically it would be of little value. The

  13. Solvent management in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaume, B.; Germain, M.; Puyou, M.; Rouyer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent management in large capacity reprocessing plant is studied to limit production of organic wastes. Chemical processing increases life time of solvent. Low pressure distillation allows the recycling of TBP and diluent at a low activity level. Besides heavy degradation products are eliminated. For the safety the flash point of distillated diluent increases slightly. Tests on an industrial scale started in 1985 and since more than 500 cubic meters were treated [fr

  14. Multipurpose simulator ''MR TRIOS'' for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takeshi; Uehara, Shigeru; Takata, Hideo; Kamishima, Naoyuki

    1993-01-01

    MHI (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries) has developed MR TRIOS (Mitsubishi Reprocessing plant TRansient simulation code for Integrated process for Operation Support), the realtime dynamic simulator, for multipurpose use to support the Reprocessing Plant operation in various aspects. MR TRIOS integrates the Simulation Models of the unit process in a Reprocessing Plant, including Shearing, Dissolution, NOx absorption, Accountability and Adjustment and Co-decontamination process, where each Simulation Model has two kinds of models: Process and Control System. MR TRIOS can simulate the process behavior of the unit process in an integrated manner as well as independently. It is supported by MR CONTROL, the simulator control program developed by MHI. From MR TRIOS one can obtain real-time process values, such as temperature, pressure, density, flow rate, and concentration of nuclides, enabling the evaluation of the process dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. MR TRIOS has proved to be an effective tool for the comprehensive study of the process and system dynamics, for operation technique improvements and for training

  15. Aerosols released in accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.; Hashimoto, K.; Nishio, G.; Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1987-01-01

    For analyzing the thermodynamic and radiological consequences of solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants, intensive investigations on burning contaminated condensible liquids were performed at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In small- and large-scale tests, KfK studied the behavior of kerosene, tributyl phosphate, HNO 3 mixture fires in open air and closed containments. The particle release from uranium-contaminated pool fires was investigated. Different filter devices were tested. For analyzing fires, PNL has developed the FIRIN computer code and has generated small-scale fire data in support of that code. The results of the experiments in which contaminated combustible liquids were burned demonstrate the use of the FIRIN code in simulating a solvent fire in a nuclear reprocessing plant. To demonstrate the safety evaluation of a postulated solvent fire in an extraction process of a reprocessing pant, JAERI conducted large-scale fire tests. Behavior of solvent fires in a cell and the integrity of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters due to smoke plugging were investigated. To evaluate confinement of radioactive materials released from the solvent fire, the ventilation systems with HEPA filters were tested under postulated fire conditions

  16. International safeguards for reprocessing plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, M.; Scheinman, L.; Sievering, N.; Wonder, E.; Lipman, D.; Immerman, W.; Elliott, J.M.; Crane, F.

    1981-04-01

    Proliferation risks inherent in reprocessing show the need to employ technically effective safeguards which can detect, with a high degree of assurance and on a timely basis, the diversion of significant quantities of fissionable material. A balance must be struck between what is technically feasible and effective and what is institutionally acceptable. Purpose of this report is to examine the several technical approaches to safeguards in light of their prospective acceptability. This study defines the economic, political and institutional nature of the safeguards problem; surveys generically alternative technical approaches to international safeguards including their effectiveness and relative development; characterizes the institutional implications and uncertainties associated with the acceptance and implementation of each technical alternative; and integrates these assessments into a set of overall judgments on feasible directions for reprocessing plant safeguards systems.

  17. International safeguards for reprocessing plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratzer, M.; Scheinman, L.; Sievering, N.; Wonder, E.; Lipman, D.; Immerman, W.; Elliott, J.M.; Crane, F.

    1981-04-01

    Proliferation risks inherent in reprocessing show the need to employ technically effective safeguards which can detect, with a high degree of assurance and on a timely basis, the diversion of significant quantities of fissionable material. A balance must be struck between what is technically feasible and effective and what is institutionally acceptable. Purpose of this report is to examine the several technical approaches to safeguards in light of their prospective acceptability. This study defines the economic, political and institutional nature of the safeguards problem; surveys generically alternative technical approaches to international safeguards including their effectiveness and relative development; characterizes the institutional implications and uncertainties associated with the acceptance and implementation of each technical alternative; and integrates these assessments into a set of overall judgments on feasible directions for reprocessing plant safeguards systems

  18. Development of Tokai reprocessing plant maintenance support system (TORMASS) in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Tsuneo; Sakai, Katsumi

    2008-01-01

    The maintenance work of many equipments such as mechanical, electrical and instrumentations installed in Tokai reprocessing plant has been performed more then 10,000 times per year and about 90% of maintenances were preventive work. For the maintenance management, optimization of maintenance information is required. Therefore, Tokai Reprocessing Plant Maintenance Support System (TORMASS) was developed from 1985 to 1992 as the aim of construction for suitable maintenance management system. About 24,000 equipments of specifications and about 261,000 maintenance detail were registered in this system. TORMASS has been used for the repair, inspection and replacement of equipment since 1992. (author)

  19. Future of the reprocessing business at the RT-1 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukharin, O.

    1995-01-01

    Economic viability of reprocessing operations at the RT-1 plant is provided by the contracts with nuclear utilities from Finland and Hungary. Finland will stop sending fuel to Mayak for reprocessing after 1996. Hungary will be capable to resolve the problem of spent fuel domestically some time in the future. This increases vulnerability of the reprocessing business at Mayak to future political uncertainties. (author)

  20. Radiological prevention in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenta, G.

    1983-01-01

    Prevention has received a peculiar conceptual formulation in working activities with radiation risk. In order to point out the operative aspects of this formulation the authors relates here the considerations, the criteria an the precautionary measures which have guided the choice or that have been actuated to reduce the risk for the workers of the EUREX reprocessing plant. The general aspect of this formulationa has a philosophical and doctrinarian course, peculiar in the probabilistic safety approach and in radioprotection methodology. The authors quotes here some concepts and some specific application of both but he shows above all the medical aspects of the radioprotection

  1. The fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, M.

    1986-01-01

    For a more systematic discussion about the fuel reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf, the colloquium tried to cover the most important questions put forward in the controversies: economic efficiency and energy-political needs; safety and ecological repercussions; inner safety and consequences for basic rights and the regional economic structure; majority decisions and participation of the population of the region. Elements of evaluation are the conservation of resources, health, economic efficiency, and citizens' rights of liberty. The related basic ethical questions are considered. The 18 contributions are individually recorded in the data base. (DG) [de

  2. Safety problems in fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaury, P.; Jouannaud, C.; Niezborala, F.

    1979-01-01

    The document first situates the reprocessing in the fuel cycle as a whole. It shows that a large reprocessing plant serves a significant number of reactors (50 for a plant of 1500 tonnes per annum). It then assesses the potential risks with respect to the environment as well as with respect to the operating personnel. The amounts of radioactive matter handled are very significant and their easily dispersible physical form represents very important risks. But the low potential energy likely to bring about this dispersion and the very severe and plentiful confinement arrangements are such that the radioactive risks are very small, both with respect to the environment and the operating personnel. The problems of the interventions for maintenance or repairs are mentioned. The intervention techniques in a radioactive environment are perfected, but they represent the main causes of operating personnel irradiation. The design principle applied in the new plants take this fact into account, involving a very significant effort to improve the reliability of the equipment and ensuring the provision of devices enabling the failing components to be replaced without causing irradiation of the personnel [fr

  3. Enhancements in the thorp reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakem, M.J.; Brownridge, M. [Thorp Technical Dept. and Research and Technology, BNFL plc, Sellafield, seascale, Cumbria, CA (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    A number of successful enhancements have been made to the process at the Thorp reprocessing plant at Sellafield. After a long and detailed Research and Development programme followed by an intensive design/construction project, Thorp was inactively commissioned with first active shear in March 1994. The plant has now reached a mature stage in its development, following successful active commissioning demonstrating flowsheet or better performance in the solvent extraction cycles. Enhancements are now sought to achieve a range of objectives. Against a background of ever tighter regulatory control both in terms of safety and environmental discharge, BNFL are continuing to invest in further improvements with short, medium and longer term objectives to improve plant throughput; expand the range of feed fuels; reduce environmental discharges and reduce running costs. This paper describes a few of these enhancements. (authors)

  4. Enhancements in the thorp reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakem, M.J.; Brownridge, M.

    2000-01-01

    A number of successful enhancements have been made to the process at the Thorp reprocessing plant at Sellafield. After a long and detailed Research and Development programme followed by an intensive design/construction project, Thorp was inactively commissioned with first active shear in March 1994. The plant has now reached a mature stage in its development, following successful active commissioning demonstrating flowsheet or better performance in the solvent extraction cycles. Enhancements are now sought to achieve a range of objectives. Against a background of ever tighter regulatory control both in terms of safety and environmental discharge, BNFL are continuing to invest in further improvements with short, medium and longer term objectives to improve plant throughput; expand the range of feed fuels; reduce environmental discharges and reduce running costs. This paper describes a few of these enhancements. (authors)

  5. Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of 'safeguards by design'. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how 'safeguardability' was introduced into RRP.

  6. Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

    2010-08-07

    This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of ‘safeguards by design’. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how ‘safeguardability’ was introduced into RRP.

  7. Feasibility study for adapting ITREC plant to reprocessing LMFBR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moccia, A.; Rolandi, G.

    1976-05-01

    The report evaluates the feasibility of adapting ITREC plant to the reprocessing LMFBR fuels, with the double purpose of: 1) recovering valuable Pu contained in these fuels and recycling it to the fabrication plant; 2) trying, on a pilot scale, the chemical process technology to be applied in a future industrial plant for reprocessing the fuel elements discharged from fast breeder power reactors

  8. Nuclear fuel re-processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Yuko; Honda, Takashi; Shoji, Saburo; Kobayashi, Shiro; Furuya, Yasumasa

    1989-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel re-processing plant, high Si series stainless steels not always have sufficient corrosion resistance in a solution containing only nitric acid at medium or high concentration. Further, a method of blowing NOx gases may possibly promote the corrosion of equipment constituent materials remarkably. In view of the above, the corrosion promoting effect of nuclear fission products is suppressed without depositing corrosive metal ions as metals in the nitric acid solution. That is, a reducing atmosphere is formed by generating NOx by electrolytic reduction thereby preventing increase in the surface potential of stainless steels. Further, an anode is disposed in the nitric acid solution containing oxidative metal ions to establish an electrical conduction and separate them by way of partition membranes and a constant potential or constant current is applied while maintaining an ionic state so as not to deposit metals. Thus, equipments of re-processing facility can be protected from corrosion with no particular treatment for wastes as radioactive materials. (K.M.)

  9. Safety aspects of a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donoghue, J.K.; Charlesworth, F.R.; Fairbairn, A.

    1977-01-01

    decommissioning and demolition procedures must be anticipated and suitable provision made. Application of these principles is illustrated by experience gained in the surveillance of reprocessing plants. United Kingdom regulatory procedures for the licensing and inspection of reprocessing plant, and statutory requirements influencing safety in design, construction and operation are reviewed. Recent developments in safety legislation including the Health and Safety at Work Act, 1974, are discussed

  10. Solvent distillations studies for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1989-01-01

    The substantial amounts of solvent used in large reprocessing plants are such that considerable care must be paid to solvent management to limit the production of organic wastes. The installation of intensive treatment by chemical regeneration serves to increase the service life of the solvent. General solvent management, combined with a distillation unit under reduced pressure also helps to recycle the two components of the solvent at a low activity level. Distillation also serves to remove the heavy degradation products that are generally responsible for poor hydraulic behavior and for the holdup of radioactive products such as plutonium, zirconium and ruthenium. From the safety standpoint, the flashpoint of the distilled diluent tends to rise. It can therefore be recycled without risk

  11. Safeguards implementation in UP3 reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, J.P.; Regnier, J.; Talbourdet, Y.; De Jong, P.

    1991-01-01

    The implementation of safeguards in a large size reprocessing plant is a challenge, considering the high throughput of nuclear material and the sophisticated automation of such facilities. In the case of UP3, a pragmatic and realistic approach has been devised and is applied through an efficient cooperation between the safeguards organizations, the french national authorities and the operator. In essence, they consist in verification of every significant inputs and outputs, in timely analysis by NDA (e.g. solutions of dissolution through an on site k-edge equipment), in monitoring selected parts of the inprocess inventory and in specific containment/surveillance systems for the spent fuel storage ponds and the PuO2 storage. (author)

  12. Development of new treatment process for low level radioactive waste at Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Kenichi; Sugaya, Atsushi; Saito, Yasuo; Tanaka, Kenji; Akutsu, Shigeru; Hirata, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    The Low-level radioactive Waste Treatment Facility (LWTF) was constructed at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) and cold testing has been carried out since 2006. The waste which will be treated in the LWTF is combustible/incombustible solid waste and liquid waste. In the LWTF, the combustible/incombustible solid waste will be incinerated. The liquid waste will be treated by a radio-nuclides removal process and subsequently solidified in cement. This report describes the essential technologies of the LWTF and results of R and D work for the nitrate-ion decomposition technology for the liquid waste. (author)

  13. Optimal installation program for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokawa, Toshihiko; Kiyose, Ryohei

    1976-01-01

    Optimization of the program of installation of reprocessing plants is mathematically formulated as problem of mixed integer programming, which is numerically solved by the branch-and-bound method. A new concept of quasi-penalty is used to obviate the difficulties associated with dual degeneracy. The finiteness of the useful life of the plant is also taken into consideration. It is shown that an analogous formulation is possible for the cases in which the demand forecasts and expected plant lives cannot be predicted with certainty. The scale of the problem is found to have kN binary variables, (k+2)N continuous variables, and (k+3)N constraint conditions, where k is the number of intervals used in the piece-wise linear approximation of a nonlinear objective function, and N the overall duration of the period covered by the installation program. Calculations are made for N=24 yr and k=3, with the assumption that the plant life is 15 yr, the plant scale factor 0.5, and the maximum plant capacity 900 (t/yr). The results are calculated and discussed for four different demand forecasts. The difference of net profit between optimal and non-optimal installation programs is found to be in the range of 50 -- 100 M$. The pay-off matrix is calculated, and the optimal choice of action when the demand cannot be forecast with certainty is determined by applying Bayes' theory. The optimal installation program under such conditions of uncertainty is obtained also with a stochastic mixed integer programming model. (auth.)

  14. The influence of size of plant upon reprocessing costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    This paper reviews recent published estimates for capital and operating costs of reprocessing plants in an attempt to establish a relative variation of unit reprocessing costs with plant design capacity and load factor. It is concluded that capital costs follow the well established ''rule of thumb'' for chemical plants in being proportional to (design capacity)sup(2/3). Operating costs vary significantly with variation in labour costs. Unit reprocessing costs are presented as a function of plant design capacity, load factor and method of financing

  15. New measurement techniques correct PU inventory in Japanese reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At its briefing to the Japan Atomic Energy Commission on 28 January 2003, the Japan Safeguards Office (JSGO) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) announced that, due to the introduction of more precise sampling and analytical measurement techniques for measuring plutonium in the high active liquid waste (HALW) storage tanks at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) is correcting the amount of plutonium declared in past accountancy reports to the IAEA. The corrected amounts are expected to be in line with IAEA's own independent verification data and based on measurement methodologies endorsed by the IAEA. The IAEA has recognized for some time that the amount of nuclear material transferred to waste storage had not been adequately measured in the past and has worked with the facility operators and State authorities to introduce improved measurement techniques. IAEA Director General, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei stressed however, that 'the Agency remains confident in its conclusion that no nuclear material has been diverted from the facility'. This conclusion is based on a range of activities under the NPT Safeguards Agreement between the Agency and Japan, as well as under the Additional Protocol to that Agreement which gives the Agency broad access to nuclear fuel-cycle related information and locations. TRP, in Tokai-mura, Ibaraki prefecture in Japan, was built in the early 1970s, using 1960s-era design and technology. The IAEA began inspecting the facility in 1977. In its annual evaluation of safeguards implementation, as reported to the IAEA's Board of Governors in the Safeguards Implementation Report, the Secretariat has regularly noted the need for strengthening safeguards implementation at TRP, particularly with respect to procedures used for the measurement of nuclear material in the waste produced. In 1996, Japan and the IAEA reached agreement on IAEA sampling, on a

  16. Corrosion evaluation of uranyl nitrate solution evaporator and denitrator in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kowa; Uchida, Toyomi; Shirato, Yoji; Isozaki, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2011-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) adopted the PUREX method in 1977 and has reprocessed spent nuclear fuel of 1140 tHM (tons of heavy metals) since then. The reprocessing equipment suffers from various corrosion phenomena because of high nitric acidity, solution ion concentrations, such as uranium, plutonium, and fission products, and temperature. Therefore, considering corrosion performance in such a severe environment, stainless steels, titanium steel, and so forth were employed as corrosion resistant materials. The severity of the corrosive environment depends on the nitric acid concentration and the temperature of the solution, and uranium in the solution reportedly does not significantly affect the corrosion of stainless steels and controls the corrosion rates of titanium steel. The TRP equipment that handles uranyl nitrate solution operates at a low nitric acid concentration and has not experienced corrosion problems until now. However, there is a report that corrosion rates of some stainless steels increase in proportion to rising uranium concentrations. The equipment that handles the uranyl nitrate solution in the TRP includes the evaporators, which concentrate uranyl nitrate to a maximum concentration of about 1000 gU/L (grams of uranium per liter), and the denitrator, where uranyl nitrate is converted to UO 3 powder at about 320degC. These equipments are therefore required to grasp the degree of the progress of corrosion to handle high-temperature and high-concentration uranyl nitrate. The evaluation of this equipment on the basis of thickness measurement confirmed only minor corrosion and indicated that the equipment would be fully adequate for future operation. (author)

  17. Risk assessment approach for Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ootou, Y.; Tamauchi, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Takebe, K.; Miyata, T.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: It is desirable that the operation and maintenance of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) be established and conducted with maximum effectiveness and efficiency, making the best use of risk information to help the plant achieve further enhanced safety. Risk assessment is applied for RRP, and upgraded risk information is established. In the basic design phase, the potential incidents and accidents that might occur in the plant were identified systematically and exhaustively adopting the HAZOP method. After screening the potential for occurrence, the design basis accidents (DBAs) were identified and it was confirmed that the plant would not put the general public at risk of significant radiation exposure in the case of such accidents, even when assuming the single failure of dynamic apparatus in the prevention and mitigation systems. To support the deterministic safety assessment mentioned above, the risk assessment was conducted during the basic design phase. Of the DBAs and out-of-design basis accidents excluded from DBAs because of extremely rare occurrence possibilities, the risk assessment was conducted for such accidents which might cause relatively high consequence for the general public. The risk assessment was conducted using the PSA method generally used for nuclear power plants. After that, a review of the occurrence frequency assessment for some of the accidents was made, taking into account information relating to detailed design and operation procedures. Typical examples are a loss of the hydrogen scavenging function in the plutonium solution tank and a loss of cooling capability in the high-active liquid waste storage tank. The occurrence frequency for a loss of the hydrogen scavenging function was less than 10 -5 /year. The occurrence frequency for a loss of cooling capability was less than 10 -7 /year. In addition, an importance assessment (FV index, Risk Achievement Worth) was conducted, such as a contribution to the occurrence frequency

  18. Direction of reprocessing technology development based on 30 years operation of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, S; Tanaka, T.; Ohshima, H.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Full text: Recent global interest focuses the possibility of recycling of spent fuel with advanced fast reactor fuel cycle system. Goal of closed fuel cycle is to achieve the maximum use of uranium resources and minimum disposal of waste by multi recycle of TRU as a competitive nuclear energy system. The future reprocessing and fuel fabrication system should be synchronized completely with the advanced reactor system and waste treatment and disposal back-end system to complete closed fuel cycle. To realize such system, current reprocessing system should be changed to handle Pu-U-Minor Actinide with more reductions in the cost and less waste volume, as well as an inherent proliferation resistance. For the successful industrialization of advanced reprocessing technology, it is necessary to combine three key elements of R and D efforts, engineering base demonstration and experiences of plant operation. Tokai Reprocessing Facilities licensed a maximum capacity of 0.7tHM/day began a hot operation in 1977 and reprocessed l,100tHM U02 spent fuel and 20tHM ATR-MOX with a continuous technological improvements under IAEA full scope safeguards. With 30 years experience, candidate of key technologies proposed for realizing the next advanced reprocessing are as follows: 1) Simplified co-extraction process of Pu-Np-U by using multistage centrifugal extractors in stead of pulsed columns; 2) Corrosion free components in acid condition by using corrosion resistant refractory alloys and ceramics; 3) Co-conversion technology to MA containing MOX powder by micro-wave heating method for a short process for MA containing MOX pellets fabrication; 4) Advanced verification of high level radioactive liquid waste combining separation technology of TRU and LLFP elements; 5) Advanced chemical analysis and monitoring system for TRU elements in a plant. These advanced reprocessing technologies will be applied mainly to reprocess the LWR spent fuel accumulated past and future

  19. Containment/surveillance concepts for international safeguards in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleck, M.E.; Cameron, C.P.; Camp, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the potential role of advanced containment/surveillance instrumentation systems for international safeguards in reprocessing plants. Several conceptual systems for the surveillance of containment boundary penetrations in a reference reprocessing plant are described and evaluated. The results of the evaluation aid in understanding the potential capabilities and limitations of containment/surveillance as an international safeguards concept in this type of facility

  20. Radiological impact of emissions from reprocessing plants during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Gruendler, D.; Hesel, D.; Muenster, M.; Schmidtlein, P.; Suender, B.

    1977-01-01

    When comparing the expected radiation exposure due to emissions from reprocessing plants with those from nuclear power plants it can be seen that the emissions from reprocessing plants contribute much more to the radiation exposure of the population than those from nuclear power plants. In the vicinity of reprocessing plants the highest contributions to the radiation exposure of the population are delivered by the following radionuclides: T, C 14 , Kr 85 , Sr 90 , Ru 106 , I 129 , Cs 134 , Cs 137 and Ce 144 as will as the Pu- and Cm-isotopes. Among these nuclides T, C 14 , Kr 85 und I 129 are globally distributed. While for T the contribution to the collective dose due to globally distributed T is small in comparison with the first pass exposure, the global contribution predominates for C 14 and Kr 85 . If an integration time of less than 10 5 years is considered, the contribution due to first pass exposure predominates for I 129 . When taking the radiation protection of the population into consideration, it seems sensible to retain 10% of T, 80 to 90% of C 14 , 90% of Kr 85 and 99,5% of I 129 in reprocessing plants and dispose of this material in a controlled manner. The fraction of the aerosols released should be about 10 -9 . Considering the global effects and the increasing number of nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants, an international agreement should be reached on these matters. (orig.) [de

  1. Used mixed oxide fuel reprocessing at RT-1 plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolupaev, D.; Logunov, M.; Mashkin, A.; Bugrov, K.; Korchenkin, K. [FSUE PA ' Mayak' , 30, Lenins str, Ozersk, 460065 (Russian Federation); Shadrin, A.; Dvoeglazov, K. [ITCP ' PRORYV' , 2/8 Malaya Krasmoselskay str, Moscow, 107140 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    Reprocessing of the mixed uranium-plutonium spent nuclear fuel of the BN-600 reactor was performed at the RT-1 plant twice, in 2012 and 2014. In total, 8 fuel assemblies with a burn-up from 73 to 89 GW day/t and the cooling time from 17 to 21 years were reprocessed. The reprocessing included the stages of dissolution, clarification, extraction separation of U and Pu with purification from the fission products, refining of uranium and plutonium at the relevant refining cycles. Dissolution of the fuel composition of MOX used nuclear fuel (UNF) in nitric acid solutions in the presence of fluoride ion has occurred with the full transfer of actinides into solution. Due to the high content of Pu extraction separation of U and Pu was carried out on a nuclear-safe equipment designed for the reprocessing of highly enriched U spent nuclear fuel and Pu refining. Technological processes of extraction, separation and refining of actinides proceeded without deviations from the normal mode. The output flow of the extraction outlets in their compositions corresponded to the regulatory norms and remained at the level of the compositions of the streams resulting from the reprocessing of fuel types typical for the RT-1 plant. No increased losses of Pu into waste have been registered during the reprocessing of BN-600 MOX UNF an compare with VVER-440 uranium UNF reprocessing. (authors)

  2. Study of assessing aqueous reprocessing process for the pipeless reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Masatoshi; Morioka, Nobuo; Fumoto, Hiromichi; Nishimura, Kenji; Chikazawa, Takahiro

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of new reprocessing process for the purpose of introducing pipeless plant concept, where aqueous separation methods other than solvent extraction method are adopted in order to develop more economical FBR fuel (MOX fuel) reprocessing process. At it's first stage, literature survey on precipitation method, crystallization method and ion-exchange method was performed. Based on the results, following processes were candidated for pipeless reprocessing plant. (1) The process adopting crystallization method and peroxide precipitation method (2) The process adopting oxalate precipitation method (3) The process under mild aqueous conditions (crystallization method and precipitation method) (4) The process adopting crystallization method and ion-exchange method (5) The process adopting crystallization method and solvent extraction method. The processes (1)-(5) were compared with each others in terms of competitiveness to the conventional reference process, and merits and demerits were evaluated from the viewpoint of applicability to pipeless reprocessing plant, safety, economy, Efficiencies in consumption of Resources, non-proliferation, and, Operation and Maintenance. As a result, (1) The process adopting crystallization method and peroxide precipitation method was selected as the most reasonable process to pipeless plant. Preliminary criticality safety analyses, main process chemical flowsheet, main equipment list and layout of mobile vessels and stations were reported for the (1) process. (author)

  3. Gas chromatographic analysis of extractive solvent in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlet, B.

    1984-01-01

    Operation of a reprocessing plant using the Purex process is recalled and analytical controls for optimum performance are specified. The aim of this thesis is the development of analytical methods using gas chromatography required to follow the evolution of the extraction solvent during spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent at different concentrations, is analysed along the reprocessing lines in organic or aqueous phases. Solvent degradation interferes with extraction and decomposition products are analysed. The solvent becomes less and less efficient, also it is distilled and quality is checked. Traces of solvent should also be checked in waste water. Analysis are made as simple as possible to facilitate handling of radioactive samples [fr

  4. The minimization of radioactive releases to the sea from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Ishii, T.

    1996-01-01

    The Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) started hot operation in September 1977. The total amount of about 790 tU of spent fuel, generated in Japan, has been successfully reprocessed as of December 1994. Low-level liquid wastes have been treated safely with the low-level waste treatment process. The design of TRP was based on foreign technology. In the early stage of designing, the radioactivity released to the sea was estimated at approximately 2.6 TBq/day (70 Ci/day) for beta activity (except for tritium). Later, PNC added an evaporator to the process to reduce the level down to 1/100, i.e. 9.6 TBq/year (260 Ci/year) or 2.6 x 10 -2 TBq/day (0.7 Ci/day). In addition, under the supervision of the government, PNC started R and D to further decrease the radioactivity released to the sea in terms of ALARA. Aiming at reducing the activity from 9.6 TBq/year (260 Ci/year) to 1/10 of that value (i.e. 26 Ci/year), the release reduction technology development facility was added. This facility was incorporated into the low-level waste treatment process in 1980, before starting the regular operation of TRP. Since the fuel reprocessing commenced, total radioactivity discharged to the sea has been 1.9 x 10 -2 TBq (0.51 Ci) for beta activity, as of December 1994. Before incorporating the release reduction technology development facility, the yearly level was 3.7 x 10 -3 - 7.4 x 10 -3 TBq (0.1 - 0.2 Ci). After incorporation of the facility, radioactivity released to the sea was greatly decreased to non-detection levels in recent years, in spite of increasing annual reprocessing amounts. Although serious equipment failures have occurred such as the acid recovery evaporator and the dissolvers, there was no influence on radioactivity released to the sea. (author)

  5. General criteria for the project of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Recommendations are presented establishing the general criteria for the project of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to be licensed according to the legislation in effect. They apply to all the plant's systems, components and structures which are important to operation safety and to the public's health and safety. (F.E.) [pt

  6. Summary of the status of the NFS reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.R.

    The modification program at the West Valley, New York, reprocessing plant is described. The program involves expansion, improving the plant's on-stream factor and reducing the occupational exposures, installing natural phenomena protection, and improving effluent control and waste management. Licencing requirements and their effects on scheduling are discussed. (E.C.B.)

  7. Cost and availability of gadolinium for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klepper, O.H.

    1985-06-01

    Gadolinium is currently planned for use as a soluble neutron poison in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to prevent criticality of solutions of spent fuel. Gadolinium is relatively rare and expensive. The present study was undertaken therefore to estimate whether this material is likely to be available in quantities sufficient for fuel reprocessing and at reasonable prices. It was found that gadolinium, one of 16 rare earth elements, appears in the marketplace as a by-product and that its present supply is a function of the production rate of other more prevalent rare earths. The potential demand for gadolinium in a fuel reprocessing facility serving a future fast reactor industry amounts to only a small fraction of the supply. At the present rate of consumption, domestic supplies of rare earths containing gadolinium are adequate to meet national needs (including fuel reprocessing) for over 100 years. With access to foreign sources, US demands can be met well beyond the 21st century. It is concluded therefore that the supply of gadolinium will quite likely be more than adequate for reprocessing spent fuel for the early generation of fast reactors. The current price of 99.99% pure gadolinium oxide lies in the range $50/lb to $65/lb (1984 dollars). By the year 2020, in time for reprocessing spent fuel from an early generation of large fast reactors, the corresponding values are expected to lie in the $60/lb to $75/lb (1984 dollars) price range. This increase is modest and its economic impact on nuclear fuel reprocessing would be minor. The economic potential for recovering gadolinium from the wastes of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants (which use gadolinium neutron poison) was also investigated. The cost of recycled gadolinium was estimated at over twelve times the cost of fresh gadolinium, and thus recycle using current recovery technology is not economical. 15 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  8. Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, J.; Rougeau, J.-P.

    1987-01-01

    The course of development of a comprehensive nuclear power industry has its own pace which implies the timely progressive and consistent mastery of each industrial step. In the nuclear fuel it is not surprising that the back-end services have lastly reached the industrial stage. In France, we have now fully completed the industrial demonstration of the closed fuel cycle. Our experience covers all necessary steps : transportation of spent fuel, storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, recovered uranium recycling, plutonium recycling in thermal MOX fuels, plutonium-based fuel for FBR. While FBR development is a long term target, recycling of fissile materials in present LWR reactors appears to be a source of noticable savings. In the meantime rational management of waste material is the key for increased safety and better environment protection. Reprocessing activity is certainly the major achievement of the back-end strategy. The proven efficiency of this technique as it is implemented at La Hague facility gives the full assurance of a smooth operation of the under completion UP3 unit. The base-load management system which applies during the first ten years of its operation will make possible a noticable reduction of the commercial price for reprocessing services by the end of the century. Industrial maturity being confirmed, economic maturity is now the outstanding merit of the reprocessing and recycling strategy. It is a permanent challenge, to which the response is definitely positive in the sense of reducing the nuclear KWh production cost. (author)

  9. Fast reactor system factors affecting reprocessing plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.; Pugh, O.

    1982-01-01

    The introduction of a commercial fast reactor electricity generating system is very dependent on the availability of an efficient nuclear fuel cycle. Selection of fuel element constructional materials, the fuel element design approach and the reactor operation have a significant influence on the technical feasibility and efficiency of the reprocessing and waste management plants. Therefore the fast reactor processing plant requires liaison between many design teams -reactor, fuel design, reprocessing and waste management -often with different disciplines and conflicting objectives if taken in isolation and an optimised approach to determining several key parameters. A number of these parameters are identified and the design approach discussed in the context of the reprocessing plant. Radiological safety and its impact on design is also briefly discussed. (author)

  10. Status of the decommissioning program of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    Reprocessing operations at the Eurochemic demonstration plant stopped in December 1974, after 8 years of operation. Immediately thereafter, cleaning and decontamination were begun as the first phase of the decommissioning program. The facility and reprocessing program are described to indicate the magnitude of the problem, and the requirements of the local authorities are reviewed. The technical decommissioning program consists of several phases: (1) plant cleaning and rinsing, (2) establishment of the final fissile-material balance, (3) plant decontamination for access to process equipment, (4) equipment dismantling, and (5) conditioning and storage of newly generated wastes. The two first phases have been completed, and the third one is nearing completion. Some dismantling has been performed, including the plutonium dioxide production unit. Waste-conditioning and surface-storage facilities have been built to meet the dismantling requirements. Since reprocessing may be resumed in the future, decontamination has been performed with ''smooth'' reagents to limit corrosion and dismantling has been limited to subfacilities

  11. Development of exhaust air filters for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, J.; Kaempffer, R.; Jannakos, K.; Apenberg, W.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of the iodine loading capacity of highly impregnated iodine sorption material (AC 6,120/H 1 ) for the GWA-filters (GWA: reprocessing plant for 1,500 metric tons per year of uranium) have been continued for low NO 2 -contents of the simulated dissolver offgas from GWA. When fully loading AC 6,120/H 1 , a conversion to silver iodides of Ag + of the impregnation of about 80% was reached in experiments with 1% NO 2 in the carrier gas. Despite the consumption of a substantial portion of the impregnation removal efficiencies > 99.99% were measured for a bed depth corresponding to a GWA filter stage. The test facility allowing to examine the behavior and the capacity of the AC 6,120/H 1 iodine sorption material under actual conditions at SAP Marcoule (reprocessing plant) has been completed except for installation in the reprocessing plant. (orig.) [de

  12. Remotex and servomanipulator needs in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Work on the conceptual design of a pilot-scale plant for reprocessing breeder reactor fuels is being performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The plant design will meet all current federal regulations for repocessing plants and will serve as prototype for future production plants. A unique future of the concept is the incorporation of totally remote operation and maintenance of the process equipment within a large barn-like hot cell. This approach, caled Remotex, utilizes servomanipulators coupled with television viewing to extend man's capabilities into the hostile cell environment. The Remotex concept provides significant improvements for fuel reprocessing plants and other nuclear facilities in the areas of safeguarding nuclear materials, reducing radiation exposure, improving plant availability, recovering from unplanned events, and plant decommissioning

  13. Report of the LASCAR forum: Large scale reprocessing plant safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report has been prepared to provide information on the studies which were carried out from 1988 to 1992 under the auspices of the multinational forum known as Large Scale Reprocessing Plant Safeguards (LASCAR) on safeguards for four large scale reprocessing plants operated or planned to be operated in the 1990s. The report summarizes all of the essential results of these studies. The participants in LASCAR were from France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, the Commission of the European Communities - Euratom, and the International Atomic Energy Agency

  14. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomasson, J.; Drain, F.; David, A.

    2001-01-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  15. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, J. [Cogema, F-78140 Velizy (France); Drain, F.; David, A. [SGN, F-78182 Saint Quentin en Yvelines (France)

    2001-07-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for the back-end management of their spent fuel. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  16. Reprocessing RTR fuel in the La Hague plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, J. [Cogema, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France); Drain, F.; David, A. [SGN, 78 - Saint Quentin en Yveline (France)

    2001-07-01

    Starting in 2006, research reactors operators will be fully responsible for their research and testing reactors spent fuel back-end management. It appears that the only solution for this management is treatment-conditioning, which could be done at the La Hague reprocessing complex in France. The fissile material can be separated in the reprocessing plants and the final waste can be encapsulated in a matrix adapted to its potential hazards. RTR reprocessing at La Hague would require some modifications, since the plant had been primarily designed to reprocess fuel from light water reactors. Many provisions have been taken at the plant design stage, however, and the modifications would be feasible even during active operations, as was done from 1993 to 1995 when a new liquid waste management was implemented, and when one of the two vitrification facilities was improved. To achieve RTR back-end management, COGEMA and its partners are also conducting R and D to define a new generation of LEU fuel with performance characteristics approximating those of HEU fuel. This new-generation fuel would be easier to reprocess. (author)

  17. Surveillance system using the CCTV at the fuel transfer pond in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, T.; Fukuhara, J.; Ochiai, K.; Ohnishi, T.; Ogata, Y.; Okamoto, H.

    1991-01-01

    The Fuel Transfer Pond (FTP) in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) is a strategic point for safeguards. Spent fuels, therefore, in the FTP have been surveyed by the surveillance system using the underwater CCTV. This system was developed through the improvement of devices composed of cameras and VCRs and the provision of tamper resistance function as one of the JASPAS (Japan Support Program for Agency Safeguards) program. The purpose of this program is to realize the continuous surveillance of the slanted tunnel through which the spent fuel on the conveyor is moved from the FTP to the Mechanical Processing Cell (MPC). This paper reports that, when this surveillance system is applied to an inspection device, the following requirements are needed: To have the ability of continuous and unattended surveillance of the spent fuel on the conveyor path from the FTP to the MPC; To have the tamper resistance function for continuous and unattended surveillance of the spent fuel

  18. Equipment specifications for an electrochemical fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemphill, Kevin P.

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical reprocessing is a technique used to chemically separate and dissolve the components of spent nuclear fuel, in order to produce new metal fuel. There are several different variations to electrochemical reprocessing. These variations are accounted for by both the production of different types of spent nuclear fuel, as well as different states and organizations doing research in the field. For this electrochemical reprocessing plant, the spent fuel will be in the metallurgical form, a product of fast breeder reactors, which are used in many nuclear power plants. The equipment line for this process is divided into two main categories, the fuel refining equipment and the fuel fabrication equipment. The fuel refining equipment is responsible for separating out the plutonium and uranium together, while getting rid of the minor transuranic elements and fission products. The fuel fabrication equipment will then convert this plutonium and uranium mixture into readily usable metal fuel.

  19. The safety of the new reprocessing plants of La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, C.; Dubois, G.

    1987-09-01

    In this document the authors show the main guiding lines on which is based the safety of the new reprocessing plant of La Hague. They are: - the objectives: to limit the impacts on workers and environment - the methods: safety analysis based on the checking and evaluation of significant risks. - the means: to make a safety plant by the use of quality assurance in the conception and in the plant construction [fr

  20. Standard model for safety analysis report of fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    A standard model for a safety analysis report of fuel reprocessing plants is established. This model shows the presentation format, the origin, and the details of the minimal information required by CNEN (Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear) aiming to evaluate the requests of construction permits and operation licenses made according to the legislation in force. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Technical specifications on the welding in fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karino, Motonobu; Uryu, Mitsuru; Matsui, N.; Nakazawa, Fumio; Imanishi, Makoto; Koizumi; Kazuhiko; Sugawara, Junichi; Tanaka, Hideo

    1999-04-01

    The past specifications SGN of the welding in JNC was reexamined for the reprocessing plants in order to further promote the quality control. The specification first concerns the quality of raw materials, items of the quality tests, material management, and qualification standards of the welders. It extends over details of the welding techniques, welding design, welding testings, inspection and the judgment standards. (H. Baba)

  2. Status of project design work for a German reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, K.; Zuehlke, P.

    1976-01-01

    A reprocessing plant will be built within the framework of a comprehensive waste management center planned by the Federal Government to treat the fuel elements unloaded from German nuclear power stations. On the basis of an annual throughput of 1,400 te of uranium averaged over the life of the plant, the center will be able to serve between 45,000 and 50,000 MWe of installed nuclear generating capacity. A comprehensive conceptual design study of the reprocessing plant to be built has been completed on the basis of the operating experience accumulated at the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant and the development work carried out by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and in the light also of an intensive exchange of experience with British and French reprocessing companies within the framework of United Reprocessors GmbH. This conceptual design study is the foundation for the preliminary project to be carried out on a collaborative basis by KEWA and PWK. (orig.) [de

  3. Decontamination and decommissioning of the West Valley Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, H.F.; Keel, R.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant through September 1, 1986. The topics addressed are: D and D of areas for reuse by the Liquid Waste Treatment System (LWTS); D and D of areas for reuse as High Level Waste (HLW) canister storage; and technologies developed in D and D work

  4. Multi-purpose simulator 'MR TRIOS' for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    MHI(Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.) has developed MR TRIOS(Mitsubishi Reprocessing plant TRansient simulator of Integrated process for Operation Support), the realtime dynamic simulator, for multipurpose use to support the Reprocessing Plant operation in various aspects. MR TRIOS integrates the simulation models of the unit process in reprocessing plant, including shearing, dissolution, NO x absorption, accountability and adjustment and co-decontamination process, where each simulation model has two kinds of models, one is Process and the other is Control System. MR TRIOS can simulate the process behavior of the above listed unit process in an integrated manner as well as independently. It is realized by MR CONTROL, the simulator control program developed by MHI. We can get from MR TRIOS the real-time process values, such as temperature, pressure, density, flow rate and concentration of eminent nuclides etc. enabling the evaluation of the process dynamic characteristics under various operating conditions. MR TRIOS has been proved to be an effective tool for the comprehensive study of the process and system dynamics, for operation technique improvements and for training. In this report we will show the introductory outline of multi-purpose simulator 'MR TRIOS' for reprocessing plant and also show the possibility to clarify the fundamental technical requirement to realize the effective material accountancy measure for Head-end Area. (author)

  5. Information disclosure of troubles occurring at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tatsuya; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Shinozaki, Yoshinori

    2005-01-01

    At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), efforts are made so that troubles occurred are promptly reported and announced publicly, and for minor troubles, etc., announcement to the society is made through the web-site and publicity magazines, so as to assure the transparency of the business. (author)

  6. Nuclear accountability data at the EUREX reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilardi, S.; Pozzi, F.

    1976-01-01

    In the present work the physical inventory's and fissile material balance's data, which have been collected during the irradiated MTR fuel reprocessing campaign at the EUREX plant in Saluggia (VC), are reported, together with the most important procedures of fissile material accountability

  7. Melter operation results in chemical test at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanehira, Norio; Yoshioka, Masahiro; Muramoto, Hitoshi; Oba, Takaaki; Takahashi, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Chemical Test of the glass melter system of the Vitrification Facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) was performed. In this test, basic performance of heating-up of the melter, melting glass, pouring glass was confirmed using simulated materials. Through these tests and operation of all modes, good results were gained, and training of operators was completed. (author)

  8. Outline of human machine interface at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niioka, T.; Miyazaki, T.; Fujita, D.; Esashika, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Nakamura, W.; Tochigi, T.; Yoshimoto, A.; Yokoi, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) has been performing the active tests since the end of March, 2006, for its Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant using the spent fuels retrieved from the Light Water Reactors. At the early stage of the tests relatively low burn-up fuels have been used, and the burn-up will be increased at later stages until the start of commercial operation planned next year. The plant is operated from the main control room in the Control Building, where two types of operator consoles are located for plant monitoring and operation. The Operator Interface Station (OIS) driven by computer systems is chiefly used for instrumentation and control for production activities during normal operation. In addition to this, safety panels composed of hardware circuits are installed for nuclear safety functions such as criticality safety management, explosion protection, and confinement of radioactive materials. This paper outlines the Human Machine Interface features applied to the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  9. Air conditioning facilities in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Michitaka; Oka, Tsutomu

    1987-01-01

    Reprocessing plants are the facilities for separating the plutonium produced by nuclear reaction and unconsumed remaining uranium from fission products in the spent fuel taken out of nuclear reactors and recovering them. The fuel reprocessing procedure is outlined. In order to ensure safety in handling radioactive substances, triple confinement using vessels, concrete cells and buildings is carried out in addition to the prevention of criticality and radiation shielding, and stainless steel linings and drip trays are installed as occasion demands. The ventilation system in a reprocessing plant is roughly divided into three systems, that is, tower and tank ventilation system to deal with offgas, cell ventilation system for the cells in which main towers and tanks are installed, and building ventilation system. Air pressure becomes higher from tower and tank system to building system. In a reprocessing plant, the areas in a building are classified according to dose rate. The building ventilation system deals with green and amber areas, and the cell ventilation system deals with red area. These three ventilation systems are explained. Radiation monitors are installed to monitor the radiation dose rate and air contamination in working places. The maintenance and checkup of ventilation systems are important. (Kako, I.)

  10. Plan for the civil reprocessing pilot plant of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.Y.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the R and D work, experience on plant operation and site situation, the necessity and feasibility of building a pilot plant for civil reprocessing in China are discussed. The capacity of 100 kg HM/day (LWR) and 3 kg HM/day (MTR) has been proposed. The plant consists of cold testing facility and hot pilot facility. It is expected to complete the pilot plant in 1990's. This paper also describes the purpose, scale, process and equipment of the pilot plant

  11. Roles of programmable logic controllers in fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Balakrishnan, V.P.; Pandya, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    Fuel charging facility is another application of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) in fuel reprocessing plants, that involves automatic operation of fuel cask dolly, charging motor, pneumatic doors, clutches, clamps, stepper motors and rod pushers in a pre-determined sequence. Block diagram of ACF system is given for underlining the scope of control and interlocks requirements involved for automation of the fuel charging system has been provided for the purpose at KARP Plant, Kalpakkam

  12. Solvent distillation studies for a purex reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginisty, C.; Guillaume, B.

    1990-01-01

    A distillation system has been developed for regeneration of Purex solvent and will be implemented for the first time in a reprocessing plant. The results are described and analyzed, with emphasis on laboratory experiments which were made with a radioactive plant solvent. Particularly the distillation provides a good separation of solvent degradation products, which was verified by measurements of interfacial tension and plutonium or ruthenium retention. 16 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  13. Development of safety evaluation technology for fire and explosion in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Akihiko

    2005-01-01

    Based on some lessons learned from the accidents in the reprocessing plant all over the world, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) has researched and developed the safety technologies for the reprocessing plants and its related facilities. This paper describes some accidental information around the reprocessing plants and its related research activities in JNC. (author)

  14. Institutional arrangements for a multinational reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.B.; Chayes, A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper lists some of the major issues that would have to be faced in negotiating the institutional structure of a multinational nuclear-fuel center. None of the organization problems is inherently insoluble. Difficulties are exacerbated by the large number of questions, their interrelations, and the complexity of the assumed structure. However, the assumptions posed the most difficult case. A reduction in membership and in the ambitious scope of the enterprise, at least at the outset, would greatly reduce the complexity of the organizational structure and the difficulty of negotiations. The analysis suggests that multinational fuel-cycle activities should start out more modestly, perhaps only with joint appraisal by a relatively few countries with existing geographic or economic connections. If operations are contemplated it would seem that the first step should be joint arrangements for spent-fuel storage, with the decision to go forward to more elaborate activities deferred. This approach would not only be simpler and permit the parties to gain experience working together, but it would have the virtue of delaying reprocessing until it was clear that there was a real need for it. Even on this reduced basis, the negotiating task would not be easy. The key, of course, to overcoming difficult technical problems of institutional structure is politial will--the genuine commitment of the participants to the aims and values of the enterprise. This suggests that any effort to cajole--not to say coerce--participation in a multinational fuel-cycle enterprise would be wholly misplaced. A reluctant partner would have available an infinitude of points and issues to create plausible, irritating, and ultimately defeating delay and complication in the negotiating process. Only assent freely given in the perception that the enterprise really serves the interest of the countries involved will be able to surmount the many institutional problems that will inevitably arise

  15. Radiation exposures in reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.; Caldwell, R.D.; Hall, R.M.

    1979-06-01

    Two large reprocessing facilities have been operating at the Savannah River Plant since 1955. The plant, which is near Aiken, South Carolina, is operated for the US Department of Energy by the Du Pont Company. The reprocessing facilities have a work force of approximately 1,800. The major processes in the facilities are chemical separations of irradiated material, plutonium finishing, and waste management. This paper presents the annual radiation exposure for the reprocessing work force, particularly during the period 1965 through 1978. It also presents the collective and average individual annual exposures for various occupations including operators, mechanics, electricians, control laboratory technicians, and health physicists. Periodic and repetitive work activities that result in the highest radiation exposures are also described. The assimilation of radionuclides, particularly plutonium, by the work force is reviewed. Methods that have been developed to minimize the exposure of reprocessing personnel are described. The success of these methods is illustrated by experience - there has been no individual worker exposure of greater than 3.1 rems per year and only one plutonium assimilation greater than the maximum permissible body burden during the 24 years of operation of the facilities

  16. Radiation exposures in reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, G.; Caldwell, R.D.; Hall, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    Two large reprocessing facilities have been operating at the Savannah River Plant since 1955. The plant, which is near Aiken, South Carolina, is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Du Pont Company. The reprocessing facilities have a work force of approximately 1,800. The major processes in the facilities are chemical separations of irradiated material, plutonium finishing, and waste management. This paper presents the annual radiation exposure for the reprocessing work force, particularly during the period 1965 through 1978. It also presents the collective and average individual annual exposures for various occupations including operators, mechanics, electricians, control laboratory technicians, and health physicists. Periodic and repetitive work activities that result in the highest radiation exposures are also described. The assimilation of radionuclides, particularly plutonium, by the work force is reviewed. Methods that have been developed to minimize the exposure of reprocessing personnel are described. The success of these methods is illustrated by experience - there has been no individual worker exposure of greater than 3.1 rems per year and only one plutonium assimilation greater than the maximum permissible body burden during the 24 years of operation of the facilities

  17. Experience of iodine removal in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Komori, Y.; Takeda, K.

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai reprocessing plant about 170 ton of irradiated fuels have been processed since the beginning of hot operations in 1977. There was no effective equipment for iodine removal from the off-gas except for alkaline scrubbers when the plant construction was completed. In order to reduce the iodine discharge to the atmosphere, silver-exchanged zeolite (AgX) filters were installed additionally in 1979 and 1980, and they have been effective. However, those decontamination factors (DFs) were not as high as expected, and increasing the reprocessing amount of spent fuels it became necessary to lower the iodine discharge to the atmosphere. Therefore, other iodine removal equipment is planned to be installed in the plant. Concerning these investigations and development of iodine removal techniques, the iodine concentration of actual off-gases was measured and useful data were obtained

  18. Report of the study grou: Data Processing in Reprocessing Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    A study group to examine Data Processing in Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plants was created at the request of the Head of Productions and entrusted to the Director of the La Hague Centre. The groupe was made up of engineers working in different fields: piloting, architecture, building outfits, services etc. To begin with the group examined the solutions proposed by the La Hague Centre for the replacement of data processing units in service at the time but too old and unreliable to meet the safety rules laid down. Secondly, as a contribution towards France's heritage in the fuel reprocessing field, the group investigated systems and configurations for possible application to the equipment of future plants. The results of these studies were submitted in January 1974 [fr

  19. The refurbishment of the D1206 fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, G.

    1988-01-01

    The term decommissioning can be applied not only to reactors but to any nuclear plant, laboratory, building or part of a building that may have been associated with radioactive material and needs to be restored to clean conditions. In this case the decommissioning and reconstruction of the Dounreay Fast Reactor fuel reprocessing plant, so that plutonium oxide could be reprocessed as well as enriched uranium fuel, is described. The work included improving containment and shielding, building a new head-end treatment cave for the more complex and larger fuel elements, improving the ventilation and constructing a new dissolver. In this paper the breakdown cave and dissolver cell are described and compared and the work done explained. (U.K.)

  20. Concept of a tritium extraction facility for a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaboylu, K.; Paulovic, M.; Ulrich, D.

    1991-01-01

    There are several alternatives for reducing the release of tritium to the environment originating from the wastewater of a reprocessing plant. Such alternatives, which are applicable for sites not located by the sea or by large rivers, are limited to either injection of tritiated wastewater into suitable deep geological formations, or final disposal into a deep underground repository after adequate treatment similar to other low and intermediate active waste. Removal of tritium from the wastewater by enrichment represents a further feasible option of the second alternative, which allows reduction of the huge volume of tritiated water to be treated before disposal. A significant volume reduction increases the safety of the subsequent steps such as transport, interim storage and final disposal of tritiated waste, furthermore, decreases the corresponding overall waste management cost. The projected Wackersdorf reprocessing plant has been considered as a reference for assessing the permitted tritium releases and other site characteristics. (orig.)

  1. Impact of the Tokai reprocessing plant on the workers and on the surrounding environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tago, I.

    1996-01-01

    The Tokai reprocessing plant began operation in September 1977 to establish oxide fuel reprocessing technology in Japan. Its designed capacity is about 0.7 metric tons of uranium per day. This report gives an example of the evaluation of the health and environmental aspects of a reprocessing plant. (author)

  2. Capital and operating costs of irradiated natural uranium reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiriet, L.; Jouannaud, C.; Couture, J.; Duboz, J.

    1966-01-01

    This paper presents first a method of analysing natural uranium reprocessing plants investment costs (method similar to LANG and BACH well known in the fuel oil industry) and their operating costs (analysed according to their economic type). This method helps establishing standard cost structures for these plants, allowing thus comparisons between existing or planned industrial facilities. It also helps evaluating the foreseeable consequences of technical progress. Some results obtained are given, concerning: the investment costs sensitivity to the various technical parameters defining the fuel and their comparison according to the country or the economic area taken into account. Finally, the influence of the plants size on their investment costs is shown. (author) [fr

  3. Abnormal reactions in a evaporator in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Takashi; Umeda, Miki; Sugikawa, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate a self-accelerated reaction in an evaporator in a fuel reprocessing plant due to organic-nitric acid reactions, a development of a calculation code is under way. Mock-up tests were performed to investigate the fluid dynamic behavior of the organic solvent in the evaporator. Based on these results, the model of the calculation code was constructed. This report describes the results of mock-up tests and the model of the calculation code. (author)

  4. Safety assessment of UP3-A reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, J.P.; Guezenec, J.Y.; Poirier, M.C.

    1992-02-01

    This presentation describes how the safety assessment was made of UP3-A plant of the La Hague establishment for the building permit and operating license within the context of French nuclear regulations and the national debate on the need for reprocessing. Other factors discussed are how the public was involved, how the regulations were improved in the process and what the different stages of commissioning consisted of. (author)

  5. Potential fire or explosion risks in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, G.

    1983-05-01

    Installation for reprocessing are large chemical plants handling large quantities of inflammable solvents and products allowing large risk of fire. Further, the chemical process involves the use of oxidizer and reducer agents which can have a very strong chemical activity and by certain circumstances create overpressures or large explosions. This paper shows the principal radioactive consequences we can retain in safety analyses. As an example the combustion phenomenon involved in a solid waste storage silo with irradiated uranium traces is described [fr

  6. Methods for separating actinides from reprocessing and refabrication plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedder, D.W.; Finney, B.C.; Blomeke, J.O.

    1979-01-01

    Chemical processing flowsheets have been developed to partition actinides from all actinide-bearing LWR fuel reprocessing and refabrication plant wastes. These wastes include high-activity-level liquids, scrap recovery liquors, HEPA filters and incinerator ashes, and chemical salt wastes such as sodium carbonate scrub solutions, detergent cleanup streams, and alkaline off-gas scrubber liquors. The separations processes that were adopted for this study are based on solvent extraction, cation exchange chromatography, and leaching with Ce 4+ -HNO 3 solution

  7. Features in the aspect of materials in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    1992-01-01

    The process of the reprocessing plant installed in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, by Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co., Ltd. is the Purex wet process experienced in Japan and abroad, and which can obtain the uranium and plutonium products of high purity at high recovery rate. This process is to melt spent fuel with nitric acid, and extract and separate uranium, plutonium and fission products from the obtained solution by utilizing the difference in chemical properties. The yearly amount of treatment of the reprocessing plant of this company is 800 t uranium. In order to ensure the safety in the reprocessing plant that handles the solution with high radioactivity, the function of confining radioactive substances in definite areas is demanded. For the purpose, the machinery, equipment and piping containing radioactive substances are made of the materials having the corrosion resistance against nitric acid, and welded structure is adopted to prevent leakage. Negative pressure is maintained in waste gas treatment facilities in relation to cells, and in the cells in relation to the building. The outline of the facilities, the materials of the main machinery and equipment, and the applied technologies are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  9. The safety of the reprocessing plant of Cogema La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledermann, P.

    1997-01-01

    The risks associated to the operation of a reprocessing plant come from the important quantities of radioactive matter. To insure the reprocessing safety consists in keeping, in any circumstance, the containment of radioactive matter. That this objective that leads the safety at any step of the factory life. Three risks families are listed: the risks from nuclear origin, associated to the specific physico-chemical behaviours of radioactive matter (dispersion and criticality, thermal risks and risks bound to the hydrogen production); the second family is the group of internal risks resulting from the industrial activity (chemical risks, fire risks, dysfunctions of electric installations or falls of loads); the last family is the group of external risks resulting from the impact of events reaching the site where are established the installations (risks associated to climatic conditions, risks associated to surrounding activities such explosions, fires, impact resulting from the fall of a tourism plane or road transport of hazardous matter). (N.C.)

  10. In-line analytical instrumentation in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.K.; Bhargava, V.K.; Marathe, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing plants where uranium and plutonium are separated from highly radioactive fission products, continuous monitoring of these constituents is helpful in many ways. Apart from quick detection of possible process malfunctions, in-line monitoring protects operating personnel from radiation hazards, reduces the cost of laboratory analysis and increases the overall efficiency of the process. A review of a proqramme of work on the design, fabrication and testing of some in-line instruments viz. gamma absorptiometer for uranium, neutron monitor for plutonium, acidity monitor for scrub nitric acid etc., their feasibility studies in the laboratory as well as in the pilot plant is presented. (auth.)

  11. The need to study of bounding accident in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segawa, Satoshi; Fujita, Kunio

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear consensus that the severe accident corresponds to the core damage accident for power reactors. On the other hand, for FCFs, there is no clear consensus on what is the accident to assess the safety in the region of beyond design basis, or what is the accident which has very low probability but large consequence. The need to examine a bounding consequence of each type of accident is explained to advance the rationality of safety management and regulation and, as a result, to reinforce the safety of a reprocessing plant. The likelihood of occurrence of an accident causing a bounding consequence should correspond to that of a severe accident at a nuclear power plant. The bounding consequence will be derived using the deterministic method and sound engineering judgment supplemented by the probabilistic method. Once an agreement on such a concept is reached among regulators, operators and related experts it will help to provide a solid basis to ensure the safety of a reprocessing plant independent of that of a nuclear power plant. In this paper, we show a preliminary risk profile of RRP calculated by QSA (Quantitative Safety Assessment) which JNFL developed. The profile shows that bounding consequences of various accidents in a range of occurrence frequency corresponding to a severe accident at a nuclear power plant. And we find that the bounding consequence of high-level liquid waste boiling is the largest among all in this range. Therefore, the risk of this event is shown in this paper as an example. To build a common consensus about bounding accidents among concerned parties will encourage regulatory body to introduce such an idea for more effective regulation with scientific rationality. Additionally the study of bounding accidents can contribute to substantial development for accident management strategy as reprocessing operators. (authors)

  12. West Valley Reprocessing Plant. Safety analysis plant, supplement 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Supplement 18 contains the following additions to Appendix II--5.0 Geology and Seismology: Section 12 ''Seismic Investigations for Spent Fuel Reprocessing Facility at West Valley, New York,'' October 20, 1975, and Section 13 ''Earthquake Return Period Analysis at West Valley, New York, for Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc.'' November 5, 1975

  13. IAEA verification of materials accounting in commercial reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Hakkila, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reprocessing plants currently under International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards have design capacities up to 210 tonnes of heavy metal per year. All of the plants use conventional materials accounting for safeguards. However, several larger commercial reprocessing plants are being designed with capacities of 350 to 1200 tonnes of heavy metal per year. It is likely that many of these plants, as well as some of the existing smaller ones, will adopt near-real-time materials accounting. The major effect of the combination of larger plants and near-real-time accounting on IAEA safeguards will be the demand for greater timeliness of verification. Continuous inspector presence may be required, as well as more on-site measurements by the inspector. In this paper, the authors review what needs to be verified, as well as current inspector activities in the process area. The bulk of the paper describes rapid, easy-to-use measurement techniques and instruments that may be applied to on-site verification measurements

  14. Fuel reprocessing plant: No qualitative differences as compared to other sensitive process plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweinoch, J.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear power plants like the fuel reprocessing plant belong to the highly sensitive installations in respect of safety, but involve the same risks qualitatively as liquid-gas plants or chemical plants. Therefore no consequences for basic rights are discernible. The police can take adequate preventive measures. The regulations governing police action provide proper and sufficient warrants. (DG) [de

  15. Optimization of the sizes and dates of starting up of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Kikusaburo

    1977-01-01

    It is desirable to complete the nuclear fuel cycle domestically for promoting nuclear power generation in Japan, and the reprocessing of spent fuel is indispensable. However, the capacity of the reprocessing plant in PNC and the reprocessing by the commissioning to foreign countries will be insufficient by the latter half of 1980s. In the planning of the second reprocessing plant in Japan, the following problems remain yet to be solved. The international regulation and the laws in Japan regarding the storage and transport of spent fuel, the disposal of radioactive wastes, and the recycling of plutonium must be established. The consensus of the public on the necessity and the safety of fuel reprocessing must be obtained. The technical investigation about fuel reprocessing and related business must be carried out sufficiently, including the necessity of introducing the technology from abroad. The economy and various conditions for industrializing fuel reprocessing must be studied. The economy of fuel reprocessing plants, the reprocessing cost taking escalation into account, mean reprocessing cost, the optimization of the time of starting full operation and the time of starting-up, the rise of reprocessing cost due to the escalation of operational cost are explained. Numerical calculation was carried out about the second reprocessing plant in Japan, and the results are examined. (Kako, I.)

  16. A comprehensive fuel nuclide analysis at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenz, H.J.; Koch, L.

    1983-01-01

    The composition of spent fuel can be determined by various methods. They rely partially on different information. Therefore the synopsis of the results of all methods permits a detection of systematic errors and their explanation. Methods for determining the masses of fuel nuclides at the reprocessing input point range from pure calculations (shipper data) to mere experimental determinations (volumetric analysis). In between, a mix of ''fresh'' experimental results and ''historical'' data is used to establish a material balance. Deviations in the results obtained by the individual methods can be attributed to the information source, which is unique for the method in question. The methodology of the approach consists of three steps: by paired comparison of the operator analysis (usually volumetric or gravimetric) with remeasurements the error components are determined on a batch-by-batch basis. Using the isotope correlation technique the operator data as well as the remeasurements are checked on an inter-batch basis for outliers, precision and bias. Systematic errors can be uncovered by inter-lab comparison of remeasurements and confirmed by using historical information. Experience collected during the reprocessing of LWR fuel at two reprocessing plants prove the flexibility and effectiveness of this approach. An example is presented to demonstrate its capability in detecting outliers and determining systematic errors. (author)

  17. Plant for retention of 14C in reprocessing plants for LWR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, H.; Gutowski, H.; Bonka, H.; Gruendler, D.

    1983-01-01

    The 14 C produced from nuclear power plants is actually totally emitted from nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants. Using the radiation protection principles proposed in ICRP 26, 14 C should be retained at heavy water moderated reactors and reprocessing plants due to a cost-benefit analysis. In the frame of a research work to cost-benefit analysis, which was sponsored by the Federal Minister of the Interior, an industrial plant for 14 C retention at reprocessing plants for LWR fuel elements has been planned according to the double alkali process. The double alkali process has been chosen because of the sufficient operation experience in the conventional chemical technique. In order to verify some operational parameters and to gain experiences, a cold test plant was constructed. The experiment results showed that the double alkali process is a technically suitable method with high operation security. Solidifying CaCO 3 with cement gives a product fit for final disposal

  18. Application of probabilistic safety assessment to Rokkasho reprocessing plant, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Takashi; Takebe, Kazumi; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu

    2008-01-01

    A probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is made on the boiling accident of a highly active liquid waste tank, which may result in significant consequences, in accordance with the procedure for PSA developed for nuclear power plants. Obtained as results are the frequency of boiling accident of a certain tank of 2.0x10 -8 /y (frequency of boiling accident of any tank of 4.1x10 0-8 /y), its error factor of approx. 6, and information on the relative risk importance based on the FV index and RAW for various components, systems and activities of personnel and on the sensitivity of key parameters. Furthermore, the effect of the time required for repairing failed instruments on the frequency of accident, how to deal with the common cause of failure of the duplicated dynamic components, one of which is at least in operation, and conservative exposure dose in the event of an accident are examined. The database for the Rokkasho reprocessing plant has not been established yet, but the PSA results utilizing available failure rate databases of existing nuclear power plants and reprocessing plants in Japan and abroad can be used effectively to optimize operations and maintenance, if they are interpreted properly and some uncertainties are taken into account. (author)

  19. Intergovernmental action of neighbours against the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    BV Art. 11, para. 2; BBauG section 12 (Federal Building Law). Art.11, para. 2 BV does not require that local development planning for a reprocessing plant should take into consideration the effects on neighbouring municipalities as a result of post-construction activities, in this case the transport of radioactive material via certain routes. Such supra-regional aspects go beyond the planning basis of a local government. These are the headnotes of a decision by the Bavarian Higher Administrative Court (BayVerfGH, 29.4.1987 - Vf. 5 - VII - 86). The issue of the proceedings commenced by a collective action is the question whether an area development plan for the purpose of erecting the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant infringes the constitutional rights of the town of Nuernberg due to the fact that after commissioning of the plant, radioactive material will be transported to and from the plant, and the envisaged route for the transports leads through the urban area. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Design verification for large reprocessing plants (Proposed procedures)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolandi, G.

    1988-07-01

    In the 1990s, four large commercial reprocessing plants will progressively come into operation: If an effective and efficient safeguards system is to be applied to these large and complex plants, several important factors have to be considered. One of these factors, addressed in the present report, concerns plant design verification. Design verification provides an overall assurance on plant measurement data. To this end design verification, although limited to the safeguards aspects of the plant, must be a systematic activity, which starts during the design phase, continues during the construction phase and is particularly performed during the various steps of the plant's commissioning phase. The detailed procedures for design information verification on commercial reprocessing plants must be defined within the frame of the general provisions set forth in INFCIRC/153 for any type of safeguards related activities and specifically for design verification. The present report is intended as a preliminary contribution on a purely technical level, and focusses on the problems within the Agency. For the purpose of the present study the most complex case was assumed: i.e. a safeguards system based on conventional materials accountancy, accompanied both by special input and output verification and by some form of near-real-time accountancy involving in-process inventory taking, based on authenticated operator's measurement data. C/S measures are also foreseen, where necessary to supplement the accountancy data. A complete ''design verification'' strategy comprehends: informing the Agency of any changes in the plant system which are defined as ''safeguards relevant''; ''reverifying by the Agency upon receiving notice from the Operator on any changes, on ''design information''. 13 refs

  1. Computer integrated construction at AB building in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takami, Masahiro; Azuchi, Takehiro; Sekiguchi, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    JNFL (Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited) is now processing with construction of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Rokkasho Village in Aomori Prefecture, which is coming near to the busiest period of construction. Now we are trying to complete the civil work of AB Building and KA Building in a very short construction term by applying CIC (Computer Integrated Construction) concept, in spite of its hard construction conditions, such as the massive and complicated building structure, interferences with M and E (Mechanical and Electrical) work, severe winter weather, remote site location, etc. The key technologies of CIC are three-dimensional CAD, information network, and prefabrication and mechanization of site work. (author)

  2. Outline of material accountancy system for Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Touko; Yamazaki Yoshihiro; Ai, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, Facility Attachment (FA) for Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) was entered into force and the safeguards has been implemented in accordance with the FA. So operator must carry out the effectual material accountancy on the basis of facility operation. RRP is large and complex facility and operated based on automatic and remote system. For efficient material accounting viewpoint, the system especially automatic data collection is established using RRP computer network. The paper describes the outline of material accountancy system, the structure of RRP computer network including how to collect the source data, to convert the batch data and the reporting. (author)

  3. Process analysis in a THTR trial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodda, B.G.; Filss, P.; Kirchner, H.; Kroth, K.; Lammertz, H.; Schaedlich, W.; Brocke, W.; Buerger, K.; Halling, H.; Watzlawik, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    The demands on an analytical control system for a THTR trial reprocessing plant are specified. In a rather detailed example, a typical sampling, sample monitoring and measuring process is described. Analytical control is partly automated. Data acquisition and evaluation by computer are described for some important, largely automated processes. Sample management and recording of in-line and off-line data are carried out by a data processing system. Some important experiments on sample taking, sample transport and on special analysis are described. (RB) [de

  4. Spent solvent treatment process at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Akihiro; Saka, Munenori; Araya, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Tomohiro; Wakamatsu, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    In order to dispose of spent organic solvent and diluent produced by the PUREX method, it is desirable that it should be in stable form for easy handling. For this reason, spent solvent is reduced to powder form and further molded so that it becomes easier to handle for temporary storage at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). In this paper, the treatment unit for reducing spent solvent to powder form and the treatment unit for modeling the powder are introduced as well as their treatment results during Chemical Test. (author)

  5. Improvement of shearing machine in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takae, Akiyoshi; Otani, Yoshikuni

    1994-01-01

    The shearing machine in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant has been improved and refurbished through its operational experience for about 20 years. Every component except the shear housing and magazine is changed for improved things by PNC, while the shearing machine had been designed and fabricated originally by a French Company. The improvement of the shearing machine was carried out for the purpose of settling the problems which were experienced in the past operation, and improving durability, remote maintainability, and operability. The details of their improvement work are described. (author)

  6. Government on the spot over Sellafield's reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The 18-year gestation of British Nuclear Fuels' Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) is almost at an end. Only one hurdle seemingly remains - the authorisation to dispose of its wastes. Opponents see this as the last chance to scrap what they regard as an environmental and financial white elephant. BNF's original rationale for THORP has grown increasingly threadbare since it was proposed in the mid-1970s - and the Government may now be forced into a last-minute rethink of the consequences of allowing it to be commissioned. (Author)

  7. Advanced Purex process for the new French reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.; Ledermann, P.; Pradel, P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the main process innovations of the new Cogema reprocessing plants of La Hague (UP3 and UP2 800). Major improvements of process like the use of rotary dissolvers and annular columns, and also entirely new processes like solvent distillation and plutonium oxidizing dissolution, yield an advanced Purex process. The results of these innovations are significant improvements for throughput, end-products purification performances and waste minimization. They contribute also to limit personnel exposure. The main results of the first three years of operation are described. (author). 3 refs., 5 figs

  8. Replacement of the criticality accident alarm system in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Momose, Takumaro; Suzuki, Kei; Kawai, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    A Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) was installed as part of criticality safety management for use in reducing the radiation workers could be exposed to in the rare case of a criticality accident. The initial CAAS version was installed the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) in the 1980s. It includes units that can detect gamma-rays or neutron-rays released in criticality accidents (CADs), one of which consists of three plastic scintillation gamma detectors and three solid state neutron detectors with fissile material, and in being highly reliable utilizes the 2 out of 3 voting system. The purpose of this study is to give the design principles and procedures for determining the adequate relocation of the CADs within the TRP. The optimal places for the CADs to be relocated to were determined using a conservative evaluation method. Firstly, equipment needing to be monitored for criticality accidents was selected with consideration given to the risk of excessive exposure to workers. Secondly, the detection threshold of a minimum accident was set to be an increase in power of 10 15 fissions/s occurring within a rise-time of between 0.5 ms and 1 s. The sum of neutron and gamma doses of a minimum accident (10 15 fissions) was 0.3 Gy at an unshielded distance of 1 m. Finally, doses at where the CADs were installed were evaluated using parameters calculated with MCNP and ANISN. As a result, the alarm trip level of both the gamma detector and the neutron detector being set at 2.0 mGy/h enabled minimum criticality accidents to be conservatively detected. These results were then applied to the new CAD positions. (author)

  9. Review of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Control of hydrogen gas produced by radiolysis of reprocessing solutions at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, E.; Surugaya, N.; Takaya, A.; Nakamura, H.; Maki, A.; Yamanouchi, T.

    1999-10-01

    Radioactive materials in aqueous solution at a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant causes radiolytic generation of several gases including hydrogen. Hydrogen accumulating in equipment can be an explosion hazard. In such plants, though the consideration in the design has been fundamentally made in order to remove the ignition source from the equipment, the hydrogen concentration in the equipment should not exceed the explosion threshold. It is, therefore, desired to keep the hydrogen concentration lower than the explosion threshold by dilution with the air introduced into equipment, from the viewpoint which previously prevents the explosion. This report describes the calculation of hydrogen generation, evaluation of hydrogen concentration under abnormal operation and consideration of possible improvement at Tokai Reprocessing Plant. The amount of hydrogen generation was calculated for each equipment from available data on radiolysis induced by radioactive materials. Taking into consideration for abnormal condition that is single failure of air supply and loss of power supply, the investigation was made on the method for controlling so that the hydrogen concentration may not exceed the explosion threshold. Possible means which can control the concentration of hydrogen gas under the explosion threshold have been also investigated. As the result, it was found that hydrogen concentration of most equipment was kept under the explosion threshold. It was also shown that improvement of the facility was necessary on the equipment in which the concentration of the hydrogen may exceed the explosion threshold. Proposals based on the above results are also given in this report. The above content has been described in 'Examination of the hydrogen produced by the radiolysis' which is a part of 'Reviews of Design Data for Safety Assessment of Tokai Reprocessing Plant' (JNC TN8410 99-002) published in February 1999. This report incorporates the detail evaluation so that operation

  10. Present status of fuel reprocessing plant in PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kenji

    1981-01-01

    In the fuel reprocessing plant of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, its hot test has now been completed. For starting its full-scale operation duly, the data are being collected on the operation performance and safety. The construction was started in June, 1971, and completed in October, 1974. In July, 1977, spent fuel was accepted in the plant, and the hot test was started. In September, the same year, the first fuel shearing was made. So far, a total of about 31 t U from both BWR and PWR plants has been processed, thus the hot test was entirely completed. The following matters are described: hot test and its results, research on Pu and U mixed extraction, utilization of product plutonium, development of safeguard technology, and repair work on the acid recovery evaporation tank. (J.P.N.)

  11. Development of remote maintenance technology for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Akira; Saito, Masayuki; Kawamura, Hironobu; Yamade, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Sen; Sugiyama, Sakae.

    1986-01-01

    In the plants for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel containing fission products, due to the facts that the facilities are in high radiations fields, and the surfaces of equipments are contaminated with radioactive substances, the troubles of process equipments are directly connected to the remarkable drop of the rate of operation of the facilities. Therefore, the development of various remote maintenance techniques has been carried out so far, but this time, Hitachi Ltd. got a chance to take part in the repair of spent fuel dissolving tanks in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. and the development of several kinds of remote checkup equipment related to the repair work. Especially in the repair of the dissolving tanks, a radiation-withstanding checkup and repair apparatus which has high remote operability taking the conditions of radioactive environment and the restriction of the repaired objects in consideration was required, and a dissolving tank repairing robot composed of six kinds has been developed. The key points of the development were the selective use of high radiation-withstanding parts and materials, small size structure and the realization of full remote operability. The full remote maintenance apparatus of this kind is unique in the world, and applicable to wide fields. (Kako, I.)

  12. Remote repair and inspection technics in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Kenji; Ishibashi, Yuzo; Otani, Yosikuni

    1986-01-01

    Tokai reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. is the only factory in Japan which treats 0.7 t/day of the spent fuel from LWR power stations and recovers remaining uranium and newly produced plutonium. Since the reprocessing plant started the hot test in September, 1977, about eight years have elapsed, and 233 t of spent fuel was treated as of August, 1985. During this period, the development of various remote working techniques have been carried out to cope with the failure of equipment and to strengthen the preventive maintenance of equipment. In this report, the development of the techniques for the remote repair of leaking dissolving tanks and the development of the remote inspection system for confirming the soundness of equipment in cells are described. In nuclear facilities, from the viewpoint of the reduction of radiation exposure accompanying the works under high radiation, labor saving, the increase of capacity factor by shortening the period of repair works, the improvement of safety and reliability of the facilities by perfecting checkup and inspection and so on, it is strongly desired to put robots in practical use for maintenance and inspection. (Kako, I.)

  13. Concept of off-gas purification in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; von Ammon, R.

    1986-01-01

    Concepts and individual processes for the off-gas purification in reprocessing plants are described which are suited to achieve a better retention of the gaseous and volatile radionuclides 129 I, 85 Kr, 14 C, and tritium. Improved and new process steps have been developed to the cold pilot plant scale. Essential individual process steps are an efficient iodine desorption from the dissolver solution, improved and new off-gas scrubs with nitric acid, a cryogenic as well as a selective absorption process for rare gas recovery plus the required prepurification steps and a process for the continuous and pressure-free fixation and storage of krypton in a metal matrix. Individual facilities have been selected and combined to investigate integrated dissolver off-gas systems. Advanced concepts based on a process using low flows and loads of all off-gas streams including the cell ventilation off-gas are briefly discussed

  14. Safeguarding of large scale reprocessing and MOX plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howsley, R.; Burrows, B.; Longevialle, H. de; Kuroi, H.; Izumi, A.

    1997-01-01

    In May 97, the IAEA Board of Governors approved the final measures of the ''93+2'' safeguards strengthening programme, thus improving the international non-proliferation regime by enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards verification. These enhancements are not however, a revolution in current practices, but rather an important step in the continuous evolution of the safeguards system. The principles embodied in 93+2, for broader access to information and increased physical access already apply, in a pragmatic way, to large scale reprocessing and MOX fabrication plants. In these plants, qualitative measures and process monitoring play an important role in addition to accountancy and material balance evaluations in attaining the safeguard's goals. This paper will reflect on the safeguards approaches adopted for these large bulk handling facilities and draw analogies, conclusions and lessons for the forthcoming implementation of the 93+2 Programme. (author)

  15. Process control of an HTGR fuel reprocessing cold pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rode, J.S.

    1976-10-01

    Development of engineering-scale systems for a large-scale HTGR fuel reprocessing demonstration facility is currently underway in a cold pilot plant. These systems include two fluidized-bed burners, which remove the graphite (carbon) matrix from the crushed HTGR fuel by high temperature (900 0 C) oxidation. The burners are controlled by a digital process controller with an all analog input/output interface which has been in use since March, 1976. The advantages of such a control system to a pilot plant operation can be summarized as follows: (1) Control loop functions and configurations can be changed easily; (2) control constants, alarm limits, output limits, and scaling constants can be changed easily; (3) calculation of data and/or interface with a computerized information retrieval system during operation are available; (4) diagnosis of process control problems is facilitated; and (5) control panel/room space is saved

  16. Pilot and pilot-commercial plants for reprocessing spent fuels of FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaldaev, V.S.; Sokolova, I.D.

    1988-01-01

    A review of modern state of investigations on the FBR mixed oxide uranium-plutonium fuel reprocessing abroad is given. Great Britain and France occupy the leading place in this field, operating pilot plants of 5 tons a year capacity. Technology of spent fuel reprocessing and specific features of certain stages of the technological process are considered. Projects of pilot and pilot-commercial plants of Great Britain, France, Japan, USA are described. Economic problems of the FBR fuel reprocessing are touched upon

  17. Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

    1980-12-01

    The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents

  18. Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant-1: a stepping stone in Indian PHWR spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sanjay; Dubey, K.; Qureshi, F.T.; Lokeswar, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    India has low reserves of uranium and high reserves of thorium. In order to optimize resource utilization India has adopted a closed fuel cycle to ensure long-term energy security. The optimum resource utilization is feasible only by adopting reprocessing, conditioning and recycle options. It is very much imperative to view spent fuel as a vital resource material and not a waste to be disposed off. Thus, spent nuclear fuel reprocessing forms an integral part of the Indian Nuclear Energy Programme. Aqueous reprocessing based on PUREX technology is in use for more than 50 years and has reached a matured status

  19. Use of fuel reprocessing plant instrumentation for international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has a program for developing instrumentation to be used by safeguards inspectors at reprocessing facilities. These instruments have generally been individual pieces of equipment for improving the accuracy of existing measurement instrumentation or equipment to perform nondestructive assay on a selected basis. It is proposed that greater use be made of redundant plant instrumentation and data recovery systems that could augment plant instrumentation to verify the validity of plant measurements. Use of these methods for verfication must be proven as part of an operating plant before they can be relied upon for safeguards surveillance. Inspectors must be qualified in plant operations, or have ready access to those so qualified, if the integrity of the operation is to be properly assessed. There is an immediate need for the development and in-plant proof testing of an integrated gamma, passive neutron, and active neutron measurement system for drum quantities of radioactive trash. The primary safeguards effort should be limited to plutonium and highly enriched uranium

  20. Decontamination and remote dismantling tests in the Itrec reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candelieri, T.; Gerardi, A.; Soffietto, G.

    1993-01-01

    The scope of this research is to evaluate the advantages of the rack removal system in the dismantling of reprocessing installations. The objective of this work is to verify experimentally the possibility of the decontamination of any particular module and the capability of the remote dismantling of components installed in the mobile rack. In particular, the main objective is to develop remotely operated equipment for the dismantling of centrifugal contactors. The decontamination of the equipment which represents the most important preliminary phase of the decommissioning operation, allowed to obtain low-level radioactivity. A supporting programme has been performed in order to collect sufficient data for the project and design of the remote dismantling machine. On the basis of technological cold test results, the project of the dismantling machine's construction has been optimized. Positive results obtained during the hot dismantling operations on the Rack 6 bis attested the effectiveness of the rack removal system as an original design which facilitates decommissioning of reprocessing plants. 2 tabs., 18 figs

  1. Status report - expert knowledge of operators in fuel reprocessing plants, enrichment plants and fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuss, W.; Kramer, J.; Wildberg, D.

    1987-01-01

    The necessary qualifications of the responsible personnel and the knowledge required by personnel otherwise employed in nuclear plants are among the requirements for licensing laid down in paragraph 7 of the German Atomic Energy Act. The formal regulations for nuclear power plants are not directly applicable to plants in the fuel cycle because of the differences in the technical processes and the plant and work organisation. The aim of the project was therefore to establish a possible need for regulations for the nuclear plants with respect to the qualification of the personnel, and to determine a starting point for the definition of the required qualifications. An extensive investigation was carried out in the Federal Republic of Germany into: the formal requirements for training; the plant and personnel organisation structures; the tasks carried out by the responsible and otherwise employed personnel; and the state of training. For this purpose plant owners and managers were interviewed and the literature and plant specific documentation (e.g. plant rules) were reviewed. On the basis of literature research, foreign practices were determined and used to make comparative evaluations. The status report is divided into three separate parts for the reprocessing, the uranium enrichment, and the manufacture of the fuel elements. On the basis of the situation for reprocessing plants (particularly that of the WAK) and fuel element manufacturing plants, the development of a common (not uniform) regulation for all the examined plants in the fuel cycle was recommended. The report gives concrete suggestions for the content of the regulations. (orig.) [de

  2. General Atomic reprocessing pilot plant: description and results of initial testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    In June 1976 General Atomic completed the construction of a reprocessing head-end cold pilot plant. In the year since then, each system within the head end has been used for experiments which have qualified the designs. This report describes the equipment in the plant and summarizes the results of the initial phase of reprocessing testing

  3. Administrative and managerial controls for the operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are provided for the administrative and managerial controls necessary for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Topics covered include: administrative organization; review and audit; facility administrative policies and procedures; and tests and inspections. Recognizing that administrative practices vary among organizations operating nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, the standard incorporates flexibility that provides for compliance by any organization

  4. Density and volume measurements of reprocessing plant feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platzer, R.; Carrier, M.; Neuilly, M.; Dedaldechamp, P.

    1985-05-01

    A theoretical study of the phenomenon of gas bubbles formation within a liquid led to an adaptation of the differential pressure bubbling technique for the measurement of liquid levels and densities in tanks. Experiments, carried out on a 800 liters tank with water and uranyl nitrate solutions had the double aim to study the precision attainable on volume and density measurements and to design a method for corrections of influencing factors. In parallel, procedures for transfer of known volumes through the use of siphons and for tank calibration by liquid level measurement are also investigated. The paper presents the first results obtained so far and the conclusions to be drawn for the elaboration of calibration and exploitation procedures suitables for use in reprocessing plants. The demonstration to transfer mass of solution with an accuracy of 0.1% is made [fr

  5. Safety demonstration test on solvent fire in fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Gunji; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes a fundamental of results obtained in the Reprocessing Plant Safety Demonstration Test Program which was performed under the contract between the Science and Technology Agency of Japan and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this test program, a solvent fire was hypothesized, and such data were obtained as fire behavior, smoke behavior and integrity of exhaust filters in the ventilation system. Through the test results, it was confirmed that under the fire condition in hypothetical accident, the integrity of the cell and the cell ventilation system were maintained, and the safety function of the exhaust filters was maintained against the smoke loading. Analytical results by EVENT code agreed well with the present test data on the thermofluid flow in a cell ventilation system. (author)

  6. Qualitative simulation for supervision of a nuclear reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyval, L.; Ledoux, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the first application of a supervision support system to a part of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The system is called DIAPASON; its role is to help the operators to understand the behaviour of the process, and to diagnose failures if needed. This paper is only concerned with the simulation of the behaviour of the process and the associated explanations provided by DIAPASON during the normal operation periods. The modeling, simulation techniques are presented, when applied to a nuclear process. A causal graph linking the relevant variables by Qualitative Transfer Functions models the process behaviour. The simulation consists in propagating through the entire graph the significant events detected on the input variables or on measurable disturbances of the process. As a result, the evolutions of all the other variables are obtained. The explanations that can be provided at the present time are deduced from the simulation

  7. Microbial transformations of radionuclides released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, and the fission products Tc, I, Cs, Sr, released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides and the fission products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed. (author)

  8. Remote repair of the dissolvers in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Yosikuni

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, there occurred failures (pinholes) in two dissolver tanks successively in 1982 and 1983. These dissolvers are set under high radiation field, not permitting access of the personnel. So, repair works were carried out after development of the remotely operated repair system. For repair of the failed dissolver tanks, after tests and studies, the means was employed of grinding off the wall surface to small depth and then forming over it a corrosion resistant sealing layer by padding welding. The repair system which enabled the repair and the inspection in the cell by remote operation consisted of six devices including polishing, welding, dye penetration test, etc. Repair works on the dissolvers took two months and a half from September 1983. (Mori, K.)

  9. Total data management in the La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthion, Y.; Perot, J.P.; Silie, P.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the complexity of a spent fuel reprocessing plant and its nuclear characteristics, the operators must have real-time access to updated information on many subjects. To meet these requirements effectively, Cogema has installed a number of diversified data processing systems linked by a communications network called Haguenet. The whole system forms the La Hague Total Data Management System (TDMS) which performs a full range of functions, namely production data management, maintenance data management, technical documentation and miscellaneous. Some examples of the main process data management applications implemented within the La Hague TDMS are briefly described (nuclear materials and waste follow-up, analytical data management, operating procedures management and site inspection management). Also presented are some examples of the maintenance-related systems implemented within the La Hague TDMS (diagnostic assistance system, software maintenance center, maintenance interventions demand and spare parts data management). (Z.S.)

  10. Environmental radioactivity monitoring around the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, K.; Hareyama, H.; Takeishi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited has carried out environmental monitoring in order to check that the dose of radiation to which the public is exposed around the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is much lower than the annual dose limit. The monitoring is mainly carried out according to 'the program decided by the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) of Japan' and 'the program decided by the Aomori Prefectural Government.' In this report, we present information on the monitoring according to the NSC program, that is the point of view of selection of the monitoring items for dose assessment, the point of view of the dose assessment from the monitoring results, etc. Also, we report on estimation of the effects from the facilities on the monitoring results obtained and dose assessment of the public during Active testing of RRP. (author)

  11. APL used for control of a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruschka, B.

    1975-05-01

    A package of interactive APL functions for data maintaining and processing is discussed in some detail. The data is recorded during the cycle of irradiated fuels and is used to control the reprocessing plant at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (WAK). First nuclear fuel processing is explained. A short justification is given of the reasons why the program language APL and the facilities of the file subsystem APL PLUS had been chosen for data handling. This is followed by the description of workspace and file organisation, all mainfunctions and files are described. Finally all functions are listed, an example of a user session and the output of daily and monthly reports from terminal and high-speed printer are presented. (orig.) [de

  12. 129I in the environment around a nuclear reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, S.N.; Doshi, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    129 I and 131 I activities are measured in leaf samples collected within Trombay region, covering a radius of 4500 m from the reprocessing plant. The concentration of 129 I and 131 I in dried leaf samples ranged from 0.04 to 1.28 pCi/gm and 4 to 5 pCi/gm respectively. A radiochemical procedure involving distillation and solvent extractions of 129 I and then counting in a Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer is used for its final determination. The concentration of 129 I observed in leaf samples collected at the south site gate is used to calculate the dose commitment to an adult via grass-cow-milk pathway. On the basis of conservative assumption that the activity present in the grass would be equal to that in the leaf, the dose commitment to an adult through milk ingestion route will not exceed 5.5 μSv/y. (author). 2 tabs., 13 refs

  13. The reprocessing plant as a problem of international law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendling, L.

    1987-01-01

    The planned construction of the reprocessing plant creates problems with regard to transfrontier environmental protection, due to the potential hazards involved, and these problems institute obligations of the Federal Republic of Germany under contractual law and under customary international law. Particularly under customary international neighbour law the F.R.G. is obliged to prevent and abstain from transfrontier activities entailing environmental effects with considerable damaging potential in the neighbouring states, which also includes the duty of providing for protection against accidents. It is, however, a clear fact that the states decided the peaceful uses of atomic energy to be admissible, and accept the risk of possible catastrophic damage. The interpretation of existing international laws has to take this fact into account. (orig./HSCH) [de

  14. Diagnostic aid and maintenance at the La Hague reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, J.B.; Chabert, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Cogema plant at La Hague is the world's leading nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A major extension program was initiated in 1980. It includes the construction of a new 800 t/year capacity plant (UP3), to be commissioned in 1989, and the doubling of the capacity of the present plant (UP2 800) scheduled to go on stream in 1992. On the occasion of this huge capital investment, an overall assessment was made of the operating and maintenance systems of the site. The general objective was to achieve maximum productivity and availability, in view of: - the extreme importance of safety for the protection of workers and the environment, - the high level of automation required by the complexity of the process, - the inaccessibility of the nuclear equipment, the scale of the investment. To achieve this goal, a set of diagnostic and maintenance aid systems were developed and installed. A general site data network serves to link these systems and to distribute the corresponding data to the different users. This paper describes these different systems, presents the functionalities of the network and demonstrates the sequencing of the operations in a typical maintenance application

  15. Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

  16. Development of remote fuel pushing system in Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Munish; Coelho, G.; Kodilkar, S.S.; Mishra, A.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Nair, M.K.T.

    1990-01-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (PREFRE), Tarapur has been processing spent fuel arising from Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors for quite some time. The process adopted in the plant is purex process with chopleach head end treatment. The head end treatment involves loading of ten spent fuel bundles in the charging cask at a time in the fuel bay and aligning the cask with the transfer port and subsequently pushing all the ten bundles together into the fuel magazine. At present the fuel is pushed into the magazine manually. Since the ten bundles weigh approximately 200 Kg. and involves pushing of 9.4 meters length, the operation is carried out using stainless steel screwed pipes, in steps of five lengths. The entire operation requires a large number of trained skilled workers and is found to be tedious. To solve this problem a hydraulic cum pneumatic fuel pushing system has been designed, fabricated, tested and is in the process of installation in the fuel handling area. This paper describes various requirements, constraints and dimensional details arising in the incorporation of such a system to be back fitted in an existing plant, though many of these constraints can be avoided in future plants. Further, complete sequence of operations, technical specifications regarding the telescopic hydraulic power pack and associated controls incorporated in the system are highlighted. (author). 2 figs

  17. The main chemical safety problems in main process of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Fengli; Zhao Shangui; Liu Xinhua; Zhang Chunlong; Lu Dan; Liu Yuntao; Yang Xiaowei; Wang Shijun

    2014-01-01

    There are many chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing. The reaction conditions and the products are different so that the chemical safety problems are different. In the paper the chemical reactions in the aqueous process of nuclear fuel reprocessing are described and the main chemical safety problems are analyzed. The reference is offered to the design and accident analysis of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (authors)

  18. Development of some operations in technological flowsheet for spent VVER fuel reprocessing at a pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, L.N.; Galkin, B.Ya; Lyubtsev, R.I.; Romanovskii, V.N.; Velikhov, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The fuel reprocessing pilot plants for high active materials would permit the study and development or particular processing steps and flowsheet variations; in some cases, these experimental installations realize on a small scale practically all technological chains of large reprocessing plants. Such a fuel reprocessing pilot plant with capacity of 3 kg U/d has been built at V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute. The pilot plant is installed in the hot cell of radiochemical compartment, and is composed of the equipments for fuel element cutting and dissolving, the preparation of feed solution (clarification, correction), extraction reprocessing and the production of uranium, plutonium and neptunium concentrates, the complex processing of liquid and solid wastes and a special unit for gas purification and analysis. In the last few years, a series of experiments have been carried out on the reprocessing of spent VVER fuel. (J.P.N.)

  19. Radiation protection aspects in decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrappa, P.; Joshi, P.P.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Sidhwa, B.M.; Nadkarni, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    The decontamination of a fuel reprocessing plant which underwent partial decommissioning is described. The following radiation protection aspects of the work are discussed: dismantling and removal of process vessels, columns and process off-gas filters; decontamination of various process areas; and management of liquid and solid wastes. The work was completed safely by using personnel protective equipment such as plastic suits and respirators (gas, particulate and fresh air). Total dose commitment for this work was around 3000 man-rems, including dose received by staff for certain jobs related to the operation of a section of the plant. The external dose was kept below the annual limit of 5000 mrems for any individual. No internal contamination incident occurred which caused a dose commitment in excess of 10% of the annual limit. The fact that all the work was completed by the staff normally associated with the operation of the plant contributed significantly to the management and control of personnel exposures. (H.K.)

  20. Management of low level wastes at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, N.; Ochi, E.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), after start-up of the commercial operation, radioactive wastes will be generated. Wastes generated from a reprocessing plant generally consist of many kinds of characteristics in view of ''activity level'', ''nuclide composition'', ''chemical properties'', ''physical properties'', and so on. For stable operation of a reprocessing plant, we should t reat , ''condition'' and ''dispose'' these wastes considering these wastes characteristics. To contribute to the nuclear fuel cycle project, it is important to evaluate technologies such as, ''Treatment'', ''Conditioning'' and ''Final Disposal'', not only for technical but also for economical aspects. Considering the final disposal in the future, the basic policy in ''Treatment'' and ''Conditioning'' at RRP is shown below: Recover and reuse chemicals (such as nitric acid and TBP, etc.) in plant; Radioactive waste shall be divided, classified and managed according to activity level, nuclide composition, the radiation level, its physical properties, chemical properties, etc.; Treat them based on ''classification'' management with proper combination; Condition them as intermediate forms in order to keep flexibility in the future disposal method; Original volume of annually generated wastes at RRP is estimated as 5600m3 except highly radioactive vitrified waste, and these wastes shall be treated in the following units, which are now under commisioning, in order to reduce and stabilize wastes. Low-level concentrated liquid waste to be treated with a ''Drying and peptization'' unit; Spent solvent to be treated with a ''Pyrolysis and hydrothermal solidification'' unit; Relatively low-level non-alfa flammable wastes to be treated with a ''Incineration and hydrothermal solidification'' unit; CB/BP (Channel Box and Burnable Poison) to be processed with a ''Cutting'' unit; Other wastes to be kept as their generated state with a ''Intermediate storage''. As a result of these

  1. Meeting the safeguards challenges of a commercial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Chesnay, B.; Pearsall, C.; Takeda, S.; Tomikawa, H.; Fujimaki, K.; Iwamoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    Never before has the IAEA taken on such a large challenge as implementing a safeguards system at a commercial reprocessing plant. The challenges lay in a wide range of areas. This paper will present an overview of how specific challenges are being met in: Providing an initial and continuing design verification approach that maintains continuity of knowledge for the life-time of the plant; Providing a robust safeguards approach, including added assurance measures to confirm the operational conditions of the facility; Providing verification systems with the highest sensitivity and reliability, while also being cost efficient; Providing timely and accurate analytical laboratory results; Providing sufficient authentication to joint-use, unattended verification systems to assure that independent conclusions can be reached; Providing a comprehensive integrated software system that allows for remote inspector data handling and evaluation and thus reducing inspection effort. A primary prerequisite to developing and implementing a safeguards approach of this magnitude is the transparent and interactive cooperation of the State and the operator. The JNFL Project has been a model example of this cooperation. This cooperation has been in the areas of system security, operational modifications, schedule adjustments, technical development and financial support. (author)

  2. Authentication of reprocessing plant safeguards data through correlation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.L.; Wangen, L.E.; Mullen, M.F.

    1995-04-01

    This report investigates the feasibility and benefits of two new approaches to the analysis of safeguards data from reprocessing plants. Both approaches involve some level of plant modeling. All models involve some form of mass balance, either applied in the usual way that leads to material balances for individual process vessels at discrete times or applied by accounting for pipe flow rates that leads to material balances for individual process vessels at continuous times. In the first case, material balances are computed after each tank-to-tank transfer. In the second case, material balances can be computed at any desired time. The two approaches can be described as follows. The first approach considers the application of a new multivariate sequential test. The test statistic is a scalar, but the monitored residual is a vector. The second approach considers the application of recent nonlinear time series methods for the purpose of empirically building a model for the expected magnitude of a material balance or other scalar variable. Although the report restricts attention to monitoring scalar time series, the methodology can be extended to vector time series

  3. Solvent extraction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Jinichi

    1986-01-01

    The purex process provides a solvent extraction method widely used for separating uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution containing spent fuel. The Tokai Works has adopted the purex process with TPB-n dodecane as the extraction agent and a mixer settler as the solvent extraction device. The present article outlines the solvent extraction process and discuss the features of various extraction devices. The chemical principle of the process is described and a procedure for calculating the number of steps for countercurrent equilibrium extraction is proposed. Discussion is also made on extraction processes for separating and purifying uranium and plutonium from fission products and on procedures for managing these processes. A small-sized high-performance high-reliability device is required for carrying out solvent extraction in reprocessing plants. Currently, mixer settler, pulse column and centrifugal contactor are mainly used in these plants. Here, mixer settler is comparted with pulse column with respect to their past achievements, design, radiation damage to solvent, operation halt, controllability and maintenance. Processes for co-extraction, partition, purification and solvent recycling are described. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Research and development on air cleaning system of reprocessing plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruki, K.

    1985-01-01

    Present status in Japan of R and D on air cleaning systems, especially of the fuel reprocessing plant is summarized. The description is centered on the R and D and experience of Tokai-reprocessing plant, which covers the plant air cleaning system, effort carried out for decreasing I 2 effluence in the actual vented off-gas, and R and D for recovery of Kr and 3 H. Some experimental results for the evaluation of HEPA filter are also described

  5. Design aspects of water usage in the Windscale nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, J.; Bullock, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The safeguard requirements of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant place unique constraints on a designer which, in turn, affect the scope for the exercise of water economy. These constraints are examined within the context of the British Nuclear Fuels Limited reprocessing plants at Windscale and indicate the scope for water conservation. The plants and their design principles are described with particular reference to water services and usage. Progressive design development is discussed to illustrate the increasing importance of water economy. (author)

  6. Analysis of the options - rationale for servomanipulator maintenance in future reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herndon, J.N.; Hamel, W.R.

    1984-04-01

    The currently available maintenance systems which can be applied, in various combinations, to large-volume in-cell maintenance operations are: (1) contact, (2) overhead cranes, (3) power manipulators, (4) mechanical master/slave manipulators, and (5) servomanipulators. The requirements for reprocessing plant maintenance are reviewed, and the capabilities of remote maintenance systems are described. A basic trade-off analysis of these remote maintenance systems considering reprocessing plant requirements is given. Justification is given for selecting the overhead crane/servomanipulator-based maintenance concept as the option most desirable for future large reprocessing plant maintenance. 23 references, 6 tables

  7. Material balance areas and frequencies for large reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.

    1994-01-01

    It has long been recognized that facilities with a large nuclear material throughput will probably not meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) goal for detecting trickle diversion of plutonium over periods of about one year. The reason is that measurement errors for plutonium concentration and for liquid volume are often approximately relative over a fairly wide range of true values. Therefore, large throughput facilities will tend to have large uncertainties assigned to their annual throughput. By the same argument, if frequent balances are performed over small material balance areas, then the uncertainty associated with each balance period for each balance area will be small. However, trickle diversion would still be difficult to detect statistically. Because the IAEA will soon be faced with safeguarding a new large-scale reprocessing plant in Japan, it is timely to reconsider the advantages and disadvantages of performing frequent material balances over small balance areas (individual tanks where feasible). Therefore, in this paper the authors present some simulation results to study the effect of balance frequency on loss detection probability, and further simulation results to study possibilities introduced by choosing small balance areas. They conclude by recommending frequent balances over small areas

  8. Remote repair robots for dissolvers in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Sen; Hirose, Yasuo; Kawamura, Hironobu; Minato, Akira; Ozaki, Norihiko.

    1984-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, for the purpose of the reduction of radiation exposure of workers, the shortening of working time and the improvement of capacity ratio of the facilities, the technical development of various devices for remote maintenance and inspection has been advanced so far. This time, an occasion came to inspect and repair the pinhole defects occurred in spent fuel dissolving tanks in the reprocessing plant of Tokai Establishment, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. However, since the radiation environmental condition and the restricting condition due to the object of repair were extremely severe, it was impossible to cope with them using conventional robot techniques. Consequently, a repair robot withstanding high level radiation has been developed anew, which can work by totally remote operation in the space of about 270 mm inside diameter and about 6 m length. The repair robot comprises a periscope reflecting mirror system, a combined underwater and atmospheric use television, a grinder, a welder, a liquid penetrant tester and an ultrasonic flaw detector. The key points of the development were the parts withstanding high level radiation and the selection of materials, to make the mechanism small size and the realization of totally remote operation. (Kako, I.)

  9. Aerosols released from solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1985-01-01

    Thermodynamic, aerosol characterizing and radiological data of solvent fires in reprocessing plants have been established in experiments. These are the main results: Depending on the ventilation in the containment, kerosene-TBP mixtures burn at a rate up to 120 kg/m 2 h. The aqueous phase of inorganic-organic mixtures might be released during the fire. The gaseous reaction products contain unburnable acidic compounds. Solvents with TBP-nitrate complex shows higher (up to 25%) burning rates than pure solvents (kerosene-TBP). The nitrate complex decomposes violently at about 130 0 C with a release of acid and unburnable gases. Up to 20% of the burned kerosene-TBP solvents are released during the fire in the form of soot particles, phosphoric acid and TBP decomposition products. The particles have an aerodynamic mass median diameter of about 0.5 μm and up to 1.5% of the uranium fixed in the TBP-nitrate complex is released during solvent fires. (orig.)

  10. Eurochemic reprocessing plant decommissioning. Decontamination of contaminated metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walthery, R.; Teunckens, L.; Lewandowski, P.

    1998-01-01

    When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantifies of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area, marks them as 'suspected material'. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has been spent in recycling through decontamination, melting and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can be considered as a first order ecological priority to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes to be disposed of, to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes, and to make economic use of primary material and conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. Other evaluations as the environmental impact of recycling compared to non recycling (mining or production of new material) and waste treatment, with the associated risks involved, can also be considered, as well as social and political impacts of recycling. This document gives an overview of the current practices in recycling of materials at the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Dessel, Belgium. It deals with the decontamination and measurement techniques in use, and considers related technical and economic aspects and constraints. (author)

  11. Simulation and analysis of plutonium reprocessing plant data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.; Coulter, A.; Wangen, L.

    1996-01-01

    It will be difficult for large-throughput reprocessing plants to meet International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) detection goals for protracted diversion of plutonium by materials accounting alone. Therefore, the IAEA is considering supplementing traditional material balance analysis with analysis of solution monitoring data (frequent snapshots of such solution parameters as level, density, and temperature for all major process vessels). Analysis of solution monitoring data will enhance safeguards by improving anomaly detection and resolution, maintaining continuity of knowledge, and validating and improving measurement error models. However, there are costs associated with accessing and analyzing the data. To minimize these costs, analysis methods should be as complete as possible simple to implement, and require little human effort. As a step toward that goal, the authors have implemented simple analysis methods for use in an off-line situation. These methods use solution level to recognize major tank activities, such as tank-to-tank transfers and sampling. In this paper, the authors describe their application to realistic simulated data (the methods were developed by using both real and simulated data), and they present some quantifiable benefits of solution monitoring

  12. Monitoring of releases from an irradiated fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1978-01-01

    At its UP 2 plant, the La Hague facility reprocesses irradiated fuel by the PUREX process. The fuel stems from graphite/gas, natural-uranium reactors and pressurized or boiling water enriched-uranium reactors. The gaseous effluents are collected and purified by high-efficiency washing and filtration. After purification the gas stream is discharged into the atmosphere by a single stack, 100m high and 6m in diameter, located at a high point on the site (184m). The radionuclides released into the air are: krypton-85, iodine-129 and -131, and tritium. The liquid effluents are collected by drainage systems, which transfer them to the effluent treatment station in the case of active or suspect solutions. Active solutions undergo treatment by chemical and physical processes. After purification the waste water is released into the sea by an underwater drainage system 5km long, which brings the outlet point into the middle of a tidal current 2km offshore. The radionuclides contained in the purified waste water are fission products originating from irradiated fuels in only slightly variable proportions, in which ruthenium-rhodium-106 predominates. Traces of the transuranium elements are also found in these solutions

  13. Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used

  14. Off-gas processing method in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Seki, Eiji.

    1990-01-01

    Off-gases containing a radioactive Kr gas generated in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant are at first sent to a Kr gas separator. Then, the radioactive Kr gas extracted there is introduced to a Kr gas fixing device. A pretreatment and a post-treatment are applied by using a non-radioactive clean inert gas except for the Kr gas as a purge gas. If the radioactive Kr gas is contained in the off-gases discharged from the Kr gas fixing device after applying the post-treatment, the off gases are returned to the Kr gas separator. Accordingly, in a case where the radioactive Kr gas is contained in the off-gases discharged from the Kr gas fixing device, it is not necessary to apply the fixing treatment to all of the off gases. In view of the above, increase of the amount of processing gases can be suppressed and the radioactive Kr gas can be fixed efficiently and economically. (I.N.)

  15. The life prediction study of Rokkasho reprocessing plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Yano, M.; Takizawa, M.; Shibata, S.

    1998-01-01

    The life prediction study of major equipment materials used in heavily corrosive nitric acid solutions of the RRP was carried out. The nitric acid recovery made of type 304ULC austenitic steel and the dissolver made of type 705 metallic zirconium are selected on the present study. This study is composed of major three programs, namely, the mock-up tests by small-sized equipments simulated to the practical design, laboratory tests for examining corrosion controlling factors by small specimens and to establish the data base system for the life prediction. Important parameters on this study was extracted with analyzing the past data of the life prediction on the Tokai reprocessing equipments. The mock-ups design was made by considering the quantitative evaluation of the most important parts on objective equipments, namely, heat conducting tubes in an acid recovery evaporator and a thermal jacket in a dissolver. From pre-examinations, the effects of radioactive species, nitric acid solution chemistry, the corrosion mechanisms were elucidated. Mock-up testing conditions corrosion monitoring methods and a data base concept for the the life prediction were selected from pre-examination data by referencing the plant operation planning. (author)

  16. Radiation resistant polymers and coatings for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Mallika, C.; Lawrence, Falix

    2014-01-01

    Polymer based materials are extensively used in the nuclear industry for the reprocessing of spent fuels in highly radioactive and corrosive environment. Hence, these polymer materials are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation, resulting in the degradation in properties. Polymers containing aromatic molecules generally possess higher resistance to radiation degradation than the aliphatic polymers. For improving the radiation resistance of polymers various methods are reported in the literature. Among the aromatic polymers, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has the radiation tolerance up to 10 Mega Grey (MGy). To explore the possibility of enhancing the radiation resistance of PEEK, a study was initiated to develop PEEK - ceramic composites and evaluate the effect of radiation on the properties of the composites. PEEK and PEEK - alumina (micron size) composites were irradiated in a gamma chamber using 60 Co source and the degradation in mechanical, structural, electrical and thermal properties, gel fraction, coefficient of friction and morphology were investigated. The degradation in the mechanical properties owing to radiation could be reduced by adding alumina filler to PEEK. Nano alumina filler was observed to be more effective in suppressing the damage caused by radiation on the polymer, when compared to micron alumina filler. For the protection of aluminium components in the manipulators and the rotors and stators of the motors of the centrifugal extractors employed in the plant from the attack by nitric acid vapour, PEEK coating based on liquid dispersion was developed, which has resistance to radiation, chemicals and wear. The effect of radiation and chemical vapour on the properties of the PEEK coating was estimated. The performance of the coating in the plant was evaluated and the coating was found to give adequate protection to the motors of centrifugal extractors against corrosion. (author)

  17. Catalogue and classification of technical safety rules for light-water reactors and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloser, M.; Fichtner, N.; Neider, R.

    1975-08-01

    This report on the cataloguing and classification of technical rules for land-based light-water reactors and reprocessing plants contains a list of classified rules. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  18. A review of liquor transfer systems for use in nuclear reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, J.

    1982-01-01

    Liquor pumping systems for use in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are described. Comparison of the operating characteristics and system constants are made between the air lift/Vacuum Operated Slug Lift, power fluidics and ejector pump systems. (author)

  19. Remote systems and remote maintenance of a reprocessing plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funaya, T.

    1977-01-01

    The design concept and overall maintenance philosophy applied in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation Reprocessing Plant at Tokai-mura, Japan, are briefly introduced. Details on remote systems and remote maintenance in mechanical processing areas are described

  20. Seismic analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Service Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York: documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Davito, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    This material was generated as part of a seismic case review of the NFS Reprocessing Plant. This study is documented in UCRL-52266. The material is divided into two parts: mathematical model information, and ultimate load calculations and comparisons

  1. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented

  2. Guide to the selection, training, and licensing or certification of reprocessing plant operators. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-06-01

    The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 55, establishes procedures and criteria for the licensing of operators, including senior operators, in ''Production and Utilization Facilities'', which includes plants for reprocessing irradiated fuel. A training guide is presented which will facilitate the licensing of operators for nuclear reprocessing plants by offering generalized descriptions of the basic principles (theory) and the unit operations (mechanics) employed in reprocessing spent fuels. In the present volume, details about the portions of a training program that are of major interest to management are presented. (JSR)

  3. Hybrid KED/XRF measurement of minor actinides in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsue, S.T.; Collins, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Minor actinides have received considerable attention recently in the nuclear power industry. Because of their potential value as recycle fuels in thermal and breeder reactors, reprocessing plants may have an economic incentive to extract Np, Am, and Cm from their waste streams. This report discusses the technique of hybrid densitometry and its potential to measure Np and Am in reprocessing plants. Precision estimates are made for the hybrid analysis of Np and Am in two types of dissolver solutions

  4. Development of safeguards approach for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, S.J.; Abedin-Zadeh, R.; Pearsall, C.; Chesnay, B.; Creusot, C.; Ehinger, M.; Kuhn, E.; Robson, N.; Higuchi, H.; Takeda, S.; Fujimaki, K.; Ai, H.; Uehara, S.; Amano, H.; Hoshi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), which is currently undergoing construction and commissioning by the Japan Nuclear Fuels Limited (JNFL), is scheduled to begin active operations in 2005. The planned operating capacity is 800 tonnes of spent fuel per year containing approximately 8 tonnes of plutonium. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Japan safeguards authorities are working with JNFL to develop a Safeguards Approach that is both effective and efficient. In order to accomplish this goal, a number of advanced concepts are being introduced and many currently applied safeguards measures are being enhanced. These new and improved techniques and procedures will provide for more sensitive and reliable verification of nuclear material and facility operations while reducing the required inspection effort. The Safeguards Approach incorporates systematic Design Information Examination and Verification (DIE/DIV) during all phases of construction, commissioning and operation. It incorporates installed, unattended radiation and solution measurement and monitoring systems along with a number of inspector attended measurement systems. While many of the measurement systems will be independent-inspector controlled, others will require authentication of a split signal from operator controlled systems. The independent and/or authenticated data from these systems will be transmitted over a network to a central inspector center for evaluation. Near-Real-Time-Accountancy (NRTA) will be used for short period sequential analysis of the operator and inspector data which, when combined with Solution Monitoring data, will provide higher assurance in the verification of nuclear material for timeliness and of the operational status of the facility. Samples will be taken using a facility installed, but IAEA authenticated, automatic sampling system and will then be transferred to a jointly used IAEA-JSGO On-Site Laboratory (OSL). This paper provides an

  5. Head-end process technology for the new reprocessing plants in France and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saudray, D.; Hugelmann, D.; Cho, A.

    1991-01-01

    Major technological innovations brought to the new UP3 and UP2-800 reprocessing plants of COGEMA LA HAGUE and also to the JNFS ROKKASHO plant concern the head-end process. The continuous process designed allows for high throughputs whilst meeting stringent safety requirements. The head-end of each plant includes two lines for each operation in order to guarantee availability. This paper presents the T1 head-end facility of the UP3 plant as well as the few adaptations implemented in the ROKKASHO Reprocessing Plant to fulfill the particular design requirements in Japan

  6. DIRECT DISMANTLING OF REPROCESSING PLANT CELLS THE EUREX PLANT EXPERIENCEe2d12c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gili, M.; Troiani, F.; Risoluti, P.

    2003-01-01

    After finishing the reprocessing campaigns in 1970-1983, the EUREX pilot reprocessing plant of ENEA Saluggia Research Center started into a new phase, aiming to materials and irradiated fuel systemation and radioactive wastes conditioning. In 1997 the project ''CORA'' for a vitrification plant for the high and intermediate liquid radioactive wastes started. The ''CORA'' plant will be hosted in some dismantled cells of the EUREX plant, reusing many of the EUREX plant auxiliary systems, duly refurbished, saving money and construction time and avoiding a new nuclear building in the site. Two of the cells that will be reused were part of the EUREX chemical process (solvent recovery and 2nd extraction cycle) and the components were obviously internally contaminated. In 2000 the direct (hands-on) dismantling of one of them started and has been completed in summer 2002; the second one will be dismantled in the next year and then the ''CORA'' plant will be assembled inside the cells. Special care w as taken to avoid spread of contamination in the cells, where ''CORA'' installation activities will start in the next years, during the dismantling process The analysis of data and results collected during the dismantling of the first cell shows that direct dismantling can be achieved with careful choice of tools, procedures and techniques, to reduce volumes of wastes to be disposed and radiological burden

  7. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

    1980-04-01

    The first volume of this report summarizes the results and conclusions for this study of conventional and advanced nuclear materials accounting systems applicable for both large (1500 MTHM/y) and small (210 MTHM/y) spent-fuel reprocessing facilities subject to international verification

  8. Design of the vitrification plant for HLLW generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vematsu, K.

    1986-01-01

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is now designing a vitrification plant. This plant is for the solidification of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) which is generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, and for the demonstration of the vitrification technology. The detailed design of the plant which started in 1982 was completed in 1984. At present the design improvement is being made for the reduction of construction cost and for the licensing which is going to be applied in 1986. The construction will be started in autumn 1987. The plant has a large shielded cell with low flow ventilation, and employs rack-mounted module system and high performance two-armed servomanipulator system to accomplish the fully remote operations and maintenance. The vitrification of HLLW is based on the liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melter process. The processing capacity is equivalent to the reprocessing of 0.7 ton of heavy metals per day. The glass production rate is about 9 kg/h, and about 300 kg of glass is poured periodically from the bottom of the melter into a canister. Produced glass is stored under the forced air cooling condition

  9. The second periodic safety review report of Tokai Reprocessing Plant [JAEA-Technology--2016-007-PT1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Nobutoshi; Miura, Yasushi; Tachibana, Ikuya; Omori, Satoru; Wake, Junichi; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Nakano, Takafumi; Nagasato, Yoshihiko

    2016-07-01

    The periodic safety review of Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) is an activity to confirm the application of the safety activity implementation and to give effective additional measures for the facility safety and the improvement of its reliability. We implemented 4 items as follows; (1) evaluation of safety activity implementation, (2) evaluation of status of safety activities reflecting the latest technical knowledges, (3) technical evaluation about aging degradation, and (4) planning measures about a 10-years-plan that the operator shall implement in order to keep the facility condition. We summarized this report as the result of research and evaluation of above 4 items as the second periodic safety review at TRP. About (1), we researched about the 8 items that are QA activities, operation management, maintenance management, etc. We confirmed the result that we are adequately expanding its safety activities by preparing the necessary documents and schemes, and so on. About (2), we researched them in view point of safety research results and technology development results and confirmed that we reflect latest knowledges into our facility and make efforts for improvement of safety and reliability. About (3), we can keep the safety of the facilities important to safety and the sea discharge line, under assumption of the present maintenance till the next aging evaluation, because no 'focuses for aging degradation' exist which we cannot deny the gap between the initial prediction and actual condition, by measurements and technical view. About (4), by the technical results of aging degradation evaluation, we found no additional safety plans into maintenance strategies. (author)

  10. Design and fabrication of stainless steel components for long life of spent fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, R.; Ramkumar, P.; Sundararaman, V.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Baldev Raj; Shanmugam, K.

    2010-01-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels based on the PUREX process is the proven process with many commercial plants operating satisfactorily worldwide. The process medium being nitric acid, austenitic stainless steel is the material of construction as it is the best commercially available material for meeting the conditions in the reprocessing plants. Because of the high radiation fields, contact maintenance of equipment and systems of these plants are very time consuming and costly unlike other chemical process plants. Though the plants constructed in the early years required extensive shut downs for replacement of equipment and systems within the first fifteen years of operation itself, development in the field of stainless steel metallurgy and fabrication techniques have made it possible to design the present day plants for an operating life period of forty years. A review of the operational experience of the PUREX process based aqueous reprocessing plants has been made in this paper and reveals that life limiting failures of equipment and systems are mainly due to corrosion while a few are due to stresses. Presently there are no standards for design specification of materials and fabrication of reprocessing plants like the nuclear power plants, where well laid down ASTM and ASME codes and standards are available which are based on the large scale operational feedbacks on pressure vessels for conventional and nuclear industries. (author)

  11. Advance purex process for the new reprocessing plants in France and in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viala, M.

    1991-01-01

    In the early Eighties, Japanese utilities formed the Japan Nuclear Fuel Service Co (JNFS), which is in charge of the construction and the operation of the first commercial reprocessing plant in Japan to be erected in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture. Following a thorough worldwide examination of available processes and technologies, JNFS selected the French technology developed for UP3 and UP2 800 for the plants' main facilities. For these three new plants, the 40-year old PUREX process which is used worldwide for spent fuel reprocessing, has been significantly improved. This paper describes some of the innovative features of the selected processes

  12. General Atomic Reprocessing Pilot Plant: engineering-scale dissolution system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, H.H.

    1979-04-01

    In February 1978, a dissolver-centrifuge system was added to the cold reprocessing pilot plant at General Atomic Company, which completed the installation of an HTGR fuel head-end reprocessing pilot plant. This report describes the engineering-scale equipment in the pilot plant and summarizes the design features derived from development work performed in the last few years. The dissolver operating cycles for both thorium containing BISO and uranium containinng WAR fissile fuels are included. A continuous vertical centrifuge is used to clarify the resultant dissolver product solution. Process instrumentation and controls for the system reflect design philosophy suitable for remote operation

  13. Noble gas atmospheric monitoring for international safeguards at reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakhleh, C.W.; Poths, J.; Stanbro, W.D.; Perry, R.T. Jr.; Wilson, W.B.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    The use of environmental sampling is a major component of the improvements of International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards being carried out under Program 93+2. Nonradioactive noble gas isotopic measurements in the effluent stream of large reprocessing facilities may provide useful confirmatory information on the burnup and reactor type of the spent fuel undergoing reprocessing. The authors have taken and analyzed stack samples at an operating facility. The data show clear fission signals. The authors are currently applying a maximum-likelihood estimation procedure to determine the fuel burnup from these data. They anticipate that the general features involved in the table noble gas problem--selection of appropriate signals, measurement of those signals under realistic conditions, and inverse calculation of parameters of interest from the environmental data--will be present in all environmental sampling problems. These methods should therefore be widely applicable

  14. Decommissioning and dismantling of the reprocessing plant Karlsruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiben, K.; Fritz, P.

    1995-01-01

    Reprocessing activities were discontinued in late 1990. The facility was drained and rinsed, and 80 m3 of HLWC have since been stored in special tanks, awaiting vitrification. Decommissioning work is scheduled to proceed in six phases. The reprocessing areas of the facility will be prepared for release from radiological control and dismantled in the first phase. The remaining facilities can be deregulated, and storage tanks dismantled, only after termination of phase 1. The goal of the following phase is clearance from radiological control of all controlled areas, and the last phase is to cover dismantling of all buildings and restoration of a green field site. The overall costs of these activities are estimated to amount to DM 1.657 million. The article explains the contents of the first permits for decommissioning as well as the documents prepared for planning of work and licence application. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Selective absorption pilot plant for decontamination of fuel reprocessing plant off-gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Eby, R.S.; Huffstetler, V.C.

    1977-10-01

    A fluorocarbon-based selective absorption process for removing krypton-85, carbon-14, and radon-222 from the off-gas of conventional light water and advanced reactor fuel reprocessing plants is being developed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in conjunction with fuel recycle work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Savannah River Laboratory. The process is characterized by an especially high tolerance for many other reprocessing plant off-gas components. This report presents detailed drawings and descriptions of the second generation development pilot plant as it has evolved after three years of operation. The test facility is designed on the basis of removing 99% of the feed gas krypton and 99.9% of the carbon and radon, and can handle a nominal 15 scfm (425 slm) of contaminated gas at pressures from 100 to 600 psig (7.0 to 42.2 kg/cm/sup 2/) and temperatures from minus 45 to plus 25/sup 0/F (-43 to -4/sup 0/C). Part of the development program is devoted to identifying flowsheet options and simplifications that lead to an even more economical and reliable process. Two of these applicative flowsheets are discussed.

  16. Study on reprocessing plant during transition period from LWR to FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Takashi; Matsui, Minefumi; Nishimura, Masashi; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Mori, Yukihide; Kuroda, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We have proposed a concept of a reprocessing plant suitable for the transition period from the light water reactors (LWRs) to the fast breeder reactors (FBRs) by making comparison of two plant concepts: (1) Independent Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in separately constructed lines and (2) Modularized Plant which processes LWR fuel and FBR fuel in a same line. We made construction plans based on the reference power generation plan, and evaluated the Pu supply capability using the power generation plan as an indicator of plant operation flexibility. In general, a margin of processing capacity increases the Pu supply capability. The margin of the Modularized Plant necessary to obtain equivalent Pu supply capability is smaller than that of the Independent Plant. Also the margin of the Independent Plant results in decrease in the plant utilization factor. But the margin of the Modularized Plant results in little decrease in the plant utilization factor, because the Modularized Plant can address the types of reprocessing fuel to adjust to Pu demand and processing capacity. Therefore, the Modularized Plant has a greater potential for the reprocessing plants during transition period. (author)

  17. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Baker, A.L.; Cobb, D.D.

    1980-04-01

    The following appendices are included: aqueous reprocessing and conversion technology, reference facilities, process design and operating features relevant to materials accounting, operator's safeguards system structure, design principles of dynamic materials accounting systems, modeling and simulation approach, optimization of measurement control, aspects of international verification problem, security and reliability of materials measurement and accounting system, estimation of in-process inventory in solvent-extraction contactors, conventional measurement techniques, near-real-time measurement techniques, isotopic correlation techniques, instrumentation available to IAEA inspectors, and integration of materials accounting and containment and surveillance

  18. Airborne effluent control for LMFBR fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarbro, O.O.; Groenier, W.S.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    A significant part of the LMFBR fuel reprocessing development program has been devoted to the development of efficient removal systems for the volatile fission products, including 131 I, krypton, tritium, 129 I, and most recently 14 C. Flowsheet studies have indicated that very significant reductions of radioactive effluents can be achieved by integrating advanced effluent control systems with new concepts of containment and ventilation; however, the feasibility of such has not yet been established, nor have the economics been examined. This paper presents a flowsheet for the application of advanced containment systems to the processing of LMFBR fuels and summarizes the status and applicability of specific fission product removal systems

  19. Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Baker, A.L.; Cobb, D.D.

    1980-04-01

    The following appendices are included: aqueous reprocessing and conversion technology, reference facilities, process design and operating features relevant to materials accounting, operator's safeguards system structure, design principles of dynamic materials accounting systems, modeling and simulation approach, optimization of measurement control, aspects of international verification problem, security and reliability of materials measurement and accounting system, estimation of in-process inventory in solvent-extraction contactors, conventional measurement techniques, near-real-time measurement techniques, isotopic correlation techniques, instrumentation available to IAEA inspectors, and integration of materials accounting and containment and surveillance. (DLC)

  20. Fuel reprocessing plant - no solution for the economy of the region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvers, G.

    1986-01-01

    Both for the construction and operation stage, the direct and indirect impact of the fuel reprocessing plant on employment on the whole will be negative. It is not altogether certain either that there will be no adverse effects for the areas of tourism. The top organization of German trade unions (DGB) holds that a different structure-political concept from the one represented by the large-scale project of the fuel reprocessing plant would be more appropriate for the region. Employment in the steel and construction industries must be safeguarded by corresponding programmes, and new employment must be created in small- and medium-size companies. (DG) [de

  1. Fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing R and D: technological development for a commercial plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colas, J.; Saudray, D.; Coste, J.A.; Roux, J.P.; Jouan, A.

    1987-01-01

    The technological developments undertaken by the CEA are applied to a plant project of a 50 t/y capacity, having to reprocess in particular the SUPERPHENIX 1 reactor fuel. French experience on fast breeder reactor fuel reprocessing is presented, then the 50 t/y capacity plant project and the research and development installations. The R and D programs are described, concerning: head-end operations, solvent extractions, Pu02 conversion and storage, out-of-specification Pu02 redissolution, fission products solution vitrification, conditioning of stainless steel hulls by melting, development of remote operation equipments, study of corrosion and analytical problems

  2. International safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant: containment and surveillance concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.

    1980-12-01

    Concepts for containment/surveillance for reprocessing plants are described, conceptual designs are developed, and their effectiveness is evaluated. A technical approach to design of containment/surveillance systems is presented, and design considerations are discussed. This is the second in a series of reports. The first described the basis for the study of international safeguards for reprocessing plants. In this second report, only containment/surveillance is discussed. The third report will discuss the integration of concepts for containment/surveillance and material accountancy

  3. The validation of waste assay systems during active test at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takayuki; Miura, Yasushi; Iwamoto, Tomonori

    2007-01-01

    In order to implement accurate material accountancy at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) as a large scale reprocessing plant, it is necessary to introduce accurate measurement systems not only for mainstream material, but also appropriate measurement systems for solid waste materials. In this sense, the generated wastes by the active test operation have been measured with the Non-Destructive Assay Systems, such as Rokkasho Hulls Measurement System (RHMS) and Waste Crate Assay System (WCAS) for accountancy. This paper describes the experience of the NDA operation and the evaluation results for accountancy. (author)

  4. Evaluation of methods for seismic analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarz, F.J.; Murray, R.C.; Arthur, D.F.; Feng, W.W.; Wight, L.H.; Zaslawsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Currently, no guidelines exist for choosing methods of structural analysis to evaluate the seismic hazard of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. This study examines available methods and their applicability to fuel reprocessing plant structures. The results of this study should provide a basis for establishing guidelines recommending methods of seismic analysis for evaluating future fuel reprocessing plants. The approach taken is: (1) to identify critical plant structures and place them in four categories (structures at or near grade; deeply embedded structures; fully buried structures; equipment/vessels/attachments/piping), (2) to select a representative structure in each of the first three categories and perform static and dynamic analysis on each, and (3) to evaluate and recommend method(s) of analysis for structures within each category. The Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant is selected as representative of future commercial reprocessing plants. The effect of site characteristics on the structural response is also examined. The response spectra method of analysis combined with the finite element model for each category is recommended. For structures founded near or at grade, the lumped mass model could also be used. If a time history response is required, a time-history analysis is necessary. (U.S.)

  5. Extracts and compounds active on TRP ion channels from Waldheimia glabra, a ritual medicinal plant from Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Annamaria; Bassoli, Angela; Borgonovo, Gigliola; Panseri, Sara; Manzo, Alessandra; Pentimalli, Daniela; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2017-08-15

    Waldheimia glabra (Decne.) Regel is a wild plant from the Himalayan Mountains, commonly known as Smooth Ground Daisy. This plant is traditionally used by local populations in religious rituals (incense) or in traditional herbal medicine to treat skin diseases, headache, joint pain and fever. In literature few data are available on the investigation of this aromatic plant. The present work aims at deepening knowledge about the chemical composition of W. glabra extracts and incense, as well as its activity on TRP ion channels. Extracts and incense of W. glabra were analyzed by using HS-SPME GC/MS, GC/MS and NMR analysis. Tests on the activity of W. glabra extracts and isolated compounds (+)-ludartin 1 and B-ring-homo-tonghaosu 2 on TRP channels were also performed. Some extracts and pure compounds from W. glabra showed an interesting activity in terms of efficacy and potency on rat TRPA1, an ion channel involved in several sensory mechanisms, including pungency, environmental irritation and pain perception. Activity is discussed and compared with that of other known TRPA1 natural agonists with different chemical structures. All compounds showed only a negligible inhibition activity on rat TRPM8 ion channel. Our findings demonstrate that W. glabra is involved in the receptor activation mechanism and therefore represents a new natural product potentially useful in pharmaceutical and agrifood research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Access control system for two person rule at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Sawako; Ino, Munekazu; Yamada, Noriyuki; Oota, Hiroto; Iwasaki, Mitsuaki; Kodani, Yoshiki; Iwamoto, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Following the amendment and enforcement of Regulation of Reprocessing Activity on March 29th 2012, two person rule has become compulsory for the specific rooms to counter and prevent the sabotage or theft of nuclear materials by the insiders at reprocessing plant in Japan. The rooms will include those which contains cooling systems for decay heat removal from spent fuels and so on, scavenging systems to prevent the hydrogen accumulation, and those which contains nuclear material. To ensure the two person rule at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, JNFL has recently, after comprehensive study, introduced efficient and effective access control system for the rooms mentioned above. The system is composed of bio-attestation devices, surveillance cameras and electronic locks to establish access control system. This report outlines the access control system for two person rule and introduces the operation. (author)

  7. Design and development of effluent treatment plants for the Sellafield reprocessing factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howden, M.

    1989-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been carried out at Sellafield since the early 1950s. The storage of fuel in water filled ponds prior to reprocessing and the reprocessing operation itself results in the generation of a number of radioactive liquid effluents. The highly active liquors are stored in stainless steel tanks and will, with the commissioning of the Windscale Vitrification Plant, be converted into glass for long term storage and disposal. The medium and low active liquors are, after appropriate treatment, discharged to sea well below the Authorised Limits which are set by the appropriate Regulatory Bodies. Since 1960 these have been the Department of the Environment and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food. Even though the discharges have been well below the limits set, BNFL have for many years adopted a policy of reducing the levels of activity still further. Considerable progress has already been made, by changing reprocessing operations regimes but more importantly by the development and construction of specialised effluent treatment plants. Further reductions are, however, planned. Two major effluent treatment plants form the main basis of BNFL's policy to reduce activity discharges from Sellafield. The first, the Site Ion Exchange Effluent Plant, to treat storage pond water was brought into operation in 1985. The second, the enhanced Actinide Removal Plant to treat medium and low active effluents, is programmed to operate in 1992. (author)

  8. A JNFL - COGEMA cooperation. Focus on the uranium tests of the Rokkasho mura Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffon, Jean-Paul; Ohtou, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    Description of a new type of cooperation for the start-up of the Rokkasho-mura Reprocessing Plant. After recalling the background of this cooperation the paper describes its main features: training on a sister plant and in RRP facilities, on site assistance backed-up by a dedicated team having full access to the sister plant information from the design stage to actual operations. (author)

  9. NO/sub x/ emissions from Hanford nuclear fuels reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajunen, A.L.; Dirkes, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Operation of the existing Hanford nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities will increase the release of nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) to the atmosphere over present emission rates. Stack emissions from two reprocessing facilities, one waste storage facility and two coal burning power plants will contain increased concentrations of NO/sub x/. The opacity of the reprocessing facilities' emissions is predicted to periodically exceed the State and local opacity limit of twenty percent. Past measurements failed to detect differences in the ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration with and without reprocessing plant operations. Since the facilities are not presently operating, increases in the non-occupational ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration were predicted from theoretical diffusion models. Based on the calculations, the annual average ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration will increase from the present level of less than 0.004 ppM to less than 0.006 ppM at the Hanford site boundaries. The national standard for the annual mean ambient air NO 2 concentration is 0.05 ppM. Therefore, the non-occupational ambient air NO/sub x/ concentration will not be increased to significant levels by reprocessing operations in the Hanford 200 Areas

  10. Dynamic response of high speed centrifuge for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Gaurav; Satish Kumar, V.; Selvaraj, T.; Ananda Rao, S.M.; Ravisankar, A.

    2012-01-01

    The standard for balancing the rotating bowl describes only the details about the selection of balance quality grade and the permissible residual unbalance for different operating speeds. This paper presents the effects of unbalance on the rotating bowl of high speed centrifuge used in reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In this study, the residual unbalance is evaluated for different recommended balancing grades in accordance with the ISO 1940. This unbalance mass generates dynamic force which acts on the rotor. The dynamic response of the rotor like displacements and stresses under this dynamic force are studied by numerical simulation. Finally, the effect of residual unbalance on the rotating bowl performance for different balancing grades is discussed. The experimental measurements are also carried out for the case of G 1.0 grade balanced rotating bowl to validate the resonance frequency as well as vibration amplitudes. (author)

  11. Study on the abnormal reaction in an evaporator at a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kida, Takashi; Sugikawa, Susumu; Ohsaki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The calculation code was constructed in order to evaluate a self-accelerated reaction in an evaporator in a fuel reprocessing plant due to organic-nitric acid reactions. This report describes the model of the calculation code and the result of the trial calculation. (author)

  12. Low and medium level liquid waste processing at the new La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1986-05-01

    Reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels produces low and medium activity liquid wastes. These radioactive wastes are decontamined before release in environment. The new effluent processing plant, which is being built at La Hague, is briefly described. Radionuclides are removed from liquid wastes by coprecipitation. The effluent is released after decantation and filtration. Insoluble sludges are conditioned in bitumen [fr

  13. Research and development of safeguards measures for the large scale reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Sato, Yuji; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Masuda, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Isao; Uchikoshi, Seiji; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro; Nidaira, Kazuo [Nuclear Material Control Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    The Government of Japan agreed on the safeguards concepts of commercial size reprocessing plant under the bilateral agreement for cooperation between the Japan and the United States. In addition, the LASCAR, that is the forum of large scale reprocessing plant safeguards, could obtain the fruitful results in the spring of 1992. The research and development of safeguards measures for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant should be progressed with every regard to the concepts described in both documents. Basically, the material accountancy and monitoring system should be established, based on the NRTA and other measures in order to obtain the timeliness goal for plutonium, and the un-attended mode inspection approach based on the integrated containment/surveillance system coupled with radiation monitoring in order to reduce the inspection efforts. NMCC has been studying on the following measures for a large scale reprocessing plant safeguards (1) A radiation gate monitor and integrated surveillance system (2) A near real time Shipper and Receiver Difference monitoring (3) A near real time material accountancy system operated for the bulk handling area (4) A volume measurement technique in a large scale input accountancy vessel (5) An in-process inventory estimation technique applied to the process equipment such as the pulse column and evaporator (6) Solution transfer monitoring approach applied to buffer tanks in the chemical process (7) A timely analysis technique such as a hybrid K edge densitometer operated in the on-site laboratory (J.P.N.).

  14. Experience in the construction of a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi

    1976-01-01

    The construction and operation of a reprocessing plant was first published in 1956. The Reprocessing Expert Committee of AEC was established in 1959, and the preliminary design was finished in 1964 by NCP of Britain. The detailed design was completed in 1969 by SGN of France, and the training of operators was carried out in parallel with this in France. The results of the safety investigation was approved in Jan. 1970, and the construction was started in June 1971. The site of the reprocessing plant is the eastern part of the Tokai Establishment of PNC. The process adopted is the wet Purex process having been established in large practical plants. The treating capacity is 0.7 t/day. The main processes are acceptance and storage, mechanical treatment, and chemical treatment. The reprocessing facilities comprise the main shop, the analysis station, the main exhaust stack, the decontamination station, the solid waste store, the sea discharge pipe, and other incidental facilities. The construction works were about 7 months behind the schedule when the water flow test was finished. The chemical test was finished in March, 1975, and the uranium test is in progress since Sept., 1975. The problems for future are the developments of effective waste treatment and storing techniques, and the researches have been carried out by PNC. The construction project of the second plant is urgently required, since it takes 10 years from planning to operation. (Kako, I.)

  15. Dynamic analysis and response spectra for the main processing building of a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mischke, J.; Hilpert, H.J.; Henkel, F.O.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with the determination of the floor response spectra for the main processing building of the planned reprocessing plant due to the special loading conditions of earthquake, airplane crash and blast. With these spectra the stress and strain of the components and their bearing forces which react on the building can be calculated. (orig.) [de

  16. Specification of an Expert system for the control of extraction units in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorda, A.; Charon, E.; Coppens, P.; Romet, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Industrial operation of extraction units in reprocessing plants is very complex because the great number of chemical and hydraulic parameters to take into account. This complexity associated to the impossibility to see inside the active enclosures make difficult the operation processes, diagnosis and corrections. Management of parameters by an expert system will increase productivity and safety of solvent extraction in pulsed columns [fr

  17. Development of a continuous dissolution process for the new reprocessing plants at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, P.; Patarin, L.; Tarnero, M.

    1984-08-01

    The French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has designed a continuous rotary dissolver for LWR fuel reprocessing. An industrial prototype has been tested since 1979 at the Service des Prototypes Industriels, at Marcoule. This type of dissolver will be installed at the COGEMA's Reprocessing Plants at La Hague. The advantages of a continuous process are listed, compared to batch dissolutions (chemistry, operation, capacity). The industrial prototype, featuring safe geometry, is described. The R and D program is indicated, and the main results of inactive tests already performed on the industrial prototype are given, including heating, mechanical, and chemical tests (UO 2 dissolutions at 4tU per day)

  18. The treatment of liquid effluents of reprocessing plants by a chemical process: French experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, N.; Taillard, D.

    1977-01-01

    The goal of radioactive effluent processing is to obtain a liquid with a residual activity level allowing disposal and a minimum amount of slurries. Insolubilization methods used in France are described to eliminate fission products in reprocessing plants effluents i.e. strontium, cesium, ruthenium and antimony; others radioelements are generally carried away with others precipitates. Evolution of the process is expressed in terms of reprocessing needs and improvements. Decontamination factors better than 100 are now possible with concentration factors between 30 and 50 [fr

  19. Development of a continuous dissolution process for the new reprocessing plants at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, P.; Patarin, L.; Tarnero, M.

    1984-01-01

    The French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has designed a continuous rotary dissolver for LWR fuel reprocessing. An industrial prototype has been tested since 1979 at the Service des Prototypes Industriels, at Marcoule. This type of dissolver will be installed at the COGEMA's Reprocessing Plants at La Hague. The advantages of a continuous process are listed, compared to batch dissolutions (chemistry, operation, capacity). The industrial prototype, featuring safe geometry, is described. The R and D program is indicated, and the main results of inactive tests already performed on the industrial prototype are given, including heating, mechanical, and chemical tests (UO 2 dissolutions at 4tU per day)

  20. Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium from Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Satoshi; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Miyabe, Kenjiro

    2002-03-01

    Chemical forms and discharge ratios to stack and sea of tritium form Tokai Reprocessing Plant of Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) were investigated by analyzing monitoring data. It was ascertained that approximately 70-80% of tritium discharged from the main stack was tritiated water vapor (HTO) and approximately 20-30% was tritiated hydrogen (HT) as a result of analyzing the data taken from reprocessing campaign's in 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000 and 2001, and also that the amount of tritium released from the stack was less than 1% of tritium inventory in spent fuel and the amount of tritium released into sea was approximately 20-40% of inventory. (author)

  1. How to simplify the analytics for input-output accountability measurements in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottmar, H.; Eberle, H.; Matussek, P.; Michel-Piper, I.

    1986-02-01

    An analytical approach to high-performance uranium and plutonium accountancy measurements in reprocessing input and output solutions is presented, which provides larger operational simplicity than the conventionally applied chemical methods. The proposed alternative is based on energy-dispersive absorption edge and fluorescence X-ray spectrometry, using the proven and reliable K-edge densitometry technique as reference method. Two X-ray densitometers developed for accurate and reliable uranium and plutonium analysis in both the feed and product solutions are described. Practical experiences and results from their performance evaluation on actual process solutions from a reprocessing plant are presented and discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Krypton separation from waste gas of a reprocessing plant by low temperature rectification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    6 lectures at this seminar describe and evaluate the results of the research and development work on low temperature krypton separation from the waste gas of the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. They are used for making decisions for the process to be used in the future on a large scale at the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant. 2 further lectures deal with alternatives to this process, which were also developed: the freon washing and low temperature adsorption of krypton. All the lectures were included separately in the INIS and ENERGY databases. (RB) [de

  3. Progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillis, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Eurochemic reprocessing facility at Dessel in Belgium, was constructed from 1960 to 1966. After shutdown, the plant was decontaminated from 1975 to 1979 to keep safe standby conditions at reasonable cost. When it was decided in 1986 not to resume reprocessing in Belgium, the main Belgoprocess activities changed to processing and storage of radioactive waste and to decontamination and decommissioning of obsolete nuclear facilities. The industrial decommissioning was started in 1990. This document presents the project: overview of decommissioning activities and equipment used, automation in decontamination, ensuring health and safety during the operations, release of decontaminated materials, current situation of the decommissioning activities and quality assurance program. (A.L.B.)

  4. The reprocessing plant of Tokai-Mura (Japan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.; Coignaud, M.

    1978-01-01

    The main stages of cooperation between Japan and the French nuclear industry for the development of the Tokai-Mura plant are presented. The plant facilities and the operating conditions are described [fr

  5. Experience of in-cell visual inspection using CCD camera in hot cell of Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, Padi Srinivas; Amudhu Ramesh Kumar, R.; Geo Mathews, M.; Ravisankar, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the selection, customization and operating experience of the visual inspection system for the hot cell of a Reprocessing Plant. For process equipment such as fuel chopping machine, dissolver, centrifuge, centrifugal extractors etc., viewing of operations and maintenance using manipulators is required. For this, the service of in-cell camera is essential. The ambience of the hot cell of Compact facility for Reprocessing of Advanced fuels in Lead cell (CORAL) for the reprocessing of fast reactor spent fuel has high gamma radiation and acidic vapors. Black and white Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera has been used in CORAL incorporating in-house modifications to suit the operating ambient conditions, thereby extending the operating life of the camera. (author)

  6. Absorption process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.; Reed, W.D.; Pashley, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant selective absorption process for the collection and recovery of krypton and xenon is being further developed to demonstrate, on a pilot scale, a fluorocarbon-based process for removing krypton from the off-gas of an LMFBR fuel reprocessing plant. The new ORGDP selective absorption pilot plant consists of a primary absorption-stripping operation and all peripheral equipment required for feed gas preparation, process solvent recovery, process solvent purification, and krypton product purification. The new plant is designed to achieve krypton decontamination factors in excess of 10 3 with product concentration factors greater than 10 4 while processing a feed gas containing typical quantities of common reprocessing plant off-gas impurities, including oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, water, xenon, iodine, and methyl iodide. Installation and shakedown of the facility were completed and some short-term tests were conducted early this year. The first operating campaign using a simulated reprocessing plant off-gas feed is now underway. The current program objective is to demonstrate continuous process operability and performance for extended periods of time while processing the simulated ''dirty'' feed. This year's activity will be devoted to routine off-gas processing with little or no deliberate system perturbations. Future work will involve the study of the system behavior under feed perturbations and various plant disturbances. (U.S.)

  7. Workshop on instrumentation and analyses for a nuclear fuel reprocessing hot pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, S.M.; Feldman, M.J.; Wymer, R.G.; Hoffman, D.

    1980-05-01

    In order to assist in the study of instrumentation and analytical needs for reprocessing plants, a workshop addressing these needs was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from May 5 to 7, 1980. The purpose of the workshop was to incorporate the knowledge of chemistry and of advanced measurement techniques held by the nuclear and radiochemical community into ideas for improved and new plant designs for both process control and inventory and safeguards measurements. The workshop was athended by experts in nuclear and radiochemistry, in fuel recycle plant design, and in instrumentation and analysis. ORNL was a particularly appropriate place to hold the workshop since the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is centered there. Requirements for safeguarding the special nuclear materials involved in reprocessing, and for their timely measurement within the process, within the reprocessing facility, and at the facility boundaries are being studied. Because these requirements are becoming more numerous and stringent, attention is also being paid to the analytical requirements for these special nuclear materials and to methods for measuring the physical parameters of the systems containing them. In order to provide a focus for the consideration of the workshop participants, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) being designed conceptually by the CFRP was used as a basis for consideration and discussions

  8. Annual report on the environmental radiation monitoring around Tokai Reprocessing Plant. FY 2001. Document on present state of affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kunihiko; Takeishi, Minoru; Miyagawa, Naoto

    2002-06-01

    Environmental radiation monitoring around the Tokai Reprocessing Plant has been performed since 1975, based on ''Safety Regulations for the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, Chapter IV - Environmental Monitoring''. This annual report presents the results of the environmental monitoring and the dose estimation to the hypothetical inhabitant due to the radioactivity discharged from the plant during April 2001 to March 2002. Appendices present comprehensive information, such as monitoring program, monitoring results, meteorological data and annual discharges from the plant. (author)

  9. Development and modification of materials applied for reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Yamanouchi, N.; Kikuchi, M.; Kuriki, Y.; Tamura, M.

    1991-01-01

    To attain sufficient reliability of materials for chemical reaction vessels used in nitric acid environments of reprocessing process, the optimization of R-304ULC steels and developments of alternative alloys against the trans-passive corrosion were made. Following composition adjustment and the thermomechanical treatment so-called SAR were selected in the former; to control Cr and Ni contents upper limits of type 304L standard, to exclude minor elements within engineeringly available, to control Si contents 0.1-0.2 wt%. Plates and pipes of the optimized R-304ULC showed a good corrosion resistance both results of long time immersion in nitric acid production process and the evaluation of tunneling corrosion resistance, comparing with commercial heats. 30%Cr Ni base alloy added sufficient amounts of W and Si was selected in the latter for attaining sufficient corrosion resistances in a wide range of passive to trans-passive. It is concluded that both inhibition of anodic- and cathodic-reactions are required to attain sufficient corrosion resistances in highly oxidizing environments like boiling nitric acid solutions. (author)

  10. Remote handling developments for inspection and repair of highly active reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    Having the capability to carry out regular and comprehensive inspection of active plant can have benefits beyond the need to satisfy the possible requirements of National Regulatory Authorities. Intermediate inspection can provide qualitative data on the state of the plant, whilst regular inspection can provide quantitative data on which to base predictive judgments. Information of this sort can allow confidence in predicting the actual life of the plant as opposed to the theoretical. The following paper addresses the areas of plant inspection and repair by reference to specific projects either already completed or at an advanced stage of development at BNFL's Sellafield reprocessing plant. (author)

  11. PIPEX - A model of a design concept for reprocessing plants with improved containment and surveillance features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This paper explains that the PIPEX concept is essentially a reprocessing plant using the PUREX process but with in-built improved containment and surveillance features resulting in increased health protection and environmental safety as well as higher resistance to diversion of fissile material. The paper gives a general description of the design and operating philosophy of such a plant and goes on to examine the safeguards and safety principles and implications

  12. Extraction process technology for the new reprocessing plants in France and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boullis, B.; Drain, F.; Hugelman, D.

    1991-01-01

    The new reprocessing plants UP3 and UP2-800 in France and Rokkasho in Japan use or will use an improved technology for their extraction cycles. The equipment selected are pulse columns (cylindrical and annular) and mixer-settlers (normal type and extra-flat type). This paper presents the equipment selected for each plant and the extensive R and D performed especially for pulsed columns by CEA and also the results of first active runs in UP3

  13. Development and demonstration of near-real-time accounting systems for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dayem, H.A.; Shipley, J.P.; Baker, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    A program to develop and demonstrate near-real-time accounting systems for reprocessing plants has been active at Los Alamos since 1976. The technology has been developed through modeling and simulation of process operation and measurement systems and evaluation of these data using decision analysis techniques. Aspects of near-real-time systems have been demonstrated successfully at the AGNS reprocessng plant as part of a joint study of near-real-time accounting

  14. Outline of center for research and development in Rokkasho reprocessing plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, S.; Kanatsugu, K.; Shakutsui, M.

    1998-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd.(JNFL) is now constructing a commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Rokkasho Mura, introducing French Technology on the main processes of it. In October 1995 prior to the reprocessing plant operation, JNFL established the CENTER FOR RESEARCH and DEVELOPMENT (Center for R and D) inside the plant site to perform various tests which are intended to improve the safety, availability and reliability of the reprocessing plant. The test facility of the center was constructed from 1991 to 1995, and now many tests have been being performed in the center. A full-scale mock-up of the Head end process components based on French Technology, which consist of a tilting crane, shearing machine, dissolver, hull rinser, end piece rinser and maintenance equipment, was moved into a new building from the Head End Demonstration Test facility in Kobe (reported in RECOD '91). Functional tests and system performance tests are carried out under cold conditions (non radioactive). As equipment and piping layout in the cell and working area layout outside of the cell are simulated to the reprocessing plant design, it is possible to test remote maintainability and repairability under the same condition as the reprocessing plant except radioactive condition. A full-scale mock-up of the Centrifugal clarifier based on French Technology, which can clarify the dissolution solution is operated to confirm clarification performance under various cold conditions and is tested for the maintainability and the repairability. A sampling bench imported from France is the same one planed to be operated in the reprocessing plant which samples for various analysis from each process. The sampling bench is tested to confirm operability, maintainability and reliability. Also the sampling piping and pneumatic piping are going to be install to the sampling bench for a system test of sampling system. Two types of MERC (Mobile Equipment Replacement Cask), which replace worn parts remotely

  15. Safety aspects of LWR fuel reprocessing and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, M.; Leichsenring, C.H.; Herrmann, G.W.; Schueller, W.; Hagenberg, W.; Stoll, W.

    1977-01-01

    The paper is focused on the safety and the control of the consequences of credible accidents in LWR fuel reprocessing plants and in mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants. Each of these plants serve for many power reactor (about 50.000 Mwel) thus the contribution to the overall risk of nuclear energy is correspondingly low. Because of basic functional differences between reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants and nuclear power reactors, the structure and safety systems of these plants are different in many respects. The most important differences that influence safety systems are: (1) Both fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants do not have the high system pressure that is associated with power reactors. (2) A considerable amount of the radioactivity of the fuel, which is in the form of short-lived radionuclides has decayed. Therefore, fuel reprocessing plants and mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants are designed with multiple confinement barriers for control of radioactive materials, but do not require the high-pressure containment systems that are used in LWR plants. The consequences of accidents which may lead to the dispersion of radioactive materials such as chemical explosions, nuclear excursions, fires and failure of cooling systems are considered. A reasonable high reliability of the multiple confinement approach can be assured by design. In fuel reprocessing plants, forced cooling is necessary only in systems where fission products are accumulated. However, the control of radioactive materials can be maintained during normal operation and during the above mentioned accidents, if the dissolver off-gas and vessel off-gas treatment systems provide for effective removal of radioactive iodine, radioactive particulates, nitrogen oxides, tritium and krypton 85. In addition, the following incidents in the dissolver off-gas system itself must be controlled: failures of iodine filters, hydrogen explosion in O 2 - and NOsub(x)-reduction component, decomposition of

  16. Turning point of U.S. government decision in US-Japan nuclear fuel reprocessing negotiation in 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Yoshinori

    2010-01-01

    U.S. President Carter's Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy, announced in April 1977, which terminated federal funding for reprocessing, was a shock to the Atomic Energy Authority of the Japanese Government that had promoted the construction of Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). After that, it became necessary to negotiate the 'Joint Determination for the Effective Safeguardability of TRP' subject to the 1968 Agreement for cooperation between the Government of Japan and the Government of the United States of America concerning civil use of Atomic Energy. Negotiations for the 'Joint Determination for the Effective Safguardability of TRP' were conducted in the U.S.-Japan Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Negotiation and Joint Field Work meetings from April to September 1977. Both governments agreed to the TRP operation's terms and conditions including 'Joint Determination for the Effective Safeguardability of TRP' in the third negotiation. In spite of the hard position on reprocessing stated in the Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy enacted by President Carter, these negotiations concluded accepting the operation of TRP with condition. In this paper, I will explore the reasons for the abovementioned political decision by the U.S. government based on its disclosure documents. (author)

  17. A survey of methods to immobilize tritium and carbon-14 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1991-02-01

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize tritium ( 3 H) and carbon-14 ( 14 C) released from U0 2 fuel in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future application in Canada. The calculated inventories of both 3 H and 14 C in used fuel are low; special measures to limit releases of these radionuclides from reprocessing plants are not currently in place, and may not be necessary in future. If required, however, several possible approaches to the concentration and immobilization of both radionuclides are available for development. Technology to control these radionuclides in reactor process streams is in general more highly developed than for reprocessing plant effluent, and some control methods may be adaptable to reprocessing applications

  18. Simulation study of near-real-time accounting in a generic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, C.A.; Whiteson, R.; Zardecki, A.

    1992-01-01

    Our simulation program FacSim has been used to estimate balance closure variances for a number of real proposed nuclear material processing facilities that rely primarily on item measurements. We are enhancing the program so that it can be applied to facilities such as reprocessing plants that handle bulk materials ad primarily perform bulk and flow measurements. The extended simulation program can apply any of several types of sequential statistical tests to near-real-time accounting information to evaluate the capability of the facility accounting system to detect material and operational anomalies in a timely fashion. The program allows facility designers and operators to evaluate measurement and anomaly detection strategies before system implementation and to demonstrate facility's capability for maintaining accurate inventory information during plant operation. These features are illustrated by application to a generic reprocessing plant

  19. Development of integrated parameter database for risk assessment at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamauchi, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-01

    A study to develop a parameter database for Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the application of risk information on plant operation and maintenance activity is important because the transparency, consistency, and traceability of parameters are needed to explanation adequacy of the evaluation to third parties. Application of risk information for the plant operation and maintenance activity, equipment reliability data, human error rate, and 5 factors of 'five-factor formula' for estimation of the amount of radioactive material discharge (source term) are key inputs. As a part of the infrastructure development for the risk information application, we developed the integrated parameter database, 'R-POD' (Rokkasho reprocessing Plant Omnibus parameter Database) on the trial basis for the PSA of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. This database consists primarily of the following 3 parts, 1) an equipment reliability database, 2) a five-factor formula database, and 3) a human reliability database. The underpinning for explaining the validity of the risk assessment can be improved by developing this database. Furthermore, this database is an important tool for the application of risk information, because it provides updated data by incorporating the accumulated operation experiences of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. (author)

  20. Improved iodine and tritium control in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Schmieder, H.; Roesch, W.; Weirich, F.

    1981-01-01

    During spent fuel processing, iodine and tritium are distributed in many aqueous, organic and gaseous process streams, which complicates their control. Small modifications of conventional purex flow sheets, compatible with processing in the headend and the first extraction cycle are necessary to confine the iodine and the tritium to smaller plant areas. The plant area connected to the dissolver off-gas (DOG) system is suited to confine the iodine and the plant area connected to the first aqueous cycle is suited to confine the tritium. A more clear and convenient iodine and tritium control will be achieved. Relevant process steps have been studied on a lab or a pilot plant scale using I-123 and H-3 tracer

  1. Process monitoring for reprocessing plant safeguards: a summary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, H.T.; Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.; Hebble, T.L.

    1986-10-01

    Process monitoring is a term typically associated with a detailed look at plant operating data to determine plant status. Process monitoring has been generally associated with operational control of plant processes. Recently, process monitoring has been given new attention for a possible role in international safeguards. International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) Task C.59 has the goal to identify specific roles for process monitoring in international safeguards. As the preliminary effort associated with this task, a review of previous efforts in process monitoring for safeguards was conducted. Previous efforts mentioned concepts and a few specific applications. None were comprehensive in addressing all aspects of a process monitoring application for safeguards. This report summarizes the basic elements that must be developed in a comprehensive process monitoring application for safeguards. It then summarizes the significant efforts that have been documented in the literature with respect to the basic elements that were addressed

  2. Safeguarding aspects of large-scale commercial reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The paper points out that several solutions to the problems of safeguarding large-scale plants have been put forward: (1) Increased measurement accuracy. This does not remove the problem of timely detection. (2) Continuous in-process measurement. As yet unproven and likely to be costly. (3) More extensive use of containment and surveillance. The latter appears to be feasible but requires the incorporation of safeguards into plant design and sufficient redundancy to protect the operators interests. The advantages of altering the emphasis of safeguards philosophy from quantitative goals to the analysis of diversion strategies should be considered

  3. Reliability analysis of repairable safety systems of a reprocessing plant allowing for tolerable system downtimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1987-01-01

    GRS has been engaged in safety analysises of the German Reprocessing Plant for several years. The development and verification of appropriate reliability analysis methods, the generation of data as well as the search for an adequate structural presentation of the results to form a basis of recommendations for technical or administrative measures or contributions to risk oriented evaluations have been or are in the process of being established. In contrast to NPP-studies, the reliability assessment of safety systems of a reprocessing plant is applied to repairable and often relatively small systems allowing for tolerable system downtimes. A sketch of the diverse cooling systems of a vessel containing a selfheating solution is given. The interruption of the cooling function for about one day might be tolerable before boiling will be reached. This interval is suitable for transfer of the solution to a spare vessel or for repairing the failed components, thus restoring the cooling function

  4. Management of regenerant effluent waste at reprocessing plant, Tarapur- a new approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Munish; Bajpai, D D; Mudaiya, Avinash; Varadarajan, N [Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant, Tarapur (India)

    1994-06-01

    Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (PREFRE) Plant, Tarapur has been processing zircaloy clad spent fuel arising from PHWR namely RAPS and MAPS. The plant has been provided with a water pool to receive and store the irradiated fuel assemblies from the reactor site for an interim period before they are taken up for chop-leach and further reprocessing by PUREX process. This paper highlights the important and innovative modifications like introduction of a cation exchanger for water polishing and using nitric acid as regenerant. The regenerant effluent (nitric acid) is recycled to the main process cells where it is mixed and further treated along with process waste stream. This is a step towards minimising effluent generation. The paper describes the advantages of modified system like operational simplification, manpower, man-rem saving and minimising release of activity to environment. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Operating experience and development of fluidized-bed denitrators for UNH at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Nakamichi, Hideya; Takeda, Seiichiro; Kubota, Kanya; Katoh, Shuji

    1983-01-01

    The fluidized bed denitrator for uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) at Tokai reprocessing plant has been operated since 1976. About 170 tons of spent fuel have been reprocessed, and the denitrator has encountered numerous operational problems during the period. This report deals with these technical problems and the associated countermeasures taken, including the dismantling and reconstruction of equipment and the improvement of operating method. The major problems encountered were as follows: (1) the crystallization of UNH on the UNH feeding line, (2) spray nozzle clogging and candle filter clogging, (3) particle growth, (4) plugging of the drawing-out line by nozzle caking, and (5) slugging in fluidized-bed denitration. The total quantity and quality of UO 3 products obtained so far at the plant are also briefly described together with some future R and D programs such as the improvement of UO 3 reactivity and the automation of denitrators. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Safety-related concrete structure design and construction of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Hideki; Munakata, Yoshinari; Togashi, Akihito

    2003-01-01

    The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant of the Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., is a facility to reprocess remained uranium without firing and newly formed plutonium contained in spent fuels used at the nuclear power stations, to produce fuels to be repeatedly used. Constructions in this facility has some characteristics shown as follows: 1) radiation shielding and seismic isolated functions like those at the nuclear power plants, 2) reduction of wall thickness based on partially using heavy concrete at walls required for radiation shielding, 3) protective design against fly-coming matters such as aircrafts, 4) construction period reduction based on winter construction and large scale block engineering. Here were described characteristics of designs on radiation shielding, seismic isolated and fly-coming matters protection construction engineering and quality control on concrete. (G.K.)

  7. Radioactive wastes management in fiscal year 1983 in the fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, the releases of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes are so managed not to exceed the respective objective release levels. Of the radioactive liquid wastes, the high level concentrated wastes are stored in tanks and the low level wastes are stored in tanks or asphalt solidified. For radioactive solid wastes, high level solid wastes are stored in casks, low level solid wastes and asphalt solids in drums etc. The releases of radioactive gaseous and liquid wastes in the fiscal year 1983 were below the objective release levels. The radioactive wastes management in the fuel reprocessing plant in fiscal year 1983 is given in tables, the released quantities, the stored quantities, etc. (Mori, K.)

  8. The development of in-cell remote inspection system in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yuzo

    1985-01-01

    In the Tokai fuel reprocessing plant, the containment is triple, i.e. the vessel containing radioactive material, then the concrete cell structure and finally the housing building. The fuel reprocessing plant is now proceeding with the development of an in-cell remote inspection system. The inspection system is for inspection of the cell itself and the equipment etc. in the cell, concerning the integrity. Described are the following: the course taken and problems in development of the remote inspection system; development of the floor rambling type remote inspection equipment and the multiple armed type, both for inspection of in-cell ''drip trays''; in-cell equipment inspection devices in specifications etc.; problems in its future development. (Mori, K.)

  9. Occupational exposure at the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyle, A.; Partington, C.

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear reprocessing plant at Sellafield employs approximately 6500 people in a wide range of activities involving radioactive materials. The exposure to personnel over the period 1978-1989 is reviewed. Information is presented on collective and average dose exposure which both show significant downward trends. The current annual collective dose for reprocessing operations is 21.4 man Sv and the average whole body exposure 3.7 mSv.y -1 , taking account of both internal and external exposure. The introduction of radiological design targets for new plants and the use of formal ALARP assessments on projects has contributed substantially to the observed reduction in dose uptake. Experience also indicates that significant dose reduction can be achieved by heightening the awareness of both managers and workers of the dose implications of their work and working methods. (author)

  10. A numerical simulation of 129I in the atmosphere emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Togawa, Orihiko

    2010-01-01

    A global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, is applied to investigate the behavior of 129 I emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe (Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France). The result of numerical simulation for more than fifty-year period from the 1950s is validated by comparison with measurements of 129 I around the world and analyzed to clarify the characteristic of the distributions of concentration and deposition of 129 I. The modeled concentrations of 129 I in precipitation in Europe and the United States and inventories in the seawater around Japan and the Gulf of Mexico are in the same order as measurements. the emitted 129 I to the atmosphere is distributed all over the Northern Hemisphere due mainly to the prevailing westerlies and can be an important source of supply of artificial 129 I for the seawater remote from the point source such as a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  11. Maintenance management of emergency power supply equipment (uninterruptible power supply) in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, Kyosuke; Hiyama, Hisao; Shibata, Satomi; Iwasaki, Shogo; Inami, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Uninterruptible power supply systems are installed in the Tokai reprocessing plant in preparation for the emergency case that the commercial power supply is stopped by an accidental or intentional interruption in the supply of electricity. The uninterruptible power supply system particularly provides a temporary power source to the important devices for the radiation control of nuclear critical monitoring in the plant. Thus, the system is potentially important and essential for nuclear plants. The paper reports the current activities such as regular inspections, replacement of parts and system update, to maintain the function of uninterruptible power supply systems. (author)

  12. Decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley, New York, Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, L F; Nemec, J F; Koochi, A K

    1978-06-01

    The methodology and numerical values of NUREG-0278 were applied to four decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley Fuel Reprocessing Plant. The cost and impacts of the following four alternatives for the process building, fuel receiving and storage, waste tank farm, and auxiliary facilities were assessed: (1) layaway, (2) protective storage, (3) preparation for alternate nuclear use, and (4) dismantlement. The estimated costs are 5.7, 11, 19, and 31 million dollars, respectively. (DLC)

  13. Bavarian Constitutional Court, judgement of November 27, 1985 (Parliamentary investigating committee, concerning the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    The decision deals with the refusing of an application to establish a parliamentary investigation committee concerning to the reprocessing plant Wackersdorf. Pursuant to Art. 25 para. 1 of the Bavarian Constitution especially the principle of separation of powers (Art. 5 Bavarian Constitution) and the rule of law (Art. 3 para. 1 Bavarian Constitution) have to be regarded, according to which the central part of the executive power is not subject to parliamentary control.

  14. Bavarian Constitutional Court, judgement of November 27, 1985 (Parliamentary investigating committee, concerning the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The decision deals with the refusing of an application to establish a parliamentary investigation committee concerning to the reprocessing plant Wackersdorf. Pursuant to Art. 25 para. 1 of the Bavarian Constitution especially the principle of separation of powers (Art. 5 Bavarian Constitution) and the rule of law (Art. 3 para. 1 Bavarian Constitution) have to be regarded, according to which the central part of the executive power is not subject to parliamentary control. (WG) [de

  15. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured 235 U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured 233 U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the 238 U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables

  16. The extraction behavior of some noticeable nuclides in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanouchi, T.; Sasao, N.; Ozawa, M.; Yamana, H.

    1987-01-01

    The extraction behavior of some TRU nuclides and Ru-106 were investigated on the basis of the process analytical data obtained during this decade of the hot operation in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Some characteristics of their extraction behavior under Tokai-flowsheet became clear. They were explainable by the chemical features of these nuclides in conjunction with the chemical conditions of the process. Some extraction-simulation calculations were performed to supplement the understanding of their characteristic behaviors

  17. Decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley, New York, Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.F.; Nemec, J.F.; Koochi, A.K.

    1978-06-01

    The methodology and numerical values of NUREG-0278 were applied to four decommissioning alternatives for the West Valley Fuel Reprocessing Plant. The cost and impacts of the following four alternatives for the process building, fuel receiving and storage, waste tank farm, and auxiliary facilities were assessed: (1) layaway, (2) protective storage, (3) preparation for alternate nuclear use, and (4) dismantlement. The estimated costs are 5.7, 11, 19, and 31 million dollars, respectively

  18. A prototype for actinide alpha monitoring in liquid effluents of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardone, G.; Mattia, B.; Durante, R.; Frazzoli, F.V.

    1983-01-01

    The report deals with the design criteria of prototype measuring device, based on the alpha spectrometry, aimed to the determination of actinides solutions in reprocessing plants. The described instrument is considered as the result of a preliminary stage of development. Taking into account the experimental results obtained with Pu bearing solutions the performances achievable are evaluated; in particular, it turns out that the minimum detectable activity is about 10 -5 Ci/l

  19. Incineration of dry burnable waste from reprocessing plants with the Juelich incineration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, H.; Gomoll, H.; Lins, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Juelich incineration process is a two stage controlled air incineration process which has been developed for efficient volume reduction of dry burnable waste of various kinds arising at nuclear facilities. It has also been applied to non nuclear industrial and hospital waste incineration and has recently been selected for the new German Fuel Reprocessing Plant under construction in Wackersdorf, Bavaria, in a modified design

  20. Application of active neutronic interrogation method to the line analysis in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passard, C.

    1993-01-01

    In a reprocessing plant of irradiated spent fuels, the knowledge in real time (line analysis) of uranium and plutonium quantities present in solutions is an extremely important parameter to control the proceeding and for the apparatus safety. The active neutronic analysis give a nondestructive non intrusive and quick measure to know the concentrations. This method consists in inducing fissions in nuclides with a neutron source and then to detect the particles which come from

  1. A welcoming approach to winning support [public relations policy at the Sellafield Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, C.G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The public relations policy of British Nuclear Fuels with respect to the Sellafield reprocessing centre is described. Key factors in reassuring the public on the safety of the plant have been the opening of an exhibition centre and a widely advertised open invitation to visit Sellafield together with a commitment to an open information policy and the promotion of understanding through the use of less technical language. An improvement in public confidence in Sellafield is reported. (U.K.)

  2. Process pump operating problems and equipment failures, F-Canyon Reprocessing Facility, Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.; Starks, J.B.; Galloway, W.D.

    1987-02-01

    A compilation of operating problems and equipment failures associated with the process pumps in the Savannah River Plant F-Canyon Fuel Reprocessing Facility is presented. These data have been collected over the 30-year operation of the facility. An analysis of the failure rates of the pumps is also presented. A brief description of the pumps and the data bank from which the information was sorted is also included

  3. The Planning of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeborg, T U; Haeffner, E; Hultgren, Aa

    1963-10-15

    A shielded volume (42 m{sup 3}) in the hot laboratory at Kjeller, Norway, has been used for the installation of a small pilot plant intended for studies on nuclear fuel reprocessing. During the first period of operation (1963) a plutonium separation method (the Silex process) developed at AB Atomenergi will be studied. This document is a description of the project during the stage of technical planning and chemical process development.

  4. Elaboration and implementation of automatized management system of operating mode at La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, S.; Lepine, C.; Dumetz, A.; Nicolet, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the documentation system for operators conducting the new units for fuel reprocessing at La Hague plant. The aim of this system, called COGEMO, is to improve man-machine system reliability, by presenting in real time to operators the information required for efficiently operating the installation in any situation (start up), transients, incidents). Qualification is developed in two shops (a mechanical and a chemical unit) and will be extended to other units when they will be put into service [fr

  5. Dynamic analysis and response spectra for the main process building of a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, H.J.; Henkel, F.O.

    1988-01-01

    This paper deals with the determination of the floor response spectra for the main process building of the planned reprocessing plant due to the special loading conditions of earthquake, airplane crash and blast. With these spectra the stress and strain of the components and their bearing forces which react on the building can be calculated. Some special problems depending on the length of the building are not yet answered and will be discussed later. (orig.)

  6. A global-scale dispersion analysis of iodine-129 from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Togawa, Orihiko

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional global chemical transport model, MOZART-2, is applied to investigate the global-sale dispersion of Iodine-129 from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The concentration and deposition of 129 I obtained by MOZART-2 are dispersed all over the Northern Hemisphere. The emission of 129 I to the atmosphere is thus important in considering the transport of 129 I to remote sites. (author)

  7. The use of neptunium-239 to assess neptunium distribution throughout a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Savage, D.J.; Prentice, P.C.

    1989-08-01

    A radiometric technique has been devised to use the gamma emission from the neptunium-239 daughter of americium-243 to estimate neptunium distribution in a plant reprocessing irradiated plutonium based fuels. Three trials were undertaken with samples from the Prototype Fast Reactor at Dounreay. The trials have confirmed the previous chemical measurements and the usefulness of this technique to highlight the effect of altered flowsheet conditions. (author)

  8. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities: COGEMA expertise devoted to UP1 reprocessing plant dismantling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, A.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last past decades, the French nuclear industry has acquired a great experience and know-how in the field of dismantling. Today this experience amounts to more than 200,000 hours. The fundamental aims within dismantling strategy are the same as for all nuclear facilities: minimising doses received by workers, minimising waste volume and adapting waste management to radioactivity levels, minimising costs. French experience is based on technologies which are currently used in nuclear maintenance facilities. Dismantling is a dynamic process especially in the field of decontamination (chemical and mechanical), cleaning, robotics and remote control operations. The strategy for the dismantling of former UP1 reprocessing plant is based on the feedback of experience gained through the dismantling of other facilities such as the AT1 workshop at La Hague. This workshop, a pilot plant for reprocessing of fast-breeder reactor fuels (Rapsodie and Phenix) has to be dismantled to IAEA level 3 (unrestricted site use), excluding civil works structures. Currently conducted by trained shifts, this dismantling project should end in 1999. The experience already acquired proves that chemical rinsings with the use of specific reagents is sufficient to decontaminate the hot cells and that the use of remote operations or robotics is not as important as previously envisaged. The UP1 reprocessing plant of Marcoule operated from 1958 to 1997. End of the operation was pronounced on the 31st of December 1997. 20,000 tons of spent fuels were reprocessed at UP1. The cleaning and dismantling operations at the Marcoule site depend upon the CEA, EDF and COGEMA. The Defence and Industry Ministries asked for a specific structure to be set up. An economic interest group called CODEM was created in May 1996. CODEM decides, finances and supervises dismantling operations, while respecting the constraints of nuclear safety, environmental protection and cost-effectiveness. The cleaning operations of

  9. Experience and projects concerning treatment, conditioning and storage of all radioactive wastes from Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, G.; Matsumoto, K.; Miyahara, K.

    1984-01-01

    The active operation of Tokai reprocessing plant started in September 1977, and about 170 t U of spent fuel were reprocessed between then and December 1982. During this period, the low-level waste processing plant reduced the amount of radioactivity discharged into the environment. For radioactive liquid waste, the treatment procedures consist mainly of evaporation to keep the discharge into the sea at a low level. For combustible low-level solid waste and the solvent waste, which is of low tributyl phosphate content, incineration has been used successfully (burned: about 150 t of combined LLSW, about 50 m 3 of solvent waste, i.e. diluent waste). Most of the past R and D work was devoted to reducing the activity discharged into the environment. Current R and D work is concerned with the treatment of solvent waste, the conditioning of solid wastes, the bituminization of low-level liquid waste and the vitrification of high-level liquid waste. The paper describes present practices, R and D work and future aspects of the treatment, conditioning and storage of all radioactive wastes from Tokai reprocessing plant. (author)

  10. Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehinger, Michael H.; Johnson, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

  11. Nuclear fuel reprocessing deactivation plan for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1994-10-01

    The decision was announced on April 28, 1992 to cease all United States Department of Energy (DOE) reprocessing of nuclear fuels. This decision leads to the deactivation of all fuels dissolution, solvent extraction, krypton gas recovery operations, and product denitration at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The reprocessing facilities will be converted to a safe and stable shutdown condition awaiting future alternate uses or decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D). This ICPP Deactivation Plan includes the scope of work, schedule, costs, and associated staffing levels necessary to achieve a safe and orderly deactivation of reprocessing activities and the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). Deactivation activities primarily involve shutdown of operating systems and buildings, fissile and hazardous material removal, and related activities. A minimum required level of continued surveillance and maintenance is planned for each facility/process system to ensure necessary environmental, health, and safety margins are maintained and to support ongoing operations for ICPP facilities that are not being deactivated. Management of the ICPP was transferred from Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) to Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO) on October 1, 1994 as part of the INEL consolidated contract. This revision of the deactivation plan (formerly the Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Phaseout Plan for the ICPP) is being published during the consolidation of the INEL site-wide contract and the information presented here is current as of October 31, 1994. LITCO has adopted the existing plans for the deactivation of ICPP reprocessing facilities and the plans developed under WINCO are still being actively pursued, although the change in management may result in changes which have not yet been identified. Accordingly, the contents of this plan are subject to revision

  12. The use of artificial intelligence for safeguarding fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.W.; Forgy, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recorded process data from the ''Minirun'' campaigns conducted at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) in Barnwell, South Carolina during 1980 to 1981 have been utilized to study the suitability of computer-based Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for process monitoring for safeguards purposes. The techniques of knowledge engineering were used to formulate the decision-making software which operates on the process data customarily used for process operations. The OPS5 AI language was used to construct an Expert System for this purpose. Such systems are able to form reasoned conclusions from incomplete, inaccurate or otherwise ''fuzzy'' data, and to explain the reasoning that led to them. The programs were tested using minirun data taken during simulated diversions ranging in size from 1 to 20 L of solution that had been monitored previously using conventional procedural techniques. 13 refs., 3 figs

  13. The use of artificial intelligence for safeguard fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.W.; Forgy, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Recorded process data from minirun campaigns conducted at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant have been utilized to study the suitability of computer-based artificial intelligence (AI) methods for process monitoring for safeguards purposes. The techniques of knowledge engineering were used to formulate the decision-making software. The computer software accepted as input process data customarily used for process operations that had previously been recorded on magnetic tape during the 1980 miniruns. The OPS5 AI language was used to construct an expert system for simulated monitoring of the process. Such expert systems facilitate the employment of the heuristic reasoning used by human observers to form reasoned conclusions from incomplete, inaccurate, or otherwise fuzzy data

  14. DA and NDA measurement of nuclear materials Mayak reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzekun, E.G.; Lelyuk, G.A.; Sazhnov, V.K.

    1999-01-01

    Methods of nuclear material (NM) analysis and their quality assurance at the laboratory of RT-1 plant of PA Mayak are reviewed as applicable to the NM control and accounting system. The impact of analysis quality on the NM control and accounting system quality is analyzed. It has been shown that major component of the inventory difference for plutonium is caused by the errors of its measurement in the initial solution. The expedience of decreasing this error from 5 % to 1-1.5 % has been substantiated. Errors of plutonium detection on the other flows of NM at the facility prove to be acceptable for the NM control and accounting system. Accuracy of uranium concentration measurements proved to be satisfactory for all NM flows [ru

  15. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01

    The risks involved in the routine release of 85 Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of 85 Kr. Instead of releasing the 85 Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing 85 Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from 85 Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of 85 Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for 85 Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated 3 H and 14 C also encourage delaying implementation of the 85 Kr recovery in the early plants

  16. Head-end iodine removal from a reprocessing plant with a solid sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.; Furrer, J.; Schultes, E.

    1976-01-01

    In the first large-scale reprocessing plant planned in the Federal Republic of Germany a total amount of 580 kg of iodine per annum will be released in the fuel dissolution process for a maximum heavy metal throughput of 1800 tons per year and 40,000 MWd/t of burnup. The main portion of the iodine is formed by the 129 I (T/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10 7 a) isotope of which 82 Ci at the maximum are released every year. With the scheduled fuel element storage time of greater than or equal to 220 d the simultaneous release of 131 I is less than or equal to 12.5 Ci the mass of which does not play any part. According to the computer model presently imposed in the Federal Republic of Germany for treatment of the environmental impact by radioiodine, a total decontamination factor of 340 must be attained. This implies a long-term diffusion factor of 1 x 10 -7 s/m 3 for releases via the stack of the reprocessing plant and a limit value of 50 mrem/a at the maximum for the thyroid dose to the critical group of the population via the ingestion path. The flowsheet for dissolver off-gas cleaning in a reprocessing plant employing solid iodine sorption material and the arrangement of filter components are discussed. The principle of an iodine sorption filter is described which allows exhaustive loading of the iodine sorption material. The removal reactions of different organic iodine compounds and the loading capacity and removal efficiency of the iodine sorption material in the original dissolver off-gases of reprocessing plants are indicated. Studies on the influence of filter poisons are reported.Operating experience gathered with a first iodine sorption filter in operation is discussed; this filter has been used to remove practically all iodine produced in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Pilot Plant (WAK). Direct measurement of 129 I in samples of filter material using a low energy photon spectrometer is briefly reported

  17. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets

  18. Monitoring of released radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, M.; Keta, S.; Nagai, S.; Kano, M.; Ishihara, N.; Moriyama, T.; Ogaki, K.; Noda, K.

    2009-01-01

    Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant started its active tests with spent fuel at the end of March 2006. When spent fuels are sheared and dissolved, radioactive gaseous effluent and radioactive liquid effluent such as krypton-85, tritium, etc. are released into the environment. In order to limit the public dose as low as reasonably achievable in an efficient way, RRP removes radioactive material by evaporation, rinsing, filtering, etc., and then releases it through the main stack and the sea discharge pipeline that allow to make dispersion and dilution very efficiently. Also, concerning the radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent to be released into the environment, the target values of annual release have been defined in the Safety Rule based on the estimated annual release evaluated at the safety review of RRP. By monitoring the radioactive material in gaseous exhaust and liquid effluent RRP controls it not to exceed the target values. RRP reprocessed 430 tUpr of spent fuel during Active Test (March 2006 to October 2008). In this report, we report about: The outline of gaseous and liquid effluent monitoring. The amount of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent during the active test. The performance of removal of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents. The impact on the public from radioactive effluents during the active test. (author)

  19. Evaluation and development plan of NRTA measurement methods for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.; Hakkila, E.A.; Flosterbuer, S.F.

    1995-01-01

    Near-real-time accounting (NRTA) has been proposed as a safeguards method at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), a large-scale commercial boiling water and pressurized water reactors spent-fuel reprocessing facility. NRTA for RRP requires material balance closures every month. To develop a more effective and practical NRTA system for RRP, we have evaluated NRTA measurement techniques and systems that might be implemented in both the main process and the co-denitration process areas at RRP to analyze the concentrations of plutonium in solutions and mixed oxide powder. Based on the comparative evaluation, including performance, reliability, design criteria, operation methods, maintenance requirements, and estimated costs for each possible measurement method, recommendations for development were formulated. This paper discusses the evaluations and reports on the recommendation of the NRTA development plan for potential implementation at RRP

  20. Plutonium determination by spectrophotometry of plutonium (VI): control of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, J [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), Centre de la Hague, 50 - Cherbourg (France)

    1980-10-01

    The plutonium (VI) spectrophotometric determination, after AgO oxidation in 3 M nitric acid medium, is used for the running-control of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague. Analytical device used in glove-box or shielded-cell is briefly described. This method is fast, sensitive, unfailing and gives simple effluents. It is applied by day and night shifts, during Light Water Reactor fuel reprocessing campaign, for 0.5 mg/l up to 20 g/l plutonium solutions. Reference solution measurements have a 0.8 to 1.4 % relative standard deviation; duplicate plutonium determinations give a 0.3% relative standard deviation for sample analysis. There is a discrepancy (- 0.3% to - 0.9%) between the spectrophotometric method results and the isotopic dilution analysis.

  1. Plutonium determination by spectrophotometry of plutonium (VI): control of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, J.

    1980-01-01

    The plutonium (VI) spectrophotometric determination, after AgO oxidation in 3 M nitric acid medium, is used for the running-control of the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague. Analytical device used in glove-box or shielded-cell is briefly described. This method is fast, sensitive, unfailing and gives simple effluents. It is applied by day and night shifts, during Light Water Reactor fuel reprocessing campaign, for 0.5 mg/l up to 20 g/l plutonium solutions. Reference solution measurements have a 0.8 to 1.4 % relative standard deviation; duplicate plutonium determinations give a 0.3% relative standard deviation for sample analysis. There is a discrepancy (- 0.3% to - 0.9%) between the spectrophotometric method results and the isotopic dilution analysis [fr

  2. Role of near-real-time accounting in international safeguards for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    The effectiveness of conventional nuclear materials accounting systems, both national and international, is constrained by the fundamental process features of high-throughput nuclear facilities and the economic limits of effective nuclear materials management consistent with production goals. Conventional accounting, complemented by near-real-time accounting, may meet projected IAEA performance goals for detecting diversion in medium- and high-throughput reprocessing facilities projected for the late 1900's. The design of materials accounting systems for international safeguards in reprocessing plants is discussed, paying particular attention to the question of international verification. Specific problems in measurement techniques, data evaluation, and systems structure are identified, and the current status of research and development efforts is reviewed

  3. Decommissioning of nuclear reprocessing plants French past experience and approach to future large scale operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean Jacques, M.; Maurel, J.J.; Maillet, J.

    1994-01-01

    Over the years, France has built up significant experience in dismantling nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities or various types of units representative of a modern reprocessing plant. However, only small or medium scale operations have been carried out so far. To prepare the future decommissioning of large size industrial facilities such as UP1 (Marcoule) and UP2 (La Hague), new technologies must be developed to maximize waste recycling and optimize direct operations by operators, taking the integrated dose and cost aspects into account. The decommissioning and dismantling methodology comprises: a preparation phase for inventory, choice and installation of tools and arrangement of working areas, a dismantling phase with decontamination, and a final contamination control phase. Detailed description of dismantling operations of the MA Pu finishing facility (La Hague) and of the RM2 radio metallurgical laboratory (CEA-Fontenay-aux-Roses) are given as examples. (J.S.). 3 tabs

  4. Total Data Management System for the La Hague spent fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, J.; Coignaud, G.; Perot, J.P.; Fournier, W.; Silvain, B.

    1991-01-01

    Operation of the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants at La Hague, France, generates considerable data processing requirements. To meet these requirements, a Total Data Management System (TDMS) has been designed and installed to operate the biggest Ethernet industrial network in Europe. This network, called Haguenet, interconnects a large number of computers and user terminals. The TDMS' main operational functions are plant operation and production data management, maintenance data management, technical documents management and computer-aided design (CAD). Extensive experience was gained through the design and operation of the TDMS at La Hague. (author)

  5. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-07-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system

  6. Possibilities of tritium removal from waste waters of pressurized water reactors and fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribnikar, S.V.; Pupezin, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    Starting from parameters known for heavy water production processes, a parallel was made with separation of tritium from water. The quantity in common is the total cascade flow. The most efficient processes appear to be hydrogen sulfide, water exchange, hydrogen- and water distillation. Prospects of application of new processes are discussed briefly. Problems concerning detritiation of pressurized water reactors and large fuel reprocessing plants are analyzed. Detritiation of the former should not present problems. With the latter, economical detritiation can be achieved only after some plant flow patterns are changed. (U.S.)

  7. Zirconium-made equipment for the new La Hague reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, J.; Demay, R.; Bernard, C.; Mouroux, J.P.; Simonnet, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of zirconium was developed to solve some problems of severe corrosion in boiling nitric medium, and to guarantee the service life of the equipment concerned. The paper presents the experience gained since the early 1970s, when the first units made of zirconium were used in French reprocessing plants. For the new La Hague UP3 and UP2 800 plants, it was decided to extend the use of zirconium to make large-scale equipment and, to do so, a major R and D program was implemented, of which the main results are presented

  8. Selection of construction materials for equipment in an experimental reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizrahi, R.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    A review is made of the most significant corrosion problems that may be present in different stages of the process in a spent fuel reprocessing plant. The influence of different variables is analyzed: concentration of nitric acid and other oxidizing species, temperature, etc., in corrosion of materials of most frequent use in pipings and equipment. The materials are austenitic stainless steels and refractory metals, especially zirconium and its alloys. Both general and localized corrosion phenomena are analyzed for these materials. Selection criteria for the use of adequate material in different components of the plant are also discussed. (author). 32 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Development of a computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system for a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Joseph, C.; Madeen, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    A computerized nuclear materials control and accounting system (CNMCAS) for a fuel reprocessing plant is being developed by Allied-General Nuclear Services at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. Development work includes on-line demonstration of near real-time measurement, measurement control, accounting, and processing monitoring/process surveillance activities during test process runs using natural uranium. A technique for estimating in-process inventory is also being developed. This paper describes development work performed and planned, plus significant design features required to integrate CNMCAS into an advanced safeguards system. 2 refs

  10. Aspects of remote maintenance in an FRG reprocessing plant from the manufacturer's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitzchel, G.; Tennie, M.; Saal, G.

    1986-01-01

    In April 1986 a consortium led by Kraftwerk Union AG was commissioned by the German society for nuclear fuel reprocessing (DWK) to build the first West German commercial reprocessing plant for spent fuel assemblies. The main result of the planning efforts regarding remote maintenance operations inside the main process building was the introduction of FEMO technology (FEMO is an acronym based on German for remote handling modular technique). According to this technology the two cells in which the actual reprocessing (which is based on the PUREX technique) takes place are provided with frames to accommodate the process components (tanks, pumps, agitators, etc.), each frame together with the components which it supports forming one module. The two cells are inaccessible and windowless. For handling operations each cell is equipped with an overhead crane and a crane-like manipulator carrier system (MTS) with power manipulator. Viewing of the operations from outside the cells is made possible by television (TV) cameras installed at the crane, the MTS, and the manipulator. This paper addresses some examples of problems that still need to be solved in connection with FEMO handling. In particular, the need for close cooperation between the equipment operator, the component designer, the process engineer, the planning engineer, and the licensing authorities will be demonstrated

  11. Results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Baldov, A.N.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the results of technical and economical examinations for substantiation of special plant design for reprocessing and radioactive wastes disposal are presented. Ground for the examination conducting was Health of Nation Programme ratified by the President and a number of Governmental decisions. The special plant is planned in the Mangystau Region. In the framework of feasibility study the data base by the worldwide known technologies was implemented, on reprocessing and experience of radioactive waste disposal. The technical requirements for the special plant construction are determined. The alternative options by structure content and site location of the special plant and radioactive waste disposal are cited

  12. Radiation protection experience during active commissioning of the Thorp reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spour, K.; Hutton, E.

    1996-01-01

    BNFL's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (Thorp) reprocesses uranium oxide fuel assemblies which have been irradiated in thermal reactors in the UK and overseas. Plans for the plant were first announced in 1974. Application for planning permission was submitted in 1977, and government permission to construct the plant was granted after the Windscale inquiry in 1977. The plant was given the license to start active commissioning in head end in early 1994, and then in chemical plants in late 1994. Presently the whole of the process is being challenged in a planned commissioning strategy which will last into 1996. Thorp is designed to reprocess the spent oxide fuel into uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) and plutonium dioxide (PuO 2 ). The Thorp complex can be essentially broken down into three distinct areas: Thorp receipt and storage provides pond storage for fuel awaiting reprocessing in Thorp. Head end fuel is transferred from receipt and storage into the feed pond where it is monitored to check fissile content, burn up and cooling time. The individual fuel assemblies for LWR fuel, or cans in the case of AGR fuel, are transferred onto the shear elevator and carried up to the shear cave. The fuel is sheared into small lengths to optimize the dissolution of the fuel inside the cladding. The sheared fuel and cladding debris is directed via a chute into one of three dissolvers, each with a nominal 1.8 teU capacity and dissolved in 8M nitric acid for approximately 16 hours. The cladding hulls are retained in a removable basket and sent for encapsulation. Insoluble fission products and fine particles of cladding are removed by centrifugation. Clarified dissolver solution is then accounted for by measurements taken for volume, mass and isotopic composition. Following this, the solution is transferred to buffer storage tarns and fed onto the chemical separation area. The liquor is transferred to the chemical separation area where it undergoes first cycle separation in pulsed columns

  13. Progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R.

    2007-01-01

    Belgoprocess started the industrial decommissioning of the main process building of the former EUROCHEMIC reprocessing plant in 1990, after completion of a pilot project in which two buildings were emptied and decontaminated to background levels. The remaining structures were demolished and the concrete debris was disposed of as industrial waste and green field conditions restored. The Eurochemic reprocessing plant operated from 1966 to 1974 to process fuel from power reactors and research reactors. The main building is a large concrete structure, comprising a surface area of 55,000 m 2 , concrete volume 12,500 m 3 , and 1,500 Mg of metal components. The building is divided into multiple cells. About 106 individual cell structures have to be dismantled, involving the removal and decontamination of equipment from each cell, the decontamination of the cell walls, ceilings and floors, the dismantling of the ventilation system. Most of the work involves hands-on operations under protective clothing tailored to each specific task. Tool automation and automatic positioning systems are successfully applied. In view of the final demolition of the main process building, the main process building is divided into three parts - each part is isolated from the others. In the middle of 2008, after the removal of the NDA-IPAN/GEA installation, the eastern part will be demolished. The paper presents a status overview of the decommissioning and decontamination activities at the main process building of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the nuclear site of Dessel in Belgium. The specific BELGOPROCESS approach will be highlighted, in which the decommissioning activities are carried out on an industrial scale with special emphasis on cost minimisation, the use of technology on an industrial representative scale and the specific alpha contamination of equipment and building surfaces, requiring that the decommissioning work is done with adequate protective clothing. Also

  14. Progress and experiences from the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant - 16022

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walthery, Robert; Lewandowski, Patrick; Ooms, Bart; Reusen, Nancy; Van Laer, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Belgoprocess started the industrial decommissioning of the main process building of the former EUROCHEMIC reprocessing plant in 1990, after completion of a pilot project in which two buildings were emptied and decontaminated to background levels. The remaining structures were demolished and the concrete debris was disposed of as industrial waste and green field conditions restored. The Eurochemic reprocessing plant operated from 1966 to 1974 to process fuel from power reactors and research reactors. The main building is a large concrete structure, comprising a surface area of 55,000 m 2 , concrete volume 12,500 m 3 , and 1,500 Mg of metal components. The building is divided into multiple cells. About 106 individual cell structures have to be dismantled, involving the removal and decontamination of equipment from each cell, the decontamination of the cell walls, ceilings and floors, the dismantling of the ventilation system. Most of the work involves hands-on operations under protective clothing tailored to each specific task. Tool automation and automatic positioning systems are successfully applied. In view of the final demolition of the main process building, the main process building has been divided into three parts - each part is isolated from the others. In September 2008 the eastern part of the building has been demolished. The paper presents a status overview of the decommissioning and decontamination activities at the main process building of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant on the nuclear site of Dessel in Belgium. The specific BELGOPROCESS strategy will be highlighted, in which the decommissioning activities are carried out on an industrial scale with special emphasis on cost minimisation, the use of technology on an industrial representative scale and the specific alpha contamination of equipment and building surfaces, requiring that the decommissioning work is done with adequate protective clothing. Also specific breathing and cooling air

  15. Radiological considerations in the design of Reprocessing Uranium Plant (RUP) of Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF), Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    A Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) being planned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam is an integrated facility with head end and back end of fuel cycle plants co-located in a single place, to meet the refuelling needs of the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). Reprocessed uranium oxide plant (RUP) is one such plant in FRFCF to built to meet annual requirements of UO 2 for fabrication of fuel sub-assemblies (FSAs) and radial blanket sub-assemblies (RSAs) for PFBR. RUP receives reprocessed uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) from fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) of FRFCF. Unlike natural uranium oxide plant, RUP has to handle reprocessed uranium oxide which is likely to have residual fission products activity in addition to traces of plutonium. As the fuel used for PFBR is recycled within these plants, formation of higher actinides in the case of plutonium and formation of higher levels of 232 U in the uranium product would be a radiological problem to be reckoned with. The paper discussed the impact of handling of multi-recycled reprocessed uranium in RUP and the radiological considerations

  16. Measuring process solutions in a reprocessing plant to 0.1%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.M.; Ehinger, M.H.; Ellis, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    Measurement of SNM in reprocessing plant solutions involves two major problems; measurement of bulk solution quantities and analysis of highly radioactive samples. It has been shown at the BNFP that bulk measurements can be made routinely under operating conditions to less than 0.1% total uncertainty. Two specific advances in measurement technology have been largely responsible for this improved performance. The quartz bourdon tube electromanometer replaces the fluid manometer for differential pressure measurements. The vibrating tube densimeter provides accurate measurement of density in lab samples. These instruments, coupled with a rigorous measurement and quality control procedures, are the means to achieve better than 0.1% performance

  17. Computer aided process control equipment at the Karlsruhe reprocessing pilot plant, WAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, R.; Finsterwalder, L.; Gutzeit, G.; Reif, J.; Stollenwerk, A.H.; Weinbrecht, E.; Weishaupt, M.

    1991-01-01

    A computer aided process control system has been installed at the Karlsruhe Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plant, WAK. All necessary process control data of the first extraction cycle is collected via a data collection system and is displayed in suitable ways on a screen for the operator in charge of the unit. To aid verification of displayed data, various measurements are associated to each other using balance type process modeling. Thus, deviation of flowsheet conditions and malfunctioning of measuring equipment are easily detected. (orig.) [de

  18. Standard model for the safety analysis report of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This norm establishes the Standard Model for the Safety Analysis Report of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants, comprehending the presentation format, the detailing level of the minimum information required by the CNEN for evaluation the requests of Construction License or Operation Authorization, in accordance with the legislation in force. This regulation applies to the following basic reports: Preliminary Safety Analysis Report - PSAR, integrating part of the requirement of Construction License; and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) which is the integrating part of the requirement for Operation Authorization

  19. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant D1206: disassembly cave window 4 replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.G.; Beckitt, S.; Potts, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    At UKAEA's fast reactor reprocessing plant at Dounreay, the containment glass on the zinc bromide cave viewing window tank failed after 13 years active use. External shielding was fitted and the window tank subsequently drained to make it safe. Fuel cropping operations carried out behind the window were resited to enable cave work to continue whilst a project team made arrangements and plans to replace the damaged window. Because of the complexity of the task and high (alpha, beta, gamma and neutron) radiation levels in excess of 500 Sv/hr a rehearsal facility was built to develop the remote handling techniques to be employed in the task. (UK)

  20. Reprocessing of fast reactor fuels in the UP2 plant at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenevier, F.; Grellard, J.; Wauquier, J.M.

    The installations of the UP2 plant and particularly the geometry of the HAO shop equipment were defined for reprocessing fuels from the ordinary water system. The high fissile substance level of fuels from the fast neutron system necessitated certain modifications to the installations and some operating restrictions so that they could be treated in the existing installation. After reviewing the characteristics of the reference fuel and describing the particular restrictions to be respected for safety-criticality, the choices made with respect to installation modifications and operating restrictions are presented. The observations made during a first treatment campaign confirm the validity of the options chosen [fr

  1. Diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate administration protocol for radiological emergency medicine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation therapy of diethylene-triamine-penta-acetate (DTPA) should be initiated immediately to workers who have significant incorporation of plutonium, americium or curium in the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. A newly designed electric mesh nebulizer is a small battery-operated passive vibrating mesh device, in which vibrations in an ultrasonic horn are used to force drug solution through a mesh of micron-sized holes. This nebulizer enables DTPA administration at an early stage in the event of a radiation emergency from contamination from the above radioactive metals.

  2. Iodine-129 in the environment of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant: Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauschild, J.; Aumann, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    A field investigation of the transfer of 129 I and of natural 127 I in the soil-pasture-cow-milk/meat pathway has been carried out at a dairy farm situated 5400 m to the north of the small Karlsruhe nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Soil and herbage samples were collected during the period between April 1986 and April 1987. Milk samples were collected during the 1986 grazing season. The concentrations of 129 I and 127 I were determined in all soil, herbage and milk samples. (author)

  3. Explosion risks linked to red oils in the spent fuels reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents the risk of explosion associated with reactions between tributyl phosphate (TBP) and its degradation products and nitrates from nitric acid or associated with heavy metals (uranium and plutonium); These reactions may lead to the formation of unstable compounds known as 'red oils'. The feedback explosions linked to the formation of such compounds occurring in spent fuel reprocessing plants round the world, is briefly discussed. The main measures to control these risks, implemented in French factories concerned are also presented. (N.C.)

  4. HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of the sequential equipment operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.B.; Fields, D.E.; Kergis, C.A.

    1979-05-01

    The second sequential operation of the HTGR fuel reprocessing cold-dry head-end pilot plant equipment has been successfully completed. Twenty standard LHGTR fuel elements were crushed to a size suitable for combustion in a fluid bed burner. The graphite was combusted leaving a product of fissile and fertile fuel particles. These particles were separated in a pneumatic classifier. The fissile particles were fractured and reburned in a fluid bed to remove the inner carbon coatings. The remaining products are ready for dissolution and solvent extraction fuel recovery

  5. Reduced waste arise in a reprocessing plant by the use of remote control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issel, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses how the increasing use of remote controlled processes, which is unavoidable with respect to work in hostile environment and which after serious further development and experience may improve plant production rate lead to another benefit in handling nuclear material, the benefit of reducing waste production and by this the avoidance of radioactive dispersal. The example of reprocessing of spent fuel is shown, what consequences and what improvements can be expected in the waste management by remote handling and maintenance instead of direct intervention by men

  6. Studies in the dissolver off-gas system for a spent FBR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinrich, E.; Huefner, R.; Weirich, F.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations of possible modifications of the process steps of a dissolver off-gas (DOG) system for a spent FBR fuel reprocessing plant are reported. The following operations are discussed: iodine removal from the fuel solution; behaviour of NOsub(x) and iodine in nitric acid off-gas scrubbers at different temperatures and nitric acid concentrations; iodine desorption from the scrub acid; selective absorption of noble gases in refrigerant-12; cold traps. The combination of suitable procedures to produce a total DOG system is described. (U.K.)

  7. Results of Active Test of Uranium-Plutonium Co-denitration Facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numao, Teruhiko; Nakayashiki, Hiroshi; Arai, Nobuyuki; Miura, Susumu; Takahashi, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tanaka, Izumi

    2007-01-01

    In the U-Pu co-denitration facility at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), Active Test which composes of 5 steps was performed by using uranium-plutonium nitrate solution that was extracted from spent fuels. During Active Test, two kinds of tests were performed in parallel. One was denitration performance test in denitration ovens, and expected results were successfully obtained. The other was validation and calibration of non-destructive assay (NDA) systems, and expected performances were obtained and their effectiveness as material accountancy and safeguards system was validated. (authors)

  8. Radioactive airborne effluent discharged from Tokai reprocessing plant. 1998-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Akira; Miyauchi, Toru; Akiyama, Kiyomitsu; Momose, Takumaro; Kozawa, Tomoyasu; Yokota, Tomokazu; Ohtomo, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-01

    This report provides the data set of atmospheric discharges from Tokai reprocessing plant in Tokai-mura, Japan over the period from 1998 to 2007. Daily and weekly data are shown for 85 Kr that is continuously monitored and for the other nuclides (alpha emitters, beta emitters, 3 H, 14 C, 129 I and 131 I) whose activities are evaluated based on weekly samplings (Weekly sampling is continuous for 1 week). The data contained in this report are expected to apply for studying the behavior of the radioactive airborne effluent in the environment. (author)

  9. Summary of typical routine maintenance activities at Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Supplement (March, 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    Typical maintenance activities, such as replacement of worn out parts and cleaning of filter elements, routinely performed during steady operation are summarized. [The Summary of Typical Routine Maintenance Activities at Tokai Reprocessing Plant] (JNC TN 8450 2001-006) was already prepared in September, 2001. The purpose of this summary is to give elementary understanding on these activities to people who are responsible for explanation them to the public. At this time, the same kind of summary is prepared as a supplement of the previous one. (author)

  10. Guideline for design and construction radiation monitoring equipments for Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Ninomiya, Kazushige; Jin, Kazumi; Morifuji, Masayuki; Nemoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Akira; Kawai, Keiichi

    1999-12-01

    Various kind of radiation monitoring equipment are used in radiation controlled area at each facility of Tokai reprocessing plant. These equipments have been designed and constructed based on the users requirements, and permitted by governmental regulation office. And, design has been carried out in consideration of the adoption of the new technology and our operational experience. Then, it has been used effectively for the radiation control of the facilities. This report summarizes the technical requirements that should be taken into consideration in the design and installation of radiation monitoring equipments. These requirements are fundamentally applicable when the equipments of the new facilities will be designed or the present instruments will be replaced. (author)

  11. A study on graded approach for risk assessment of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Tatsuro; Kohata, Yuuji; Takebe, Kazumi; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Kazuya; Kurosu, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    In a reprocessing plant, radioactive materials exist in several chemical processes and storage facilities, therefore we should evaluate risks of many events with various types, scenarios, frequencies and consequences in order to assess total risk of the plant. In order to assess risks of many events efficiently and effectively, the 'Graded Approach' should be applied to the assessment method taking account of importance of the consequence, complexity of scenarios and necessitated uncertainty. Therefore, we have developed a simplified quantitative method, so-called the 'improved risk index method', based on the 'risk index method' recommended by US NRC as qualitative risk evaluation method for 'Integrated safety analysis (ISA)' of fuel cycle facilities, to enhance quantitability, consistency and traceability in evaluation. The results of the 'improved risk index method' well agree with the detailed PSA in spite of the simplification. We will use this method in combination with the detailed PSA method, and will use the results for risk-informed management/regulation of the Rokkasho reprocessing plant. (author)

  12. Historic American Engineering Record, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Stacy; Julie Braun

    2006-12-01

    Just as automobiles need fuel to operate, so do nuclear reactors. When fossil fuels such as gasoline are burned to power an automobile, they are consumed immediately and nearly completely in the process. When the fuel is gone, energy production stops. Nuclear reactors are incapable of achieving this near complete burn-up because as the fuel (uranium) that powers them is burned through the process of nuclear fission, a variety of other elements are also created and become intimately associated with the uranium. Because they absorb neutrons, which energize the fission process, these accumulating fission products eventually poison the fuel by stopping the production of energy from it. The fission products may also damage the structural integrity of the fuel elements. Even though the uranium fuel is still present, sometimes in significant quantities, it is unburnable and will not power a reactor unless it is separated from the neutron-absorbing fission products by a method called fuel reprocessing. Construction of the Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Chem Plant started in 1950 with the Bechtel Corporation serving as construction contractor and American Cyanamid Company as operating contractor. Although the Foster Wheeler Corporation assumed responsibility for the detailed working design of the overall plant, scientists at Oak Ridge designed all of the equipment that would be employed in the uranium separations process. After three years of construction activity and extensive testing, the plant was ready to handle its first load of irradiated fuel.

  13. Spent fuel handling and storage facility for an LWR fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.H.; King, F.D.

    1979-01-01

    The facility will have the capability to handle spent fuel assemblies containing 10 MTHM/day, with 30% if the fuel received in legal weight truck (LWT) casks and the remaining fuel received in rail casks. The storage capacity will be about 30% of the annual throughput of the reprocessing plant. This size will provide space for a working inventory of about 50 days plant throughput and empty storage space to receive any fuel that might be in transit of the reprocessing plant should have an outage. Spent LWR fuel assemblies outside the confines of the shipping cask will be handled and stored underwater. To permit drainage, each water pool will be designed so that it can be isolated from the remaining pools. Pool water quality will be controlled by a filter-deionizer system. Radioactivity in the water will be maintained at less than or equal to 2 x 10 -4 Ci/m 3 ; conductivity will be maintained at 1 to 2 μmho/cm. The temperature of the pool water will be maintained at less than or equal to 40 0 C to retard algae growth and reduce evaporation. Decay heat will be transferred to the environment via a heat exchanger-cooling tower system

  14. The thermal oxide reprocessing plant at Sellafield: three years of active operation in the chemical separation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philips, C.

    1998-01-01

    The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant at British Nuclear Fuels' Sellafield site started operating in March 1994 with the shearing of its first irradiated fuel. In January 1995 the Chemical Separation part of the plant commenced processing the irradiated fuel feed solution that had been produced in the previous year by the Head End plant. By the Spring of 1998 over 1400 t of irradiated fuel has been reprocessed in Thorp, and the plant is being steadily and successfully ramped up to its normal operating throughput. The performance of the Thorp Chemical Separation Plant has been excellent, with the solvent extraction contactors performing as predicted by the extensive development programme. In particular the uranium-plutonium separation stage, which received intensive development to deal with the effects of the fission product technetium, has given an overall separation performance well in excess of the minimum flowsheet requirement. Decontamination of the uranium and plutonium products from fission products has in general been better than flowsheet requirements and the solvent extraction equipment has operated stably under the automatic controls developed during the R and D programme. Discharges of contaminants to waste streams have generally been in line with, or better than, expectation. This paper compares with flowsheet predictions a range of the key fission product and transuranic decontamination factors achieved in Thorp, shows how waste stream discharges are a small fraction of Sellafield Site discharge limits, demonstrates how uranium - plutonium separation performance has compared with expectation and summarises the overall performance of the Chemical Separation Plant. (author)

  15. Reprocessing decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.

    1978-01-01

    The United States must decide whether to permit, delay, or prohibit the reprocessing and recycling of nuclear spent fuel. To permit reprocessing would allow recycle as early as 1985; to delay the decision for a later administration to deal with means spent fuel would mount up at nuclear reactor sites; to prohibit would eliminate recycling and mandate permanent storage. Bayesian decision analysis was used to examine reprocessing costs associated with risks and economic benefits. Three distinct categories of risk that are important in the nuclear fuel cycle are discussed. These are: health, environment, and safety risks; nuclear theft and sabotage; and nuclear weapons proliferation risks. Results are discussed from comparing nine routes to weapons-usuable mterial available to nonweapons states that desire a nuclear capability. These are: production reactor and military reporcessor; research reacotr and military reprocessor; power plant plus military reprocessor or commercial reprocessor; enrichment (centrifuge, gaseous diffusion, electromagnetic separation, or aerodynamic jet cascade); and accelerator. It was found that the commercial power reactor-commercial reprocessor route is comparatively unattractive to a nonweapons state. In summary, allowing nuclear fuel reprocessing to go forward in the United States can be expected to increase the costs to society by a maximum $360 million a year. This is approximately one-seventh of the expected benefit (reduced electricity bills) to be dderived by society from closing the fuel cycle. It appears that the permitting reprocessing now is logically preferable to delaying or prohibiting the technology, the author concludes

  16. State-of-the-art report on accident analysis and risk analysis of reprocessing plants in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yasushi

    1985-12-01

    This report summarizes informations obtained from America, England, France and FRG concerning methodology, computer code, fundamental data and calculational model on accident/risk analyses of spent fuel reprocessing plants. As a result, the followings are revealed. (1) The system analysis codes developed for reactor plants can be used for reprocessing plants with some code modification. (2) Calculational models and programs have been developed for accidental phenomenological analyses in FRG, but with insufficient data to prove them. (3) The release tree analysis codes developed in FRG are available to estimate radioactivity release amount/probability via off-gas/exhaustair lines in the case of accidents. (4) The computer codes developed in America for reactor-plant environmental transport/safety analyses of released radioactivity can be applied to reprocessing facilities. (author)

  17. Thorium base fuels reprocessing at the L.P.R. (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) experimental plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almagro, J.C.; Dupetit, G.A.; Deandreis, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The availability of the LPR (Radiochemical Processes Laboratory) plant offers the possibility to demonstrate and create the necessary technological basis for thorium fuels reprocessing. To this purpose, the solvents extraction technique is used, employing TBP (at 30%) as solvent. The process is named THOREX, a one-cycle acid, which permits an adequate separation of Th 232 and U 233 components and fission products. For thorium oxide elements dissolution, the 'chopp-leach' process (installed at LPR) is used, employing a NO 3 H 13N, 0.05M FH and 0.1M Al (NO 3 ) 3 , as solvent. To adapt the pilot plant to the flow-sheet requirements proposed, minor modifications must be carried out in the interconnection of the existing decanting mixers. The input of the plant has been calculated by Origin Code modified for irradiations in reactors of the HWR type. (Author)

  18. Characterization of the head end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, R.F.

    1986-11-01

    The head-end cells at the West Valley Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant are characterized in this report. These cells consist of the Process Mechanical Cell (PMC) where irradiated nuclear fuel was trimmed of excess hardware and sheared into short segments; and the General Purpose Cell (GPC) where the segments were collected and stored prior to dissolution, and leached hulls were packaged for disposal. Between 1966 and 1972, while Nuclear Fuels Services operated the plant, these cells became highly contaminated with radioactive materials. The purpose of this characterization work was to develop technical information as a basis of decontamination and decommissioning planning and engineering. It was accomplished by performing remote in-cell visual examinations, radiation surveys, and sampling. Supplementary information was obtained from available written records, out-of-cell inspections, and interviews with plant personnel

  19. Contribution to the study of the degradation of the solvent used in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goasmat, F.

    1984-01-01

    The degradation of a mixed solvent (tributylphosphate - hydrocarbons) in a fuel reprocessing plant (UP 2 at La Hague, France) is studied in this thesis. Laboratory studies on degradation mechanisms, decomposition products and regeneration processes are reviewed in a bibliographic synthesis. Solvent degradation is investigated on a real solvent from a reprocessing plant. Influence of degradation on solvent performance is shown and regeneration processes should be improved. Many regeneration processes are tested on solvent from the plant and results are discussed. Separation and analysis of degradation products show the polyfunctional structure of compounds formed [fr

  20. On-Line Monitoring for Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams at Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Billing, Justin M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; Peterson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Advanced techniques enabling enhanced safeguarding of the spent fuel reprocessing plants are urgently needed. Our approach is based on prerequisite that real time monitoring of the solvent extraction flowsheets provides unique capability to quickly detect unwanted manipulations with fissile isotopes present in the radiochemical streams during reprocessing activities. The methods used to monitor these processes must be robust and must be able to withstand harsh radiation and chemical environments. A new on-line monitoring system satisfying these requirements and featuring Raman spectroscopy combined with a Coriolis and conductivity probes, has been recently developed by our research team. It provides immediate chemical data and flow parameters of high-level radioactive waste streams with high brine content generated during retrieval activities from Hanford nuclear waste storage tanks. The nature of the radiochemical streams at the spent fuel reprocessing plant calls for additional spectroscopic information, which can be gained by the utilization of UV-vis-NIR capabilities. Raman and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopies are analytical techniques that have extensively been extensively applied for measuring the various organic and inorganic compounds including actinides. The corresponding spectrometers used under the laboratory conditions are easily convertible to the process-friendly configurations allowing remote measurements under the flow conditions. A fiber optic Raman probe allows monitoring of the high concentration species encountered in both aqueous and organic phases within the UREX suite of flowsheets, including metal oxide ions, such as uranyl, components of the organic solvent, inorganic oxo-anions, and water. The actinides and lanthanides are monitored remotely by UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy in aqueous and organic phases. In this report, we will present our recent results on spectroscopic measurements of simulant flowsheet solutions and commercial fuels available at

  1. Contribution of research and development and engineering to a large reprocessing plant project. Extension of the La Hague plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutaud de la Combe, P.; Courouble, J.M.; Sauteron, J.; Redon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Two reprocessing plants are operated by Cogema: Marcoule (since 1958) and La Hague (since 1967). Since 1976 the latter has been reprocessing LWR assemblies in its 'HAO' workshop, operation of which has provided industrial experience in the reprocessing of this type of fuel. This experience will be drawn upon in the construction of extensions to the La Hague plant, namely the UP3 plant, which will have a capacity of 800 t/a, and UP2-800, which will expand the present plant likewise to a capacity of 800 t/a. These extensions will contain a number of improvements, particularly in the areas of safety and waste treatment, and of procedure and equipment. A considerable R and D contribution is provided by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), which is the licence holder, with its laboratories at Fontenay and the pilot workshop and industrial prototypes service at Marcoule. This activity supports all phases of the project, from the establishment of basic principles to the definition of essential characteristics of equipment, covering also the testing of full-scale prototypes (mock-ups) for the principal components: rotating continuous dissolver, swinging decanter, subcritical pulsed columns, used-solvent distilling apparatus, fission-product vitrification furnace, etc. Engineering work for the new facilities is performed by the Societe generale pour les techniques nouvelles in four phases: (1) establishment of basic data; (2) preparation of preliminary plans (including an estimate and a preliminary schedule) and of the preliminary safety reports; (3) drafting of the 'project' file, giving definitive costs and deadlines; (4) implementation, up to and including the operational testing stage. All phases of design and implementation are subject to a quality assurance programme. Extension of the La Hague plant represents an investment of 23,500 million French francs (in July 1981). Construction is expected to be completed in 1989. (author)

  2. Summary of plutonium terrestrial research studies in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L.; Andriano, D.C.; Pinder, J.F.; McLeod, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports plutonium concentrations of wheat, soybeans, and corn grown (a) on a field adjacent to one of the nuclear reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), (b) in a glasshouse, and (c) offsite. The crops on SRP were grown on a field that has been receiving both fallout plutonium and plutonium emitted at low chronic levels from an air exhaust stack since 1955. The crops grown in the glasshouse were raised on soil from the onsite agricultural field. The offsite field has received only fallout plutonium. The crop data indicate that the dose to an individual from ingesting grain grown on the field, although higher than from ingesting grain grown offsite, is still small (the 70-year dose-to-bone from eating 2 X 10 5 g (440 lb) of wheat in a year would be less than one mrem). Crop data from the field and the glasshouse experiment indicate that less than 10% of the total contamination of field-grown crops adjacent to a reprocessing facility was contributed by root uptake, the remainder by deposition on the plant surfaces. The plutonium content of the grain was generally 10 to 100 times less than that of the vegetation, again suggesting that deposition from stack emissions vegetation, again suggesting that deposition from stack emissions on the vegetation increased the plutonium content; whereas the grain, particularly corn and soybeans, was protected by thehusk or pod and contained principally plutonium from the root uptake pathway

  3. Advanced techniques for analytic liquid wastes management in the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.; Moulin, J.P.; Runge, S.; Schott, R.; Kashiwai, T.; Hayashi, M.

    1991-01-01

    The JNFS Rokkasho reprocessing plant is a large scale commercial reprocessing plant. Liquid waste treatment relies on concentration by evaporation. The management of liquid wastes is rather sophisticated and implies, beside the organic wastes, sorting out between process and non-process, acidic and salt-bearing, tritiated and low tritiated streams and also according to their level of activity. A particular attention had to be paid to the analytical wastes, as their particularity is to contain not only a significant amount of radioactivity but also some fissile material and exotic chemicals which are useful for analytical purpose but unwanted in the main process mainly because of their corrosive and chelating properties. The analytical wastes are sorted out according to their activity level and fissile material content. On the one hand, a specific process has been developed to recover the bulk of plutonium from the analytical wastes. On the other hand, the foreseeable amount of unwanted chemicals (such as chloride ions) has been drastically reduced by carefully selecting all the analytical methods either by modification of already known methods or in some cases by working out new methods

  4. Initiating events study of the first extraction cycle process in a model reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Renze; Zhang, Jian Gang; Zhuang, Dajie; Feng, Zong Yang [China Institute for Radiation Protection, Taiyuan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Definition and grouping of initiating events (IEs) are important basics for probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). An IE in a spent fuel reprocessing plant (SFRP) is an event that probably leads to the release of dangerous material to jeopardize workers, public and environment. The main difference between SFRPs and nuclear power plants (NPPs) is that hazard materials spread diffusely in a SFRP and radioactive material is just one kind of hazard material. Since the research on IEs for NPPs is in-depth around the world, there are several general methods to identify IEs: reference of lists in existence, review of experience feedback, qualitative analysis method, and deductive analysis method. While failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an important qualitative analysis method, master logic diagram (MLD) method is the deductive analysis method. IE identification in SFRPs should be consulted with the experience of NPPs, however the differences between SFRPs and NPPs should be considered seriously. The plutonium uranium reduction extraction (Purex) process is adopted by the technics in a model reprocessing plant. The first extraction cycle (FEC) is the pivotal process in the Purex process. Whether the FEC can function safely and steadily would directly influence the production process of the whole plant-production quality. Important facilities of the FEC are installed in the equipment cells (ECs). In this work, IEs in the FEC process were identified and categorized by FMEA and MLD two methods, based on the fact that ECs are containments in the plant. The results show that only two ECs in the FEC do not need to be concerned particularly with safety problems, and criticality, fire and red oil explosion are IEs which should be emphatically analyzed. The results are accordant with the references.

  5. Estimation of gamma dose rate from hulls and shield design for the hull transport cask of Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    In Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP), un-dissolved clad of fuel pins known as hulls are the major sources of high level solid waste. Safe handling, transport and disposal require the estimation of radioactivity as a consequent of gamma dose rate from hulls in fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant in comparison with thermal reactor fuel. Due to long irradiation time and low cooling of spent fuel, the evolution of activation products 51 Cr, 58 Co, 54 Mn and 59 Fe present as impurities in the fuel clad are the major sources of gamma radiation. Gamma dose rate from hull container with hulls from Fuel Sub Assembly (FSA) and Radial Sub Assembly (RSA) of Fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP) was estimated in order to design the hull transport cask. Shielding computations were done using point kernel code, IGSHIELD. This paper describes the details of source terms, estimation of dose rate and shielding design of hull transport cask in detail. (author)

  6. Inspection activities of other strategic points (OSPs) at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaifuki, Yukinobu; Ebata, Takashi; Nakano, Sadayuki; Fujimaki, Kazunori

    2008-01-01

    At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), Active Test (AT) using actual spent fuels for the final confirmation of the equipment and the system has been performed since March 31, 2006 toward the commercial operation. The safeguards inspection during AT is required in the same manner as commercial operation condition because plutonium is handled. In RRP automated verification systems are established by using unattended verification systems including a number of process monitoring systems along with main plutonium handling process from the spent fuel storage until the MOX product storages. Even under the modernized safeguards, inspection activities at Other Strategic Points (OSPs) are required to confirm plant status in accordance with requirements of the IAEA safeguards criteria. This paper presents procedures and inspection activities at OSPs which has been implemented in RRP since start of AT. (author)

  7. Conception and development of a computer-aided design for a spent fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blayrac, M.

    1989-06-01

    A spent fuel reprocessing plant is composed of connected equipments. The aim of this study is the creation of schemes representing the different workshops of the plant and the calculation of linkage characteristics (flux) from a graphic description of functional structures. The program, written in FORTRAN 77, based on mass, flow rate and energy conservation, uses a module library each corresponding to an elementary operation of chemical engineering. Verification is necessary for result quality and accuracy. The important number of parameters and variables used in the program, requires a diagnosis accelerating research of errors for correction. Knowledges used in these last operations are qualitative (knowledge of experts) and quantitative (results of calculations) for the development of an expert system written in D-PROLOG [fr

  8. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a fuel reprocessing plant. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Schelonka, E.P.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.; Augustson, R.H.; Barnes, J.W.

    1977-09-01

    A materials management system is described for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a fuel-reprocessing plant. Recently developed nondestructive-analysis techniques and process-monitoring devices are combined with conventional chemical analyses and process-control instrumentation for improved materials accounting data. Unit-process accounting based on dynamic material balances permits localization of diversion in time and space, and the application of advanced statistical methods supported by decision-analysis theory ensures optimum use of accounting information for detecting diversion. This coordinated safeguards system provides maximum effectiveness consistent with modest cost and minimum process interference. Modeling and simulation techniques are used to evaluate the sensitivity of the system to single and multiple thefts and to compare various safeguards options. The study identifies design criteria that would improve the safeguardability of future plants

  9. Filter safety tests under solvent fire in a cell of nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Gunji

    1988-01-01

    In a nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant, a solvent fire in an extraction process is postulated. Since 1983, large scale solvent fire tests were carried out by Fire/Filter Facility to demonstrate solvent burning behavior in the cell, HEPA filter integrity by the fire and radioactive confinement by air-ventilation of the plant under postulated fire conditions. From results of 30 % TBP-70 % n-dodecane fire, burning rate of solvent in the cell, smoke generation rate and smoke deposition onto duct surface were obtained by a relation between air-ventilation rate into the cell and burning surface area of the solvent. The endurance of HEPA filter due to smoke plugging was measured by a pressure drop across the filter during the fire. The confinement of radioactive materials from the burning solvent was determined by the measurement of airborne concentrations in the cell for stable nuclei simulated fission products, radioactive tracers and uranium nitrate. (author)

  10. Demonstration and development of safeguards techniques in the PNC reprocessing plant. Part of a coordinated programme on the use of installed instrumentation in fuel reprocessing facilities for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, H.

    1979-04-01

    A hull-monitoring system in the Head-End facility and systems for surveillance and containment in the spent fuel receiving and storage facility at Tokai Reprocessing Plant are described. Operating experience on them is analyzed

  11. Radioecological studies on plutonium and iodine-129 in the surroundings of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettelkopf, H.; Pimpl, M.

    1982-01-01

    Plutonium and 129 I are emitted from the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK) together with exhaust air and liquid effluents. Plutonium dispersion in the environment was used to calculate the dispersion factors, to determine the rates of deposition on grass and of the total deposition rates, to measure the distribution at depth of plutonium in the soil and to evaluate the contamination of plants and animals in the environment of the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant. The plutonium emissions with the liquid effluents were studied to deepen understanding of the process of sedimentation in a river system. Sediments, water samples, aerosols and living organisms from the Altrhein were examined. Factors of transfer to various organisms living in the Altrhein were measured. Most of the 129 I release from WAK goes via the exhaust air: this even applies after installation of an iodine filter into the exhaust air stack. The 129 I contamination of the environmental air, the soil, thyroids and milk was measured. Regarding the milk/air concentration ratio, a mean value of 210 was determined with a scattering range of 50 to 1480. Soil contamination was studied very thoroughly. Iodine-129 is transported into lower soil layers at a very slow rate only, if at all. The contamination of the soil with 129 I remained largely constant during the three years of investigations. The low rates of deposition of 0.02 to 0.05 cm/s indicate that 129 I is released to the environmental air again from plants undergoing the process of rotting. (author)

  12. Revisit of analytical methods for the process and plant control analyses during reprocessing of fast reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    CORAL (COmpact facility for Reprocessing of Advanced fuels in Lead cell) is an experimental facility for demonstrating the reprocessing of irradiated fast reactor fuels discharged from the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR). The objective of the reprocessing plant is to achieve nuclear grade plutonium and uranium oxides with minimum process waste volumes. The process flow sheet for the reprocessing of spent Fast Reactor Fuel consists of Transport of spent fuel, Chopping, Dissolution, Feed conditioning, Solvent Extraction cycle, Partitioning Cycle and Re-conversion of Plutonium nitrate and uranium nitrate to respective oxides. The efficiency and performance of the plant to achieve desired objective depends on the analyses of various species in the different steps adopted during reprocessing of fuels. The analytical requirements in the plant can be broadly classified as 1. Process control Analyses (Analyses which effect the performance of the plant- PCA); 2. Plant control Analyses (Analyses which indicates efficiency of the plant-PLCA); 3. Nuclear Material Accounting samples (Analyses which has bearing on nuclear material accounting in the plant - NUMAC) and Quality control Analyses (Quality of the input bulk chemicals as well as products - QCA). The analytical methods selected are based on the duration of analyses, precision and accuracies required for each type analytical requirement classified earlier. The process and plant control analyses requires lower precision and accuracies as compared to NUMAC analyses, which requires very high precision accuracy. The time taken for analyses should be as lower as possible for process and plant control analyses as compared to NUMAC analyses. The analytical methods required for determining U and Pu in process and plant samples from FRFR will be different as compared to samples from TRFR (Thermal Reactor Fuel Reprocessing) due to higher Pu to U ratio in FRFR as compared TRFR and they should be such that they can be easily

  13. Isotope correlation techniques for verifying input accountability measurements at a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, H.; Nakahara, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope correlation techniques were studied to verify input accountability measurements at a reprocessing plant. On the basis of a historical data bank, correlation between plutonium-to-uranium ratio and isotopic variables was derived as a function of burnup. The burnup was determined from the isotopic ratios of uranium and plutonium, too. Data treatment was therefore made in an iterative manner. The isotopic variables were defined to cover a wide spectrum of isotopes of uranium and plutonium. The isotope correlation techniques evaluated important parameters such as the fuel burnup, the most probable ratio of plutonium to uranium, and the amounts of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing batches in connection with fresh fuel fabrication data. In addition, the most probable values of isotope abundance of plutonium and uranium could be estimated from the plutonium-to-uranium ratio determined, being compared with the reported data for verification. A pocket-computer-based system was developed to enable inspectors to collect and evaluate data in a timely fashion at the input accountability measurement point by the isotope correlation techniques. The device is supported by battery power and completely independent of the operator's system. The software of the system was written in BASIC. The data input can be stored in a cassette tape and transferred into a higher level computer. The correlations used for the analysis were given as a form of analytical function. Coefficients for the function were provided relevant to the type of reactor and the initial enrichment of fuel. (author)

  14. Dynamic behaviour of solvent contactors in fuel reprocessing plants- an analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, R P; Siddiqui, H R [Nuclear Waste Management Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Murthy, K K; Kansra, V P [Fuel Reprocessing Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    Fuel reprocessing plants carry out separation of useful fissile and fertile materials from spent nuclear fuels by isolating highly radioactive fission products using solvent extraction method. In the fuel reprocessing step of nuclear fuel cycle, optimisation of process parameters in the PUREX flowsheet design is of great importance particularly on account of the need to realize high degree of recovery of fissile and fertile materials and to ensure proper control on concentrations of fissile element in process streams for avoidance of criticality. In counter-current solvent contactors of PUREX flowsheet there are a variety of processes conditions which may cause plutonium accumulations that requires attention to ascertain safe Pu concentrations within the contactors. A study was carried out using the PUREX process mathematical model Solvent Extraction Program Having Interacting Solutes (SEPHIS) for pulsed solvent contactors in PREFRE-1, Tarapur and PREFRE-2, Kalpakkam flowsheets for optimising the process parameters in plutonium purification cycles. The study was extended to predict the behaviour of contactors handling plutonium bearing solutions under certain anticipated deviations in the process parameters. Modifications wherever necessary were carried out to the original SEPHIS code. This paper discusses the results obtained during this analysis. (author). 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Model of iodine transport and reaction kinetics in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.

    1977-05-01

    A model is presented to describe the time-dependent flow and retention of stable iodine isotopes and the decay of 131 I in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The plant consists of 16 units of equipment such as a voloxidizer or graphite burner, fuel dissolver, solvent extractors, storage tanks, vaporizers, primary iodine sorbers, and silver zeolite. The rate of accumulation of bulk and radioactive iodine in these units and in the environment is described using 19 differential equations. Reasonable time-dependence of iodine retention factors (RFs) by the plant were calculated. RFs for a new plant in excess of 10 6 for stable iodine and 129 I decrease to the range of 10 3 to 10 2 as plant operating times exceed 50 to 100 days. The RFs for 131 I also decrease initially, for a period of approximately 10 days, but then increase by several orders of magnitude due to radioactive decay and isotopic exchange. Generally, the RFs for 131 I exceed those for stable iodine by factors of 10 4 or more. 19 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  16. Operational experience of gaseous effluent treatment at the Eurochemic reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.; Detilleux, E.

    1977-01-01

    The EUROCHEMIC fuel reprocessing plant applies the PUREX flow sheet. Two particular features of the plant influence gaseous and liquid effluents: chemical decanning and the ability to process a wide range of fuels, uranium metal or oxide, having an initial enrichment typical of power reactors (up to 5%) or material testing reactors (up to 93%). The ventilation circuits, treatment plant and monitoring equipment for gaseous releases are briefly described. No retention facilities for rare gases, tritium, or carbon-14 are provided. The releases are monitored for krypton-85, iodine-131, alpha and beta-gamma aerosols and tritium. Between 1966 and 1974 the plant processes about 200 tonnes of power reactor fuel, from which about 0.7 tonnes of plutonium and 1.5 tonnes of highly enriched uranium were separated. The most important points in the operation of the gas cleaning equipment are indicated: efficiency, operational reliability, incidents, etc.. Actual discharges as measured are compared with the limits set in the operation licence. Using the atmospheric diffusion coefficients, the dose commitment is estimated. The low level liquid effluents are passed, after neutralization, to the treatment plant of the Belgian nuclear center CEN/SCK. However, if the activity exceeds the limit set by the CEN/SCK, the effluents are concentrated by evaporation and stored on the EUROCHEMIC site. (orig.) [de

  17. Control of radio-iodine at the German reprocessing plant WAK during operation and after shutdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Kuhn, K.D. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    During 20 years of operation 207 metric tons of oxide fuel from nuclear power reactors with 19 kg of iodine-129 had been reprocessed in the WAK plant near Karlsruhe. In January 1991 the WAK Plant was shut down. During operation iodine releases of the plant as well as the iodine distribution over the liquid and gaseous process streams had been determined. Most of the iodine is evolved into the dissolver off-gas in volatile form. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and especially gaseous process and waste streams. After shut down of the plant in January 1991, iodine measurements in the off-gas streams have been continued up to now. Whereas the iodine-129 concentration in the dissolver off-gas dropped during six months after shutdown by three orders of magnitude, the iodine concentrations in the vessel ventilation system of the PUREX process and the cell vent system decreased only by a factor of 10 during the same period. Iodine-129 releases of the liquid high active waste storage tanks did not decrease distinctly. The removal efficiencies of the silver impregnated iodine filters in the different off-gas streams of the WAK plant depend on the iodine concentration in the off-gas. The reason of the observed dependence of the DF on the iodine-129 concentration might be due to the presence of organic iodine compounds which are difficult to remove. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Commissioning and operating experience of compressed air system of a reprocessing plant (Paper No. 5.10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, M.K.T.; Bajpai, D.D.; Mishra, A.K.; Kulkarni, H.B.; Raje, R.V.; Rajeshwar, S.

    1992-01-01

    Compressed air system is one of the most important utility systems, required in the continued operation of a radiochemical plant. Moisture and oil free compressed air is used in large scale for process control and process operations in reprocessing plants. Commissioning and operating experience of this system is described in detail, to indicate the importance of the system in the overall design and operation of such chemical plant. (author). 1 tab

  19. In-depth analysis of accidental criticality in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.; Gmal, B.

    1989-01-01

    An in-depth-analysis including probabilistic considerations has been performed for a potential criticality excursion in two large vessels in a planned reprocessing plant. Criticality safety of these components is based on limitation of uranium and plutonium concentration. The main intention of this study was to investigate the potential and probable magnitude of a criticality in greater detail and to detect possible weaknesses of criticality safety provisions. The results of the analysis show, that the calculated probability of less than 5 · 10 -4 /a a for a criticality excursion in the most relevant rework tank may be further reduced. The peak power rework tank may be further reduced by design modifications. The peak power and total fissions of the critical excursion as assessed in a preceding analysis for licensing are conservative by factors of 10 and 4, respectively

  20. Regional potential radiological consequences and their variability of failtRe events in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.; Friedland, W.; Geiss, H.; Muller, H.; Prohl, G.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program system has been developed for best estimate assessments of radiological consequences of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides. Computerized data bases as realistic as possible have been established and used describing weather sequences, land topography and usage, human population density, yield of agricultural products, etc. Input from the complex atmospheric transport program MUSEMEI and from the food chain program ECOSYS is combined with the main program BAMBUS to calculate site specific probability distributions for individual and regional collective exposures as functions of the time of year of the release, spatial location, exposure pathway, etc. In this paper, the principles of the program system are described and examples are given for its application to a selected hypothetical failure event in a reprocessing plant

  1. Experience in construction of a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Sakuma, A.; Inoue, K.

    1977-01-01

    In June 1970, Japan Gasoline Co., Ltd (JGC)and Saint-Goblan Techniques Nouvelles of France received an order for the construction of a reprocessing plant from Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, as a joint prime contractor. JGC was responsible for: procurement, inspection, and schedule control of equipment and materials other than those imported from Europe; for conclusion of contracts with various subcontractors relating to the building construction, piping, and similar work; and for supervision of field work. Field work began in June 1971 and was completed in about 40 months. This paper describes the experiences of JGC during the period of the entire operation, and on the basis of this experience recommends modifications to their approach to similar projects in the future

  2. Development of support system for maintenance and administration of reprocessing plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Syogo; Taniguchi, Takayuki; Shiraishi, Yoshihiko; Isaka, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    Each year, maintenance work is carried out for about 10,000 pieces of equipment, including mechanical devices, electric equipment and instruments, at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant. Ninety percent of such maintenance work is preventive maintenance. In order to manage the information about the maintenance work, a computer support system was developed between 1985 and 1992. Twenty-seven thousand pieces of equipment and 180,000 maintenance histories have already been registered in the system. The system has been used for planning inspections and replacement of equipment as well as checking their maintenance histories. Actual usage of the system has shown that some auxiliary functions need to be added. The system will therefore be improved and extended. (author)

  3. A safety evaluation of fire and explosion in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Kouji; Miyata, Teijirou

    1996-01-01

    The demonstration test was performed in JAERI to prove the adequacy of a safety evaluation for an air-ventilation system in the case of solvent fire and red-oil explosion in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The test objectives were to obtain data of the safety evaluation on a thermofluid behavior and a confinement effect of radioactive materials during fire and explosion while the system is operating in a cell. The computer code was developed to evaluate the safety of associated network in the ventilation system and to estimate the confinement of radioactive materials in the system. The code was verified by comparison of code calculations with results of the demonstration test. (author)

  4. Seismic tests on a reduced scale mock-up of a reprocessing plant cooling pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queval, J.C.; Gantenbein, F.; Lebelle, M.

    1995-01-01

    In conjunction with COGEMA and SGN, CEA has launched an important research program to validate the reprocessing plant cooling pond calculation mainly for the effect of the racks on the fluid-pond interaction. The paper presents the tests performed on a reduced scale mock-up (scale 1/5). The tests are composed by: -random excitations at very low excitation level to measure the natural frequencies, especially the first sloshing mode frequency; -sinusoidal tests to measure the damping; -seismic tests performed with 3 different time reduction scales (1, 1/5, 1/√5) and 3 different synthetic accelerograms. Two types of simplified model with added masses and finite element model were developed. Comparisons of measured and calculated pressure fields against the panels will be presented. The measured frequencies, obtained during tests, are in good agreement with Housner's results. (authors). 2 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Application of probabilistic risk assessment to nuclear fuel reprocessing at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.

    1980-01-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory has developed an integrated risk assessment methodology that has been applied to systems in the nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant. The methodology can be applied to several types of design and operational problems. Basically, the analysis is subdivided into individual modules that can be either utilized separately or integrated into an overall risk analysis. Computer codes and computer data banks are utilized extensively to minimize the manual effort. The flow of information begins with a definition of the system to be analyzed followed by an evaluation of sources of fault information, storage of this information in data banks, design analysis and data treatment, risk calculations, and end product options

  6. Seismic investigation of the Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endebrock, E.G.; Bartholomew, R.J.; Bennett, J.G.; Brasier, R.I.; Corcoran, W.F.

    1978-03-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the earthquake level at which the Nuclear Fuel Service, Inc., Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York, could first experience a predefined structural failure. The effort was divided into tasks of evaluating soil-structure interaction, determining overall facility motion, and analyzing the substructures. The analysis included using two- and three-dimensional finite element computer codes. Shear wall failure, cell flexural failure (beam action), and foundation (pile) failure were identified as possible structural failure types. The cells that contain radioactive materials and that are required to confine such materials during an earthquake should remain intact up to 0.20 g's. At the same loading, the piles supporting the confinement cells could undergo displacements sufficient to cause fracture of piping between nonmonolithically connected cells

  7. Separation of krypton from dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant using preparative gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoni, M.

    1984-02-01

    Kr-85 can be separated from the pre-purified purge air in the final processing step of the purification phase for dissolver off-gases of a reprocessing plant with the aid of preparative gas chromatography. Activated carbon adsorbers in combination with helium as carrier gas permits maximum gas mixture through-flow. A separation temperature of 30 0 C is considered optimal. An adsorbent volume of 40 dm 3 is necessary for processing the residual gas flow of 2.5 Nm 3 /h; the adsorbent is divided between 2 columns linked in series each of which are 2 m long with an internal diameter of 100 mm. The helium flow required is five times greater than the off-gas flow. The degree of purity for krypton is greater than 90% for a decontamination factor of greater than 1000. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Preliminary analysis of treatment strategies for transuranic wastes from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Yasutake, K.M.; Allen, R.P.

    1985-07-01

    This document provides a comparison of six treatment options for transuranic wastes (TRUW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel. Projected transuranic waste streams from the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), the reference fuel reprocessing plant in this report, were grouped into the five categories of hulls and hardware, failed equipment, filters, fluorinator solids, and general process trash (GPT) and sample and analytical cell (SAC) wastes. Six potential treatment options were selected for the five categories of waste. These options represent six basic treatment objectives: (1) no treatment, (2) minimum treatment (compaction), (3) minimum number of processes and products (cementing or grouting), (4) maximum volume reduction without decontamination (melting, incinerating, hot pressing), (5) maximum volume reduction with decontamination (decontamination, treatment of residues), and (6) noncombustible waste forms (melting, incinerating, cementing). Schemes for treatment of each waste type were selected and developed for each treatment option and each type of waste. From these schemes, transuranic waste volumes were found to vary from 1 m 3 /MTU for no treatment to as low as 0.02 m 3 /MTU. Based on conceptual design requirements, life-cycle costs were estimated for treatment plus on-site storage, transportation, and disposal of both high-level and transuranic wastes (and incremental low-level wastes) from 70,000 MTU. The study concludes that extensive treatment is warranted from both cost and waste form characteristics considerations, and that the characteristics of most of the processing systems used are acceptable. The study recommends that additional combinations of treatment methods or strategies be evaluated and that in the interim, melting, incineration, and cementing be further developed for commercial TRUW. 45 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs

  9. Preliminary analysis of treatment strategies for transuranic wastes from reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, W.A.; Schneider, K.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Yasutake, K.M.; Allen, R.P.

    1985-07-01

    This document provides a comparison of six treatment options for transuranic wastes (TRUW) resulting from the reprocessing of commercial spent fuel. Projected transuranic waste streams from the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP), the reference fuel reprocessing plant in this report, were grouped into the five categories of hulls and hardware, failed equipment, filters, fluorinator solids, and general process trash (GPT) and sample and analytical cell (SAC) wastes. Six potential treatment options were selected for the five categories of waste. These options represent six basic treatment objectives: (1) no treatment, (2) minimum treatment (compaction), (3) minimum number of processes and products (cementing or grouting), (4) maximum volume reduction without decontamination (melting, incinerating, hot pressing), (5) maximum volume reduction with decontamination (decontamination, treatment of residues), and (6) noncombustible waste forms (melting, incinerating, cementing). Schemes for treatment of each waste type were selected and developed for each treatment option and each type of waste. From these schemes, transuranic waste volumes were found to vary from 1 m/sup 3//MTU for no treatment to as low as 0.02 m/sup 3//MTU. Based on conceptual design requirements, life-cycle costs were estimated for treatment plus on-site storage, transportation, and disposal of both high-level and transuranic wastes (and incremental low-level wastes) from 70,000 MTU. The study concludes that extensive treatment is warranted from both cost and waste form characteristics considerations, and that the characteristics of most of the processing systems used are acceptable. The study recommends that additional combinations of treatment methods or strategies be evaluated and that in the interim, melting, incineration, and cementing be further developed for commercial TRUW. 45 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation Safeguards and Separations Reprocessing Plant Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, Alex [ORNL; Billings, Jay Jay [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL

    2011-08-01

    This report details the progress made in the development of the Reprocessing Plant Toolkit (RPTk) for the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program. RPTk is an ongoing development effort intended to provide users with an extensible, integrated, and scalable software framework for the modeling and simulation of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants by enabling the insertion and coupling of user-developed physicochemical modules of variable fidelity. The NEAMS Safeguards and Separations IPSC (SafeSeps) and the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) supporting program element have partnered to release an initial version of the RPTk with a focus on software usability and utility. RPTk implements a data flow architecture that is the source of the system's extensibility and scalability. Data flows through physicochemical modules sequentially, with each module importing data, evolving it, and exporting the updated data to the next downstream module. This is accomplished through various architectural abstractions designed to give RPTk true plug-and-play capabilities. A simple application of this architecture, as well as RPTk data flow and evolution, is demonstrated in Section 6 with an application consisting of two coupled physicochemical modules. The remaining sections describe this ongoing work in full, from system vision and design inception to full implementation. Section 3 describes the relevant software development processes used by the RPTk development team. These processes allow the team to manage system complexity and ensure stakeholder satisfaction. This section also details the work done on the RPTk ``black box'' and ``white box'' models, with a special focus on the separation of concerns between the RPTk user interface and application runtime. Section 4 and 5 discuss that application runtime component in more detail, and describe the dependencies, behavior, and rigorous testing of its constituent components.

  11. Task 5c: measurement and instrumentation under subsystem design of the LLL safeguard material control program. [For fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-12-31

    A product survey was conducted of all security products currently available on the market. Documentation is presented of the survey and a printout of the data is included. A general description is given of new but recommended instrumentation and security devices for application to fuel reprocessing plants. Security systems and hardware recommended for development, assembly, and testing are discussed briefly. (DLC)

  12. Floor response spectra of the main process building of a reprocessing plant against earthquake, airplane crash and blast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the general concept of the planned reprocessing plant for spent fuel elements, the main process building has the central function. This building will be designed to withstand earthquake, airplane crash and blast. This report deals with the stress on components and systems due to vibration of the building, the floor response spectra

  13. A quantitative approach to design of material accounting system for a complex facility. Study at the PNC reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, K.

    1994-01-01

    An approach to a design of nuclear materials accounting sysyem for a complex facility in Japan is discussed. Near-real-time materials accountancy model studied at the PNC reprocessing plant is described. Main features of the computerized nuclear materials accounting system are considered as well as the PROMAC - C code algorithm for statistical data processing is presented. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Alternative reprocessing schemes evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This paper reviews the parameters which determine the inaccessibility of the plutonium in reprocessing plants. Among the various parameters, the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials, the various processing schemes and the confinement are considered. The emphasis is placed on that latter parameter, and the advantages of an increased confinement in the socalled PIPEX reprocessing plant type are presented

  15. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  16. Present and future potential of krypton-85 for the detection of clandestine reprocessing plants for treaty verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppner, Michael; Glaser, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Burnup calculations are applied to determine the amount of krypton-85 that is produced during the irradiation of nuclear fuel. Since krypton-85 is most likely released into the atmosphere during reprocessing to separate plutonium, atmospheric transport modeling is used to calculate the worldwide distribution of krypton-85 concentrations stemming from emissions from declared reprocessing plants. The results are the basis for scenarios in which emissions from clandestine reprocessing facilities have to be detected against various background levels. It is concluded that today's background imposes heavily on the ability to detect small and medium plutonium separation rates; only high separation rates of 1 SQ per week and higher have a chance to be detected with feasible outlay. A fixed network of monitoring stations seems too costly; instead the high number of samples that are required rather calls for mobile sampling procedures, where air samples are collected at random locations over the world and are analyzed in regional laboratories for their krypton-85 concentration. Further, it is argued that krypton-85 emissions from declared reprocessing activities have to be significantly lowered to enable a worldwide verification of the absence of even smaller clandestine reprocessing. For each scenario the number of samples that have to be taken for probable detection is calculated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational radiation exposure at the Eurochemic reprocessing plant during normal operation and intervention periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.

    1980-01-01

    The Eurochemic reprocessing plant is a direct-maintenance, demonstration facility. From 1966 to 1974 it has processed about 180 tonnes of natural or low-enriched uranium, mainly as oxide, and about 30 tonnes of alloys of aluminium and highly enriched uranium. In this period, the operation was stopped for the time necessary to build and connect a new unit for the separation and purification of plutonium. As from 1975, all equipment was rinsed in order to put the plant in standby, some particular equipment was dismantled and a campaign of systematic decontamination was started. Simultaneously, the necessary steps were taken for the solidification and conditioning for storage or disposal of the wastes produced during the operation of the plant. The methods used to determine the individual doses due to external or internal irradiation are shortly described, as well as the rules set up for limiting these doses or for authorizing planned exposures. For the period 1966-1978 the paper shows the distribution of yearly individual and collective doses recorded for the permanent staff and for workers occupied for limited times. Correlations are shown between the absorbed doses and the nature of the work (normal operation, intervention, etc.) or the function in the enterprise (operation, maintenance, health physics, etc.). A small number of incidents leading to intakes or doses higher than normal did occur. However, experience has shown that careful planning and close collaboration between operational and health physics staff have resulted in keeping the doses within the authorized limits. (author)

  18. Tritium control by water recycle in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, N.E.; Ward, G.N.

    1975-06-01

    A preliminary study was made of the use of water recycle within a reprocessing plant to control the escape of tritium and to consolidate it for disposal. Tritium distribution was evaluated in the leacher, high-level, and low-level systems for seven different flowsheet conditions. Tritium retention efficiency was also evaluated for these flowsheet conditions. Impact of tritiated water recycle on the plant design and operation is assessed. It is concluded that tritium control by water recycle is feasible. Achievement of satisfactory retention efficiencies and economic volumes of solidified tritium waste will require extension of existing technology and development of new technology. Evaluation of potential abnormal conditions indicate that releases from upsets need not be excessive. Some increase in occupational exposure will occur because of the pervasiveness, persistence, and ease of uptake of tritiated water vapor. Incentives for tritium control by water recycle may prove marginal if this increased exposure to plant personnel is significant compared to the small reduction in exposure to the general public. Recommendations are presented for further studies

  19. Aerial and liquid effluent treatment in BNFL's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, P.I.; Buckley, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) completed construction of its Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield in 1992, at a cost of pound 1,850M. After Government and Regulatory approval, active commissioning was initiated in January 1994. Since then, the whole of the plant has been progressively commissioned and moved towards full operational status. From the outset, the need to protect the workforce, the public and the environment in general from the plant's discharges was clearly recognised. The design intent was to limit radiation exposure of members of the general public to 'As Low as Reasonably Practicable' (ALARP). Furthermore no member of the most highly exposed (critical) group should receive an annual dose exceeding 50 microsieverts from either the aerial or marine discharge routes. This paper describes how the design intent has been met, concentrating mainly on aerial discharges. It describes the sub-division of the plant's ventilation system into a number of separate systems, according to the volume and source of the arising and the complexity of the treatment process. The dissolver off-gas, central off-gas, cell and building ventilation systems are described, together with the development programme which was undertaken to address the more demanding aspects of the performance specification. This ranged from small-scale experiments with irradiated fuel to inactive pilot plant trials and full-scale plant measurements. In addition wind tunnel tests were employed to assist dispersion modelling of the gases as they are discharged from the THORP stack. All the resulting information was then used, with the aid of mathematical models, in the design of an off-gas treatment system which could achieve the overall goal. (J.P.N.)

  20. Development of the ELEX process for tritium separation at reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggeman, A.; Meynendonckx, L.; Parmentier, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Baetsle, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ELEX process for isotopic enrichment and separation of tritium from aqueous reprocessing effluents is described. After the development of an appropriate hydrophobic catalyst and the study of the separate constituent steps of the ELEX process, an integrated bench-scale installation with a detritiation capacity of 10 mol water per hour was constructed. It comprises essentially a 1.5 kW electrolyser and two 2 cm diameter by 3 m high exchange columns. In this mini-pilot the ELEX process was successfully demonstrated by detritiating more than 1000 dm 3 water containing up to 100 mCi tritium per dm 3 , which is the feed concentration expected for application of the process in a reprocessing plant. The process decontamination factor was always larger than 100 and the overall tritium balance could be kept within the experimental errors of the various measurements. Depending on the duration of the runs, the volume reduction factor was between 10 and 15, but this factor will become much higher when the present electrolyser will be replaced by the low-volume one now under construction at S.C.K./C.E.N. The technical availability of the mini-pilot amounted to 99% or more for the last experiments. During the nearly 6000 hours of operation there were no tritium contamination problems. At present the construction of a 280 mol.h -1 or 0.12 m 3 H 2 O (HTO) per day pilot detritiation installation nears completion. In this unit, which will have a total tritium inventory of maximum 1000 Ci, the ELEX process will be demonstrated with a volume reduction factor of 100 and a process decontamination factor of 100. Again the feed concentration will be 100 Ci tritium per m 3 . In the future this installation will be supplemented with a pre-treatment unit for the removal of fission products, organics and nitric acid

  1. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Jenkins, C.E.; Rhoads, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Safety and cost information were developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing plant with characteristics similar to the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. The main process building, spent fuel receiving and storage station, liquid radioactive waste storage tank system, and a conceptual high-level waste-solidification facility were postulated to be decommissioned. The plant was conceptually decommissioned to three decommissioning states or modes; layaway, protective storage, and dismantlement. Assuming favorable work performance, the elapsed time required to perform the decommissioning work in each mode following plant shutdown was estimated to be 2.4 years for layaway, 2.7 years for protective storage, and 5.2 years for dismantlement. In addition to these times, approximately 2 years of planning and preparation are required before plant shutdown. Costs, in constant 1975 dollars, for decommissioning were estimated to be $18 million for layaway, $19 million for protective storage and $58 million for dismantlement. Maintenance and surveillance costs were estimated to be $680,000 per year after layaway and $140,000 per year after protective storage. The combination mode of protective storage followed by dismantlement deferred for 10, 30, and 100 years was estimated to cost $64 million, $67 million and $77 million, respectively, in nondiscounted total 1975 dollars. Present values of these costs give reduced costs as dismantlement is deferred. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year radiation dose commitment to the members of the public from airborne releases from normal decommissioning activities were estimated to be less than 11 man-rem

  2. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, K.J.; Jenkins, C.E.; Rhoads, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Safety and cost information were developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a fuel reprocessing plant with characteristics similar to the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant. The main process building, spent fuel receiving and storage station, liquid radioactive waste storage tank system, and a conceptual high-level waste-solidification facility were postulated to be decommissioned. The plant was conceptually decommissioned to three decommissioning states or modes; layaway, protective storage, and dismantlement. Assuming favorable work performance, the elapsed time required to perform the decommissioning work in each mode following plant shutdown was estimated to be 2.4 years for layaway, 2.7 years for protective storage, and 5.2 years for dismantlement. In addition to these times, approximately 2 years of planning and preparation are required before plant shutdown. Costs, in constant 1975 dollars, for decommissioning were estimated to be $18 million for layaway, $19 million for protective storage and $58 million for dismantlement. Maintenance and surveillance costs were estimated to be $680,000 per year after layaway and $140,000 per year after protective storage. The combination mode of protective storage followed by dismantlement deferred for 10, 30, and 100 years was estimated to cost $64 million, $67 million and $77 million, respectively, in nondiscounted total 1975 dollars. Present values of these costs give reduced costs as dismantlement is deferred. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year radiation dose commitment to the members of the public from airborne releases from normal decommissioning activities were estimated to be less than 11 man-rem.

  3. Optimization of the retention of radioactive material from the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonka, H.; Horn, H.-G.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-protection ordinance of the Federal Republic of Germany does not know the expression 'optimization in radiological protection'. In order to gain experiences with the cost-benefit analysis for the retention of radioactive material from nuclear facilities as proposed in ICRP 26, this method has been applied on the emission of radioactive material with the airborne effluents of reprocessing plants. The reference plant has an annual throughput of 1500 t of spent LWR-fuel. Basing on this plant, two smaller plants (350 t/a, 700 t/a) are also analysed. The cost-benefit-analysis is carried-out for H3, C14, Kr85, J129 and aerosols. For these nuclides as well as for the three plant-sizes, the methods of retention, the estimated annual costs of retention, the emission rates for the different retention measures and the resulting collective-dose commitments are shown. Based on an α-value of 8000 $/man-Sv (20,000 DM/Man-Sv) the cost-benefit analysis shows no optimum for H3 and Kr 85. The optimum C14 as well as iodine retention is a high-efficiency scrubber and an iodine filter, respectively for the dissolver off-gas. For aerosols the cost-benefit analysis shows an optimum for the filtration of the dissolver off-gas by means of HEPA filters. For the other aerosol-sources, condensation, scrubbing and additional droplet separation from the off-gas is optimum. Reasons differing from cost-benefit analysis require HEPA filters for all major aerosol-sources. (author)

  4. Computer code TRANS-ACE predicting for fire and explosion accidents in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hitoshi; Nishio; Gunji; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1993-11-01

    The accident analysis code TRANS-ACE was developed to evaluate the safety of a ventilation system in a reprocessing plant in the event of fire and explosion accidents. TRANS-ACE can evaluate not only the integrity of a ventilation system containing HEPA filters but also the source term of radioactive materials for release out of a plant. It calculates the temperature, pressure, flow rate, transport of combustion materials and confinement of radioactive materials in the network of a ventilation system that might experience a fire or explosion accident. TRANS-ACE is based on the one-dimensional compressible thermo-fluid analysis code EVENT developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Calculational functions are added for the radioactive source term, heat transfer and radiation to cell and duct walls and HEPA filter integrity. For the second edition in the report, TRANS-ACE has been improved incorporating functions for the initial steady-state calculation to determine the flow rates, pressure drops and temperature in the network before an accident mode analysis. It is also improved to include flow resistance calculations of the filters and blowers in the network and to have an easy to use code by simplifying the input formats. This report is to prepare an explanation of the mathematical model for TRANS-ACE code and to be the user's manual. (author)

  5. Iodine-129 in the environment of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.J.

    1978-01-01

    129 I has been analyzed in both aqueous and soil samples to characterize the environmental impact of the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reprocessing operations. 129 I was quantified by a neutron activation procedure with γ-ray spectrometric detection [Ge(Li)]. For many samples, natural iodine ( 127 I) was also quantified. A wide range of samples can be accommodated by a combustion-based preirradiation isolation technique. 129 I amounts as low as 3.8 fCi can be determined with counting times of less than 30 minutes (s/sub rel/ = 10%). Deposition of 129 I in the environment via aqueous and airborne emissions has been studied. Data from analysis of seepage basin contents, spring water, on-plant streams, and the Savannah River show that 129 I from the seepage basins migrates easily through the soil with the groundwater, eventually reaching the Savannah River. Annual aqueous release rates were estimated to be 16 to 27 mCi/year. Data from analysis of soils from distances up to 159 km from SRP show above background levels of 129 I in both the minimum and maximum airborne transport directions. The soil results are compared with a wind dispersion model. The vertical distribution of 129 I in the soil was determined to a depth of 61 cm

  6. Method of separating plutonium from the process streams of a reprocessing plant for HTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, D.; Kankura, R.; Wenzel, U.

    1975-07-15

    The process streams of a reprocessing plant for Th-U fuel elements can be purified of Pu, using a chromatographic method. The process is based on the principles of extraction chromatography with the application of the method of breakthrough chromatography. The inert carrier consists of polytrifluoromonochloroethylene, TOA forming the steady-state phase and 2 M HNO/sub 3/ the mobile phase. After adjustment of the feed solution to the extraction conditions, Pu is extracted in the separating column to the steady-state phase. The height of the separating stages is expressed by the equation HTS (cm) = 0.2 + 0.65 u/sub 0/ (cm min/sup -1/). Due to the delayed Pu/Th exchange in TOA, it depends heavily on the linear flow velocity. Details are given of the design of a separating unit for a flowrate of 2 kg of heavy metal per day (the flowrate of the Jupiter plant). (12 fig, 4 tables)

  7. Development of remote repair robots for dissolvers in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Sen; Kunikata, Michio; Kawamura, Hironobu.

    1985-01-01

    For nuclear facilities, various types of remote maintenance and inspection devices have been developed to reduce radiation exposure to workers, save labor, and improve the operating rate of the plant. Existing robot technology, however, could not be employed when we were recently called upon to inspect and repair pinhole defects which had occurred in the spent fuel dissolvers of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation's Tokai Reprocessing Plant, because the work had to be done in an extremely radioactive environment, conditions too extreme for conventional robots. For this reason, we developed highly radiation-resistant repair robots capable of fully remote-controlled operation inside the barrels of the dissolvers, which have the inconvenient shape of 270 mm inside diameter and 6 m length. The process for developing the six different repair robots and the their functions are described in this paper. This development was sponsored by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) under contract with Hitachi, Ltd. (author)

  8. Evaporation of low-activity-level liquid waste at Tokai Reprocessing Plant, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojima, Yasuo; Nemoto, Yuichi; Fukushima, Misao; Shibuya, Jun; Miyahara, Kenji

    1983-01-01

    The operation of Tokai reprocessing plant started in 1977. The determination of the decontamination factors (DF) of the evaporators for low activity level liquid waste (LALW) has been made through the operation. This paper deals with the examination of the first evaporator located at the LALW treatment plant. The operational principle and condition of the evaporator system are briefly explained. The effects of wire-mesh demisters and liquid properties on the decontamination factor were examined in this study. The results are summarized as follows: (1) The DF decreased with the increasing vapor mass velocity on account of entrainment. (2) The DF was able to be improved by using wire-mesh demisters when the vapor mass velocity was less than 2,500 kg/m 2 h. Practically, the most suitable vapor velocity for the evaporator was around 2,000 kg/m 2 h. (3) The DF in the evaporator for 137 Cs, 144 Ce, 90 Sr and 106 Ru was between 10 3 and 10 4 . Regarding 106 Ru, the DF in acid evaporation was less than that in alkaline evaporation. (Aoki, K.)

  9. Study on applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to components of reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Makoto; Okuyama, Gen; Chiba, Shigeru; Matsunaga, Tsunebumi

    1991-01-01

    In view of the growing need for prolongation of lives of reprocessing plant installations, we recently investigated the applicability of highly corrosion-resistant amorphous coating techniques to such plant components as to be subjected to a badly corrosive environment created by high temperatures, boiling nitric acid (HNO 3 ), etc. As the result, giving a preference to the Ta-based amorphous alloys exhibiting high corrosion-resistance in HNO 3 solutions, we made specimens of stainless steel plates coated with the above amorphous alloys through the sputtering process thereof. To our satisfaction, these specimens successfully passed various HNO 3 corrosion tests as described later on. Ta-based amorphous films give cathodic protection to 310 Nb stainless steel plates, and that with extremely low corrosion rates of themselves as protecting agents. For these reasons, we are confident that there will be no practical problems at all, in case we adopt stainless steel plates partially coated with such amorphous alloys for use in a nitric-acid environment. In this paper, we explain the comparative tests for various amorphous alloys with different compositions, referring also to the thus-selected Ta-based amorphous alloy along with several kinds of corrosion tests specially arranged for the same alloy. (author)

  10. Strontium-90 concentrations in pronghorn antelope bones near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, O.D.; Halford, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Metacarpal bones were collected from pronghorn antelope near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant and adjacent areas on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Site in Southeastern Idaho. Control bones were collected from offsite animals at higher elevations. Average concentrations in metacarpals were 9.6+-2.8(SE) pCi/g(ash) within 10 km of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), 4.0+-0.9pCi/g for animals on the remainder of the INEL Site and 5.5+-1.0pCi/g for control animals. ICPP atmospheric releases of 90 Sr appeared to have caused a significant (P 90 Sr concentrations in antelope bones within 10 km of the ICPP as compared to bones of other INEL antelope. However, the ICPP antelope bone 90 Sr concentrations were not statistically different from that occurring in bones of the control animals from higher elevations. Antelope near the ICPP received approximately double the radiation dose to bone compared to doses received by other INEL antelope as a result of 90 Sr in bone. Strontium-90 in bone from both fallout and ICPP sources resulted in an estimated average radiation dose of 40 mrad/yr to edosteal cells and 20 mrad/yr to active bone marrow. (author)

  11. A review of the separation and immobilisation of krypton arising from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judd, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The techniques for the separation and immobilisation of 85 Kr are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to processes currently available or undergoing development on the technical to industrial scale. Of the separation processes, cryogenic distillation has reached the most advanced stage of development, with a pilot facility already undergoing radioactive demonstration. The PNC Kr-recovery pilot plant, which has a off-gas flow capacity of 110 m 3 hr -1 (approximately 1/4 the scale of THORP), is currently undergoing tests at Tokai Mura. Low-temperature absorption and adsorption processes have also reached the pilot plant stage but have yet to undergo radiological tests. The separated krypton has been conventionally stored as the compressed gas in cylinders, but progress made in encapsulation techniques suggest that more secure immobilisation can be achieved by encapsulation within a metal or zeolite matrix. Processes based on the implantation of krypton in a metal or metal alloy have been demonstrated on the technical scale with the radioactive gas. It is concluded that the technology for the separation, isolation and immobilisation of radioactive krypton is available only on a reduced scale compared with THORP. The investment cost of a 85 Kr management facility for THORP, based on cryogenic distillation followed by immobilisation by implantation in metal and assuming a 20 year plant life, is estimated at 51-57M pounds. The cost of prepurification of the off-gas stream is included in this figure. Accompanying operating costs, including those incurred by disposal of the encapsulate in geological formations, are estimated at 2.2-3.3 M pounds per annum. Further development work under radioactive conditions is still required prior to the application of existing technology to full-scale fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  12. Experience in constructing a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Sakuma, A.; Inoue, K.

    1977-01-01

    Towards the end of 1970, Japan Gasoline Co. Ltd. (JGC) and Saint-Gobain Techniques Nouvelles of France received an order for the construction of a reprocessing plant from Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, as a joint prime contractor. The work executed by JGC in this project is reported and consisted of: (1) Procurement, inspection and schedule control of equipment and materials other than those imported from Europe; (2) Conclusion of contracts with various subcontractors relating to the building construction, piping and other work; and (3) Supervision of field work. The field work began in June 1971 and was completed in about 40 months. The overall field labour mobilized during that time totalled about 410,000 man-days, and 900,000 man-hours were spent by the JGC engineers. With the object of constructing a high-quality plant, JGC since 1969 has started to investigate subcontractors in Japan as well as undertaking the selection, education and training of prospective subcontractors. For the welding work in particular, techniques were imported from France and domestic techniques were developed at the same time. Completion of the blank tests was estimated to require 33 months, but the schedule was delayed about seven months for various reasons. Obviously there is room for many improvements when constructing future nuclear chemical plants. However, careful consideration should also be given from the basic design stage onward, to the methods and sequence of construction so that a simplified plan can be obtained from which the work could be easily executed without resorting to special technology. This would lead to reduction in construction time, and a safer and more reliable plant at lower cost. (author)

  13. Developments in safety and operations culture in BNFL's thorp reprocessing plant, Sellafield, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kett, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the best descriptions of Culture is 'how we do things around here'. In a stable organisation it is extremely difficult to change any type of culture, whether it is an operations, customer service or safety culture. To change culture one of two elements are essential. There must be either a significant external pressure felt by all in the organisation or a change in senior management, with authority to set a new direction for the organisation. BNFL had a unique opportunity through the commissioning and operation of the Thorp Reprocessing Plant at Sellafield to shape a new Safety and Operations Culture. Both the key elements for change were present. Thorp was a high profile flagship plant that had attracted multinational investment. It incorporated new technology. The workforce had volunteered to operate the plant. A strong senior management team was specially selected. The plant was being commissioned in an environment where there was significant opposition by 'anti nuclear' groups. It was essential to both BNFL and the wider international nuclear community that Thorp was commissioned and operated safely. A strong operating culture was developed with safety as the corner stone. The culture comprises three key components. Rigorous plant safety case and risk assessments before work commences and modifications to the plant occur; A high level of involvement by all levels of the workforce in both operations and safety matters; Strong supportive leadership which does not allow safety standards to be compromised and encourages open debate on how to improve. During commissioning and early operation of Thorp the robustness of the Safety and Operations Culture was demonstrated. On several occasions, despite intense commercial pressure, operations were halted until the situation was resolved both technically and procedurally. This paper describes how the Safety and Operations Culture was developed. The key factors for success include recruitment, team selection

  14. Determination of trace amounts of uranium in a reprocessing plant by solution spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauchien, P.; Cauchetier, Ph.

    1983-01-01

    To establish inventory tables accurately and satisfy safeguards requirements - and also to ensure satisfactory operation of a reprocessing plant - it is essential to determine the uranium content of numerous solutions where the uranium is present only in trace quantities. For this purpose a method is proposed which relies on the fluorescence of uranyl solutions exposed to ultra-violet radiation. After a brief theoretical summary, the parameters which influence the measurements most strongly are enumerated: medium, temperature, nature of the matrix, and choice of wavelength of the incident radiation. It is then apparent that the measurement must be performed by internal calibration (using the proportional addition method) and that it is useful to obtain a fluorescence spectrum which enables us to verify the presence of uranium. The applications of this method at the La Hague plant are described, where it has been used since October 1981 by shift teams, notably to check the following points: the attack acid (before receiving the fuel), the foot of the first-cycle column, the carbonated solvent washing solution and the solutions of the effluent treatment unit. It is in fact used throughout the plant, even for checking uranium in PuO 2 oxide. The method makes it possible to avoid organic reagents such as pyridine and, in many cases, cumbersome effluent-generating separations. Determinations are possible - to give one example - by simple dilution in the fission-product concentrates and in plutonium solutions where the Pu/U ratio is as great as 1000/1. In pure solutions the detection limit with the equipment used at present is a few μg per litre in the measuring tank. In general, the accuracy is a few per cent. (author)

  15. Safety demonstration tests of postulated solvent fire accidents in extraction process of a fuel reprocessing plant, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukamoto, Michio; Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji; Uno, Seiichiro; Kamoshida, Atsusi; Watanabe, Hironori; Hashimoto, Kazuichiro; Kitani, Susumu.

    1992-03-01

    Demonstration tests of hypothetical solvent fire in an extraction process of the reprocessing plant were carried out from 1984 to 1985 in JAERI, focusing on the confinement of radioactive materials during the fire by a large-scale fire facility (FFF) to evaluate the safety of air-ventilation system in the plant. Fire data from the demonstration test were obtained by focusing on fire behavior at cells and ducts in the ventilation system, smoke generation during the fire, transport and deposition of smoke containing simulated radioactive species in the ventilation system, confinement of radioactive materials, and integrity of HEPA filters by using the FFF simulating an air-ventilation system of the reference reprocessing plant in Japan. The present report is published in a series of the report Phase I (JAERI-M 91-145) of the demonstration test. Test results in the report will be used for the verification of a computer code FACE to evaluate the safety of postulated fire accidents in the reprocessing plant. (author)

  16. BNFL's application of computer aided engineering to 'THORP' thermal oxide reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall-Wilton, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    BNFL are currently constructing facilities at Sellafield, Cumbria to reprocess thermal oxide fuel for U.K., European and Japanese utilities. Faced with a 3.5bn pound capital program to provide new facilities at Sellafield, BNFL took the opportunity to embrace the new computer aided engineering technologies then emerging in 1981. To give some idea of the commitment made by BNFL to the above many millions of pounds has been invested in hardware, and more on software and people. The 'THORP' (Head End and Chemical Separation Plant) project represents 1.5bn pounds. The introduction of computer aided engineering has provided a clash free design with full assurance that all materials and components used are compatible. Planning in the design offices in conjunction with an experienced construction management team enables the sequence of piping installation to be determined long before the construction teams enter the work area. This planning aspect has been significantly improved by using EVS (Enhanced Visualisation System). The use of supercomputing graphics facilities is stimulating demands from areas of engineering who have previously not sought to use magnetic data from a variety of sources. The result is mainly due to the data being easily accessible to users who have very little computing experience. (N.K.)

  17. Study of pneumatic hydropulse filter for feed clarification in reprocessing plant head-end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, I.A.; Shah, B.V.; Salunke, S.U.; Kumar, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    A Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) Filter with sintered stainless steel cartridges was tested for suitability in reprocessing plant head-end filtration. The filter was tested with simulated slurry containing between 25 and 400 ppm of calcium carbonate particulates in the size ranges 45 to 53 micron and 53 to 75 micron at varying flow rates. Procedures were developed for dislodging the layer of solids on the cartidridges and regenerating the filter remotely. Application of 5.4 kg/cm 2 air to the dome of the filter during regenaration was found to be optimum for dislodging the particulate layer on the cartridges. No difficulties due to choking of the filter cartridges were experienced during operation and good regeneration by remote operation was possible. Approach velocity at the filter medium was about 6 cm/min. The efficiency of regeneration was better than 90%. Filtration efficiency was found to be better than 90%. Solid loading capacity was found to increase with increase of particle size and feed concentration. (author). 2 figs., 10 tabs

  18. Thermal decomposition of organic solvent with nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Kouji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Miyata, Sadaichirou

    1995-02-01

    Since a thermal decomposition of organic solvent containing TBP (tributyl phosphate) with nitric acid and heavy metal nitrates is an exothermic reaction, it is possible to cause an explosive decomposition of TBP-complex materials formed by a nitration between the solvent and nitric acid, if the solvent involving TBP-complex is heated upto a thermal limit in an evaporator to concentrate a fuel liquid solution from the extraction process in the reprocessing plant. In JAERI, the demonstration test for explosive decomposition of TBP-complex by the nitration was performed to elucidate the safety margin of the evaporator in the event of hypothetical explosion under auspices of the Science and Technology Agency. The demonstration test was carried out by heating TBP/n-dodecane solvent mixed with nitric acid and uranium nitrate. In the test, the thermal decomposition behavior of the solvent was examined, and also a kinematic reaction constant and a heat formation of the TBP-complex decomposition were measured by the test. In the paper, a safety analysis of a model evaporator was conducted during accidental conditions under the explosive decomposition of the solvent. (author).

  19. Dose evaluation model for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi; Iyogi, Takashi; Inaba, Jiro; Chiang, Jing-Hsien; Suwa, Hiroji; Koide, Mitsuo

    2007-01-01

    A dose evaluation model was developed for radionuclides released from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant which is located in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, and now undergoing test operation. The dose evaluation model suitable for medium- and long-term dose assessments for both prolonged and short-term releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere was developed on the PC. The ARAC-2, a particle tracing type dispersion model coupled with 3-D wind field calculation by a mass conservative model, was adopted as the atmospheric dispersion model. The terrestrial transfer model included movement in soil and groundwater as well as an agricultural and livestock farming system. The available site-specific social and environmental characteristics were incorporated in the model. Growing of the crops was also introduced and radionuclides absorbed were calculated from weight increase from the start of deposition to harvest, and transfer factors. Most of the computer code system of the models was completed by 2005, and this paper reports the results of the development. (author)

  20. Identification of potential safety-related incidents applicable to a breeder fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The current emphasis on safety in all phases of the nuclear fuel cycle requires that safety features be identified and included in designs of nuclear facilities at the earliest possible stage. A popular method for the early identification of these safety features is the Preliminary Hazards Analysis. An extension of this analysis is to illustrate the nature of a hazard by its effects in accident situations, that is, to identify what are called safety-related incidents. Some useful tools are described which have been used at the Savannah River Laboratory, SRL, to make Preliminary Hazards Analyses as well as safety analyses of facilities for processing spent nuclear fuels from both power and production reactors. These tools have also been used in safety studies of waste handling operations at the Savannah River Plant. The tools are the SRL Incidents Data Bank and the What If meeting. The application of this methodology to a proposed facility which has breeder fuel reprocessing capability, the Hot Experimental Facility (HEF) is illustrated

  1. Optimal measurement uncertainties for materials accounting in a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayem, H.A.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization techniques are used to calculate measurement uncertainties for materials accountability instruments in a fast breeder reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plant. Optimal measurement uncertainties are calculated so that performance goals for detecting materials loss are achieved while minimizing the total instrument development cost. Improved materials accounting in the chemical separations process (111 kg Pu/day) to meet 8-kg plutonium abrupt (1 day) and 40-kg plutonium protracted (6 months) loss-detection goals requires: process tank volume and concentration measurements having precisions less than or equal to 1%; accountability and plutonium sample tank volume measurements having precisions less than or equal to 0.3%, short-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.04%, and long-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.04%; and accountability and plutonium sample tank concentration measurements having precisions less than or equal to 0.4%, short-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.1%, and long-term correlated errors less than or equal to 0.05%

  2. The FIRAC code - its applicability and boundary conditions for fire accident analysis in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewekamp, M.

    1991-01-01

    After a short description of the modelling capabilities and the implementation of the computer code the possible applications of FIRAC are demonstrated by means of two test-examples. The so gained experiences with respect to the variation of different parameters, convergency criteria, etc. can be used for the simulation of a fire accident in the storage area for unconditioned combustible low active waste (LAW) of the planned reprocessing plant at Wackersdorf. The code is prepared for calculating direct effects (of the fire) in the fire room as well as particularly effects on adjacent rooms and ventilation systems. Source terms for the release of radioactive particles outside a building can also be investigated. The temperature and pressure curves for the fire room as well as for other areas in the facility show that no damages caused by temperature effects are expected for the considered fire of low active waste. As a result of the calculated mass and volumetric flows radioactive aerosole particles could be transported into normally non-active areas. The FIRAC code renders the possibility of a more detailed analysis of those parameters relevant for fire accidents and by this means completes the so far phenomenological procedure of the fire hazard analysis in nuclear facilities. (orig.) [de

  3. The development of basic glass formulations for solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yaozhong; Tang Baolong; Zhang Baoshan; Zhou Hui

    1995-01-01

    Basic glass formulations 90U/19, 90U/20, 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 applied in electric melting process are developed by using the mathematical model of the viscosity and electric resistance of waste glass. The yellow phase does not occur for basic glass formulations 90U/19 and 90U/20 solidifying HLW from nuclear fuel reprocessing plant when the waste loading is 20%. Under the waste loading is 16%, the process and product properties of glass 90U/19 and 90U/20 come up to or surpass the properties of the same kind of foreign waste glasses, and other properties are about the same to them of foreign waste glasses. The process and product properties of basic glass formulations 90Nd/7 and 90Nd/10 used for the solidification of 'U replaced by Nd' liquid waste are almost similar to them of 90U/19 and 90U/20. These properties fairly meet the requirements of 'joint test' (performed at KfK-INE, Germany). Among these formulations, 90Nd/7 is applied in cold engineering scale electric melting test performed at KfK-INE in Germany. The main process properties of cold test is similar to laboratory results

  4. Measurement of artificial radionuclides in whole diets around the BNF plc reprocessing plant at Sellafield, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondon, K.J.; Walters, B.

    1993-01-01

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food has conducted a duplicate diet study around the BNF reprocessing plant of Sellafield in Cumbria. Samples were collected from adults and children. The results of analyses for a number of artificial radionuclides are reported; dose calculations using actual food intakes have also been made. Samples were obtained in both winter (phase 1) and summer (phase 11), between which times the Chernobyl accident occurred, making site-specific dose assessment from caesium isotopes difficult in summer samples. Control diets were collected from a coastal area in Lancashire. Average annual doses based on pre-Chernobyl sampling ranged from 2 μSv in control children to 14 μSv in study adults. This range increased to 9-50 μSv in the second phase of the study. Maximum individual doses were 86 μSv in phase 1 and 102 μ in phase 11, these being well within the government's target dose for members of the public. (author)

  5. Engaging Local Stakeholders on Technical Issues: Test Case at the La Hague Reprocessing Plant - 59211

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, Ludivine

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection (IRSN) lead a pilot action dealing with the decommissioning of a workshop located on the site of Areva's La Hague fuel-reprocessing plant site in Northwestern France. The purpose of the pilot program was to test ways for IRSN and a few local stakeholders (Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) members, local elected officials, etc.) to engage in technical discussions. The discussions were intended to enable the local stakeholders to review the operator's decommissioning application and provide input. The pilot program confirmed there is a definite challenge in successfully opening a meaningful dialogue to discuss technical issues. Three factors influence the extent of the challenge: the knowledge gap between experts and local stakeholders, the conflict between transparency and confidentiality which is inherent with technical topics, and the difficulty for an official expertise institute to hold a dialogue with 'outsiders' during an ongoing reviewing process in which it is participating. The pilot program, given its mixed results, also provided valuable lessons for further improvement of stakeholders' involvement. (authors)

  6. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luykx, F.; Fraser, G.

    1983-01-01

    The report covers operational nuclear power stations of capacity greater than 5C MWe and nucler fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community. Radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent discharges from these installations are given for the period 1976 to 1980, expressed both in absolute terms and normalized to net electricity production from the fuel. An assesssment is then made of exposure of members of the public consequent to the 1980 discharges. Where environmental contamination levels were detectable the results have been taken into account in the dose assessment; however, environmental contamination was in general below the limit of detection. In these circumstances the dose estimates rely entirely on theoretical models which frequently incorporate conservative assumptions; hence these estimates are likely to be greater than the doses actually received. The estimated exposures have then been compared with the dose limits set out in the Euratom Directive of 15th July, 1980. It is concluded that the exposure of members of the public always left an appreciable safety margin relative to the limits and indeed lay within the variations in exposure which result from natural background

  7. The establishment of in-process plutonium mass equation in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaya, Kosuke; Ebata, Takashi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Kawai, Akio; Iwamoto, Tomonori

    2008-01-01

    At Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), Active Test (AT) using actual spent fuels for the final confirmation of the equipment and the system has been performed toward the commercial operation. From the safeguards viewpoint, performance of material accountancy equipment is confirmed and data for evaluating parameters of the inspection equipment is obtained by making use of the AT period. RRP is applied to Near Real Time material Accountancy (NRTA). Under the NRTA scheme, the inventory at a cut-off time during process operation needs to be accounted for. There are some un-measurable inventories of plutonium in the process, which will be calculated from inventory estimation equations. The amount of these plutonium inventories calculated from the equations is so large that it is essential to improve the inventory estimation equations to be quite accurate. Therefore, correctness of the inventory estimation equations is evaluated by using process operation data obtained during AT. This paper describes the results of evaluating the inventory estimation equations by using the process operation data and the NRTA procedure under continuous operating condition as well. (author)

  8. Atmospheric tritium concentrations under influence of AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant (France) and background levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, O; Hébert, D; Solier, L; Maro, D; Pellerin, G; Voiseux, C; Lamotte, M; Laguionie, P

    2017-10-01

    In-air tritium measurements were conducted around the AREVA NC La Hague reprocessing plant, as well as on other sites that are not impacted by the nuclear industry in northwest of France. The results indicate that the dominant tritium form around the AREVA site is HT (86%). HT and HTO levels are lower than 5 and 1 Bq. m -3 for hourly samples taken in the plume. No tritiated organic molecules (TOM) were detected. 26 measurement campaigns were performed and links were established between near-field 85 Kr, HT and HTO activities. Environmental measurements are in line with those taken at the discharge stack, and tend to demonstrate that there are no rapid changes in the tritium forms released. Out of the influence of any nuclear activities, the levels measured were below 13 mBq.m -3 for HT and 5 mBq.m -3 for HTO (<0.5 Bq. L -1 ). HTO level in air seems to be influenced by HTO activities in surrounding seawater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    The report presents the available data on radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents discharged by nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community from 1972 to 1976. Discharges are expressed both in absolute terms and relative to the net production of electricity from the fuel. On the basis of the discharges recorded for 1976 the resulting maximum exposure of members of the population is quantified and compared with the dose limits prescribed by Euratom radiological protection standards and with the exposure resulting from natural radioactivity. It is concluded that there is no case in which a discharge could have given rise to an exposure exceeding the relevant prescribed limit. Not only did the possible maximum exposures incurred by individuals leave an appreciable safety margin relative to that limit but, for the vast majority of installations, they were comparable with or were considerably lower than the geographical and temporal variations in exposures resulting from natural radioactivity. Where environmental levels have been detectable the measured results have of course been used but, with few exceptions, the levels have remained less than the very low limits of detection currently possible. In general, where theoretical models are used to evaluate exposure, they are designed to give conservative results and hence it is likely that the true exposures are even less than those calculated

  10. Aerosol and iodine removal system for the dissolver off-gas in a large fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, J.; Wilhelm, J.G.; Jannakos, K.

    1979-01-01

    A newly developed filter combination for the dissolver off-gas in a reprocessing plant with a throughput of 1400 t/y of heavy metal is presented and single filter components are described. The design principle chosen provides for remote handling and direct disposal in waste drums of 200 l volume. The optimization of housings and filter units is studied on true scale components in the simulated dissolver off-gas of a test facility named PASSAT. This facility will be described. PASSAT will be also used for final testing of the SORPTEX process which is under development. Its concept is included in the paper. The design and function of the new multiway sorption filter providing for complete loading of the iodine sorption material and maintaining continuously high decontamznation factors will also be given. Removal efficiencies measured for aerosols and iodine in an existing reprocessing plant are indicated

  11. Report on the FR Germany: US technical workshop on near-real-time material accounting for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weh, R.; Hakkila, E.A.; Canty, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A technical workshop on the subject of near-real-time material accounting in an industrial scale reprocessing plant was held. Organized within the context of the US DOE - FR German Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) agreement in the field of international safeguards, the workshop was initiated by the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Wiederaufarbeitung von Kernbrennstoffen, responsible for the construction and operation of a planned industrial scale reprocessing plant in the FR Germany. The workshop's objective was to establish the current state of the art for near-real-time accounting and to bring out a common understanding and consensus among experts from both countries which seve as a basis for the definition of problems still to be solved. A summary of the workshop presentations, preliminary conclusions drawn by the experts attending as well as some implications for the application of dynamic balancing are given

  12. Studies in biological excretion of inhaled plutonium in the case of a few occupational workers in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedge, A.G.; Chandramouli, S.; Iyer, R.S.; Bhat, I.S.

    1992-01-01

    A power reactor fuel reprocessing plant is in operation at Tarapur. The various processes involved in the plant are: fuel rod cutting, dissolution in nitric acid, separation of plutonium, and handling of separated plutonium. The chemical form of plutonium could be nitrate, TBP complex, or oxide depending upon the nature of the process involved. Possible internal exposure to plant personnel occurs mainly by inhalation and occasionally through a contaminated wound. Occupational workers are regularly monitored for internal contamination by urinary excretion analysis as well as by in-vivo lung counting. This paper presents a follow-up study of plutonium elimination in four inhalation exposure cases. (author) 8 refs.; 6 figs

  13. Computerized Analytical Data Management System and Automated Analytical Sample Transfer System at the COGEMA Reprocessing Plants in La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flament, T.; Goasmat, F.; Poilane, F.

    2002-01-01

    Managing the operation of large commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, such as UP3 and UP2-800 in La Hague, France, requires an extensive analytical program and the shortest possible analysis response times. COGEMA, together with its engineering subsidiary SGN, decided to build high-performance laboratories to support operations in its plants. These laboratories feature automated equipment, safe environments for operators, and short response times, all in centralized installations. Implementation of a computerized analytical data management system and a fully automated pneumatic system for the transfer of radioactive samples was a key factor contributing to the successful operation of the laboratories and plants

  14. Description of solid waste expected from a large commercial reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keely, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Both low-level and high-level solid wastes generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are characterized in this paper with respect to source, quantity, content, radioactivity, potential volume reduction, and transuranic content

  15. Development of process simulation code for reprocessing plant and process analysis for solvent degradation and solvent washing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Keiki

    1999-01-01

    We developed a process simulation code for an entire nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The code can be used on a PC. Almost all of the equipment in the reprocessing plant is included in the code and the mass balance model of each item of equipment is based on the distribution factors of flow-out streams. All models are connected between the outlet flow and the inlet flow according to the process flow sheet. We estimated the amount of DBP from TBP degradation in the entire process by using the developed code. Most of the DBP is generated in the Pu refining process by the effect of α radiation from Pu, which is extracted in a solvent. On the other hand, very little of DBP is generated in the U refining process. We therefore propose simplification of the solvent washing process and volume reduction of the alkali washing waste in the U refining process. The first Japanese commercial reprocessing plant is currently under construction at Rokkasho Mura, Recently, for the sake of process simplification, the original process design has been changed. Using our code, we analyzed the original process and the simplified process. According our results, the volume of alkali waste solution in the low-level liquid treatment process will be reduced by half in the simplified process. (author)

  16. Safety demonstration tests on pressure rise in ventilation system and blower integrity of a fuel-reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Junichi; Suzuki, Motoe; Tsukamoto, Michio; Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-12-01

    In JAERI, the demonstration test was carried out as a part of safety researches of the fuel-reprocessing plant using a large-scale facility consist of cells, ducts, dumpers, HEPA filters and a blower, when an explosive burning due to a rapid reaction of thermal decomposition for solvent/nitric acid occurs in a cell of the reprocessing plant. In the demonstration test, pressure response propagating through the facility was measured under a blowing of air from a pressurized tank into the cell in the facility to elucidate an influence of pressure rise in the ventilation system. Consequently, effective pressure decrease in the facility was given by a configuration of cells and ducts in the facility. In the test, transient responses of HEPA filters and the blower by the blowing of air were also measured to confirm the integrity. So that, it is confirmed that HEPA filters and the blower under pressure loading were sufficient to maintain the integrity. The content described in this report will contribute to safety assessment of the ventilation system in the event of explosive burning in the reprocessing plant. (author)

  17. Disposal of Kr-85 separated from the dissolver off-gas of a reprocessing plant for LWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nommensen, O.

    1981-08-01

    The principle of the radiation protection to keep the radiation load of the population as low as possible requires the development of methods for retaining the radionuclide Krypton 85 seperated off the dissolver waste gas of future reprocessing plants for LWR-nuclear fuel elements. In a recommendation of the RSK the long-termed storage of the Kr-85 in a pressure gas bottle and the marine disposal we considered to be disposal methods low in risk. The present work develops a concept for both of the disposal methods and demonstrates their technical feasibility. The comparison of the cost estimations effected for both of the disposal methods shows that the costs related with the marine disposal of the pressure gas bottles amounting to 1.90 DM/kg of reprocessed U fall by the factor 10 below the costs that result from the surface storage of the bottles. In both cases was referred to a reprocessing capacity of 1400 t U/a corresponding to 50 GW installed nuclear power, thereby accumulating approximately 629 PBq (17 MCi) Kr-85 per year. Both concepts project the seperated radioactive inert gas to be filled in pressure gas bottles in a low temperature rectification plant. Each of the 85 bottles to be filled per year contains 7.4 PBq (200 kCi) Kr-85. (orig./HP) [de

  18. A survey of methods for separating and immobilizing krypton-85 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1990-12-01

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize krypton-85 arising from dissolution or prior treatment of nuclear fuel in a reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future applications in Canada. Cryogenic distillation is the most fully demonstrated method of separation of krypton from off-gases, but it is complex. In particular, it requires pretreatment of the gas stream to eliminate several other components before the final distillation. The most highly developed alternative process is fluorocarbon adsorption, while several other processes have been investigated on a bench scale. The simplest method of storing radioactive krypton is in compressed-gas cylinders, but the risks of accidental release are increased by the corrosive nature of the decay product, rubidium. Encapsulation in either a metal matrix or a hydrothermally vitrified zeolite appears to offer the most secure immobilization of krypton. Processes for both types of material have been demonstrated inactively on a scale approaching that required for treatment of off-gases from a commercial-scale fuel reprocessing plant. Low-operating temperatures and pressures of the metal encapsulation process, compared with encapsulation in zeolites, represent a definite advantage, but electrical power requirements for the former process are relatively high. It appears that suitable technology is available for separation and immobilization of radioactive krypton, should the need arise in Canada in the future

  19. Design and Implementation of Equipment for Enhanced Safeguards of a Plutonium Storage in a Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richir, P.; Dechamp, L.; Buchet, P.; Dransart, P.; Dzbikowicz, Z.; Peerani, P.; ); Pierssens, L.; Persson, L.; Ancius, D.; Synetos, S.; ); Edmonds, N.; Homer, A.; Benn, K.-A.; Polkey, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Security unit (NUSEC) of the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU, JRC) was entrusted by DG ENER to design and implement equipment in order to achieve enhanced safeguards of a plutonium dioxide storage located on the MAGNOX reprocessing plant in Sellafield (UK). Enhanced safeguards must lead to a win-win situation for all parties involved. In this case the DG ENER inspectorate will save inspection time, manpower and future financial resources and the operator will have the right to access its storage without the need for inspector presence. To reach this goal, while at the same time taking into account current budget constraints, NUSEC developed applications that use equipment commonly used in the safety and security fields but so far have not been used in safeguards. For instance, two laser scanners are used to detect entry/exit events into and out of the store and to provide the necessary information to an algorithm in order to categorize objects/people passing the scanners, e.g., a Fork Lift Truck, a trolley used to bring in PuO 2 containers, a system used for the dispatch of cans, people, etc. An RFID reader is used to identify equipment duly authorized to access the store. All PuO 2 containers arriving from the production line must be weighed, identified and measured using gamma and neutron detectors before they can be transferred to the store. For this purpose an Unattended Combined Measurement System (UCMS) was designed and manufactured by the JRC in order to do all verification activities using a single instrument. This paper describes the design features of the equipment and its implementation with the support of the Sellafield Ltd. in the framework of the MAGNOX store project. (author)

  20. Retrospective dosimetry of an accidental intake case of radioruthenium-106 at the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Takada, Chie; Ito, Kimio; Momose, Takumaro; Miyabe, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    On November 30, 1978, two workers in the acid recovery cell of the nuclear spent fuel reprocessing plant of JAEA-NFCEL were involved in an accident in which they became unconscious due to lack of oxygen. They were rescued immediately by other workers and were given artificial respiration to restore their normal breathing. Subsequent measurements by the whole-body counter showed that they were contaminated internally with 106 Ru. Prolonged lung monitoring was carried out for one of them. A significantly high activity of 106 Ru was obtained in the lung monitoring on the day of the accident. The physicochemical characteristics of the incorporated radioactive materials were not observed. In order to perform more reasonable internal dose assessment, the interpretation of the bioassay datasets of the worker was made based on the guideline demonstrated in the EU project IDEAS. The effective half-life of the materials in the lungs was determined to be 140 days which leads to the default Type S absorption type in the HRTM and the f 1 value was estimated to be less than 0.005 which is one-tenth of the default value. Simultaneous intakes via inhalation and ingestion were also suggested from several pieces of evidence although pure inhalation was assumed for internal dose assessment at the time of the accident. The aerosol size of the materials was not determined due to a lack of information if assuming simultaneous intakes; however, the resulting committed effective dose was about 1 mSv and its variation was small against the aerosol size ranging from 1 μm to 20 μm. (author)

  1. Suggestions of radiation protection instruments in ships used for transporting spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants to central stores and further to fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warenmo, G.

    1979-01-01

    Some radiation protection measures are necessary in ships which will be used for transporting spent fuel elements from nuclear power plants to central stores and further to fuel reprocessing plants in order to protect the crew from unnecessarily high radiation doses and to ensure that not allowable values occur. Such measures are discussed in this report as well as suitable radiation protection instruments for such ships. (E.R.)

  2. Preliminary field tests of near-real-time materials accountancy system at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TASK F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Masayori; Sawahata, Toshio; Sugiyama, Toshihide; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Suyama, Naohiro

    1982-01-01

    A study of applying the proposed near-real-time material accountancy model to the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp.), showed that the model was feasible and effective to meet the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards criteria in terms of detection timeliness and sensitivity. This study using the computer simulation technique is shown in this paper. In order to investigate the applicability of the model to the actual plant, the field test was carried out on the process in the material balance area (MBA) which covers the area from the input accountability vessel (IAV) to the product accountability vessel (PAV), in cooperation with JAERI. The key measuring points for dynamic physical inventory counts (D-PIT) are shown. The results of test evaluation are as follows: For timely detection, it will be able to evaluate an abnoumal accountancy in process by using the MUFd (material unaccounted for) obtained by the D-PIT about once every week. Therefore, this seems to satisfy the timely detection of IAEA safeguards criteria. As for detection, sensitivity and verification procedures, in order to clarify these criteria for a large scale reprocessing plant, further research and development will be required. In addition, since the field test was carried out along with normal plant operation, additional man-power problem was also considered. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Final report, Task 3: possible uses of the Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The West Valley Plant could readily be used for work on reprocessing of alternative fuels, spiking, coprocessing (including CIVEX), waste solidification, and the recovery of radioactive gases. The plant could be easily modified for any scale between small-scale experimental work to production-scale demonstration, involving virtually any combination of fissile/fertile fuel materials that might be used in the future. The use of this plant for the contemplated experimental work would involve lower capital costs than the use of other facilities at DOE sites, except possibly for spiking of recovered products; the operating costs would be no greater than at other sites. The work on reprocessing of alternative fuels and coprocessing could commence within about one year; on recovery of radioactive gases, in 3 to 5 years; on spiking, in 4 years; and on waste solidification demonstration, in about 5 years. The contemplated work could be begun at this plant at least as early as at Barnwell, although work on spiking of recovered products could probably be started in existing hot cells earlier than at West Valley

  4. Development of the system for the estimation of materials flow in pyrochemical reprocessing plant. Characteristic evaluation of the oxide electrowinning plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Nobuo; Tozawa, Katuhiro; Sato, Koji

    2002-07-01

    The operation of the plant with the non-aqueous reprocessing technology depends on the materials handling equipment closely. Because the value of decontamination factor of the products in the plant is low, treatment of nuclear materials requires remote operation technology. So the system for the evaluation of materials flow in the plant was built to evaluate the production ability of the plant and to check out the plant operation from the viewpoint of materials flow. The system is only based on information of the treatment abilities of materials handling machines and process installations and the arrangement of process installations in the reprocessing cell that influences a way to operate materials handling machines intensity. Therefore the system can be used to estimate the characteristics of non-aqueous plants that are not in detail design stage. The amount of production and the characteristics of the oxide electrowinning plant (operation term 200days/year, plant capacity 50tHM/year in design) designed in Feasibility Study Phase1 were estimated using the system. The results show that the practical amount of production of the plant design is about 88% of the designed value. To increase the amount of production, it is more useful to speed up materials handling machine time than to install new installation or to give priority to conduct bottleneck processes. It is because materials handling influences the production ability of the plant deeply. (author)

  5. Development of off-gas filters for reprocessing plants. Development and construction of an off-gas filter system for large reprocessing plants. Off-gas section of the resolver test stand of the IHCh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furrer, J.; Kaempffer, R.; Wilhelm, J.G.; Pfauter, C.; Jannakos, K.; Apenberg, W.; Lange, W.; Mendel, W.; Potgeter, G.; Zabel, G.

    1976-01-01

    The test of the highly impregnated iodine sorption material AC 6,120 was continued in the laboratory under simulated conditions of a 1,500 t/a uranium reprocessing plant. The influence of NO in nitrogen as the carrier gas on the removal efficiency of the sorption material has been especially examined. Several experiments on the removal efficiency of iodine sorption by the material AC 6,120 were carried out in the original off-gas of the French processing plant SAP Marcoule while the filter system was installed on the one side directly behind the dissolver and on the other side behind the iodine desorption columm. The first iodine filter developed at LAF II was installed in the off-gas line of the dissolver in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant. The filter system for the dissolver off-gas handling test rig of the IHCh was specified and ordered with an engineering firm. The conception of the prototype off-gas filter system was selected and a lock and transport system allowing to replace filters was designed and subjected for testing. Five alternative solutions were set up in order to find the appropriate filter concept. The method of selection based on the evaluation of performance criteria. According to the selected solution a filter drum was designed and constructed. The lock of the filter system has been designed and realized. Preliminary tests have been made. (orig.) [de

  6. Technical and economic evaluation of processes for krypton-85 recovery from power fuel-reprocessing plant off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waggoner, R.C.

    1982-08-01

    A technical and economical analysis has been made of methods for collecting and concentrating krypton from the off-gas from a typical nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The methods considered were cryogenic distillation, fluorocarbon absorption, mordenite adsorption, and selective permeation. The conclusions reached were: Cryogenic distillation is the only demonstrated route to date. Fluorocarbon absorption may offer economic and technical advantages if fully developed and demonstrated. Mordenite adsorption has been demonstrated only on a bench scale and is estimated to cost more than either cryogenic distillation or fluorocarbon absorption. Selective permeation through a silicone rubber membrane is not sufficiently selective for the route to be cost effective

  7. Absorption column working study for iodine formed in spent fuel reprocessing plant gaseous effluents: hydrodynamic and mass transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vignau, B.

    1986-09-01

    The hydrodynamic and matter transfer parameters has been studied on absorption columns destined to trap iodine issued of spent fuel reprocessing plants. These columns have different packing - Raschig rings (glass, ceramic, PVC, steel) - Berl saddles (ceramic) - Weaved metallic thread (steel). The effect of dimension and of packing structure on gas pressure drop and on liquid holdup has been evaluated. The partial transfer coefficients of I 2 -Air-NaOH system has been the object of an experimental study. This system can be simulated by CO 2 -Air-NaOH system [fr

  8. Study on the combustion behavior of radiolytically generated hydrogen explosion in small scale annular vessels at the reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Tatsuya; Tamauchi, Yoshikazu; Arai, Nobuyuki; Dai, Wenbin; Sakaihara, Motohiro; Kanehira, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water, etc. in process vessels in reprocessing plant. Usually, the hydrogen is scavenged by compressed air into vessels to prevent hydrogen explosion. When an earthquake beyond design based occurs, for example, the compressed air may stop and the hydrogen starts accumulating in the vessels, and under this condition, an ignition source might set off hydrogen explosion. Therefore, the explosion derived by the radiolytically generated hydrogen is designated as one of severe accidents on Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in new regulatory requirements. It is important to understand the combustion behavior of hydrogen explosion inside a vessel for consideration of safety measures against the severe accident, because the influences of detonation are not considered in the design basis of vessels. Especially, the investigations about the combustion behavior which considered influence of interior obstacles inside the vessel are not performed yet. In order to investigate the combustion behavior comprehensively, explosion experiment, combustion analysis and structural analysis are carried out using the representative vessels (small scale annular vessel, small scale plate vessel, large scale annular vessel and large scale cylindrical vessel) selected from Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. In this paper, the results of experiments and analysis of small scale annular vessel (as one of representative vessel, imitated a pulsed column in the reprocessing plant) are reported. As imitated vessels, three vessels are manufactured with different interior obstacle arrangements as follows, A) cylindrical obstacles are faithfully reproduced and are arranged based on the actual vessel, B) cylindrical obstacles are arranged more densely than the actual vessel, and C) there are no obstacles inside the vessel. Experiments of hydrogen explosion are performed under condition of stoichiometric hydrogen-air ratio (premixed hydrogen-air is used). As a result of

  9. Analysis of a control and data acquisition system for radiation protection monitors of spent fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Boxue

    1997-01-01

    For the radiation protection monitoring of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, the paper analyzes the composition and requirements of a control and data acquisition system. With the concepts of typical distributing and opening models, the hardware consists of IPC, communication of RS-485 bus lines and data multiplexer. The software consists of real-time multi-services operation system and modelling program. It can sample monitoring data, control monitor's operation, and process data and other information. It has good expansive and compatible features

  10. Design lead shielded casks for shipment and spent fuel from power reactors to reprocessing plant at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharamaiah, P.

    1975-01-01

    Spent fuels from the Tarapur and Rajasthan Atomic Power Stations (TAPS and RAPS) are shipped to Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur in heavily lead shielded casks weighing about 65 tonnes as they are highly radioactive. The design of the casks has to meet stringemt requirements of safety and the integrity should be ensured to contain activity under credible accidents during handling and transportation. The paper presents the design of two casks for TAPS and RAPS spent fuel transportation particularly with reference to stress analysis considerations. The analysis also includes the handling gadgets and tie down attachments on the rail wagon and road trailer. (author)

  11. Operating experience of centrifugal contactors used in a third plutonium purification cycle at the Marcoule reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coste, J.A.; Breschet, C.A.; Delafontaine, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Multistage centrifugal contactors of the type SGN-ROBATEL LX 208 NSC are used in a third plutonium cycle at the Marcoule Reprocessing Plant, they have been smooth-running since the commissioning in 1984. The four centrifugal contactors, totalling 32 stages, are used for Extraction. Scrub and Acidic Strip, and a bank of three flat mixer-settlers is used for plutonium blocking, and soda washing of the solvent. The plutonium product, the residual activity of which is less than one microcurie per gram, is diluent washed in a bank of three flat mixer-settlers, before been concentrated in a zirconium evaporator to 200 g. 1 -1

  12. Summary of the last step of active test at separation facility and purification facility in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroishi, Yuuki; Iseki, Tadahiro; Mitani, Akira; Takahashi, Naoki; Tsujimura, Akino; Sato, Nobuharu; Inaba, Makoto; Itagaki, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    During the last step of Active Test (AT) at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP), the performance of the Separation Facility, mainly for pulsed columns and mixer-settlers were tested; Diluent washing efficiency, Plutonium extraction and stripping efficiency, Decontamination factors of fission products and Uranium and plutonium losses into wastes. Also, those of the Plutonium purification unit in the Purification Facility have been checked; Diluent washing efficiency, Plutonium extraction and stripping efficiency and Plutonium losses into wastes. Test results were equivalent to or better than expected values. (author)

  13. TRP channels: an overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd

    2005-01-01

    The TRP ("transient receptor potential") family of ion channels now comprises more than 30 cation channels, most of which are permeable for Ca2+, and some also for Mg2+. On the basis of sequence homology, the TRP family can be divided in seven main subfamilies: the TRPC ('Canonical') family......, the TRPV ('Vanilloid') family, the TRPM ('Melastatin') family, the TRPP ('Polycystin') family, the TRPML ('Mucolipin') family, the TRPA ('Ankyrin') family, and the TRPN ('NOMPC') family. The cloning and characterization of members of this cation channel family has exploded during recent years, leading...... to a plethora of data on the roles of TRPs in a variety of tissues and species, including mammals, insects, and yeast. The present review summarizes the most pertinent recent evidence regarding the structural and functional properties of TRP channels, focusing on the regulation and physiology of mammalian TRPs....

  14. Fallout of cesium-137 on a forest ecosystem in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriano, D.C.; Hoyt, G.D.; Pinder, J.E. III

    1981-01-01

    Forest canopies intercepted airborne radionuclide-bearing particles released by a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at the Savannah River Plant producing higher concentrations and accumulations of 137 Cs, 238 Pu and sup(239,240)Pu in the forest litter and mineral soil. This impact resulted in 137 Cs contents usually more than double that for the control samples not influenced by the plant release. The variations in accumulation and distribution patterns of 137 Cs, 238 Pu and sup(239,240)Pu were caused by the apparent greater mobility of 137 Cs in the soil profile and the time of deposition of the Pu isotopes. The use of 137 Cs as an environmental analog for Pu appears questionable as indicated by inconsistent relationships in samples between 137 Cs and 238 Pu or 137 Cs and sup(239,240)Pu. However, its use looks promising in situations elsewhere where erosional transport mechanism determines the mobility of these radionuclides. (author)

  15. Savannah River Laboratory data banks for risk assessment of fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, W.S.

    1981-10-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory maintains a series of computerized data banks primarily as an aid in probabilistic risk assessment studies in the fuel reprocessing facilities. These include component failure rates, generic incidents, and reports of specific deviations from normal operating conditions. In addition to providing data for probability studies, these banks, have served as a valuable aid in trend analysis, equipment histories, process hazards analysis, consequence assessments, incident audit, process problem solving, and training

  16. Chapter 2: Development of instrumentation for safety analyses in fuel reprocessing and treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Development and provision of methods allowing for safety-related statements on non-appropriate operation of intermediate storage, reprocessing and waste conditioning on the basis of probabilities. By applying the methods and models to the courses of events considered, activity releases at the chimney and their probable frequency were determined. For accidents known to be radiologically relevant, expected values for exposure were computed by means of complex distribution and exposure models. (DG) [de

  17. Why reprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, T.

    1977-01-01

    Prospective costs of reprocessing, waste management, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication have risen so much that the costs of U/P recycle and of spent fuel storage are nearly equal. This paper reviews the current state of the reprocessing industry, with a list of facilities all over the world, and examines the incentives and disincentives other than short-term economics that will affect the decision of states to acquire their own reprocessing facilities. Finally, it examines the possibility of avoiding a widespread commercial reprocessing industry

  18. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, K.

    1965-05-01

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated

  19. Mechanical and Instrumental Experiences from the Erection, Commissioning, and Operation of a Small Pilot Plant for Development Work on Aqueous Reprocessing of Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, K

    1965-05-15

    A radio chemical pilot plant for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels has been built by AB Atomenergi at Kjeller in Norway. In the report a short description of the main equipment is given as well as of the procedure during the erection of the plant. Finally the results and experiences from the cold tests, tracer tests and active runs are indicated.

  20. Microchemical chip technology and nuclear energy. To develop new analytical system for process control in reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokeshi, Manabu; Ikeda, Yasuhisa; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2006-01-01

    A feasibility study for two years has been done to apply micro-chemical chip technology to nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Desktop-sized thermal lens microscope (DT-TLM) combined with integrated glass ship was examined in order to find a rapid and sensitive analytical method. A laser-beam is split into two beams, one as the reference while the other to be absorbed in a small quantity of sample solution in a cell with short optical-path length. The solution, on absorbing laser photons, increases in temperature accompanied with change in refractive index, which can be detected by using thermal lens microscope. After examinations of Co-complexes in the presence of 10 -6 M Cu ions by using micro chip-extraction behavior from aqueous phase to chloroform organic phase, and of U(VI) solutions in 3M nitric acid with added 8-quinolinol and others to develop optical density at absorbing wavelength, the author concluded that the system may be applicable for the practical analysis of U(VI) and H + in the spent fuel reprocessing plant. (S. Ohno)

  1. Considerations affecting deep-well disposal of tritium-bearing low-level aqueous waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Warner, D.L.; Steindler, M.J.

    1977-03-01

    Present concepts of disposal of low-level aqueous wastes (LLAW) that contain much of the fission-product tritium from light water reactors involve dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams at fuel reprocessing plants. These concepts have been challenged in recent years. Deep-well injection of low-level aqueous wastes, an alternative to biospheric dispersal, is the subject of this presentation. Many factors must be considered in assessing its feasibility, including technology, costs, environmental impact, legal and regulatory constraints, and siting. Examination of these factors indicates that the technology of deep-well injection, extensively developed for other industrial wastes, would require little innovation before application to low-level aqueous wastes. Costs would be low, of the order of magnitude of 10 -4 mill/kWh. The environmental impact of normal deep-well disposal would be small, compared with dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams; abnormal operation would not be expected to produce catastrophic results. Geologically suitable sites are abundant in the U.S., but a well would best be co-located with the fuel-reprocessing plant where the LLAW is produced. Legal and regulatory constraints now being developed will be the most important determinants of the feasibility of applying the method

  2. Benchmark data for a large reprocessing plant for evaluation of advanced data analysis algorithms and safeguards system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burr, T.L.; Coulter, C.A.; Wangen, L.E.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the simulation and analysis of solution level and density (L,D) in all key main process tanks in a large reprocessing plant. In addition, initial provisions were made to include temperature (T) data in the analysis at a later time. FacSim, a simulation program developed at Los Alamos, was used to generate simulated process operating data for the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) that is now under construction in Japan. Both normal facility operation and more than thirty abrupt diversion scenarios were modeled over 25-day periods of simulated operation beginning with clean startup of the facility. The simulation tracked uranium, plutonium (both +3 and +4 oxidation states), HNO 3 diluent, and tributyl phosphate from the input accountability vessel to the plutonium output accountability vessel, with the status of each process vessel and many pipes recorded at intervals of approximately four minutes. These data were used to determine solution volume and density values in each process vessel as a function of time

  3. A study of safeguards approach for the area of plutonium evaporator in a large scale reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Hirotada; Ikawa, Koji

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary study on a safeguards approach for the chemical processing area in a large scale reprocessing plant has been carried out. In this approach, plutonium inventory at the plutonium evaporator will not be taken, but containment and surveillance (C/S) measures will be applied to ensure the integrity of an area specifically defined to include the plutonium evaporator. The plutonium evaporator area consists of the evaporator itself and two accounting points, i.e., one before the plutonium evaporator and the other after the plutonium evaporator. For newly defined accounting points, two alternative measurement methods, i.e., accounting vessels with high accuracy and flow meters, were examined. Conditions to provide the integrity of the plutonium evaporator area were also examined as well as other technical aspects associated with this approach. The results showed that an appropriate combination of NRTA and C/S measures would be essential to realize a cost effective safeguards approach to be applied for a large scale reprocessing plant. (author)

  4. A study of statistical tests for near-real-time materials accountancy using field test data of Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihara, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Hideo; Ikawa, Koji; Miura, Nobuyuki; Iwanaga, Masayuki; Kusano, Toshitsugu.

    1988-03-01

    An Near-Real-Time Materials Accountancy(NRTA) system had been developed as an advanced safeguards measure for PNC Tokai Reprocessing Plant; a minicomputer system for NRTA data processing was designed and constructed. A full scale field test was carried out as a JASPAS(Japan Support Program for Agency Safeguards) project with the Agency's participation and the NRTA data processing system was used. Using this field test data, investigation of the detection power of a statistical test under real circumstances was carried out for five statistical tests, i.e., a significance test of MUF, CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and Page's test on MUF residuals. The result shows that the CUMUF test, average loss test, MUF residual test and the Page's test on MUF residual test are useful to detect a significant loss or diversion. An unmeasured inventory estimation model for the PNC reprocessing plant was developed in this study. Using this model, the field test data from the C-1 to 85 - 2 campaigns were re-analyzed. (author)

  5. Removal efficiency of silver impregnated filter materials and performance of iodie filters in the off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Hoeflich, V.

    1997-01-01

    An almost quantitative retention of iodine is required in reprocessing plants. For the iodine removal in the off-gas streams of a reprocessing plant various sorption materials had been tested under realistic conditions in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in cooperation with the Karlsruhe research center FZK. The laboratory results achieved with different iodine sorption materials justified long time performance tests in the WAK Plant. Technical iodine filters and sorption materials for measurements of iodine had been tested from 1972 through 1992. This paper gives an overview over the most important results, Extended laboratory, pilot plant, hot cell and plant experiences have been performed concerning the behavior and the distribution of iodine-129 in chemical processing plants. In a conventional reprocessing plant for power reactor fuel, the bulk of iodine-129 and iodine-127 is evolved into the dissolver off-gas. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and gaseous process and waste streams of the plant. Iodine filters with silver nitrate impregnated silica were installed in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in 1975 and in two vessel vent systems in 1988. The aim of the Karlsruhe iodine research program was an almost quantitative evolution of the iodine during the dissolution process to remove as much iodine with the solid bed filters as possible. After shut down of the WAK plant in December 1990 the removal efficiency of the iodine filters at low iodine concentrations had been investigated during the following years. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Removal efficiency of silver impregnated filter materials and performance of iodie filters in the off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Hoeflich, V. [Wiederaufarbeitungsanlage Karlsruhe (Germany)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An almost quantitative retention of iodine is required in reprocessing plants. For the iodine removal in the off-gas streams of a reprocessing plant various sorption materials had been tested under realistic conditions in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in cooperation with the Karlsruhe research center FZK. The laboratory results achieved with different iodine sorption materials justified long time performance tests in the WAK Plant. Technical iodine filters and sorption materials for measurements of iodine had been tested from 1972 through 1992. This paper gives an overview over the most important results, Extended laboratory, pilot plant, hot cell and plant experiences have been performed concerning the behavior and the distribution of iodine-129 in chemical processing plants. In a conventional reprocessing plant for power reactor fuel, the bulk of iodine-129 and iodine-127 is evolved into the dissolver off-gas. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and gaseous process and waste streams of the plant. Iodine filters with silver nitrate impregnated silica were installed in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in 1975 and in two vessel vent systems in 1988. The aim of the Karlsruhe iodine research program was an almost quantitative evolution of the iodine during the dissolution process to remove as much iodine with the solid bed filters as possible. After shut down of the WAK plant in December 1990 the removal efficiency of the iodine filters at low iodine concentrations had been investigated during the following years. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Optimal sizes and siting of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants; Tailles et localisations optimales des usines de retraitement des combustibles nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiriet, L; Deledicq, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Siege (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The expansion of a nuclear economy entails the development of fuel process and reprocessing plant programmes. The model proposed makes it possible to select the size, the site and the start-up schedule of the plants in such a way as to minimize the total freight and reprocessing costs. As an illustration, we have approached the problem of burnt natural uranium processing plants related to natural uranium-graphite as nuclear power stations. The sites and annual output of the reactors, the possible plant sites and cost functions (freight and reprocessing) are supposed to be known. The method consists in first approaching the process plant problem as a Dynamic Programming problem, increasing programme slices (total reactor output) being explored sequentially. When the quantities of burnt natural uranium to be reprocessed are fixed, the minimization of the transport cost is then also carried out as a dynamic programming problem. The neighbourhood of the optimum process cost is explored in order to find the minimum summation of a suboptimal processing cost and corresponding optimal transport cost. As the reprocessing problem can be represented on a sequential graph, in order to compute the sub-optima, we developed and used a 'reflexion algorithm'. The method can be interpreted as a general mechanism for determining the optimum when to a sequential dynamic problem (for example an equipment programme) is added a complementary problem (transport, for instance). It also makes it possible to estimate the economic losses which result from the choice of a non optimal policy for other than economic reasons. (author) [French] L'expansion de l'economie nucleaire se traduit par un developpement des programmes d'usines d'elaboration et de retraitement des combustibles. Le modele propose permet de choisir la taille, la localisation et la cadence de mise en service des usines de maniere a minimiser le total des frais de transport et de retraitement. A titre d'exemple nous avons

  8. Summary of the seismic analyses of the Nuclear Fuel Services Reprocessing Plant at West Valley, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endebrock, E.G.

    1978-03-01

    Results are presented from the seismic investigations of the Nuclear Fuel Services Fuel Reprocessing Plant conducted by the Chemical Plants Division of Dravo Corporation (CPD), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). Results of the different analytical procedures are summarized. The LASL studies showed that structural distress would initially occur in two places, the building piles and the walls of the Mechanical Crane Room. This structural distress would occur at 0.14 g. The LLL investigation showed that the Liquid Waste Cell and the General Purpose Cell would start to show structural distress at 0.09g, and that lateral pile distress would begin at 0.11g

  9. Report on the NGS3 Working Group on Safeguards by Design For Aqueous Reprocessing Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael; Schanfein, Mark

    2011-02-01

    The objective of the Working Group on SBD for Aqueous Reprocessing Facilities was to provide recommendations, for facility operators and designers, which would aid in the coordination and integration of nuclear material accountancy and the safeguards requirements of all concerned parties - operators, state/regional authorities, and the IAEA. The recommendations, which are to be provided to the IAEA, are intended to assist in optimizing facility design and operating parameters to ensure the safeguardability of the facility while minimizing impact on the operations. The one day Working Group session addressed a wide range of design and operating topics.

  10. Operating experience in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller, W.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1953, reprocessing has accumulated 180 years of operating experience in ten plants, six of them with 41 years of operation in reprocessing oxide fuel from light water reactors. After abortive, premature attempts at what is called commercial reprocessing, which had been oriented towards the market value of recoverable uranium and plutonium, non-military reprocessing technologies have proved their technical feasibility, since 1966 on a pilot scale and since 1976 on an industrial scale. Reprocessing experience obtained on uranium metal fuel with low and medium burnups can now certainly be extrapolated to oxide fuel with high burnup and from pilot plants to industrial scale plants using the same technologies. The perspectives of waste management of the nuclear power plants operated in the Federal Republic of Germany should be viewed realistically. The technical problems still to be solved are in a balanced relationship to the benefit arising to the national economy out of nuclear power generation and can be solved in time, provided there are clearcut political boundary conditions. (orig.) [de

  11. Reprocessing in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossney, G [United Reprocessors G.m.b.H., Karlsruhe (F.R. Germany)

    1976-04-01

    The status of reprocessing activities within the member organizations of United Reprocessors is reviewed. The U.K. government has approved overseas deals by BNFL which will help to pay for their planned plant of 1000 te U p.a. at Windscale. In Germany KEWA has selected a site at Aschenburg as a fuel cycle centre where they plan to build a utility financed reprocessing plant of 1500 te U p.a. France has formed a new fuel cycle corporation, Cogema, which hopes to participate in the large volume of Japanese business negotiated by BNFL. United Reprocessors have agreed to pool their technology which may be available to organisations wishing to construct reprocessing plants in their own countries.

  12. Plant Line Trial Evaluation of Viable Non-Chromium Passivation Systems for Electrolytin Tinplate, ETP (TRP 9911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Sinsel

    2003-06-30

    Plant trial evaluations have been completed for two zirconium-based, non-chromium passivation systems previously identified as possible alternatives to cathodic dichromate (CDC) passivation for electrolytic tinplate (ETP). These trials were done on a commercial electrolytic tin plating line at Weirton Steel and extensive evaluations of the materials resulting from these trials have been completed. All this was accomplished as a collaborative effort under the AISI Technology Roadmap Program and was executed by seven North American Tin Mill Products producers [Bethlehem Steel (now acquired by International Steel Group (ISG)), Dofasco Inc., National Steel (now acquired by U.S. Steel), U.S. Steel, USS-Posco, Weirton Steel, and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel] with funding partially from the Department of Energy (DOE) and partially on an equal cost sharing basis among project participants. The initial phases of this project involved optimization of application procedures for the non-chromium systems in the laboratories at Bethlehem Steel and Betz Dearborn followed by extensive testing with various lacquer formulations and food simulants in the laboratories at Valspar and PPG. Work was also completed at Dofasco and Weirton Steel to develop methods to prevent precipitation of insoluble solids as a function of time from the zirconate system. The results of this testing indicated that sulfide staining characteristics for the non-chromium passivation systems could be minimized but not totally eliminated and neither system was found to perform quite as good, in this respect, as the standard CDC system. As for the stability of zirconate treatment, a method was developed to stabilize this system for a sufficient period of time to conduct plant trial evaluations but, working with a major supplier of zirconium orthosulfate, a method for long term stabilization is still under development.

  13. Spent fuel reprocessing options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this publication is to provide an update on the latest developments in nuclear reprocessing technologies in the light of new developments on the global nuclear scene. The background information on spent fuel reprocessing is provided in Section One. Substantial global growth of nuclear electricity generation is expected to occur during this century, in response to environmental issues and to assure the sustainability of the electrical energy supply in both industrial and less-developed countries. This growth carries with it an increasing responsibility to ensure that nuclear fuel cycle technologies are used only for peaceful purposes. In Section Two, an overview of the options for spent fuel reprocessing and their level of development are provided. A number of options exist for the treatment of spent fuel. Some, including those that avoid separation of a pure plutonium stream, are at an advanced level of technological maturity. These could be deployed in the next generation of industrial-scale reprocessing plants, while others (such as dry methods) are at a pilot scale, laboratory scale or conceptual stage of development. In Section Three, research and development in support of advanced reprocessing options is described. Next-generation spent fuel reprocessing plants are likely to be based on aqueous extraction processes that can be designed to a country specific set of spent fuel partitioning criteria for recycling of fissile materials to advanced light water reactors or fast spectrum reactors. The physical design of these plants must incorporate effective means for materials accountancy, safeguards and physical protection. Section four deals with issues and challenges related to spent fuel reprocessing. The spent fuel reprocessing options assessment of economics, proliferation resistance, and environmental impact are discussed. The importance of public acceptance for a reprocessing strategy is discussed. A review of modelling tools to support the

  14. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO 2 fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed

  15. Problem statement: international safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Darby, J.L.

    1979-03-01

    This report considers the problem of developing international safeguards for a light-water reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing/conversion facility that combines the Purex process with conversion of plutonium nitrate to the oxide by means of plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation and calcination. Current international safeguards systems are based on the complementary concepts of materials accounting and containment and surveillance, which are designed to detect covert, national diversion of nuclear material. This report discusses the possible diversion threats and some types of countermeasures, and it represents the first stage in providing integrated international safeguards system concepts that make optimum use of available resources. The development of design methodology to address this problem will constitute a significant portion of the subsequent effort. Additionally, future technology development requirements are identified. 8 figures, 1 table

  16. Corrosion studies on materials of construction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Dayal, R.K.; Gnanamoorthy, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion studies on specimens of commercial Type 304L stainless steel (SS), nuclear grade type 304L SS, extra low-carbon nitric acid grade (NAG) Uranus-16 SS, NAG Uranus-65 SS, Ti, Ti-5% Ta, Ti-0.25% Pd, Zircaloy-2, weldments of Ti and of Ti-5% Ta, and surface-modified (thermally oxidised and anodised) Ti were carried out to assess their corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. The results indicated that Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta, Uranus-16 SS and Uranus-65 SS have excellent corrosion resistance in boiling nitric acid solution. Specimens of Zircaloy-2, Ti-5% Ta and thermally-oxidised Ti showed excellent corrosion resistance also in a simulated uranium-containing reprocessing medium in a concentrated nitric acid solution. SEM and XRD analyses were carried out on the tested specimens to examine the scale morphology and phases present on the surface. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO[sub 2] fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of methods for decladding LWR fuel for a pyroprocessing-based reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, W.D.; Mailen, J.C.; Michaels, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    The first step in reprocessing disassembled light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel is to separate the zirconium-based cladding from the UO{sub 2} fuel. A survey of decladding technologies has been performed to identify candidate decladding processes suitable for LWR fuel and compatible with downstream pyropr for separation of actinides and fission products. Technologies for the primary separation of Zircaloy cladding from oxide fuel and for secondary separations (in most cases, a further decontamination of the cladding) were reviewed. Because cutting of the fuel cladding is a necessary step in all flowsheet options, metal cutting technologies were also briefly evaluated. The assessment of decladding processes resulted in the identification of the three or four potentially attractive options that may warrant additional near-term evaluation. These options are summarized, and major strengths and issues of each option are discussed.

  19. Selection of critical group in relation to the release of radionuclides from nuclear spent fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohmomo, Y.

    1980-01-01

    In respect of internal radiation due to the coastal release of radionuclides, survey on marine food consumption is most useful for the selection of critical group. Species of marine organisms they usually eat is fully over 100 in the coastal area of Ibaraki prefecture where the fuel reprocessing plant is located. Though it gives only a spot datum, one day's consumption survey a season is of convenience to obtain cooperation from housewives and is of use to pick up critical organisms and those who eat much of them. However, long-term survey is required to estimate ordinary intake of the critical foods or those who are supposed critical people. One day's consumption survey makes it easy to perform the subsequent long-term one

  20. Release of radioactive materials in simulation test of a postulated solvent fire in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, G.; Hashimoto, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on small- and large-scale fire tests performed to examine the adequacy of a safety evaluation method for a solvent fire in the extraction process of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The test objectives were to obtain information on the confinement of radioactive materials during a 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate-n-dodecane fire while air ventilation is operating in the cell. The rates of release of cesium, strontium, cerium, ruthenium, and uranium from a burning solvent were determined. The quantities of species released were obtained from the solvent burning rate, smoke generation rate, partition coefficients of species between solvent and water, and coefficients of species entrainment to atmosphere in cell

  1. Decontamination and partial dismantling of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. Lessons learnt with respect to health physics and waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenco, A.; Detilleux, E.; Ferrari, P.

    1980-01-01

    After nine years in use, the installations of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant were washed down and decontaminated to enable access to be gained to all the cells and some items of equipment, the reuse of which is not envisaged, and dismantled. The procedures followed to ensure the radiation protection of the workers and the means and results of individual dosimetry are described. Some suggestions, mainly covering the lay-out of the cells and the items of equipment, are made in order to reduce still more the doses incurred. The production and control of the liquid and solid waste resulting from the decontamination and dismantling illustrate the advantage of using very high pressure water jets on the one hand and a careful covering of the walls and floors on the other [fr

  2. Tritium in reprocessing plants: a study of the inventory, behavior, and the possibilities of separation of the tritium isotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnez, H.; Laser, M.; Merz, E.

    The path followed by tritium in reprocessing plants is described in quantitative terms based on the Purex and Thorex processes. Flowsheets are given for the Purex process which are on the one hand based on the present state of technology, but make provision at the same time for a recycling of the aqueous phase and a tritium separation. As an alternative approach the technical and economic aspects have been examined of a prior separation of the tritium after reduction of the fuel elements, followed by separation from the aqueous phase. The ultimate storage and transport of the separated tritium were included in the cost determination. The conclusion is reached as a result of the study that tritium separation is possible on scientific and technical grounds. The estimates made show the financial outlay to be less than 10 DM/GWh, but may on occasion be substantially higher, since no practical or industrial experience of the process is yet available

  3. The development and design of the off-gas treatment system for the thermal oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) at Sellafield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, P.I. [British Nuclear Fuels, Sellafield (United Kingdom); Buckley, C.P.; Miller, W.W. [British Nuclear Fuels, Risley (United Kingdom)

    1995-02-01

    British Nuclear Fuels completed construction of its Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield in 1992, at a cost of 1,850M. After Government and Regulatory approval, active commissioning was initiated on 17 January 1994. From the outset, the need to protect the workforce, the public and the environment in general from the plant`s discharges was clearly recognised. The design intent was to limit radiation exposure of members of the general public to As Low as Reasonably Practicable. Furthermore no member of the most highly exposed group should receive an annual dose exceeding 50 microsieverts from either the aerial or marine discharge routes. This paper describes how the design intent has been met with respect to aerial discharges. It outlines the development programme which was undertaken to address the more demanding aspects of the performance specification. This ranged from small-scale experiments with irradiated fuel to inactive pilot plant trials and full-scale plant measurements. The resulting information was then used, with the aid of mathematical models, in the design of an off-gas treatment system which could achieve the overall goal. The principal species requiring treatment in the THORP off-gas system are iodine-129, carbon-14, nitrogen oxides (NOx), fuel dust particles and aerosols containing plutonium or mixed fission products. The paper describes the combination of abatement equipment used in different parts of the plant, including counter-current absorption columns, electrostatic precipitators, dehumidifiers and High Efficiency Particulate Air filters. Because a number of separate off-gas streams are combined before discharge, special depression control systems were developed which have already proved successful during plant commissioning. BNFL is confident that the detailed attention given to the development and design phases of the THORP off-gas system will ensure good performance when the plant moves into fully radioactive operation.

  4. Demonstration test on the safety of a cell ventilation system during a hypothetical explosive burning in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tsukamoto, Michio; Koike, Tadao

    1993-01-01

    To demonstrate the safety of an air ventilation system of cells in a fuel reprocessing plant under a postulated explosive burning caused by solvent fire or by thermal decomposition of nitrated solvent, four types of demonstration tests have been conducted using a large-scale facility simulating a cell ventilation system of an actual reprocessing plant, thus revealing effective mitigation by cell and duct structures on the pressure and temperature pulses generated by explosive burning. In boilover burning tests, solvent fire in a model cell was observed with various sizes of burning surface area as a main parameter, and analysis was performed on the factors dominating the magnitude of boilover burning, revealing that the magnitude strongly depends on accumulated amounts and their ratio of oxygen and solvent vapor present in the cell. In deflagration tests, solid rocket fuel was burned in the cell to simulate the explosive source. The generated pressure and temperature pulses were effectively declined by the cell and duct structures and the integrity of the ventilation system was kept. In blower tests, a centrifugal turbo blower was imposed by a lump of air with a larger flow rate than the rated one by about six times to observe the transient response of the blower fan and motor. It was found that integrity of the blower was kept. In pressure transient tests, compressed air was blown into the cell to induce a mild transient state of fluid dynamics inside the facility, and a variety of data were successfully obtained to be used for the verification and improvement of a computer code. In all the tests, transient overloading of gas caused no damage on HEPA filters, and overloading on the blower motor was avoided either by the slipping of transmission belt or by the acceleration of blower fan rotation during peak flow. (author)

  5. 10 CFR Appendix F to Part 50 - Policy Relating to the Siting of Fuel Reprocessing Plants and Related Waste Management Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and Related Waste Management Facilities F Appendix F to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... Relating to the Siting of Fuel Reprocessing Plants and Related Waste Management Facilities 1. Public health... facilities for the temporary storage of highlevel radioactive wastes, may be located on privately owned...

  6. Calculation of burn-up data for spent LWR-fuels with respect to the design of spent fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasteiger, R.

    1976-11-01

    The design of spent fuel reprocessing plants makes necessary a detailed knowledge of the composition of the incoming fuels as a function of burn-up. This report gives a broad review on the composition of radionuclides in fuels (fission products, actinides) and structural materials for different burn-up data. (orig.) [de

  7. The development and design of the off-gas treatment system for the thermal oxide reprocessing plant (THORP) at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, P.I.; Buckley, C.P.; Miller, W.W.

    1995-01-01

    British Nuclear Fuels completed construction of its Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at Sellafield in 1992, at a cost of 1,850M. After Government and Regulatory approval, active commissioning was initiated on 17 January 1994. From the outset, the need to protect the workforce, the public and the environment in general from the plant's discharges was clearly recognised. The design intent was to limit radiation exposure of members of the general public to As Low as Reasonably Practicable. Furthermore no member of the most highly exposed group should receive an annual dose exceeding 50 microsieverts from either the aerial or marine discharge routes. This paper describes how the design intent has been met with respect to aerial discharges. It outlines the development programme which was undertaken to address the more demanding aspects of the performance specification. This ranged from small-scale experiments with irradiated fuel to inactive pilot plant trials and full-scale plant measurements. The resulting information was then used, with the aid of mathematical models, in the design of an off-gas treatment system which could achieve the overall goal. The principal species requiring treatment in the THORP off-gas system are iodine-129, carbon-14, nitrogen oxides (NOx), fuel dust particles and aerosols containing plutonium or mixed fission products. The paper describes the combination of abatement equipment used in different parts of the plant, including counter-current absorption columns, electrostatic precipitators, dehumidifiers and High Efficiency Particulate Air filters. Because a number of separate off-gas streams are combined before discharge, special depression control systems were developed which have already proved successful during plant commissioning. BNFL is confident that the detailed attention given to the development and design phases of the THORP off-gas system will ensure good performance when the plant moves into fully radioactive operation

  8. MOX fuel reprocessing and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the reprocessing of MOX fuel in UP2-800 plant at La Hague, and to the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling. 1. MOX fuel reprocessing. In a first step, the necessary modifications in UP2-800 to reprocess MOX fuel are set out. Early in the UP2-800 project, actions have been taken to reprocess MOX fuel without penalty. They consist in measures regarding: Dissolution; Radiological shieldings; Nuclear instrumentation; Criticality. 2. Mox successive reprocessing and recycling. The plutonium recycling in the LWR is now a reality and, as said before, the MOX fuel reprocessing is possible in UP2-800 plant at La Hague. The following actions in this field consist in verifying the MOX successive reprocessing and recycling possibilities. After irradiation, the fissile plutonium content of irradiated MOX fuel is decreased and, in this case, the re-use of plutonium in the LWR need an important increase of initial Pu enrichment inconsistent with the Safety reactor constraints. Cogema opted for reprocessing irradiated MOX fuel in dilution with the standard UO2 fuel in appropriate proportions (1 MOX for 4 UO2 fuel for instance) in order to save a fissile plutonium content compatible with MOX successive recycling (at least 3 recyclings) in LWR. (author). 2 figs

  9. Airborne waste management technology applicable for use in reprocessing plants for control of iodine and other off-gas constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    Extensive work in the area of iodine removal from reprocessing plant off-gas streams using various types of solid sorbent materials has been conducted worldwide over the past two decades. This work has focused on the use of carbon filters, primarily for power plant applications. More recently, the use of silver-containing sorbents has been the subject of considerable research. The most recent work in the United States has addressed the use of silver-exchanged faujasites and mordenites. The chemical reactions of iodine with silver on the sorbent are not well defined, but it is generally believed that chemisorbed iodides and iodates are formed. The process for iodine recovery generally involves passage of the iodine-laden gas stream through a packed bed of the adsorbent material preheated to a temperature of about 150/degree/C. Most iodine removal system designs utilizing silver-containing solid sorbents assume only a 30 to 50% silver utilization. Based on laboratory tests, potentially 60 to 70% of the silver contained in the sorbents can be reacted with iodine. To overcome the high cost of silver associated with these materials, various approaches have been explored. Among these are the regeneration of the silver-containing sorbent by stripping the iodine and trapping the iodine on a sorbent that has undergone only partial silver exchange and is capable of attaining a much higher silver utilization. This summary report describes the US work in regeneration of iodine-loaded solid sorbent material. In addition, the report discusses the broader subject of plant off-gas treatment including system design. The off-gas technologies to recovery No/sub x/ and to recover and dispose of Kr, 14 C, and I are described as to their impacts on the design of an integrated off-gas system. The effect of ventilation philosophy for the reprocessing plant is discussed as an integral part of the overall treatment philosophy of the plant off-gas. 103 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  10. Trends in fuel reprocessing safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujino, Takeshi

    1981-01-01

    With the operation of a fuel reprocessing plant in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) and the plan for a second fuel reprocessing plant, the research on fuel reprocessing safety, along with the reprocessing technology itself, has become increasingly important. As compared with the case of LWR power plants, the safety research in this field still lags behind. In the safety of fuel reprocessing, there are the aspects of keeping radiation exposure as low as possible in both personnel and local people, the high reliability of the plant operation and the securing of public safety in accidents. Safety research is then required to establish the safety standards and to raise the rate of plant operation associated with safety. The following matters are described: basic ideas for the safety design, safety features in fuel reprocessing, safety guideline and standards, and safety research for fuel reprocessing. (J.P.N.)

  11. Demonstration of an automated electromanometer for measurement of solution in accountability vessels in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (part II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamonouchi, T.; Fukuari, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Komatsu, M.; Suyama, N.; Uchida, T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the results of an operational field test of the automated electromanometer system installed at the input accountability vessel (251V10) and the plutonium product accountability vessel (266V23) in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant. This system has been in use since September 1979 when it was installed in the PNC plant by BNL as part of Task-E, one of the thirteen tasks, in the Tokai Advanced Safeguards Technology Exercise (TASTEX) program. The first report on the progress of this task was published by S. Suda, et al., in the Proceedings of the INMM 22nd Annual Meeting. In this paper, further results of measurement and data analysis are shown. Also, the reliability and applicability of this instrument for accountability, safeguards, and process control purposes are investigated using the data of 106 batches for 251V10 and 40 batches for 266V23 obtained during two campaigns in 1981. There were small but significant differences relative to the plant's measurements for both vessels of 251V10 and 266V23; however, the difference for 251V10 was slightly decreased in the latest vessel calibration. Initially, there were many spurious signals originating with the raw data caused by a software error in the system. However, almost normal conditions were obtained after corrections of the program were made

  12. Design of sealing arrangements for development of leak tight articulated manipulator for waste management and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, Satish B.; Mudaiya, Avinash K.

    2016-01-01

    As a part of development of Remote handling equipment and gadgets, Leak tight Articulated Manipulator (ARTM) has been developed for shielded facilities of Nuclear Recycle Plant. The ARTM is a Master Slave Manipulator having 8 Kg Payload capacity and most suitable for shielded sampling cubicles of Waste Management plants and dilution hot cells of Reprocessing plants. All the motions and forces are transmitted from Master to slave arm through the mechanical linkages, which are housed inside the wall tube. The mechanical linkages and wall tube run across the shielded wall. The applications involving seal tightness of the glove boxes and dilution hot cells intend to use all the accessories including MSMs to be leak tight. During the design of leak tight ARTM, all the potential leak paths through the components of existing ARTM were examined critically and static and dynamic seals were designed based on the geometry and requirement of particular leak path. A leak proof testing set up was fabricated for evaluating the leak rates across the manipulator contemplating the actual operating conditions. The manipulator was subjected to the Friction, Rigidity and Leak tests. The results of the tests are satisfactory and as per the International standards available. The leak rates measured for different manipulators were in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 % of air volume/hr @ 200 mm of water columndifferential negative pressure. (author)

  13. The use of process information for verification of inventory in solvent extraction contactors in near-real-time accounting for reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Hafer, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Near-real-time accounting is being studied as a technique for improving the timeliness of accounting in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A major criticism of near-real-time accounting is perceived disclosure of proprietary data for IAEA verification, particularly in verifying the inventory of solvent extraction contractors. This study indicates that the contribution of uncertainties in estimating the inventory of pulsed columns or mixer settlers may be insignificant compared to uncertainties in measured throughput and measurable inventory for most reprocessing plants, and verification may not be a serious problem. Verification can become a problem for plants with low throughput and low inventory in tasks if contactor inventory variations or uncertainties are greater than --25%. Each plant must be evaluated with respect to its specific inventory and throughput characteristics

  14. Characterization of airborne plutonium-bearing particles from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1977-11-01

    The elemental compositions, sizes, structures, and 239 Pu contents were determined for 299 plutonium-bearing particles isolated from airborne particles collected at various locations in the exhaust from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. These data were compared with data from natural aerosol particles. Most of the collected particles were composed of aggregates of crustal materials. Seven percent of the particles were organic and 3% were metallic, viz., iron, chromium, and nickel. High enrichment factors for titanium, manganese, chromium, nickel, zinc, and copper were evidence of the anthropic nature of some of the particles. The amount of plutonium in most particles was very small (less than one femtocurie of 239 Pu). Plutonium concentrations were determined by the fission track counting method. Only one particle contained sufficient plutonium for detection by electron microprobe analysis. This was a 1-μm-diameter particle containing 73% PuO 2 by weight (estimated to be 170 fCi of 239 Pu) in combination with Fe 2 O 3 and mica. The plutonium-bearing particles were generally larger than natural aerosols. The geometric mean diameter of those collected from the mechanical line exhaust point where plutonium is converted to the metal was larger than that of particles collected from the wet cabinet exhaust (13.7 μm vs. 4.6 μm). Particles from the mechanical line also contained more plutonium per particle than those from the wet cabinets

  15. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Tanner, J.E.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01

    A health risk assessment was conducted to investigate the impact of implementing regulations from the Environmental Protection Agency's Final Environmental Statement - 40 CFR 190 - Environmental Protection Requirements for Normal Operation of Activities in the Uranium Fuel Cycle. Potential risks involved in the routine release of 85 Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of 85 Kr. The average occupationally exposed worker was estimated to receive about 400 to 600 mrem/y from 85 Kr recovery and immobilization activities. This dose is a factor of 20,000 to 30,000 higher than the estimated dose to the maximum offsite individual (0.02 mrem/y), and a factor of 130,000 to 200,000 higher than the dose received by the average member of the 50-mile population (0.003 mrem/y) from routine release of all 85 Kr. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02-0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks cannot be considered meaningful. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from 85 Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from recovery, immobilization and storage of the noble gas. 22 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  16. HTGR fuel reprocessing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, L.H.; Heath, C.A.; Shefcik, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The following aspects of HTGR reprocessing technology are discussed: characteristics of HTGR fuels, criteria for a fuel reprocessing flowsheet; selection of a reference reprocessing flowsheet, and waste treatment

  17. Reprocessing the truth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldsmith, E.; Bunyard, P.; Hildyard, N.

    1978-01-01

    Comments are made on the Report by the Inspector, Mr. Justice Parker, after the public inquiry into the application by British Nuclear Fuels Limited for permission to construct and operate a thermal oxide reprocessing plant at their Windscale works. Particular questions raised include: corrosion or storage of spent fuel, vitrification of radioactive waste; radiation effects, and permissible levels; radioactive emissions, critical groups and critical pathways; risks; reprocessing economics; commitment to the FBR; sociological aspects, including employment, nuclear weapon proliferation and terrorism, and Britain's moral responsibilities. (U.K.)

  18. Acquisition and validation of transfer data for Ru from reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasius, E.; Huth, R.; Krumrey, R.; Neumann, W.; Woll, G.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to determine the ruthenium transfer factor from soil to plants on the basis of selected useful plants and food plants, namely potatoes, summer wheat and pasture grass. For this purpose ruthenium is used in the form of dioxide, chloride and nitrosyl complexes. Tests are made in field patches with inactive ruthenium and in isotope laboratories with Ru-106 or Ru-103. After the harvest of the plants the ruthenium is determined by means of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry in pyrolytically coated graphite pipes. (orig./RB) [de

  19. Fuel requirements (without reprocessing) for Iran 1, 2, 3 and 4 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroomian, M.; Roustayian, S.

    1976-10-01

    By use of a computer program written by the Nuclear Power Plant Management of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, the Yellow Cake, natural uranium and separative work unit (SWU) for the first core and ten reloads of the Iran 1, 2, 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plants have been calculated for different tail assays. (author)

  20. General Atomic HTGR fuel reprocessing pilot plant: results of initial sequential equipment operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In September 1977, the processing of 20 large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fuel elements was completed sequentially through the head-end cold pilot plant equipment. This report gives a brief description of the equipment and summarizes the results of the sequential operation of the pilot plant. 32 figures, 15 tables

  1. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  2. Trend analysis of human error events and assessment of their proactive prevention measure at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Satoru; Tanaka, Izumi; Wakabayashi, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    A trend analysis of human error events is important for preventing the recurrence of human error events. We propose a new method for identifying the common characteristics from results of trend analysis, such as the latent weakness of organization, and a management process for strategic error prevention. In this paper, we describe a trend analysis method for human error events that have been accumulated in the organization and the utilization of the results of trend analysis to prevent accidents proactively. Although the systematic analysis of human error events, the monitoring of their overall trend, and the utilization of the analyzed results have been examined for the plant operation, such information has never been utilized completely. Sharing information on human error events and analyzing their causes lead to the clarification of problems in the management and human factors. This new method was applied to the human error events that occurred in the Rokkasho reprocessing plant from 2010 October. Results revealed that the output of this method is effective in judging the error prevention plan and that the number of human error events is reduced to about 50% those observed in 2009 and 2010. (author)

  3. Solid waste processing and compaction in the AD2 workshop of the new La Hague reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, B.M.; Vigreux, B.

    1987-01-01

    The AD2 workshop of the new spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at La Hague in France will process and package dry solid wastes. The waste packages will be segregated according to their activity levels and stored at temporary on-site facilities. Full commissioning is scheduled for end-1988. However, operation of the TO dry spent field unloading and receiving unit at La Hague required early availability of some waste processing functions and part of the AD2 workshop was commissioned towards the end of 1986. The new La Hague plant is organized into four main zones: - zone 1 is an uncontrolled area with no permanent contamination and zero risk of accidental contamination, - zone 2 is a controlled are with no permanent contamination and low risk of accidental minor contamination, - zone 3 is a controlled area with no permanent contamination but a risk of minor contamination due to various incidents, - zone 4 is a controlled area with permanent contamination. The AD2 workshop will handle all dry solid wastes from zones 2, 3 and 4. It will also: characterize the resulting waste packages (contents, mass, alpha, beta and gamma activity, dose equivalent rate) and check for absence of surface contamination; transfer the packages to temporary on-site storage facilities; store and administer mobile handling tasks and transporters

  4. A near-real-time material accountancy model and its preliminary demonstration in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, K.; Ihara, H.; Nishimura, H.; Tsutsumi, M.; Sawahata, T.

    1983-01-01

    The study of a near-real-time (n.r.t.) material accountancy system as applied to small or medium-sized spent fuel reprocessing facilities has been carried out since 1978 under the TASTEX programme. In this study, a model of the n.r.t. accountancy system, called the ten-day-detection-time model, was developed and demonstrated in the actual operating plant. The programme was closed on May 1981, but the study has been extended. The effectiveness of the proposed n.r.t. accountancy model was evaluated by means of simulation techniques. The results showed that weekly material balances covering the entire process MBA could provide sufficient information to satisfy the IAEA guidelines for small or medium-sized facilities. The applicability of the model to the actual plant has been evaluated by a series of field tests which covered four campaigns. In addition to the material accountancy data, many valuable operational data with regard to additional locations for an in-process inventory, the time needed for an in-process inventory, etc., have been obtained. A CUMUF (cumulative MUF) chart of the resulting MUF data in the C-1 and C-2 campaigns clearly showed that there had been a measurement bias across the process MBA. This chart gave a dramatic picture of the power of the n.r.t. accountancy concept by showing the nature of this bias, which was not clearly shown in the conventional material accountancy data. (author)

  5. Research on technological assessment for ageing management of commercial reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The research program has been carried out to provide technical database and review manuals for evaluating the adequacy of Tokai plant's Ageing Management report from F.Y.2006 to F.Y.2011. In the near future, the regulator will be to carry out the evaluation of Rokkasho plant, which is commercial-size plant mainly designed by the technologies in Britain and France. This plant is different from Tokai plant in a technique of the prevention of corrosion. The purpose of the research program is to provide supplementary database and improve the review manual in order to evaluate the adequacy of Rokkasho plant's Ageing Management report. We selected three experimental subjects on ageing phenomena listed bellow in this program on the basis of the result of the operational experience of the foreign plants and the related previous studies. Effect of solid deposit adhering on the metal, Np(VI) and nitrous ions in solution on the corrosion of stainless steel made reduced pressure evaporator in boiling nitric acid solutions, Conditions of initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of the zirconium made components in boiling nitric acid solutions including highly-concentrated plutonium, Conditions of initiation of Hydrogen Embrittlement Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipe Fittings Composed of Zirconium, Tantalum and Stainless Steel in high radioactive nitric acid solutions. (author)

  6. Concept of a large-capacity irradiated-fuel-reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, C.; Couture, J.; Issel, W.; Mamelle, J.

    The processing of LWR fuels in recent years has run into difficulties due to the adaptation of the Purex process to these fuels with a high irradiation rate. This has led to development of new technological techniques. High-capacity plants should, in the future, limit their discharge of liquid and gaseous effluents to values comparable to those of nuclear electric stations. Investment costs necessary for processing the effluents and for temporary storage of the wastes are part of the total cost of these plants. However, the investments remain within acceptable limits. The 1500-ton/year plant presented is an example of what can be done in the 1980's

  7. Nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.; Harris, D.; Mills, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out on an industrial scale in the United Kingdom since 1952. Two large reprocessing plants have been constructed and operated at Windscale, Cumbria and two smaller specialized plants have been constructed and operated at Dounreay, Northern Scotland. At the present time, the second of the two Windscale plants is operating, and Government permission has been given for a third reprocessing plant to be built on that site. At Dounreay, one of the plants is operating in its original form, whilst the second is now operating in a modified form, reprocessing fuel from the prototype fast reactor. This chapter describes the development of nuclear fuel reprocessing in the UK, commencing with the research carried out in Canada immediately after the Second World War. A general explanation of the techniques of nuclear fuel reprocessing and of the equipment used is given. This is followed by a detailed description of the plants and processes installed and operated in the UK

  8. Radioecological survey in the vicinity of the EUREX reprocessing plant, Saluggia, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.; Fasolo, G.B.; Viazzo, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a revision of the first survey carried on in 1972 in the vicinity of the EUREX plant are reported. In the present report the radiation protection implications have been considered according to the last recommendations of ICRP. In particular the collective effective dose committment has been evaluated after the global liquid and gaseous discharge from the plant during its operations since 1970

  9. Why reprocess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of whether to reprocess spent nuclear fuel elements has been studied already in the early days of the commercial utilization of nuclear power and has been answered positively. This also, and in particular, applies to the United States. Under the new American nuclear policy reprocessing is rejected only for reasons of non-proliferation. Although these are valid reasons, the effectiveness of a ban on reprocessing, as fas as the non-profileration of nuclear weapons is concerned, is not accepted worldwide because the necessary knowledge either already exists in many countries or can be obtained. Only if there had been a realistic chance to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons, also the other industrialized countries would have seconded the policy of the United States. A country like the Federal Republic of Germany, with a substantial long-term nuclear power program based initially on light water reactors, subsequently on advanced reactor systems, cannot do without a complete nuclear fuel cycle. This reasoning is outlined in the light of economic and radioecological aspects. Extensive experience on a technical scale is available in the reprocessing sector. The technical problems associated with this activity have been solved in principle and have largely been demonstrated to function in practice. (orig.) [de

  10. Cement waste form development for ion-exchange resins and fine particles ILW of AREVA La Hague Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, D.; Sanchez-Canet, J.; Avril, D.; Roussel, C.; Pineau, J.N.

    2015-01-01

    Wastes have been temporarily stored in dedicated silos in La Hague reprocessing plant. These wastes are to be retrieved in the near future and to be conditioned for final disposal. Some of these wastes are supposed to be encapsulated in cement matrix and, depending on the chemical composition of the waste streams, several projects are presently ongoing. The present article aims to focus on one amongst these cement encapsulation relevant projects, namely the conditioning of a mix of spent ion-exchange resins (from filtration of pool) and fine particles (insoluble fission products from spent fuel dissolution and Zircaloy and stainless steel fines from cladding shearing). The project, aims to retrieve these wastes from a silo, separate the resins and fine particles from the other waste (hulls and end pieces), in order to encapsulate the intermediate-level fines and resins in a cement matrix. The waste forms will be produced in AREVA's La Hague reprocessing plant, prior to being sent as intermediate-level waste to a long-term repository. The cement formulation developments were initially carried out at a small scale at C.E.A. Marcoule on surrogate wastes. One of the main issues that were considered was the chemical compatibility between waste and cement matrix. Indeed, swelling phenomena are sometimes reported when ion exchange resins are embedded in cement matrixes such as Portland cement. This kind of destructive phenomenon has been prevented by the use of cement containing a high amount of ground granulated blast furnace slag. The impact of the variability of ionic charge of the resins on the waste form's properties has also been addressed in order to comfort the results obtained on the reference ionic charge of resins NaNO 3 . Once the results obtained were satisfactory, intermediate scale and full scale tests were performed by AREVA. These tests have focused on adjusting the mixing process and controlling the thermal properties of the mix during setting

  11. Releases of radioiodine from the Karlsruhe nuclear fuel reprocessing plant as a result of spontaneous fission of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettelkopf, H.

    1977-02-01

    Fro, 23,7,1976 to 28.7.76 and from 8.3.76 to 9.16.76 50 pCi 131 I/m 3 , 116 pCi 133 I/m 3 und 195 pCi 135 I/m 3 were measured on an average in 11 samples of waste air from the Karlsruhe Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant (WAK). During these time intervals no dissolution of fuel material was performed. From 16.9.76 to 27.10.76 18 charges of nuclear fuel were dissolved. During this period 3.3 pCi 131 I/m 3 and 7.9 pCi 133 I/m 3 were obtained as mean waste air concentrations which were higher than the lower detection limit of the method of measurement used. 244 Cm, 242 Cm, 242 Pu, 240 Pu and 238 Pu are responsible for the production of radioiodine in nuclear fuel by spontaneous fission. 244 Cm is the most important nuclide in highly active waste solutions (HAL). The cumulative fission yield is well approximated by 3% for 13 I and by 6% for 133 I. The radioiodine is set free during fuel dissolution by venting of tanks and HAL pipes and during the vritification of such solutions. The radioiodine produced by spontaneous fission is released from WAK only by venting of tanks and HAL pipes. Corresponding to the conditions of venting, air concentrations as high as 4.4 pCi 131 I/m 3 and 8.2 pCi 133 I/m 3 are expected. These concentrations agree well with air concentrations measured during the period of fuel dissolution. Based on plausible assumptions the 131 I and 133 I waste air concentrations for the period of outage are calculated from an evaporated volume of HAL in the pipes corresponding to about 10 g of 244 Cm and with 40% equilibrium between I 2 in evaporated HAL and in waste air. In the worst case 131 I-concentrations in the waste air of WAK result in an annual release of 0.2 mCi 131 I. This value is less than 1% of the authorized annual releases of 1976. For a reprocessing plant of 1,400 t/a capacity the annual expected release of 131 I lies in the mCi range. (orig.) [de

  12. TRP channels in kidney disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Y.J.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian TRP channel proteins form six-transmembrane cation-permeable channels that may be grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of amino acid sequence homology (TRPC, TRPV, TRPM, TRPA, TRPP, and TRPML). Recent studies of TRP channels indicate that they are involved in numerous fundamental cell

  13. Indian experience in fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.N.; Kumar, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    Plant scale experience in fuel reprocessing in India was started with the successful design, execution and commissioning of the Trombay plant in 1964 to reprocess aluminium clad metallic uranium fuel from the 40 MWt research reactor. The plant has helped in generating expertise and trained manpower for future reprocessing plants. With the Trombay experience, a larger plant of capacity 100 tonnes U/year to reprocess spent oxide fuels from the Tarapur (BWR) and Rajasthan (PHWR) power reactors has been built at Tarapur which is undergoing precommissioning trial runs. Some of the details of this plant are dealt with in this paper. In view of the highly corrosive chemical attack the equipment and piping are subjected to in a fuel reprocessing plant, some of them require replacement during their service if the plant life has to be extended. This calls for extensive decontamination for bringing the radiation levels low enough to establish direct accesss to such equipment. For making modifications in the plant to extend its life and also to enable expansion of capacity, the Trombay plant has been successfully decontaminated and partially decommissioned. Some aspects of thi decontamination campaign are presented in this paper

  14. Modular design of a reprocessing plant dissolver off-gas system. Variations, flexibility and stage of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrich, E.; Huefner, R.

    1984-01-01

    Simple and economic control of the volatile radionuclides in a reprocessing plant requires two equally important prerequisites: suitable processing in the plant head-end and reliable operation of the dissolver off-gas (DOG) purification system. A small number of DOG purification modules was selected from various alternatives. The major selection criteria are removal efficiency, simplicity, convenient operating conditions and flexibility that provide compatibility with other off-gas treatment steps, subsequent waste treatment and different processing modes in the head-end. The behaviour of noxious materials was investigated in nitric acid off-gas scrubbers of different design and for a wide range of operating modes and conditions. A concentration range of nitric acid from very dilute to hyperazeotropic concentrations and a temperature range from -55 deg. C to above room temperature as well as the use of hydrogen peroxide were studied on an engineering scale. Nitrous gases and iodine can be removed to the trace level at special operating modes. Aerosol and iodine filters are discussed briefly. A selective absorption process using CF 2 Cl 2 solvent for noble gas and 14 C removal was developed on a laboratory scale. It operates at low temperatures and atmospheric pressure. Xe and Kr were separated using two absorption columns. Pilot-plant scale noble gas scrubbers are under construction and are being integrated into the existing test facility. A series of process steps has been chosen for integrated process demonstration runs on an engineering scale. The integrated DOG system consists of several scrubbers and filters operating at atmospheric pressure. The temperature decreases stepwise, without producing large changes in the opposite direction, providing compatibility within the process train

  15. Standard for design criteria for decommissioning of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper was developed by the ANSI Standards Committee N46. Deactivation or shutdown followed by continued operation on the same site does not constitute decommissioning. It is felt that abandonment with entombment of the highly radioactive parts of the plant is the only economically feasible alternative

  16. West Valley Reprocessing Plant. IE inspection report No. 75-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Results of an inspection of the West Valley Processing Plant on October 20-23, 1975 are reported. The inspection consisted of selective examinations of procedures and representative records, interviews with personnel, and observations by the inspector. No items of noncompliance were observed

  17. Plutonium in the lungs of pronghorn antelope near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, O.D.; Dickson, R.L.; Autenrieth, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The lungs of pronghorn antelope which are common on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site were sampled as a bioindicator of plutonium in the environment near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant which is located on the INEL site. Lungs were collected from September 1972 to December 1976 and analyzed for Pu. The source of Pu found in the lungs could be determined from a study of the 238 Pu/ 239-240 Pu ratio as there is a higher proportion of 238 Pu in the chemical plant releases than in world-wide fallout in the soils of Southeastern Idaho. Results indicate that 238 Pu from the chemical plant is being deposited in lungs and possibly other tissues of pronghorn. Only a proportion of the animals close to the plant had detectable quantities. Concentrations were near the detection limits and do not constitute a health hazard to the pronghorn. Meaningful comparisons can be made to radiation protection standards since pronghorn lungs are similar in size to man's. (author)

  18. An independent method for input accountability in reprocessing plants : magnesium tracer technique for the accountability of plutonium (MAGTRAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, C.K.; Jain, H.C.; Chitambar, S.A.; Kavimandan, V.D.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    1975-01-01

    A new technique 'MAGTRAP' for the measurement of the total plutonium in an accountability tank is described which does not require knowledge of either the total volume of solution in the tank or the size of the sample aliquot. The method depends on the addition of natural magnesium as a tracer and the subsequent isotope dilution of an aliquot using a spike with known 26 Mg/ 242 Pu ratio. Using only the isotopic ratios of 26 Mg/ 24 Mg and 239 Pu/ 242 Pu in the mixture, the quantity of the plutonium in the accountability tank can be calculated. In order to correct for magnesium blank, an additional measurement is required before tracer addition. The magnesium tracer technique can also be used to check the volume (or weight) calibration of the tank. Several experiments were carried out in the input accountability tank of the Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur to assess the accuracy of this method. The weight (or volume) of the solution in the tank could be measured independently with an accuracy of better than 0.5%. An experiment was also conducted to measure the total uranium in the accountability tank using MAGTRAP. The accuracy was better than 1%. The tracer technique was also used to arrive at optimum sparging times to ensure the homogeneity of the solution in the tank. Chemical procedures developed for the separation of plutonium and magnesium from dissolver solutions are also discussed. (author)

  19. Safety demonstration tests on thermal decomposition of nitrated solvent with nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Michio; Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Watanabe, Koji; Uchiyama, Gunzou; Nishio, Gunji; Murata, Mikio

    2001-03-01

    The demonstration tests were conducted to investigate the safety of the ventilation system and integrity of the HEPA filters under the design basis accident (DBA) of the evaporator in the reprocessing plants. The tests were carried out by heating organic solvent (TBP/n- dodecane) mixed with nitric acid in a sealed vessel. It was possible to cause an explosive decomposition of TBP-complex formed by nitration of the solvent with nitric acid. The following was obtained by the analysis of the experimental results of the tests. From derivation by the experimental method, data on the maximum mass release rate and the maximum energy release rate in the explosion, as the solvent of 1 [kg] spouted out by the thermal decomposition, were obtained. They were 0.59 [kg/s] and 3240.3 [kJ/kg·s] respectively. The influence given on the cell ventilation system by this explosion was small and it was demonstrated that the safety of the HEPA filters could be secured. (author)

  20. Safety demonstration tests of air-ventilation system for the postulated explosive burning in a cell of fuel-reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Junichi; Suzuki, Motoe; Tukamoto, Michio; Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji

    1995-03-01

    Safety demonstration tests of an explosive burning in a cell in the reprocessing plant has been carried out in JAERI under the auspices of the Science and Technology Agency, to evaluate the safety of an air-ventilation system during the hypothetical explosion. The postulated explosive burning of organic solvent mixed with nitric acid was simulated by solid explosives. The demonstration test was performed using an industrial scale experimental facility simulating to the ventilation system of the large scale reprocessing plant in JAPAN. Propagations of pressure, temperature, and gas velocity through cells and ducts in the ventilation system were measured during the explosive burning under deflagration. Experimental data in this report can be used to evaluate the transport phenomena of radioactive materials in the ventilation system during the explosion, and also to verify computer code CELVA for the safety analysis of ventilation system in the event of explosion accidents. (author)

  1. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveria Lopes, M.J. de.

    1974-03-01

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  2. Methodology for Determining the Radiological Status of a Process: Application to Decommissioning of a Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girones, Ph.; Ducros, C.; Legoaller, C.; Lamadie, F.; Fulconis, J.M.; Thiebaut, V.; Mahe, C.

    2006-01-01

    Decommissioning a nuclear facility is subject to various constraints including regulatory safety requirements, but also the obligation to limit the waste volume and toxicity. To meet these requirements the activity level in each component must be known at each stage of decommissioning, from the preliminary studies to the final release of the premises. This document describes a set of methods used to determine the radiological state of a spent fuel reprocessing plant. This approach begins with a bibliographical survey covering the nature of the chemical processes, the operational phases, and the radiological assessments during the plant operating period. In this phase it is also very important to analyze incidents and waste management practices. All available media should be examined, including photos and videos which can provide valuable data and must not be disregarded. At the end of this phase, any items requiring verification or additional data are reviewed to define further investigations. Although it is not unusual at this point to carry out an additional bibliographical survey, the essential task is to carry out in situ measurements. The second phase thus consists in performing in situ measurement campaigns involving essentially components containing significant activity levels. The most routinely used methods combine the results of elementary measurements such as the dose rate or more sophisticated measurements such as gamma spectrometry using CdZnTe detectors and gamma imaging to estimate and localize the radioactivity. Each instrument provides part of the answer (location of a contamination hot spot, standard spectrum, activity). The results are combined and verified through the use of calculation codes: Mercure, Visiplan and Microshield. (authors)

  3. Fuel reprocessing plant environmental impact in the arid regions of the western United States. Annual report, October 1976--September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seale, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The first year of the fuel reprocessing plant environmental impact study has been completed. During this time, emphasis has been placed on the description of a reference plant and on the characterization of arid lands located sites. In addition, it was recognized early that the development of a rational methodology for comparing various siting proposals, both in terms of the extent of the facilities to be constructed at any given site and in terms of the selection of the best site among a range of alternatives, would be necessary. Indeed, this decision has already been confirmed in that its appropriateness has survived the rather severe changes in the nuclear fuel cycle policy that have occurred in the past year. Indeed, the very fact that these changes have occurred and comparable alterations in basic policy may be expected in the future, tend to emphasize the necessity for developing logical and rational methods of system evaluation which have the inherent flexibility necessary to reflect these various policy options. In carrying out the study the full scope of technical expertise available has been brought to bear on the various appropriate parts of the overall study. Coordination between these various investigators throughout this period has been open, productive, and, in some cases, spirited. The resolution of many of the questions raised in this initial phase of the study has contributed significantly to the development of the siting methodology. An assessment of the existing regulatory climate as it reflects throughout the appropriate position in the federal establishment has been completed. Identification of comparable material at the state level is certainly a more diffuse and uncertain process. Demonstration of the workability of the siting methodology is currently one of the major objectives of the next year of study. That objective should be met within the presently defined program schedule and budget

  4. Reprocessing fuel from the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Campbell, T.G.

    1985-11-01

    The irradiated fuel, reject fuel tubes, and fuel fabrication scrap from the Southwest Experimental Fast Oxide Reactor (SEFOR) were transferred to the Savannah River Plant (SRP) for uranium and plutonium recovery. The unirradiated material was declad and dissolved at SRP; dissolution was accomplished in concentrated nitric acid without the addition of fluoride. The irradiated fuel was declad at Atomics International and repacked in aluminum. The fuel and aluminum cans were dissolved at SRP using nitric acid catalyzed by mercuric nitrate. As this fuel was dissolved in nongeometrically favorable tanks, boron was used as a soluble neutron poison

  5. Methodology and development of instruments for the safety analysis of a nuclear reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Characteristics and overlapping aspects in the elaboration of safety analyses for the nuclear and conventional units are presented. The current methods are presented and their limits of applicability characterized. The transferability of individual methods or their elements to the analysis of the reference plant of Wackersdorf is examined and the procedure for the systems analysis is determined. It is of great importance to prove that the essential kinds of incidents and possibilities of release with potential effects in the environment are completely identified. The incidents are divided into basic incidents, which are characterized by superior physical/chemical release mechanisms. An essential objective is to systematize the safety analysis and to summarize the presentation of results. Selection criteria are presented, which allow a limitation of the analysis to essential influencing parameters without removing aspects from the overall safety-relevant statement. Besides the selection criteria, instruments and mathematical models are explained with the help of which the representative and possible incidents covering all potential risks for all areas of the plant, systems and components can be selected. These design-basis accidents (criticality, self-heating, fire, explosion, leakages, earth quakes) are decisive for the determination of potential damaging effects in the environment and thus for the overall statement on the licensability. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.

    1996-01-01

    UKAEA have recently reprocessed two LEU silicide fuel elements in their MTR fuel reprocessing plant at Dounreay. The reprocessing was undertaken to demonstrate UKAEA's commitment to the world-wide research reactor communities future needs. Reprocessing of LEU silicide fuel is seen as a waste treatment process, resulting in the production of a liquid feed suitable for conditioning in a stable form of disposal. The uranium product from the reprocessing can be used as a blending feed with the HEU to produce LEU for use in the MTR cycle. (author)

  7. Reprocessing and waste management in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogg, C.S.; Howarth, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the progress in irradiated fuel reprocessing and waste management at the Sellafield site. Magnox fuel reprocessing is reviewed and oxide fuel reprocessing, due to commence in the early 1990s, is compared with existing practices. The article describes how magnox fuel reprocessing will be sustained by recent additions of new plant and shows how waste management downstream of reprocessing will be integrated across the Sellafield site. This article was first presented as a paper at the Waste Management '87 (1-5 March, Tucson, Arizona) conference. (author)

  8. Testing remotely operated module technique for Wackersdorf reprocessing plant at Lahde test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leister, P.; Schroeder, G.; Boehme, G.

    1986-01-01

    The FEMO technique represents a plant concept which makes it possible to carry out the repair of high and medium activity wet chemical stages of the process by remote handling without direct access by staff. For this purpose, the apparatus of this step of the process is arranged modularly in large cells, so that movable large handling devices such as cranes and manipulator systems can replace process components subject to wear via the process modules. The machine room of the former coal-fired power station Heyden I at Lahde was, after removal of the turbines and generators, converted to a hall in which the following test areas were accommodated: FEMO cell section with 10 positions for module, cell wall mock-up and wall penetration, module mounting area, module measuring position, workplace for service area, training position, welding position and FEMO control position. (orig./HP) [de

  9. NDA systems to support nuclear material control and accounting in spent fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.C.B.; Clark, P.A.; Nicols, O.P.; Whitehouse, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed descriptions of a number of instrument systems relating to accountancy and safeguarding of plutonium operations and storage on Thermal Oxide Plant (Thorp) are provided. The systems described include the Plutonium Inventory Measurement System (PIMS), used to provide Near Real Time Materials Accountancy (NRTMA) information within the Thorp plutonium finishing area; the Product Can Contents Monitor (PCCM), used to verify can weight measurements and isotopic composition and; the In-Store Plutonium Verification Monitor, used to provide in-situ measurements of plutonium in cans whilst they are in their storage channels. These nondestructive systems are necessarily combined with other physical security, surveillance and identification arrangements for the handling and storage of plutonium product cans [ru

  10. Iodine-129 in rabbit thyroids near a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraley, L. Jr.; Bowman, G.C.; Markham, O.D.

    1982-01-01

    The 129 I/ 127 I atom ratios in rabbits collected on the INEL site were larger than ratios in rabbits from a control area. Maximum 129 I/ 127 I atom ratios (9.1 x 10 -4 ) occurred near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Based on rabbit thyroid concentrations, the 129 I appeared to be deposited primarily in the direction of the predominant winds from the ICPP, northeast and southwest. Dose rates from the 129 I to thyroids of INEL rabbits varied from 0.1 to 260 μGy/y (0.01 to 26 mrad/y). Iodine-129 atmospheric releases from the ICPP appeared to have increased the 129 I/ 127 I atom ratios on and near the INEL site. (author)

  11. Statement on the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has chosen the following objectives for future reprocessing plant design: reduced radiation exposure to workers; minimal environmental impact; improved plant operation and maintenance; improved accountability; no plutonium diversion; and reduced overall capital and operating cost. These objectives lead to a plant with totally remote operation. The Breeder Reactor Engineering Test (BRET) has been designed to perform a key role in demonstrating advanced reprocessing technology. It has been scheduled to be available to reprocess spent fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility. The principal features of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and of the BRET facility are appropriate for all reactor types

  12. Experience and prospects in reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rougeau, J.-P.

    1997-01-01

    Reprocessing nuclear fuels is a long and successful industrial story. For decades, commercial reprocessing plants have been operating in France, the United Kingdom and Japan. The industrial outcome is clear and widely recognized: thousand tons of spent fuels have been reprocessed in these plants. Over the years, these facilities have been adapted to new types of fuel. Thus, the nuclear industry has fully demonstrated its ability to cope with technological change and its capacity to adapt itself to improvements. For decades, technical capability has been stressed and emphasized by nuclear industrial leaders as the most important point. This is no longer the case. Today the industry has to face a new commercial reality and to find the most adaptable answer to the utilities' requirements. This paper presents the current achievements and medium and long-term trends of the nuclear reprocessing activity, the ongoing commercial changes and gives an outlook for future evolutions. International political factors will also be examined. (author)

  13. The international reprocessing situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sornein, J.

    1976-01-01

    It is investigated what volume and availability of reprocessing capacity is needed for LWR (and AGR) fuel elements for Western Europe, USA, and Japan during the period from 1980 to 1990. Taking into account the technical, financial, and licensing difficulties, an optimistic and pessimistic assessment is made especially for Western Europe, and from the findings conclusions are drawn for spent fuel element storage and nuclear power plant construction. (HR/LN) [de

  14. Spent fuel reprocessing system availability definition by process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.; Haldy, B.B.; Jonzen, M.

    1978-05-01

    To examine nuclear fuel reprocessing plant operating parameters such as maintainability, reliability, availability, equipment redundancy, and surge storage requirements and their effect on plant throughput, a computer simulation model of integrated HTGR fuel reprocessing plant operations is being developed at General Atomic Company (GA). The simulation methodology and the status of the computer programming completed on reprocessing head end systems is reported

  15. TRP Channels in Human Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Van Haute

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This review gives an overview of morphological and functional characteristics in the human prostate. It will focus on the current knowledge about transient receptor potential (TRP channels expressed in the human prostate, and their putative role in normal physiology and prostate carcinogenesis. Controversial data regarding the expression pattern and the potential impact of TRP channels in prostate function, and their involvement in prostate cancer and other prostate diseases, will be discussed.

  16. Non-destructive assay of leached hulls in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Henderson, B.C.; Gray, J.H.; Huff, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The hull monitor at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuels Plant (BNFP) will be a remotely controlled, fully automated system designed to quantitatively assay leached hulls for undissolved U and Pu. The hull monitor will assay the hulls from one metric ton of fuel per dissolver basket with the design goal of detecting 0.1% undissolved fuel and yet remain within the framework of the BNFP materials flow of five hull baskets per day. The non-destructive assay will be accomplished using a computer-based gamma-ray pulse height analysis system employing a 5 x 5 inch NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The intense radiations from the fission product isotopes and the activation product isotopes produced in the reactor prevent direct assay of the undissolved fuel left in the hulls. The measurement will be made indirectly by demonstrating a correlation between the amount of 144 Ce undissolved and the remaining U. The isotope 144 Ce is a direct fission product with high cumulative yield. The daughter isotope 144 Pr has a gamma ray at 2.18 MeV well above other predominant radiations in the spectrum from the major interferences 60 Co, 58 Co, 95 Zr( 95 Nb), 137 Cs and 106 Ru( 106 Rh). Segmented scanning operation of the hull monitor is accomplished by rotation and vertical transversal of the hulls container past the detector station. Proper collimation and absorbers are required to maximize the 144 Ce( 144 Pr) to background ratio. A basket indexer is provided which monitors the scanning rate and ensures repositioning. The leached hull monitor system will be interfaced to a computer-based multichannel analyzer for ease of operation and data handling. A calibration basket has been fabricated to accomodate radioactive sources and inactive Zircaloy hulls

  17. Treatment and separation of radioactive fission products tritium, rare gases and iodine in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnez, H.

    1975-07-15

    Rare gases must be separated from the process off-gases of the head-end of the Purex and Thorex processes. To achieve high decontamination factors, the quantity of off-gas should be kept as low as possible. For rare gas separation, there are two possible methods of routing the off-gas: (a) the open flushing gas circuit, in which the purified off-gas (generally air) is passed off via the stack and (b) the closed circuit in which the off-gas (nitrogen or rare gases) is recycled to the dissolver after purification. Tritium must not be entrained into the second extraction cycle or be emitted with off-gases in the form of water vapor (HTO) or HT, but must remain completely in the aqueous phase. Most of the process water is recycled, as a result of which the tritium becomes concentrated in it. This tritiated water is then subjected to tritium rectification at a suitable point in the process. Iodine is very difficult to isolate to a small number of process stages. Present aim is to release the iodine in the dissolver stage into the off-gas, so as to prevent it being entrained into the extraction part. By the injection of hot nitrogen or water vapor into the dissolver or into iodine-containing condensates, all of the iodine is passed into the gaseous phase. Scrubbers can also be used together with iodine-containing condensates to adjust the scrubbing solution. Capital cost of separation plants account for 1 to 10 percent of the total cost of the reprocessing installation, and even more if a sophisticated tritium separation system is required. (DLC)

  18. On-Line Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Streams at Spent Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.; Levitskaia, T.; Casella, A.

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safe- guards standards for fissionable material at spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide a more timely, cost-effective and resource-efficient means for MC&A verification at such facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including a spectroscopy-based monitoring system, to potentially reduce the time and re- source burden associated with current techniques. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major cold flowsheet chemicals using ultra-violet and visible, near infrared and Raman spectroscopy. This paper will provide an overview of the methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technologies. Our ability to identify material intentionally diverted from a liquid-liquid solvent extraction contactor system was successfully tested using on-line process monitoring as a means to detect the amount of material diverted. A chemical diversion, and detection of that diversion, from a solvent extraction scheme was demonstrated using a centrifugal contactor system operating with the PUREX flowsheet. A portion of the feed from a counter-current extraction system was diverted while a continuous extraction experiment was underway. The amount observed to be diverted by on-line spectroscopic process monitoring was in excellent agreement with values based from the known mass of

  19. Tritium concentrations in the atmospheric environment at Rokkasho, Japan before the final testing of the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akata, Naofumi; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Shima, Nagayoshi; Iyogi, Takashi; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed at obtaining background tritium concentrations in precipitation and air at Rokkasho where the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Japan has been under construction. Tritium concentration in monthly precipitation during fiscal years 2001-2005 had a seasonal variation pattern which was high in spring and low in summer. The tritium concentration was higher than that observed at Chiba City as a whole. The seasonal peak concentration at Rokkasho was generally higher than that at Chiba City, while the baseline concentrations of both were similar. The reason for the difference may be the effect of air mass from the Asian continent which is considered to have high tritium concentration. Atmospheric tritium was operationally separated into HTO, HT and hydrocarbon (CH(3)T) fractions, and the samples collected every 3 d-14 d during fiscal year 2005 were analyzed for these fractions. The HTO concentration as radioactivity in water correlated well with that in the precipitation samples. The HT concentration was the highest among the chemical forms analyzed, followed by the HTO and CH(3)T concentrations. The HT and CH(3)T concentrations did not have clear seasonal variation patterns. The HT concentration followed the decline previously reported by Mason and Östlund with an apparent half-life of 4.8 y. The apparent and environmental half-lives of CH(3)T were estimated as 9.2 y and 36.5 y, respectively, by combining the present data with literature data. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the atmospheric lifetime of 12 y for CH(4) to estimate global warming in its 2007 report. The longer environmental half-life of CH(3)T suggested its supply from other sources than past nuclear weapon testing in the atmosphere. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 137Cs uptake by sheep grazing tidally-inundated and inland pastures near the Sellafield reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Field investigations into the transfer of 137 Cs from pasture to sheep tissues have been made at two contrasting sites in west Cumbria, close to the nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Sellafield. These were a saltmarsh bordering on the Esk estuary in 1982 and inland pastures close to the perimeter of the works in 1984. 137 Cs concentrations of sampled vegetation from the saltmarsh were generally two orders of magnitude greater than from the inland pasture due to its inundation with 137 Cs associated with silt. The relatively high 137 Cs content of soil/silt compared to that of vegetation at each site meant that soil contamination of vegetation sometimes accounted for a substantial proportion of its 137 Cs activity (up to 99% on the saltmarsh and 67% on the inland pastures). Considerable seasonal changes occurred in the extent of 137 Cs contamination on the inland pastures, with late winter and early spring levels being up to 20-fold higher than those of the summer. 137 Cs concentrations in tissues of lambs from the saltmarsh were consistently higher than for ewes; this was not true for sheep from the inland pastures. 137 Cs concentrations in kidney were found to be higher than in all other tissues, both in the study flocks and in one of the controls. Transfer coefficients (calculated by dividing the 137 Cs concentration of fresh tissue by the daily intake of 137 Cs) were significantly (P 137 Cs activity due to soil/silt contamination was removed from the estimates of daily intake leaving 137 Cs associated with the vegetation only to contribute to the transfer coefficients. Further studies are required to determine the availability of 137 Cs associated with soil/silt particles which are ingested by animals. (author)