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Sample records for reporter gene imaging

  1. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases

  2. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging

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    Min, Jung Joon [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Recent progress in the development of non-invasive imaging technologies continues to strengthen the role of molecular imaging biological research. These tools have been validated recently in variety of research models, and have been shown to provide continuous quantitative monitoring of the location(s), magnitude, and time-variation of gene expression. This article reviews the principles, characteristics, categories and the use of radionuclide reporter gene imaging technologies as they have been used in imaging cell trafficking, imaging gene therapy, imaging endogenous gene expression and imaging molecular interactions. The studies published to date demonstrate that reporter gene imaging technologies will help to accelerate model validation as well as allow for clinical monitoring of human diseases.

  3. Imaging reporter gene for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beco, V. de; Baillet, G.; Tamgac, F.; Tofighi, M.; Weinmann, P.; Vergote, J.; Moretti, J.L.; Tamgac, G.

    2002-01-01

    Scintigraphic images can be obtained to document gene function at cellular level. This approach is presented here and the use of a reporter gene to monitor gene therapy is described. Two main ways are presented: either the use of a reporter gene coding for an enzyme the action of which will be monitored by radiolabeled pro-drug, or a cellular receptor gene, the action of which is documented by a radio labeled cognate receptor ligand. (author)

  4. MRI Reporter Genes for Noninvasive Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Yang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is one of the most important imaging technologies used in clinical diagnosis. Reporter genes for MRI can be applied to accurately track the delivery of cell in cell therapy, evaluate the therapy effect of gene delivery, and monitor tissue/cell-specific microenvironments. Commonly used reporter genes for MRI usually include genes encoding the enzyme (e.g., tyrosinase and β-galactosidase, the receptor on the cells (e.g., transferrin receptor, and endogenous reporter genes (e.g., ferritin reporter gene. However, low sensitivity limits the application of MRI and reporter gene-based multimodal imaging strategies are common including optical imaging and radionuclide imaging. These can significantly improve diagnostic efficiency and accelerate the development of new therapies.

  5. Investigation progress of PET reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yumei; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging for gene therapy and gene expression has been more and more attractive, while the use of gene therapy has been widely investigated and intense research have allowed it to the clinical setting in the last two-decade years. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide qualitative and quantitative information for gene therapy. PET imaging could also obtain some valuable parameters not available by other techniques. This technology is useful to understand the process and development of gene therapy and how to apply it into clinical practice in the future. (authors)

  6. Reporter gene imaging: potential impact on therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Blasberg, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)-based molecular-genetic imaging in living organisms has enjoyed exceptional growth over the past 5 years; this is particularly striking since it has been identified as a new discipline only within the past decade. Positron emission tomography is one of three imaging technologies (nuclear, magnetic resonance and optical) that has begun to incorporate methods that are established in molecular and cell biology research. The convergence of these disciplines and the wider application of multi-modality imaging are at the heart of this success story. Most current molecular-genetic imaging strategies are 'indirect,' coupling a 'reporter gene' with a complimentary 'reporter probe.' Reporter gene constructs can be driven by constitutive promoter elements and used to monitor gene therapy vectors and the efficacy of trans gene targeting and transduction, as well as to monitor adoptive cell-based therapies. Inducible promoters can be used as 'sensors' to regulate the magnitude of reporter gene expression and can be used to provide information about endogenous cell processes. Reporter systems can also be constructed to monitor mRNA stabilization and specific protein-protein interactions. Promoters can be cell specific and restrict transgene expression to certain tissue and organs. The translation of reporter gene imaging to specific clinical applications is discussed. Several examples that have potential for patient imaging studies in the near future include monitoring adenoviral-based gene therapy, oncolytic herpes virus therapy, adoptive cell-based therapies and Salmonella-based tumor-targeted cancer therapy and imaging. The primary translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to be (a) quantitative monitoring of the gene therapy vector and the efficacy of transduction in clinical protocols, by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring cell trafficking, targeting

  7. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging for cardiac gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki; Tamaki, Nagara

    2007-01-01

    In the field of cardiac gene therapy, angiogenic gene therapy has been most extensively investigated. The first clinical trial of cardiac angiogenic gene therapy was reported in 1998, and at the peak, more than 20 clinical trial protocols were under evaluation. However, most trials have ceased owing to the lack of decisive proof of therapeutic effects and the potential risks of viral vectors. In order to further advance cardiac angiogenic gene therapy, remaining open issues need to be resolved: there needs to be improvement of gene transfer methods, regulation of gene expression, development of much safer vectors and optimisation of therapeutic genes. For these purposes, imaging of gene expression in living organisms is of great importance. In radionuclide reporter gene imaging, ''reporter genes'' transferred into cell nuclei encode for a protein that retains a complementary ''reporter probe'' of a positron or single-photon emitter; thus expression of the reporter genes can be imaged with positron emission tomography or single-photon emission computed tomography. Accordingly, in the setting of gene therapy, the location, magnitude and duration of the therapeutic gene co-expression with the reporter genes can be monitored non-invasively. In the near future, gene therapy may evolve into combination therapy with stem/progenitor cell transplantation, so-called cell-based gene therapy or gene-modified cell therapy. Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is now expected to contribute in providing evidence on the usefulness of this novel therapeutic approach, as well as in investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neovascularisation and safety issues relevant to further progress in conventional gene therapy. (orig.)

  8. Advances in study of molecular imaging reporte gene systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; An Rui

    2010-01-01

    The use of molecular imaging reporter gene systems has allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical application, which provides methodology to monitor the expression of therapeutic gene noninvasively and achieve quantitative outcome in vivo. Recently, the radionuclide reporter gene still is the focus many studies, but MRI and optical reporter gene have gradually played a important part in reporter gene systems. On the basis of combination of multi-subject, for example applied chemistry and molecular biology, more and more new modified reporter genes and molecular probes have spread out. This paper mainly introduces the advantages and disadvantages of reporter gene system and development trends. (authors)

  9. Advances in study of reporter gene imaging for monitoring gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Chuanjie; Zhou Jiwen

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of gene therapy, it is requisite to monitor localization and expression of the therapeutic gene in vivo. Monitoring expression of reporter gene using radionuclide reporter gene technique is the best method. Adenoviral vectors expressing reporter gene are constructed using gene fusion, bicistronic, double promoter or bidirectional transcriptional recombination techniques, and transferred into target cells and tissues, then injected radiolabeled reporter probes which couple to the reporter genes. The reporter genes can be imaged invasively, repeatedly, quantitatively with γ-camera, PET and SPECT. Recently, several reporter gene and reporter probe systems have been used in studies of gene therapy. The part of them has been used for clinic trials

  10. Advances of reporter gene imaging monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation in the treatment of various tissue damage or degenerative diseases are research hotspots both at home and abroad. However, ignorance of the homing, differentiation and functional expression of the stem cell in vivo influence the further development of stem cell therapy. As an important component of molecular imaging technology, reporter gene imaging dynamically monitors the change of stem cell in vivo via monitoring the expression of transfected reporter gene. This paper briefly describes the latest research progress and the future development trend of the monitoring of reporter gene imaging in stem cell therapy in vivo. (authors)

  11. Assays for noninvasive imaging of reporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.S.; Barrio, J.R.; Herschman, H.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Repeated, noninvasive imaging of reporter gene expression is emerging as a valuable tool for monitoring the expression of genes in animals and humans. Monitoring of organ/cell transplantation in living animals and humans, and the assessment of environmental, behavioral, and pharmacologic modulation of gene expression in transgenic animals should soon be possible. The earliest clinical application is likely to be monitoring human gene therapy in tumors transduced with the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) suicide gene. Several candidate assays for imaging reporter gene expression have been studied, utilizing cytosine deaminase (CD), HSV1-tk, and dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) as reporter genes. For the HSV1-tk reporter gene, both uracil nucleoside derivatives (e.g., 5-iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil [FIAU] labeled with 124 I, 131 I ) and acycloguanosine derivatives {e.g., 8-[ 18 F]fluoro-9-[[2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy]methyl]guanine (8-[ 18 F]-fluoroganciclovir) ([ 18 F]FGCV), 9-[(3-[ 18 F]fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine ([ 18 F]FHPG)} have been investigated as reporter probes. For the D2R reporter gene, a derivative of spiperone {3-(2'-[ 18 F]-Fluoroethyl)spiperone ([ 18 F]FESP)} has been used with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. In this review, the principles and specific assays for imaging reporter gene expression are presented and discussed. Specific examples utilizing adenoviral-mediated delivery of a reporter gene as well as tumors expressing reporter genes are discussed

  12. Recombinant carcinoembryonic antigen as a reporter gene for molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Wu, Anna M.; Braun, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Reporter genes can provide a way of noninvasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression, or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human FcγRIIb receptor. The NA3-FcγRIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-FcγRIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-FcγRIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA 124 I-labeled single-chain Fv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4 h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8 ± 0.2, 15.2 ± 1.3, and 4.6 ± 1.2 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 4, 20, and 48 h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48 h demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8 ± 0.8%ID/g. The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. (orig.)

  13. Repetitive Imaging of Reporter Gene Expression in the Lung

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    Jean-Christophe Richard

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomographic imaging is emerging as a powerful technology to monitor reporter transgene expression in the lungs and other organs. However, little information is available about its usefulness for studying gene expression over time. Therefore, we infected 20 rats with a replication-deficient adenovirus containing a fusion gene encoding for a mutant Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and an enhanced green fluorescent protein. Five additional rats were infected with a control virus. Pulmonary gene transfer was performed via intratracheal administration of vector using a surfactant-based method. Imaging was performed 4–6 hr, and 4, 7, and 10 days after gene transfer, using 9-(4-[18F]-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutylguanine, an imaging substrate for the mutant kinase. Lung tracer uptake assessed with imaging was moderately but significantly increased 4–6 hr after gene transfer, was maximal after 4 days, and was no longer detectable by 10 days. The temporal pattern of transgene expression measured ex vivo with in vitro assays of thymidine kinase activity and green fluorescent protein was similar to imaging. In conclusion, positron emission tomography is a reliable new tool to evaluate the onset and duration of reporter gene expression noninvasively in the lungs of intact animals.

  14. SPECT imaging of cardiac reporter gene expression in living rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Liang; Wu Tao; Jiang Rifeng; Zhang Yongxue

    2009-01-01

    This work is to demonstrate feasibility of imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSVI-tk) reporter gene in rabbits myocardium by using the reporter probe 131 I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-l-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 131 I-FIAU) and SPECT. Rabbits of the study group received intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk and control group received aseptic saline injection. Two sets of experiments were performed on the study group. Rabbits of the 1st set were injected with 131 I-FIAU 600 μCi at Day 2 after intramyocardial transfection of Ad5-tk in 1xl0 9 , 5x10 8 , 1x10 8 , 5x10 7 and 1x10 7 pfu, and heart SPECT imaging was done at different hours. Rabbits of the 2nd were transferred various titers of Ad5-tk (1x10 9 , 5x10 8 , 1x10 8 , 5x10 7 , 1x10 7 pfu) to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. Two days later, 131 I-FIAU was injected and heart SPECT imaging was performed at 6, 24 and 48 h, before killing them for gamma counting of the hearts. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to verify the transferred HSVI-tk gene expression. Semi-quantitative analysis derived of region of interest (ROI) of SPECT images and RT-PCR images was performed and the relationship of SPECT images with ex vivo gamma counting and mRNA level were evaluated. SPECT images conformed 131 I-FIAU accumulation in rabbits injected with Ad5-tk in the anterolateral wall. The optimal images quality was obtained at 24-48 h for different viral titers. The highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium was seen at 6 h, and then declined with time. The threshold was 5x10 7 pfu of virus titer. The result could be set better in 1-5x10 8 pfu by SPECT analysis and gamma counting. ROI-derived semi-quantitative study on SPECT images correlated well with ex vivo gamma counting and mRNA levels from RT-PCR analysis. The HSVI-tk/ 131 I-FIAU reporter gene/reporter probe system is feasible for cardiac SPECT reporter

  15. The progress of PET based reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Zhang Xiuli

    2005-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. (authors)

  16. hNIS-IRES-eGFP Dual Reporter Gene Imaging

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    Jiantu Che

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The human and rodent sodium iodide symporters (NIS have recently been cloned and are being investigated as potential therapeutic and reporter genes. We have extended this effort by constructing an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-linked human NIS (hNIS-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP hybrid reporter gene for both nuclear and optical imaging. A self-inactivating retroviral vector, termed pQCNIG, containing hNIS-IRES-eGFP dual reporter gene, driven by a constitutive CMV promoter, was constructed and used to generate RG2-pQCNIG cells and RG2-pQCNIG tumors. 131I-iodide and 99mTcO4-pertechnetate accumulation studies plus fluorescence microscopy and intensity assays were performed in vitro, and gamma camera imaging studies in RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumor-bearing athymic rats were performed. RG2-pQCNIG cells expressed high levels of hNIS protein and showed high intensity of eGFP fluorescence compared with RG2 wild-type cells. RG2-pQCNIG cells accumulated Na131I and 99mTcO4– to a 50:1 and a 170:1 tissue/medium ratio at 10 min, compared with 0.8:1.2 tissue/medium ratio in wild-type RG2 cells. A significant correlation between radiotracer accumulation and eGFP fluorescence intensity was demonstrated. RG2-pQCNIG and RG2 tumors were readily differentiated by in vivo gamma camera imaging; radiotracer uptake increased in RG2-pQCNIG but declined in RG2 tumors over the 50-min imaging period. Stomach and thyroid were the major organs of radionuclide accumulation. The IRES-linked hNIS-eGFP dual reporter gene is functional and stable in transduced RG2-pQCNIG cells. Optical and nuclear imaging of tumors produced from these cell lines provides the opportunity to monitor tumor growth and response to therapy. These studies indicate the potential for a wider application of hNIS reporter imaging and translation into patient studies using radioisotopes that are currently available for human use for both SPECT and PET imaging.

  17. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

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    Gambhir, Sanjiv [Portola Valley, CA; Pritha, Ray [Mountain View, CA

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  18. Molecular MR imaging of cancer gene therapy. Ferritin transgene reporter takes the stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Sumitaka; Furukawa, Takako; Saga, Tsuneo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been actively investigated and made rapid progress in the past decade. Applied to cancer gene therapy, the technique's high spatial resolution allows evaluation of gene delivery into target tissues. Because noninvasive monitoring of the duration, location, and magnitude of transgene expression in tumor tissues or cells provides useful information for assessing therapeutic efficacy and optimizing protocols, molecular imaging is expected to become a critical step in the success of cancer gene therapy in the near future. We present a brief overview of the current status of molecular MR imaging, especially in vivo reporter gene imaging using ferritin and other reporters, discuss its application to cancer gene therapy, and present our research of MR imaging detection of electroporation-mediated cancer gene therapy using the ferritin reporter gene. (author)

  19. Advances in study of perpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Yongxue

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is an effect way to provide qualitative and quantitative information for gene therapy. There are three systems of reporter gene including kinase reporter gene. perpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) has perfect physical and chemical characteristic which is suit for imaging as reporter gene. It has been widely investigated and intensively researched. Two substrates of HSV1-tk are purine nucleosite derivant and acyclovir derivant, which can also be used as reporter probes of HSV1-tk. (authors)

  20. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-01-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans

  1. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

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    Hofmann, M. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Michael.Hofmann@insel.ch; Gazdhar, A. [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Weitzel, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland); Schmid, R. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Krause, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-12-20

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and human000.

  2. Non-invasive imaging using reporter genes altering cellular water permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Wu, Di; Davis, Hunter C.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2016-12-01

    Non-invasive imaging of gene expression in live, optically opaque animals is important for multiple applications, including monitoring of genetic circuits and tracking of cell-based therapeutics. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable such monitoring with high spatiotemporal resolution. However, existing MRI reporter genes based on metalloproteins or chemical exchange probes are limited by their reliance on metals or relatively low sensitivity. Here we introduce a new class of MRI reporters based on the human water channel aquaporin 1. We show that aquaporin overexpression produces contrast in diffusion-weighted MRI by increasing tissue water diffusivity without affecting viability. Low aquaporin levels or mixed populations comprising as few as 10% aquaporin-expressing cells are sufficient to produce MRI contrast. We characterize this new contrast mechanism through experiments and simulations, and demonstrate its utility in vivo by imaging gene expression in tumours. Our results establish an alternative class of sensitive, metal-free reporter genes for non-invasive imaging.

  3. Alpha-fetoprotein-targeted reporter gene expression imaging in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Chung, Hye Kyung; Park, Ju Hui; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun

    2016-07-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Eastern Asia, and its incidence is increasing globally. Numerous experimental models have been developed to better our understanding of the pathogenic mechanism of HCC and to evaluate novel therapeutic approaches. Molecular imaging is a convenient and up-to-date biomedical tool that enables the visualization, characterization and quantification of biologic processes in a living subject. Molecular imaging based on reporter gene expression, in particular, can elucidate tumor-specific events or processes by acquiring images of a reporter gene's expression driven by tumor-specific enhancers/promoters. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various experimental HCC mouse models and we present in vivo images of tumor-specific reporter gene expression driven by an alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) enhancer/promoter system in a mouse model of HCC. The current mouse models of HCC development are established by xenograft, carcinogen induction and genetic engineering, representing the spectrum of tumor-inducing factors and tumor locations. The imaging analysis approach of reporter genes driven by AFP enhancer/promoter is presented for these different HCC mouse models. Such molecular imaging can provide longitudinal information about carcinogenesis and tumor progression. We expect that clinical application of AFP-targeted reporter gene expression imaging systems will be useful for the detection of AFP-expressing HCC tumors and screening of increased/decreased AFP levels due to disease or drug treatment.

  4. In vivo SPECT reporter gene imaging of regulatory T cells.

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    Ehsan Sharif-Paghaleh

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs were identified several years ago and are key in controlling autoimmune diseases and limiting immune responses to foreign antigens, including alloantigens. In vivo imaging techniques including intravital microscopy as well as whole body imaging using bioluminescence probes have contributed to the understanding of in vivo Treg function, their mechanisms of action and target cells. Imaging of the human sodium/iodide symporter via Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT has been used to image various cell types in vivo. It has several advantages over the aforementioned imaging techniques including high sensitivity, it allows non-invasive whole body studies of viable cell migration and localisation of cells over time and lastly it may offer the possibility to be translated to the clinic. This study addresses whether SPECT/CT imaging can be used to visualise the migratory pattern of Tregs in vivo. Treg lines derived from CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ cells were retrovirally transduced with a construct encoding for the human Sodium Iodide Symporter (NIS and the fluorescent protein mCherry and stimulated with autologous DCs. NIS expressing self-specific Tregs were specifically radiolabelled in vitro with Technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99mTcO(4(- and exposure of these cells to radioactivity did not affect cell viability, phenotype or function. In addition adoptively transferred Treg-NIS cells were imaged in vivo in C57BL/6 (BL/6 mice by SPECT/CT using (99mTcO(4(-. After 24 hours NIS expressing Tregs were observed in the spleen and their localisation was further confirmed by organ biodistribution studies and flow cytometry analysis. The data presented here suggests that SPECT/CT imaging can be utilised in preclinical imaging studies of adoptively transferred Tregs without affecting Treg function and viability thereby allowing longitudinal studies within disease models.

  5. [Myocardial single photon emission tomography imaging of reporter gene expression in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Lan, Xiao-li; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Tao; Jiang, Ri-feng; Zhang, Yong-xue

    2009-06-01

    To explore the feasibility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) detection of heart reporter gene expression and observed the optimal transfecting titer and imaging time by using herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) as reporter gene and 131I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (131I-FIAU) as reporter probe in rabbit myocardium. The recombinant Ad-tk carrying HSV1-tk gene and adenovirus (Ad) as vector was constructed and intramyocardially injected to rabbits at various concentrations (1 x 10(9) pfu, 5 x 10(8) pfu, 1 x 10(8) pfu, 5 x 10(7) pfu, 1 x 10(7) pfu). Two days later, rabbits were injected with 600 microCi 131I-FIAU in ear-margin vein and then underwent SPECT myocardium imaging for detection of HSV1-tk expression at 6 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after injection, rabbits with 1 x 10(9) pfu Ad-tk injection were imaged at 96 h and 120 h. Rabbits were sacrificed after imaging and the total myocardial 131I-FIAU accumulation was quantified in percent of injected dose per gram myocardium (% ID/g). The myocardial Ad-tk expression was determined with RT-PCR. Reporter gene was detected by SPECT imaging in the injection site while not detected in the control myocardium and site remote from injection. RT-PCR results also evidenced HSV1-tk express in the injection site. The SPECT target/nontarget ratio was correlated with ex vivo gamma-counting (r2 = 0.933, Ppfu by SPECT imaging. The cardiac SPECT reporter gene imaging with HSV1-tk as reporter gene and 131I-FIAU as reporter probe is feasible.

  6. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression.

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    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun, Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C Clifton; Humm, John L

    2009-10-01

    To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO). Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe (124)I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ((124)I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe (18)F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with (124)I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and (18)F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Correlation coefficients between (124)I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between (18)F-FMISO and (124)I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of this model for the

  7. In vivo characterization of a reporter gene system for imaging hypoxia-induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, Sean; Pugachev, Andrei; Sun Xiaorong; Burke, Sean; Claus, Filip; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, C. Clifton; Humm, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize a tumor model containing a hypoxia-inducible reporter gene and to demonstrate utility by comparison of reporter gene expression to the uptake and distribution of the hypoxia tracer 18 F-fluoromisonidazole ( 18 F-FMISO). Methods: Three tumors derived from the rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT were grown in each of two rats as follows: (1) parental R3327-AT, (2) positive control R3327-AT/PC in which the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion reporter gene was expressed constitutively, (3) R3327-AT/HRE in which the reporter gene was placed under the control of a hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive promoter sequence (HRE). Animals were coadministered a hypoxia-specific marker (pimonidazole) and the reporter gene probe 124 I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ( 124 I-FIAU) 3 h prior to sacrifice. Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole fluorescent staining intensity was then performed on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Utility of this system was demonstrated by assessment of reporter gene expression versus the exogenous hypoxia probe 18 F-FMISO. Two rats, each bearing a single R3327-AT/HRE tumor, were injected with 124 I-FIAU (3 h before sacrifice) and 18 F-FMISO (2 h before sacrifice). Statistical analysis of the spatial association between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU on a pixel-by-pixel basis was performed. Results: Correlation coefficients between 124 I-FIAU uptake and pimonidazole staining intensity were: 0.11 in R3327-AT tumors, -0.66 in R3327-AT/PC and 0.76 in R3327-AT/HRE, confirming that only in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor was HSV1-tkeGFP gene expression associated with hypoxia. Correlation coefficients between 18 F-FMISO and 124 I-FIAU uptakes in R3327-AT/HRE tumors were r=0.56, demonstrating good spatial correspondence between the two tracers. Conclusions: We have confirmed hypoxia-specific expression of the HSV1-tkeGFP fusion gene in the R3327-AT/HRE tumor model and demonstrated the utility of

  8. Feasibility of sodium/iodide symporter gene as a new imaging reporter gene: comparison with HSV1-tk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Kang, Joo Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Chul Woo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging reporter genes, such as HSV1-tk and D 2 receptor genes, make it possible to visualise gene expression non-invasively and repetitively in vivo. However, these systems require the synthesis of complicated substrates and the availability of expensive PET equipment. Expression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene can be easily monitored with radioiodines and technetium-99m using a gamma camera. To evaluate the possibility of using NIS as an imaging reporter gene, we compared its characteristics with those of the conventional HSV1-tk gene. The CM cell line was made by transfecting the HSV1-tk gene into CT-26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line). The CTN and CMN cell lines were then made by transfecting the NIS gene into CT-26 and CM. We measured the uptake of iodine-125 iodovinyldeoxyuridine ([ 125 I]IVDU) and 125 I to evaluate the expression of the HSV1-tk and NIS genes, respectively. Each cell line was injected into four flank sites in Balb/c mice. The biodistribution study was performed after intravenously injecting [ 125 I]IVDU and 131 I, and 131 I scintigraphy was performed for the evaluation of NIS expression. In vitro studies indicated that CTN and CMN had 40- to 79-fold and 150- to 256-fold higher uptake of 125 I than CT-26 and CM, respectively. Furthermore, CM and CMN showed 57- to 69-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. NIS gene expression and 125 I accumulation were found to be directly correlated (R 2 =0.923), as were HSV1-tk gene expression and [ 125 I]IVDU accumulation (R 2 =0.956). Calculated signal per unit NIS and HSV1-tk mRNA expression was 23,240±3,755 cpm and 34,039±5,346 cpm, respectively. In vivo study indicated that CTN and CMN had 2.3- and 5.8-fold higher uptake of 131 I than CT-26 and CM, and 1.8- and 3.5-fold higher uptake of [ 125 I]IVDU than CT-26 and CTN. Scintigraphy using 131 I easily visualised CTN and CMN tumours. In conclusion, the NIS gene may be viewed as an imaging

  9. Effects of Epigenetic Modulation on Reporter Gene Expression: Implications for Stem Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Manickam; Park, Jinha M.; Cao, Feng; Wang, Dongxu; Paulmurugan, Ramasay; Tseng, Jeffrey R.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Tracking stem cell localization, survival, differentiation, and proliferation following transplantation in living subjects is essential for understanding stem cell biology and physiology. In this study, we investigated the long-term stability of reporter gene expression in an embryonic rat cardiomyoblast cell line and the role of epigenetic modulation on reversing reporter gene silencing. Cells were stably transfected with plasmids carrying cytomegalovirus promoter driving firefly luciferase reporter gene (CMV-Fluc) and passaged repeatedly for 3–8 months. Within the highest expressor clone, the firefly luciferase activity decreased progressively from passage-1 (843±28) to passage-20 (250±10) to passage-40 (44±3) to passage-60 (3±1 RLU/µg) (P<0.05 vs. passage-1). Firefly luciferase activity was maximally rescued by treatment with 5-azacytidine (DNA methyltransferase inhibitor) compared to trichostatin A (histone deacetylase inhibitor) and retinoic acid (transcriptional activator) (P<0.05). Increasing dosages of 5-azacytidine treatment led to higher levels of firefly luciferase mRNA (RT-PCR) and protein (Western blots) and inversely lower levels of methylation in the CMV promoter (DNA nucleotide sequence). These in vitro results were extended to in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of cell transplant in living animals. Cells treated with 5-azacytidine were monitored for 2 weeks compared to 1 week for untreated cells (P<0.05). These findings should have important implications for reporter gene-based imaging of stem cell transplantation. PMID:16246867

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Retinoic Acid Receptor Activity using a Sodium/Iodide Symporter and Luciferase Dual Imaging Reporter Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung So

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Retinoic acids are natural derivatives of vitamin A, and play important roles in modulating tumor cell growth by regulating differentiation, thus suggesting the potential use of these derivatives in cancer therapy and prevention. To visualize the intranuclear responses of functional retinoic acid receptors, we have developed a dual-imaging reporter gene system based on the use of sodium/iodide symporter (NIS and luciferase in cancer cell lines. NIS and luciferase genes were linked with an internal ribosome entry site, and placed under the control of an artificial cis-acting retinoic acid responsive element (pRARE/NL. After retinoic acid treatment, I-125 uptake by pRARE/NL transfected cells was found to have increased by up to about five times that of nontreated cells. The bioluminescence intensity of pRARE/NL transfected cells showed dose-dependency. In vivo luciferase images showed higher intensity in retinoic acid treated SK-RARE/NL tumors, and scintigraphic images of SK-RARE/NL tumors showed increased Tc-99m uptake after retinoic acid treatment. The NIS/luciferase imaging reporter system was sufficiently sensitive to allow the visualization of intranuclear retinoic acid receptor activity. This cis-enhancer imaging reporter system may be useful in vitro and in vivo for the evaluation of retinoic acid responses in such areas as cellular differentiation and chemoprevention.

  11. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  12. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  13. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and chorioallantoic membrane. Our results suggest that melA is a useful photoacoustic reporter gene for visualizing bacteria, and further work

  14. Deep-tissue reporter-gene imaging with fluorescence and optoacoustic tomography: a performance overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Ale, Angelique; Morscher, Stefan; Burton, Neal C; Schaefer, Karin; Radrich, Karin; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-10-01

    A primary enabling feature of near-infrared fluorescent proteins (FPs) and fluorescent probes is the ability to visualize deeper in tissues than in the visible. The purpose of this work is to find which is the optimal visualization method that can exploit the advantages of this novel class of FPs in full-scale pre-clinical molecular imaging studies. Nude mice were stereotactically implanted with near-infrared FP expressing glioma cells to from brain tumors. The feasibility and performance metrics of FPs were compared between planar epi-illumination and trans-illumination fluorescence imaging, as well as to hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) system combined with X-ray CT and Multispectral Optoacoustic (or Photoacoustic) Tomography (MSOT). It is shown that deep-seated glioma brain tumors are possible to visualize both with fluorescence and optoacoustic imaging. Fluorescence imaging is straightforward and has good sensitivity; however, it lacks resolution. FMT-XCT can provide an improved rough resolution of ∼1 mm in deep tissue, while MSOT achieves 0.1 mm resolution in deep tissue and has comparable sensitivity. We show imaging capacity that can shift the visualization paradigm in biological discovery. The results are relevant not only to reporter gene imaging, but stand as cross-platform comparison for all methods imaging near infrared fluorescent contrast agents.

  15. Dual-therapeutic reporter genes fusion for enhanced cancer gene therapy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, T V; Foygel, K; Willmann, J K; Paulmurugan, R

    2013-05-01

    Two of the successful gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies include herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) enzyme-ganciclovir prodrug and the Escherichia coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme-CB1954 prodrug strategies; these enzyme-prodrug combinations produce activated cytotoxic metabolites of the prodrugs capable of tumor cell death by inhibiting DNA synthesis and killing quiescent cells, respectively. Both these strategies also affect significant bystander cell killing of neighboring tumor cells that do not express these enzymes. We have developed a dual-combination gene strategy, where we identified HSV1-TK and NTR fused in a particular orientation can effectively kill tumor cells when the tumor cells are treated with a fusion HSV1-TK-NTR gene- along with a prodrug combination of GCV and CB1954. In order to determine whether the dual-system demonstrate superior therapeutic efficacy than either HSV1-TK or NTR systems alone, we conducted both in vitro and in vivo tumor xenograft studies using triple negative SUM159 breast cancer cells, by evaluating the efficacy of cell death by apoptosis and necrosis upon treatment with the dual HSV1-TK genes-GCV-CB1954 prodrugs system, and compared the efficiency to HSV1-TK-GCV and NTR-CB1954. Our cell-based studies, tumor regression studies in xenograft mice, histological analyses of treated tumors and bystander studies indicate that the dual HSV1-TK-NTR-prodrug system is two times more efficient even with half the doses of both prodrugs than the respective single gene-prodrug system, as evidenced by enhanced apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells in vitro in culture and xenograft of tumor tissues in animals.

  16. Noninvasive imaging of transplanted living functional cells transfected with a reporter estrogen receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Shinji [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)]. E-mail: shinjit@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Furukawa, Takako [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Mori, Tetsuya [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaizuki, Matsuoka, Yoshida, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The transplantation of functional cells such as dopaminergic cells into damaged tissue is now clinically ongoing, but at present the population of surviving cells at the transplantation site mostly cannot be noninvasively examined. To visualize surviving transplanted functional cells using a noninvasive method, we chose the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (ERL) as a reporter molecule and 16{alpha}-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-17{beta}-estradiol (FES) for its ligand. We used a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line for recipient cells as a model. To obtain ES cells that constitutively or inducibly express ERL, we transfected two types of expression vectors into EB5 parental ES cell line using the lipofection method and obtained about 30 clones for each of the two types of transfectants. Then, to examine the expression level of ERL, we performed Western blotting analysis. Ligand uptake experiments were carried out using [{sup 3}H]-estradiol with or without excessive unlabeled estradiol for control cells and ERL transfectants. Each selected clone was also used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies involving FES in nude mice transplanted with control cells and ERL transfectants. In some of the clones transfected with the inducible-type ERL gene, protein was expressed much higher than in the controls. However, constitutive-type ERL gene-transfected ES cells showed no protein production in spite of their gene expression activity being considerably high. All clones also expressed equal levels of the Oct-3/4 gene, a marker of pluripotency, in comparison with the parental cells. Also, the specific uptake of [{sup 3}H]-estradiol was over 30 times higher in inducer-treated ERL-expressing ES cells compared to untreated control cells. Finally, by performing dynamic PET imaging, we successfully visualized ERL-expressing teratomas using FES.

  17. Noninvasive imaging of transplanted living functional cells transfected with a reporter estrogen receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Shinji; Furukawa, Takako; Mori, Tetsuya; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa

    2005-01-01

    The transplantation of functional cells such as dopaminergic cells into damaged tissue is now clinically ongoing, but at present the population of surviving cells at the transplantation site mostly cannot be noninvasively examined. To visualize surviving transplanted functional cells using a noninvasive method, we chose the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (ERL) as a reporter molecule and 16α-[ 18 F]-fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES) for its ligand. We used a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell line for recipient cells as a model. To obtain ES cells that constitutively or inducibly express ERL, we transfected two types of expression vectors into EB5 parental ES cell line using the lipofection method and obtained about 30 clones for each of the two types of transfectants. Then, to examine the expression level of ERL, we performed Western blotting analysis. Ligand uptake experiments were carried out using [ 3 H]-estradiol with or without excessive unlabeled estradiol for control cells and ERL transfectants. Each selected clone was also used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies involving FES in nude mice transplanted with control cells and ERL transfectants. In some of the clones transfected with the inducible-type ERL gene, protein was expressed much higher than in the controls. However, constitutive-type ERL gene-transfected ES cells showed no protein production in spite of their gene expression activity being considerably high. All clones also expressed equal levels of the Oct-3/4 gene, a marker of pluripotency, in comparison with the parental cells. Also, the specific uptake of [ 3 H]-estradiol was over 30 times higher in inducer-treated ERL-expressing ES cells compared to untreated control cells. Finally, by performing dynamic PET imaging, we successfully visualized ERL-expressing teratomas using FES

  18. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  19. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  20. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  1. Downstream reporter gene imaging for signal transduction pathway of dopamine type 2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Bom, Hee Seung

    2004-01-01

    The Dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signal pathway regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of proteins including cAMP reponse element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor. In this study, we developed a reporter strategy using the GAL4 fusion CREB to assess the phosphorylation of CREB, one of the targets of the D2R signal transduction pathway. We used three plasmids: GAL4 fusion transactivator (pCMV-CREB), firefly luciferase reporter with GAL4 binding sites (pG5-FLUC), and D2R plasmid (pCMV-D2R). Group 1 293T cells were transiently transfected with pCMV-CREB and pG5-FLUC, and group 2 cells were transfected with all three plasmids. Transfected cells were stimulated with different concentrations of dopamine (0-200 M). For animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells (1x10 6 ) were subcutaneously injected on the left and right thigh of six nude mice, respectively. Dopamine stimiulation was performed with intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA incombination with carbidopa, a peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor. Bioluminescence optical imaging studies were performed before and after L-DOPA injection. In cell culture studies, group 1 cells showed strong luciferase activity which implies direct activation of the signaling pathway due to growth factors contained in culture medium. Group 2 cells showed strong luciferase activity and a further increase after administration of dopamine. In animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells showed bioluminescence signal before L-DOPA injection, but signal from group 2 cells significantly increased 12 h after L-DOPA injection. The signal from group 1 cells disappeared thereafter, but group 2 cells continued to show signal until 36 h of L-DOPA injection. This study demonstrates imaging of the D2R signal transduction pathway and should be useful for noninvasive imaging of downstream effects of G-coupled protein pathways

  2. Molecular Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Stably Expressing Human PET Reporter Genes After Zinc Finger Nuclease-Mediated Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfs, Esther; Holvoet, Bryan; Ordovas, Laura; Breuls, Natacha; Helsen, Nicky; Schönberger, Matthias; Raitano, Susanna; Struys, Tom; Vanbilloen, Bert; Casteels, Cindy; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Van Laere, Koen; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Deroose, Christophe M

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging is indispensable for determining the fate and persistence of engrafted stem cells. Standard strategies for transgene induction involve the use of viral vectors prone to silencing and insertional mutagenesis or the use of nonhuman genes. Methods: We used zinc finger nucleases to induce stable expression of human imaging reporter genes into the safe-harbor locus adeno-associated virus integration site 1 in human embryonic stem cells. Plasmids were generated carrying reporter genes for fluorescence, bioluminescence imaging, and human PET reporter genes. Results: In vitro assays confirmed their functionality, and embryonic stem cells retained differentiation capacity. Teratoma formation assays were performed, and tumors were imaged over time with PET and bioluminescence imaging. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the application of genome editing for targeted integration of human imaging reporter genes in human embryonic stem cells for long-term molecular imaging. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  3. MR molecular imaging of tumours using ferritin heavy chain reporter gene expression mediated by the hTERT promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yan [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of ChengDu Medical College, Department of Radiology, ChengDu (China); Gong, Ming-fu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Wang, Guang-xian; Su, Tong-sheng; Wen, Li; Zhang, Dong [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, XinQiao Hospital, ChongQing (China)

    2016-11-15

    Using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter and the modified ferritin heavy chain (Fth) reporter gene, reporter gene expression for MRI was examined in telomerase positive and negative tumour cells and xenografts. Activity of the reporter gene expression vector Lenti-hTERT-Fth1-3FLAG-Puro was compared to constitutive CMV-driven expression and to the untransfected parental control in five tumour cell lines: A549, SKOV3, 293T, U2OS and HPDLF. In vitro, transfected cells were evaluated for FLAG-tagged protein expression, iron accumulation and transverse relaxation. In vivo, tumours transduced by lentiviral vector injection were imaged using T2*WI. Changes in tumour signal intensity were validated by histology. Only telomerase positive tumour cells expressed FLAG-tagged Fth and displayed an increase in R2* above the parental control, with a corresponding change in T2*WI. In addition, only telomerase positive tumours, transduced by injection of the reporter gene expression construct, exhibited a change in signal intensity on T2*WI. Tumour histology verified the expression of FLAG-tagged Fth and iron accumulation in telomerase positive tissue. Reporter gene expression for MRI, using the Fth reporter and the hTERT promoter, may be a useful strategy for the non-invasive diagnosis of many types of cancer. (orig.)

  4. Validating tyrosinase homologue MelA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert; Zemp, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic drug resistance is a major worldwide issue. Development of new therapies against pathogenic bacteria requires appropriate research tools for replicating and characterizing infections. Previously fluorescence and bioluminescence modalities have been used to image infectious burden in animal models but scattering significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. We hypothesize that photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-toresolution ratio, could be useful for visualizing MelA-expressing bacteria since MelA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue involved in melanin production. Using an inducible expression system, E. coli expressing MelA were visibly black in liquid culture. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), MelA-expressing bacteria (at different dilutions in PBS), and chicken embryo blood were injected in plastic tubes which were imaged using a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system. Photoacoustic imaging at 6 different wavelengths (680, 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900nm) enabled spectral de-mixing to distinguish melanin signals from blood. The signal to noise ratio of 9x diluted MelA bacteria was 55, suggesting that ~20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. When MelA bacteria were injected as a 100 μL bolus into a chicken embryo, photoacoustic signals from deoxy- and oxy- hemoglobin as well as MelA-expressing bacteria could be separated and overlaid on an ultrasound image, allowing visualization of the bacterial location. Photoacoustic imaging may be a useful tool for visualizing bacterial infections and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  5. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilchung [Ames Laboratory; Ray, Judhajeet [Ames Laboratory; Gupta, Vinayak [Iowa State University; Ilgu, Muslum [Ames Laboratory; Beasley, Jonathan [Iowa State University; Bendickson, Lee [Ames Laboratory; Mehanovic, Samir [Molecular Express; Kraus, George A. [Iowa State University; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit [Ames Laboratory

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  6. A novel triple-modality reporter gene for whole-body fluorescent, bioluminescent, and nuclear noninvasive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev, Vladimir; Vider, Jelena; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ageyeva, Ludmila; Tourkova, Vilia; Doubrovin, Michael; Serganova, Inna; Beresten, Tatiana; Ivanova, Anna; Blasberg, Ronald; Balatoni, Julius; Bornmann, William; Gelovani Tjuvajev, Juri

    2004-01-01

    Two genetic reporter systems were developed for multimodality reporter gene imaging of different molecular-genetic processes using fluorescence, bioluminescence (BLI), and nuclear imaging techniques. The eGFP cDNA was fused at the N-terminus with HSV1-tk cDNA bearing a nuclear export signal from MAPKK (NES-HSV1-tk) or with truncation at the N-terminus of the first 45 amino acids (Δ45HSV1-tk) and with firefly luciferase at the C-terminus. A single fusion protein with three functional subunits is formed following transcription and translation from a single open reading frame. The NES-TGL (NES-TGL) or Δ45HSV1-tk/GFP/luciferase (Δ45-TGL) triple-fusion gene cDNAs were cloned into a MoMLV-based retrovirus, which was used for transduction of U87 human glioma cells. The integrity, fluorescence, bioluminescence, and enzymatic activity of the TGL reporter proteins were assessed in vitro. The predicted molecular weight of the fusion proteins (130 kDa) was confirmed by western blot. The U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells had cytoplasmic green fluorescence. The in vitro BLI was 7- and 13-fold higher in U87-NES-TGL and U87-Δ45-TGL cells compared to nontransduced control cells. The Ki of 14 C-FIAU was 0.49±0.02, 0.51±0.03, and 0.003±0.001 ml/min/g in U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells, respectively. Multimodality in vivo imaging studies were performed in nu/nu mice bearing multiple s.c. xenografts established from U87-NES-TGL, U87-Δ45-TGL, and wild-type U87 cells. BLI was performed after administration of d-luciferin (150 mg/kg i.v.). Gamma camera or PET imaging was conducted at 2 h after i.v. administration of [ 131 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal) or [ 124 I]FIAU (7.4 MBq/animal), respectively. Whole-body fluorescence imaging was performed in parallel with the BLI and radiotracer imaging studies. In vivo BLI and gamma camera imaging showed specific localization of luminescence and radioactivity to the TGL transduced xenografts with background levels of activity

  7. Evaluation of transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor with sodium iodide symporter as an imaging reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2006-10-01

    Oestrogen receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors whose activity is modulated either by oestrogens or by an alternative signalling pathway. Oestrogen receptors interact via a specific DNA-binding domain, the oestrogen responsive element (ERE), in the promoter region of sensitive genes. This binding leads to an initiation of gene expression and hormonal effects. To determine the transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor, we developed a molecular imaging system using sodium iodide symporter (NIS) as a reporter gene. The NIS reporter gene was placed under the control of an artificial ERE derived from pERE-TA-SEAP and named as pERE-NIS. pERE-NIS was transferred to MCF-7, human breast cancer cells, which highly expressed oestrogen receptor-alpha with lipofectamine. Stably expressing cells were generated by selection with G418 for 14 days. After treatment of 17beta-oestradiol and tamoxifen with serial doses, the (125)I uptake was measured for the determination of NIS expression. The inhibition of NIS activity was performed with 50 micromol x l(-1) potassium perchlorate. The MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with 17beta-oestradiol accumulated (125)I up to 70-80% higher than did non-treated cells. NIS expression was increased according to increasing doses of 17beta-oestradiol. MCF7/pERE-NIS treated with tamoxifen also accumulated (125)I up to 50% higher than did non-treated cells. Potassium perchlorate completely inhibited (125)I uptake. When MDA-MB231 cells, the oestrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells, were transfected with pERE-NIS, (125)I uptake of MDA-MB-231/pERE-NIS did not increase. This pERE-NIS reporter system is sufficiently sensitive for monitoring transcriptional activity of the oestrogen receptor. Therefore, cis-enhancer reporter systems with ERE will be applicable to the development of a novel selective oestrogen receptor modulator with low toxicity and high efficacy.

  8. Using Dual Fluorescence Reporting Genes to Establish an In Vivo Imaging Model of Orthotopic Lung Adenocarcinoma in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Yen, Chih-Ching; Wang, Jiun-Long; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2016-12-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is characterized by a poor prognosis and high mortality worldwide. In this study, we purposed to use the live imaging techniques and a reporter gene that generates highly penetrative near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to establish a preclinical animal model that allows in vivo monitoring of lung cancer development and provides a non-invasive tool for the research on lung cancer pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy. A human lung adenocarcinoma cell line (A549), which stably expressed the dual fluorescence reporting gene (pCAG-iRFP-2A-Venus), was used to generate subcutaneous or orthotopic lung cancer in nude mice. Cancer development was evaluated by live imaging via the NIR fluorescent signals from iRFP, and the signals were verified ex vivo by the green fluorescence of Venus from the gross lung. The tumor-bearing mice received miR-16 nucleic acid therapy by intranasal administration to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy in this live imaging system. For the subcutaneous xenografts, the detection of iRFP fluorescent signals revealed delicate changes occurring during tumor growth that are not distinguishable by conventional methods of tumor measurement. For the orthotopic xenografts, the positive correlation between the in vivo iRFP signal from mice chests and the ex vivo green fluorescent signal from gross lung tumors and the results of the suppressed tumorigenesis by miR-16 treatment indicated that lung tumor size can be accurately quantified by the emission of NIR fluorescence. In addition, orthotopic lung tumor localization can be accurately visualized using iRFP fluorescence tomography in vivo, thus revealing the trafficking of lung tumor cells. We introduced a novel dual fluorescence lung cancer model that provides a non-invasive option for preclinical research via the use of NIR fluorescence in live imaging of lung.

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [18F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; O'Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Szanda, Istvan; Blower, Philip J.; Banga, Jasvinder Paul; Clarke, Susan E.M.; Ballinger, James R.; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2010-01-01

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters 123 I-iodide, 131 I-iodide and 99m Tc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate 18 F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([ 18 F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [ 18 F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF 4 - with [ 18 F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [ 18 F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [ 18 F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  10. In vivo imaging of induction of heat-shock protein-70 gene expression with fluorescence reflectance imaging and intravital confocal microscopy following brain ischaemia in reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Xavier; Santalucía, Tomàs; Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Purroy, Jesús; Calvo, Maria; Salas-Perdomo, Angélica; Justicia, Carles; Couillaud, Franck; Planas, Anna M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke induces strong expression of the 72-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP-70) in the ischaemic brain, and neuronal expression of HSP-70 is associated with the ischaemic penumbra. The aim of this study was to image induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in vivo after brain ischaemia using reporter mice. A genomic DNA sequence of the Hspa1b promoter was used to generate an Hsp70-mPlum far-red fluorescence reporter vector. The construct was tested in cellular systems (NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line) by transient transfection and examining mPlum and Hsp-70 induction under a challenge. After construct validation, mPlum transgenic mice were generated. Focal brain ischaemia was induced by transient intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and the mice were imaged in vivo with fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) with an intact skull, and with confocal microscopy after opening a cranial window. Cells transfected with the Hsp70-mPlum construct showed mPlum fluorescence after stimulation. One day after induction of ischaemia, reporter mice showed a FRI signal located in the HSP-70-positive zone within the ipsilateral hemisphere, as validated by immunohistochemistry. Live confocal microscopy allowed brain tissue to be visualized at the cellular level. mPlum fluorescence was observed in vivo in the ipsilateral cortex 1 day after induction of ischaemia in neurons, where it is compatible with penumbra and neuronal viability, and in blood vessels in the core of the infarction. This study showed in vivo induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in ischaemic brain using reporter mice. The fluorescence signal showed in vivo the induction of Hsp-70 in penumbra neurons and in the vasculature within the ischaemic core.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of [{sup 18}F]tetrafluoroborate: a PET imaging agent for thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging of the sodium/iodide symporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Sunassee, Kavitha; Weeks, Amanda J.; Berry, David J.; Paul, Rowena L.; Cleij, Marcel; O' Doherty, Michael J.; Marsden, Paul K.; Szanda, Istvan; Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Banga, Jasvinder Paul [King' s College London, Division of Cell and Gene Based Therapy, London (United Kingdom); Clarke, Susan E.M.; Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Cheng, Sheue-Yann [National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Bethesda (United States)

    2010-11-15

    The human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) is a well-established target in thyroid disease and reporter gene imaging using gamma emitters {sup 123}I-iodide, {sup 131}I-iodide and {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate. However, no PET imaging agent is routinely available. The aim of this study was to prepare and evaluate {sup 18}F-labelled tetrafluoroborate ([{sup 18}F]TFB) for PET imaging of hNIS. [{sup 18}F]TFB was prepared by isotopic exchange of BF{sub 4} {sup -} with [{sup 18}F]fluoride in hot hydrochloric acid and purified using an alumina column. Its identity, purity and stability in serum were determined by HPLC, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and mass spectrometry. Its interaction with NIS was assessed in vitro using FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells, with and without stimulation by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), in the presence and absence of perchlorate. Biodistribution and PET imaging studies were performed using BALB/c mice, with and without perchlorate inhibition. [{sup 18}F]TFB was readily prepared with specific activity of 10 GBq/mg. It showed rapid accumulation in FRTL-5 cells that was stimulated by TSH and inhibited by perchlorate, and rapid specific accumulation in vivo in thyroid (SUV = 72 after 1 h) and stomach that was inhibited 95% by perchlorate. [{sup 18}F]TFB is an easily prepared PET imaging agent for rodent NIS and should be evaluated for hNIS PET imaging in humans. (orig.)

  12. Imaging after vascular gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Yang, Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    Targets for cardiovascular gene therapy currently include limiting restenosis after balloon angioplasty and stent placement, inhibiting vein bypass graft intimal hyperplasia/stenosis, therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiac and lower-limb ischemia, and prevention of thrombus formation. While catheter angiography is still standard method to follow-up vascular gene transfer, other modern imaging techniques, especially intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), magnetic resonance (MR), and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging provide complementary information about the therapeutic effect of vascular gene transfer in humans. Although molecular imaging of therapeutic gene expression in the vasculatures is still in its technical development phase, it has already offered basic medical science an extremely useful in vivo evaluation tool for non- or minimally invasive imaging of vascular gene therapy

  13. Development of a New Reporter Gene System-dsRed/Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase-Xanthine for Molecular Imaging of Processes Behind the Intact Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 ± 0.008 vs. 0.00031 ± 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line, and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = 0.69, meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [* C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 ± 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 ± 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 ± 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT, which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the “sensory system” have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the “beacon system” image data. Such an approach requires two different “reporter genes” and two different “reporter substrates.” Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB.

  14. Applications of the Preclinical Molecular Imaging in Biomedicine: Gene Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collantes, M.; Peñuelas, I.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy constitutes a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited disorders. Imaging techniques using ionizing radiation as PET or SPECT are used for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In this review the main reporter gene/reporter probe strategies are summarized, as well as the contribution of preclinical models to the development of this new imaging modality previously to its application in clinical arena. [es

  15. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  16. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serganova, Inna [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Ponomarev, Vladimir [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Blasberg, Ronald [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: blasberg@neuro1.mskcc.org

    2007-10-15

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  17. Human reporter genes: potential use in clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serganova, Inna; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Blasberg, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    The clinical application of positron-emission-tomography-based reporter gene imaging will expand over the next several years. The translation of reporter gene imaging technology into clinical applications is the focus of this review, with emphasis on the development and use of human reporter genes. Human reporter genes will play an increasingly more important role in this development, and it is likely that one or more reporter systems (human gene and complimentary radiopharmaceutical) will take leading roles. Three classes of human reporter genes are discussed and compared: receptors, transporters and enzymes. Examples of highly expressed cell membrane receptors include specific membrane somatostatin receptors (hSSTrs). The transporter group includes the sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). The endogenous enzyme classification includes human mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (hTK2). In addition, we also discuss the nonhuman dopamine 2 receptor and two viral reporter genes, the wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene and the HSV1-tk mutant (HSV1-sr39tk). Initial applications of reporter gene imaging in patients will be developed within two different clinical disciplines: (a) gene therapy and (b) adoptive cell-based therapies. These studies will benefit from the availability of efficient human reporter systems that can provide critical monitoring information for adenoviral-based, retroviral-based and lenteviral-based gene therapies, oncolytic bacterial and viral therapies, and adoptive cell-based therapies. Translational applications of noninvasive in vivo reporter gene imaging are likely to include: (a) quantitative monitoring of gene therapy vectors for targeting and transduction efficacy in clinical protocols by imaging the location, extent and duration of transgene expression; (b) monitoring of cell trafficking, targeting, replication and activation in adoptive T-cell and stem/progenitor cell therapies

  18. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Joseph C.; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  19. Comparison of [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 14}C]FIAU for imaging of HSV1-tk reporter gene expression: adenoviral infection vs stable transfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung-Jun; Iyer, Meera [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, B3-399A BRI 700 Westwood Plaza, CA 90095-1770, Los Angeles (United States); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, UCLA School of Medicine, B3-399A BRI 700 Westwood Plaza, CA 90095-1770, Los Angeles (United States); Department of Radiology, Bio-X Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Earlier studies involving comparison of different reporter probes have shown conflicting results between pyrimidine nucleosides [e.g., 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil (FIAU)] and acycloguanosine derivatives [e.g., penciclovir (PCV), 9-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl)guanine (FHBG)]. We hypothesized that this reported discrepancy may be related to how the reporter gene is delivered to the cells - stably transfected vs adenoviral infection. We directly compared the uptake characteristics of [{sup 18}F]FHBG, [{sup 3}H]PCV, and [{sup 14}C]FIAU in cell culture and in vivo using an adenoviral mediated gene transfer model and stably transfected cells. We further compared the uptake of three reporter probes using both HSV1-tk and a mutant HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells to assess the optimal reporter probe/reporter gene combination. [{sup 14}C]FIAU accumulation was greater than that of [{sup 3}H]PCV and [{sup 18}F]FHBG in control cells and in HSV1-tk stably transfected cells (P<0.001). After infection of C6 cells with AdCMV-HSV1-tk (1.5 x 10{sup 8} pfu), [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 3}H]PCV accumulation was significantly greater than that of [{sup 14}C]FIAU (P<0.01). [{sup 18}F]FHBG and [{sup 3}H]PCV accumulated to a significantly greater extent than [{sup 14}C]FIAU in C6-stb-sr39tk+ and AdCMV-HSV1-sr39tk infected C6 cells (P<0.001). Results from the nude mice supported the results in cell culture. [{sup 14}C]FIAU led to significantly higher %ID/g in C6-stb-tk+ xenografts than [{sup 18}F]FHBG (P<0.05); however, compared with [{sup 14}C]FIAU, [{sup 18}F]FHBG led to as high %ID/g in HSV1-tk expressing hepatocytes and to significantly greater %ID/g in C6-stb-sr39tk+ xenografts and HSV1-sr39tk expressing hepatocytes. Dynamic sequential images showed that [{sup 18}F]FHBG was well retained in HSV1-sr39tk expressing cells (C6-stb-sr39tk+) for at least 4 h after injection, while it was rapidly cleared from HSV1-tk expressing cells (MH3924A

  20. The use of molecular imaging of gene expression by radiotracers in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard-Fiardo, P.; Franken, P.R.; Harrington, K.J.; Vassaux, G.; Cambien, B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Progress with gene-based therapies has been hampered by difficulties in monitoring the biodistribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. Recent developments in non-invasive imaging have allowed researchers and clinicians to assess the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression in animals and humans. Such advances should eventually lead to improvement in the efficacy and safety of current clinical protocols for future treatments. Areas Covered: The molecular imaging techniques for monitoring gene therapy in the living subject, with a specific highlight on the key reporter gene approaches that have been developed and validated in preclinical models using the latest imaging modalities. The applications of molecular imaging to biotherapy, with a particular emphasis on monitoring of gene and vector biodistribution and on image-guided radiotherapy. Expert Opinion: Among the reporter gene/probe combinations that have been described so far, one stands out, in our view, as the most versatile and easy to implement: the Na/I symporter. This strategy, exploiting more than 50 years of experience in the treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinomas, has been validated in different types of experimental cancers and with different types of oncolytic viruses and is likely to become a key tool in the implementation of human gene therapy. (authors)

  1. Advances of reporter gene monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiang; Yin Hongyan; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell therapy research has made great progress, demonstrating a broad application prospects. However, stem cell therapy as a new disease treatment, there are still many problems to be solved. Reporter gene imaging is a rapid development in recent years, a non-invasive, sensitive method of monitoring of stem cells, in particular radionuclide reporter gene imaging has high sensitivity and specificity of the advantages of strong and can carry out imaging of deep tissue and repeat imaging, is a tracer in vivo conditions, the most promising stem cell transplantation technique, showing good prospects for development. (authors)

  2. Monitoring the Induction of Heat Shock Factor 1/Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression following 17-Allylamino-Demethoxygeldanamycin Treatment by Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Reporter Gene Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell response to proteotoxic cell stresses is mediated primarily through activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1. This transcription factor plays a major role in the regulation of the heat shock proteins (HSPs, including HSP70. We demonstrate that an [124I]iodide-pQHNIG70 positron emission tomography (PET reporter system that includes an inducible HSP70 promoter can be used to image and monitor the activation of the HSF1/HSP70 transcription factor in response to drug treatment (17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-AAG]. We developed a dual imaging reporter (pQHNIG70 for noninvasive imaging of the heat shock response in cell culture and living animals previously and now study HSF1/HSP70 reporter activation in both cell culture and tumor-bearing animals following exposure to 17-AAG. 17-AAG (10–1,000 nM induced reporter expression; a 23-fold increase was observed by 60 hours. Good correspondence between reporter expression and HSP70 protein levels were observed. MicroPET imaging based on [124I]iodide accumulation in pQHNIG70-transduced RG2 xenografts showed a significant 6.2-fold reporter response to 17-AAG, with a corresponding increase in tumor HSP70 and in tumor human sodium iodide symporter and green fluorescent protein reporter proteins. The HSF1 reporter system can be used to screen anticancer drugs for induction of cytotoxic stress and HSF1 activation both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Uptake kinetics and biodistribution of C-14-D-luciferin-a radiolabeled substrate for the firefly luciferase catalyzed bioluminescence reaction : impact on bioluminescence based reporter gene imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Frank; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Bhaumik, Srabani; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Firefly luciferase catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of D-luciferin to oxyluciferin in the presence of cofactors, producing bioluminescence. This reaction is used in optical bioluminescence-based molecular imaging approaches to detect the expression of the firefly luciferase reporter

  4. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  5. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning.......To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  6. Theranostic Imaging of Cancer Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) is a promising therapeutic approach for treating cancers of various phenotypes. This strategy is independent of various other chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating cancers where the drugs are mainly designed to target endogenous cellular mechanisms, which are different in various cancer subtypes. In GDEPT an external enzyme, which is different from the cellular proteins, is expressed to convert the injected prodrug in to a toxic metabolite, that normally kill cancer cells express this protein. Theranostic imaging is an approach used to directly monitor the expression of these gene therapy enzymes while evaluating therapeutic effect. We recently developed a dual-GDEPT system where we combined mutant human herpes simplex thymidine kinase (HSV1sr39TK) and E. coli nitroreductase (NTR) enzyme, to improve therapeutic efficiency of cancer gene therapy by simultaneously injecting two prodrugs at a lower dose. In this approach we use two different prodrugs such as ganciclovir (GCV) and CB1954 to target two different cellular mechanisms to kill cancer cells. The developed dual GDEPT system was highly efficacious than that of either of the system used independently. In this chapter, we describe the complete protocol involved for in vitro and in vivo imaging of therapeutic cancer gene therapy evaluation.

  7. Positron emission tomography and gene therapy: basic concepts and experimental approaches for in vivo gene expression imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuelas, Iván; Boán, JoséF; Martí-Climent, Josep M; Sangro, Bruno; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Prieto, Jesús; Richter, José A

    2004-01-01

    More than two decades of intense research have allowed gene therapy to move from the laboratory to the clinical setting, where its use for the treatment of human pathologies has been considerably increased in the last years. However, many crucial questions remain to be solved in this challenging field. In vivo imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) by combination of the appropriate PET reporter gene and PET reporter probe could provide invaluable qualitative and quantitative information to answer multiple unsolved questions about gene therapy. PET imaging could be used to define parameters not available by other techniques that are of substantial interest not only for the proper understanding of the gene therapy process, but also for its future development and clinical application in humans. This review focuses on the molecular biology basis of gene therapy and molecular imaging, describing the fundamentals of in vivo gene expression imaging by PET, and the application of PET to gene therapy, as a technology that can be used in many different ways. It could be applied to avoid invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring; accurately diagnose the pathology for better planning of the most adequate therapeutic approach; as treatment evaluation to image the functional effects of gene therapy at the biochemical level; as a quantitative noninvasive way to monitor the location, magnitude and persistence of gene expression over time; and would also help to a better understanding of vector biology and pharmacology devoted to the development of safer and more efficient vectors.

  8. Positive radionuclide imaging of miRNA expression using RILES and the human sodium iodide symporter as reporter gene is feasible and supports a protective role of miRNA-23a in response to muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel Simion

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key players in many biological processes and are considered as an emerging class of pharmacology drugs for diagnosis and therapy. However to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of miRNAs, it is becoming crucial to monitor their expression pattern using medical imaging modalities. Recently, we developed a method called RILES, for RNAi-Inducible Luciferase Expression System that relies on an engineered regulatable expression system to switch-ON the expression of the luciferase gene when a miRNA of interest is expressed in cells. Here we investigated whether replacing the luciferase reporter gene with the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS reporter gene will be also suited to monitor the expression of miRNAs in a clinical setting context. We provide evidence that radionuclide imaging of miRNA expression using hNIS is feasible although it is not as robust as when the luciferase reporter gene is used. However, under appropriate conditions, we monitored the expression of several miRNAs in cells, in the liver and in the tibialis anterior muscle of mice undergoing muscular atrophy. We demonstrated that radiotracer accumulation in transfected cells correlated with the induction of hNIS and with the expression of miRNAs detected by real time PCR. We established the kinetic of miRNA-23a expression in mice and demonstrated that this miRNA follows a biphasic expression pattern characterized by a loss of expression at a late time point of muscular atrophy. At autopsy, we found an opposite expression pattern between miRNA-23a and one of the main transcriptional target of this miRNA, APAF-1, and as downstream target, Caspase 9. Our results report the first positive monitoring of endogenously expressed miRNAs in a nuclear medicine imaging context and support the development of additional work to establish the potential therapeutic value of miRNA-23 to prevent the damaging effects of muscular atrophy.

  9. Positive radionuclide imaging of miRNA expression using RILES and the human sodium iodide symporter as reporter gene is feasible and supports a protective role of miRNA-23a in response to muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Viorel; Sobilo, Julien; Clemoncon, Rudy; Natkunarajah, Sharuja; Ezzine, Safia; Abdallah, Florence; Lerondel, Stephanie; Pichon, Chantal; Baril, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in many biological processes and are considered as an emerging class of pharmacology drugs for diagnosis and therapy. However to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of miRNAs, it is becoming crucial to monitor their expression pattern using medical imaging modalities. Recently, we developed a method called RILES, for RNAi-Inducible Luciferase Expression System that relies on an engineered regulatable expression system to switch-ON the expression of the luciferase gene when a miRNA of interest is expressed in cells. Here we investigated whether replacing the luciferase reporter gene with the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) reporter gene will be also suited to monitor the expression of miRNAs in a clinical setting context. We provide evidence that radionuclide imaging of miRNA expression using hNIS is feasible although it is not as robust as when the luciferase reporter gene is used. However, under appropriate conditions, we monitored the expression of several miRNAs in cells, in the liver and in the tibialis anterior muscle of mice undergoing muscular atrophy. We demonstrated that radiotracer accumulation in transfected cells correlated with the induction of hNIS and with the expression of miRNAs detected by real time PCR. We established the kinetic of miRNA-23a expression in mice and demonstrated that this miRNA follows a biphasic expression pattern characterized by a loss of expression at a late time point of muscular atrophy. At autopsy, we found an opposite expression pattern between miRNA-23a and one of the main transcriptional target of this miRNA, APAF-1, and as downstream target, Caspase 9. Our results report the first positive monitoring of endogenously expressed miRNAs in a nuclear medicine imaging context and support the development of additional work to establish the potential therapeutic value of miRNA-23 to prevent the damaging effects of muscular atrophy.

  10. Image Guidance and Assessment of Radiation Induced Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelizzari, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Image guidance and assessment techniques are being developed for combined radiation/gene therapy, which utilizes a radiation-inducible gene promoter to cause expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha...

  11. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Il Chung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging

  12. Imaging gene expression in real-time using aptamers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ilchung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways are usually activated by external stimuli and are transient. The downstream changes such as transcription of the activated genes are also transient. Real-time detection of promoter activity is useful for understanding changes in gene expression, especially during cell differentiation and in development. A simple and reliable method for viewing gene expression in real time is not yet available. Reporter proteins such as fluorescent proteins and luciferase allow for non-invasive detection of the products of gene expression in living cells. However, current reporter systems do not provide for real-time imaging of promoter activity in living cells. This is because of the long time period after transcription required for fluorescent protein synthesis and maturation. We have developed an RNA reporter system for imaging in real-time to detect changes in promoter activity as they occur. The RNA reporter uses strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags), which can be expressed from a promoter of choice. The tobramycin, neomycin and PDC RNA aptamers have been utilized for this system and expressed in yeast from the GAL1 promoter. The IMAGEtag RNA kinetics were quantified by RT-qPCR. In yeast precultured in raffinose containing media the GAL1 promoter responded faster than in yeast precultured in glucose containing media. IMAGEtag RNA has relatively short half-life (5.5 min) in yeast. For imaging, the yeast cells are incubated with their ligands that are labeled with fluorescent dyes. To increase signal to noise, ligands have been separately conjugated with the FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) pairs, Cy3 and Cy5. With these constructs, the transcribed aptamers can be imaged after activation of the promoter by galactose. FRET was confirmed with three different approaches, which were sensitized emission, acceptor photobleaching and donor lifetime by FLIM (fluorescence lifetime imaging

  13. An image-based, dual fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of shRNA for gene silencing at the single-cell level [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2tt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Kojima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is widely used to suppress gene expression in a specific manner. The efficacy of RNAi is mainly dependent on the sequence of small interfering RNA (siRNA in relation to the target mRNA. Although several algorithms have been developed for the design of siRNA, it is still difficult to choose a really effective siRNA from among multiple candidates. In this article, we report the development of an image-based, quantitative, ratiometric fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of RNAi at the single-cell level. Two fluorescence reporter constructs are used. One expresses the candidate small hairpin RNA (shRNA together with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; the other expresses a 19-nt target sequence inserted into a cassette expressing a red fluorescent protein (either DsRed or mCherry. Effectiveness of the candidate shRNA is evaluated as the extent to which it knocks down expression of the red fluorescent protein. Thus, the red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio (appropriately normalized to controls is used as the read-out for quantifying the siRNA efficacy at the individual cell level. We tested this dual fluorescence assay and compared predictions to actual endogenous knockdown levels for three different genes (vimentin, lamin A/C and Arp3 and twenty different shRNAs. For each of the genes, our assay successfully predicted the target sequences for effective RNAi. To further facilitate testing of RNAi efficacy, we developed a negative selection marker (ccdB method for construction of shRNA and red fluorescent reporter plasmids that allowed us to purify these plasmids directly from transformed bacteria without the need for colony selection and DNA sequencing verification.

  14. An image-based, dual fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of shRNA for gene silencing at the single-cell level [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/39j

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Kojima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is widely used to suppress gene expression in a specific manner. The efficacy of RNAi is mainly dependent on the sequence of small interfering RNA (siRNA in relation to the target mRNA. Although several algorithms have been developed for the design of siRNA, it is still difficult to choose a really effective siRNA from among multiple candidates. In this article, we report the development of an image-based, quantitative, ratiometric fluorescence reporter assay to evaluate the efficacy of RNAi at the single-cell level. Two fluorescence reporter constructs are used. One expresses the candidate small hairpin RNA (shRNA together with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; the other expresses a 19-nt target sequence inserted into a cassette expressing a red fluorescent protein (either DsRed or mCherry. Effectiveness of the candidate shRNA is evaluated as the extent to which it knocks down expression of the red fluorescent protein. Thus, the red-to-green fluorescence intensity ratio (appropriately normalized to controls is used as the read-out for quantifying the siRNA efficacy at the individual cell level. We tested this dual fluorescence assay and compared predictions to actual endogenous knockdown levels for three different genes (vimentin, lamin A/C and Arp3 and twenty different shRNAs. For each of the genes, our assay successfully predicted the target sequences for effective RNAi. To further facilitate testing of RNAi efficacy, we developed a negative selection marker (ccdB method for construction of shRNA and red fluorescent reporter plasmids that allowed us to purify these plasmids directly from transformed bacteria without the need for colony selection and DNA sequencing verification.

  15. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  16. Gene therapy imaging in patients for oncological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penuelas, Ivan; Haberkorn, Uwe; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2005-01-01

    Thus far, traditional methods for evaluating gene transfer and expression have been shown to be of limited value in the clinical arena. Consequently there is a real need to develop new methods that could be repeatedly and safely performed in patients for such purposes. Molecular imaging techniques for gene expression monitoring have been developed and successfully used in animal models, but their sensitivity and reproducibility need to be tested and validated in human studies. In this review, we present the current status of gene therapy-based anticancer strategies and show how molecular imaging, and more specifically radionuclide-based approaches, can be used in gene therapy procedures for oncological applications in humans. The basis of gene expression imaging is described and specific uses of these non-invasive procedures for gene therapy monitoring illustrated. Molecular imaging of transgene expression in humans and evaluation of response to gene-based therapeutic procedures are considered. The advantages of molecular imaging for whole-body monitoring of transgene expression as a way to permit measurement of important parameters in both target and non-target organs are also analyzed. The relevance of this technology for evaluation of the necessary vector dose and how it can be used to improve vector design are also examined. Finally, the advantages of designing a gene therapy-based clinical trial with imaging fully integrated from the very beginning are discussed and future perspectives for the development of these applications outlined. (orig.)

  17. a positive control plasmid for reporter gene assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... qualification as a positive control for luciferase reporter gene assays. Key words: Reporter gene plasmid, luciferase assay, cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer, human melanoma cell line. INTRODUCTION. Reporter genes, often called reporters, have become a precious tool in studies of gene expression ...

  18. Image of HSV1-TK gene expression with {sup 123}IVDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. So livertargeted gene transfer is significant tool for expanding the treatment options and gene function studies. Gene transfer methods commonly use recombinant viral vector. However, viral vectors also have various disadvantages for example immune recognition after adenoviral vector delivery and potential viralassociated toxicity including helper virus replication and insertional mutagenesis. In contrast, nonviral vectors such as naked plasmid DNA(pDNA) and cationic liposomal systems exhibit low immunogenicity and repeated administration is possible(Ledley et al.,1992; Nabel et al.,1993). These are attractive vectors for in vivo gene transfer because of their suitable characteristics such as biodegradability, minimal toxicity, nonimmunogenicity, and simplicity of use. But non-viral gene delivery, has problems associated with limited efficiency at gene expression. hydrodynamic-based produce has very high level efficiency of gene extraction in liver or soild tumor. In mice, hydrodynamic-based produce was reported that a high level of transgene expression could be obtained in the liver by intravenous injection of large volume( 8{approx}10% of body weight) and high-speed ( Kobayashi N et al., 2004 ). HSV1-TK is one of the most widely use effect gene systems sued for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a suicide gene, or as a reporter gene In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have developed as prodrug for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Several 5-substituted uracil nucleoside derivatives have been identified to have high sensitivity and selective accumulation in HSV1-TK expression cell. This producer has been used hydrodynamic-based produce, we investigated to image of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene with (E

  19. Cell surface expression of single chain antibodies with applications to imaging of gene expression in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, Jeffrey P.; Bednarski, Mark; Li, King C.; Barbieri, Susan O.; Lu, Amy T.; Nguyen, Dee; Varadarajan, John; Osen, Maureen; Star-Lack, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Imaging of gene expression in vivo has many potential uses for biomedical research and drug discovery, ranging from the study of gene regulation and cancer to the non-invasive assessment of gene therapies. To streamline the development of imaging marker gene technologies for nuclear medicine, we propose a new approach to the design of reporter/probe pairs wherein the reporter is a cell surface-expressed single chain antibody variable fragment that has been raised against a low molecular weight imaging probe with optimized pharmacokinetic properties. Proof of concept of the approach was achieved using a single chain antibody variable fragment that binds with high affinity to fluorescein and an imaging probe consisting of fluorescein isothiocyanate coupled to the chelator diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid labeled with the gamma-emitter 111 In. We demonstrate specific high-affinity binding of this probe to the cell surface-expressed reporter in vitro and assess the in vivo biodistribution of the probe both in wild-type mice and in mice harboring tumor xenografts expressing the reporter. Specific uptake of the probe by, and in vivo imaging of, tumors expressing the reporter are shown. Since ScFvs with high affinities can be raised to almost any protein or small molecule, the proposed methodology may offer a new flexibility in the design of imaging tracer/reporter pairs wherein both probe pharmacokinetics and binding affinities can be readily optimized. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  1. Localizing genes to cerebellar layers by classifying ISH images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Kirsch

    Full Text Available Gene expression controls how the brain develops and functions. Understanding control processes in the brain is particularly hard since they involve numerous types of neurons and glia, and very little is known about which genes are expressed in which cells and brain layers. Here we describe an approach to detect genes whose expression is primarily localized to a specific brain layer and apply it to the mouse cerebellum. We learn typical spatial patterns of expression from a few markers that are known to be localized to specific layers, and use these patterns to predict localization for new genes. We analyze images of in-situ hybridization (ISH experiments, which we represent using histograms of local binary patterns (LBP and train image classifiers and gene classifiers for four layers of the cerebellum: the Purkinje, granular, molecular and white matter layer. On held-out data, the layer classifiers achieve accuracy above 94% (AUC by representing each image at multiple scales and by combining multiple image scores into a single gene-level decision. When applied to the full mouse genome, the classifiers predict specific layer localization for hundreds of new genes in the Purkinje and granular layers. Many genes localized to the Purkinje layer are likely to be expressed in astrocytes, and many others are involved in lipid metabolism, possibly due to the unusual size of Purkinje cells.

  2. In Vivo Imaging of mdrla Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Synold, Timothy W

    2005-01-01

    .... With the advent of new bioimaging technology and the advancement of efficient gene targeting strategies, they found an opportunity to apply these state-of-the-art molecular tools to their problem...

  3. Image Makers: Reporters or Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruzzello, Marion C.

    To explore how news sources are used by media to create a social image of women during key suffrage events of 1858, 1920, and 1970, the front page stories of the "New York Times" were reviewed for 1 week prior to and 1 week following each of these events: May 14, 1858, the Eighth National Women's Rights Convention in New York City;…

  4. Intelligent image retrieval based on radiology reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstmair, Axel; Langer, Mathias; Kotter, Elmar [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Daumke, Philipp; Simon, Kai [Averbis GmbH, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To create an advanced image retrieval and data-mining system based on in-house radiology reports. Radiology reports are semantically analysed using natural language processing (NLP) techniques and stored in a state-of-the-art search engine. Images referenced by sequence and image number in the reports are retrieved from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and stored for later viewing. A web-based front end is used as an interface to query for images and show the results with the retrieved images and report text. Using a comprehensive radiological lexicon for the underlying terminology, the search algorithm also finds results for synonyms, abbreviations and related topics. The test set was 108 manually annotated reports analysed by different system configurations. Best results were achieved using full syntactic and semantic analysis with a precision of 0.929 and recall of 0.952. Operating successfully since October 2010, 258,824 reports have been indexed and a total of 405,146 preview images are stored in the database. Data-mining and NLP techniques provide quick access to a vast repository of images and radiology reports with both high precision and recall values. Consequently, the system has become a valuable tool in daily clinical routine, education and research. (orig.)

  5. Intelligent image retrieval based on radiology reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstmair, Axel; Langer, Mathias; Kotter, Elmar; Daumke, Philipp; Simon, Kai

    2012-01-01

    To create an advanced image retrieval and data-mining system based on in-house radiology reports. Radiology reports are semantically analysed using natural language processing (NLP) techniques and stored in a state-of-the-art search engine. Images referenced by sequence and image number in the reports are retrieved from the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and stored for later viewing. A web-based front end is used as an interface to query for images and show the results with the retrieved images and report text. Using a comprehensive radiological lexicon for the underlying terminology, the search algorithm also finds results for synonyms, abbreviations and related topics. The test set was 108 manually annotated reports analysed by different system configurations. Best results were achieved using full syntactic and semantic analysis with a precision of 0.929 and recall of 0.952. Operating successfully since October 2010, 258,824 reports have been indexed and a total of 405,146 preview images are stored in the database. Data-mining and NLP techniques provide quick access to a vast repository of images and radiology reports with both high precision and recall values. Consequently, the system has become a valuable tool in daily clinical routine, education and research. (orig.)

  6. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and ''phenotyping'' of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy's experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of

  7. Reporter gene bioassays in environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, S; Belkin, S; Schmid, R D

    2000-01-01

    In parallel to the continuous development of increasingly more sophisticated physical and chemical analytical technologies for the detection of environmental pollutants, there is a progressively more urgent need also for bioassays which report not only on the presence of a chemical but also on its bioavailability and its biological effects. As a partial fulfillment of that need, there has been a rapid development of biosensors based on genetically engineered bacteria. Such microorganisms typically combine a promoter-operator, which acts as the sensing element, with reporter gene(s) coding for easily detectable proteins. These sensors have the ability to detect global parameters such as stress conditions, toxicity or DNA-damaging agents as well as specific organic and inorganic compounds. The systems described in this review, designed to detect different groups of target chemicals, vary greatly in their detection limits, specificity, response times and more. These variations reflect on their potential applicability which, for most of the constructs described, is presently rather limited. Nevertheless, present trends promise that additional improvements will make microbial biosensors an important tool for future environmental analysis.

  8. Breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS): Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardivon, Anne A.; Athanasiou, Alexandra; Thibault, Fabienne; El Khoury, Carl

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the technical aspects and interpretation criteria in breast MR imaging based on the first edition of breast imaging and reporting data system (BIRADS) published by the American College of Radiology (ACR) in 2003. In a second article, practical cases will be proposed for training the readers. The major aims of using this lexicon are: first to use a logical and standardized description of MR lesions, secondly to obtain a structured MR report with a clear final impression (BIRADS assessment categories), and thirdly to help comparison between different clinical studies based on similar breast MRI terminology

  9. Gene transfer strategies for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, B.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J.; Zinn, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilization of molecular biology techniques offers attractive options in nuclear medicine for improving cancer imaging and therapy with radiolabeled peptides. Two of these options include utilization of phage-panning to identify novel tumor specific peptides or single chain antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the antibodies and gene transfer techniques to increase the number of antigen/receptor sites expressed on malignant cells. The group has focused on the latter approach for improving radiolabeled peptide imaging and therapy. The most widely used gene transfer vectors in clinical gene therapy trials include retrovirus, cationic lipids and adenovirus. It has been utilized adenovirus vectors for gene transfer because of their ability to accomplish efficient in vivo gene transfer. Adenovirus vectors encoding the genes for a variety of antigens/receptors (carcinoembryonic antigen, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTr2) have all shown that their expression is increased on cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo following adenovirus infection. Of particular interest has been the adenovirus encoding for SSTr2 (AdCMVSSTr2). Various radioisotopes have been attached to somatostatin analogues for imaging and therapy of SSTr2-positive tumors both clinically and in animal models. The use of these analogues in combination with AdCMVSSTr2 is a promising approach for improving the detection sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of these radiolabeled peptides against solid tumors. In addition, it has been proposed the use of SSTr2 as a marker for imaging the expression of another cancer therapeutic transgene (e.g. cytosine deaminase, thymidine kinase) encoded within the same vector. This would allow for non-invasive monitoring of gene delivery to tumor sites

  10. Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Multidrug Resistance. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwnica-Worms, David

    2009-01-01

    One focus area of DOE Office of Science was the Imaging of Gene Expression in Health and Disease in real time in tissue culture, whole animals and ultimately patients. Investigators of the Molecular Imaging Group, Washington University Medical School, ascribed to this objective and a major focus of this group directly tied into the DOE program through their efforts targeting the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1). Our plans for continuation of the program were to extend and build on this line of investigation, incorporating new molecular tools into our methodology to selectively inhibit MDR1 gene expression with novel modulation strategies. Two approaches were to be pursued: (1) high throughput screening of compounds that disrupted mutant p53 transactivation of the MDR1 promoter, and (2) knockdown of MDR1 messenger RNA with retroviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA constructs. These would be combined with our continuing effort to synthesize ligands and examine structure-activity relationships of bis-salicylaldehydes labeled with gallium-68 to generate PET agents for imaging MDR1 P-glycoprotein function. We would be uniquely positioned to correlate therapeutic modulation of MDR1 gene expression and protein function in the same systems in vivo using PET and bioluminescence reporters. Use of animal models such as the mdr1a/1b(-/-) gene deleted mice would also have enabled refined analysis of modulation and tracer pharmacokinetics in vivo. Overall, this DOE program and resultant tools would enable direct monitoring of novel therapeutic strategies and the MDR phenotype in relation to gene expression and protein function in vivo.

  11. Developmentally regulated expression of reporter gene in adult ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pression of reporter gene in adult brain specific GAL4 enhancer traps of. Drosophila ... genes based on their expression pattern, thus enabling us to overcome the ... order association and storage centres of olfactory learning and memory, and ...

  12. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States); Hagen, Stephen J., E-mail: sjhagen@ufl.edu [Physics Department, University of Florida, P.O. Box 118440, Gainesville, FL 32611-8440 (United States)

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  13. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We present a method for extracting gene expression data from images of bacterial cells. ► The method does not employ cell segmentation and does not require high magnification. ► Fluorescence and phase contrast images of the cells are correlated through the physics of phase contrast. ► We demonstrate the method by characterizing noisy expression of comX in Streptococcus mutans. -- Abstract: Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly.

  14. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression.

  15. Biological Education of IVFRU and FIAU for HSV1-TK Reporter Gene Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Jong Chan; Choi, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2006-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus Type1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) system is a useful gene therapy monitoring method. HSV1-TK is one of the most widely used effector gene systems used for imaging gene expression, in association with its use as a reporter gene. It has resulted the development of a number of radiolabeled HSV1-TK substrates for the non-invasive detection of HSV1-TK expression. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. Prodrug activation or sucide gene therapy has been shown to be successful in potentiating the therapeutic index by sensitizing genetically modified tumor cells to various prodrugs or enhancing the action of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. The most studied prodrug activation approaches involve transfection of tumors with HSV1-TK gene. (Z)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro- 2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) possesses a 2'-fluoro substituent in the ribose configuration, is considered to protect IVFRU from enzyme mediated degradation in vivo. It is obviously potential substrates for HSV1-TK imaging. 2'-Fiuoro-2'-deoxy-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl- 5-iodo-uridine (FIAU), an anticancer drug widely used in clinical practice, is an analogue of thymidine. In a series of studies using adenovirus vector for gene transfer described the appropriate combination of exogenously introduced HSV1-TK as a 'marker/reporter gene' and radiolabelled FIAU as a 'marker substrate/reporter probe' for monitoring gene therapy and gene expression

  16. Small space object imaging : LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Valley, Michael T.; Kearney, Sean Patrick

    2009-10-01

    We report the results of an LDRD effort to investigate new technologies for the identification of small-sized (mm to cm) debris in low-earth orbit. This small-yet-energetic debris presents a threat to the integrity of space-assets worldwide and represents significant security challenge to the international community. We present a nonexhaustive review of recent US and Russian efforts to meet the challenges of debris identification and removal and then provide a detailed description of joint US-Russian plans for sensitive, laser-based imaging of small debris at distances of hundreds of kilometers and relative velocities of several kilometers per second. Plans for the upcoming experimental testing of these imaging schemes are presented and a preliminary path toward system integration is identified.

  17. Imaging living central neurones using viral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschemacher, A G; Paton, J F R; Kasparov, S

    2005-01-02

    Studies of central neurones and other cellular components of the brain, such as glial and vascular cells, can be greatly advanced by the use of the modern optical techniques such as confocal live cell imaging. Fluorescent proteins have allowed imaging of particular cell types or intracellular elements to be visualised and distinguished from irrelevant background structures. To introduce the genetic information encoding for fluorescent proteins into relevant cellular targets, molecular tools are required. Viral vectors are one of the best ways of gene delivery into differentiated postnatal brain neurones and glia. Current progress in this field allows targeting of various cell types and therefore makes it possible to express a variety of fluorescent constructs in selected subpopulations of neurones, for example. In this review, we will discuss and compare the properties of the most popular viral gene delivery systems and the advantages of different brain cell preparations to illustrate how they can be used for high-resolution live cell confocal imaging in order to study new aspects of central nervous system (CNS) structure and function.

  18. Magnetosphere imager science definition team interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Johnson, C. L.

    1995-01-01

    For three decades, magnetospheric field and plasma measurements have been made by diverse instruments flown on spacecraft in may different orbits, widely separated in space and time, and under various solar and magnetospheric conditions. Scientists have used this information to piece together an intricate, yet incomplete view of the magnetosphere. A simultaneous global view, using various light wavelengths and energetic neutral atoms, could reveal exciting new data nd help explain complex magnetospheric processes, thus providing a clear picture of this region of space. This report documents the scientific rational for such a magnetospheric imaging mission and provides a mission concept for its implementation.

  19. In vivo PET imaging with 18F-FHBG of hepatoma cancer gene therapy using herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and ganciclovir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, TaeSup; Kim, JunYoup; Moon, ByungSeok; Kang, JooHyun; Song, Inho; Kwon, HeeChung; Kim, KyungMin; Cheon, GiJeong; Choi, ChangWoon; Lim, SangMoo

    2007-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo to evaluate the gene therapy efficacy is a critical issue for scientists and physicians. Non-invasive nuclear imaging can offer information regarding the level of gene expression and its location when an appropriate reporter gene is constructed in the therapeutic gene therapy. Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy by activating relatively nontoxic compounds, such as acyclovir or ganciclovir (GCV), to induce cell death. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of monitoring cancer gene therapy using retroviral vector transduced HSV1-tk and GCV, in vitro cellular uptake and in vivo animal studies, including biodistribution and small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, were performed in HSV1-tk and luciferase (Luc)-transduced MCA-TK/Luc and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-transduced MCA-eGFP hepatoma cell lines

  20. Cloning-free regulated monitoring of reporter and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demirkaya Omer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of the promoters, their regulatory elements, and their variations in the human genome remain unknown. Reporter gene technology for transcriptional activity is a widely used tool for the study of promoter structure, gene regulation, and signaling pathways. Construction of transcriptional reporter vectors, including use of cis-acting sequences, requires cloning and time-demanding manipulations, particularly with introduced mutations. Results In this report, we describe a cloning-free strategy to generate transcriptionally-controllable linear reporter constructs. This approach was applied in common transcriptional models of inflammatory response and the interferon system. In addition, it was used to delineate minimal transcriptional activity of selected ribosomal protein promoters. The approach was tested for conversion of genes into TetO-inducible/repressible expression cassettes. Conclusion The simple introduction and tuning of any transcriptional control in the linear DNA product renders promoter activation and regulated gene studies simple and versatile.

  1. GAL4 enhancer trap strains with reporter gene expression during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the development of adult brain in Drosophila melanogaster. C. R. VENKATESH ... vous system (CNS), at different time points during the pupal stage—a critical .... in frontal view, with further reduced reporter gene expression. Orthodenticle and ...

  2. Preparation and biological evaluation of 2-amino-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxy-methylbutyl) purine (6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV) as a novel PET probe for imaging HSV1-tk reporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Hancheng [Research Center of Radiopharmaceuticals, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yin Duanzhi [Research Center of Radiopharmaceuticals, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: chcbati@yahoo.com.cn; Zhang Lan [Research Center of Radiopharmaceuticals, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhejiang California International NanoSystems Institute, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Yang, Xiaofeng; Xu Xiaoyan; Liu Weiguo; Zheng Xuesheng [Institute of Brain Medical Science, Second affiliated Hospital, Medicine School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Zhang Hong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Medicine School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Wang Jing [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Medicine School of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Zhejiang California International NanoSystems Institute, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu Yuhong [Zhejiang California International NanoSystems Institute, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Cheng Dengfeng; Zheng Mingqiang; Han Yanjiang; Wu Mingxing; Wang Yongxian [Research Center of Radiopharmaceuticals, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2007-08-15

    Introduction: 2-Amino-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxy-methylbutyl) purine (6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV) was prepared via a one-step nucleophilic substitution and evaluated as a novel probe for imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene. Methods: Log P of 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV was calculated in octanol/phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Stability studies were performed in PBS and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Cell uptake was performed at various time points in wild-type cells and transduced cells. For in vivo studies, tumors were grown in nude mice by inoculation with C6 cells, wild type and tk positive. The radiotracer was intravenously injected to animals, and micro-PET imaging was performed. Biodistribution of 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV was performed on another group of animals at different time points. Results: Log P of 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV was -0.517. 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV was fairly stable in PBS and BSA at 6 h. The tracer uptake in C6-tk cells was 5.5-18.8 times higher than that in wild-type cells. The plasma half-life of 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV was as follows: {alpha} t{sub 1/2}=1.2 min and {beta} t{sub 1/2}=73.7 min. The average ratio of tumor uptake between the transduced tumor and the wild-type tumor was 1.69 at 15 min. Conclusion: Biological evaluation showed that 6-[{sup 18}F]FPCV is a potential probe for imaging HSV1-tk gene expression. However, its in vivo defluorination may limit its application in PET imaging of gene expression.

  3. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  4. Live imaging of muscles in Drosophila metamorphosis: Towards high-throughput gene identification and function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puah, Wee Choo; Wasser, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Time-lapse microscopy in developmental biology is an emerging tool for functional genomics. Phenotypic effects of gene perturbations can be studied non-invasively at multiple time points in chronological order. During metamorphosis of Drosophila melanogaster, time-lapse microscopy using fluorescent reporters allows visualization of alternative fates of larval muscles, which are a model for the study of genes related to muscle wasting. While doomed muscles enter hormone-induced programmed cell death, a smaller population of persistent muscles survives to adulthood and undergoes morphological remodeling that involves atrophy in early, and hypertrophy in late pupation. We developed a method that combines in vivo imaging, targeted gene perturbation and image analysis to identify and characterize genes involved in muscle development. Macrozoom microscopy helps to screen for interesting muscle phenotypes, while confocal microscopy in multiple locations over 4-5 days produces time-lapse images that are used to quantify changes in cell morphology. Performing a similar investigation using fixed pupal tissues would be too time-consuming and therefore impractical. We describe three applications of our pipeline. First, we show how quantitative microscopy can track and measure morphological changes of muscle throughout metamorphosis and analyze genes involved in atrophy. Second, our assay can help to identify genes that either promote or prevent histolysis of abdominal muscles. Third, we apply our approach to test new fluorescent proteins as live markers for muscle development. We describe mKO2 tagged Cysteine proteinase 1 (Cp1) and Troponin-I (TnI) as examples of proteins showing developmental changes in subcellular localization. Finally, we discuss strategies to improve throughput of our pipeline to permit genome-wide screens in the future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of gene expression levels in individual bacterial cells without image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, In Hae; Son, Minjun; Hagen, Stephen J

    2012-05-11

    Studies of stochasticity in gene expression typically make use of fluorescent protein reporters, which permit the measurement of expression levels within individual cells by fluorescence microscopy. Analysis of such microscopy images is almost invariably based on a segmentation algorithm, where the image of a cell or cluster is analyzed mathematically to delineate individual cell boundaries. However segmentation can be ineffective for studying bacterial cells or clusters, especially at lower magnification, where outlines of individual cells are poorly resolved. Here we demonstrate an alternative method for analyzing such images without segmentation. The method employs a comparison between the pixel brightness in phase contrast vs fluorescence microscopy images. By fitting the correlation between phase contrast and fluorescence intensity to a physical model, we obtain well-defined estimates for the different levels of gene expression that are present in the cell or cluster. The method reveals the boundaries of the individual cells, even if the source images lack the resolution to show these boundaries clearly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The pivotal role of multimodality reporter sensors in drug discovery: from cell based assays to real time molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Pritha

    2011-04-01

    Development and marketing of new drugs require stringent validation that are expensive and time consuming. Non-invasive multimodality molecular imaging using reporter genes holds great potential to expedite these processes at reduced cost. New generations of smarter molecular imaging strategies such as Split reporter, Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, Multimodality fusion reporter technologies will further assist to streamline and shorten the drug discovery and developmental process. This review illustrates the importance and potential of molecular imaging using multimodality reporter genes in drug development at preclinical phases.

  7. A report on digital image processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.; Alex, J.; Haridasan, G.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents developments in software, connected with digital image processing and analysis in the Centre. In image processing, one resorts to either alteration of grey level values so as to enhance features in the image or resorts to transform domain operations for restoration or filtering. Typical transform domain operations like Karhunen-Loeve transforms are statistical in nature and are used for a good registration of images or template - matching. Image analysis procedures segment grey level images into images contained within selectable windows, for the purpose of estimating geometrical features in the image, like area, perimeter, projections etc. In short, in image processing both the input and output are images, whereas in image analyses, the input is an image whereas the output is a set of numbers and graphs. (author). 19 refs

  8. Dendrimer-Stabilized Gold Nanostars as a Multifunctional Theranostic Nanoplatform for CT Imaging, Photothermal Therapy, and Gene Silencing of Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ping; Chen, Jingwen; Hu, Yong; Li, Xin; Wang, Han; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2016-12-01

    Development of versatile nanomaterials combining diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities within one single nanoplatform is extremely important for tumor theranostics. In this work, the authors report the synthesis of a gold nanostar (Au NS)-based theranostic platform stabilized with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified amine-terminated generation 3 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers. The formed RGD-modified dendrimer-stabilized Au NSs (RGD-Au DSNSs) are used as a gene delivery vector to complex small interfering RNA (siRNA) for computed tomography (CT) imaging, thermal imaging, photothermal therapy (PTT), and gene therapy of tumors. The results show that the RGD-Au DSNSs are able to compact vascular endothelial growth factor siRNA and specifically deliver siRNA to cancer cells overexpressing α v β 3 integrin. Under near-infrared laser irradiation, the viability of cancer cells is only 20.2% after incubation with the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes, which is much lower than that of cells after single PTT or gene therapy treatment. Furthermore, in vivo results show that the RGD-Au DSNS/siRNA polyplexes enable tumor CT imaging, thermal imaging, PTT, and gene therapy after intratumoral injection. These results indicate that the developed multifunctional nanoconstruct is a promising platform for tumor imaging and combinational PTT and gene therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Meeting report--Imaging the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Violaine; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Poujol, Christel; Sagot, Isabelle; Saltel, Frédéric

    2015-11-01

    Every two years, the French Society for Cell Biology (SBCF) organises an international meeting called 'Imaging the Cell'. This year, the 8th edition was held on 24-26 June 2015 at University of Bordeaux Campus Victoire in the city of Bordeaux, France, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Over the course of three days, the meeting provided a forum for experts in different areas of cell imaging. Its unique approach was to combine conventional oral presentations during morning sessions with practical workshops at hosting institutes and the Bordeaux Imaging Center during the afternoons. The meeting, co-organised by Violaine Moreau and Frédéric Saltel (both INSERM U1053, Bordeaux, France), Christel Poujol and Fabrice Cordelières (both Bordeaux Imaging Center, Bordeaux, France) and Isabelle Sagot (Institut de Biochimie et Génétique Cellulaires, Bordeaux, France), brought together about 120 scientists including 16 outstanding speakers to discuss the latest advances in cell imaging. Thanks to recent progress in imaging technologies, cell biologists are now able to visualise, follow and manipulate cellular processes with unprecedented accuracy. The meeting sessions and workshops highlighted some of the most exciting developments in the field, with sessions dedicated to optogenetics, high-content screening, in vivo and live-cell imaging, correlative light and electron microscopy, as well as super-resolution imaging. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Reconstructing Dynamic Promoter Activity Profiles from Reporter Gene Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannan, Soumya; Sams, Thomas; Maury, Jérôme

    2018-01-01

    activity despite the fact that the observed output may be dynamic and is a number of steps away from the transcription process. In fact, some promoters that are often thought of as constitutive can show changes in activity when growth conditions change. For these reasons, we have developed a system......Accurate characterization of promoter activity is important when designing expression systems for systems biology and metabolic engineering applications. Promoters that respond to changes in the environment enable the dynamic control of gene expression without the necessity of inducer compounds......, for example. However, the dynamic nature of these processes poses challenges for estimating promoter activity. Most experimental approaches utilize reporter gene expression to estimate promoter activity. Typically the reporter gene encodes a fluorescent protein that is used to infer a constant promoter...

  11. Targeted molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. Edmund

    2003-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to visualize the cellular and molecular processes occurring in living tissues, and for the imaging of specific molecules in vivo, the development of reporter probes and dedicated imaging equipment is most important. Reporter genes can be used to monitor the delivery and magnitude of therapeutic gene transfer, and the time variation involved. Imaging technologies such as micro-PET, SPECT, MRI and CT, as well as optical imaging systems, are able to non-invasively detect, measure, and report the simultaneous expression of multiple meaningful genes. It is believed that recent advances in reporter probes, imaging technologies and gene transfer strategies will enhance the effectiveness of gene therapy trials

  12. Introduction of optical reporter gene into cancer and immune cells using lentiviral vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon; Le, Uyenchi N.; Moon, Sung Min; Heo, Young Jun; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2004-01-01

    For some applications such as gene therapy or reporter gene imaging, a gene has to be introduced into the organism of interest. Adenoviral vectors are capable of transducing both replicating and non-dividing cells. The adenoviral vectors do not integrate their DNA into host DNA, but do lead to an immune response. Lentiviruses belong to the retrovirus family and are capable of infecting both dividing and non-dividing cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is an example of a lentavirus. A disabled HIV virus has been developed and could be used for in vivo gene delivery. A portion of the viral genome which encodes for accessory proteins canbe deleted without affecting production of the vector and efficiency of infection. Lentiviral delivery into various rodent tissues shows sustained expression of the transgene of up to six months. Furthermore, there seems to be little or no immune response with these vectors. These lentiviral vectors hold significant promise for in vivo gene delivery. We constructed lentiviral vector encoding firefly luciferase (Fluc) and eGFP. Fluc-eGFP fusion gene was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pLentiM1.3 vector. Reporter gene (Fluc-eGFP) was designed to be driven by murine CMV promoter with enhanced efficacy of transgene expression as compared to human CMV promoter. We transfected pLenti1.3-Fluc into human cervix cancer cell line (HeLa) and murine T lymphocytes. We also constructed adenovirus encoding Fluc and transfected to HeLa and T cells. This LentiM1.3-Fluc was transfected into HeLa cells and murine T lymphocytes in vitro, showing consistent expression of eGFP under the fluorescence microscopy from the 2nd day of transfection. Firefly luciferase reporter gene was not expressed in immune cells when it is mediated by adenovirus. Lentivirus was validated as a useful vector for both immune and cancer cells

  13. In Vivo Imaging of Local Gene Expression Induced by Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Sandre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to demonstrate that colloidal dispersions of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran macromolecules placed in an alternating magnetic field can not only produce heat, but also that these particles could be used in vivo for local and noninvasive deposition of a thermal dose sufficient to trigger thermo-induced gene expression. Iron oxide nanoparticles were first characterized in vitro on a bio-inspired setup, and then they were assayed in vivo using a transgenic mouse strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersions were applied topically on the mouse skin or injected subcutaneously with Matrigel™ to generate so-called pseudotumors. Temperature was monitored continuously with a feedback loop to control the power of the magnetic field generator and to avoid overheating. Thermo-induced luciferase expression was followed by bioluminescence imaging 6 h after heating. We showed that dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle dispersions were able to induce in vivo mild hyperthermia compatible with thermo-induced gene expression in surrounding tissues and without impairing cell viability. These data open new therapeutic perspectives for using mild magnetic hyperthermia as noninvasive modulation of tumor microenvironment by local thermo-induced gene expression or drug release.

  14. Imaging of gene expression in live pancreatic islet cell lines using dual-isotope SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joo Ho; Nguyen, Binh; Wells, R Glenn; Kovacs, Michael S; McGirr, Rebecca; Prato, Frank S; Morgan, Timothy G; Dhanvantari, Savita

    2008-01-01

    We are combining nuclear medicine with molecular biology to establish a sensitive, quantitative, and tomographic method with which to detect gene expression in pancreatic islet cells in vivo. Dual-isotope SPECT can be used to image multiple molecular events simultaneously, and coregistration of SPECT and CT images enables visualization of reporter gene expression in the correct anatomic context. We have engineered pancreatic islet cell lines for imaging with SPECT/CT after transplantation under the kidney capsule. INS-1 832/13 and alphaTC1-6 cells were stably transfected with a herpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase-green fluorescent protein (HSV1-thymidine kinase-GFP) fusion construct (tkgfp). After clonal selection, radiolabel uptake was determined by incubation with 5-(131)I-iodo-1-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl)uracil ((131)I-FIAU) (alphaTC1-6 cells) or (123)I-FIAU (INS-1 832/13 cells). For the first set of in vivo experiments, SPECT was conducted after alphaTC1-6/tkgfp cells had been labeled with either (131)I-FIAU or (111)In-tropolone and transplanted under the left kidney capsule of CD1 mice. Reconstructed SPECT images were coregistered to CT. In a second study using simultaneous acquisition dual-isotope SPECT, INS-1 832/13 clone 9 cells were labeled with (111)In-tropolone before transplantation. Mice were then systemically administered (123)I-FIAU and data for both (131)I and (111)In were acquired simultaneously. alphaTC1-6/tkgfp cells showed a 15-fold greater uptake of (131)I-FIAU, and INS-1/tkgfp cells showed a 12-fold greater uptake of (123)I-FIAU, compared with that of wild-type cells. After transplantation under the kidney capsule, both reporter gene expression and location of cells could be visualized in vivo with dual-isotope SPECT. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of glucagon- and insulin-positive cells at the site of transplantation. Dual-isotope SPECT is a promising method to detect gene expression in and location of

  15. The development of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jinhua

    2006-01-01

    Suicide gene treatment of tumor catches more and more attention in recent years. Cells transferred with suicide gene from virus or bacteria will express specific enzymes and transform innocuous prodrugs into highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs. As a result, the cells will be killed. Radionuclide labeled probe can display the biologic characteristics of suicide gene in vivo. This article reviews the development of HSV-tk gene imaging. (authors)

  16. Report on the Marine Imaging Workshop 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timm Schoening

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine optical imaging has become a major assessment tool in science, policy and public understanding of our seas and oceans. Methodology in this field is developing rapidly, including hardware, software and the ways of their application. The aim of the Marine Imaging Workshop (MIW is to bring together academics, research scientists and engineers, as well as industrial partners to discuss these developments, along with applications, challenges and future directions. The first MIW was held in Southampton, UK in April 2014. The second MIW, held in Kiel, Germany, in 2017 involved more than 100 attendees, who shared the latest developments in marine imaging through a combination of traditional oral and poster presentations, interactive sessions and focused discussion sessions. This article summarises the topics addressed during the workshop, particularly the outcomes of these discussion sessions for future reference and to make the workshop results available to the open public.

  17. Establishment of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes: sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Won Jung; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun

    2007-01-01

    Dual reporter gene imaging has several advantages for more sophisticated molecular imaging studies such as gene therapy monitoring. Herein, we have constructed hepatoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and the functionalities of the genes were evaluated in vivo by nuclear and optical imaging. A pRetro-PN vector was constructed after separating NIS gene from pcDNA-NIS. RSV-EGFP-WPRE fragment separated from pLNRGW was cloned into pRetro-PN vector. The final vector expressing dual reporter genes was named pRetro-PNRGW. A human hepatoma (HepG2) cells were transfected by the retrovirus containing NIS and EGFP gene (HepG2-NE). Expression of NIS gene was confirmed by RT-PCR, radioiodine uptake and efflux studies. Expression of EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscope. The HepG2 and HepG2-NE cells were implanted in shoulder and hindlimb of nude mice, then fluorescence image, gamma camera image and I-124 microPET image were undertaken. The HepG2-NE cell was successfully constructed. RT-PCR showed NIS and EGFP mRNA expression. About 50% of cells showed fluorescence. The iodine uptake of NIS-expressed cells was about 9 times higher than control. In efflux study, T 1/2 of HepG2-NE cells was 9 min. HepG2-NE xenograft showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots and higher iodine-uptake compared to those of HepG2 xenograft. A hepatoma cell line expressing NIS and EGFP dual reporter genes was successfully constructed and could be used as a potential either by therapeutic gene or imaging reporter gene

  18. Ratiometric Gas Reporting: A Nondisruptive Approach To Monitor Gene Expression in Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Masiello, Caroline A; Del Valle, Ilenne; Gao, Xiaodong; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2018-03-16

    Fluorescent proteins are ubiquitous tools that are used to monitor the dynamic functions of natural and synthetic genetic circuits. However, these visual reporters can only be used in transparent settings, a limitation that complicates nondisruptive measurements of gene expression within many matrices, such as soils and sediments. We describe a new ratiometric gas reporting method for nondisruptively monitoring gene expression within hard-to-image environmental matrices. With this approach, C 2 H 4 is continuously synthesized by ethylene forming enzyme to provide information on viable cell number, and CH 3 Br is conditionally synthesized by placing a methyl halide transferase gene under the control of a conditional promoter. We show that ratiometric gas reporting enables the creation of Escherichia coli biosensors that report on acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducers used for quorum sensing by Gram-negative bacteria. Using these biosensors, we find that an agricultural soil decreases the bioavailable concentration of a long-chain AHL up to 100-fold. We also demonstrate that these biosensors can be used in soil to nondisruptively monitor AHLs synthesized by Rhizobium leguminosarum and degraded by Bacillus thuringiensis. Finally, we show that this new reporting approach can be used in Shewanella oneidensis, a bacterium that lives in sediments.

  19. Imaging the impact of genes on Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Vegt, J P M; van Nuenen, B F L; Bloem, B R

    2009-01-01

    by the discovery of mutations in single genes that can cause autosomal dominant (alpha-synuclein (SNCA)) and leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene) or recessive (Parkin, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), DJ-1, and ATP13A2 gene) forms of PD. Here, we review how structural and functional neuroimaging...... of individuals carrying a mutation in one of the PD genes has offered a unique avenue of research into the pathogenesis of PD. In symptomatic mutation carriers (i.e. those with overt disease), brain mapping can help to link the molecular pathogenesis of PD more directly with functional and structural changes...... monogenic forms of PD, common polymorphisms in genes that influence mono-aminergic signaling or synaptic plasticity may have modifying effects on distinct aspects of PD. We also discuss how functional and structural neuroimaging can be used to better characterize these genotype-phenotype correlations....

  20. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  1. Reconstructing Dynamic Promoter Activity Profiles from Reporter Gene Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Soumya; Sams, Thomas; Maury, Jérôme; Workman, Christopher T

    2018-03-16

    Accurate characterization of promoter activity is important when designing expression systems for systems biology and metabolic engineering applications. Promoters that respond to changes in the environment enable the dynamic control of gene expression without the necessity of inducer compounds, for example. However, the dynamic nature of these processes poses challenges for estimating promoter activity. Most experimental approaches utilize reporter gene expression to estimate promoter activity. Typically the reporter gene encodes a fluorescent protein that is used to infer a constant promoter activity despite the fact that the observed output may be dynamic and is a number of steps away from the transcription process. In fact, some promoters that are often thought of as constitutive can show changes in activity when growth conditions change. For these reasons, we have developed a system of ordinary differential equations for estimating dynamic promoter activity for promoters that change their activity in response to the environment that is robust to noise and changes in growth rate. Our approach, inference of dynamic promoter activity (PromAct), improves on existing methods by more accurately inferring known promoter activity profiles. This method is also capable of estimating the correct scale of promoter activity and can be applied to quantitative data sets to estimate quantitative rates.

  2. Culture and magnetic resonance image of magnetospirillum magneticum AMB1 for the application as a vector for multimodal image reporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae, Seong Ho; Vu, Nguyen H.; Jung, Young Yeon; Min, Jung Joon

    2007-01-01

    Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 synthesize uniform, nano-sized magnetite (Fe3O4) particles, which are referred to as bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs). BacMPs have potential for various technological applications and the molecular mechanism of their formation is of particular interest. In this study, we established the culture method for M. magneticum AMB-1 and analysed it's growth property and magnetic resonance image. Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 strain was obtained from ATCC and inoculated in Magnetospirillum growth medium (MSGM). M. magneticum was cultured at 26? with 60 rpm shaking and check the optical density (OD) in 600 nm every 6 hours. Cultured M. magneticum that reached to stataionary phase was collected by centrifugation and suspend in PBS. MR image was taken by 1.5T MRI machine. The growth of M. magneticum was reached up to 0.2 OD600 at 80 hours after inoculation. The bacterial suspension was made the concentration 2 X 10-11 CFU/ml and successfully taken MR image using by 1.5T MRI machine. M. magneticum AMB strain was successfully cultured in our laboratory condition and was shown intensive MR image. Now we can use this bacteria as a multimodal image vector if the M. magneticum is transformed with an bioluminescent or fluorescent reporter gene. Further study about the development of M. magneticum strain as a multimodal image is needed

  3. Gemini Planet Imager: Preliminary Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macintosh, B

    2007-05-10

    For the first time in history, direct and indirect detection techniques have enabled the exploration of the environments of nearby stars on scales comparable to the size of our solar system. Precision Doppler measurements have led to the discovery of the first extrasolar planets, while high-contrast imaging has revealed new classes of objects including dusty circumstellar debris disks and brown dwarfs. The ability to recover spectrophotometry for a handful of transiting exoplanets through secondary-eclipse measurements has allowed us to begin to study exoplanets as individual entities rather than points on a mass/semi-major-axis diagram and led to new models of planetary atmospheres and interiors, even though such measurements are only available at low SNR and for a handful of planets that are automatically those most modified by their parent star. These discoveries have galvanized public interest in science and technology and have led to profound new insights into the formation and evolution of planetary systems, and they have set the stage for the next steps--direct detection and characterization of extrasolar Jovian planets with instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). As discussed in Volume 1, the ability to directly detect Jovian planets opens up new regions of extrasolar planet phase space that in turn will inform our understanding of the processes through which these systems form, while near-IR spectra will advance our understanding of planetary physics. Studies of circumstellar debris disks using GPI's polarimetric mode will trace the presence of otherwise-invisible low-mass planets and measure the build-up and destruction of planetesimals. To accomplish the science mission of GPI will require a dedicated instrument capable of achieving contrast of 10{sup -7} or more. This is vastly better than that delivered by existing astronomical AO systems. Currently achievable contrast, about 10{sup -5} at separations of 1 arc second or larger, is

  4. Use of reporter-gene based bacteria to quantify phenanthrene biodegradation and toxicity in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Doyun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanakno 599, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hee Sun [School of Earth and Environmental Science, Seoul National University, Gwanakno 599, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lin, Chu-Ching; Barkay, Tamar [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Rutgers University, 76 Lipman Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States); Nam, Kyoungphile, E-mail: kpnam@snu.ac.k [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanakno 599, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    A phenanthrene-degrading bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505 was used to construct two fluorescence-based reporter strains. Strain D harboring gfp gene was constructed to generate green fluorescence when the strain started to biodegrade phenanthrene. Strain S possessing gef gene was designed to die once phenanthrene biodegradation was initiated and thus to lose green fluorescence when visualized by a live/dead cell staining. Confocal laser scanning microscopic observation followed by image analysis demonstrates that the fluorescence intensity generated by strain D increased and the intensity by strain S decreased linearly at the phenanthrene concentration of up to 200 mg/L. Such quantitative increase and decrease of fluorescence intensity in strain D (i.e., from 1 to 11.90 {+-} 0.72) and strain S (from 1 to 0.40 {+-} 0.07) were also evident in the presence of Ottawa sand spiked with the phenanthrene up to 1000 mg/kg. The potential use of the reporter strains in quantitatively determining biodegradable or toxic phenanthrene was discussed. - Research highlights: A novel reporter bacterial strain has been developed. The bacterium can quantitatively determine the change in fluorescence intensity. The intensity can represent the bioavailable phenanthrene in solid matrix. - A cell-killing gene harboring reporter bacterium shows phenanthrene toxicity.

  5. A Novel Reporting System to Improve Accuracy in Appendicitis Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Benjamin D.; Drake, Frederick T.; Simianu, Vlad V.; Shriki, Jabi E.; Hippe, Daniel S.; Dighe, Manjiri; Bastawrous, Sarah; Cuevas, Carlos; Flum, David; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to ascertain if standardized radiologic reporting for appendicitis imaging increases diagnostic accuracy. MATERIALS AND METHODS We developed a standardized appendicitis reporting system that includes objective imaging findings common in appendicitis and a certainty score ranging from 1 (definitely not appendicitis) through 5 (definitely appendicitis). Four radiologists retrospectively reviewed the preoperative CT scans of 96 appendectomy patients using our reporting system. The presence of appendicitis-specific imaging findings and certainty scores were compared with final pathology. These comparisons were summarized using odds ratios (ORs) and the AUC. RESULTS The appendix was visualized on CT in 89 patients, of whom 71 (80%) had pathologically proven appendicitis. Imaging findings associated with appendicitis included appendiceal diameter (odds ratio [OR] = 14 [> 10 vs appendicitis. In this initially indeterminate group, using the standardized reporting system, radiologists assigned higher certainty scores (4 or 5) in 21 of the 28 patients with appendicitis (75%) and lower scores (1 or 2) in five of the seven patients without appendicitis (71%) (AUC = 0.90; p = 0.001). CONCLUSION Standardized reporting and grading of objective imaging findings correlated well with postoperative pathology and may decrease the number of CT findings reported as indeterminate for appendicitis. Prospective evaluation of this reporting system on a cohort of patients with clinically suspected appendicitis is currently under way. PMID:26001230

  6. Optimage central organised image quality control including statistics and reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, A.; Schilz, C.; Shannoun, F.; Schreiner, A.; Hermen, J.; Moll, C.

    2008-01-01

    Quality control of medical imaging systems is performed using dedicated phantoms. As the imaging systems are more and more digital, adequate image processing methods might help to save evaluation time and to receive objective results. The developed software package OPTIMAGE is focusing on this with a central approach: On one hand, OPTIMAGE provides a framework, which includes functions like database integration, DICOM data sources, multilingual user interface and image processing functionality. On the other hand, the test methods are implemented using modules which are able to process the images automatically for the common imaging systems. The integration of statistics and reporting into this environment is paramount: This is the only way to provide these functions in an interactive, user-friendly way. These features enable the users to discover degradation in performance quickly and document performed measurements easily. (authors)

  7. Muscular cysticercosis: Case report and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo, Neide Regina Simoes; Fiorio, Ulysses Ferreira; Clemente, Marcel Andreazza, E-mail: neideolmo@yahoo.com.br [Clinica Mult Imagem, Santos, SP (Brazil); Bastos, Eder Amaral [Universidade Metropolitana de Santos (UNIMES), Santos, SP (Brazil); Mendes, Gustavo Gomes [AC Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-11-15

    Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by a worm of the Cestoda class. The most prevalent form affects the nervous system. This case report is from a 78-year old female patient evaluated at Clinica Mult Imagem, in the city of Santos, Brazil, who presented a form of the disease that differed from the classic neurocysticercosis, in this case muscular cysticercosis. This and other forms of manifestation justify further studies to ensure adequate recognition, diagnosis and treatment of this parasitic disease. (author)

  8. Image understanding architecture: a status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Charles C.

    1995-01-01

    The image understanding architecture (IUA) effort is now entering a new phase. The second generation IUA prototypes are nearing completion and our experience with the hardware, extensive software simulations, and additional research are guiding the development of a new generation of the IUA. Furthermore, the primary contractors have been selected for a technology reinvestment project (TRP) award to develop a commercial, off-the-shelf implementation of the new IUA for dual-use embedded applications. Thus, the IUA effort is in the process of making the transition from a research and development project to being a commercially available vision accelerator. IUA development is currently taking place at three sites (Hughes Research Laboratories in Malibu, Calif., Amerinex Artificial Intelligence Inc., and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst). This TRP consortium plans to form a new company to take over all aspects of IUA development and production. This article summarizes the previous efforts, describes the current status of the effort, expands briefly upon some of the basic research that is supporting the next generation IUA, and concludes with a section describing the efforts that will be undertaken in developing the next generation.

  9. Confocal quantification of cis-regulatory reporter gene expression in living sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Sagar; Hanser, Bridget; Davidson, Eric H; Fraser, Scott E

    2006-11-15

    Quantification of GFP reporter gene expression at single cell level in living sea urchin embryos can now be accomplished by a new method of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Eggs injected with a tissue-specific GFP reporter DNA construct were grown to gastrula stage and their fluorescence recorded as a series of contiguous Z-section slices that spanned the entire embryo. To measure the depth-dependent signal decay seen in the successive slices of an image stack, the eggs were coinjected with a freely diffusible internal fluorescent standard, rhodamine dextran. The measured rhodamine fluorescence was used to generate a computational correction for the depth-dependent loss of GFP fluorescence per slice. The intensity of GFP fluorescence was converted to the number of GFP molecules using a conversion constant derived from CLSM imaging of eggs injected with a measured quantity of GFP protein. The outcome is a validated method for accurately counting GFP molecules in given cells in reporter gene transfer experiments, as we demonstrate by use of an expression construct expressed exclusively in skeletogenic cells.

  10. Muscular cysticercosis: Case report and imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neide Regina Simões Olmo

    Full Text Available Summary Cysticercosis is a parasitic disease caused by a worm of the Cestoda class. The most prevalent form affects the nervous system. This case report is from a 78-year-old female patient evaluated at Clínica Mult Imagem, in the city of Santos, Brazil, who presented a form of the disease that differed from the classic neurocysticercosis, in this case muscular cysticercosis. This and other forms of manifestation justify further studies to ensure adequate recognition, diagnosis and treatment of this parasitic disease.

  11. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, You La; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Choi, Chang Ik; Lee, Sang Woo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring.

  12. Imaging Diagnosis of Neonatal Anemia: Report of Two Unusual Etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Bhandari Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia in neonatal period is rare, with the common causes being Rh and ABO blood group incompatibility, hemorrhagic disease of newborn, congenital hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinopathies, and TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes virus infections. Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis (OP are among the rare causes of neonatal anemia. A review of the literature shows approximately 200 reported cases of congenital leukemia. Articles describing the imaging features of congenital leukemia are still rarer. Infantile OP, another rare disorder with a reported incidence of 1 in 250,000 has characteristic imaging features, which are diagnostic of the disease. We report a case each, of two rare diseases: Congenital leukemia and infantile osteopetrosis. Additionally, our report highlights the radiological and imaging features of congenital leukemia and infantile OP and their crucial role in arriving at an early diagnosis.

  13. A Region-Based GeneSIS Segmentation Algorithm for the Classification of Remotely Sensed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios K. Mylonas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an object-based segmentation/classification scheme for remotely sensed images, based on a novel variant of the recently proposed Genetic Sequential Image Segmentation (GeneSIS algorithm. GeneSIS segments the image in an iterative manner, whereby at each iteration a single object is extracted via a genetic-based object extraction algorithm. Contrary to the previous pixel-based GeneSIS where the candidate objects to be extracted were evaluated through the fuzzy content of their included pixels, in the newly developed region-based GeneSIS algorithm, a watershed-driven fine segmentation map is initially obtained from the original image, which serves as the basis for the forthcoming GeneSIS segmentation. Furthermore, in order to enhance the spatial search capabilities, we introduce a more descriptive encoding scheme in the object extraction algorithm, where the structural search modules are represented by polygonal shapes. Our objectives in the new framework are posed as follows: enhance the flexibility of the algorithm in extracting more flexible object shapes, assure high level classification accuracies, and reduce the execution time of the segmentation, while at the same time preserving all the inherent attributes of the GeneSIS approach. Finally, exploiting the inherent attribute of GeneSIS to produce multiple segmentations, we also propose two segmentation fusion schemes that operate on the ensemble of segmentations generated by GeneSIS. Our approaches are tested on an urban and two agricultural images. The results show that region-based GeneSIS has considerably lower computational demands compared to the pixel-based one. Furthermore, the suggested methods achieve higher classification accuracies and good segmentation maps compared to a series of existing algorithms.

  14. MR imaging findings of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Park, Eui Dong; Kim, Hyung Jin; Ha, Choong Kun [College of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju(Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of massive spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by repeated lumbar punctures during spinal anesthesia in a 36-year-old man. The signal intensities of spinal SAH were similar to those of the conus medullaris on both T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Although spinal SAH is hardly recognized on MR, spinal SAH of sufficient amount may cause alteration of the cerebrospinal fluid signal.

  15. Congenital CMV Infection, An imaging perspective: A case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nikunj Patel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain imaging is most important tool for the accurate diagnosis of various congenital CNS infections. Infections of the foetal nervous system results in spectrum of findings that depends upon the inciting agent and the timing of infection. As a general rule earlier the infection, more severe are the findings. Congenital CMV infection can be diagnosed with accuracy with its specific features identified on brain imaging. We present a case of congenital CMV infection in an 8-months-old boy, its clinical presentation, imaging findings and laboratory reports. Specific literature review is included in order to point out major goals achieved in the diagnosis and prognosis of congenital CMV infection.

  16. Stepped frequency imaging for flaw monitoring: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of research into the usefulness of stepped frequency imaging (SFI) to nuclear power plant inspection. SFI is a method for producing ultrasonic holographic images without the need to sweep a two-dimensional aperture with the transducer. Instead, the transducer may be translated along a line. At each position of the transducer the frequency is stepped over a finite preselected bandwidth. The frequency stepped data is then processed to synthesize the second dimension. In this way it is possible to generate images in regions that are relatively inaccessible to two-dimensional scanners. This report reviews the theory and experimental work verifying the technique, and then explores its possible applications in the nuclear power industry. It also outlines how this new capability can be incorporated into the SDL-1000 Imaging System previously developed for EPRI. The report concludes with five suggestions for uses for the SFI method. These are: monitoring suspect or repaired regions of feedwater nozzles; monitoring pipe cracks repaired by weld overlay; monitoring crack depth during test block production; imaging flaws where access is difficult; and imaging flaws through cladding without distortion

  17. Images and society (or Images, Society and its Decoding Las imágenes y la sociedad (o las imágenes, la sociedad y su desciframiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Soto Ramírez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Common sense, the thinking of the people par excellence, asserts that: a picture is worth a thousand words. This is a big mistake. The images are not carriers of meanings. The images always go through three basic processes are: production, circulation and reception. These processes are always determined in the time and social space. They are always the result of multiple relationships (social, ideological, political, moral, religious, etc., established with them. Always there are so many elements beyond the image, which determines its meaning. The meaning of an image always depends on the relationships established with it in a historical time and space, socially and culturally determined. The images are never alone. To decrypt their meanings, you must first know the symbolic life of the societies in which they appear. Images do not have a single meaning because it depends on the historical and cultural geography which presents. The images always have a close relationship with the society they were born. The Muhammad cartoons not offend everyone equally.


    El sentido común, que es el pensamiento de las colectividades por excelencia, afirma que: una imagen dice más que mil palabras. Lo cual es un grave error. Las imágenes no son portadoras de significados. Las imágenes siempre atraviesan por tres procesos básicos que son: su producción, su circulación y su recepción. Estos procesos siempre están determinados en el tiempo y en el espacio sociales. Su significado siempre es el resultado de múltiples relaciones (sociales, ideológicas, políticas, morales, religiosas, etc., que se establecen con las mismas. Es decir, siempre existen elementos que están más allá de la imagen, que determinan su significado. La manera en cómo se significa una imagen, siempre depende de las relaciones que se establecen con ella en un tiempo histórico y en un espacio, social y culturalmente determinado. Las imágenes nunca están solas. Para

  18. Consultation system for image diagnosis: Report formation support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, M.; Sakuma, S.; Ishigaki, T.; Suzuki, K.; Oikawa, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed a consultation system for image diagnosis, involving artificial intelligence ideas. In this system, the authors proposed a new report formation support system and implemented it in lymphangiography. This support system starts with the input of image interpretation. The input process is made mainly by selecting items. This system encodes the input findings into the semantic network, which is represented as a directed graph, and it reserves them into the knowledge database in the above structure. Finally, the output (report) is made in the near natural language, which corresponds to the input findings

  19. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Shiaochin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. Results We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1 subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2 insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3 link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. Conclusion The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  20. A BAC-bacterial recombination method to generate physically linked multiple gene reporter DNA constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maye, Peter; Stover, Mary Louise; Liu, Yaling; Rowe, David W; Gong, Shiaochin; Lichtler, Alexander C

    2009-03-13

    Reporter gene mice are valuable animal models for biological research providing a gene expression readout that can contribute to cellular characterization within the context of a developmental process. With the advancement of bacterial recombination techniques to engineer reporter gene constructs from BAC genomic clones and the generation of optically distinguishable fluorescent protein reporter genes, there is an unprecedented capability to engineer more informative transgenic reporter mouse models relative to what has been traditionally available. We demonstrate here our first effort on the development of a three stage bacterial recombination strategy to physically link multiple genes together with their respective fluorescent protein (FP) reporters in one DNA fragment. This strategy uses bacterial recombination techniques to: (1) subclone genes of interest into BAC linking vectors, (2) insert desired reporter genes into respective genes and (3) link different gene-reporters together. As proof of concept, we have generated a single DNA fragment containing the genes Trap, Dmp1, and Ibsp driving the expression of ECFP, mCherry, and Topaz FP reporter genes, respectively. Using this DNA construct, we have successfully generated transgenic reporter mice that retain two to three gene readouts. The three stage methodology to link multiple genes with their respective fluorescent protein reporter works with reasonable efficiency. Moreover, gene linkage allows for their common chromosomal integration into a single locus. However, the testing of this multi-reporter DNA construct by transgenesis does suggest that the linkage of two different genes together, despite their large size, can still create a positional effect. We believe that gene choice, genomic DNA fragment size and the presence of endogenous insulator elements are critical variables.

  1. Using a web-based image quality assurance reporting system to improve image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuczman, Gregory J; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Alkasab, Tarik K; Huang, Ambrose J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the impact of a web-based image quality assurance reporting system on the rates of three common image quality errors at our institution. A web-based image quality assurance reporting system was developed and used beginning in April 2009. Image quality endpoints were assessed immediately before deployment (period 1), approximately 18 months after deployment of a prototype reporting system (period 2), and approximately 12 months after deployment of a subsequent upgraded department-wide reporting system (period 3). A total of 3067 axillary shoulder radiographs were reviewed for correct orientation, 355 shoulder CT scans were reviewed for correct reformatting of coronal and sagittal images, and 346 sacral MRI scans were reviewed for correct acquisition plane of axial images. Error rates for each review period were calculated and compared using the Fisher exact test. Error rates of axillary shoulder radiograph orientation were 35.9%, 7.2%, and 10.0%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rate between periods 1 and 2 was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Error rates of shoulder CT reformats were 9.8%, 2.7%, and 5.8%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rate between periods 1 and 2 was statistically significant (p = 0.03). Error rates for sacral MRI axial sequences were 96.5%, 32.5%, and 3.4%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rates between periods 1 and 2 and between periods 2 and 3 was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A web-based system for reporting image quality errors may be effective for improving image quality.

  2. Nuclear Imaging for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    thymidine kinase transfected EL4 cells . Further exploration of Tc-99m conjugated potential HSV1-TK substrates is still undergoing in our laboratory...prostate cancer cells , has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy for prostate cancer[10, 11]. Therefore, an adenovirus...BJ5183 together with pAdeasy-1, the viral DNA plasmid. The pAdeasy-1 is E1 and E3 deleted, its E1 function can be complemented in 293A cells . The

  3. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Serganova, Inna [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the {sup 124}I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 124}I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped {sup 124}I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of {sup 124}I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that {sup 124}I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future

  4. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Kaestle; Alexandra Winkeler; Raphaela Richter; Heinrich Sauer; Jürgen Hescheler; Cornel Fraefel; Maria Wartenberg; Andreas H. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fl...

  5. Fluoromodule-based reporter/probes designed for in vivo fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Chakraborty, Subhasish K.; Sampath, Padma; Rojas, Juan J.; Hou, Weizhou; Saurabh, Saumya; Thorne, Steve H.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical imaging of whole, living animals has proven to be a powerful tool in multiple areas of preclinical research and has allowed noninvasive monitoring of immune responses, tumor and pathogen growth, and treatment responses in longitudinal studies. However, fluorescence-based studies in animals are challenging because tissue absorbs and autofluoresces strongly in the visible light spectrum. These optical properties drive development and use of fluorescent labels that absorb and emit at longer wavelengths. Here, we present a far-red absorbing fluoromodule–based reporter/probe system and show that this system can be used for imaging in living mice. The probe we developed is a fluorogenic dye called SC1 that is dark in solution but highly fluorescent when bound to its cognate reporter, Mars1. The reporter/probe complex, or fluoromodule, produced peak emission near 730 nm. Mars1 was able to bind a variety of structurally similar probes that differ in color and membrane permeability. We demonstrated that a tool kit of multiple probes can be used to label extracellular and intracellular reporter–tagged receptor pools with 2 colors. Imaging studies may benefit from this far-red excited reporter/probe system, which features tight coupling between probe fluorescence and reporter binding and offers the option of using an expandable family of fluorogenic probes with a single reporter gene. PMID:26348895

  6. Small animal PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression with {sup 124}IVDU in liver by the hydrodynamic injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, I. H.; Lee, T. S.; Woo, S. G.; Jeong, J. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, K. M.; Chun, K. J.; Choi, C. W.; Lim, S. M. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The liver is an important target organ for gene transfer due to its capacity for synthesizing serum protein and its involvement in numerous genetic diseases. High level of foreign gene expression in liver can be achieved by a large-volume and high-speed intravenous injection of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA), so called hydrodynamic injection. This study is aimed to evaluate liver specific-gene expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase(HSV1-tk) by hydrodynamic injection and image HSV1-tk expression using {sup 124}IVDU-PET. We constructed herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk)-expressing pDNA (pHSV1-tk) modified from pEGFP-N1. Hydrodynamic injection was performed using 40 {mu}g of plasmid (pEGFP/N1 or pHSV1-tk) in 2 ml of 0.85% saline solution for 20{approx}22g mice in 5 seconds intravenously. At 1 d post-hydrodynamic injection, biodistribution study was performed at 2 h post-injection of radiolabeled IVDU, fluorescence image was obtained using optical imager and small animal PET image was acquired with {sup 124}IVDU at 2 h post-injection. After PET imaging, digital whole body autoradiography (DWBA) was performed. Expression of HSV1-tk and EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR in each liver tissue. In liver of pHSV1-tk and pEGFP/N1 injection groups, {sup 123}IVDU uptake was 5.65%ID/g and 0.98%ID/g, respectively. {sup 123}IVDU uptake in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group showed 5.7-fold higher than that of pEGFP/N1 injection group (p<0.01). On the other hand, the liver of pEGFP/N1 injection group showed fluorescence activity. In small animal PET images, {sup 124}IVDU uptake was selectively localized in liver of pHSV1-tk injection group and also checked in DWBA, but showed minimal uptake in liver of pEGFP/N1 injection mice. Hydrodynamic injection was effective to liver-specific delivery of plasmid DNA. Small animal PET image of {sup 124}IVDU could be used in the evaluation of noninvasive reporter gene imaging in liver.

  7. Ultrasound and MR imaging findings of vulvar leiomyoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee; Woo, Seong Ku; Kim, Sang Pyu

    2002-01-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign neoplasms that can occur at any anatomical site containing smooth muscle, though most originate in the female genital tract. Leiomyomas of the vulval perineum are, however, very rare. We report the ultrasonographic (US) and MR imagings of a vulvar leiomyoma, and briefly review the literature

  8. Ultrasound and MR imaging findings of vulvar leiomyoma: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee; Woo, Seong Ku; Kim, Sang Pyu [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-11-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign neoplasms that can occur at any anatomical site containing smooth muscle, though most originate in the female genital tract. Leiomyomas of the vulval perineum are, however, very rare. We report the ultrasonographic (US) and MR imagings of a vulvar leiomyoma, and briefly review the literature.

  9. Clone and expression of human transferrin receptor gene: a marker gene for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Liu Lizhi; Lv Yanchun; Liu Xuewen; Cui Chunyan; Wu Peihong; Liu Qicai; Ou Shanxing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To clone human transferrin receptor (hTfR) gene and construct expression vector producing recombination protein. Methods: Human transferrin receptor gene cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR from human embryonic liver and lung tissue. Recombinant pcDNA3-hTfR and pEGFP-Cl-hTfR plasmids were constructed and confirmed by DNA sequencing. These plasmids were stably transfected into the HEK293 cells. The protein expression in vitro was confirmed by Western Blot. The efficiency of expression and the location of hTfR were also investigated by fluorescence microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Results: The full length cDNA of hTfR gene (2332 bp) was cloned and sequenced. The hTfR (190 000) was overexpressed in transfected HEK293 cells by Western blot analysis. Fluorescence micrographs displayed that the hTfR was expressed at high level and located predominantly in the cell surface. Conclusions: Human transferrin receptor (hTfR) gene has been successfully cloned and obtained high-level expression in HEK293 cells, and the recombination protein of hTfR distributed predominantly in the cell membrane. (authors)

  10. Designer genes. Recombinant antibody fragments for biological imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A.M.; Yazaki, P.J. [Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology

    2000-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), with high specificity and high affinity for their target antigens, can be utilized for delivery of agents such as radionuclides, enzymes, drugs or toxins in vivo. However, the implementation of radiolabeled antibodies as magic bullets for detection and treatment of diseases such as cancer has required addressing several shortcomings of murine MAbs. These include their immunogenicity, sub-optimal targeting and pharmacokinetic properties, and practical issues of production and radiolabeling. Genetic engineering provides a powerful approach for redesigning antibodies for use in oncologic applications in vivo. Recombinant fragments have been produced that retain high affinity for target antigens, and display a combination of rapid, high-level tumor targeting with concomitant clearance from normal tissues and the circulation in animal models. An important first step was cloning and engineering of antibody heavy and light chain variable domains into single-chain Fvs (molecular weight, 25-17 kDa), in which the variable regions are joined via a synthetic linker peptide sequence. Although scFvs themselves showed limited tumor uptake in preclinical and clinical studies, they provide a useful building block for intermediate sized recombinant fragments. Covalently linked dimers or non-covalent dimers of scFvs (also known as diabodies) show improved targeting and clearance properties due to their higher molecular weight (55kDa) and increased avidity. Further gains can be made by generation of larger recombinant fragments, such as the minibody, an scFv-C{sub H}3 fusion protein that self-assembles into a bivalent dimer of 80 kDa. A systematic evaluation of scFv, diabody, minibody, and intact antibody (based on comparison of tumor uptakes, tumor: blood activity ratios, and calculation of an Imaging Figure of Merit) can form the basis for selection of combinations of recombinant fragments and radionuclides for imaging applications. Ease of engineering

  11. Designer genes. Recombinant antibody fragments for biological imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, A.M.; Yazaki, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), with high specificy and high affinity for their target antigens, can be utilized for delivery of agents such as radionuclides, enzymes, drugs or toxins in vivo. However, the implementation of radiolabeled antibodies as magic bullets for detection and treatment of diseases such as cancer has required addressing several shortcomings of murine MAbs. These include their immunogenicity, sub-optimal targeting and pharmacokinetic properties, and practical issues of production and radiolabeling. Genetic engineering provides a powerful approach for redesigning antibodies for use in oncologic applications in vivo. Recombinant fragments have been produced that retain high affinity for target antigens, and display a combination of rapid, high-level tumor targeting with concomitant clearance from normal tissues and the circulation in animal models. An important first step was cloning and engineering of antibody heavy and light chain variable domains into single-chain Fvs (molecular weight, 25-17 kDa), in which the variable regions are joined via a synthetic linker peptide sequence. Although scFvs themselves showed limited tumor uptake in preclinical and clinical studies, they provide a useful building block for intermediate sized recombinant fragments. Covalently linked dimers or non-covalent dimers of scFvs (also known as diabodies) show improved targeting and clearance properties due to their higher molecular weight (55kDa) and increased avidity. Further gains can be made by generation of larger recombinant fragments, such as the minibody, an scFv-C H 3 fusion protein that self-assembles into a bivalent dimer of 80 kDa. A systematic evaluation of scFv, diabody, minibody, and intact antibody (based on comparison of tumor uptakes, tumor: blood activity ratios, and calculation of an Imaging Figure of Merit) can form the basis for selection of combinations of recombinant fragments and radionuclides for imaging applications. Ease of engineering and

  12. Developing standard transmission system for radiology reporting including key images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Chil

    2007-01-01

    Development of hospital information system and Picture Archiving Communication System is not new in the medical field, and the development of internet and information technology are also universal. In the course of such development, however, it is hard to share medical information without a refined standard format. Especially in the department of radiology, the role of PACS has become very important in interchanging information with other disparate hospital information systems. A specific system needs to be developed that radiological reports are archived into a database efficiently. This includes sharing of medical images. A model is suggested in this study in which an internal system is developed where radiologists store necessary images and transmit them is the standard international clinical format, Clinical Document Architecture, and share the information with hospitals. CDA document generator was made to generate a new file format and separate the existing storage system from the new system. This was to ensure the access to required data in XML documents. The model presented in this study added a process where crucial images in reading are inserted in the CDA radiological report generator. Therefore, this study suggests a storage and transmission model for CDA documents, which is different from the existing DICOM SR. Radiological reports could be better shared, when the application function for inserting images and the analysis of standard clinical terms are completed

  13. Imaging of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Thymidine Kinase Gene Expression with Radiolabeled 5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU) in Liver by Hydrodynamic-based Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, In Ho; Lee, Tae Sup; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; An, Gwang Il; Chung, Wee Sup; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Hydrodynamic-based procedure is a simple and effective gene delivery method to lead a high gene expression in liver tissue. Non-invasive imaging reporter gene system has been used widely with herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and its various substrates. In the present study, we investigated to image the expression of HSV1-tk gene with 5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVDU) in mouse liver by the hydrodynamicbased procedure. HSV1-tk or enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) encoded plasmid DNA was transferred into the mouse liver by hydrodynamic injection. At 24 h post-injection, RT-PCR, biodistribution, fluorescence imaging, nuclear imaging and digital wholebody autoradiography (DWBA) were performed to confirm transferred gene expression. In RT-PCR assay using mRNA from the mouse liver, specific bands of HSV1-tk and EGFP gene were observed in HSV1-tk and EGFP expressing plasmid injected mouse, respectively. Higher uptake of radiolabeled IVDU was exhibited in liver of HSV1-tk gene transferred mouse by biodistribution study. In fluorescence imaging, the liver showed specific fluorescence signal in EGFP gene transferred mouse. Gamma-camera image and DWBA results showed that radiolabeled IVDU was accumulated in the liver of HSV1-tk gene transferred mouse. In this study, hydrodynamic-based procedure was effective in liver-specific gene delivery and it could be quantified with molecular imaging methods. Therefore, co-expression of HSV1-tk reporter gene and target gene by hydrodynamic-based procedure is expected to be a useful method for the evaluation of the target gene expression level with radiolabeled IVDU.

  14. Using the 2A Protein Coexpression System: Multicistronic 2A Vectors Expressing Gene(s) of Interest and Reporter Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Garry A; Ryan, Martin D

    2018-01-01

    To date, a huge range of different proteins-many with cotranslational and posttranslational subcellular localization signals-have been coexpressed together with various reporter proteins in vitro and in vivo using 2A peptides. The pros and cons of 2A co-expression technology are considered below, followed by a simple example of a "how to" protocol to concatenate multiple genes of interest, together with a reporter gene, into a single gene linked via 2As for easy identification or selection of transduced cells.

  15. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2017-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero M, Julian F; Perez A, Maria C; Cerquera C, Fredy M

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease,which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardioinfantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  17. Imaging Manifestations in Systemic Cat Scratch Disease: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero Melo, Julian Francisco; Perez Alvarado, Maria Carolina; Cerquera Cabrera, Fredy Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cat scratch disease is a zoonosis caused by Bartonella henselae, which is transmitted by scratches, bites or exposition to cats saliva (1). The disease typically manifests with local lymphadenitis after bacterial inoculation in the skin, however, there is an atypical systemic presentation in 5 to 10% of patients, which causes unspecific symptoms. There are several imaging findings that lead the radiologist to consider this diagnosis, in order to prevent an invasive procedure, especially if we consider that the majority of cases occur in the pediatric population (2,3). Although in the majority of cases the symptoms and imaging findings resolve spontaneously, there are specific indications like the systemic form of the disease, which requires antibiotic treatment. In the present article we are exposing a case report from Fundacion Cardio infantil; we will review some epidemiologic aspects, clinical manifestations, diagnostic methods as well as imaging findings in Ultrasonography, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance and Nuclear Medicine.

  18. Optimal imaging for treaty verification FY2014 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, Nathan R.; Johnson, William C.; Brubaker, Erik M.; Kupinski, Matthew Alan; MacGahan, Christopher Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    FY2014 technical report of our project funded by DNN R&D that leverages advanced inference methods developed for medical and adaptive imaging to address arms control applications. We seek a method to acquire and analyze imaging data of declared treaty-accountable items without creating an image of those objects or otherwise storing or revealing any classified information. Such a method would avoid the use of classified-information barriers. We present our progress on FY2014 tasks defined in our life-cycle plan. We also describe some future work that is part of the continuation of this project in FY2015 and beyond as part of a venture that joins ours with a related PNNL project.

  19. Optimal imaging for treaty verification FY2014 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Nathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, William C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brubaker, Erik M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kupinski, Matthew Alan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); MacGahan, Christopher Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    FY2014 technical report of our project funded by DNN R&D that leverages advanced inference methods developed for medical and adaptive imaging to address arms control applications. We seek a method to acquire and analyze imaging data of declared treaty-accountable items without creating an image of those objects or otherwise storing or revealing any classified information. Such a method would avoid the use of classified-information barriers. We present our progress on FY2014 tasks defined in our life-cycle plan. We also describe some future work that is part of the continuation of this project in FY2015 and beyond as part of a venture that joins ours with a related PNNL project.

  20. Imaging Appearance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis on the Diffusion Weighted Images: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Oh, Keon Se

    2011-01-01

    Imaging finding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalitis contain bilateral, symmetric, patchy, or diffuse increased T2WI signal intensities in the basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem, and centrum semiovale. In particular, the centrum semiovale is most commonly involved. Most of the HIV encephalitis cases are accompanied by brain atrophy. No previous study has reported symmetric increased signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale without brain atrophy on diffusion weighted images in HIV encephalitis patients. Here, we report a case of this. We suggest that radiologists should consider the possibility of HIV encephalitis if there are symmetric increases in signal intensity at the bilateral centrum semiovale on diffusion weighted images of patients with a history of HIV infection.

  1. Ratio Imaging of Enzyme Activity Using Dual Wavelength Optical Reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz F. Kircher

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF probes that are activated by specific proteases has, for the first time, allowed enzyme activity to be imaged in vivo. In the current study, we report on a method of imaging enzyme activity using two fluorescent probes that, together, provide improved quantitation of enzymatic activity. The method employs two chemically similar probes that differ in their degradability by cathepsin B. One probe consists of the NIRF dye Cy5.5 attached to a particulate carrier, a crosslinked iron oxide nanoparticle (CLIO, through cathepsin B cleavable l-arginyl peptides. A second probe consists of Cy3.5 attached to a CLIO through proteolytically resistant d-arginyl peptides. Using mixtures of the two probes, we have shown that the ratio of Cy5.5 to Cy3.5 fluorescence can be used to determine levels of cathepsin B in the environment of nanoparticles with macrophages in suspension. After intravenous injection, tissue fluorescence from the nondegradable Cy3.5–d-arginyl probe reflected nanoparticle accumulation, while fluorescence of the Cy5.5–l-arginyl probe was dependent on both accumulation and activation by cathepsin B. Dual wavelength ratio imaging can be used for the quantitative imaging of a variety of enzymes in clinically important settings, while the magnetic properties of the probes allow their detection by MR imaging.

  2. Imaging spectrum in disseminated histoplasmosis: case report and brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S.B.; Midha, N.; Gupta, M.; Sharma, U.; Talib, V.H.

    2005-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic disseminated histoplasmosis are non-specific and resemble those of other chronic infections and malignancies. We report the radiographic, sonographic and contrast-enhanced CT appearances of histoplasmosis in an adult male with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, who was HIV negative and presented with weight loss and pyrexia. Imaging studies simulated tuberculosis with mediastinal lymphadenopathy, bilateral fibrotic lung lesions, hepatomegaly and bilateral hypoattenuating adrenal enlargement, without clinical or laboratory evidence of hypoadrenalism. Computed tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of adrenal glands revealed Histoplasma capsulatum. We report our experience to increase awareness of the imaging spectrum of disseminated histoplasmosis and its similarity to tuberculosis as, with increasing incidence of AIDS, the chances of these infections are likely to increase. Moreover, awareness of this entity is important because it is known that untreated disseminated histoplasmosis is fatal Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  3. MR imaging features of peritoneal adenomatoid mesothelioma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lins, Cynthia Maria Coelho; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Monteiro, Carlos Ribeiro; Feres, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Adenomatoid mesothelioma of the peritoneum (AMP) is a rare benign tumor originating from mesothelial cells.1 Most frequently, AMP occurs between 26 and 55 years of age, at a mean age of 41 years. In contrast to diffuse malignant mesothelioma, which has been linked to asbestos exposure, the etiology of AMP has not been established. Only a minority of patients have symptoms related to the tumor. AMP may present local recurrence, but it has no potential for malignant transformation. Although there are many case reports of abdominal mesotheliomas, to date, there have been no reports of MR imaging features of AMP. In this article, we present the MR imaging features of a case of AMP with histopathological correlation. (author)

  4. MR imaging features of peritoneal adenomatoid mesothelioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lins, Cynthia Maria Coelho; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Monteiro, Carlos Ribeiro [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Internal Medicine], e-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.br; Cunha, Adilson Ferreira [School of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Valeri, Fabio V. [Victorio Valeri Institute of Medical Diagnosis, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Feres, Omar [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Surgery and Anatomy

    2009-07-01

    Adenomatoid mesothelioma of the peritoneum (AMP) is a rare benign tumor originating from mesothelial cells.1 Most frequently, AMP occurs between 26 and 55 years of age, at a mean age of 41 years. In contrast to diffuse malignant mesothelioma, which has been linked to asbestos exposure, the etiology of AMP has not been established. Only a minority of patients have symptoms related to the tumor. AMP may present local recurrence, but it has no potential for malignant transformation. Although there are many case reports of abdominal mesotheliomas, to date, there have been no reports of MR imaging features of AMP. In this article, we present the MR imaging features of a case of AMP with histopathological correlation. (author)

  5. Volatile Gas Production by Methyl Halide Transferase: An In Situ Reporter Of Microbial Gene Expression In Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Masiello, Caroline A; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2016-08-16

    Traditional visual reporters of gene expression have only very limited use in soils because their outputs are challenging to detect through the soil matrix. This severely restricts our ability to study time-dependent microbial gene expression in one of the Earth's largest, most complex habitats. Here we describe an approach to report on dynamic gene expression within a microbial population in a soil under natural water levels (at and below water holding capacity) via production of methyl halides using a methyl halide transferase. As a proof-of-concept application, we couple the expression of this gas reporter to the conjugative transfer of a bacterial plasmid in a soil matrix and show that gas released from the matrix displays a strong correlation with the number of transconjugant bacteria that formed. Gas reporting of gene expression will make possible dynamic studies of natural and engineered microbes within many hard-to-image environmental matrices (soils, sediments, sludge, and biomass) at sample scales exceeding those used for traditional visual reporting.

  6. Immunocytochemistry and fluorescence imaging efficiently identify individual neurons with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene disruption in primary cortical cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunematsu, Hiroto; Uyeda, Akiko; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko; Sugo, Noriyuki

    2017-08-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful method to investigate the role of genes by introducing a mutation selectively and efficiently to specific genome positions in cell and animal lines. However, in primary neuron cultures, this method is affected by the issue that the effectiveness of CRISPR/Cas9 is different in each neuron. Here, we report an easy, quick and reliable method to identify mutants induced by the CRISPR/Cas9 system at a single neuron level, using immunocytochemistry (ICC) and fluorescence imaging. Dissociated cortical cells were transfected with CRISPR/Cas9 plasmids targeting the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Fluorescence ICC with CREB antibody and quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity demonstrated that CREB expression disappeared in a fraction of the transfected neurons. The downstream FOS expression was also decreased in accordance with suppressed CREB expression. Moreover, dendritic arborization was decreased in the transfected neurons which lacked CREB immunoreactivity. Detection of protein expression is efficient to identify individual postmitotic neurons with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene disruption in primary cortical cultures. The present method composed of CRISPR/Cas9 system, ICC and fluorescence imaging is applicable to study the function of various genes at a single-neuron level.

  7. Can skeletal image reporting be taught online: Perspectives of experienced reporting radiographers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leishman, Lesley

    2013-01-01

    Background: Image interpretation relies upon expert clinical skill and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the theories and concepts that underpin clinical practices. Traditionally, radiographer reporting education has been delivered using a blend of classroom based learning combined with workplace clinical practice. The direct and indirect costs of staff development and maintenance of the service has seen the incorporation of e-learning into courses in other health professions. Yet, despite its proven success, in the UK radiography has been resistant to progression into e-learning for reporting. This study aims to explore the perceptions of reporting radiographers to interactive online delivery of skeletal image reporting education. Method: Invitations to participate in the study were sent to 80 radiology departments in the UK. Reporting radiographers were asked to complete an online questionnaire to detail their reporting education experiences and to consider whether online delivery was a viable option. Results: A total of 86 radiographers participated in the study. They could see potential benefits of online delivery but agreed it would only be suitable for delivery of theoretical subjects, and that development of practical/clinical skills required interaction with experts in the field to enhance learning. Conclusion: Image reporting education is not suitable for entirely online delivery, and a blended learning solution, where online classroom based learning is combined with work based learning is more appropriate as it allows for interaction with experts in the field of reporting to facilitate the development of reporting skills enhance the overall learning experience

  8. Specific expression of bioluminescence reporter gene in cardiomyocyte regulated by tissue specific promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vu Hong; Tae, Seong Ho; Le, Nguyen Uyen Chi; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    As the human heart is not capable of regenerating the great numbers of cardiac cells that are lost after myocardial infarction, impaired cardiac function is the inevitable result of ischemic disease. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have gained popularity as a potentially ideal cell candidate for tissue regeneration. In particular, hESCs are capable of cardiac lineage-specific differentiation and confer improvement of cardiac function following transplantation into animal models. Although such data are encouraging, the specific strategy for in vivo and non-invasive detection of differentiated cardiac lineage is still limited. Therefore, in the present study, we established the gene construction in which the optical reporter gene Firefly luciferase was controlled by Myosin Heavy Chain promoter for specific expressing in heart cells. The vector consisting of - MHC promoter and a firefly luciferase coding sequence flanked by full-length bovine growth hormone (BGH) 3'-polyadenylation sequence based on pcDNA3.1- vector backbone. To test the specific transcription of this promoter in g of MHC-Fluc or CMV-Flue (for control) plasmid DNA in myocardial tissue, 20 phosphate-buffered saline was directly injected into mouse myocardium through a midline sternotomy and liver. After 1 week of injection, MHC-Fluc expression was detected from heart region which was observed under cooled CCD camera of in vivo imaging system but not from liver. In control group injected with CMV-Flue, the bioluminescence was detected from all these organs. The expression of Flue under control of Myosin Heavy Chain promoter may become a suitable optical reporter gene for stem cell-derived cardiac lineage differentiation study.

  9. Combined lineage mapping and gene expression profiling of embryonic brain patterning using ultrashort pulse microscopy and image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Dodson, Colin R.; Bai, Yuqiang; Lekven, Arne C.; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2014-12-01

    During embryogenesis, presumptive brain compartments are patterned by dynamic networks of gene expression. The spatiotemporal dynamics of these networks, however, have not been characterized with sufficient resolution for us to understand the regulatory logic resulting in morphogenetic cellular behaviors that give the brain its shape. We have developed a new, integrated approach using ultrashort pulse microscopy [a high-resolution, two-photon fluorescence (2PF)-optical coherence microscopy (OCM) platform using 10-fs pulses] and image registration to study brain patterning and morphogenesis in zebrafish embryos. As a demonstration, we used time-lapse 2PF to capture midbrain-hindbrain boundary morphogenesis and a wnt1 lineage map from embryos during brain segmentation. We then performed in situ hybridization to deposit NBT/BCIP, where wnt1 remained actively expressed, and reimaged the embryos with combined 2PF-OCM. When we merged these datasets using morphological landmark registration, we found that the mechanism of boundary formation differs along the dorsoventral axis. Dorsally, boundary sharpening is dominated by changes in gene expression, while ventrally, sharpening may be accomplished by lineage sorting. We conclude that the integrated visualization of lineage reporter and gene expression domains simultaneously with brain morphology will be useful for understanding how changes in gene expression give rise to proper brain compartmentalization and structure.

  10. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  11. Visualization of ecdysteroid activity using a reporter gene in the crustacean, Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Miki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2014-02-01

    Ecdysone is a hormone known to play a pivotal role in crustaceans and insects. In order to evaluate the ecdysone activities in the environment and within the organism, we have developed a biomonitoring Daphnia strain by introducing a reporter gene. In this study, the ecdysone response element was inserted in the upstream region of a reporter gene, and the DNA construct was injected into Daphnia eggs. The expression of the reporter gene was detected during the early embryonic development stage. In addition, when the eggs expressing the reporter gene were exposed to ecdysone, there was enhanced expression of the reporter gene at detectable levels, while the presence of an antagonist led to its downregulation. These results suggested that this system could be potentially developed for monitoring ecdysone activities in media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging for Cardiac Surgery and Targeted Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Nakayama

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac revascularization is presently performed without realtime visual assessment of myocardial blood flow or perfusion. Moreover, gene therapy of the heart cannot, at present, be directed to specific territories at risk for myocardial infarction. We have developed a surgical imaging system that exploits the low autofluorescence, deep tissue penetration, low tissue scatter, and invisibility of near-infrared (NIR fluorescent light. By completely isolating visible and NIR light paths, one is able to visualize, simultaneously, the anatomy and/or function of the heart, or any desired tissue. In rat model systems, we demonstrate that the heptamethine indocyanine-type NIR fluorophores IR-786 and the carboxylic acid form of IRDye78 can be injected intravenously in the living animal to provide real-time visual assessment of myocardial blood flow or perfusion intraoperatively. This imaging system may prove useful for the refinement of revascularization techniques, and for the administration of cardiac gene therapy.

  13. Nuclear medicine and imaging research. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1981-09-01

    The Progress Report for the period January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981 of the Franklin Memorial Research Institute discusses instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation in nuclear medicine and imaging research. Imaging systems and image evaluation are discussed in four projects: Radiation Detector Studies, Dual Purpose Scanner for Thyroid Imaging, Instrumentation for Image Processing and Enhancement, and Energy-Coded Processing in Nuclear Medicine

  14. Imaging Findings of Wirsungocele: A Report of Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Won; Jou, Sung Shick; Han, Jong Kyu; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Kim, Young Tong

    2008-01-01

    Wirsungocele is defined as a cystic dilatation of the terminal portion of the main pancreatic duct, and this is an extremely rare malady. The pathophysiology of Wirsungocele has been proposed that a congenital or acquired weakness in the distal duct that's associated with functional obstruction may lead to the formation of Wirsungocele. In addition, mechanical obstruction of the distal duct has been considered as another mechanism of Wirsungocele. We report here on the imaging findings of two cases of Wirsungocele that seemed to occur by different pathophysiologic mechanisms

  15. The SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashford, V.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.

    1986-10-01

    We describe test beam results from a prototype Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) for the SLD experiment at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The system includes both liquid and gas radiators, a long drift box containing gaseous TMAE and a proportional wire chamber with charge division readout. Measurements of the multiplicity and detection resolution of Cerenkov photons, from both radiators are presented. Various design aspects of a new engineering prototype, currently under construction, are discussed and recent R and D results relevant to this effort are reported

  16. Case Report: Magnetic resonance imaging in rabies encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Arekapudi Subramanyaswara; Varma, Dandu Ravi; Chalapathi Rao, Mamidi Venkata; Mohandas, Surat

    2009-01-01

    Rabies encephalitis is an invariably fatal disease characterized by typical clinical symptoms. Although the diagnosis of this condition can be made on the basis of the patient's history and the classical clinical presentation, neuroimaging may still play a role, especially for establishing an early diagnosis in cases with atypical presentations or when the history of animal bite is not forthcoming. We report the MRI findings in a case of furious rabies encephalitis and describe the utility of diffusion imaging in its diagnosis

  17. Preliminary validation of varicella zoster virus thymidine kinase as a novel reporter gene for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, Christophe M.; Chitneni, Satish K.; Gijsbers, Rik; Vermaelen, Peter; Ibrahimi, Abdelilah; Balzarini, Jan; Baekelandt, Veerle; Verbruggen, Alfons; Nuyts, Johan; Debyser, Zeger; Bormans, Guy M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging of gene expression with positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a powerful tool for biomedical research during the last decade. The prototypical herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) PET reporter gene (PRG) is widely used and many other PRGs have also been validated. We investigated varicella zoster virus thymidine kinase (VZV-tk) as new PRG with radiolabeled bicyclic nucleoside analogues (BCNAs) as PET tracers. Methods: The uptake and washout of four different radiolabeled BCNAs was evaluated in cells expressing VZV-tk after lentiviral vector (LV) transduction and in control cells. Metabolism of the tracers was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Mice bearing VZV-TK expressing xenografts were imaged with PET. Results: High uptake in VZV-tk expressing cells was seen for 3 of the 4 tracers tested. The uptake of the tracers could be blocked by the presence of excess thymidine in the incubation solution. Cellular retention was variable, with one tracer showing an acceptable half-life of ∼ 1 hour. The amount of intracellular tracer correlated with the titer of LV used to transduce the cells. VZV-TK dependent conversion into metabolites was shown by HPLC. No specific accumulation was observed in cells expressing a fusion protein containing an HSV1-TK moiety. VZV-tk expression in xenografts resulted in a 60% increase in uptake in vivo as measured with PET. Conclusions: We have validated the combination of VZV-tk and radiolabeled BCNAs as new PRG/PRP system. Further optimization of the PRPs and the PRG are warranted to increase the signal.

  18. Genetic Imaging of the Association of Oxytocin Receptor Gene (OXTR Polymorphisms with Positive Maternal Parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina J. Michalska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-validated models of maternal behavior in small-brain mammals posit a central role of oxytocin in parenting, by reducing stress and enhancing the reward value of social interactions with offspring. In contrast, human studies are only beginning to gain insights into how oxytocin modulates maternal behavior and affiliation. Methods: To explore associations between oxytocin receptor genes and maternal parenting behavior in humans, we conducted a genetic imaging study of women selected to exhibit a wide range of observed parenting when their children were 4-6 years old. Results: In response to child stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging, hemodynamic responses in brain regions that mediate affect, reward, and social behavior were significantly correlated with observed positive parenting. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs53576 and rs1042778 in the gene encoding the oxytocin receptor were significantly associated with both positive parenting and hemodynamic responses to child stimuli in orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Conclusions: These findings contribute to the emerging literature on the role of oxytocin in human social behavior and support the feasibility of tracing biological pathways from genes to neural regions to positive maternal parenting behaviors in humans using genetic imaging methods.

  19. Diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter in Huntington gene mutation individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Arb Saba

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the role of the involvement of white matter tracts in huntingtin gene mutation patients as a potential biomarker of the progression of the disease. Methods We evaluated 34 participants (11 symptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, 12 presymptomatic huntingtin gene mutation, and 11 controls. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging to assess white matter integrity using diffusion tensor imaging, with measurement of fractional anisotropy. Results We observed a significant decrease of fractional anisotropy in the cortical spinal tracts, corona radiate, corpus callosum, external capsule, thalamic radiations, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculus, and inferior frontal-occipital fasciculus in the Huntington disease group compared to the control and presymptomatic groups. Reduction of fractional anisotropy is indicative of a degenerative process and axonal loss. There was no statistically significant difference between the presymptomatic and control groups. Conclusion White matter integrity is affected in huntingtin gene mutation symptomatic individuals, but other studies with larger samples are required to assess its usefulness in the progression of the neurodegenerative process.

  20. Case report: value of gene expression profiling in the diagnosis of atypical neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harttrampf, Anne C; Chen, Qingrong; Jüttner, Eva; Geiger, Julia; Vansant, Gordon; Khan, Javed; Kontny, Udo

    2017-08-17

    Nephroblastoma and neuroblastoma belong to the most common abdominal malignancies in childhood. Similarities in the initial presentation may provide difficulties in distinguishing between these two entities, especially if unusual variations to prevalent patterns of disease manifestation occur. Because of the risk of tumor rupture, European protocols do not require biopsy for diagnosis, which leads to misdiagnosis in some cases. We report on a 4½-year-old girl with a renal tumor displaying radiological and laboratory characteristics supporting the diagnosis of nephroblastoma. Imaging studies showed tumor extension into the inferior vena cava and bilateral lung metastases while urine catecholamines and MIBG-scintigraphy were negative. Preoperative chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycine D and adriamycin according to the SIOP2001/GPOH protocol for the treatment of nephroblastoma was initiated and followed by surgical tumor resection. Histopathology revealed an undifferentiated tumor with expression of neuronal markers, suggestive of neuroblastoma. MYCN amplification could not be detected. DNA-microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix genechip human genome U133 plus 2.0 and artificial neural network analysis. Results were confirmed by multiplex RT-PCR. Principal component analysis using 84 genes showed that the patient sample was clearly clustering with neuroblastoma tumors. This was confirmed by hierarchical clustering of the multiplex RT-PCR data. The patient underwent treatment for high-risk neuroblastoma comprising chemotherapy including cisplatin, etoposide, vindesine, dacarbacine, ifosfamide, vincristine, adriamycine and autologous stem cell transplantation followed by maintenance therapy with 13-cis retinoic acid (GPOH NB2004 High Risk Trial Protocol) and is in complete long-term remission. The use of gene expression profiling in an individual patient strongly contributed to clarification in a diagnostic dilemma which finally led to a change of

  1. Case Report: Neuro-Imaging Findings in Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Mahvelati

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder in which cutaneous and scleral Telangiectasia, cerebellar ataxia and immunodeficiency occur. There is a high incidence of development of malignant tumors, mainly lymphomas. Cerebellar atrophy is the most prominent abnormality and is shown better by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI than CT-Scan. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs rarely. We report a 7 years old boy who admitted for recurrent pulmonary infections. His examination showed ataxic gait with decreased deep tendon reflexes in lower extremities. He had telangiectasia in the eyes and his speech was slurred and difficult. Brain MRI showed cerebellar atrophy with diffuse hyperintensity in white matter, most prominent in occipital region, which was suggestive of leukodystrophy. This white matter change was not reported before in AT.

  2. Terminator Operon Reporter: combining a transcription termination switch with reporter technology for improved gene synthesis and synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Mur, Luis A J; Rees Stevens, Pauline; Pachebat, Justin A; Newbold, C James; Hayes, Finbarr; Kingston-Smith, Alison

    2016-05-25

    Synthetic biology is characterized by the development of novel and powerful DNA fabrication methods and by the application of engineering principles to biology. The current study describes Terminator Operon Reporter (TOR), a new gene assembly technology based on the conditional activation of a reporter gene in response to sequence errors occurring at the assembly stage of the synthetic element. These errors are monitored by a transcription terminator that is placed between the synthetic gene and reporter gene. Switching of this terminator between active and inactive states dictates the transcription status of the downstream reporter gene to provide a rapid and facile readout of the accuracy of synthetic assembly. Designed specifically and uniquely for the synthesis of protein coding genes in bacteria, TOR allows the rapid and cost-effective fabrication of synthetic constructs by employing oligonucleotides at the most basic purification level (desalted) and without the need for costly and time-consuming post-synthesis correction methods. Thus, TOR streamlines gene assembly approaches, which are central to the future development of synthetic biology.

  3. Transient expression of β-glucuronidase reporter gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-18

    May 18, 2009 ... Therefore, special attention must be given to the use of genetic manipulation for .... of gus gene was used as a visual marker in transformation. Bacteria ... selective culture (SC) medium containing 200 mg/l carbenicillin and. 50 mg/l .... clones had caused the difference of host-plant response to bacterial ...

  4. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kaestle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP. After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector–mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application—injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  5. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    roles in the process have been identified through transcriptomics. The assignment of function to these genes has been enabled in combination with gene deletion studies. In this work, 14 genes known to play a role in protein secretion in filamentous fungi were overexpressed in Aspergillus nidulans....... The background strain was a fluorescent reporter secreting mRFP. The overall effect of the overexpressions could thus be easily monitored through fluorescence measurements, while the effects on physiology were determined in batch cultivations and surface growth studies. Results: Fourteen protein secretion...... pathway related genes were overexpressed with a tet-ON promoter in the RFP-secreting reporter strain and macromorphology, physiology and protein secretion were monitored when the secretory genes were induced. Overexpression of several of the chosen genes was shown to cause anomalies on growth, micro...

  6. Effect of external and internal factors on the expression of reporter genes driven by the N resistance gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiria, Palak; Sidler, Corinne; Woycicki, Rafal; Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-07-01

    The role of resistance (R) genes in plant pathogen interaction has been studied extensively due to its economical impact on agriculture. Interaction between tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the N protein from tobacco is one of the most widely used models to understand various aspects of pathogen resistance. The transcription activity governed by N gene promoter is one of the least understood elements of the model. In this study, the N gene promoter was cloned and fused with two different reporter genes, one encoding β-glucuronidase (N::GUS) and another, luciferase (N::LUC). Tobacco plants transformed with the N::GUS or N::LUC reporter constructs were screened for homozygosity and stable expression. Histochemical analysis of N::GUS tobacco plants revealed that the expression is organ specific and developmentally regulated. Whereas two week old plants expressed GUS in midveins only, 6-wk-old plants also expressed GUS in leaf lamella. Roots did not show GUS expression at any time during development. Experiments to address effects of external stress were performed using N::LUC tobacco plants. These experiments showed that N gene promoter expression was suppressed when plants were exposed to high but not low temperatures. Expression was also upregulated in response to TMV, but no changes were observed in plants treated with SA.

  7. Transient expression of β-glucuronidase reporter gene in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404 carrying the pBI.121 binary plasmid was used in transformation to introduce the gus (ß-glucuronidase/GUS) gene into teak shoot-tissues. In vitro regenerated shoots from various teak clones, i.e. the ITB, GT, P97, P96, P75, P20, and P108 clones were vacuum-infiltrated for 5 min in ...

  8. MR Imaging in a Child with Survey: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Woo; Park, Sun Won; Kwon, Young Se; Oh, In Suk; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Won Hong; Suh, Chang Hae [College of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    Scurvy is very rare disease in industrialized societies. Nevertheless, it still exists in higher risk groups including economically disadvantaged populations with poor nutrition, such as the elderly and chronic alcoholics. The incidence of scurvy in the pediatric population is very low. This study reports a case of scurvy in a 5-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and developmental delay based on MRI findings. curvy results from a deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). A marked reduction in the occurrence of scurvy has occurred over the last 100 years due to improved knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment of scurvy. However, the disease still exists even in industrialized countries. Because scurvy is rare in modern society, reported magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings associated with scurvy are very rare. We report a case of scurvy in a 5-year-old girl with associated MRI findings. The diagnosis of scurvy is made by clinical and radiographic findings and may be supported by additional findings such as reduced levels of vitamin C in the serum or Buffy-coat of leukocytes. The MRI findings of scurvy are not well known; however, when the MRI findings include subperiosteal hematoma with periostitis, metaphyseal changes, and heterogeneous bone marrow signal intensity, scurvy should be included in the differential diagnosis. Clinicians and radiologists must be aware of this extremely rare but still present condition, because it is potentially fatal and easily cured with vitamin C supplementation.

  9. MR Imaging in a Child with Survey: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Seung Woo; Park, Sun Won; Kwon, Young Se; Oh, In Suk; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Won Hong; Suh, Chang Hae

    2007-01-01

    Scurvy is very rare disease in industrialized societies. Nevertheless, it still exists in higher risk groups including economically disadvantaged populations with poor nutrition, such as the elderly and chronic alcoholics. The incidence of scurvy in the pediatric population is very low. This study reports a case of scurvy in a 5-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and developmental delay based on MRI findings. curvy results from a deficiency of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). A marked reduction in the occurrence of scurvy has occurred over the last 100 years due to improved knowledge about the pathophysiology and treatment of scurvy. However, the disease still exists even in industrialized countries. Because scurvy is rare in modern society, reported magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings associated with scurvy are very rare. We report a case of scurvy in a 5-year-old girl with associated MRI findings. The diagnosis of scurvy is made by clinical and radiographic findings and may be supported by additional findings such as reduced levels of vitamin C in the serum or Buffy-coat of leukocytes. The MRI findings of scurvy are not well known; however, when the MRI findings include subperiosteal hematoma with periostitis, metaphyseal changes, and heterogeneous bone marrow signal intensity, scurvy should be included in the differential diagnosis. Clinicians and radiologists must be aware of this extremely rare but still present condition, because it is potentially fatal and easily cured with vitamin C supplementation

  10. Transferrin receptor molecular imaging: targeting for diagnosis and monitoring of gene delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun-Mi Kim; Hwan-Jeong Jeong; Jin-Hee Kim; Chang-Guhn Kim

    2004-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we investigated the targetability of Tf conjugated compounds to Tf-R expressed on cancer cells for detection and diagnosis and the usefulness of gamma probe-targeting delivery system on monitoring whether the gene complex bind to the cells specifically. Methods: For the detection and diagnosis of Tf-R positive cancer cells, Tf-chitosan conjugates were synthesized as previously described by Kircheis et al with some modifications. Succinimidyl 6-hydrazino nicotinate hydrochloride (HYNIC) was bound to Tf-chitosan conjugates. HYNIC-Tf-chitosan conjugates were labelled with 99mTc. In the monitoring of Tf-R specific gene delivery system, we used the HYNIC-Tf conjugated dendrimer. For tumor model, 5- to 6-week-old female BALB/c nude mice were injected subcutaneously in the left thigh with Ramos cells (human Burkitt's lymphoma). The gamma imagings were acquired after administration of 99mTc HYNIC-Tf conjugates and 99mTc HYNIC-Tf-DNA polyplexes via the tail vein of tumor bearing nude mice at 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. To compare the image acquired with HYNIC-Tf conjugate, Ga-67 study was performed. To certify the expression of delivered gene via DNA polyplexes, 2 days after gene complex injection we inspected the expression of GFP in dissected tumor tissue. Results: Radiolabeling yields of both HYNIC-Tf conjugate and HYNIC-Tf-dendrimer gene complex were above 90% until 12hr. Uptake in the Ramos model of 99mTc HYNIC-Tf conjugate showed higher than those of Ga-67. A few minutes after injection 99mTc HYNIC-Tf conjugate localized mainly in the circulation (heart), kidneys, and tumor. At later times, radioactivity in tumor increased until 90 min. Pharmacokinetics of Ga-67 were different from those of 99mTc HYNIC-Tf conjugate. Tumor to nontumor ratio of Ga-67 was approximately 2 but in case of 99mTc HYNIC-Tf conjugate showed until 5. In Ramos lymphoma model, 99mTc HYNIC-Tf-DNA polyplexes accumulated the tumor site, and the gene expression of 99m

  11. Final Technical Report for SISGR: Ultrafast Molecular Scale Chemical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Guest, Jeffrey R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Guisinger, Nathan P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Hla, Saw Wai [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Schatz, George C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Seideman, Tamar [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Van Duyne, Richard P. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-10

    The Northwestern-Argonne SISGR program utilized newly developed instrumentation and techniques including integrated ultra-high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy/scanning tunneling microscopy (UHV-TERS/STM) and surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS) to advance the spatial and temporal resolution of chemical imaging for the study of photoinduced dynamics of molecules on plasmonically active surfaces. An accompanying theory program addressed modeling of charge transfer processes using constrained density functional theory (DFT) in addition to modeling of SE-FSRS, thereby providing a detailed description of the excited state dynamics. This interdisciplinary and highly collaborative research resulted in 62 publications with ~ 48% of them being co-authored by multiple SISGR team members. A summary of the scientific accomplishments from this SISGR program is provided in this final technical report.

  12. Imaging Features of Pediatric Pentastomiasis Infection: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Can; Wang, Xi Qun; Lin, Long; Gao, De Chun; Zhang, Hong Xi; Zhang, Yi Ying; Zhou, Yin Bao [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang (China)

    2010-08-15

    We report here a case of pentastomiasis infection in a 3-year-old girl who had high fever, abdominal pain, abdominal tension and anemia. Ultrasound scanning of the abdomen revealed disseminated hyperechoic nodules in the liver and a small amount of ascites. Abdominal MRI showed marked hepatomegaly with disseminated miliary nodules of high signal intensity throughout the hepatic parenchyma on T2-weighted images; retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and disseminated miliary nodules on the peritoneum were also noted. Chest CT showed scattered small hyperdense nodules on both sides of the lungs. The laparoscopy demonstrated diffuse white nodules on the liver surface and the peritoneum. After the small intestinal wall and peritoneal biopsy, histological examination revealed parenchymal tubercles containing several larvae of pentastomids and a large amount of inflammatory cell infiltration around them. The pathological diagnosis was parasitic granuloma from pentastomiasis infection

  13. Imaging Features of Pediatric Pentastomiasis Infection: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Can; Wang, Xi Qun; Lin, Long; Gao, De Chun; Zhang, Hong Xi; Zhang, Yi Ying; Zhou, Yin Bao

    2010-01-01

    We report here a case of pentastomiasis infection in a 3-year-old girl who had high fever, abdominal pain, abdominal tension and anemia. Ultrasound scanning of the abdomen revealed disseminated hyperechoic nodules in the liver and a small amount of ascites. Abdominal MRI showed marked hepatomegaly with disseminated miliary nodules of high signal intensity throughout the hepatic parenchyma on T2-weighted images; retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and disseminated miliary nodules on the peritoneum were also noted. Chest CT showed scattered small hyperdense nodules on both sides of the lungs. The laparoscopy demonstrated diffuse white nodules on the liver surface and the peritoneum. After the small intestinal wall and peritoneal biopsy, histological examination revealed parenchymal tubercles containing several larvae of pentastomids and a large amount of inflammatory cell infiltration around them. The pathological diagnosis was parasitic granuloma from pentastomiasis infection

  14. Application of multimedia image technology in engineering report demonstration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lili, Jiang

    2018-03-01

    With the rapid development of global economic integration, people’s strong desire for a wide range of global exchanges and interactions has been promoted, and there are more unprecedented convenient means for people to know the world and even to transform the world. At this stage, we realize that the traditional mode of work has become difficult to adapt to the changing trends of the world and informatization, multimedia, science and technology have become the mainstream of the times. Therefore, this paper will mainly analyze the present situation of the project report demonstration system and the key points of the work and put forward with pertinence specific application strategy of the integration with multimedia image technology.

  15. National Land Imaging Requirements (NLIR) Pilot Project summary report: summary of moderate resolution imaging user requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadnais, Carolyn; Stensaas, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Under the National Land Imaging Requirements (NLIR) Project, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is developing a functional capability to obtain, characterize, manage, maintain and prioritize all Earth observing (EO) land remote sensing user requirements. The goal is a better understanding of community needs that can be supported with land remote sensing resources, and a means to match needs with appropriate solutions in an effective and efficient way. The NLIR Project is composed of two components. The first component is focused on the development of the Earth Observation Requirements Evaluation System (EORES) to capture, store and analyze user requirements, whereas, the second component is the mechanism and processes to elicit and document the user requirements that will populate the EORES. To develop the second component, the requirements elicitation methodology was exercised and refined through a pilot project conducted from June to September 2013. The pilot project focused specifically on applications and user requirements for moderate resolution imagery (5–120 meter resolution) as the test case for requirements development. The purpose of this summary report is to provide a high-level overview of the requirements elicitation process that was exercised through the pilot project and an early analysis of the moderate resolution imaging user requirements acquired to date to support ongoing USGS sustainable land imaging study needs. The pilot project engaged a limited set of Federal Government users from the operational and research communities and therefore the information captured represents only a subset of all land imaging user requirements. However, based on a comparison of results, trends, and analysis, the pilot captured a strong baseline of typical applications areas and user needs for moderate resolution imagery. Because these results are preliminary and represent only a sample of users and application areas, the information from this report should only

  16. Bioluminescence imaging of β cells and intrahepatic insulin gene activity under normal and pathological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokio Katsumata

    Full Text Available In diabetes research, bioluminescence imaging (BLI has been applied in studies of β-cell impairment, development, and islet transplantation. To develop a mouse model that enables noninvasive imaging of β cells, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC transgenic mouse in which a mouse 200-kbp genomic fragment comprising the insulin I gene drives luciferase expression (Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mouse. BLI of mice was performed using the IVIS Spectrum system after intraperitoneal injection of luciferin, and the bioluminescence signal from the pancreatic region analyzed. When compared with MIP-Luc-VU mice [FVB/N-Tg(Ins1-lucVUPwrs/J] expressing luciferase under the control of the 9.2-kbp mouse insulin I promoter (MIP, the bioluminescence emission from Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice was enhanced approximately 4-fold. Streptozotocin-treated Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice developed severe diabetes concomitant with a sharp decline in the BLI signal intensity in the pancreas. Conversely, mice fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed an increase in the signal, reflecting a decrease or increase in the β-cell mass. Although the bioluminescence intensity of the islets correlated well with the number of isolated islets in vitro, the intensity obtained from a living mouse in vivo did not necessarily reflect an absolute quantification of the β-cell mass under pathological conditions. On the other hand, adenovirus-mediated gene transduction of β-cell-related transcription factors in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice generated luminescence from the hepatic region for more than 1 week. These results demonstrate that BLI in Ins1-luc BAC transgenic mice provides a noninvasive method of imaging islet β cells and extrapancreatic activity of the insulin gene in the liver under normal and pathological conditions.

  17. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A; Rubin, P; Kemp, J; Israel, E; Busse, W; Ledford, D; Murray, J J; Segal, A; Tinkleman, D; Drazen, J M

    1997-03-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, deletion of two, or addition of one zinc finger (Sp1/Egr-1) binding sites in the region 176 to 147 bp upstream from the ATG translation start site where there are normally 5 Sp1 binding motifs in tandem. Reporter gene activity directed by any of the mutant forms of the transcription factor binding region was significantly (P < 0.05) less effective than the activity driven by the wild type transcription factor binding region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated the capacity of wild type and mutant transcription factor binding regions to bind nuclear extracts from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). These data are consistent with a family of mutations in the 5-LO gene that can modify reporter gene transcription possibly through differences in Sp1 and Egr-1 transactivation.

  18. Development and evaluation of an efficient heterologous gene knock-in reporter system in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yifei; Yan, Hongxiang; Deng, Jiezhong; Huang, Zhigang; Jin, Xurui; Yu, Yanlan; Hu, Qiwen; Hu, Fuquan; Wang, Jing

    2017-09-18

    Lactococcus lactis is a food grade probiotics and widely used to express heterologous proteins. Generally, target genes are knocked into the L. lactis genome through double-crossover recombination to express heterologous proteins stably. However, creating marker-less heterologous genes knocked-in clones is laborious. In this study, an efficient heterologous gene knock-in reporter system was developed in L. lactis NZ9000. Our knock-in reporter system consists of a temperature-sensitive plasmid pJW and a recombinant L. lactis strain named NZB. The pJW contains homologous arms, and was constructed to knock-in heterologous genes at a fixed locus of NZ9000 genome. lacZ (β-galactosidase) gene was knocked into the chromosome of NZ9000 as a counter-selective marker through the plasmid pJW to generate NZB. The engineered NZB strain formed blue colonies on X-Gal plate. The desired double-crossover mutants formed white colonies distinctive from the predominantly blue colonies (parental and plasmid-integrated clones) when the embedded lacZ was replaced with the target heterologous genes carried by pJW in NZB. By using the system, the heterologous gene knocked-in clones are screened by colony phenotype change rather than by checking colonies individually. Our new knock-in reporter system provides an efficient method to create heterologous genes knocked-in clones.

  19. A novel binary T-vector with the GFP reporter gene for promoter characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ye Jiang

    Full Text Available Several strategies have been developed to clone PCR fragments into desired vectors. However, most of commercially available T-vectors are not binary vectors and cannot be directly used for Agrobacterium-mediated plant genetic transformation. In this study, a novel binary T-vector was constructed by integrating two AhdI restriction sites into the backbone vector pCAMBIA 1300. The T-vector also contains a GFP reporter gene and thus, can be used to analyze promoter activity by monitoring the reporter gene. On the other hand, identification and characterization of various promoters not only benefit the functional annotation of their genes but also provide alternative candidates to be used to drive interesting genes for plant genetic improvement by transgenesis. More than 1,000 putative pollen-specific rice genes have been identified in a genome-wide level. Among them, 67 highly expressed genes were further characterized. One of the pollen-specific genes LOC_Os10g35930 was further surveyed in its expression patterns with more details by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Finally, its promoter activity was further investigated by analyzing transgenic rice plants carrying the promoter::GFP cassette, which was constructed from the newly developed T-vector. The reporter GFP gene expression in these transgenic plants showed that the promoter was active only in mature but not in germinated pollens.

  20. Uses of software in digital image analysis: a forensic report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Jha, Shailendra

    2010-02-01

    Forensic image analysis is required an expertise to interpret the content of an image or the image itself in legal matters. Major sub-disciplines of forensic image analysis with law enforcement applications include photo-grammetry, photographic comparison, content analysis and image authentication. It has wide applications in forensic science range from documenting crime scenes to enhancing faint or indistinct patterns such as partial fingerprints. The process of forensic image analysis can involve several different tasks, regardless of the type of image analysis performed. Through this paper authors have tried to explain these tasks, which are described in to three categories: Image Compression, Image Enhancement & Restoration and Measurement Extraction. With the help of examples like signature comparison, counterfeit currency comparison and foot-wear sole impression using the software Canvas and Corel Draw.

  1. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [{sup 131}I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: lxl730724@hotmail.com; Yin Xiaohua; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China) and Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2009-02-15

    Aim: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with {sup 131}I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with {sup 131}I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82{+-}2.05% and 94.85{+-}1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [{sup 131}I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55{+-}0.37% and 2.09{+-}0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene

  2. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, Dharmin; Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter; Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo; Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees; Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard; Smitt, Peter Sillevis

    2002-01-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of 123 I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with 123 I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). 123 I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with 123 I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after 123 I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with the transgene in the former E1

  3. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Dharmin [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo [Crucell Holland BV, Leiden (Netherlands); Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Smitt, Peter Sillevis [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of {sup 123}I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with {sup 123}I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). {sup 123}I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with {sup 123}I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after {sup 123}I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with

  4. Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfano, Robert R.; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2002-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of penile paraffinoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormio, Luigi; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Scavone, Carmen; Selvaggio, Oscar; Massenio, Paolo; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Macarini, Luca; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Penile paraffinoma is a well-known delayed complication of paraffin oil injection into the penis for penile girth augmentation but its MRI features have not been previously described. A 35-year-old Ukraine man presented with erectile dysfunction, voiding difficulty and an irregular, hard and painful penile mass that had progressively grown over the last year. He reported having received, seven years before, several penile injections of paraffin oil for penile girth augmentation. On physical examination, the mass was tender, poorly delimited, and involved the whole penile shaft and the cranial part of the scrotum. Preoperative MRI, performed to determine the extent of tissue to be removed and the possibilities of penile reconstruction, showed a newly-formed homogeneous tissue, compressing but not infiltrating Buck’s fascia, iso-hypointense relative to muscle on T1-weighted sequences, and with a low signal intensity at T2-weighted sequences. On T1-weighted fat suppressed sequences, it did not enhance with contrast administration. MRI data were confirmed by surgical findings, as the newly-formed scar tissue did not infiltrate Buck’s fascia. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of penile paraffinoma. MRI seems to provide an adequate imaging of the histological events occurring after injection of paraffin oil in the subcutaneous tissues. Penile paraffinoma remains a clinical diagnosis, but MRI features may be helpful in planning an adequate surgical strategy and, in selected cases, establishing the differential diagnosis with other penile diseases, including cancer

  6. Identification of a novel CLRN1 gene mutation in Usher syndrome type 3: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hidekane; Oshikawa, Chie; Nakayama, Jun; Moteki, Hideaki; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2015-05-01

    This study examines the CLRN1 gene mutation analysis in Japanese patients who were diagnosed with Usher syndrome type 3 (USH3) on the basis of clinical findings. Genetic analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing (MPS) was conducted to search for 9 causative USH genes in 2 USH3 patients. We identified the novel pathogenic mutation in the CLRN1 gene in 2 patients. The missense mutation was confirmed by functional prediction software and segregation analysis. Both patients were diagnosed as having USH3 caused by the CLRN1 gene mutation. This is the first report of USH3 with a CLRN1 gene mutation in Asian populations. Validating the presence of clinical findings is imperative for properly differentiating among USH subtypes. In addition, mutation screening using MPS enables the identification of causative mutations in USH. The clinical diagnosis of this phenotypically variable disease can then be confirmed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. WellReader: a MATLAB program for the analysis of fluorescence and luminescence reporter gene data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Frédéric; Besson, Bruno; Baptist, Guillaume; Izard, Jérôme; Pinel, Corinne; Ropers, Delphine; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2010-05-01

    Fluorescent and luminescent reporter gene systems in combination with automated microplate readers allow real-time monitoring of gene expression on the population level at high precision and sampling density. This generates large amounts of data for the analysis of which computer tools are missing to date. We have developed WellReader, a MATLAB program for the analysis of fluorescent and luminescent reporter gene data. WellReader allows the user to load the output files of microplate readers, remove outliers, correct for background effects and smooth and fit the data. Moreover, it computes biologically relevant quantities from the measured signals, notably promoter activities and protein concentrations, and compares the resulting expression profiles of different genes under different conditions. WellReader is available under a LGPL licence at http://prabi1.inrialpes.fr/trac/wellreader.

  8. High-Throughput Screening of a Luciferase Reporter of Gene Silencing on the Inactive X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Alissa; Plath, Kathrin; Damoiseaux, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Assays of luciferase gene activity are a sensitive and quantitative reporter system suited to high-throughput screening. We adapted a luciferase assay to a screening strategy for identifying factors that reactivate epigenetically silenced genes. This epigenetic luciferase reporter is subject to endogenous gene silencing mechanisms on the inactive X chromosome (Xi) in primary mouse cells and thus captures the multilayered nature of chromatin silencing in development. Here, we describe the optimization of an Xi-linked luciferase reactivation assay in 384-well format and adaptation of the assay for high-throughput siRNA and chemical screening. Xi-luciferase reactivation screening has applications in stem cell biology and cancer therapy. We have used the approach described here to identify chromatin-modifying proteins and to identify drug combinations that enhance the gene reactivation activity of the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

  9. Antisense imaging of epidermal growth factor-induced p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression in MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Judy; Chen, Paul; Mrkobrada, Marko [Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 19 Russell Street, M5S 2S2, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Meiduo [Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, 19 Russell Street, M5S 2S2, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Vallis, Katherine A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    accumulation of {sup 111}In-labeled antisense ODNs in the presence of EGF induction of the p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene (0.32%{+-}0.06% injected dose/g) compared with normal saline-treated control mice (0.11%{+-}0.07% injected dose/g). The tumor/blood ratio for antisense ODNs in the presence of EGF induction of the p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene (4.87{+-}0.87) was also significantly higher than for control random sequence ODNs (2.14{+-}0.69) or for mice receiving antisense ODNs but not treated with EGF (2.07{+-}0.37). We conclude that antisense imaging of upregulated p21{sup WAF-1/CIP-1} gene expression is feasible and could represent a promising new molecular imaging strategy for monitoring tumor response in cancer patients. To our knowledge, this study also describes the first report of molecular imaging of the upregulated expression of a downstream gene target of the EGFR, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor. (orig.)

  10. The first report of prion-related protein gene (PRNT) polymorphisms in goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Byung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Prion protein is encoded by the prion protein gene (PRNP). Polymorphisms of several members of the prion gene family have shown association with prion diseases in several species. Recent studies on a novel member of the prion gene family in rams have shown that prion-related protein gene (PRNT) has a linkage with codon 26 of prion-like protein (PRND). In a previous study, codon 26 polymorphism of PRND has shown connection with PRNP haplotype which is strongly associated with scrapie vulnerability. In addition, the genotype of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 26 of PRND is related to fertilisation capacity. These findings necessitate studies on the SNP of PRNT gene which is connected with PRND. In goat, several polymorphism studies have been performed for PRNP, PRND, and shadow of prion protein gene (SPRN). However, polymorphism on PRNT has not been reported. Hence, the objective of this study was to determine the genotype and allelic distribution of SNPs of PRNT in 238 Korean native goats and compare PRNT DNA sequences between Korean native goats and several ruminant species. A total of five SNPs, including PRNT c.-114G > T, PRNT c.-58A > G in the upstream of PRNT gene, PRNT c.71C > T (p.Ala24Val) and PRNT c.102G > A in the open reading frame (ORF) and c.321C > T in the downstream of PRNT gene, were found in this study. All five SNPs of caprine PRNT gene in Korean native goat are in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with a D' value of 1.0. Interestingly, comparative sequence analysis of the PRNT gene revealed five mismatches between DNA sequences of Korean native goats and those of goats deposited in the GenBank. Korean native black goats also showed 5 mismatches in PRNT ORF with cattle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic research of the PRNT gene in goat.

  11. Using reporter gene assays to identify cis regulatory differences between humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Adrien; Shrit, Ralla A; Blekhman, Ran; Gilad, Yoav

    2007-08-01

    Most phenotypic differences between human and chimpanzee are likely to result from differences in gene regulation, rather than changes to protein-coding regions. To date, however, only a handful of human-chimpanzee nucleotide differences leading to changes in gene regulation have been identified. To hone in on differences in regulatory elements between human and chimpanzee, we focused on 10 genes that were previously found to be differentially expressed between the two species. We then designed reporter gene assays for the putative human and chimpanzee promoters of the 10 genes. Of seven promoters that we found to be active in human liver cell lines, human and chimpanzee promoters had significantly different activity in four cases, three of which recapitulated the gene expression difference seen in the microarray experiment. For these three genes, we were therefore able to demonstrate that a change in cis influences expression differences between humans and chimpanzees. Moreover, using site-directed mutagenesis on one construct, the promoter for the DDA3 gene, we were able to identify three nucleotides that together lead to a cis regulatory difference between the species. High-throughput application of this approach can provide a map of regulatory element differences between humans and our close evolutionary relatives.

  12. MR imaging of medullary streaks in osteosclerosis: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Tae Soo; Song, Ho Taek; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Dong Woo; Park, Choong Ki

    2000-01-01

    We present a case of medullary sclerosis of the appendicular skeleton in a patient with chronic renal insufficiency for whom MR imaging findings were characteristic. T1- and T2-weighted MR images showed multiple vertical lines (medullary streaks) of low signal intensity in the metaphyses and diaphyses of the distal femur and proximal tibia

  13. Mirror-image duplication of the primary axis and heart in Xenopus embryos by the overexpression of Msx-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Solursh, M

    1995-10-01

    The Msx-1 gene (formerly known as Hox-7) is a member of a discrete subclass of homeobox-containing genes. Examination of the expression pattern of Msx-1 in murine and avian embryos suggests that this gene may be involved in the regionalization of the medio-lateral axis during earlier development. We have examined the possible functions of Xenopus Msx-1 during early Xenopus embryonic development by overexpression of the Msx-1 gene. Overexpression of Msx-1 causes a left-right mirror-image duplication of primary axial structures, including notochord, neural tube, somites, suckers, and foregut. The embryonic developing heart is also mirror-image duplicated, including looping directions and polarity. These results indicate that Msx-1 may be involved in the mesoderm formation as well as left-right patterning in the early Xenopus embryonic development.

  14. Early Infantile Leigh-like Gene Defects Have a Poor Prognosis: Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Alfadhel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Solute carrier family 19 (thiamine transporter, member 3 ( SCL19A3 gene defect produces an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder associated with different phenotypes and acronyms. One of the common presentations is early infantile lethal Leigh-like syndrome. We report a case of early infantile Leigh-like SLC19A3 gene defects of patients who died at 4 months of age with no response to a high dose of biotin and thiamine. In addition, we report a novel mutation that was not reported previously. Finally, we review the literature regarding early infantile Leigh-like SLC19A3 gene defects and compare the literature with our patient.

  15. Environmental Application of Reporter-Genes Based Biosensors for Chemical Contamination Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matejczyk Marzena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research concerning possibilities of applications of reporter-genes based microorganisms, including the selective presentation of defects and advantages of different new scientific achievements of methodical solutions in genetic system constructions of biosensing elements for environmental research. The most robust and popular genetic fusion and new trends in reporter genes technology – such as LacZ (β-galactosidase, xylE (catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, gfp (green fluorescent proteins and its mutated forms, lux (prokaryotic luciferase, luc (eukaryotic luciferase, phoA (alkaline phosphatase, gusA and gurA (β-glucuronidase, antibiotics and heavy metals resistance are described. Reporter-genes based biosensors with use of genetically modified bacteria and yeast successfully work for genotoxicity, bioavailability and oxidative stress assessment for detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and different environmental samples, surface water, soil, sediments.

  16. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A.; Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges; Martin-Duque, Pilar; Vieja, Antonio de la; Briat, Arnaud; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  17. Assessment of the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene to visualize oncolytic adenovirus propagation in peritoneal tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merron, Andrew; McNeish, Iain A. [Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Institute of Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Baril, Patrick; Tran, Lucile; Vassaux, Georges [CHU Hotel Dieu, INSERM, Nantes (France); CHU de Nantes, Institut des Maladies de l' Appareil Digestif, Nantes (France); Martin-Duque, Pilar [Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza (Spain); Vieja, Antonio de la [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Madrid (Spain); Briat, Arnaud [INSERM U877, Grenoble (France); Harrington, Kevin J. [Chester Beatty Laboratories, Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    In vivo imaging of the spread of oncolytic viruses using the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been proposed. Here, we assessed whether the presence of NIS in the viral genome affects the therapeutic efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947 following intraperitoneal administration, in a mouse model of peritoneal ovarian carcinoma. We generated AdAM7, a dl922-947 oncolytic adenovirus encoding the NIS coding sequence. Iodide uptake, NIS expression, infectivity and cell-killing activity of AdAM7, as well as that of relevant controls, were determined in vitro. In vivo, the propagation of this virus in the peritoneal cavity of tumour-bearing mice was determined using SPECT/CT imaging and its therapeutic efficacy was evaluated. In vitro infection of ovarian carcinoma IGROV-1 cells with ADAM7 led to functional expression of NIS. However, the insertion of NIS into the viral genome resulted in a loss of efficacy of the virus in terms of replication and cytotoxicity. In vivo, on SPECT/CT imaging AdAM7 was only detectable in the peritoneal cavity of animals bearing peritoneal ovarian tumours for up to 5 days after intraperitoneal administration. Therapeutic experiments in vivo demonstrated that AdAM7 is as potent as its NIS-negative counterpart. This study demonstrated that despite the detrimental effect observed in vitro, insertion of the reporter gene NIS in an oncolytic adenovirus did not affect its therapeutic efficacy in vivo. We conclude that NIS is a highly relevant reporter gene to monitor the fate of oncolytic adenovectors in live subjects. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility of baculovirus-mediated reporter gene delivery for efficient monitoring of islet transplantation in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuai; Pan, Yu; Lv, Jing; Wu, Haifei; Tian, Jingyan; Zhang, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the feasibility of baculovirus vector-mediated sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene delivery to monitor islet transplantation. Methods: Baculovirus vectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or NIS (Bac-GFP and Bac-NIS) were established using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. The GFP expression of Bac-GFP-infected rat islets was observed in vitro by fluorescence microscopy. Iodine uptake and inhibition of iodine uptake by NaClO 4 in Bac-NIS-infected islets were dynamically monitored in vitro. Bac-GFP- or Bac-NIS-infected islets were implanted into the left axillary cavity of NOD-SCID mice, and fluorescence imaging and 125 I NanoSPECT/CT imaging were subsequently performed in vivo. Results: Bac-GFP efficiently infected rat islets (over 95% infected at MOI = 40), and the expression of GFP lasted approximately two weeks. NaClO 4 could inhibit iodine uptake by Bac-NIS-infected islets. In vivo imaging revealed that the fluorescence intensity of the transplant sites in Bac-GFP-infected groups was significantly higher than in the non-infected group. Grafts could be clearly observed by 125 I NanoSPECT/CT imaging for up to 8 h. Conclusion: Baculovirus vectors are powerful vehicles for studying rat islets in gene delivery. It is feasible to use a baculovirus vector to delivery an NIS gene for non-invasive monitoring transplanted islets in vivo by the expression of the target gene

  19. Detection of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse in doping control using mammalian reporter gene bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtman, Corine J; Sterk, Saskia S; van de Heijning, Monique P M; Brouwer, Abraham; Stephany, Rainer W; van der Burg, Bart; Sonneveld, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are a class of steroid hormones related to the male hormone testosterone. They are frequently detected as drugs in sport doping control. Being similar to or derived from natural male hormones, AAS share the activation of the androgen receptor (AR) as common mechanism of action. The mammalian androgen responsive reporter gene assay (AR CALUX bioassay), measuring compounds interacting with the AR can be used for the analysis of AAS without the necessity of knowing their chemical structure beforehand, whereas current chemical-analytical approaches may have difficulty in detecting compounds with unknown structures, such as designer steroids. This study demonstrated that AAS prohibited in sports and potential designer AAS can be detected with this AR reporter gene assay, but that also additional steroid activities of AAS could be found using additional mammalian bioassays for other types of steroid hormones. Mixtures of AAS were found to behave additively in the AR reporter gene assay showing that it is possible to use this method for complex mixtures as are found in doping control samples, including mixtures that are a result of multi drug use. To test if mammalian reporter gene assays could be used for the detection of AAS in urine samples, background steroidal activities were measured. AAS-spiked urine samples, mimicking doping positive samples, showed significantly higher androgenic activities than unspiked samples. GC-MS analysis of endogenous androgens and AR reporter gene assay analysis of urine samples showed how a combined chemical-analytical and bioassay approach can be used to identify samples containing AAS. The results indicate that the AR reporter gene assay, in addition to chemical-analytical methods, can be a valuable tool for the analysis of AAS for doping control purposes.

  20. Applications of the Preclinical Molecular Imaging in Biomedicine: Gene Therapy; Aplicaciones de la Imagen Molecular Preclínica en Biomedicina: Terapia Génica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collantes, M.; Peñuelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Gene therapy constitutes a promising option for efficient and targeted treatment of several inherited disorders. Imaging techniques using ionizing radiation as PET or SPECT are used for non-invasive monitoring of the distribution and kinetics of vector-mediated gene expression. In this review the main reporter gene/reporter probe strategies are summarized, as well as the contribution of preclinical models to the development of this new imaging modality previously to its application in clinical arena. [Spanish] La terapia génica constituye una nueva y prometedora opción para un tratamiento eficiente y dirigido de numerosas enfermedades hereditarias. Las técnicas de imagen que utilizan radiaciones ionizantes como PET o SPECT son utilizadas para la monitorización no invasiva de la distribución y la cinética de la expresión génica mediada por distintos vectores. En este resumen se explican brevemente los principales sistemas gen reportero/sonda reportera que permiten la visualización in vivo de la expresión génica, así como la aportación de los modelos preclínicos al desarrollo de esta nueva estrategia de imagen previamente a su aplicación en el ámbito clínico.

  1. Transcription-Based Molecular Imaging and Gene Therapy for Castration-resistant and Metastatic Prostate Cancer in Translational Models

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Ziyue

    2013-01-01

    The advanced stage of prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death for American men. Novel, effective treatment options and more cancer-specific diagnostic tools are urgently needed to facilitate patient management. Here, we explored the construction and application of an array of gene-based molecular imaging and therapeutic vectors in a variety of clinically relevant settings. These vectors exploit prostate cancer-specific promoters to control the transcription of imag...

  2. Combination therapy and evaluation of therapeutic effect in hepatocellular carcinoma cell using triple reporter genes; containing for NIS, HSV1-sr39tk and GFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, You La; Lee, Yong Jin; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To identify therapeutic effect after combine Sodium Iodine Symporter (NIS) and Mutant Herpes-simplex virus type 1 sr39tk (HSV1-sr39tk) expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we transfected triple gene and investigated the properties of these gene ability in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After making vector with gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of HSV1-sr39tk and green florescence protein (GFP), to make triple reporter genes NIS gene was further fused to the vector using IRES vector. The vector expressing triple reporter gene was transfected to the Huh-7 cell line using liposome. Functions of hNIS and HSV1-sr39tk expression were confirmed by radio iodine uptake with and without perchlorate and [3H]-penciclovir (3-H PCV) uptake, respectively. To evaluate therapeutic effect in vitro, GCV and I-131 was treated in Huh-7/NTG cell and dual therapy performed. An animal imaging acquired using Optix and microPET in vivo. I-125 uptake was increased up to 100-fold compare to that of non-transfected cells. The transfected cell accumulated H-3 PCV up to 53 times higher at 2 hour than that of non-transfected cells. With fluorescence microscopy, green fluorescence was detected in the transfected cell. In cytotoxic studies, the cell viability of Huh-7/NTG cell was decreased to 41 % of control cell at 10ug/ml GCV concentrations. The survival rate of the Huh-7/NTG cell treated with I-131 decreased up to 16%. In I-131 and GCV dual therapy, Huh-7/NTG cell survival rate decreased up to 4%. In animal studies, Huh-7/NTG tumors showed higher uptake of 18F-FHBG and I-124 than Huh-7 tumors. GFP signal is also higher in Huh-7/NTG tumor than control. We successfully constructed a vector with delivery two therapeutic genes and one reporter gene and transfected the vector to a Huh-7 cell. The hepatocellular carcinoma cell transfected with the vector can be treated with GCV and I-131. The effect of dual gene therapy could be easily assessed by the optical reporter gene imaging.

  3. Imaging data analyses for hazardous waste applications. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, N.; Ginsberg, I.W.

    1995-12-01

    The paper presents some examples of the use of remote sensing products for characterization of hazardous waste sites. The sites are located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) where materials associated with past weapons testing are buried. Problems of interest include delineation of strata for soil sampling, detection and delineation of buried trenches containing contaminants, seepage from capped areas and old septic drain fields, and location of faults and fractures relative to hazardous waste areas. Merging of site map and other geographic information with imagery was found by site managers to produce useful products. Merging of hydrographic and soil contaminant data aided soil sampling strategists. Overlays of suspected trench on multispectral and thermal images showed correlation between image signatures and trenches. Overlays of engineering drawings on recent and historical photos showed error in trench location and extent. A thermal image showed warm anomalies suspected to be areas of water seepage through an asphalt cap. Overlays of engineering drawings on multispectral and thermal images showed correlation between image signatures and drain fields. Analysis of aerial photography and spectral signatures of faults/fractures improved geologic maps of mixed waste areas

  4. Synthesis of 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-5-iodo-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([{sup 18}F]-FIAU) and micro-PET imaging of suicide gene expression in tumor-bearing nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alauddin, M.M.; Shahinian, A.; Park, R.; Tohme, M.; Fissekis, J.D.; Conti, P.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). PET Imaging Science Center

    2004-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) is being used as a suicide gene for gene therapy of cancer. An in vivo method to assess the HSV1-tk enzyme activity after gene transfer is desirable to monitor gene expression as an indicator of gene delivery. Imaging of the HSV1-tk reporter gene along with various reporter probes is of current interest. We originally developed [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression and demonstrated that [{sup 18}F]-FHBG is more useful than [{sup 18}F]-FHPG for this purpose. [{sup 124}I]-FIAU has been shown to be a potential PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk gene expression, and is superior to [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG. We also demonstrated that radiolabeled FMAU can be used as a marker for HSV-tk gene expression, and is superior to [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG. Earlier we reported a synthesis for 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-5-methyl-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([{sup 18}F]-FMAU) and some other 5-substituted nucleosides. We have synthesized now [{sup 18}F]-FIAU, used the tracer for micro-PET imaging of suicide gene expression in tumor-bearing nude mice, and compared the results with earlier studies using [{sup 14}C]-FMAU. (orig.)

  5. Synthesis of 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-5-ethyl-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([{sup 18}F]-FEAU) and micro-PET imaging of HSV-tk gene expression in tumor-bearing nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alauddin, M.M.; Shahinian, A.; Park, R.; Tohme, M.; Fissekis, J.D.; Conti, P.S. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). PET Imaging Science Center

    2004-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) is being used as a suicide gene for gene therapy of cancer. An in vivo method to assess the HSV1-tk enzyme activity after gene transfer is desirable to monitor gene expression as an indicator of gene delivery. Imaging of the HSV1-tk reporter gene along with various reporter probes is of current interest. We originally developed [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG for PET imaging of HSV1-tk gene expression and demonstrated that [{sup 18}F]-FHBG is more useful than [{sup 18}F]-FHPG for this purpose. [{sup 124}I]-FIAU has been shown to be a potential PET imaging agent for HSV1-tk gene expression, and is superior to [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG. We also demonstrated that radiolabeled FMAU can be used as a marker for HSV-tk gene expression, and is superior to [{sup 18}F]-FHPG and [{sup 18}F]-FHBG. Earlier we reported a synthesis for 2'-deoxy-2'-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-5-methyl-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil ([{sup 18}F]-FMAU) and some other 5-substituted nucleosides. We have synthesized now [{sup 18}F]-FEAU, used the tracer for micro-PET imaging of suicide gene expression in tumor-bearing nude mice, and compared the results with earlier studies using [{sup 14}C]-FMAU. (orig.)

  6. Detection of estrogenic activity in sediment-associated compounds using in vitro reporter gene assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, J.; Dennekamp, M.; Vethaak, A.D.; Brouwer, A.; Koeman, J.H.; Burg, van der B.; Murk, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Sediments may be the ultimate sink for persistent (xeno-) estrogenic compounds released into the aquatic environment. Sediment-associated estrogenic potency was measured with an estrogen receptor-mediated luciferase reporter gene (ER-CALUX) assay and compared with a recombinant yeast screen. The

  7. A small scale cell culture system to analyze mechanobiology using reporter gene constructs and polyurethane dishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seefried, Lothar; Mueller-Deubert, Sigrid; Wentzer, Thomas Schwarz

    2010-01-01

    of mechanotransduction and its crosstalk with biochemically induced signal transduction, AP1 and SP1 luciferase reporter gene constructs were cloned and transfected into various cell lines and primary cells. A newly developed bioreactor and small-scale 24-well polyurethane dishes were used to apply cyclic stretching...

  8. New in vitro reporter gene bioassays for screening of hormonal active compounds in the environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svobodová, Kateřina; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2010), s. 839-847 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP503/10/0408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : endocrine disruptors * in vitro bioassays * reporter gene assays Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.280, year: 2010

  9. A case report on ATP6V0A4 gene mutation: Forecast of familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient does not have hearing impairment. ATP6V0A4 gene ... This case report emphasizes the significance of early diagnosis and genetic screening of recessive forms of ... Buffer defect /low buffer type distal RTA also involves the loss of ... weight of 4 Kg with no emergency treatment at the time of birth. Afterwards, his ...

  10. Final Project Report: Imaging Fault Zones Using a Novel Elastic Reverse-Time Migration Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Ting [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, Sirui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Kai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Imaging fault zones and fractures is crucial for geothermal operators, providing important information for reservoir evaluation and management strategies. However, there are no existing techniques available for directly and clearly imaging fault zones, particularly for steeply dipping faults and fracture zones. In this project, we developed novel acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion methods for high-resolution velocity model building. In addition, we developed acoustic and elastic reverse-time migration methods for high-resolution subsurface imaging of complex subsurface structures and steeply-dipping fault/fracture zones. We first evaluated and verified the improved capabilities of our newly developed seismic inversion and migration imaging methods using synthetic seismic data. Our numerical tests verified that our new methods directly image subsurface fracture/fault zones using surface seismic reflection data. We then applied our novel seismic inversion and migration imaging methods to a field 3D surface seismic dataset acquired at the Soda Lake geothermal field using Vibroseis sources. Our migration images of the Soda Lake geothermal field obtained using our seismic inversion and migration imaging algorithms revealed several possible fault/fracture zones. AltaRock Energy, Inc. is working with Cyrq Energy, Inc. to refine the geologic interpretation at the Soda Lake geothermal field. Trenton Cladouhos, Senior Vice President R&D of AltaRock, was very interested in our imaging results of 3D surface seismic data from the Soda Lake geothermal field. He planed to perform detailed interpretation of our images in collaboration with James Faulds and Holly McLachlan of University of Nevada at Reno. Using our high-resolution seismic inversion and migration imaging results can help determine the optimal locations to drill wells for geothermal energy production and reduce the risk of geothermal exploration.

  11. Skeletal and reticuloendothelial imaging in osteopetrosis: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.M.; Lambertus, J.

    1977-01-01

    Skeletal and reticuloendothelial images, using Tc-99m HEDP and Tc-99m sulfur colloid, respectively, were obtained from two adult patients with osteopetrosis. Skeletal images demonstrated increased activity in multiple fracture sites, in mandibular osteomyelitis, in ends of splayed long bones adjacent to joints, and in the epiphyseal ends of short tubular bones. The remainder of the skeleton involved with osteopetrosis showed no generalized increased uptake of Tc-99m HEDP. These findings indicate that metabolic activity in this disease is abnormally increased in the usual areas of bone growth but appears normal elsewhere. Reticuloendothelial imaging showed an almost total lack of activity in the axial and peripheral skeletal marrow space. Anemia, however, was only moderate in these patients. Skeletal scintigraphy may be useful to evaluate the presence and extent of the frequent complications of osteopetrosis, namely fractures and osteomyelitis

  12. Imaging Finding of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, Tae Jun; Cho, Hee Woo

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome with characteristic clinical and radiological manifestations. Many reports on MEN1 have been published; however, no cases of radiologically diagnosed MEN1 have been reported. Therefore, we report on a radiologically diagnosed case of MEN1 with clinical symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer.

  13. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  14. Providers' Access of Imaging Versus Only Reports: A System Log File Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hye-Young; Gichoya, Judy Wawira; Vest, Joshua R

    2017-02-01

    An increasing number of technologies allow providers to access the results of imaging studies. This study examined differences in access of radiology images compared with text-only reports through a health information exchange system by health care professionals. The study sample included 157,256 historical sessions from a health information exchange system that enabled 1,670 physicians and non-physicians to access text-based reports and imaging over the period 2013 to 2014. The primary outcome was an indicator of access of an imaging study instead of access of a text-only report. Multilevel mixed-effects regression models were used to estimate the association between provider and session characteristics and access of images compared with text-only reports. Compared with primary care physicians, specialists had an 18% higher probability of accessing actual images instead of text-only reports (β = 0.18; P < .001). Compared with primary care practice settings, the probability of accessing images was 4% higher for specialty care practices (P < .05) and 8% lower for emergency departments (P < .05). Radiologists, orthopedists, and neurologists accounted for 79% of all the sessions with actual images accessed. Orthopedists, radiologists, surgeons, and pulmonary disease specialists accessed imaging more often than text-based reports only. Consideration for differences in the need to access images compared with text-only reports based on the type of provider and setting of care are needed to maximize the benefits of image sharing for patient care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  16. Visualization of gene expression in the live subject using the Na/I symporter as a reporter gene: applications in biotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Patrick; Martin-Duque, Pilar; Vassaux, Georges

    2010-02-01

    Biotherapies involve the utilization of antibodies, genetically modified viruses, bacteria or cells for therapeutic purposes. Molecular imaging has the potential to provide unique information that will guarantee their biosafety in humans and provide a rationale for the future development of new generations of reagents. In this context, non-invasive imaging of gene expression is an attractive prospect, allowing precise, spacio-temporal measurements of gene expression in longitudinal studies involving gene transfer vectors. With the emergence of cell therapies in regenerative medicine, it is also possible to track cells injected into subjects. In this context, the Na/I symporter (NIS) has been used in preclinical studies. Associated with a relevant radiotracer ((123)I(-), (124)I(-), (99m)TcO4(-)), NIS can be used to monitor gene transfer and the spread of selectively replicative viruses in tumours as well as in cells with a therapeutic potential. In addition to its imaging potential, NIS can be used as a therapeutic transgene through its ability to concentrate therapeutic doses of radionuclides in target cells. This dual property has applications in cancer treatment and could also be used to eradicate cells with therapeutic potential in the case of adverse events. Through experience acquired in preclinical studies, we can expect that non-invasive molecular imaging using NIS as a transgene will be pivotal for monitoring in vivo the exact distribution and pharmacodynamics of gene expression in a precise and quantitative way. This review highlights the applications of NIS in biotherapy, with a particular emphasis on image-guided radiotherapy, monitoring of gene and vector biodistribution and trafficking of stem cells.

  17. MR imaging findings of renal capsular leiomyoma : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dal Mo; Yoon, Myung Hwan; Kim, Hak Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Chung, Jin Woo; Cho, Hyun I; Lee, Jong Bouk [Gachon Medical college Gil Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-06-01

    In the literature, descriptions of the MR findings of renal leiomyoma are rare. We present the MR findings of a capsular leiomyoma of the kidney in which hypointensity relative to normal renal parenchyma was seen on both T1-and T2-weighted MR images.

  18. MR imaging findings of renal capsular leiomyoma : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dal Mo; Yoon, Myung Hwan; Kim, Hak Soo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Chung, Jin Woo; Cho, Hyun I; Lee, Jong Bouk

    1999-01-01

    In the literature, descriptions of the MR findings of renal leiomyoma are rare. We present the MR findings of a capsular leiomyoma of the kidney in which hypointensity relative to normal renal parenchyma was seen on both T1-and T2-weighted MR images

  19. Ruptured splenic epidermoid cyst: case report and imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, N.J.B.; Arthur, R.J.; Stringer, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    Traumatic rupture of a splenic epidermoid cyst is a rare but recognised cause of ''acute abdomen'' in a child. We describe such a case occurring after very minor trauma, show the influence that imaging had in making an accurate diagnosis, and discuss how this influenced clinical management. (orig.). With 1 fig

  20. Ruptured splenic epidermoid cyst: case report and imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, N.J.B. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Clarendon Wing, General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Arthur, R.J. [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Clarendon Wing, General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Stringer, M.D. [Department of Paediatric Surgery, General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Traumatic rupture of a splenic epidermoid cyst is a rare but recognised cause of ``acute abdomen`` in a child. We describe such a case occurring after very minor trauma, show the influence that imaging had in making an accurate diagnosis, and discuss how this influenced clinical management. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  1. Inter-Association Task Force Report on Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Special Libraries Association, Washington, DC.

    In 1988, the Board of Directors of the Special Libraries Association provided funding to a task force to gather data which would determine how certain segments of society perceive librarians, how librarians view themselves and their colleagues, and to provide recommendations for addressing the issue of image. The task force project consisted of…

  2. Granular Cell Tumor of the Neurohypophysis: A Case Report with Magnetic Resonance and CT Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Ka Yeon; Lee, Sun Jin; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeon Soo [Dept. of Pathology, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeun, Shin Soo [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A granular cell tumor (GCT) usually occurs as a small, solitary, nodular tumor and is more prevalent in adult females. The authors report the magnetic resonance (MR) and CT imaging findings in a 61-year-old woman with GCT of the neurohypophysis presenting with a history of reduced visual acuity in her right eye. MR images showed a suprasellar mass with an isointense signal on a T1-weighted image and an hypointense signal on a T2-weighted image. The histopathological examination revealed a granular cell tumor. In this article, the MR and CT imaging findings of GCT of the neurohypophysis with the literature reviews are discussed.

  3. Granular Cell Tumor of the Neurohypophysis: A Case Report with Magnetic Resonance and CT Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Ka Yeon; Lee, Sun Jin; Ahn, Kook Jin; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Bum Soo; Lee, Yeon Soo; Jeun, Shin Soo

    2011-01-01

    A granular cell tumor (GCT) usually occurs as a small, solitary, nodular tumor and is more prevalent in adult females. The authors report the magnetic resonance (MR) and CT imaging findings in a 61-year-old woman with GCT of the neurohypophysis presenting with a history of reduced visual acuity in her right eye. MR images showed a suprasellar mass with an isointense signal on a T1-weighted image and an hypointense signal on a T2-weighted image. The histopathological examination revealed a granular cell tumor. In this article, the MR and CT imaging findings of GCT of the neurohypophysis with the literature reviews are discussed.

  4. Splicing defect in FKBP10 gene causes autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghami, Fatemeh; Tabei, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Moravej, Hossein; Dastsooz, Hassan; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Silawi, Mohammad; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2018-05-25

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of connective tissue disorder caused by mutations of genes involved in the production of collagen and its supporting proteins. Although the majority of reported OI variants are in COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes, recent reports have shown problems in other non-collagenous genes involved in the post translational modifications, folding and transport, transcription and proliferation of osteoblasts, bone mineralization, and cell signaling. Up to now, 17 types of OI have been reported in which types I to IV are the most frequent cases with autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Here we report an 8- year- old boy with OI who has had multiple fractures since birth and now he is wheelchair-dependent. To identify genetic cause of OI in our patient, whole exome sequencing (WES) was carried out and it revealed a novel deleterious homozygote splice acceptor site mutation (c.1257-2A > G, IVS7-2A > G) in FKBP10 gene in the patient. Then, the identified mutation was confirmed using Sanger sequencing in the proband as homozygous and in his parents as heterozygous, indicating its autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. In addition, we performed RT-PCR on RNA transcripts originated from skin fibroblast of the proband to analyze the functional effect of the mutation on splicing pattern of FKBP10 gene and it showed skipping of the exon 8 of this gene. Moreover, Real-Time PCR was carried out to quantify the expression level of FKBP10 in the proband and his family members in which it revealed nearly the full decrease in the level of FKBP10 expression in the proband and around 75% decrease in its level in the carriers of the mutation, strongly suggesting the pathogenicity of the mutation. Our study identified, for the first time, a private pathogenic splice site mutation in FKBP10 gene and further prove the involvement of this gene in the rare cases of autosomal recessive OI type XI with distinguished clinical manifestations.

  5. SERS imaging of cell-surface biomolecules metabolically labeled with bioorthogonal Raman reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Lin, Liang; Li, Zefan; Liu, Jie; Hong, Senlian; Li, Yaya; Zheng, Meiling; Duan, Xuanming; Chen, Xing

    2014-08-01

    Live imaging of biomolecules with high specificity and sensitivity as well as minimal perturbation is essential for studying cellular processes. Here, we report the development of a bioorthogonal surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) imaging approach that exploits small Raman reporters for visualizing cell-surface biomolecules. The cells were cultured and imaged by SERS microscopy on arrays of Raman-enhancing nanoparticles coated on silicon wafers or glass slides. The Raman reporters including azides, alkynes, and carbondeuterium bonds are small in size and spectroscopically bioorthogonal (background-free). We demonstrated that various cell-surface biomolecules including proteins, glycans, and lipids were metabolically incorporated with the corresponding precursors bearing a Raman reporter and visualized by SERS microscopy. The coupling of SERS microscopy with bioorthogonal Raman reporters expands the capabilities of live-cell microscopy beyond the modalities of fluorescence and label-free imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Flexible Measurement of Bioluminescent Reporters Using an Automated Longitudinal Luciferase Imaging Gas- and Temperature-optimized Recorder (ALLIGATOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Priya; Hoyle, Nathaniel P; O'Neill, John S

    2017-12-13

    Luciferase-based reporters of cellular gene expression are in widespread use for both longitudinal and end-point assays of biological activity. In circadian rhythms research, for example, clock gene fusions with firefly luciferase give rise to robust rhythms in cellular bioluminescence that persist over many days. Technical limitations associated with photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or conventional microscopy-based methods for bioluminescence quantification have typically demanded that cells and tissues be maintained under quite non-physiological conditions during recording, with a trade-off between sensitivity and throughput. Here, we report a refinement of prior methods that allows long-term bioluminescence imaging with high sensitivity and throughput which supports a broad range of culture conditions, including variable gas and humidity control, and that accepts many different tissue culture plates and dishes. This automated longitudinal luciferase imaging gas- and temperature-optimized recorder (ALLIGATOR) also allows the observation of spatial variations in luciferase expression across a cell monolayer or tissue, which cannot readily be observed by traditional methods. We highlight how the ALLIGATOR provides vastly increased flexibility for the detection of luciferase activity when compared with existing methods.

  7. Diagnostic imaging of Klippel-Feil syndrome: conventional radiography, CT and MR imaging. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochens, R.; Schubeus, P.; Steinkamp, H.J.; Menzhausen, L.; Felix, R.

    1993-01-01

    In two patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome, type II radiographic findings of the malformation are shown in the cervical spine and the craniocervical junction. Conventional X-rays of the cervical spine in the AP and lateral view and conventional tomography as well as CT of the cervical spine were obtained in both patients. One of the two patients additionally underwent MR imaging. Findings of the different imaging modalities are compared with each other. (orig.) [de

  8. In vivo imaging agents: an international market report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a global perspective of the in vivo imaging agents business to market planning executives who are working for companies that develop, produce and distribute various types of in vivo imaging agents. Others that could find this study useful include investment bankers, regulatory and governmental authorities and purchasers of these products. The study attempts to diligently provide market data by type for important geographic markets - Western Europe, the U.S.A., and Japan. A competitive intelligence section which discusses companies involved in these markets constitutes the last part of this study. These profiles are not intended to extensively evaluate each company's marketing strengths or strategies but to provide a general idea of the market presence and prospects. A combination of primary and secondary research is used for all findings. (author)

  9. MR imaging of eosinophilic granuloma: report of 11 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schepper, A M.A. de [Department of Medical Imaging, Univ. Hospital, Antwerp, (Belgium)1; Ramon, F [Department of Medical Imaging, Univ. Hospital, Antwerp, (Belgium)1; Marck, E van [Department of Pathology, University Hospital, Antwerp (Belgium)2

    1993-04-01

    The findings in 11 patients with histologically proven eosinophilic granuloma (EG) examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are described. In contrast with the variable appearance of EG on conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT), relatively constant features - intermediate to high signal intensity on T1-weighting, high signal intensity of T2-weighting, marked enhancement - were found on MRI. MRI was superior to other imaging methods in demonstrating bone marrow involvement and any accompanying soft tissue mass or inflammation. Intermediate to high signal intensity on T1-weighting and marked contrast enhancement could not be 'explained' by histological findings. Prediction of the evolutionary phase of EG by MRI remains questionable because of the phase I (proliferative) histology of all 11 lesions. (orig.)

  10. Imaging manifestation of cerebral gumma: report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Ming; Miao Tizong; Zheng Luping; Zhang Shilin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the imaging manifestations of cerebral gumma. Methods: Three cases of surgically proved cerebral gumma were analyzed. All patients had history of ultra-marriage sexual life, and the laboratory tests, including the serums and/or the cerebrospinal fluid test, highly indicated the diagnosis of syphilis. Pathological results demonstrated cerebral gumma after operation. Results: On CT scan, case 1 showed a 5.0 cm x 3.5 cm hypo-density area at left temporal lobe with obvious mass effect, and post-contrast CT scan revealed a rim enhancement. MR scanning was not performed. In case 2, a mixture lesion was detected on right frontal lobe on pre-contrast CT scan, and spot-like central enhancement and mild mass effect were demonstrated on postcontrast CT scan. Pre-contrast T 1 WI showed 2 round lesions situated at right frontal lobe (1.5 cm in diameter) and right periventricular areas (1.0 cm in diameter), separately, which showed iso-signal on T 1 WI and hyper-signal on T 2 WI, and ring-like enhancement with slight compression of the right lateral ventricle. In case 3, CT plain scan demonstrated multiple hypo-dense lesions, most of the lesions located on both frontal lobe and left temporal lobe, and enhanced CT scan was not performed. MR imaging revealed many nodule and mass lesions with hypo-signal on T 1 WI and hyper-signal on T 2 WI, located on both hemispheres with nodular or circular enhancement after injection of contrast media. Conclusion: The imaging manifestations of cerebral gumma were nonspecific. Thus, the preoperational diagnosis should be made combining the clinical, laboratory, and imaging data

  11. A novel mutation in the SH3BP2 gene causes cherubism: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shi-Feng

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cherubism is a rare hereditary multi-cystic disease of the jaws, characterized by its typical appearance in early childhood, and stabilization and remission after puberty. It is genetically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion and the gene coding for SH3-binding protein 2 (SH3BP2 may be involved. Case presentation We investigated a family consisting of 21 members with 3 female affected individuals with cherubism from Northern China. Of these 21 family members, 17 were recruited for the genetic analysis. We conducted the direct sequence analysis of the SH3BP2 gene among these 17 family members. A disease-causing mutation was identified in exon 9 of the gene. It was an A1517G base change, which leads to a D419G amino acid substitution. Conclusion To our knowledge, the A1517G mutation has not been reported previously in cherubism. This finding is novel.

  12. Case report of novel CACNA1A gene mutation causing episodic ataxia type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alan Isaacs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Episodic ataxia type 2 (OMIM 108500 is an autosomal dominant channelopathy characterized by paroxysms of ataxia, vertigo, nausea, and other neurologic symptoms. More than 50 mutations of the CACNA1A gene have been discovered in families with episodic ataxia type 2, although 30%–50% of all patients with typical episodic ataxia type 2 phenotype have no detectable mutation of the CACNA1A gene. Case: A 46-year-old Caucasian man, with a long history of bouts of imbalance, vertigo, and nausea, presented to our hospital with 2 weeks of ataxia and headache. Subsequent evaluation revealed a novel mutation in the CACNA1A gene: c.1364 G > A Arg455Gln. Acetazolamide was initiated with symptomatic improvement. Conclusion: This case report expands the list of known CACNA1A mutations associated with episodic ataxia type 2.

  13. Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting asymmetric cortical high-intensity on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yuko; Kimura, Noriyuki; Hanaoka, Takuya; Aso, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Teruyuki; Murai, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Katsuya; Matsubara, Etsuro

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a genetically confirmed case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with a prion protein gene codon 180 mutation presenting atypical magnetic resonance imaging findings. The present case exhibited an acute onset and lateralized neurologic signs, and progressive cognitive impairment. No myoclonus or periodic synchronous discharges on electroencephalography were observed. Diffusion-weighted images revealed areas of high signal intensity in the right frontal and temporal cortices at onset that extended to the whole cortex and basal ganglia of the right cerebral hemisphere at 3 months. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was initially negative for neuron specific enolase, tau protein, 14-3-3 protein, and abnormal prion protein, the CSF was positive for these brain-derived proteins at 3 months after onset.

  14. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Susan J.; Andronikou, Savvas; Kilborn, Tracy; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  15. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Susan J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Radiology Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kilborn, Tracy [University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Kaplan, Bernard S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Nephrology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  16. CT and magnetic resonance imaging finding of lipomatous hemanioperisytoma of skull base: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Girl; Yu, In Kyu; Kim, Han Kyu; Kim, Seung Min; Kang, Dong Wook [Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    Lipomatous hemangiopericytoma (LHPC) is recently recognized as a rare hemangiopericytoma variant. To our knowledge, imaging features of LHPC involving skull base have not yet been reported. We present the imaging features of LHPC of skull base in a 44-year-old female, along with a literature review CT and magnetic resonance imagings showed well-enhanced fatty issues containing temporal skull base masses, with pressure bony erosions.

  17. Effect of high image compression on the reproducibility of cardiac Sestamibi reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Allen, L.; Beuzeville, S.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Compression algorithms have been mooted to minimize storage space and transmission times of digital images. We assessed the impact of high-level lousy compression using JPEG and wavelet algorithms on image quality and reporting accuracy of cardiac Sestamibi studies. Twenty stress/rest Sestamibi cardiac perfusion studies were reconstructed into horizontal short, vertical long and horizontal long axis slices using conventional methods. Each of these six sets of slices were aligned for reporting and saved (uncompressed) as a bitmap. This bitmap was then compressed using JPEG compression, then decompressed and saved as a bitmap for later viewing. This process was repeated using the original bitmap and wavelet compression. Finally, a second copy of the original bitmap was made. All 80 bitmaps were randomly coded to ensure blind reporting. The bitmaps were read blinded and by consensus of 2 experienced nuclear medicine physicians using a 5-point scale and 25 cardiac segments. Subjective image quality was also reported using a 3-point scale. Samples of the compressed images were also subtracted from the original bitmap for visual comparison of differences. Results showed an average compression ratio of 23:1 for wavelet and 13:1 for JPEG. Image subtraction showed only very minor discordance between the original and compressed images. There was no significant difference in subjective quality between the compressed and uncompressed images. There was no significant difference in reporting reproducibility of the identical bitmap copy, the JPEG image and the wavelet image compared with the original bitmap. Use of the high compression algorithms described had no significant impact on reporting reproducibility and subjective image quality of cardiac Sestamibi perfusion studies

  18. Informatics in radiology: automated structured reporting of imaging findings using the AIM standard and XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Stefan L; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and descriptive imaging data are a vital component of the radiology report and are frequently of paramount importance to the ordering physician. Unfortunately, current methods of recording these data in the report are both inefficient and error prone. In addition, the free-text, unstructured format of a radiology report makes aggregate analysis of data from multiple reports difficult or even impossible without manual intervention. A structured reporting work flow has been developed that allows quantitative data created at an advanced imaging workstation to be seamlessly integrated into the radiology report with minimal radiologist intervention. As an intermediary step between the workstation and the reporting software, quantitative and descriptive data are converted into an extensible markup language (XML) file in a standardized format specified by the Annotation and Image Markup (AIM) project of the National Institutes of Health Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. The AIM standard was created to allow image annotation data to be stored in a uniform machine-readable format. These XML files containing imaging data can also be stored on a local database for data mining and analysis. This structured work flow solution has the potential to improve radiologist efficiency, reduce errors, and facilitate storage of quantitative and descriptive imaging data for research. Copyright © RSNA, 2011.

  19. Reporting of quantitative oxygen mapping in EPR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; McMillan, Alan; Matsumoto, Shingo; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Saito, Keita; Mitchell, James B.; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V. R.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen maps derived from electron paramagnetic resonance spectral-spatial imaging (EPRI) are based upon the relaxivity of molecular oxygen with paramagnetic spin probes. This technique can be combined with MRI to facilitate mapping of pO 2 values in specific anatomic locations with high precision. The co-registration procedure, which matches the physical and digital dimensions of EPR and MR images, may present the pO 2 map at the higher MRI resolution, exaggerating the spatial resolution of oxygen, making it difficult to precisely distinguish hypoxic regions from normoxic regions. The latter distinction is critical in monitoring the treatment of cancer by radiation and chemotherapy, since it is well-established that hypoxic regions are three or four times more resistant to treatment compared to normoxic regions. The aim of this article is to describe pO 2 maps based on the intrinsic resolution of EPRI. A spectral parameter that affects the intrinsic spatial resolution of EPRI is the full width at half maximum (FWHM) height of the gradient-free EPR absorption line in frequency-encoded imaging. In single point imaging too, the transverse relaxation times (T2∗) limit the resolution since the signal decays by exp(-tp/T2∗) where the delay time after excitation pulse, t p, is related to the resolution. Although the spin densities of two point objects may be resolved at this separation, it is inadequate to evaluate quantitative changes of pO 2 levels since the linewidths are proportionately affected by pO 2. A spatial separation of at least twice this resolution is necessary to correctly identify a change in pO 2 level. In addition, the pO 2 values are blurred by uncertainties arising from spectral dimensions. Blurring due to noise and low resolution modulates the pO 2 levels at the boundaries of hypoxic and normoxic regions resulting in higher apparent pO 2 levels in hypoxic regions. Therefore, specification of intrinsic resolution and pO 2 uncertainties are

  20. Dark Energy Studies with LSST Image Simulations, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, John Russell

    2016-01-01

    This grant funded the development and dissemination of the Photon Simulator (PhoSim) for the purpose of studying dark energy at high precision with the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) astronomical survey. The work was in collaboration with the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Several detailed physics improvements were made in the optics, atmosphere, and sensor, a number of validation studies were performed, and a significant number of usability features were implemented. Future work in DESC will use PhoSim as the image simulation tool for data challenges used by the analysis groups.

  1. Functional MR imaging of psychogenic amnesia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Lee, Moo Suk; Kang, Heoung Keun; Eun, Sung Jong; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Yong Ku

    2005-01-01

    We present here a case in which functional MR imaging (fMRI) was done for a patient who developed retrograde psychogenic amnesia for a four year period of her life history after a severe stressful event. We performed the fMRI study for a face recognition task using stimulation with three kinds of face photographs: recognizable familiar faces, unrecognizable friends' faces due to the psychogenic amnesia, and unfamiliar control faces. Different activation patterns between the recognizable faces and unrecognizable faces were found in the limbic area, and especially in the amygdala and hippocampus

  2. Magnetic Resonance imaging findings of intraspinal neurenteric cyst: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Wook; Yoon, Choon Sik; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Chung, Tae Sub

    1994-01-01

    Intraspinal neurenteric cysts are rare congenital lesions that results from abnormal separation of germ layers in the third week of embryonic development, which may cause spinal compression. Although, the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst was very difficult prior to operation, MRI has proven to be a useful imaging modality in detection, localization and characterization of intraspinal neurenteric cysts. We recently experienced intraspinal neurenteric cyst in two patients who presented with progressive guadriparesis. Myelography, CT myelography and MRI were taken and complete excision was performed. The MRI findings are presented and the literature is reviewed

  3. Functional MR imaging of psychogenic amnesia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Lee, Moo Suk; Kang, Heoung Keun; Eun, Sung Jong; Lee, Yo Han [Chonnam National Univeristy Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Ku [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    We present here a case in which functional MR imaging (fMRI) was done for a patient who developed retrograde psychogenic amnesia for a four year period of her life history after a severe stressful event. We performed the fMRI study for a face recognition task using stimulation with three kinds of face photographs: recognizable familiar faces, unrecognizable friends' faces due to the psychogenic amnesia, and unfamiliar control faces. Different activation patterns between the recognizable faces and unrecognizable faces were found in the limbic area, and especially in the amygdala and hippocampus.

  4. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes

  5. Phytoalexin detoxification genes and gene products: Implication for the evolution of host specific traits for pathogenicity. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanEtten, H.

    1997-06-01

    The overall objectives of this research were to determine which differences among PDA genes were associated with different levels of virulence on pea and to clone and characterize a MAK gene. The authors also proposed to characterize the pisatin detoxifying system in pea pathogens in addition to N. haematococca to assess whether pathogens of a common host had evolved similar pathogenicity genes.

  6. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS SPECIAL... Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, or the United Kingdom must be reported to BIS...

  7. In vivo image of radioiodinated IVDU and IVFRU in HSV-TK gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Sup; Choi, T. H.; Ahn, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Lee, S. J.; Choi, C. W. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    The extent of gene delivery and expression in gene therapy with suicide genes such as herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is assessed with measurement of selective localization of radioiodinated HSV-tk substrates in HSV-tk expressing tumor. We compared n vitro uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU, IVFRU and in vivo image of HSV-tk gene tranduced hepatocellular carcinoma model. Using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}(hydrogen peroxide), IVDU and IVFRU was radiolabeled as carrier free form. The uptake of {sup 125}I-IVDU IVFRU was determined with increasing incubation periods in MCA-tk and MCA cell line (1X10{sup 6}cell/flask). The cell harvested and counted after incubation of 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 minutes. For estimating accumulation of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing tumor, MCA-tk cells (1 X 10{sup 6}/100 {mu}l) injected intramuscularly into right thigh of buffalo rats. To determine selective localization of radiolabelled IVDU, IVFRU in HSV-tk expressing hepatocellular carcinoma bearing buffalo rats, MCA-tk cells (1X 10{sup 7} cell/100 {mu}l) were injected subcutaneously into both shoulders of buffalo rats. Established tumor mass implanted into liver of buffalo rats using intra-hepatic tumor injection. Two weeks later, {sup 123}I labelled IVDU, IVFRU(7.4 X 10{sup 7}Bq/200 {mu}l) injected intravenously into tail veins of each buffalo rats. Gamma camera used as revealing localization of {sup 123}I-IVDU, IVFRU in MCA-tk cells grafts rats and in vivo image was taken 2 hrs, 24 hrs after injection. radioiodinated IVDU, IVFRU were radiolabeled with {sup 123}I as labeling yield 70%, {sup 125}I as 84%. Two compounds showed minimal uptake in MCA cell line, but in MCA-tk cell line, increased uptake was observed. The ratio of MCA-tk to MCA was up to 116-fold in {sup 125}I-IVDU, up to 37-fold in {sup 125}I-IVFRU at 480 min. The uptake of IVDU was 4 times higher than IVFRU in MCA-tk cells. Gamma camera images of HSV-tk gene tranduced MCA tumor showed accumulation of {sup 123}I

  8. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of transplanted kidneys: Preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wypych-Klunder, Katarzyna; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Lemanowicz, Adam; Szczęsny, Wojciech; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    An aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DWI in the early period after kidney transplantation. We also aimed to compare ADC and eADC values in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, to estimate image noise and variability of measurements, and to verify possible relation between selected labolatory results and diffusion parameters in the transplanted kidney. Examinations were performed using a 1.5 T MR unit. DWI (SE/EPI) was performed in the axial plane using b-values of 600 and 1000. ADC and eADC measurements were performed in four regions of interest within the renal cortex and in three regions within the medulla. Relative variability of results and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated. The analysis included 15 patients (mean age 52 years). The mean variability of ADC was significantly lower than that of eADC (6.8% vs. 10.8%, respectively; p30 ml/min./1.73 m(2) (p<0.05). Diffusion-weighted imaging of transplanted kidneys is technically challenging, especially in patients in the early period after transplantation. From a technical point of view, the best quality parameters offer quality ADC measurement in the renal cortex using b1000. ADC and eADC values in the renal cortex measured at b1000 present a relationship with eGFR.

  9. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper

    2011-01-01

    A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFα antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NFκB regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...... with a high degree of precision within 2h, and without interference from cytokines and other factors known to activate NFκB. The assay cells also contain the Renilla luciferase reporter gene under the control of a constitutive promoter that allows TNFα-induced firefly luciferase activity to be normalized...... relative to Renilla luciferase expression. Thus, results are independent of cell number or differences in cell viability, resulting in intra and inter assay coefficients of variation of 10% or less. Normalization of results relative to the expression of an internal standard also provides a means...

  10. Late onset bipolar disorder and frontotemporal dementia with mutation in progranulin gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, Elisa; Vacca, Alessandro; Gallone, Salvatore; Govone, Flora; Zucca, Milena; Gai, Annalisa; Ferrero, Patrizia; Fenoglio, Pierpaola; Giordana, Maria Teresa; Rainero, Innocenzo

    2017-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a chronic psychiatric illness characterised by fluctuation in mood state, with a relapsing and remitting course. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with the most frequent phenotype being behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). Here, we report the case of an Italian male presenting with late-onset bipolar disorder that developed into bvFTD over time, carrying a mutation in the GRN gene. Interestingly, the patient carried the c.1639 C > T variant in the GRN gene, resulting in a R547C substitution. Our case report further corroborates the notion that, in addition to FTD, progranulin may be involved in the neurobiology of bipolar disorder type 1, and suggests to screen patients with late-onset bipolar disorder for GRN mutations.

  11. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S. [Technical Univ. of Muenchen, (Germany). Childrens' Hospital; Auer, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma.

  12. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S.; Auer, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma

  13. Advances in gene therapy of myocardial ischemia and the monitoring with molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guopeng; Zhang Yongxue

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are harmful for people. Recent advances in understanding the molecular basis of cardiovascular diseases, together with some studies of the gene therapy on cardiovascular disorders, have offered possibilities for new treatments. Gene therapies have demonstrated potential usefulness in treating myocardial ischemia. Therefore, the monitoring of the expression of therapy gene and therapeutic efficacy has become an important issue. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G.; Pawlik, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G. [University Hospital Regensburg, Institute of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Pawlik, Michael T. [Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Institute of Anaesthesiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. Malignant melanoma arising from a perianal fistula and harbouring a BRAF gene mutation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Lozoya, Rafael; Boldó, Enrique; Bosch, Nuria; Peñas, Lucas; Flores-Couce, Esther; Ochoa, Enrique; Munárriz, Javier; Aracil, Juan P; Tajahuerce, Marcos; Royo, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma of the anal region is a very uncommon disease, accounting for only 0.2-0.3% of all melanoma cases. Mutations of the BRAF gene are usually absent in melanomas occurring in this region as well as in other sun-protected regions. The development of a tumour in a longstanding perianal fistula is also extremely rare. More frequent is the case of a tumour presenting as a fistula, that is, the fistula being a consequence of the cancerous process, although we have found only two cases of fistula-generating melanomas reported in the literature. Here we report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with a perianal fistula of four years of evolution. Histopathological examination of the fistulous tract confirmed the presence of malignant melanoma. Due to the small size and the central location of the melanoma inside the fistulous tract, we believe the melanoma reported here developed in the epithelium of the fistula once the latter was already formed. Resected sentinel lymph nodes were negative and the patient, after going through a wide local excision, remains disease-free nine years after diagnosis. DNA obtained from melanoma tissue was analysed by automated direct sequencing and the V600E (T1799A) mutation was detected in exon 15 of the BRAF gene. Since fistulae experience persistent inflammation, the fact that this melanoma harbours a BRAF mutation strengthens the view that oxidative stress caused by inflammatory processes plays an important role in the genesis of BRAF gene mutations

  17. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    We continue to improve the operation of PCR-I, a single ring demonstration ststem employing analog coding to achieve high resolution (4 to 5 mm), high sensitivity (45,000 c/s/ Ci/cc) and high sampling frequency without interpolative motion. This device is designed for brain imaging in humans and for animal studies. An intensive program of software development was carried out concurrently with hardware development and led to the PL/S computer system used for PCI and PCII. Subsequently, more powerful systems were developed using a Data General Eclipse computer and, more recently, an IBM PC/AT computer with array processor. This experience gives us confidence that we can develop a computer system capable of handling the data processes and display requirements of PCR-II. 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Electrical Resistance Tomography for Subsurface Imaging. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) noninvasively maps the 3-D resistivity field in the subsurface. It can be used on a scale from feet to kilometers. The 3-D resistivity field can be used to infer subsurface hydrogeological features and provides good resolution mapping of confining layers of various types. ERT imaging has been used for real-time monitoring and process control of remediation processes such as soil heating, pump and treat, steam injection, electrokinetics, Dynamic Underground Stripping (TechID 7), Hydrous Pyrolysis/Oxidation (TechID 1519) and more. ERT can be deployed via rapid and inexpensive installation of electrodes using a Cone Penetrometer (TechID 243). Additional applications are described under TechID 140 (Tanks) and TechID 2120 (Injected Subsurface Barriers); see also the related technology TechID 2121 (EIT)

  19. First reported case of human Australian bat Lyssavirus encephalitis - A case report and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, S.E.; Walker, D.; Fomg, W.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia). Departments of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology

    1998-06-01

    Full text: In late 1996, a bat carer from Rockhampton died from diffuse encephalitis. She had sustained several scratches to her left arm by fruit bats over the preceding month. She initially complained of left arm pain and numbness but her condition rapidly deteriorated with loss of consciousness and death. Australian bat Lyssavirus (ABL) was detected in her cerebrospinal fluid and neutralising antibodies to classical rabies virus in her serum. Other viral serology was negative. Autopsy revealed neuronal intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions and electron microscopy showed bullet shaped viral particles. A Tc-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) brain scan demonstrated extensive bilateral areas of severely reduced tracer uptake in both cerebral hemispheres with the subfrontal and parieto-occipital regions the worst affected. Importantly, there was excellent correlation with the magnetic resonance image which showed diffuse cortical high signal on all pulse sequences most marked in the parieto-occipital areas. The CT scan performed at presentation had been normal and an earlier MRI had shown only a small enhancing pontine lesion. This is the first reported case of human infection by the newly identified ABL that has previously only been isolated in fruit bats. The virus belongs to the Rhabdovirus family and Lyssavirus genus and joins six other genotypes, one of which is the classic rabies virus. It has now been identified in four species of Australian fruit bats from north Queensland to Victoria. There is a paucity of knowledge relating to the distribution and transmission of the virus and research is underway to determine the potential public health risk

  20. First reported case of human Australian bat Lyssavirus encephalitis - A case report and imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.E.; Walker, D.; Fomg, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In late 1996, a bat carer from Rockhampton died from diffuse encephalitis. She had sustained several scratches to her left arm by fruit bats over the preceding month. She initially complained of left arm pain and numbness but her condition rapidly deteriorated with loss of consciousness and death. Australian bat Lyssavirus (ABL) was detected in her cerebrospinal fluid and neutralising antibodies to classical rabies virus in her serum. Other viral serology was negative. Autopsy revealed neuronal intracytoplasmic eosinophilic inclusions and electron microscopy showed bullet shaped viral particles. A Tc-99m hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) brain scan demonstrated extensive bilateral areas of severely reduced tracer uptake in both cerebral hemispheres with the subfrontal and parieto-occipital regions the worst affected. Importantly, there was excellent correlation with the magnetic resonance image which showed diffuse cortical high signal on all pulse sequences most marked in the parieto-occipital areas. The CT scan performed at presentation had been normal and an earlier MRI had shown only a small enhancing pontine lesion. This is the first reported case of human infection by the newly identified ABL that has previously only been isolated in fruit bats. The virus belongs to the Rhabdovirus family and Lyssavirus genus and joins six other genotypes, one of which is the classic rabies virus. It has now been identified in four species of Australian fruit bats from north Queensland to Victoria. There is a paucity of knowledge relating to the distribution and transmission of the virus and research is underway to determine the potential public health risk

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging in polymicrogyria: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Prasad, K.N.; Hasan, K.M.; Hou, P.; Narayana, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Polymicrogyria (PMG), a neuronal migration disorder, commonly manifests as a seizure disorder. The aim of this study was to look for the abnormalities in the underlying white matter using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that appeared normal on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with PMG. DTI was performed in three patients with PMG and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated for the cortex and adjoining subcortical white matter in both controls and patients. We observed a significantly decreased mean FA value with no significant change in the MD value in subcortical white matter underlying polymicrogyric cortex (FA=0.23±0.04, MD=1.0±0.05 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) as compared to both contralateral (FA=0.32±0.04, MD=1.0±0.05 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and normal control (FA=0.32±0.04, MD=1.0±0.06 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) white matter. Significantly increased MD and decreased FA values were also observed in the polymicrogyric cortex (FA=0.08±0.01, MD=1.2±0.10 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) as compared to normal contralateral (FA=0.12±0.04, MD=1.1±0.09 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and normal control (FA=0.12±0.01, MD=1.1±0.09 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) cortex. Significantly decreased FA values with no change in MD values in the subcortical white matter subjacent to polymicrogyric cortex reflect microstructural changes in the white matter probably due to the presence of ectopic neurons. (orig.)

  2. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    be used to observe the knock down effect by siRNAs designed to target these reporters. One aim of this project is to verify the specific knock down effect of siRNAs in cell culture and in living fish and to establish easy-read out models for testing the effect especially in vivo. Cell culture from human...... coinjection and the assay is important in order to detect knock down by siRNA. Our experiment reveal in vivo knock down at 72 hours post injection of reporter gene and siRNA, but further dose-response experiments are required to confirm specifity....

  3. CASE REPORT Imaging features of a rare case of scapuloiliac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • March 2011 7. CASE REPORT which, along with the surrounding skeletal muscles, seemed to be supporting the well-formed femoral heads. Discussion. Scapulo-iliac dysostosis (pelvis-shoulder dysplasia, Kosenow syndrome) is an uncommon hereditary skeletal dysplasia. It is classified as ...

  4. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiaolong; Wang, Gangmin; Shi, Ting; Shao, Zhihong; Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu; Ren, Jie; Lin, Chao; Wang, Peijun

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T 1 -contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  5. Imaging and Modeling Laboratory in Neurobiology and Oncology - IMNC. Activity report 2008-2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, Yves; Arlaud, Nathalie; Mastrippolito, Roland

    2014-09-01

    The Imaging and Modeling Laboratory in Neurobiology and Oncology (IMNC) is an interdisciplinary unit shared between the Paris-Sud and Paris-Diderot universities and the National Institute of Nuclear and particle physics (IN2P3). Created in January 2006, the laboratory activities are structured around three main topics: the clinical and pre-clinical multi-modal imaging (optical and isotopic), the modeling of tumoral processes, and radiotherapy. This report presents the activities of the laboratory during the years 2008-2012: 1 - Forewords; 2 - Highlights; 3 - Research teams: Small animal imaging; Metabolism, imaging and olfaction; Surgery imaging in oncology; Quantification in molecular imaging; Modeling of biological systems; 4 - Technical innovations: Instrumentation, Scientific calculation, Biology department, valorisation and open-source softwares; 5 - Publications; 6 - Scientific life, communication and teaching activities; 7 - Laboratory operation; 8 - Perspectives

  6. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible P ars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  7. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of transplanted kidneys: Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wypych-Klunder, Katarzyna; Adamowicz, Andrzej; Lemanowicz, Adam; Szczęsny, Wojciech; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    An aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DWI in the early period after kidney transplantation. We also aimed to compare ADC and eADC values in the cortex and medulla of the kidney, to estimate image noise and variability of measurements, and to verify possible relation between selected labolatory results and diffusion parameters in the transplanted kidney. Examinations were performed using a 1.5 T MR unit. DWI (SE/EPI) was performed in the axial plane using b-values of 600 and 1000. ADC and eADC measurements were performed in four regions of interest within the renal cortex and in three regions within the medulla. Relative variability of results and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were calculated. The analysis included 15 patients (mean age 52 years). The mean variability of ADC was significantly lower than that of eADC (6.8% vs. 10.8%, respectively; p<0.0001). The mean variability of measurements performed in the cortex was significantly lower than that in the medulla (6.2% vs. 11.5%, respectively; p<0.005). The mean SNR was higher in the measurements using b600 than b1000, it was higher in ADC maps than in the eADC maps, and it was higher in the cortex than in the medulla. ADC and eADC measured at b1000 in the cortex were higher in the group of the patients with eGFR ≤30 ml/min./1.73 m 2 as compared to patients with eGFR >30 ml/min./1.73 m 2 (p<0.05). Diffusion-weighted imaging of transplanted kidneys is technically challenging, especially in patients in the early period after transplantation. From a technical point of view, the best quality parameters offer quality ADC measurement in the renal cortex using b1000. ADC and eADC values in the renal cortex measured at b1000 present a relationship with eGFR

  8. Hepatic adenomatosis: rapid sequence MR imaging following gadolinium enhancement: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brummett, D.; Burton, E.M.; Sabio, H.

    1999-01-01

    Hepatic adenomas are primary liver tumors usually associated with underlying metabolic disease or with anabolic steroid or oral contraceptive use. Hepatic adenomatosis (HA) is defined as the presence of more than four adenomas. Only 13 cases of HA have been reported in patients without glycogen storage disease or steroid use. We report a case of HA imaged by postcontrast T1-weighted images obtained during a breath-holding series. The lesions were most conspicuous 3-4 min after contrast administration; 4 of the 5 tumors were not identified on T2-weighted images. Unlike previous reports of HA in which the lesions remained hyperintense during sequential postcontrast imaging, the smaller lesions in this case demonstrated contrast washout, thereby distinguishing them from hemangiomata. (orig.)

  9. Multimodal imaging of spike propagation: a technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Grant, P E; Suzuki, N; Madsen, J R; Bergin, A M; Hämäläinen, M S; Stufflebeam, S M

    2012-06-01

    We report an 11-year-old boy with intractable epilepsy, who had cortical dysplasia in the right superior frontal gyrus. Spatiotemporal source analysis of MEG and EEG spikes demonstrated a similar time course of spike propagation from the superior to inferior frontal gyri, as observed on intracranial EEG. The tractography reconstructed from DTI showed a fiber connection between these areas. Our multimodal approach demonstrates spike propagation and a white matter tract guiding the propagation.

  10. R/L, a double reporter mouse line that expresses luciferase gene upon Cre-mediated excision, followed by inactivation of mRFP expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Junshuang; Lin, Xiaolin; Lin, Xia; Lin, Taoyan; Chen, Bangzhu; Hao, Weichao; Cheng, Yushuang; Liu, Yu; Dian, Meijuan; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Gu, Weiwang

    2016-10-01

    The Cre/loxP system has become an important tool for the conditional gene knockout and conditional gene expression in genetically engineered mice. The applications of this system depend on transgenic reporter mouse lines that provide Cre recombinase activity with a defined cell type-, tissue-, or developmental stage-specificity. To develop a sensitive assay for monitoring Cre-mediated DNA excisions in mice, we generated Cre-mediated excision reporter mice, designated R/L mice (R/L: mRFP(monomeric red fluorescent protein)/luciferase), express mRFP throughout embryonic development and adult stages, while Cre-mediated excision deletes a loxP-flanked mRFP reporter gene and STOP sequence, thereby activating the expression of the second reporter gene luciferase, as assayed by in vivo and ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. After germ line deletion of the floxed mRFP and STOP sequence in R/L mice by EIIa-Cre mice, the resulting luciferase transgenic mice in which the loxP-mRFP-STOP-loxP cassette is excised from all cells express luciferase in all tissues and organs examined. The expression of luciferase transgene was activated in liver of RL/Alb-Cre double transgenic mice and in brain of RL/Nestin-Cre double transgenic mice when R/L reporter mice were mated with Alb-Cre mice and Nestin-Cre mice, respectively. Our findings reveal that the double reporter R/L mouse line is able to indicate the occurrence of Cre-mediated excision from early embryonic to adult lineages. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the R/L mice serve as a sensitive reporter for Cre-mediated DNA excision both in living animals and in organs, tissues, and cells following necropsy.

  11. Reporter gene expression in fish following cutaneous infection with pantropic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, T A; Burns, J C; Shike, H; Getchell, R; Bowser, P R; Whitlock, K E; Casey, J W

    2001-06-01

    A central issue in gene delivery systems is choosing promoters that will direct defined and sustainable levels of gene expression. Pantropic retroviral vectors provide a means to insert genes into either somatic or germline cells. In this study, we focused on somatic cell infection by evaluating the activity of 3 promoters inserted by vectors into fish cell lines and fish skin using pantropic retroviruses. In bluegill and zebrafish cell lines, the highest levels of luciferase expression were observed from the 5' murine leukemia virus long terminal repeat of the retroviral vector. The Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and cytomegalovirus early promoter, as internal promoters, generated lower levels of luciferase. Luciferase reporter vectors infected zebrafish skin, as measured by the presence of viral DNA, and expressed luciferase. We infected developing walleye dermal sarcomas with retroviral vectors to provide an environment with enhanced cell proliferation, a condition necessary for integration of the provirus into the host genome. We demonstrated a 4-fold to 7-fold increase in luciferase gene expression in tumor tissue over infections in normal walleye skin.

  12. The first report of the vanC1 gene in Enterococcus faecium isolated from a human clinical specimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Sun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The vanC1 gene, which is chromosomally located, confers resistance to vancomycin and serves as a species marker for Enterococcus gallinarum. Enterococcus faecium TJ4031 was isolated from a blood culture and harbours the vanC1gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were performed to detect vanXYc and vanTc genes. Only the vanXYc gene was found in the E. faecium TJ4031 isolate. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin and teicoplanin were 2 µg/mL and 1 µg/mL, respectively. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed that the vanC1and vanXYc genes were not expressed. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and southern hybridisation results showed that the vanC1 gene was encoded in the chromosome. E. faecalis isolated from animals has been reported to harbour vanC1gene. However, this study is the first to report the presence of the vanC1gene in E. faecium of human origin. Additionally, our research showed the vanC1gene cannot serve as a species-specific gene of E. gallinarum and that it is able to be transferred between bacteria. Although the resistance marker is not expressed in the strain, our results showed that E. faecium could acquire the vanC1gene from different species.

  13. MR imaging of neurosyphilis (report of 2 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoyi; Liao Weihua; Jiang Xinya; Chen Dengming

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To enhance the understanding of MR imaging in neurosyphilis. Methods: One case of syphilitic gumma with positive treponemal antibody test in the serum was confirmed pathologically after operation. and the other case with positive treponemal antibody test in the cerebrospinal fluid (CBF) was cured by medical therapy. Both patients were examined by MRI. Results: Syphilitic gumma has some characteristic MRI findings. The roundish areas of low signal or mixed low and iso- signal intensity was revealed on T 1 WI with the diameter ranged from 2.0 cm to 2.5 cm. The lesions were located at the cortex or infra-cortex surrounded by obvious edema. The lesions showed high signal or mixed signal made up of iso-, high, and low signals on T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA enhanced T 1 WI demonstrated irregular circular enhancement on the edge of the lesions and abnormal neighboring meningeal enhancement, and the border of the lesions was angulated with neighboring meninges by obtuse angle. Conclusion: The final diagnosis of neurosyphilis should depend on laboratory examination or histopathologic examination, but neuroimaging suspicion is paramount to early detection and diagnosis of neurosyphilis

  14. Donor leucocyte imaging in patients with AIDS: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Doherty, M.J.; Kent and Canterbury Hospital; Revell, P.; Page, C.J.; Nunan, T.O.; Lee, S.; Mountford, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Four patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and fever were investigated using donor leucocyte scans. The lung/liver and lung/spleen uptake ratios in these patients were compared with the uptake ratios in donor leucocyte scans in seven neutropenic (non-AIDS) patients and five patients who had autologous leucocyte scans performed over the same time period. All scans used indium oxine In 111 labelled leucocytes except that for one AIDS patient which used technetium hexamethyl-propylene amine oxide Tc99m labelled donor leucocytes. There were no adverse reactions to the donor cell infusions. Two patients had repeat studies 8 weeks apart (from different donors) without ill effect. There were no differences in the 111 In uptake ratios between the three groups. There were three positive studies in the patients with AIDS, and these elucidated the cause of the pyrexia in all three. The negative case is more difficult to confirm, but the clinical course and the absence of focal disease on post-mortem have been taken to support the scan findings. There was no difference in the acceptibility of the technique or the distribution of the labelled leucocytes between the AIDS and non-AIDS patients. Donor leucocyte imaging of patients with AIDS is probably more effective and considerably less hazardous for technical staff than autologous leucocyte methods. This study demonstrates that the technique can be applied successfully to patients with AIDS. (orig.)

  15. Gamma-ray imaging system. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-11-01

    The RadScan 600 gamma-ray imaging system is designed to survey large surface areas for radiological contamination with accuracy and efficiency. The resulting survey data are clear, concise, and precise in describing how much contamination is present at exact locations. Data can be permanently stored electronically and on video tape, making storage and retrieval economical and efficient. This technology can perform accurate measurements in high radiation contamination areas while minimizing worker exposure. The RadScan 600 system is a safe and effective alternative to hand-held radiation detection devices. Performance data of the demonstrated survey area of the RadScan 600 system versus the baseline, which is the hand-held radiation detection devices (RO-2 and RO-7) for a given survey, production rate is 72% of the baseline. It should be noted that the innovative technology provides 100% coverage at a unit cost of $8.64/m 2 versus a static measurement of a unit cost of $1.61/m 2 for the baseline

  16. The development and application of a multiple gene co-silencing system using endogenous URA3 as a reporter gene in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dashuai Mu

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is one of the most important medicinal mushrooms; however, molecular genetics research on this species has been limited due to a lack of reliable reverse genetic tools. In this study, the endogenous orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase gene (URA3 was cloned as a silencing reporter, and four gene-silencing methods using hairpin, sense, antisense, and dual promoter constructs, were introduced into G. lucidum through a simple electroporation procedure. A comparison and evaluation of silencing efficiency demonstrated that all of the four methods differentially suppressed the expression of URA3. Our data unequivocally indicate that the dual promoter silencing vector yields the highest rate of URA3 silencing compared with other vectors (up to 81.9%. To highlight the advantages of the dual promoter system, we constructed a co-silencing system based on the dual promoter method and succeeded in co-silencing URA3 and laccase in G. lucidum. The reduction of the mRNA levels of the two genes were correlated. Thus, the screening efficiency for RNAi knockdown of multiple genes may be improved by the co-silencing of an endogenous reporter gene. The molecular tools developed in this study should facilitate the isolation of genes and the characterization of the functions of multiple genes in this pharmaceutically important species, and these tools should be highly useful for the study of other basidiomycetes.

  17. The experimental study of reporter probe 131I-FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter gene by different vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Xiaohua; Lan Xiaoli; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying; Zhang Yongxue

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In the present study, the recombinant plasmid and adenoviral vector carrying reporter gene. herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk), were constructed and transferred into nee-natal cardiac myocytes, and a series of in vitro studies were carried out on the cells transferred to evaluate the uptake of radiolabeled reporter probe and to compare both vectors for cardiac reporter gene imaging. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSVI-tk. chosen as the reporter gene.was inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk), thus it could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. Recombinant adenovirus containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (Ad5-EGFP) was used as control. Recombinant plasmid was coated with lipofectamine TM 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex). The specific reporter probe of HSV1-tk, 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-l-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil (FAU), was labeled with 131 I by solid phase oxidation with lodogen. Product wag purified on a reverse. phase Sep-Pak C18 column and the radiochemical purity wag then assessed. The accumulation of it in the transferred cardiac myocytes wag detected as uptake rate. Furthermore, mRNA expression of HSV1-tk was detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while its protein expression wag located by immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with 131 I and the labeling efficiency was (53.82 ±2.05)%. The radiochemical purity was (94.85 ± 1.76)% after purification, and it kept stable in vitro for at least 24h. Time-dependent increase of the ac- cumulation of 131 I-FIAU was observed in both Ad5-tk group and pDC316-tk/lipoplex group. and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5h, with peak values of (12.55 ± 0.37)% and (2.09 ± 0.34)% respectively. However, it also indicated that greater

  18. Dissecting miRNA gene repression on single cell level with an advanced fluorescent reporter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Diaz, Nicolas; Böker, Kai O.; Rodriguez-Polo, Ignacio; Mitter, Michael; Preis, Jasmin; Arlt, Maximilian; Gruber, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Despite major advances on miRNA profiling and target predictions, functional readouts for endogenous miRNAs are limited and frequently lead to contradicting conclusions. Numerous approaches including functional high-throughput and miRISC complex evaluations suggest that the functional miRNAome differs from the predictions based on quantitative sRNA profiling. To resolve the apparent contradiction of expression versus function, we generated and applied a fluorescence reporter gene assay enabling single cell analysis. This approach integrates and adapts a mathematical model for miRNA-driven gene repression. This model predicts three distinct miRNA-groups with unique repression activities (low, mid and high) governed not just by expression levels but also by miRNA/target-binding capability. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of the system by applying controlled concentrations of synthetic siRNAs and in parallel, altering target-binding capability on corresponding reporter-constructs. Furthermore, we compared miRNA-profiles with the modeled predictions of 29 individual candidates. We demonstrate that expression levels only partially reflect the miRNA function, fitting to the model-projected groups of different activities. Furthermore, we demonstrate that subcellular localization of miRNAs impacts functionality. Our results imply that miRNA profiling alone cannot define their repression activity. The gene regulatory function is a dynamic and complex process beyond a minimalistic conception of “highly expressed equals high repression”. PMID:28338079

  19. Eating epilepsy: clinical and neuro image aspects - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Yacubian, Elza Marcia T.; Fiore, Lia Arno; Jorge, Carmen Lisa; Yamaga, Liliam I.; Watanabe, Tomoco; Bacheschi, Luis A.; Scaff, Milberto; Magalhaes, Alvaro E.A.

    1994-01-01

    Eating epilepsy is an uncommon form of reflex epilepsy. The authors present a case report of a patient with clinical diagnosis of eating epilepsy who was submitted to clinical tests, neuroimaging studies (MRI and SPECT) and surface EEG. Multiple intercritical EEGs showed sharp discharges in the posterior left temporal area. The MRI did not show any abnormality. The intercritical brain SPECT showed clear hypoperfusion in the posterior left temporal area; so confirming the epileptogenic focus in producing the partial complex seizures triggered by eating. (author)

  20. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. MR imaging and ultrasonographic findings of tensor fasciae suralis muscle: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keun Ho; Shim, Jae Chan; Lee, Ghi Jai; Lee, Kyoung Eun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Suh, Jung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The tensor fasciae suralis muscle is a very rare anomalous muscle located in the popliteal region. This anatomic variation has been reported often through cadaver studies. However, there are only a few radiologic reports of this entity. We presented a case of tensor fasciae suralis muscle detected as an incidental finding in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  2. Advances in gene therapy and early imaging monitoring for avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Yongxue; Qi Hongyan

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is a method that transfers foreign gene to target cells, so as to correct or compensate the disease which is caused by the gene defects and abnormalities. As a new technology, gene therapy has been used in many fields, such as cancer, cardiovascular and nervous system disease, and it brings some hope for patients with difficult and complicated disease. Avascular necrosis of femoral head is a refractory and common disease in clinical, but the traditional surgery therapy and conservative treatment both have many shortcomings,and the effect is unsatisfactory. As a new technology,gene therapy showed bright future in orthopedics ischemic disease, and its potential feasibility has been confirmed by many animal experiments. This article focuses on the research progress of gene therapy and early monitoring in the avascular necrosis of the femoral head. (authors)

  3. Clinicopathological and imaging features of lipoastrocytoma: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Ghosal, Nandita; Hegde, Alangar S

    2018-02-01

    Lipidized tumors of the central nervous system are very uncommon, with only a few cases described. We report a case of a 25-year-old woman with a tumor involving the left premotor area. She underwent gross total excision. Histologically, the tumor was composed of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive glial cells with areas of lipidization. A diagnosis of lipoastrocytoma was rendered. At three-year follow-up she was doing well, supporting the presumed favorable prognosis of these uncommon tumors. Absence of xanthochromic appearance, mitotic activity, necrosis and poor reticulin activity are the differentiating features from the pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma. We highlighted that these tumors involve the adult and pediatric population and distribute in both supratentorial and infratentorial compartments as well as in the spinal cord.

  4. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites

  5. Geophysical data fusion for subsurface imaging. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report contains the results of a three year, three-phase project whose long-range goal has been to create a means for the more detailed and accurate definition of the near-surface (0--300 ft) geology beneath a site that had been subjected to environmental pollution. The two major areas of research and development have been: improved geophysical field data acquisition techniques; and analytical tools for providing the total integration (fusion) of all site data. The long-range goal of this project has been to mathematically, integrate the geophysical data that could be derived from multiple sensors with site geologic information and any other type of available site data, to provide a detailed characterization of thin clay layers and geological discontinuities at hazardous waste sites.

  6. Radiogenomics of hepatocellular carcinoma: multiregion analysis-based identification of prognostic imaging biomarkers by integrating gene data—a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui; Yan, Zhuangzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Our objective was to identify prognostic imaging biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma in contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) with biological interpretations by associating imaging features and gene modules. We retrospectively analyzed 371 patients who had gene expression profiles. For the 38 patients with CECT imaging data, automatic intra-tumor partitioning was performed, resulting in three spatially distinct subregions. We extracted a total of 37 quantitative imaging features describing intensity, geometry, and texture from each subregion. Imaging features were selected after robustness and redundancy analysis. Gene modules acquired from clustering were chosen for their prognostic significance. By constructing an association map between imaging features and gene modules with Spearman rank correlations, the imaging features that significantly correlated with gene modules were obtained. These features were evaluated with Cox’s proportional hazard models and Kaplan-Meier estimates to determine their prognostic capabilities for overall survival (OS). Eight imaging features were significantly correlated with prognostic gene modules, and two of them were associated with OS. Among these, the geometry feature volume fraction of the subregion, which was significantly correlated with all prognostic gene modules representing cancer-related interpretation, was predictive of OS (Cox p  =  0.022, hazard ratio  =  0.24). The texture feature cluster prominence in the subregion, which was correlated with the prognostic gene module representing lipid metabolism and complement activation, also had the ability to predict OS (Cox p  =  0.021, hazard ratio  =  0.17). Imaging features depicting the volume fraction and textural heterogeneity in subregions have the potential to be predictors of OS with interpretable biological meaning.

  7. Comparison of [{sup 18}F]FHPG and [{sup 124/125}I]FIAU for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brust, P.; Friedrich, A.; Scheunemann, M.; Noll, S.; Noll, B.; Johannsen, B. [Inst. of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Forschungszentrum, Rossendorf (Germany); Haubner, R.; Avril, N. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Univ., Muenchen (Germany); Anton, M. [Inst. of Experimental Oncology, Technische Univ., Muenchen (Germany); Koufaki, O.N.; Schackert, H.K. [Dept. of Surgical Research, Technische Univ., Dresden (Germany); Hauses, M.; Schackert, G. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Technische Univ., Dresden (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [Dept. of Oncological Diagnostics and Therapy, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Various radiotracers based on uracil nucleosides (e.g. [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodo-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil, [{sup 124}I]FIAU) and acycloguanosine derivatives (e.g. [{sup 18}F]9-[(3-fluoro-1-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl]guanine, [{sup 18}F]FHPG) have been proposed for the non-invasive imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene expression. However, these radiotracers have been evaluated in different in vitro and in vivo models, precluding a direct comparison. Therefore, we directly compared [{sup 18}F]FHPG and radioiodinated FIAU to assess their potential for PET imaging of transgene expression. The uptake of [{sup 125}I]FIAU, [{sup 18}F]FHPG and [{sup 3}H]acyclovir was determined in vitro using four different HSV1-tk expressing cell lines and their respective negative controls. The in vitro tracer uptake was generally low in non-transduced parental cell lines. In HSV1-tk expressing cells, [{sup 3}H]acyclovir showed approximately a twofold higher tracer accumulation, the [{sup 18}F]FHPG uptake increased by about sixfold and the [{sup 125}I]FIAU accumulation increased by about 28-fold after 120-min incubation of T1115 human glioblastoma cells. Similar results were found in the other cell lines. In addition, biodistribution and positron emission tomography (PET) studies with [{sup 18}F]FHPG and [{sup 124/125}I]FIAU were carried out in tumour-bearing BALB/c mice. Significantly higher specific accumulation of radioactivity was found for [{sup 125}I]FIAU compared with [{sup 18}F]FHPG. The ratio of specific tracer accumulation between [{sup 125}I]FIAU and [{sup 18}F]FHPG increased from 21 (30 min p.i.) to 119 (4 h p.i.). PET imaging, using [{sup 124}I]FIAU, clearly visualised and delineated HSV1-tk expressing tumours, whereas only a negligible uptake of [{sup 18}F]FHPG was observed. This study demonstrated that in vitro and in vivo, the radioiodinated uracil nucleoside FIAU has a significantly higher specific

  8. NCRP report 160 and what it means for medical imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, Norman E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain report 160 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement and the significance of the report to medical imaging as a whole and nuclear medicine specifically. The implications of the findings of report 160 have had repercussions and will continue to affect all of ionizing radiation medical imaging. The nuclear medicine community should have an understanding of why and how report 160 is important. After reading this article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with the main focus of report 160, the significant change that has occurred since the 1980s in the ionizing radiation exposure of people in the United States, the primary background source of ionizing radiation in the United States, the primary medical exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States, trends in nuclear medicine procedures and patient exposure, and a comparison of population doses between 2006 and the early 1980s as outlined in report 160.

  9. Study of rNIS as a reporter gene monitoring rBMSC transplanted to rat myocardium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shou; Lan Xiaoli; Cao Wei; Cao Guoxiang; Zhang Guopeng; Zhang Binqing; Wu Tao; Chang Wei; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of rat sodium/iodide symporter (rNIS) as a reporter gene monitoring rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells (rBMSC) transplanted to rat myocardium in vivo. Methods: Recombinated adenovirus vector was constructed by rNIS/enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) (Ad-rNIS/EGFP). rBMSC transfected by Ad-rNIS/EGFP were studied using fluorescence microscope. Fifteen rats were transplanted with rBMSC and randomly divided into three groups: rNIS group (with rNIS transfection), blocked group (with rNIS transfection) by oral intake of perchloric sodium before planar imaging (GE Millennium MPR SPECT), and control group (without rNIS transfection). All rats underwent 99 Tc m -pertechnetate planar imaging. The biological distribution of 99 Tc m -pertechnetate was studied. The expressions of rNIS gene and protein in myocardium were measured by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot, respectively. The expressions of CD 29 , CD 44 , CD 90 , CD 11 b, CD 34 and CD 45 were measured by immunohistochemistry. Results: rBMSC transfected by Ad-rNIS/EGFP showed EGFP expression under fluorescence microscope. The transplanted rat myocardium could be visualized on 99 Tc m -pertechnetate planar imaging in rNIS group. The relative uptake ratio (R heart /R hmb , RUR) was 6.7 ±0.4. RUR in control group (3.0 ±0.2) was lower than that in rNIS group (t =2.78, P=0.03). The percentage injection dose per gram of tissue (% ID/g) of the transplanted myocardium was 60.2 ± 20.8 in rNIS group, which was higher than that (2.5 ± 0.4) % ID/g of control group ( t = 7.13, P 29 , CD 44 and CD 90 were positive, CD 45 and CD 45 negative CD 11 b mildly positive in the myocardium transplanted with infective rBMSC. Conclusion: rNIS can efficiently monitor rBMSC transplanted to rat myocardium. (authors)

  10. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Demonstrates Correlation between Behavioral Recovery and Correction of Dopamine Neurotransmission after Gene Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leriche, L.; Besret, L.; Gregoire, M.C.; Deglon, N.; Hantraye, Ph.; Leriche, L.; Besret, L.; Gregoire, M.C.; Deglon, N.; Hantraye, Ph.; Bjorklund, T.; Breysse, N.; Carlsson, T.; Kirik, D.; Dolle, F.; Mandel, R.J.; Kirik, D.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo gene transfer using viral vectors is an emerging therapy for neuro-degenerative diseases with a clinical impact recently demonstrated in Parkinson's disease patients. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, in particular, provide an excellent tool for long-term expression of therapeutic genes in the brain. Here we used the [ 11 C]raclopride [(S)-(-)-3, 5-dichloro-N-((1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)-2-hydroxy- 6-methoxybenzamide] micro-positron emission tomography (PET) technique to demonstrate that delivery of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) enzymes using an rAAV5 vector normalizes the increased [ 11 C]raclopride binding in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Importantly, we show in vivo by micro-PET imaging and postmortem by classical binding assays performed in the very same animals that the changes in [ 11 C]raclopride after viral vector-based enzyme replacement therapy is attributable to a decrease in the affinity of the tracer binding to the D2 receptors, providing evidence for reconstitution of a functional pool of endogenous dopamine in the striatum. Moreover, the extent of the normalization in this non-invasive imaging measure was highly correlated with the functional recovery in motor behavior. The PET imaging protocol used in this study is fully adaptable to humans and thus can serve as an in vivo imaging technique to follow TH+GCH1 gene therapy in PD patients and provide an additional objective measure to a potential clinical trial using rAAV vectors to deliver L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine in the brain. (authors)

  11. Malignant melanoma arising from a perianal fistula and harbouring a BRAF gene mutation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajahuerce Marcos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma of the anal region is a very uncommon disease, accounting for only 0.2-0.3% of all melanoma cases. Mutations of the BRAF gene are usually absent in melanomas occurring in this region as well as in other sun-protected regions. The development of a tumour in a longstanding perianal fistula is also extremely rare. More frequent is the case of a tumour presenting as a fistula, that is, the fistula being a consequence of the cancerous process, although we have found only two cases of fistula-generating melanomas reported in the literature. Case Presentation Here we report the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with a perianal fistula of four years of evolution. Histopathological examination of the fistulous tract confirmed the presence of malignant melanoma. Due to the small size and the central location of the melanoma inside the fistulous tract, we believe the melanoma reported here developed in the epithelium of the fistula once the latter was already formed. Resected sentinel lymph nodes were negative and the patient, after going through a wide local excision, remains disease-free nine years after diagnosis. DNA obtained from melanoma tissue was analysed by automated direct sequencing and the V600E (T1799A mutation was detected in exon 15 of the BRAF gene. Conclusion Since fistulae experience persistent inflammation, the fact that this melanoma harbours a BRAF mutation strengthens the view that oxidative stress caused by inflammatory processes plays an important role in the genesis of BRAF gene mutations.

  12. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  13. Hemorrhagic brain metastases with high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H.; Abe, O.; Aoki, S.; Masumoto, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Kunimatsu, A; Hayashi, N.; Ohtomo, K. [Graduate School of Medicine, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging has been applicable to the differential diagnosis of abscesses and necrotic or cystic brain tumors. However, restricted water diffusion is not necessarily specific for brain abscess. We describe ring-enhancing metastases of lung carcinoma characterized by high signal intensity on diffusion-weighted MR images. The signal pattern probably reflected intralesional hemorrhage. The present report adds to the growing literature regarding the differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing brain lesions.

  14. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, July 1, 1974--April 1, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1975-01-01

    Design modifications in a positron camera that improve imaging in diagnostic studies using short-lived cyclotron-produced radionuclides as tracers are described. Results are reported from clinical studies using 13 N for inhalation studies; 15 O to measure pulmonary ventilation, perfusion, and regional lung water; and the use of 13 N-ammonia, 68 Ga-microspheres, and 82 Rb for cardiac imaging and studies of blood flow in the brain. (U.S.)

  15. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing

  16. US or MR Imaging Features of Polypoid Endometriosis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Il; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Geum Rae; Kim, Mi Jin

    2009-01-01

    Polypoid endometriosis is a rare variant of endometriosis that is pathologically similar to an endometrial polyp. This lesion is frequently mistaken for a solid neoplasm in clinical, radiological and pathological examinations. The clinical and pathological features of the lesion have been well described in the English literature. However, its imaging features have not been reported in the Korean literature. We describe ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging features of pathologically-confirmed polypoid endometriosis

  17. US or MR Imaging Features of Polypoid Endometriosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Il; Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Geum Rae; Kim, Mi Jin [Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Polypoid endometriosis is a rare variant of endometriosis that is pathologically similar to an endometrial polyp. This lesion is frequently mistaken for a solid neoplasm in clinical, radiological and pathological examinations. The clinical and pathological features of the lesion have been well described in the English literature. However, its imaging features have not been reported in the Korean literature. We describe ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging features of pathologically-confirmed polypoid endometriosis.

  18. Pleomorphic adenoma: Choice of radiographic imaging modality - Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging? Illustration through a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pleomorphic adenoma (PA is the most common benign neoplasm of the major salivary glands arising primarily from the parotid gland. Computed tomography (CT is one of the primary imaging modalities used to assess the tumors of salivary glands. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may provide additional information over CT. Case Report: We report the case of a 60-year-old male with a slowly enlarging, well-defined, round, painless, non-fixated, rubber-like swelling over the left ramus region below the ear, measuring about 4 × 4.5 cm, covering the lower border of the mandible near the angle. A provisional diagnosis of PA was given and CT and MRI were used to study the lesion. Discussion: Through this case, which was suspected to have undergone malignant transformation because of indistinct margins and focal hypodense areas on CT but was later confirmed to be a benign salivary gland tumor on MRI, we illustrate the role of CT and MRI as diagnostic aids in PA and emphasize on what should be the choice of imaging modality for parotid tumors.

  19. MR imaging of pregnancy luteoma: a case report and correlation with the clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Hung Wen; Wu, Ching Jiunn; Chung, Kuo Teng; Wang, Sheng Ru; Chen, Cheng Yu [Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2005-03-15

    We report here on a 26-year-old pregnant female who developed hirsutism and virilization during her third trimester along with a significantly elevated serum testosterone level. Abdominal US and MR imaging studies were performed, and they showed unique imaging features that may suggest the diagnosis of pregnancy luteoma in the clinical context. After the delivery, the serum testosterone level continued to decrease, and it returned to normal three weeks postpartum. The follow-up imaging findings were closely correlated with the clinical presentation.

  20. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Myoepitheliloma in the Soft Palate: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hun Cheol; Yu, In Kyu; Park, Mi Ja; Jang, Dong Sik

    2011-01-01

    We report the appearance of myoepithelioma arising from minor salivary glands in the soft palate observed on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT, the tumor was round with a smooth and partial lobulating contour, and slightly marginal contrast enhancement. On T1-weighted images, the mass had heterogeneous iso-signal intensity compared to the pharyngeal muscle. Additionally, the tumor had heterogeneously high T2 signal intensity with heterogeneously strong enhancement on the Gd-enhanced T1-weighted image. Radiologists should consider myoepithelioma in the radiological differential diagnosis of soft palate tumors.

  1. Novel diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.F.; Chang, F.C.; Hu, H.H.; Hsu, L.C. [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan (China). Depts. of Internal Medicine and Radiology, and Neurological Inst.

    2006-12-15

    This report presents a rare case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis initially presenting with mental impairment and rapidly progressing to coma without any history of malignancy. In addition to highlighting the diagnostic difficulties, the linear high signal intensity along the cortex on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was identified accidentally. High signal change in the corresponding areas was also noted on unenhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging, which may be a novel method of diagnosing leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, which should be studied further.

  2. [Perfusion imaging: Instrumentation, modeling, and radiopharmaceuticals: Report of the scientific meeting: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    This meeting provided an excellent overview of the state-of-the-art in perfusion imaging from the viewpoints of mathematical data analysis, radiochemical synthesis and evaluation, and instrumentation physics. The participants and audience had an opportunity to see how each of these aspects is essential for continued progress in this field

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in primary lymphoma of the liver: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilaj Fatmir

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary lymphoma of the liver is an extremely rare finding, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing magnetic resonance imaging scan findings with such a lesion. In the case reported here, magnetic resonance imaging gave us the opportunity to ascertain the correct diagnosis, confirmed by histopathology, thus avoiding unnecessary surgery or other treatments. Although this condition is rare, knowledge of magnetic resonance imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients. Case presentation A focal lesion was incidentally detected by ultrasound in a 75-year-old asymptomatic Albanian man being treated for benign hypertrophy of prostate. Chest and abdomen computed tomography scans did not reveal any abnormal findings besides a solid focal lesion on the right lobe of the liver and a mild homogenous enlargement of the prostate gland. Subsequently, magnetic resonance imaging of the upper abdomen was performed for better characterization of this lesion. Our patient was free of symptoms and his laboratory test results were normal. Conclusions The magnetic resonance imaging scan results showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, and were thus very important in helping us provide the correct treatment for our patient.

  4. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook [Department of Internal Medicine (Cardiology), Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1 Pungnap-dong, Songpa-gu, 138-736, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin [Department of Microbiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Won Woo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2004-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10{sup 7}, 2 x 10{sup 8} or 1 x 10{sup 9} plaque forming units (pfu)] or {beta}-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} was retained in the liver (p<0.001) and the right muscle (p<0.05), with the highest uptake in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p<0.05), with a positive correlation with the imaging counts (r=0.810, p<0.05) and the biodistribution (r=0.847, p<0.001). Hot spots in rats injected with 1 x 10{sup 9} pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in

  5. Development of a codon optimization strategy using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Chee-Hoo; Yarkoni, Orr; Ajioka, James; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Nathan, Sheila

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a platform that enables high-level synthesis of useful products such as pharmaceutically related drugs, bioplastics and green fuels from synthetic DNA constructs. Large-scale expression of these products can be achieved in an industrial compliant host such as Escherichia coli. To maximise the production of recombinant proteins in a heterologous host, the genes of interest are usually codon optimized based on the codon usage of the host. However, the bioinformatics freeware available for standard codon optimization might not be ideal in determining the best sequence for the synthesis of synthetic DNA. Synthesis of incorrect sequences can prove to be a costly error and to avoid this, a codon optimization strategy was developed based on the E. coli codon usage using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case. This strategy replaces codons encoding for serine, leucine, proline and threonine with the most frequently used codons in E. coli. Furthermore, codons encoding for valine and glycine are substituted with the second highly used codons in E. coli. Both the optimized and original efor RED genes were ligated to the pJS209 plasmid backbone using Gibson Assembly and the recombinant DNAs were transformed into E. coli E. cloni 10G strain. The fluorescence intensity per cell density of the optimized sequence was improved by 20% compared to the original sequence. Hence, the developed codon optimization strategy is proposed when designing an optimal sequence for heterologous protein production in E. coli.

  6. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  7. A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmi, C.E.; Anselmi, O.E.

    2002-01-01

    A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet. Aim: This system was developed in order to improve the processes of typing, correcting, verifying and distribution of the reports and images, improving the efficiency of the personnel in the nuclear medicine department and reducing the time between the creation of the report and its reading by the referring physician. Materials and Methods: The system runs a web server (Personal Web Server, Microsoft) which serves web pages written in hypertext markup language (HTML) and active server pages (ASP). The database utilized is Microsoft Access 97. The whole communication between the web server and the database is performed by the programs written in ASP. Integrating the images from the patients is done through a 486 ibm-pc running Red Hat Linux, which serves as an intermediary between the isolated nuclear medicine network and the hospital's network. Results: The time from report verification and referring physician reading has decreased from approximately 24 hours to 12 hours. It is possible to run queries in the system in order to get productivity reports or clinical research. Imaging storage allows for correlation of current and previous studies. Conclusion: Bureaucratic processes have diminished to a certain extent in the department. Reports are now online as soon as they are verified by the nuclear medicine physician. There is no need to install dedicated software in the viewing stations since the whole system runs in the server

  8. The construction and identification of hypoxia-regulated recombinant plasmid with reporter gene hNIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qunchao; Wu Jinchang; Zhou Jundong; Gu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To construct pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS recombinant plasmid regulated by hypoxia-responsive element, which can possibly by used to detect the expression of hypoxia induced factor-α (HIF-1α) gene under hypoxia condition. Methods: Artificially synthesize the nucleotide sequences of five copies of hypoxia response elements (HREs) were cloned into pGL3-promoter vector to construct pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector. Human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene cDNA was amplified from human genome by RT-PCR, and subcloned into pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector then was sequenced. After treated with CoCl 2 as hypoxia mimic, HEK293 cells were transfected with recombinant plasmid with hNIS gene, while cells treated with DMSO as the control. Meanwhile, pcDNA3.1-HIF-1α and recombinant hNIS gene vectors were transfected into HEK293 cells at the ratio of 3 to 1, while co-transfection with pcDNA3.1 and pShuttle-NIS vectors cells were taken as the control. NIS mRNA expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR while function of NIS protein was tested by 99m TcO 4 - -uptake. Results: The sequence data of hNIS gene in recombinant plasmid were in accordance with those reported in the literatures. Compared with control groups, HEK293 cells co-transfected with both pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS and HIF-1α gene vectors and CoCl 2 -treated after pShuttle-NIS transfecting presented higher mRNA expressions of NIS and 99m TcO 4 - uptake (P<0.01). Conclusion: HIF-1α can be bound to and activate pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS in cells to accumulate radioactive nuclide 99m TcO 4 - and this technique is potential for detection of expression and activity of HIF-1α, the indicator of cell hypoxia. (authors)

  9. Visualisation of chicken macrophages using transgenic reporter genes: insights into the development of the avian macrophage lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Adam; Garcia-Morales, Carla; Vervelde, Lonneke; Gilhooley, Hazel; Sherman, Adrian; Garceau, Valerie; Gutowska, Maria W; Burt, David W; Kaiser, Pete; Hume, David A; Sang, Helen M

    2014-08-01

    We have generated the first transgenic chickens in which reporter genes are expressed in a specific immune cell lineage, based upon control elements of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) locus. The Fms intronic regulatory element (FIRE) within CSF1R is shown to be highly conserved in amniotes and absolutely required for myeloid-restricted expression of fluorescent reporter genes. As in mammals, CSF1R-reporter genes were specifically expressed at high levels in cells of the macrophage lineage and at a much lower level in granulocytes. The cell lineage specificity of reporter gene expression was confirmed by demonstration of coincident expression with the endogenous CSF1R protein. In transgenic birds, expression of the reporter gene provided a defined marker for macrophage-lineage cells, identifying the earliest stages in the yolk sac, throughout embryonic development and in all adult tissues. The reporter genes permit detailed and dynamic visualisation of embryonic chicken macrophages. Chicken embryonic macrophages are not recruited to incisional wounds, but are able to recognise and phagocytose microbial antigens. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Nuclear medicine and imaging research: instrumentation and quantitative methods of evaluation. Comprehensive progress report, January 1, 1980-January 14, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.C.

    1982-07-01

    Progress is reported for the period January 1980 through January 1983 in the following project areas: (1) imaging systems in nuclear medicine and image evaluation; and (2) methodology for quantitative evaluation of diagnostic performance

  11. Automated extraction of radiation dose information from CT dose report images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an automated tool for retrieving texts from CT dose report images. Optical character recognition was adopted to perform text recognitions of CT dose report images. The developed tool is able to automate the process of analyzing multiple CT examinations, including text recognition, parsing, error correction, and exporting data to spreadsheets. The results were precise for total dose-length product (DLP) and were about 95% accurate for CT dose index and DLP of scanned series.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging features of myxoid leiomyoma of the vagina: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scialpi, Michele; Benagiano, Giuseppe; Frati, Sara; Piscioli, Irene; Barberini, Francesco; Lupattelli, Luciano

    2009-01-01

    We report a rare case of a voluminous vaginal myxoid leiomyoma in a 27-year-old nulliparous woman. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a mass arising from the vagina, with inhomogeneous signal intensity on spin-echo T1W and T2W images. MRI accurately defined the tissue planes between the lesion and the adjacent structures and suggested its benign nature. The mass was completely resected by means of transvaginal approach and the diagnosis of myxoid leiomyoma was confirmed histologically. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the MRI features of vaginal myxoid leiomyoma

  13. Gene polymorphisms in association with self-reported stroke in US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Z Fan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Amy Z Fan1, Jing Fang1, Ajay Yesupriya2, Man-huei Chang2, Greta Kilmer1, Meaghan House3, Donald Hayes1, Renée M Ned2, Nicole F Dowling2, Ali H Mokdad1 1National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Office of Public Health Genomics, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: Epidemiologic studies suggest that several gene variants increase the risk of stroke, and population-based studies help provide further evidence. We identified polymorphisms associated with the prevalence of self-reported stroke in US populations using a representative sample.Methods: Our sample comprised US adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination (NHANES III DNA bank. We examined nine candidate gene variants within ACE, F2, F5, ITGA2, MTHFR, and NOS3 for associations with self-reported stroke. We used multivariate regression and Cox proportional hazards models to test the association between these variants and history of stroke.Results: In regression models, the rs4646994 variant of ACE (I/I and I/D genotypes was associated with higher prevalence adjusted prevalence odds ratio [APOR] = 2.66 [1.28, 5.55] and 2.23 [1.30, 3.85], respectively compared with the D/D genotype. The heterozygous genotype of MTHFR rs1801131 (A/C was associated with lower prevalence of stroke (APOR = 0.48 [0.25, 0.92] compared with A/A and C/C genotypes. For rs2070744 of NOS3, both the C/T genotype (APOR = 1.91 [1.12, 3.27] and C/C genotype (APOR = 3.31 [1.66, 6.60] were associated with higher prevalence of stroke compared with the T/T genotype.Conclusion: Our findings suggest an association between the prevalence of self-reported stroke and polymorphisms in ACE, MTHFR, and NOS3 in a population-based sample. Keywords: stroke, gene, polymorphisms, NHANES III, gene

  14. Image analysis for gene expression based phenotype characterization in yeast cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tleis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Image analysis of objects in the microscope scale requires accuracy so that measurements can be used to differentiate between groups of objects that are being studied. This thesis deals with measurements in yeast biology that are obtained through microscope images. We study the algorithms and

  15. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  16. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T.; Scippo, Marie Louise; Muller, Marc; Antignac, Jean-Philippe; Malone, Edward; Bovee, Toine F.H.; Mitchell, Samuel; Connolly, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC 50 of 0.01 ng mL -1 and 0.16 ng mL -1 respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally active compounds the

  17. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beretta, M.; Pilon, R.; Mut, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  18. Image-aided Suicide Gene Therapy Utilizing Multifunctional hTERT-targeting Adenovirus for Clinical Translation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lee, Sang-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hee; Moon, Ju Young; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Kim, Sukyoung; Kim, Eun Ok; Kang, Se Hun; Kim, Seok Ki; Choi, Sun Il; Goh, Sung Ho; Kim, Daehong; Lee, Seong-Wook; Ju, Mi Ha; Jeong, Jin Sook; Kim, In-Hoo

    2016-01-01

    Trans-splicing ribozyme enables to sense and reprogram target RNA into therapeutic transgene and thereby becomes a good sensing device for detection of cancer cells, judging from transgene expression. Previously we proposed PEPCK-Rz-HSVtk (PRT), hTERT targeting trans-splicing ribozyme (Rz) driven by liver-specific promoter phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) with downstream suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene therapy. Here, we describe success of a re-engineered adenoviral vector harboring PRT in obtaining greater antitumor activity with less off-target effect for clinical application as a theranostics. We introduced liver-selective apolipoprotein E (ApoE) enhancer to the distal region of PRT unit to augment activity and liver selectivity of PEPCK promoter, and achieved better transduction into liver cancer cells by replacement of serotype 35 fiber knob on additional E4orf1-4 deletion of E1&E3-deleted serotype 5 back bone. We demonstrated that our refined adenovirus harboring PEPCK/ApoE-Rz-HSVtk (Ad-PRT-E) achieved great anti-tumor efficacy and improved ability to specifically target HCC without damaging normal hepatocytes. We also showed noninvasive imaging modalities were successfully employed to monitor both how well a therapeutic gene (HSVtk) was expressed inside tumor and how effectively a gene therapy took an action in terms of tumor growth. Collectively, this study suggests that the advanced therapeutic adenoviruses Ad-PRT-E and its image-aided evaluation system may lead to the powerful strategy for successful clinical translation and the development of clinical protocols for HCC therapy.

  19. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  20. Imaging of human sodium-iodide symporter gene expression mediated by recombinant adenovirus in skeletal muscle of living rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Park, Seong-Wook; Lee, Heuiran; Kim, Sung Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Yang, You-Jung; Moon, Dae Hyuk

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of recombinant adenovirus-mediated human sodium-iodide symporter (hNIS) gene expression by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy in skeletal muscle of rats. Replication-defective recombinant adenovirus encoding hNIS gene [Rad-CMV-hNIS 5 x 10 7 , 2 x 10 8 or 1 x 10 9 plaque forming units (pfu)] or β-galactosidase gene (Rad-CMV-LacZ 1 x 10 9 pfu) was injected into the right biceps femoris muscle of rats (n=5-6 for each group). Three days after gene transfer, scintigraphy was performed using a gamma camera 30 min after injection of 99m TcO 4 - (1.85 MBq). An additional two rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS underwent 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy with sodium perchlorate. After the imaging studies, rats were sacrificed for assessment of the biodistribution of 99m TcO 4 - and measurement of hNIS mRNA expression. In all the rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS, hNIS expression was successfully imaged by 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy, while rats injected with Rad-CMV-LacZ or lower doses of Rad-CMV-hNIS failed to show uptake. The biodistribution studies indicated that a significantly different amount of 99m TcO 4 - was retained in the liver (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS. The muscular hNIS mRNA level quantified by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was significantly higher in rats injected with 1 x 10 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS (p 9 pfu of Rad-CMV-hNIS were specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. This study illustrated that 99m TcO 4 - scintigraphy can monitor Rad-CMV-hNIS-mediated gene expression in skeletal muscle of rats, non-invasively and quantitatively. (orig.)

  1. Biodegradable gadolinium-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers for gene transfection and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Xiaolong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Wang, Gangmin [Department of Urology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Shi, Ting [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shao, Zhihong [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China); Zhao, Peng; Shi, Donglu [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren, Jie [Institute of Nano and Biopolymeric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China); Lin, Chao, E-mail: chaolin@tongji.edu.cn [The Institute for Translational Nanomedicine, Shanghai East Hospital, Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Nanoscience, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang, Peijun, E-mail: tjpjwang@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200065 (China)

    2016-08-01

    Theranostic nano-polyplexes containing gene and imaging agents hold a great promise for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we develop a group of new gadolinium (Gd)-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide)s for gene delivery and T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Cationic poly(urethane amide)s (denoted as CPUAs) having multiple disulfide bonds, urethane and amide linkages were synthesized by stepwise polycondensation reaction between 1,4-bis(3-aminopropyl)piperazine and a mixture of di(4-nitrophenyl)-2, 2′-dithiodiethanocarbonate (DTDE-PNC) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) dianhydride at varied molar ratios. Then, Gd-chelated CPUAs (denoted as GdCPUAs) were produced by chelating Gd(III) ions with DTPA residues of CPUAs. These GdCPUAs could condense gene into nanosized and positively-charged polyplexes in a physiological condition and, however, liberated gene in an intracellular reductive environment. In vitro transfection experiments revealed that the GdCPUA at a DTDE-PNC/DTPA residue molar ratio of 85/15 induced the highest transfection efficiency in different cancer cells. This efficiency was higher than that yielded with 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine as a positive control. GdCPUAs and their polyplexes exhibited low cytotoxicity when an optimal transfection activity was detected. Moreover, GdCPUAs may serve as contrast agents for T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The results of this work indicate that biodegradable Gd-chelated cationic poly(urethane amide) copolymers have high potential for tumor theranostics. - Highlights: • Novel cationic gadolinium-chelated poly(urethane amide)s (GdCPUAs) are prepared. • GdCPUAs can induce a high transfection efficacy in different cancer cells. • GdCPUAs reveal good cyto-compatibility against cancer cells. • GdCPUAs may be applied as T{sub 1}-contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. • GdCPUAs hold high potential for cancer theranostics.

  2. Mejoramiento de imágenes usando funciones de base radial Images improvement using radial basis functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Echeverri Arias

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available La eliminación del ruido impulsivo es un problema clásico del procesado no lineal para el mejoramiento de imágenes y las funciones de base radial de soporte global son útiles para enfrentarlo. Este trabajo presenta una técnica de interpolación que disminuye eficientemente el ruido impulsivo en imágenes, mediante el uso de interpolante obtenido por funciones de base radial en el marco de la investigación enfocada en el desarrollo de un Sistema de recuperación de imágenes de recursos acuáticos amazónicos. Esta técnica primero etiqueta los píxeles de la imagen que son ruidosos y, mediante la interpolación, genera un valor de reconstrucción de dicho píxel usando sus vecinos. Los resultados obtenidos son comparables y muchas veces mejores que otras técnicas ya publicadas y reconocidas. Según el análisis de resultados, se puede aplicar a imágenes con altas tasas de ruido, manteniendo un bajo error de reconstrucción de los píxeles "ruidosos", así como la calidad visual.Global support radial base functions are effective in eliminating impulsive noise in non-linear processing. This paper introduces an interpolation technique which efficiently reduces image impulsive noise by means of an interpolant obtained through radial base functions. These functions have been used in a research project designed to develop a system for the recovery of images of Amazonian aquatic resources. This technique starts with the tagging by interpolation of noisy image pixels. Thus, a value of reconstruction for the noisy pixels is generated using neighboring pixels. The results obtained with this technique have proved comparable and often better than those obtained with previously known techniques. According to results analysis, this technique can be successfully applied on images with high noise levels. The results are low error in noisy pixel reconstruction and better visual quality.

  3. An imaging checklist for pre-FESS CT: framing a surgically relevant report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, S., E-mail: vaids@vsnl.co [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Vaid, N. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, K.E.M. Hospital, Pune (India); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-05-15

    The reference standard for preoperative imaging in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is multiplanar high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Surgeons require a precise preoperative anatomical road map, and hence it is essential for radiologists to be familiar with the normal three-dimensional sinonasal anatomy and the normal variants encountered in this region. Sagittal imaging has recently emerged as an important tool to visualize additional details in this critical anatomical region. Radiologists also need to report these examinations with special focus on the surgeon's expectations. Constant communication between the radiologist and the surgeon helps to resolve specific issues and improve the overall quality of reports. This results in better preoperative patient counselling and in predicting postoperative improvement in clinical status. This review provides a basic structured format for reporting pre-FESS CT, which can be tailored to meet individual requirements. The CT reporting format follows the order in which the sinonasal structures are approached during surgery.

  4. Report of space experiment project, 'Rad Gene', performed in the International Space Station Kibo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nagamatsu, Aiko

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the project in the title adopted by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) (in 2000) aiming to elucidate the biological effect of space environment, and contains 3 major parts of the process of the experiment, and of findings by analysis after flight and in radioadaptive response. The process for the experiment includes training of the experimenter crew (Dr. S. Magnus) in JAXA, preparation of samples (frozen cells with normal and mutated p53 genes derived from human lymphoblast TK6) and their transfer to the Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-126 launched on Nov. 15, 2008 (Japanese time) for cell culturing in Feb., 2009. Analyses after flight back to the Kennedy Space Center on Mar. 29, 2009, done on the ground in Japan thereafter include the physical evaluation, confirmation of DNA damage, and phenotypic expression with DNA- and protein-arrays (genes induced for expression of p53-related phenotypes in those cells which were stored frozen in the space, thawed on the ground and then cultured, genes induced for expressing the phenotypes and p53-related proteins expressed in cells cultured in space). Physically, total absorbed dose and dose equivalent are found to be respectively 43.5 mGy and 71.2 mSv (0.5 mSv/day). Interestingly, the biologically estimated dose by DNA-double strand breaks detected by γH2AX staining, 94.5 mSv (0.7 mSv/day), in living, frozen cells in space, is close to the above physical dose. Expression experiments of p53-related phenotypes have revealed that expression of 750 or more genes in 41,000 genes in the array is changed: enhanced or suppressed by space radiation, micro-gravity and/or their mixed effects in space environment. In 642 protein antibodies in the array, 2 proteins are found enhanced and 8, suppressed whereas heat-shock protein is unchanged. Radioadaptive response is the acquisition of radio-resistance to acute exposure by previous irradiation of small dose (window width 20-100 mSv) in normal p53

  5. Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System on CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Dong Ik; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    To assess major imaging features of Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System (LI-RADS) on contrast-enhanced CT and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and to estimate whether the combination of signal intensity favouring HCC on hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI) can act as a major feature in LI-RADS. Four hundred twenty one patients with 445 observations were included. Major features of LI-RADS on CT and MRI as well as HBP and DWI features were assessed. Diagnostic performances of LR-5 according to LI-RADS v2014 and modified LI-RADS which incorporate combination of HBP and DWI were assessed. Pairwise comparisons of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed. For HCCs, capsule appearance had the highest rate of discordance between CT and MRI (32.7%), followed by washout appearance (22.2%). Specificity (75%) of LR-5 of LI-RADS v2014 was lower than that (77.1-79.2%) of modified LI-RADS. Area under the ROC curve of modified LI-RADS (0.755-0.775) was not significantly different from that of LI-RADS v 2014 (0.709) (p > 0.05). There were substantial discordances between CT and MRI for capsule and washout appearances in hepatic observations, and combination of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI might be able to be incorporated as a major feature of LI-RADS. (orig.)

  6. The first case report of a large deletion of the BRCA1 gene in Croatia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Vesna; Sušac, Ilona; Ozretić, Petar; Eljuga, Domagoj; Levanat, Sonja

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women, and it is the leading cause of cancer related deaths in Croatia. BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations are the most common cause of hereditary breast cancer. In this report we describe a Croatian patient with no apparent family history of cancer, who developed breast cancer first at 29, and again at 33. Due to the early development of first breast cancer and triple negative status of the second, the attending physician suspected a hereditary aspect. Patient was sent to BRCA1 genetic testing. Subsequently, her mother and sister were sent to check for the mutation found in the patient. BRCA1 exons 4-6 deletion was determined and sequencing confirmed the deletion as NG_005905.2:g.107648_117905del10257. Mother and sister were not affected, but since there were no available family members on the fathers' side, it was not possible to determine if this was a case of de novo mutation. Until now, only in three reports with the similar mutation the exact mutation borders were determined. The mutation in this case was not the same as previously reported and was more than twice in size. All large deletions should be described at the nucleotide level, so that in cases with missing family data it would be possible to deduce if the mutation is already known. If the mutation is already known, it is probably not a de novo event, since it is unlikely that the breakpoints would be exactly the same more than once.

  7. Fournier gangrene: report of three cases, computed tomography imaging findings and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judici, Paola Lima Pasini; Christofoli, Maria Olivia Jacques de Medeiros; Oliveira, Paulo Cesar Rocha; Teles, Ilailson de Goes; Najjar, Yana Senna Jeronimo

    2010-01-01

    The authors report three cases of patients with Fournier gangrene. This is a polymicrobial infectious disease that affects the perineum and genitalia, especially in males, whose source is most commonly genitourinary, colorectal or cutaneous and may also not have a clearly defined focus. Potentially lethal, requires immediate clinical and surgical treatment. The purpose of this report is to describe the main findings of imaging on computed tomography in this disease and to briefly review the literature on the subject. (author)

  8. Imaging findings of anaplastic astrocytoma in a child with maple syrup urine disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw-Zoretic, Jessie; Wadhwani, Nitin R; Lulla, Rishi R; Rishi, Lulla R; Ryan, Maura E

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of branched-chain amino acid metabolism, which usually presents in childhood with encephalopathy due to cerebral edema and dysmyelination. Even with treatment, metabolic stressors may precipitate later episodes of acute decompensation. Changes related to cerebral and white matter edema have been described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and imaging can aid in both initial diagnosis and evaluation of decompensation. To date, there are no published known reports of cancer in patients with MSUD. Here, we present the first case report of an anaplastic astrocytoma in a teenager with MSUD, with a discussion of imaging findings and the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to help distinguish between tumor and metabolic changes.

  9. β-Globin gene sequencing of hemoglobin Austin revises the historically reported electrophoretic migration pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racsa, Lori D; Luu, Hung S; Park, Jason Y; Mitui, Midori; Timmons, Charles F

    2014-06-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) Austin was defined in 1977, using amino acid sequencing of samples from 3 unrelated Mexican-Americans, as a substitution of serine for arginine at position 40 of the β-globin chain (Arg40Ser). Its electrophoretic migration on both cellulose acetate (pH 8.4) and citrate agar (pH 6.2) was reported between Hb F and Hb A, and this description persists in reference literature. OBJECTIVES.-To review the clinical features and redefine the diagnostic characteristics of Hb Austin. Eight samples from 6 unrelated individuals and 2 siblings, all with Hispanic surnames, were submitted for abnormal Hb identification between June 2010 and September 2011. High-performance liquid chromatography, isoelectric focusing (IEF), citrate agar electrophoresis, and bidirectional DNA sequencing of the entire β-globin gene were performed. DNA sequencing confirmed all 8 individuals to be heterozygous for Hb Austin (Arg40Ser). Retention time on high-performance liquid chromatography and migration on citrate agar electrophoresis were consistent with that identification. Migration on IEF, however, was not between Hb F and Hb A, as predicted from the report of cellulose acetate electrophoresis. By IEF, Hb Austin migrated anodal to ("faster than") Hb A. Hemoglobin Austin (Arg40Ser) appears on IEF as a "fast," anodally migrating, Hb variant, just as would be expected from its amino acid substitution. The cited historic report is, at best, not applicable to IEF and is probably erroneous. Our observation of 8 cases in 16 months suggests that this variant may be relatively common in some Hispanic populations, making its recognition important. Furthermore, gene sequencing is proving itself a powerful and reliable tool for definitive identification of Hb variants.

  10. Ovarian granulocytic sarcoma: a case report and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Licia Pacheco; Monte, Hipolito

    2008-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma (chloroma) is a tumor consisting of myeloid precursors in an extramedullary site. It is complication of both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias. Although the lesion can occur at any site, ovarian involvement is rare. We report a case of ovary tumor associated with acute myeloid leukaemia and its imaging appearance on magnetic resonance. (author)

  11. Pseudo-meigs syndrome due to subserosal leiomyoma diagnosed by MR imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Jae Mun; Lee, Kyo Young; Han, Ku Taek; Hahn, Seong Tai

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of pseudo-meigs syndrome due to a large subserosal leiomyoma in a patient with a high serum carcinogenic antigen 125 level. Initial clinical examination suggested disseminated malignant disease though the typical signal characteristics of leiomyoma, seen at MR imaging, led to the diagnosis of pseudo-meigs syndrome

  12. MR imaging findings of leiomyoma in the prevesical space: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, In Yong; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Seong Tai

    2003-01-01

    Leiomyomas most frequently occur in the genitourinary and gastrointestinal system. This report describes the clinical and imaging findings of a leiomyoma originating in the prevesical space, a rare location. The mass abutted the fundus of the uterus, but after the correct identification of feeding vessels from the right iliac artery, prevesical leiomyoma was diagnosed radiologically

  13. MR imaging findings of leiomyoma in the prevesical space: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, In Yong; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Jae Mun; Hahn, Seong Tai [College of Medicine, Catholic Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    Leiomyomas most frequently occur in the genitourinary and gastrointestinal system. This report describes the clinical and imaging findings of a leiomyoma originating in the prevesical space, a rare location. The mass abutted the fundus of the uterus, but after the correct identification of feeding vessels from the right iliac artery, prevesical leiomyoma was diagnosed radiologically.

  14. Pseudo-meigs syndrome due to subserosal leiomyoma diagnosed by MR imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Jung, Seung Eun; Lee, Jae Mun; Lee, Kyo Young; Han, Ku Taek; Hahn, Seong Tai [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    We reports a case of pseudo-meigs syndrome due to a large subserosal leiomyoma in a patient with a high serum carcinogenic antigen 125 level. Initial clinical examination suggested disseminated malignant disease though the typical signal characteristics of leiomyoma, seen at MR imaging, led to the diagnosis of pseudo-meigs syndrome.

  15. Myxoid chondrosarcoma in the calcaneus: a case report with MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Kwack, Kyu-Sung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Oh, Joo Han [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-Do (Korea); Chung, Jin Haeng [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seong Nam, Gyeongi-Do (Korea)

    2007-06-15

    Skeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma is an extraordinarily rare neoplasm with a distinct histological morphology. Herein, we report a case of a myxoid chondrosarcoma in the calcaneus of a 20-year-old man with a description of its MR imaging (MRI) and histological findings. (orig.)

  16. Imaging Findings of Embryonal Cell Carcinoma in Ovary:A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Park, Cheol Min; Choi, Jae Woong; Seol, Hae Young; Kim, Kyeong Ah

    2004-01-01

    Embryonal cell carcinoma is one of the malignant germ cell tumors. This tumor is commonly encountered in the testis, however, it rarely occurs in the ovary. To the best of our knowledge, no imaging findings of ovarian embryonal cell carcinoma have previously been reported. We describe the US and MRI findings of such a case

  17. Imaging findings of a primary paraganglioma of the liver: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Seung Woo; Kang, Ung Rae; Park, Jae Bok [Daegu Catholic University Medical Center, Catholic University of Daegu College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Primary hepatic paraganglioma is an extremely rare type of tumor originating from extra-adrenal chromaffin cells. We report a case of primary intrahepatic paraganglioma in a 52-year-old man, with pathologic confirmation through right hepatectomy. An imaging study indicated a predominately hemorrhagic septated cystic mass and peripheral marked enhancement of the solid portions, which showed persistent enhancement.

  18. Alexander's disease: magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, E.; Pakula-Kosciesza, I.; Mierzewska, H.; Walecki, J.; Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Salomons, G.; Kmiec, T.

    2006-01-01

    Alexander's disease is a rare genetic leukodystrophy connected with mutation of the GFAP gene. Infantile, juvenile, and adult subtypes are described. We analyzed MR images in three and HMRS in two cases of Alexander's disease. The examinations were performed with a 1.5 T scanner in the SE, FSE, and FLAIR sequences in T1,T2 WI before and after gadolinium injection. Single voxel HMRS was performed. MRI showed extensive abnormal signal in the white matter of the frontal lobes, in external capsules, basal ganglia, posterior limbs of the internal capsules, and the hilus of dentate nuclei. Focal contrast enhancement was seen near the frontal horns. HMRS revealed increased Cho/Cr and mI/Cr ratios and decreased NAA/Cr ratio. The presence of lactate was also observed. MR is useful in imaging typical forms of Alexander's disease. Genetic investigation is necessary for definitive diagnosis. HMRS demonstrates metabolic abnormalities of white matter. (author)

  19. Involvement of the BDNF Gene in Loneliness in Adolescence : A Report of Opposite Gene Effects in Boys and Girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Maaike; van Roekel, Eeske; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that loneliness has a heritable component and that genes within the serotonin-, dopamine-, and oxytocin systems are related to loneliness in adolescence. In the present study, the relation between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and loneliness in adolescent boys and girls

  20. Biolistic transformation of Schistosoma mansoni: Studies with modified reporter-gene constructs containing regulatory regions of protease genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Jan; Beckmann, S.; Lim, K.-C.; Engel, J. C.; Grevelding, C. G.; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 1 (2010), s. 37-40 ISSN 0166-6851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Schistosoma * Protease * Transgene * Gene promoter * Biolistics * Electroporation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.875, year: 2010

  1. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.D.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents progress in the areas of cardiac nuclear medicine, other imaging studies, investigations with biomolecules, and assessment of risks associated with the clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals

  2. Image-Rich Radiology Reports: A Value-Based Model to Improve Clinical Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavik N; Lopez, Jose M; Jiang, Brian G; Roth, Christopher J; Nelson, Rendon C

    2017-01-01

    To determine the value of image-rich radiology reports (IRRR) by evaluating the interest and preferences of referring physicians, potential impact on clinical workflow, and the willingness of radiologists to create them. Referring physicians and radiologists were interviewed in this prospective, HIPAA-compliant study. Subject willingness to participate in the study was determined by an e-mail. A single investigator conducted all interviews using a standard questionnaire. All subjects reviewed a video mockup demonstration of IRRR and three methods for viewing embedded images, as follows: (1) clickable hyperlinks to access a scrollable stack of images, (2) scrollable and enlargeable small-image thumbnails, and (3) scrollable but not enlargeable medium-sized images. Questionnaire responses, free comments, and general impressions were captured and analyzed. Seventy-two physicians (36 clinicians, 36 radiologists) were interviewed. Thirty-one clinicians (86%) expressed interest in using IRRR. Seventy-seven percent of subjects believed IRRR would improve communication. Ten clinicians (28%) preferred method 1, 18 (50%) preferred method 2, and 8 (22%) preferred method 3 for embedding images. Thirty clinicians (83%) stated that IRRR would improve efficiency. Twenty-two radiologists (61%) preferred selecting a tool button with a mouse and right-clicking images to embed them, 13 (36%) preferred pressing a function key, and 11 (31%) preferred dictating series and image numbers. The average time radiologists were willing to expend for embedding images was 66.7 seconds. Referring physicians and radiologist both believe IRRR would add value by improving communication with the potential to improve the workflow efficiency of referring physicians. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Improving knowledge management through the support of image examination and data annotation using DICOM structured reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, José Salavert; Damian Segrelles Quilis, J; Espert, Ignacio Blanquer; García, Vicente Hernandez

    2012-12-01

    An important effort has been invested on improving the image diagnosis process in different medical areas using information technologies. The field of medical imaging involves two main data types: medical imaging and reports. Developments based on the DICOM standard have demonstrated to be a convenient and widespread solution among the medical community. The main objective of this work is to design a Web application prototype that will be able to improve diagnosis and follow-on of breast cancer patients. It is based on TRENCADIS middleware, which provides a knowledge-oriented storage model composed by federated repositories of DICOM image studies and DICOM-SR medical reports. The full structure and contents of the diagnosis reports are used as metadata for indexing images. The TRENCADIS infrastructure takes full advantage of Grid technologies by deploying multi-resource grid services that enable multiple views (reports schemes) of the knowledge database. The paper presents a real deployment of such Web application prototype in the Dr. Peset Hospital providing radiologists with a tool to create, store and search diagnostic reports based on breast cancer explorations (mammography, magnetic resonance, ultrasound, pre-surgery biopsy and post-surgery biopsy), improving support for diagnostics decisions. A technical details for use cases (outlining enhanced multi-resource grid services communication and processing steps) and interactions between actors and the deployed prototype are described. As a result, information is more structured, the logic is clearer, network messages have been reduced and, in general, the system is more resistant to failures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transforming thymidine into a magnetic resonance imaging probe for monitoring gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Liang, Yajie; Yadav, Nirbhay N; McMahon, Michael T; Walczak, Piotr; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pomper, Martin G; Tallman, Keri A; Greenberg, Marc M; van Zijl, Peter C M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-01-30

    Synthetic chemistry has revolutionized the understanding of many biological systems. Small compounds that act as agonists and antagonists of proteins, and occasionally as imaging probes, have contributed tremendously to the elucidation of many biological pathways. Nevertheless, the function of thousands of proteins is still elusive, and designing new imaging probes remains a challenge. Through screening and characterization, we identified a thymidine analogue as a probe for imaging the expression of herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK). To detect the probe, we used chemical exchange saturation transfer magnetic resonance imaging (CEST-MRI), in which a dynamic exchange process between an exchangeable proton and the surrounding water protons is used to amplify the desired contrast. Initially, five pyrimidine-based molecules were recognized as putative imaging agents, since their exchangeable imino protons resonate at 5-6 ppm from the water proton frequency and their detection is therefore less affected by endogenous CEST contrast or confounded by direct water saturation. Increasing the pK(a) value of the imino proton by reduction of its 5,6-double bond results in a significant reduction of the exchange rate (k(ex)) between this proton and the water protons. This reduced k(ex) of the dihydropyrimidine nucleosides fulfills the "slow to intermediate regime" condition for generating high CEST-MRI contrast. Consequently, we identified 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine as the optimal probe and demonstrated its feasibility for in vivo imaging of HSV1-TK. In light of these findings, this new approach can be generalized for designing specific probes for the in vivo imaging of a variety of proteins and enzymes.

  5. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...... calcium phosphate transfection method, this method has the advantage of being more feasible, as the assay can be scaled down to the microtiter plate format. Furthermore, the transfection reagent is noncytotoxic, allowing its addition together with the test compounds thereby reducing the hands...

  6. Final report of the group research. Advanced Technology for Medical Imaging Research. 1996-2000 FY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-03-01

    This report involves the organization of the research groups (4 units of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, radiotracer and radiopharmacology, clinical imaging, and molecular informative research), 5 research reports and 38 published research papers. The research reports concern Fundamental researches on the availability and production of PET radiopharmaceuticals using the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) cyclotron, Design and evaluation of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals for PET measurement (kinetics and metabolism in small animals and primates), Fundamental studies on development of technique radiation measurement, Clinical application of medical imaging technology in the fields of neuroscience, cardiovascular, cancer diagnosis and others, and A study to establish and evaluate a lung cancer screening system using spiral CT units which is in pilot-progress in Kanto and Kansai regions. (N.I.)

  7. A novel mutation of WFS1 gene in a Chinese patient with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Jia; Yi, Huan; Xu, Li; Zhong, Xiufeng; Peng, Fuhua

    2018-03-17

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), caused by mutations of the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene on chromosome 4p16.1, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus (DI), neuro-psychiatric disorders, hearing deficit, and urinary tract anomalies. Here we report a 11-year-old Chinese boy who presented with visual loss, was suspected with optic neuritis (ON) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and referred to our department for further diagnosis. Finally he was diagnosed with WS because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and optic atrophy (OA). Eight exons and flanking introns of WFS1 gene were analyzed by sequencing. A novel mutation c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8 was identified. This report reviews a case of WS associated with a novel mutation, c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8, and emphasizes that WS should be taken into account for juveniles with visual loss and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-related genes in giant breast fibroadenoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orozco Javier I

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Giant fibroadenoma is an uncommon variant of benign breast lesions. Aberrant methylation of CpG islands in promoter regions is known to be involved in the silencing of genes (for example, tumor-suppressor genes and appears to be an early event in the etiology of breast carcinogenesis. Only hypermethylation of p16INK4a has been reported in non-giant breast fibroadenoma. In this particular case, there are no previously published data on epigenetic alterations in giant fibroadenomas. Our previous results, based on the analysis of 49 cancer-related CpG islands have confirmed that the aberrant methylation is specific to malignant breast tumors and that it is completely absent in normal breast tissue and breast fibroadenomas. Case presentation A 13-year-old Hispanic girl was referred after she had noted a progressive development of a mass in her left breast. On physical examination, a 10 × 10 cm lump was detected and axillary lymph nodes were not enlarged. After surgical removal the lump was diagnosed as a giant fibroadenoma. Because of the high growth rate of this benign tumor, we decided to analyze the methylation status of 49 CpG islands related to cell growth control. We have identified the methylation of five cancer-related CpG islands in the giant fibroadenoma tissue: ESR1, MGMT, WT-1, BRCA2 and CD44. Conclusion In this case report we show for the first time the methylation analysis of a giant fibroadenoma. The detection of methylation of these five cancer-related regions indicates substantial epigenomic differences with non-giant fibroadenomas. Epigenetic alterations could explain the higher growth rate of this tumor. Our data contribute to the growing knowledge of aberrant methylation in breast diseases. In this particular case, there exist no previous data regarding the role of methylation in giant fibroadenomas, considered by definition as a benign breast lesion.

  9. Development of the 5-HT2CR-Tango System Combined with an EGFP Reporter Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Aoki, Miku; Taguchi, Katsutoshi; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-02-01

    The serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2CR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor implicated in emotion, feeding, reward, and cognition. 5-HT2CRs are pharmacological targets for mental disorders and metabolic and reward system abnormalities, as alterations in 5-HT2CR expression, RNA editing, and SNPs are involved in these disturbances. To date, 5-HT2CR activity has mainly been measured by quantifying inositol phosphate production and intracellular Ca(2+) release, but these assays are not suitable for in vivo analysis. Here, we developed a 5-HT2CR-Tango assay system, a novel analysis tool of 5-HT2CR activity based on the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-arrestin interaction. With desensitization of activated 5-HT2CR by arrestin, this system converts the 5-HT2CR-arrestin interaction into EGFP reporter gene signal via the LexA transcriptional activation system. For validation of our system, we measured activity of two 5-HT2CR RNA-editing isoforms (INI and VGV) in HEK293 cells transfected with EGFP reporter gene. The INI isoform displayed both higher basal- and 5-HT-stimulated activities than the VGV isoform. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of 5-HT2CR antagonist SB242084 was also detected by 5-HT2CR-Tango system. This novel tool is useful for in vitro high-throughput targeted 5-HT2CR drug screening and can be applied to future in vivo brain function studies associated with 5-HT2CRs in transgenic animal models.

  10. Pseudo Prune Belly Syndrome: Diagnosis Revealed by Imaging – A Case Report and Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Hemal; Sethi, Sanjay; Garg, Jatin; Ahluwalia, Amrit Pal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare entity, usually found in male neonates. It comprises complex urinary tract anomalies, bilateral undescended testis and absence of anterior abdominal wall muscles. Patients with unilateral abdominal wall deficiency, unilateral undescended testis and female neonates with abdominal wall laxity are classified as Pseudo Prune Belly syndrome (PPBS). Reports on PPBS do not highlight the radiological and imaging characteristics of this syndrome and the current literature on the role of newer imaging modalities, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), remains relatively sparse. We describe a new case of PPBS and emphasize the role of imaging, especially ultrasound and MRI in the process of diagnosis and briefly review the subject. Case Report A male infant of four months of age was referred for evaluation of left-sided cryptorchidism. Clinical examination revealed laxity of the left abdominal wall. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen, pelvis and scrotum was performed together with routine laboratory tests. Ultrasound examination was followed by intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI of the abdomen. On ultrasound, the left testis was located in the inguinal canal, the right kidney was slightly enlarged and the left kidney could not be localized. Ultrasound appearances suggested chronic obstruction in the urinary bladder. Intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI confirmed the ultrasound diagnosis and also revealed a left dysplastic kidney with a dilated, tortuous ureter. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with pseudo prune belly syndrome (PPBS). Conclusions We report a new occurrence of PPBS, a rare entity. The imaging approach for a comprehensive evaluation of the renal system in PPBS, especially with MRI, is emphasized. PMID:28580040

  11. Dengue encephalitis with predominant cerebellar involvement: Report of eight cases with MR and CT imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Vinay; Bhat, Maya; Prasad, Chandrajit; Gupta, A.K.; Saini, Jitender [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neuroimaging and Interventional Radiology, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Aziz, Zarina [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Medical Science, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India); Kumar, Sharath [Apollo Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Bangalore (India); Netravathi, M. [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Department of Neurology, Bangalore (India)

    2014-11-01

    CNS dengue infection is a rare condition and the pattern of brain involvement has not been well described. We report the MR imaging (MRI) features in eight cases of dengue encephalitis. We retrospectively searched cases of dengue encephalitis in which imaging was performed. Eight cases (three men, five women; age range: 8-42 years) diagnosed with dengue encephalitis were included in the study. MR studies were performed on 3-T and 1.5-T MR clinical systems. Two neuroradiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images and analysed the type of lesions, as well as their distribution and imaging features. All eight cases exhibited MRI abnormalities and the cerebellum was involved in all cases. In addition, MRI signal changes were also noted in the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, internal capsule, insula, mesial temporal lobe, and cortical and cerebral white matter. Areas of susceptibility, diffusion restriction, and patchy post-contrast enhancement were the salient imaging features in our cohort of cases. A pattern of symmetrical cerebellar involvement and presence of microbleeds/haemorrhage may serve as a useful imaging marker and may help in the diagnosis of dengue encephalitis. (orig.)

  12. Report of AAPM Task Group 162: Software for planar image quality metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Ikejimba, Lynda C; Harrawood, Brian P; Rong, John; Cunningham, Ian A; Flynn, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    The AAPM Task Group 162 aimed to provide a standardized approach for the assessment of image quality in planar imaging systems. This report offers a description of the approach as well as the details of the resultant software bundle to measure detective quantum efficiency (DQE) as well as its basis components and derivatives. The methodology and the associated software include the characterization of the noise power spectrum (NPS) from planar images acquired under specific acquisition conditions, modulation transfer function (MTF) using an edge test object, the DQE, and effective DQE (eDQE). First, a methodological framework is provided to highlight the theoretical basis of the work. Then, a step-by-step guide is included to assist in proper execution of each component of the code. Lastly, an evaluation of the method is included to validate its accuracy against model-based and experimental data. The code was built using a Macintosh OSX operating system. The software package contains all the source codes to permit an experienced user to build the suite on a Linux or other *nix type system. The package further includes manuals and sample images and scripts to demonstrate use of the software for new users. The results of the code are in close alignment with theoretical expectations and published results of experimental data. The methodology and the software package offered in AAPM TG162 can be used as baseline for characterization of inherent image quality attributes of planar imaging systems. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  13. Dengue encephalitis with predominant cerebellar involvement: Report of eight cases with MR and CT imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Vinay; Bhat, Maya; Prasad, Chandrajit; Gupta, A.K.; Saini, Jitender; Aziz, Zarina; Kumar, Sharath; Netravathi, M.

    2015-01-01

    CNS dengue infection is a rare condition and the pattern of brain involvement has not been well described. We report the MR imaging (MRI) features in eight cases of dengue encephalitis. We retrospectively searched cases of dengue encephalitis in which imaging was performed. Eight cases (three men, five women; age range: 8-42 years) diagnosed with dengue encephalitis were included in the study. MR studies were performed on 3-T and 1.5-T MR clinical systems. Two neuroradiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images and analysed the type of lesions, as well as their distribution and imaging features. All eight cases exhibited MRI abnormalities and the cerebellum was involved in all cases. In addition, MRI signal changes were also noted in the brainstem, thalamus, basal ganglia, internal capsule, insula, mesial temporal lobe, and cortical and cerebral white matter. Areas of susceptibility, diffusion restriction, and patchy post-contrast enhancement were the salient imaging features in our cohort of cases. A pattern of symmetrical cerebellar involvement and presence of microbleeds/haemorrhage may serve as a useful imaging marker and may help in the diagnosis of dengue encephalitis. (orig.)

  14. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  15. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  17. Image-guided Tumor Ablation: Standardization of Terminology and Reporting Criteria—A 10-Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbiati, Luigi; Brace, Christopher L.; Breen, David J.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Charboneau, J. William; Chen, Min-Hua; Choi, Byung Ihn; de Baère, Thierry; Dodd, Gerald D.; Dupuy, Damian E.; Gervais, Debra A.; Gianfelice, David; Gillams, Alice R.; Lee, Fred T.; Leen, Edward; Lencioni, Riccardo; Littrup, Peter J.; Livraghi, Tito; Lu, David S.; McGahan, John P.; Meloni, Maria Franca; Nikolic, Boris; Pereira, Philippe L.; Liang, Ping; Rhim, Hyunchul; Rose, Steven C.; Salem, Riad; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Soulen, Michael C.; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Vogl, Thomas J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided tumor ablation has become a well-established hallmark of local cancer therapy. The breadth of options available in this growing field increases the need for standardization of terminology and reporting criteria to facilitate effective communication of ideas and appropriate comparison among treatments that use different technologies, such as chemical (eg, ethanol or acetic acid) ablation, thermal therapies (eg, radiofrequency, laser, microwave, focused ultrasound, and cryoablation) and newer ablative modalities such as irreversible electroporation. This updated consensus document provides a framework that will facilitate the clearest communication among investigators regarding ablative technologies. An appropriate vehicle is proposed for reporting the various aspects of image-guided ablation therapy including classification of therapies, procedure terms, descriptors of imaging guidance, and terminology for imaging and pathologic findings. Methods are addressed for standardizing reporting of technique, follow-up, complications, and clinical results. As noted in the original document from 2003, adherence to the recommendations will improve the precision of communications in this field, leading to more accurate comparison of technologies and results, and ultimately to improved patient outcomes. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24927329

  18. Using machine learning to speed up manual image annotation: application to a 3D imaging protocol for measuring single cell gene expression in the developing C. elegans embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterston Robert H

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image analysis is an essential component in many biological experiments that study gene expression, cell cycle progression, and protein localization. A protocol for tracking the expression of individual C. elegans genes was developed that collects image samples of a developing embryo by 3-D time lapse microscopy. In this protocol, a program called StarryNite performs the automatic recognition of fluorescently labeled cells and traces their lineage. However, due to the amount of noise present in the data and due to the challenges introduced by increasing number of cells in later stages of development, this program is not error free. In the current version, the error correction (i.e., editing is performed manually using a graphical interface tool named AceTree, which is specifically developed for this task. For a single experiment, this manual annotation task takes several hours. Results In this paper, we reduce the time required to correct errors made by StarryNite. We target one of the most frequent error types (movements annotated as divisions and train a support vector machine (SVM classifier to decide whether a division call made by StarryNite is correct or not. We show, via cross-validation experiments on several benchmark data sets, that the SVM successfully identifies this type of error significantly. A new version of StarryNite that includes the trained SVM classifier is available at http://starrynite.sourceforge.net. Conclusions We demonstrate the utility of a machine learning approach to error annotation for StarryNite. In the process, we also provide some general methodologies for developing and validating a classifier with respect to a given pattern recognition task.

  19. Case reports of juvenile GM1 gangliosidosisis type II caused by mutation in GLB1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Naderi, Samaneh; Modarresi, Farzaneh; Dastsooz, Hassan; Nemati, Hamid; Farokhashtiani, Tayebeh; Shamsian, Bibi Shahin; Inaloo, Soroor; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-07-17

    Type II or juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, which is clinically distinct from infantile form of the disease by the lack of characteristic cherry-red spot and hepatosplenomegaly. The disease is characterized by slowly progressive neurodegeneration and mild skeletal changes. Due to the later age of onset and uncharacteristic presentation, diagnosis is frequently puzzled with other ataxic and purely neurological disorders. Up to now, 3-4 types of GM1-gangliosidosis have been reported and among them type I is the most common phenotype with the age of onset around 6 months. Various forms of GM1-gangliosidosis are caused by GLB1 gene mutations but severity of the disease and age of onset are directly related to the position and the nature of deleterious mutations. However, due to its unique genetic cause and overlapping clinical features, some researchers believe that GM1 gangliosidosis represents an overlapped disease spectrum instead of four distinct types. Here, we report a less frequent type of autosomal recessive GM1 gangliosidosis with perplexing clinical presentation in three families in the southwest part of Iran, who are unrelated but all from "Lurs" ethnic background. To identify disease-causing mutations, Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) utilizing next generation sequencing was performed. Four patients from three families were investigated with the age of onset around 3 years old. Clinical presentations were ataxia, gate disturbances and dystonia leading to wheelchair-dependent disability, regression of intellectual abilities, and general developmental regression. They all were born in consanguineous families with no previous documented similar disease in their parents. A homozygote missense mutation in GLB1 gene (c. 601 G > A, p.R201C) was found in all patients. Using Sanger sequencing this identified mutation was confirmed in the proband, their parents, grandparents, and extended family members, confirming

  20. Imaging Findings of Intrahepatic Bile Duct Adenoma (Peribiliary Gland Hamartoma): a Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Sung; Rha, Sung Eun; Oh, Soon Nam; Jung, Seung Eun; Shin, Yu Ri; Choi, Byung Gil; Byun, Jae Young; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Dong Goo [Catholic University of Korea, Seoul St.Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Intrahepatic bile duct adenoma is a rare benign epithelial hepatic tumor derived from bile duct cells. We report the imaging findings of a patient with bile duct adenoma, which appeared as a small heterogeneously enhancing mass with focal small cystic change on CT and MRI. Follow-up images at seven months showed a slight increase in tumor size, which could be partly explained by intratumoral hemorrhage on pathologic examination. Although rare, bile duct adenoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a small hypervascular tumor located in the periphery of liver. Focal cystic change and intratumoral hemorrhage may occur

  1. Fetal MR Imaging Analysis of Sirenomelia with Clinico Radiographic Correlation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Madhavi; Prasad, Raghavendra G; Reddy, Arvind K; Cheguri, Sandeep Reddy

    2016-06-01

    Sirenomelia is a social curiosity, a medical and diagnostic challenge prenatally compounded by varied diagnostic difficulties. Prenatal diagnosis of sirenomelia was and continues to be a challenge although von klippel et al., described a case at 10 weeks of gestational age. However, they needed a second imaging at 12(th) week for confirmation. First trimester or early second trimester anatomic survey on ultrasound and MRI is accurate for the diagnosis thereby avoiding unnecessary complex pregnancy. We report a case of second trimester diagnosed sirenomelia, with detailed analysis of image findings on ultrasound and fetal MRI.

  2. Analysis of the influence of subcellular localization of the HIV Rev protein on Rev-dependent gene expression by multi-fluorescence live-cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Horst; Hadian, Kamyar; Ziegler, Manja; Weierich, Claudia; Kramer-Hammerle, Susanne; Kleinschmidt, Andrea; Erfle, Volker; Brack-Werner, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus Rev protein is a post-transcriptional activator of HIV gene expression. Rev is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein that displays characteristic nuclear/nucleolar subcellular localization in various cell lines. Cytoplasmic localization of Rev occurs under various conditions disrupting Rev function. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between localization of Rev and its functional activity in living cells. A triple-fluorescent imaging assay, called AQ-FIND, was established for automatic quantitative evaluation of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of fluorescently tagged proteins. This assay was used to screen 500 rev genes generated by error-prone PCR for Rev mutants with different localization phenotypes. Activities of the Rev mutants were determined with a second quantitative, dual-fluorescent reporter assay. In HeLa cells, the majority of nuclear Rev mutants had activities similar to wild-type Rev. The activities of Rev mutants with abnormal cytoplasmic localization ranged from moderately impaired to nonfunctional. There was no linear correlation between subcellular distribution and levels of Rev activity. In astrocytes, nuclear Rev mutants showed similar impaired activities as the cytoplasmic wild-type Rev. Our data suggest that steady-state subcellular localization is not a primary regulator of Rev activity but may change as a secondary consequence of altered Rev function. The methodologies described here have potential for studying the significance of subcellular localization for functions of other regulatory factors

  3. Emphasis on the MR imaging findings of brown tumor: a report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Won Sun; Sung, Mi Sook; Chun, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Jee-Young; Lim, Hyun Wook; Lim, Yeon Soo; Yoo, Won Jong; Chung, Myung Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun-Won [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dongjak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Haeng [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Sosa-dong, Bucheon, Kyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Brown tumors are focal reactive osteolytic lesions that are encountered in patients with primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism, and these tumors have nonspecific magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. However, there are only a few reports on MR imaging of brown tumors. The purpose of this study is to describe the spectrum of MR imaging findings of brown tumors. The MR imaging features of five patients with clinical and pathological evidence of brown tumor were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists. The patients had primary hyperparathyroidism, which was confirmed as parathyroid adenoma (n = 2) and parathyroid carcinoma (n = 3). The MR images were evaluated for the presence of solid or cystic portions, the signal intensity of the lesions, the contrast enhancement pattern and the presence of cortex destruction and fluid-fluid levels. Twelve bone lesions were detected on the MR images of five patients; three lesions in two patients, four lesions in one patient, and one lesion in two patients. The tumor was solid in three lesions, mixed solid and cystic in four, and cystic in five. All the solid lesions were accompanied by mixed lesions. Discontinuity of the cortex and adjacent soft-tissue enhancement were seen in all the solid lesions. Fluid-fluid levels were seen in two cases within the cystic component of the mixed lesions and cystic lesions. The five patients with brown tumor demonstrated a wide spectrum of MR imaging findings. There are few lesions that are osteolytic on the radiographs and that show a short T2 on MR imaging, such as brown tumor. Multiple cystic or mixed lesions are the expected findings of brown tumors. (orig.)

  4. Large-scale image-based profiling of single-cell phenotypes in arrayed CRISPR-Cas9 gene perturbation screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Reinoud; Lüthi, Joel; Lindsay, Helen; Holtackers, René; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2018-01-23

    High-content imaging using automated microscopy and computer vision allows multivariate profiling of single-cell phenotypes. Here, we present methods for the application of the CISPR-Cas9 system in large-scale, image-based, gene perturbation experiments. We show that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene perturbation can be achieved in human tissue culture cells in a timeframe that is compatible with image-based phenotyping. We developed a pipeline to construct a large-scale arrayed library of 2,281 sequence-verified CRISPR-Cas9 targeting plasmids and profiled this library for genes affecting cellular morphology and the subcellular localization of components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We conceived a machine-learning method that harnesses genetic heterogeneity to score gene perturbations and identify phenotypically perturbed cells for in-depth characterization of gene perturbation effects. This approach enables genome-scale image-based multivariate gene perturbation profiling using CRISPR-Cas9. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  5. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells as an effective vehicle for tracking the GFP gene marker using magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Mascheri, N; Dharmakumar, R; Fan, Z; Paunesku, T; Woloschak, G; Li, D

    2010-01-01

    Background Detection of a gene using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is hindered by the magnetic resonance (MR) targeting gene technique. Therefore it may be advantageous to image gene-expressing cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles by MRI. Methods The GFP-R3230Ac (GFP) cell line was incubated for 24 h using SPIO nanoparticles at a concentration of 20 μg Fe/mL. Cell samples were prepared for iron content analysis and cell function evaluation. The labeled cells were imaged using fluorescent microscopy and MRI. Results SPIO was used to label GFP cells effectively, with no effects on cell function and GFP expression. Iron-loaded GFP cells were successfully imaged with both fluorescent microscopy and T2*-weighted MRI. Prussian blue staining showed intracellular iron accumulation in the cells. All cells were labeled (100% labeling efficiency). The average iron content per cell was 4.75±0.11 pg Fe/cell (P<0.05 versus control). Discussion This study demonstrates that the GFP expression of cells is not altered by the SPIO labeling process. SPIO-labeled GFP cells can be visualized by MRI; therefore, GFP, a gene marker, was tracked indirectly with the SPIO-loaded cells using MRI. The technique holds promise for monitoring the temporal and spatial migration of cells with a gene marker and enhancing the understanding of cell- and gene-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:18956269

  6. Modelo de error en imágenes comprimidas con wavelets Error Model in Wavelet-compressed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Puetamán G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se presenta la compresión de imágenes a través de la comparación entre el modelo Wavelet y el modelo Fourier, utilizando la minimización de la función de error. El problema que se estudia es específico, consiste en determinar una base {ei} que minimice la función de error entre la imagen original y la recuperada después de la compresión. Es de resaltar que existen muchas aplicaciones, por ejemplo, en medicina o astronomía, en donde no es aceptable ningún deterioro de la imagen porque toda la información contenida, incluso la que se estima como ruido, se considera imprescindible.In this paper we study image compression as a way to compare Wavelet and Fourier models, by minimizing the error function. The particular problem we consider is to determine basis {ei} minimizing the error function between the original image and the recovered one after compression. It is to be noted or remarked that there are many applications in such diverse fields as for example medicine and astronomy, where no image deteriorating is acceptable since even noise is considered essential.

  7. Mobile phone imaging and cloud-based analysis for standardized malaria detection and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Thomas F.; Gupta, Sparsh; Wright, David W.; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) have been widely deployed in low-resource settings. These tests are typically read by visual inspection, and accurate record keeping and data aggregation remains a substantial challenge. A successful malaria elimination campaign will require new strategies that maximize the sensitivity of RDTs, reduce user error, and integrate results reporting tools. In this report, an unmodified mobile phone was used to photograph RDTs, which were subsequently uploaded into a globally accessible database, REDCap, and then analyzed three ways: with an automated image processing program, visual inspection, and a commercial lateral flow reader. The mobile phone image processing detected 20.6 malaria parasites/microliter of blood, compared to the commercial lateral flow reader which detected 64.4 parasites/microliter. Experienced observers visually identified positive malaria cases at 12.5 parasites/microliter, but encountered reporting errors and false negatives. Visual interpretation by inexperienced users resulted in only an 80.2% true negative rate, with substantial disagreement in the lower parasitemia range. We have demonstrated that combining a globally accessible database, such as REDCap, with mobile phone based imaging of RDTs provides objective, secure, automated, data collection and result reporting. This simple combination of existing technologies would appear to be an attractive tool for malaria elimination campaigns.

  8. Avoiding pitfalls in diagnosing basilar artery occlusive disease: clinical and imaging clues - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bastos Conforto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The aim of this paper was to report on the characteristics that aid in establishing the diagnosis of basilar artery occlusive disease (BAOD among patients with hemiparesis and few or minor symptoms of vertebrobasilar disease. CASE REPORT: This report describes two cases in a public university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. We present clinical and imaging findings from two patients with hemiparesis and severe BAOD, but without clinically relevant carotid artery disease (CAD. One patient presented transient ischemic attacks consisting of spells of right hemiparesis that became progressively more frequent, up to twice a week. The neurological examination revealed slight right hemiparesis and right homonymous hemianopsia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed pontine and occipital infarcts. Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography revealed severe basilar artery stenosis. The other patient presented sudden left-side hemiparesis and hypoesthesia. One year earlier, she had reported sudden onset of vertigo that, at that time, was attributed to peripheral vestibulopathy and was not further investigated. MRI showed a right-side pontine infarct and an old infarct in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Basilar artery occlusion was diagnosed. Both patients presented their symptoms while receiving aspirin, and became asymptomatic after treatment with warfarin. CONCLUSIONS: Misdiagnosing asymptomatic CAD as the cause of symptoms in BAOD can have disastrous consequences, such as unnecessary carotid endarterectomy and exposure to this surgical risk while failing to offer the best available treatment for BAOD. Clinical and imaging features provided important clues for diagnosis in the cases presented.

  9. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June Key [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using {sup 125}I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of {sup 131}I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by {sup 125}I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to {sup 131}I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system.

  10. In vitro radionuclide therapy and in vivo scintigraphic imaging of alpha fetoprotein producing hepatocellular carcinoma by targeted sodium iodide symporter gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Song, Inho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Chung, June Key

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a gene expression targeting method for specific imaging and therapy of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) producing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, using an adenovirus vector containing the human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene driven by an AFP enhancer/promoter. The recombinant adenovirus vector, AdAFPhNIS (containing the hNIS gene driven by human AFP enhancer/promoter) was prepared. After in vitro infection by the adenovirus, hNIS gene expression in AFP producing cells and in AFP nonproducing cells was investigated using 125 I uptake assay and semi quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The killing effect of 131 I vitro clonogenic assay. In addition, tumor bearing mice were intravenously injected with the adenovirus, and scintigraphic images were obtained. The expression of hNIS was efficiently demonstrated by 125 I uptake assay in AFP producing cells, but not in AFP nonproducing cells. AFP producing HCC targeted gene expression was confirmed at the mRNA level. Furthermore, in vitro clonogenic assay showed that hNIS gene expression induced by AdAFPhNIS infection in AFP producing cells caused more sensitivity to 131 I than that in AFP nonproducing cells. Injected intravenously in HuH-7 tumor xenografts mice by adenovirus, the functional hNIS gene expression was confirmed in tumor by in vivo scintigraphic imaging. An AFP producing HCC was targeted with an adenovirus vector containing the hNIS gene using the AFP enhancer/promoter in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that AFP producing HCC specific molecular imaging and radionuclide gene therapy are feasible using this recombinant adenovirus vector system

  11. Biologic considerations in anatomic imaging with radionuclides. Final progress report, July 1974--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potchen, E.J.

    1975-01-01

    An important task relating to anatomic imaging with radionuclides is the determination of factors which effect the use of imaging procedures. This is important to reduce radiation exposure in the population, to improve the efficacy of diagnostic imaging procedures and finally to provide a basis for evaluating the potential effects of proposed regulation of use rates. In this report we describe a methodology for obtaining clinical data relating to the use of the brain scan in an inner city teaching hospital. The development of a questionnaire suitable for use in a clinical setting and providing both prospective and retrospective data is presented. The results of the use of the questionnaire at the Johns Hopkins Hospital during a three month period in 1974 are shown and discussed. Some preliminary results from these data are given and a method for further analysis is indicated

  12. MR imaging and ultrasonography findings of early myositis ossificans: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Ryeol; Park, So Young; Jin, Wook; Won, Kyu Yeoun

    2016-01-01

    Myositis ossificans (MO) is a benign soft tissue lesion with non-neoplastic heterotopic bone formation. MO in the intermediate and mature stages can be easily diagnosed if characteristic imaging findings such as a peripheral zonal pattern of ossification with variable thickness is observed. However, it is difficult to correctly diagnose early MO because it can mimic malignancy clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. We report a case of early pseudosarcomatous phase of non-traumatic MO with atypical imaging findings. A 59-year-old woman presented with pain followed by a mass in the left thigh within a week. MR imaging and ultrasonography showed an intramuscular lesion with preserved muscle fascicles in the vastus lateralis muscle. Intralesional ossification or calcification was not seen on ultrasonography. A diagnosis of myositis ossificans was made by ultrasonographically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  13. MR imaging and ultrasonography findings of early myositis ossificans: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Ryeol [Jeju National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Young; Jin, Wook [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Myositis ossificans (MO) is a benign soft tissue lesion with non-neoplastic heterotopic bone formation. MO in the intermediate and mature stages can be easily diagnosed if characteristic imaging findings such as a peripheral zonal pattern of ossification with variable thickness is observed. However, it is difficult to correctly diagnose early MO because it can mimic malignancy clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. We report a case of early pseudosarcomatous phase of non-traumatic MO with atypical imaging findings. A 59-year-old woman presented with pain followed by a mass in the left thigh within a week. MR imaging and ultrasonography showed an intramuscular lesion with preserved muscle fascicles in the vastus lateralis muscle. Intralesional ossification or calcification was not seen on ultrasonography. A diagnosis of myositis ossificans was made by ultrasonographically guided biopsy. (orig.)

  14. MR imaging findings of lower extremity sepsis caused by vibro vulnificus: A report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jihyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Min, Soo Kee; Lee, Jeong A; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2017-01-01

    Lower extremity infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus sepsis is a rapidly progressing fatal condition. Prompt diagnosis followed by early and aggressive treatment with antibiotics and fasciotomy is crucial. In this report, we described lower extremity magnetic resonance (MR) images of three patients with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. In our cases, MR imaging of lower extremity with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis showed three common findings. First, the MR signal abnormalities appeared simultaneously in all layers, including skin, subcutaneous fat, muscles, and deep fasciae. Second, the inflammation showed symmetry on both legs. Third, none of our cases was accompanied by abscess formation. These imaging features may represent rapid progression of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis and could be helpful for accurate diagnosis, and prompt and aggressive treatment

  15. MR imaging findings of lower extremity sepsis caused by vibro vulnificus: A report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Min, Soo Kee; Lee, Jeong A; Lee, Kwan Seop [Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Lower extremity infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus sepsis is a rapidly progressing fatal condition. Prompt diagnosis followed by early and aggressive treatment with antibiotics and fasciotomy is crucial. In this report, we described lower extremity magnetic resonance (MR) images of three patients with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. In our cases, MR imaging of lower extremity with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis showed three common findings. First, the MR signal abnormalities appeared simultaneously in all layers, including skin, subcutaneous fat, muscles, and deep fasciae. Second, the inflammation showed symmetry on both legs. Third, none of our cases was accompanied by abscess formation. These imaging features may represent rapid progression of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis and could be helpful for accurate diagnosis, and prompt and aggressive treatment.

  16. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  17. Naturally occurring mutations in the human 5-lipoxygenase gene promoter that modify transcription factor binding and reporter gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    In, K H; Asano, K; Beier, D; Grobholz, J; Finn, P W; Silverman, E K; Silverman, E S; Collins, T; Fischer, A R; Keith, T P; Serino, K; Kim, S W; De Sanctis, G T; Yandava, C; Pillari, A

    1997-01-01

    Five lipoxygenase (5-LO) is the first committed enzyme in the metabolic pathway leading to the synthesis of the leukotrienes. We examined genomic DNA isolated from 25 normal subjects and 31 patients with asthma (6 of whom had aspirin-sensitive asthma) for mutations in the known transcription factor binding regions and the protein encoding region of the 5-LO gene. A family of mutations in the G + C-rich transcription factor binding region was identified consisting of the deletion of one, delet...

  18. Reliable gene expression analysis by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR: reporting and minimizing the uncertainty in data accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remans, Tony; Keunen, Els; Bex, Geert Jan; Smeets, Karen; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has been widely adopted to measure differences in mRNA levels; however, biological and technical variation strongly affects the accuracy of the reported differences. RT-qPCR specialists have warned that, unless researchers minimize this variability, they may report inaccurate differences and draw incorrect biological conclusions. The Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) guidelines describe procedures for conducting and reporting RT-qPCR experiments. The MIQE guidelines enable others to judge the reliability of reported results; however, a recent literature survey found low adherence to these guidelines. Additionally, even experiments that use appropriate procedures remain subject to individual variation that statistical methods cannot correct. For example, since ideal reference genes do not exist, the widely used method of normalizing RT-qPCR data to reference genes generates background noise that affects the accuracy of measured changes in mRNA levels. However, current RT-qPCR data reporting styles ignore this source of variation. In this commentary, we direct researchers to appropriate procedures, outline a method to present the remaining uncertainty in data accuracy, and propose an intuitive way to select reference genes to minimize uncertainty. Reporting the uncertainty in data accuracy also serves for quality assessment, enabling researchers and peer reviewers to confidently evaluate the reliability of gene expression data. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Pseudo Prune Belly Syndrome: Diagnosis Revealed by Imaging - A Case Report and Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Hemal; Sethi, Sanjay; Garg, Jatin; Ahluwalia, Amrit Pal

    2017-01-01

    Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare entity, usually found in male neonates. It comprises complex urinary tract anomalies, bilateral undescended testis and absence of anterior abdominal wall muscles. Patients with unilateral abdominal wall deficiency, unilateral undescended testis and female neonates with abdominal wall laxity are classified as Pseudo Prune Belly syndrome (PPBS). Reports on PPBS do not highlight the radiological and imaging characteristics of this syndrome and the current literature on the role of newer imaging modalities, such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), remains relatively sparse. We describe a new case of PPBS and emphasize the role of imaging, especially ultrasound and MRI in the process of diagnosis and briefly review the subject. A male infant of four months of age was referred for evaluation of left-sided cryptorchidism. Clinical examination revealed laxity of the left abdominal wall. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen, pelvis and scrotum was performed together with routine laboratory tests. Ultrasound examination was followed by intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI of the abdomen. On ultrasound, the left testis was located in the inguinal canal, the right kidney was slightly enlarged and the left kidney could not be localized. Ultrasound appearances suggested chronic obstruction in the urinary bladder. Intravenous urography, voiding cysto-urethrography and MRI confirmed the ultrasound diagnosis and also revealed a left dysplastic kidney with a dilated, tortuous ureter. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with pseudo prune belly syndrome (PPBS). We report a new occurrence of PPBS, a rare entity. The imaging approach for a comprehensive evaluation of the renal system in PPBS, especially with MRI, is emphasized.

  20. The second report of a new hypomyelinating disease due to a defect in the VPS11 gene discloses a massive lysosomal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörtnagel, Konstanze; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge; Bornemann, Antje; Döcker, Miriam; Biskup, Saskia; Mayrhofer, Heidi; Battke, Florian; du Bois, Gabriele; Harzer, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    Vesicular protein sorting-associated proteins (VPS, including VPS11) are indispensable in the endocytic network, in particular the endosome-lysosome biogenesis. Exome sequencing revealed the homozygous variant p.Leu387_ Gly395del in the VPS11 gene in two siblings. On immunoblotting, the mutant VPS11 protein showed a distinctly reduced immunostaining intensity. The children presented with primary and severe developmental delay associated with myoclonic seizures, spastic tetraplegia, trunk and neck hypotonia, blindness, hearing loss, and microcephaly. Neuro-imaging showed severe hypomyelination affecting cerebral and cerebellar white matter and corpus callosum, in the absence of a peripheral neuropathy. Electron microscopy of a skin biopsy revealed clusters of membranous cytoplasmic bodies in dermal unmyelinated nerve axons, and numbers of vacuoles in eccrine sweat glands, similar to what is seen in a classic lysosomal storage disease (LSD). Bone marrow cytology showed a high number of storage macrophages with a micro-vacuolated cytoplasm. Biochemically, changes in urinary glycosphingolipids were reminiscent of those in prosaposin deficiency (another LSD). The clinical and neuro-imaged features in our patients were almost identical to those in some recently reported patients with another variant in the VPS11 gene, p.Cys846Gly; underlining the presumed pathogenic potential of VPS11 defects. A new feature was the morphological evidence for lysosomal storage in VPS11 deficiency: This newly characterised disease can be viewed as belonging to the complex field of LSD.

  1. Ongoing quality control in digital radiography: Report of AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A. Kyle; Geiser, William; Heintz, Philip; Goldman, Lee; Jerjian, Khachig; Martin, Melissa; Peck, Donald; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Ranger, Nicole; Yorkston, John

    2015-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in medical imaging is an ongoing process and not just a series of infrequent evaluations of medical imaging equipment. The QC process involves designing and implementing a QC program, collecting and analyzing data, investigating results that are outside the acceptance levels for the QC program, and taking corrective action to bring these results back to an acceptable level. The QC process involves key personnel in the imaging department, including the radiologist, radiologic technologist, and the qualified medical physicist (QMP). The QMP performs detailed equipment evaluations and helps with oversight of the QC program, the radiologic technologist is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the QC program. The continued need for ongoing QC in digital radiography has been highlighted in the scientific literature. The charge of this task group was to recommend consistency tests designed to be performed by a medical physicist or a radiologic technologist under the direction of a medical physicist to identify problems with an imaging system that need further evaluation by a medical physicist, including a fault tree to define actions that need to be taken when certain fault conditions are identified. The focus of this final report is the ongoing QC process, including rejected image analysis, exposure analysis, and artifact identification. These QC tasks are vital for the optimal operation of a department performing digital radiography

  2. CT and MR imaging features in phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-mixed connective tissue: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenshan; Deng, Yiqiong; Li, Xiumei; Li, Yueming; Cao, Dairong; Coossa, Vikash Sahadeo

    2018-04-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor-mixed connective tissue (PMT-MCT) is rare and usually benign and slow-growing. The majority of these tumors is associated with sporadic tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) or rickets, affect middle-aged individuals and are located in the extremities. Previous imaging studies often focused on seeking the causative tumors of TIO, not on the radiological features of these tumors, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. PMT-MCT remains a largely misdiagnosed, ignored or unknown entity by most radiologists and clinicians. In the present case report, a review of the known literature of PMT-MCT was conducted and the CT and MRI findings from three patient cases were described for diagnosing the small subcutaneous tumor. Typical MRI appearances of PMT-MCT were isointense relative to the muscles on T1-weighted imaging, and markedly hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging containing variably flow voids, with markedly heterogeneous/homogenous enhancement on post contrast T1-weighted fat-suppression imaging. Short time inversion recovery was demonstrated to be the optimal sequence in localizing the tumor.

  3. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue: a case report with emphasis on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moon Young; Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Chan Kwon [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Pathology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Ie Ryung [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang-Guk [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Giant cell tumor of soft tissue is a rare neoplasm, histologically resembling giant cell tumor of bone. In this report, we describe a deep and solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue interpreted as a benign soft tissue tumor based on magnetic resonance (MR) findings with hypointense to intermediate signals on T2-weighted images and impeded diffusivity (water movement) on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), which could suggest a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy suggested by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a 35-year-old male. To our knowledge, this report introduces the first deep, solid giant cell tumor of soft tissue with MR features of a giant-cell-containing benign soft tissue tumor, despite the malignancy-mimicking findings on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. (orig.)

  4. Association Between Echocardiography Laboratory Accreditation and the Quality of Imaging and Reporting for Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden, Jeremy J; Tsang, Michael Y; Ayoub, Chadi; Padang, Ratnasari; Nkomo, Vuyisile T; Tucker, Stephen F; Cassidy, Cynthia S; Bremer, Merri; Kane, Garvan C; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2017-08-01

    It is presumed that echocardiographic laboratory accreditation leads to improved quality, but there are few data. We sought to compare the quality of echocardiographic examinations performed at accredited versus nonaccredited laboratories for the evaluation of valvular heart disease. We enrolled 335 consecutive valvular heart disease subjects who underwent echocardiography at our institution and an external accredited or nonaccredited institution within 6 months. Completeness and quality of echocardiographic reports and images were assessed by investigators blinded to the external laboratory accreditation status and echocardiographic results. Compared with nonaccredited laboratories, accredited sites more frequently reported patient sex (94% versus 78%; P heart disease. Future quality improvement initiatives should highlight the importance of high-quality color Doppler imaging and echocardiographic quantification to improve the accuracy, reproducibility, and quality of echocardiographic studies for valvular heart disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Three-dimensional x-ray stereometry from paired coplanar images: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Moffitt, F H; Curry, S

    1983-10-01

    More than fifty years ago, Broadbent reported the development of a three-dimensional cephalometric method which complexed information from pairs of x-ray images oriented in two planes at right angles to each other. Empirical problems have prevented the routine clinical use of this "biplanar" method, notwithstanding its obvious conceptual brilliance. The present article reports on recent work toward the development of an alternative method of three-dimensional cephalometry in which the two images of each x-ray pair are positioned in the same plane rather than being at right angles to each other. It is believed that this "coplanar" method avoids many of the technical problems that have limited the use of the Broadbent method.

  6. US and MR imaging of candidiasis of the nervous system in premature infants: two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyo Nam; Woo, Joung Joo; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Soon Yong; Kim, Eun Ryoung [Sungae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Candidiasis of central nervous system (CNS) is rare condition and like other opportunistic fungal infections, most commonly occurs in immune-compromised patients. Because of the increasing use of antibiotics and the improving survival rate of premature infants requiring intensive care, the incidence of fungal infection in the brain has increased. We report the findings of ultrasonography and MR imaging in two cases of candidiasis of the CNS in premature infants.

  7. How I report breast magnetic resonance imaging studies for breast cancer staging and screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnicombe, Sarah

    2016-07-25

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is the most sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis and local staging of primary breast cancer and yet, despite the fact that it has been in use for 20 years, there is little evidence that its widespread uncritical adoption has had a positive impact on patient-related outcomes.This has been attributed previously to the low specificity that might be expected with such a sensitive modality, but with modern techniques and protocols, the specificity and positive predictive value for malignancy can exceed that of breast ultrasound and mammography. A more likely explanation is that historically, clinicians have acted on MRI findings and altered surgical plans without prior histological confirmation. Furthermore, modern adjuvant therapy for breast cancer has improved so much that it has become a very tall order to show a an improvement in outcomes such as local recurrence rates.In order to obtain clinically useful information, it is necessary to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the technique and the physiological processes reflected in breast MRI. An appropriate indication for the scan, proper patient preparation and good scan technique, with rigorous quality assurance, are all essential prerequisites for a diagnostically relevant study.The use of recognised descriptors from a standardised lexicon is helpful, since assessment can then dictate subsequent recommendations for management, as in the American College of Radiology BI-RADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) lexicon (Morris et al., ACR BI-RADS® Atlas, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System, 2013). It also enables audit of the service. However, perhaps the most critical factor in the generation of a meaningful report is for the reporting radiologist to have a thorough understanding of the clinical question and of the findings that will influence management. This has never been more important than at present, when we are in the throes of a

  8. US and MR imaging of candidiasis of the nervous system in premature infants: two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyo Nam; Woo, Joung Joo; Bahk, Yong Whee; Kim, Soon Yong; Kim, Eun Ryoung

    2001-01-01

    Candidiasis of central nervous system (CNS) is rare condition and like other opportunistic fungal infections, most commonly occurs in immune-compromised patients. Because of the increasing use of antibiotics and the improving survival rate of premature infants requiring intensive care, the incidence of fungal infection in the brain has increased. We report the findings of ultrasonography and MR imaging in two cases of candidiasis of the CNS in premature infants

  9. Parry-Romberg syndrome: findings in advanced magnetic resonance imaging sequences - case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Rafael Alfenas de; Ribeiro, Bruno Niemeyer de Freitas, E-mail: alfenas85@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Bahia, Paulo Roberto Valle [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de radiologia; Ribeiro, Renato Niemeyer de Freitas [Hospital de Clinica de Jacarepagua, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Lais Balbi de [Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (Unipac), Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    Parry-Romberg syndrome is a rare disease characterized by progressive hemifacial atrophy associated with other systemic changes, including neurological symptoms. Currently, there are few studies exploring the utilization of advanced magnetic resonance sequences in the investigation of this disease. The authors report the case of a 45-year-old patient and describe the findings at structural magnetic resonance imaging and at advanced sequences, correlating them with pathophysiological data. (author)

  10. Imaging findings of primary angiomyolipoma of the pancreas: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Hee; Park, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology, orea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Angiomyolipoma (AML), a part of a family of mesenchymal tumors, is a common fat-containing solid neoplasm. Kidney and liver are the main sites of AML; rarely, primary pancreatic AML has also been reported. Here, we present a case of pathologically proven primary pancreatic AML in a middle-aged female patient, based on multidetector computed tomography scan, endoscopic ultrasound, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging correlates of bee sting induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sushant K; Zeng, Li-Chuan; Li, Bing; Niu, Xiang-Ke; Wang, Jing-Liang; Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han-Feng

    2014-09-28

    Occasionally systemic complications with high risk of death, such as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), can occur following multiple bee stings. This case study reports a patient who presented with MODS, i.e., acute kidney injury, hepatic and cardiac dysfunction, after multiple bee stings. The standard clinical findings were then correlated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, which demonstrates that MRI may be utilized as a simpler tool to use than other multiple diagnostics.

  12. MR imaging findings in subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Jun; Lee, Jae Hee; Lee, Sung Yong; Chung, Sung Woo

    2000-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause neurologic complications in the spinal cord, brain, and optic and peripheral nerves. Subacute combined degeneration is a rare disease of demyelinating lesions of the spinal cord, affecting mainly the posterior and lateral columns of the thoracic cord. We report the MR imaging findings of a case of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency and mega loblastic anemia. (author)

  13. Imaging in tuberculosis of the skull and skull-base: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, S.; Aydin, K.; Poyanli, A.; Minareci, O.; Sencer, A.; Hepguel, K.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old girl, who presented with headache and tonic/clonic seizures. Imaging revealed a lytic parietal skull lesion with an adjacent epidural mass, masses in the right parietal lobe and a posterior skull-base mass. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was made after resection of the extradural mass and later verified with culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The parenchymal and skull-base lesions resolved following antituberculous treatment. We present CT, scintigraphic, angiographic and MRI findings. (orig.)

  14. Imaging Findings of Sonography and Computed Tomography for a Penile Leiomyosarcoma: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Joo Hee

    2009-01-01

    We report the ultrasonographic and computed tomography (CT) findings of a deep type of penile leiomyosarcoma that helped characterize a penile mass along with a review of the published literature. Leiomyosarcoma of the penis is a very rare disease characterized by a lobulated, expansile, soft tissue mass in CT images, with peripheral rim enhancement and internal homogeneous low density. The ultrasonographic findings revealed a lobulated and heterogeneously hypoechoic solid mass at the distal tip of the penis

  15. Imaging Findings of Sonography and Computed Tomography for a Penile Leiomyosarcoma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin; Chung, Jae Joon; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Joo Hee [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    We report the ultrasonographic and computed tomography (CT) findings of a deep type of penile leiomyosarcoma that helped characterize a penile mass along with a review of the published literature. Leiomyosarcoma of the penis is a very rare disease characterized by a lobulated, expansile, soft tissue mass in CT images, with peripheral rim enhancement and internal homogeneous low density. The ultrasonographic findings revealed a lobulated and heterogeneously hypoechoic solid mass at the distal tip of the penis.

  16. MR Spectroscopy and Perfusion MR Imaging Findings of Intracranial Foreign Body Granuloma: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seung Won; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Sun Mi; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Deok Hee; Lee, Jung Kyo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    We report a case of intracranial foreign body granuloma that showed features of a high grade tumor on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, the relative cerebral blood volume was not increased in the enhancing mass on perfusion MRI and the choline/creatine ratio only slightly increased on MR spectroscopy. The results suggest that the lesion is benign in nature. Perfusion MRI and MR spectroscopy may be helpful to differentiate a foreign body granuloma from a neoplastic condition

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of solitary infantile myofibromatosis of the skull: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Eun; Cho, Kil Ho; Suh, Jang Ho; Choi, Joon Hyuk [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Infantile myofibromatosis is a rare, benign mesenchymal disorder of early childhood characterized by solitary or multiple benign myofibroblastic tumors. The tumors may involve the skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle, bone and visceral organs. We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of solitary infantile myofibromatosis arising in the temporal bone of a ten-month-old boy, and the diagnosis was confirmed by surgical excision and histopathological examination.

  18. Optical imaging of luminescence for in vivo quantification of gene electrotransfer in mouse muscle and knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherman D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is an attractive non-invasive way to evaluate the expression of a transferred DNA, mainly thanks to its lower cost and ease of realization. In this study optical imaging was evaluated for monitoring and quantification of the mouse knee joint and tibial cranial muscle electrotransfer of a luciferase encoding plasmid. Optical imaging was applied to study the kinetics of luciferase expression in both tissues. Results The substrate of luciferase (luciferin was injected either intraperitonealy (i.p. or in situ into the muscle or the knee joint. Luminescence resulting from the luciferase-luciferin reaction was measured in vivo with a cooled CCD camera and/or in vitro on tissue lysate. Maximal luminescence of the knee joint and muscle after i.p. (2.5 mg or local injection of luciferin (50 μg in the knee joint, 100 μg in the muscle were highly correlated. With the local injection procedure adopted, in vivo and in vitro luminescences measured on the same muscles significantly correlated. Luminescence measurements were reproducible and the signal level was proportional to the amount of plasmid injected. In vivo luciferase activity in the electrotransfered knee joint was detected for two weeks. Intramuscular electrotransfer of 0.3 or 3 μg of plasmid led to stable luciferase expression for 62 days, whereas injecting 30 μg of plasmid resulted in a drop of luminescence three weeks after electrotransfer. These decreases were partially associated with the development of an immune response. Conclusion A particular advantage of the i.p. injection of substrate is a widespread distribution at luciferase production sites. We have also highlighted advantages of local injection as a more sensitive detection method with reduced substrate consumption. Besides, this route of injection is relatively free of uncontrolled parameters, such as diffusion to the target organ, crossing of biological barriers and evidencing variations in

  19. In vivo imaging of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene expression: early kinetics of radiolabelled FIAU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haubner, R.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Hantzopoulos, P.A.; Gansbacher, B. [Inst. of Experimental Oncology, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the early kinetics of I*-FIAU and the possibility of utilising iodine-123-labelled FIAU for imaging of gene expression. CMS-5 fibrosarcoma cells were transduced in vitro with the retroviral vector STK containing the HSV1-tk gene. BALB/c mice were inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk(+) and tk(-) cells into both flanks. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyluracil was radioiodinated ({sup 123}I, {sup 125}I)) using the iodogen method. High-performance liquid chromatography purification resulted in high specific activity and radiochemical purity for both tracers ([{sup 123}I]FIAU and [{sup 125}I]FIAU). Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h p.i. In addition, the genomic DNA of the tumours was isolated for measurement of the activity accumulation resulting from the [{sup 125}I]FIAU incorporation. Biodistribution studies 0.5 h p.i. showed tumour/blood and tumour/muscle ratios of 3.8 and 7.2, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, and 0.6 and 1.2, respectively, for negative control tumours. Fast renal elimination of the tracer from the body resulted in rapidly increasing tumour/blood and tumour/muscle ratios which reached values of 32 and 88 at 4 h p.i., respectively. Tracer clearance from blood was bi-exponential, with an initial half-life of 0.6 h followed by a half-life of 4.6 h. The tracer half-life in herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase-expressing tumours was 35.7 h. The highest activity accumulation (20.3%{+-}5.7% ID/g) in HSV1-tk(+) tumours was observed 1 h p.i. At that time, about 46% of the total activity found in HSV1-tk(+) tumours was incorporated into genomic DNA. Planar gamma camera imaging showed a distinct tracer accumulation as early as 0.5 h p.i., with an increase in contrast over time. These results suggest that sufficient tumour/background ratios for in vivo imaging of HSV1-tk expression with [{sup 123}I]FIAU are reached as early as 1 h p

  20. Magnetic resonance-imaging of the effect of targeted antiangiogenic gene delivery in a melanoma tumour model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hundt, Walter [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany); Steinbach, Silke [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Marburg (Germany); Mayer, Dirk; Guccione, Samira [Stanford School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Burbelko, Mykhaylo; Kiessling, Andreas; Figiel, Jens [Philipps University Marburg, Department of Radiology, Marburg (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effect of targeted gene therapy to melanoma tumours (M21) by MR-imaging. M21 and M21-L tumours were grown to a size of 850 mm{sup 3}. M21 and M21-L tumours were intravenously treated with an αvβ3-integrin-ligand-coupled nanoparticle (RGDNP)/RAF(-) complex five times every 72 hours. MRI was performed at set time intervals 24h and 72h after the i.v. injection of the complex. The MRI protocol was T1-wt-SE±CM, T2-wt-FSE, DCE-MRI, Diffusion-wt-STEAM-sequence, T2-time obtained on a 1.5-T-GE-MRI device. The size of the treated M21 tumours kept nearly constant during the treatment phase (847.8±31.4 mm{sup 3} versus 904.8±44.4 mm{sup 3}). The SNR value (T2-weighted images) of the tumours was 36.7±0.6 and dropped down to 30.6±1.9 (p=0.004). At the beginning the SNR value (T1-weighted images) of the tumours after contrast medium application was 42.3±1.9 and dropped down to 28.5±3.0 (p<0.001). In the treatment group the diffusion coefficient increased significantly under therapy (0.54±0.01x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s versus 0.67±0.04x10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). The DCE-MRI showed a reduction of the slope and of the Akep of 67.8±4.3 % respectively 64.8±3.3 % compared to baseline. Targeted gene delivery therapy induces significant changes in MR-imaging. MRI showed a significant reduction of contrast medium uptake parameters and increase of the diffusion coefficient of the tumours. (orig.)

  1. Unusual presentations of child abuse: A report of two cases and the role of imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olubukola Titilayo Abeni Omidiji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient attention has been paid to child abuse in Nigeria, where corporal punishment is still acceptable both at home and in the wider public including schools. This is notlimited to the parents; these punitive measures can also be undertaken by the extended family, caregivers, and neighbors. Mild to extreme force is allowed particularly when the crime involves tarnishing the family image. We hereby report two cases of extreme discipline that can be termed as a form of child abuse to draw the attention of clinicians and radiologists to other possible findings aside from those already reported in literature.

  2. Imaging features of gastric invasive aspergillosis: A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Jin; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Ji Yeol; Lee, Yil Gi [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Invasive aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection that usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. Although there are a few rare reports of isolated invasive aspergillosis affecting the small intestine, isolated or disseminated gastric invasive aspergillosis is extremely rare. Herein, we report 2 cases of gastric invasive aspergillosis in a 72 year old woman and a 43 year old man; the woman had been recovering from ruptured left posterior communicating artery aneurysm, which presented as emphysematous gastritis and the man from acute subdural haemorrhage in the intensive care unit, which presented as a pseudoaneurysm on CT imaging.

  3. Unusual presentations of child abuse: A report of two cases and the role of imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidiji, Olubukola Titilayo Abeni; Atalabi, Omolola Mojisola; Evbuomwan, Ogbeide Ejeordamen; Okwuegbuna, Francis Ikechukwu; Oluseyi, Olugbenga

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient attention has been paid to child abuse in Nigeria, where corporal punishment is still acceptable both at home and in the wider public including schools. This is notlimited to the parents; these punitive measures can also be undertaken by the extended family, caregivers, and neighbors. Mild to extreme force is allowed particularly when the crime involves tarnishing the family image. We hereby report two cases of extreme discipline that can be termed as a form of child abuse to draw the attention of clinicians and radiologists to other possible findings aside from those already reported in literature.

  4. Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma: Case report with review on role of imaging in diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a locally aggressive benign vascular neoplasm, composed of vasogenic and myofibroblastic elements, accounts for 0.05-0.5% of all the head and neck neoplasms. There are very few case reports of nasopharyngeal angiofibroma involving the oral cavity; we report a case involving both the maxilla and mandible in a 17-year-old patient who reported with a large firm swelling on right side of face with recurrent epistaxis and headache. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed a large lobulated enhancing soft tissue mass, which was hypointense on T1-weighted image and heterogeneously hyperintense on T2-weighted image causing expansion of pterygopalatine fossa and sphenopalatine foramen with extension into the sphenoid sinus, ethmoid air cells, right nasal cavity, right infratemporal fossa and right maxillary sinus with remodeling of right zygomatic arch and part of body and ramus of mandible. It was supplied by the right external carotid artery. Patient was referred to the department of neurosurgery for further management. The diagnosis at an early stage is important because it is associated with high risk of morbidity, but advances in imaging, and surgical methods of treatment have changed the sites associated with high risk of morbidity.

  5. First Report of Preoperative Imaging Diagnosis of a Surgically Confirmed Case of Valentino′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Suresh Mahajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Perforation of a duodenal ulcer (DU into the retroperitoneal space presenting with clinical features of acute appendicitis is known as Valentino′s syndrome. Post duodenal perforation, the gastric and duodenal fluids tend to settle in the right paracolic gutter causing peritonitis and clinically mimicking acute appendicitis. Only three cases of Valentino′s syndrome have been reported till date in the published literature and there is only one previous report of its preoperative imaging diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of preoperative imaging diagnosis in a surgically confirmed case of Valentino′s syndrome. In most cases, patients with undiagnosed Valentino′s syndrome are operated for acute appendicitis, and on finding a normal appendix, search is made for the cause of peritonitis, which then leads to retroperitoneal perforation of duodenum. The diagnosis of Valentino′s syndrome by computed tomography (CT imaging is easy and can help in avoiding the surgery or directing the surgeon directly to the repair of the duodenal perforation. It is, therefore, essential for emergency physicians, surgeons, and radiologists to know about this entity and consider it in the differential diagnosis.

  6. Interoperative fundus image and report sharing in compliance with integrating the healthcare enterprise conformance and web access todigital imaging and communication in medicinepersistent object protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Qun Wu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To address issues in interoperability between different fundus image systems, we proposed a web eye-picture archiving and communication system (PACS framework in conformance with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM and health level 7 (HL7 protocol to realize fundus images and reports sharing and communication through internet.METHODS: Firstly, a telemedicine-based eye care work flow was established based on integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE Eye Care technical framework. Then, a browser/server architecture eye-PACS system was established in conformance with the web access to DICOM persistent object (WADO protocol, which contains three tiers.RESULTS:In any client system installed with web browser, clinicians could log in the eye-PACS to observe fundus images and reports. Multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME type of a structured report is saved as pdf/html with reference link to relevant fundus image using the WADO syntax could provide enough information for clinicians. Some functions provided by open-source Oviyam could be used to query, zoom, move, measure, view DICOM fundus images.CONCLUSION:Such web eye-PACS in compliance to WADO protocol could be used to store and communicate fundus images and reports, therefore is of great significance for teleophthalmology.

  7. Interoperative fundus image and report sharing in compliance with integrating the healthcare enterprise conformance and web access to digital imaging and communication in medicine persistent object protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Qun; Lv, Zheng-Min; Geng, Xing-Yun; Jiang, Kui; Tang, Le-Min; Zhou, Guo-Min; Dong, Jian-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    To address issues in interoperability between different fundus image systems, we proposed a web eye-picture archiving and communication system (PACS) framework in conformance with digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and health level 7 (HL7) protocol to realize fundus images and reports sharing and communication through internet. Firstly, a telemedicine-based eye care work flow was established based on integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE) Eye Care technical framework. Then, a browser/server architecture eye-PACS system was established in conformance with the web access to DICOM persistent object (WADO) protocol, which contains three tiers. In any client system installed with web browser, clinicians could log in the eye-PACS to observe fundus images and reports. Multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME) type of a structured report is saved as pdf/html with reference link to relevant fundus image using the WADO syntax could provide enough information for clinicians. Some functions provided by open-source Oviyam could be used to query, zoom, move, measure, view DICOM fundus images. Such web eye-PACS in compliance to WADO protocol could be used to store and communicate fundus images and reports, therefore is of great significance for teleophthalmology.

  8. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  9. Ultrasound Backscatter Microscopy Image-Guided Intraventricular Gene Delivery at Murine Embryonic Age 9.5 and 10.5 Produces Distinct Transgene Expression Patterns at the Adult Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwon Jang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In utero injection of a retroviral vector into the embryonic telencephalon aided by ultrasound backscatter microscopy permits introduction of a gene of interest at an early stage of development. In this study, we compared the tissue distribution of gene expression in adult mice injected with retroviral vectors at different embryonic ages in utero. Following ultrasound image-guided gene delivery (UIGD into the embryonic telencephalon, adult mice were subjected to whole-body luciferase imaging and immunohistochemical analysis at 6 weeks and 1 year postinjection. Luciferase activity was observed in a wide range of tissues in animals injected at embryonic age 9.5 (E9.5, whereas animals injected at E10.5 showed brain-localized reporter gene expression. These results suggest that mouse embryonic brain creates a closed and impermeable structure around E10. Therefore, by injecting a transgene before or after E10, transgene expression can be manipulated to be local or systemic. Our results also provide information that widens the applicability of UIGD beyond neuroscience studies.

  10. Preliminary genetic imaging study of the association between estrogen receptor-α gene polymorphisms and harsh human maternal parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Benjamin B; Michalska, Kalina J; Liu, Chunyu; Chen, Qi; Hipwell, Alison E; Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Waldman, Irwin D; Decety, Jean

    2012-09-06

    A failure of neural changes initiated by the estrogen surge in late pregnancy to reverse the valence of infant stimuli from aversive to rewarding is associated with dysfunctional maternal behavior in nonhuman mammals. Estrogen receptor-α plays the crucial role in mediating these neural effects of estrogen priming. This preliminary study examines associations between estrogen receptor-α gene polymorphisms and human maternal behavior. Two polymorphisms were associated with human negative maternal parenting. Furthermore, hemodynamic responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging to child stimuli in neural regions associated with social cognition fully mediated the association between genetic variation and negative parenting. This suggests testable hypotheses regarding a biological pathway between genetic variants and dysfunctional human maternal parenting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structure and function of the human metallothionein gene family: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karin, M.

    1986-01-01

    The full nucleotide sequence of two additional human metallothionein (hMT) genes has been determined. These genes, hMT-I/sub B/ and hMT-I/sub F/, are located within the MT-I gene cluster we have described originally. The hMT-I/sub F/ gene is the first hMT-I gene whose amino acid sequence is in complete agreement with the published sequence of the human MT-I proteins. Therefore it is likely to be an active gene encoding a functional protein. However, since we have just completed the sequence analysis, we have not characterized this gene further yet. The hMT-I/sub B/ gene is closely linked to the hMT-I/sub A/ gene, and two pseudogenes, hMT-I/sub C/ and hMT-I/sub D/ separate the two. From its nucleotide sequence hMT-I/sub B/ seems to be an active gene, encoding a functional protein even though it differs in four positions from the published sequence of human MT-I proteins. This gene is expressed in a human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, and its expression is stimulated by Cd ++ . Using gene fusions to the viral thymidine-kinase gene we find that hMT-I/sub B/, like the hMT-I/sub A/ and hMT-II/sub A/ genes, contains a heavy metal responsive promoterregulatory element within its 5' flanking region. We analyzed the level of hMT-I/sub B/ mRNA in a variety of human cell lines by the S1 nuclease technique, and compared it to the expression of the hMT-II/sub A/ gene. While the hMT-II/sub A/ gene was expressed in all of the cell lines analyzed, the hMT-I/sub B/ gene was expressed in liver and kidney derived cell lines cells. This suggest that the expression of the hMT-I/sub B/ gene is controlled in a tissue specific manner. 13 refs

  12. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  13. Imaging findings in a distinct lethal inherited arteriopathy syndrome associated with a novel mutation in the FBLN4 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeshkannan, Ramiah; Kulkarni, Chinmay; Moorthy, Srikanth [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of Radiology, Ernakulam (India); Kappanayil, Mahesh [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of pediatric cardiology, Ernakulam (India); Nampoothiri, Sheela [Amrita Institute of Medical Sciences, AIMS, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Ernakulam (India); Malfait, Fransiska; Paepe, Anne de [Ghent University Hospital, Center for Medical Genetics, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    We present the imaging findings of a newly identified lethal arteriopathy associated with a novel mutation in the gene encoding fibulin-4, occurring in a distinct community from southern India. A total of 31 children from a distinct population subgroup who presented with characteristic arterial dilatation and tortuosity were studied. All children except one belonged to unrelated families from an ethno-religious group (Muslim) from the northern coastal belt of southern India. CT angiography was performed in 30 children and contrast MRA in one. Impressive dilatation and elongation of ascending aorta, arch, descending aorta and main pulmonary arteries with characteristic narrowing of aortic isthmus were seen in all patients. Stenosis of arch branches, abdominal visceral branches and pulmonary artery branches was observed in 21 (68 %), 23 (62.5 %) and 20 (65 %) patients respectively. Genetic studies revealed an identical mutation in exon 7 of the FBLN4 gene. On follow-up, 27 of them had died before the age of 3 years and only two children were alive after the age of 4 years. FBLN4-associated vasculopathy is a highly lethal disease characterized by severe aneurysmal dilatation of thoracic aorta, its branches and pulmonary arteries with stenoses at typical locations. (orig.)

  14. Simultaneous detection of transgenic DNA by surface plasmon resonance imaging with potential application to gene doping detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Simona; Ermini, Maria Laura; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Mascini, Marco; Bogani, Patrizia; Minunni, Maria

    2011-08-15

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was used as the transduction principle for the development of optical-based sensing for transgenes detection in human cell lines. The objective was to develop a multianalyte, label-free, and real-time approach for DNA sequences that are identified as markers of transgenosis events. The strategy exploits SPRi sensing to detect the transgenic event by targeting selected marker sequences, which are present on shuttle vector backbone used to carry out the transfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. Here, we identified DNA sequences belonging to the Cytomegalovirus promoter and the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein gene. System development is discussed in terms of probe efficiency and influence of secondary structures on biorecognition reaction on sensor; moreover, optimization of PCR samples pretreatment was carried out to allow hybridization on biosensor, together with an approach to increase SPRi signals by in situ mass enhancement. Real-time PCR was also employed as reference technique for marker sequences detection on human HEK cells. We can foresee that the developed system may have potential applications in the field of antidoping research focused on the so-called gene doping.

  15. Cyclin B1 Destruction Box-Mediated Protein Instability: The Enhanced Sensitivity of Fluorescent-Protein-Based Reporter Gene System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periodic expression and destruction of several cyclins are the most important steps for the exact regulation of cell cycle. Cyclins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system during cell cycle. Besides, a short sequence near the N-terminal of cyclin B called the destruction box (D-box; CDB is also required. Fluorescent-protein-based reporter gene system is insensitive to analysis because of the overly stable fluorescent proteins. Therefore, in this study, we use human CDB fused with both enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at C-terminus and red fluorescent protein (RFP, DsRed at N-terminus in the transfected human melanoma cells to examine the effects of CDB on different fluorescent proteins. Our results indicated that CDB-fused fluorescent protein can be used to examine the slight gene regulations in the reporter gene system and have the potential to be the system for screening of functional compounds in the future.

  16. Surface and borehole electromagnetic imaging of conducting contaminant plumes. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    'Electromagnetic induction tomography is a promising new tool for imaging electrical conductivity variations in the earth. The EM source field is produced by induction coil (magnetic dipole) transmitters deployed at the surface or in boreholes. Vertical and horizontal component magnetic field detectors are deployed in other boreholes or on the surface. Sources and receivers are typically deployed in a configuration surrounding the region of interest. The goal of this procedure is to image electrical conductivity variations in the earth, much as x-ray tomography is used to image density variations through cross-sections of the body. Although such EM field techniques have been developed and applied, the algorithms for inverting the magnetic data to produce the desired images of electrical conductivity have not kept pace. One of the main reasons for the lag in the algorithm development has been the fact that the magnetic induction problem is inherently three dimensional: other imaging methods such as x-ray and seismic can make use of two-dimensional approximations that are not too far from reality, but the author does not have this luxury in EM induction tomography. In addition, previous field experiments were conducted at controlled test sites that typically do not have much external noise or extensive surface clutter problems often associated with environmental sites. To use the same field techniques in environments more typical of cleanup sites requires a new set of data processing tools to remove the effects of both noise and clutter. The goal of this project is to join theory and experiment to produce enhanced images of electrically conducting fluids underground, allowing better localization of contaminants and improved planning strategies for the subsequent remediation efforts. After explaining the physical context in more detail, this report will summarize the progress made in the first year of this project: (1) on code development and (2) on field tests of

  17. Pine Gene Discovery Project - Final Report - 08/31/1997 - 02/28/2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetten, R. W.; Sederoff, R. R.; Kinlaw, C.; Retzel, E.

    2001-01-01

    Integration of pines into the large scope of plant biology research depends on study of pines in parallel with study of annual plants, and on availability of research materials from pine to plant biologists interested in comparing pine with annual plant systems. The objectives of the Pine Gene Discovery Project were to obtain 10,000 partial DNA sequences of genes expressed in loblolly pine, to determine which of those pine genes were similar to known genes from other organisms, and to make the DNA sequences and isolated pine genes available to plant researchers to stimulate integration of pines into the wider scope of plant biology research. Those objectives have been completed, and the results are available to the public. Requests for pine genes have been received from a number of laboratories that would otherwise not have included pine in their research, indicating that progress is being made toward the goal of integrating pine research into the larger molecular biology research community

  18. Role of PET in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Han

    2002-01-01

    In addition to the well-established use of positron emission tomography (PET) in clinical oncology, novel roles for PET are rapidly emerging in the field of gene therapy. Methods for controlled gene delivery to living bodies, made available through advances in molecular biology, are currently being employed in animals for reasearch purposes and in humans to treat diseases such as cancer. Although gene therapy is still in its early developmental stage, it is perceived that many serious illnesses could be treated successfully by the use of therapeutic gene delivery. A major challenge for the widespread use of human gene therapy is to achieve a controlled and effective delivery of foreign genes to target cells and subsequently, adequate levels of expression. As such, the availability of noninvasive imaging methods to accurately assess the location, duration, and level of transgene expression is critical for optimizing gene therapy strategies. Current endeavors to achieve this goal include methods that utilize magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and nuclear imaging techniques. As for PET, reporter systems that utilize gene encoding enzymes that accumulate postion labeled substrates and those transcribing surface receptors that bind specific positron labeled ligands have been successfully developed. More recent advances in this area include improved reporter gene constructs and radiotracers, introduction of potential strategies to monitor endogenous gene expression, and human pilot studies evaluating the distribution and safety of reporter PET tracers. The remarkably rapid progress occuring in gene imaging technology indicates its importance and wide range of application. As such, gene imaging is likely to become a major and exciting new area for future application of PET technology

  19. Role of PET in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Han [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-02-01

    In addition to the well-established use of positron emission tomography (PET) in clinical oncology, novel roles for PET are rapidly emerging in the field of gene therapy. Methods for controlled gene delivery to living bodies, made available through advances in molecular biology, are currently being employed in animals for reasearch purposes and in humans to treat diseases such as cancer. Although gene therapy is still in its early developmental stage, it is perceived that many serious illnesses could be treated successfully by the use of therapeutic gene delivery. A major challenge for the widespread use of human gene therapy is to achieve a controlled and effective delivery of foreign genes to target cells and subsequently, adequate levels of expression. As such, the availability of noninvasive imaging methods to accurately assess the location, duration, and level of transgene expression is critical for optimizing gene therapy strategies. Current endeavors to achieve this goal include methods that utilize magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and nuclear imaging techniques. As for PET, reporter systems that utilize gene encoding enzymes that accumulate postion labeled substrates and those transcribing surface receptors that bind specific positron labeled ligands have been successfully developed. More recent advances in this area include improved reporter gene constructs and radiotracers, introduction of potential strategies to monitor endogenous gene expression, and human pilot studies evaluating the distribution and safety of reporter PET tracers. The remarkably rapid progress occuring in gene imaging technology indicates its importance and wide range of application. As such, gene imaging is likely to become a major and exciting new area for future application of PET technology.

  20. Renal cell carcinoma associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion: imaging findings in 21 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Hao; Duan, Na; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Zhongqiu [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Zhu, Qingqiang [Medical School of Yangzhou University, Department of Medical Imaging, Subei People' s Hospital, Yangzhou (China); Li, Baoxin [Gulou Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Cui, Wenjing [Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Nanjing University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing (China); Kundra, Vikas [The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    To characterize imaging features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with Xp11.2 translocation/TFE gene fusion. Twenty-one patients with Xp11.2/TFE RCC were retrospectively evaluated. Tumour location, size, density, cystic or solid appearance, calcification, capsule sign, enhancement pattern and metastases were assessed. Fourteen women and seven men were identified with 12 being 25 years old or younger. Tumours were solitary and cystic-solid (76.2 %) masses with a capsule (76.2 %); 90.5 % were located in the medulla. Calcifications and lymph node metastases were each observed in 24 %. On unenhanced CT, tumour attenuation was greater than in normal renal parenchyma (85.7 %). Tumour enhancement was less than in normal renal cortex on all enhanced phases, greater than in normal renal medulla on cortical and medullary phases, but less than in normal renal medulla on delayed phase. On MR, the tumours were isointense on T1WI, heterogeneously hypointense on T2WI and slightly hyperintense on diffusion-weighted imaging. Xp11.2/TFE RCC usually occurs in young women. It is a cystic-solid, hyperdense mass with a capsule. It arises from the renal medulla with enhancement less than in the cortex but greater than in the medulla in all phases except the delayed phase, when it is lower than in the medulla. (orig.)

  1. Multimodality cranial image fusion using external markers applied via a vacuum mouthpiece and a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, R.A.; Seydl, K.; Lukas, P.; Bale, R.J.; Trieb, T.; Moncayo, R.; Donnemiller, E.; Eisner, W.; Burtscher, J.; Stockhammer, G.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To present a simple and precise method of combining functional information of cranial SPECT and PET images with CT and MRI, in any combination. Material and Methods: Imaging is performed with a hockey mask-like reference frame with image modality-specific markers in precisely defined positions. This frame is reproducibly connected to the VBH vacuum mouthpiece, granting objectively identical repositioning of the frame with respect to the cranium. Using these markers, the desired 3-D imaging modalities can then be manually or automatically registered. This information can be used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation of follow-up, while the same vacuum mouthpiece allows precisely reproducible stereotactic head fixation during radiotherapy. Results: 244 CT and MR data sets of 49 patients were registered to a root square mean error (RSME) of 0.9 mm (mean). 64 SPECT-CT fusions on 18 of these patients gave an RMSE of 1.4 mm, and 40 PET-CT data sets of eight patients were registered to 1.3 mm. An example of the method is given by means of a case report of a 52-year-old patient with bilateral optic nerve meningioma. Conclusion: This technique is a simple, objective and accurate registration tool to combine diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment, and follow-up, all via an individualized vacuum mouthpiece. Especially for low-resolution PET and even more so for some very diffuse SPECT data sets, activity can now be accurately correlated to anatomic structures. (orig.)

  2. Heterologous expression of mannanase and developing a new Reporter gene system in Lactobacillus casei and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Jinzhong; Zou, Yexia; Ma, Chengjie

    2015-01-01

    Reporter gene systems are useful for studying bacterial molecular biology, including the regulation of gene expression and the histochemical analysis of protein products. Here, two genes, β-1,4-mannanase (manB) from Bacillus pumilus and β-glucuronidase (gusA) from Escherichia coli K12, were clone....... casei and E.coli....

  3. Muscular sarcoidosis involving the chest and abdominal walls: case report with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, In Sook; Song, You Seon [Pusan National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Department of Radiology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Mok, Jeongha [Pusan National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Department of Internal Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kyung-Un [Pusan National University Hospital, Biomedical Research Institute, Department of Pathology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-03-15

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disorder that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in tissues, involving many organs and tissues. Extra-pulmonary, especially muscular sarcoidosis is a rare condition. The most common location of the muscular sarcoidosis is known to be the proximal muscles of the extremities; however, there have been no cases of diffuse involvement of the chest and abdominal wall muscles. Here, we report a rare muscular sarcoidosis with infiltrative pattern in the chest and abdominal wall muscles and describe the MR imaging findings that were mistaken as lymphoma at initial diagnosis. Although our case did not show characteristic MR findings of muscular sarcoidosis, clinicians or radiologists who are aware of these imaging features can perform early systemic survey for sarcoidosis. Also muscle biopsy is very important to confirm the sarcoidosis and distinguish it from other tumors. (orig.)

  4. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, July 1, 1975--March 15, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    This progress report covers four areas: development of positron instrumentation, development of NUMEDICS computer system and software, application of cyclotron-produced isotopes ( 11 C, 68 Ga, 13 N, 15 O, and 82 Rb), and application of the NUMEDICS computer system in nuclear medicine. The development of transverse section positron imaging has had a significant impact and a positron camera was designed specifically for transverse section imaging of heart and lungs. The computer net (NUMEDICS II) is progressing rapidly in design and software development. Clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility of measuring cerebral blood flow using a variety of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals and oxygen utilization using 15 O 2 . Rubidium-82 also appears to be a promising agent for measurement of cerebral blood flow

  5. Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging of ameloblastoma: 2 case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oder, P.; Royster, A.; Gibbons, D.; Mulligan, N.; Kavanagh, P.; Eustace, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cysts of the mandible are uncommon. Most arise from epithelium lining the alveolus or root of the tooth (tooth derivatives), and the rest arise from the cortical and cancellous osseous matrix of the mandible. Of cysts arising from the alveolus (odontogenic epithelium), radicular cysts are the most common, accounting for almost 90% of cases. They are almost always found either in association with a dental cavity or at the base of a devitalized, amalgam-filled tooth. Of the remaining 10% of cases, most are dentigerous cysts, arising from the outer epithelial lining of the developing tooth, which is displaced to the base of the cyst as the lesion grows. Ameloblastoma, which also arises from odontogenic epithelium, accounts for less than 1% of cases. In this case report, we review the imaging appearance, histology and management of this uncommon tumour. In doing so, we highlight signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that may allow noninvasive characterization of ameloblastoma before surgical resection. (author)

  6. Muscular sarcoidosis involving the chest and abdominal walls: case report with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, In Sook; Song, You Seon; Mok, Jeongha; Choi, Kyung-Un

    2018-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disorder that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in tissues, involving many organs and tissues. Extra-pulmonary, especially muscular sarcoidosis is a rare condition. The most common location of the muscular sarcoidosis is known to be the proximal muscles of the extremities; however, there have been no cases of diffuse involvement of the chest and abdominal wall muscles. Here, we report a rare muscular sarcoidosis with infiltrative pattern in the chest and abdominal wall muscles and describe the MR imaging findings that were mistaken as lymphoma at initial diagnosis. Although our case did not show characteristic MR findings of muscular sarcoidosis, clinicians or radiologists who are aware of these imaging features can perform early systemic survey for sarcoidosis. Also muscle biopsy is very important to confirm the sarcoidosis and distinguish it from other tumors. (orig.)

  7. Report on the Imaging Workshop for the Genomes to Life Program, April 16-18, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, STEVEN

    2003-08-04

    This report is a result of the Imaging Workshop for the Genomes to Life (GTL) program held April 16-19, 2002, in Charlotte, North Carolina. The meeting was sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science. The purpose of the workshop was to project a broad vision for future needs and determine the value of imaging to GTL program research. The workshop included four technical sessions with plenary lectures on biology and technology perspectives and technical presentations on needs and approaches as they related to the following areas of the GTL program: (1) Molecular machines (protein complexes); (2) Intracellular and cellular structure, function, and processes; (3) Multicellular: Monoclonal and heterogeneous multicellular systems, cell-cell signaling, and model systems; and (4) Cells in situ and in vivo: Bacteria in the natural environment, microenvironment, and in vivo systems.

  8. Fluorescence recovery allows theimplementation of a fluorescence reporter gene platform applicable for the detection and quantification of horizontal gene transfer in anoxic environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla-Redondo, Rafael; Riber, Leise; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2018-01-01

    H limitations, and provide experimental tools that will help broaden its horizon of application to other fields.IMPORTANCEMany anaerobic environments, like the gastrointestinal tract, anaerobic digesters, and the interiors of dense biofilms, have been shown to be hotspots for horizontal gene transfer (HGT......). Despite the increasing wealth of reports warning about the alarming spread of antibiotic resistance determinants, to date, HGT studies mainly rely on cultivation-based methods. Unfortunately, the relevance of these studies is often questionable, as only a minor fraction of bacteria can be cultivated...

  9. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zahidus Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh.

  10. A trans-acting enhancer modulates estrogen-mediated transcription of reporter genes in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki-Iwaoka, H; Maruyama, K; Endoh, H; Komori, T; Kato, S; Kawashima, H

    1999-02-01

    The presence of bone-specific estrogen agonists and discovery of the osteoblast-specific transcription factor (TF), Cbfa1, together with the discovery of synergism between a TF Pit-1 and estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) on rat prolactin gene, led to investigation of Cbfa1 in the modulation of osteoblast-specific actions of estrogen. Reverse transcribed-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of Cbfa1 in the osteoblastic cell lines, MG63, ROS17/2.8, and MC3T3E1, but not in nonosteoblastic cell lines, MCF7, C3H10T1/2, and HeLa. An ER expression vector and a series of luciferase (Luc) reporter plasmids harboring the Cbfa1 binding site OSE2 (the osteoblast-specific cis element in the osteocalcin promoter) and palindromic estrogen response elements (EREs) were cotransfected into both osteoblastic and nonosteoblastic cells. OSE2 worked as a cis- acting element in osteoblastic cells but not nonosteoblastic cells, whereas EREs were cis- acting in all cell lines. Synergistic transactivation was observed in osteoblastic cells only when both ERE and OSE2 were placed in juxtaposition to the promoter. Forced expression of Cbfa1 in C3H10T1/2 cells also induced synergism. Tamoxifen, a partial agonist/antagonist of estrogen, acted as an osteoblast-specific agonist in cells transfected with a promoter containing ERE and acted synergistically with a promoter containing the ERE-OSE2 enhancer combination. These results support the idea that bone-specific TFs modulate the actions of estrogen in a tissue-specific manner.

  11. Association Between Brain Gene Expression, DNA Methylation, and Alteration of Ex Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging Transverse Relaxation in Late-Life Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Dawe, Robert J; Boyle, Patricia A; Gaiteri, Chris; Yang, Jingyun; Buchman, Aron S; Schneider, Julie A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2017-12-01

    Alteration of ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation is associated with late-life cognitive decline even after controlling for common neuropathologic conditions. However, the underlying neurobiology of this association is unknown. To investigate the association between brain gene expression, DNA methylation, and alteration of magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation in late-life cognitive decline. Data came from 2 community-based longitudinal cohort studies of aging and dementia, the Religious Orders Study, which began in 1993, and the Rush Memory and Aging Project, which began in 1997. All participants agreed to undergo annual clinical evaluations and to donate their brains after death. By October 24, 2016, a total of 1358 individuals had died and had brain autopsies that were approved by board-certified neuropathologists. Of those, 552 had undergone ex vivo imaging. The gene expression analysis was limited to 174 individuals with both imaging and brain RNA sequencing data. The DNA methylation analysis was limited to 225 individuals with both imaging and brain methylation data. Maps of ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation were generated using fast spin echo imaging. The target was a composite measure of the transverse relaxation rate (R2) that was associated with cognitive decline after controlling for common neuropathologic conditions. Next-generation RNA sequencing and DNA methylation data were generated using frozen tissue from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Genome-wide association analysis was used to investigate gene expression and, separately, DNA methylation for signals associated with the R2 measure. Of the 552 individuals with ex vivo imaging data, 394 were women and 158 were men, and the mean (SD) age at death was 90.4 (6.0) years. Four co-expressed genes (PADI2 [Ensembl ENSG00000117115], ZNF385A [Ensembl ENSG00000161642], PSD2 [Ensembl ENSG00000146005], and A2ML1 [Ensembl ENSG00000166535]) were

  12. Imaging of unilateral adrenal hemorrhages in patients after blunt abdominal trauma: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal hemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma is extremely rare. Most of the lesions are unilateral and right sided. Although often asymptomatic, life-threatening adrenal insufficiency may develop in the bilateral adrenal gland hemorrhage. Isolated adrenal injuries are very rare. They are often associated with other organ injuries. The mortality rates of patients range from 7% to 32%. In this report, we present the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of unilateral adrenal hemorrhages in two patients with a history of fall from a height.

  13. Imaging Findings of Localized Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Pancreas: a Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Shin, Sang Soo; Choi, Yoo Duk

    2011-01-01

    We report here on a case of localized lymphoid hyperplasia of the pancreas in a 70-year-old man which manifested as double lesions (uncinate process and tail) in the organ. The lesions were incidentally detected as hypoechoic lesions on ultrasonography and they appeared as delayed enhancing lesions on the contrast-enhanced dynamic CT and MRI. Total pancreatectomy was performed, because malignant tumor could not be excluded according to the preoperative imaging studies and the endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy failed. Pathology revealed localized lymphoid hyperplasia. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. He has been alive for 18 months after surgery.

  14. Radiologic Imaging Findings of Bilateral Infiltrating Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breasts:A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, Hee Sun; Jeh, Su Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH), a rare benign lesion, shows the proliferation of the breast stromal tissue mimicking the low grade angiosarcoma (1-7). The most common mammographic and ultrasound finding of PASH is a circumscribed mass without calcification and it is difficult to distinguish from the phyllodes tumor and fibroadenoma (1-4, 8). Up to our knowledge, PASH presenting as rapid bilateral breast enlargement, as seen in our case, is very rare. In addition, several English medical literature were reported in this kind of manifestation of PASH (3, 4, 8). We described imaging findings of diffuse, infiltrating, and bilateral manifectation of PASH.

  15. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, January 1, 1985-November 1, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    Developments of improved imaging systems in nuclear medicine are reported with emphasis on development of positron emission tomographs that combine high resolution, with high sensitivity and high count rate capability. A second generation cylindrical analog positron camera design has provided excellent light collection with limited light spread, characteristics needed for high spatial and temporal resolution. Other aspects of the camera development include the design of associated electronics, and provision for data storage and processing. Utilizing the above camera basic studies have been performed to evaluate blood flow in the cat brain stem during auditory stimulation, ventilation in the dog using 13 N and blood flow in the canine heart. 2 refs., 2 figs

  16. Imaging Findings of Localized Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Pancreas: a Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Heo, Suk Hee; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital and Medical School, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Soo; Choi, Yoo Duk [Chonnam National University Hospital and Medical School, Gwangju (KR)

    2011-08-15

    We report here on a case of localized lymphoid hyperplasia of the pancreas in a 70-year-old man which manifested as double lesions (uncinate process and tail) in the organ. The lesions were incidentally detected as hypoechoic lesions on ultrasonography and they appeared as delayed enhancing lesions on the contrast-enhanced dynamic CT and MRI. Total pancreatectomy was performed, because malignant tumor could not be excluded according to the preoperative imaging studies and the endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsy failed. Pathology revealed localized lymphoid hyperplasia. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. He has been alive for 18 months after surgery.

  17. Colon Mucinous Adenocarcinoma in Childhood: A Case Report with Emphasis on Image Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Muccillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is extremely rare in children. We report a case of a 12-year-old boy who presented with a five-month history of weight loss and anorexia, associated with vomiting episodes, dizziness, fatigue, and dyspnea. On physical examination, a palpable abdominal mass was noticed on the right hypochondrium and flank. An imaging study was performed, which showed a solid mass on the right colon. The patient underwent incisional surgical biopsy, and subsequent histopathologic analysis revealed a colon mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  18. Ewing's sarcoma recurrence vs radiation necrosis in dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khadrawy, A.M.; Hoffer, F.A.; Reddick, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. We report a case of Ewing's sarcoma in the right distal femur in a 6-year-old male to demonstrate how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DEMRI) findings predicted histopathology. Materials and methods. DEMRI was performed at presentation and during and after completion of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Histopathologic studies were done at presentation, at 77 weeks (20 weeks after a pathological fracture), and from the en bloc resection at 104 weeks. Results. DEMRI predicted the early tumor response, absence of tumor recurrence, presence of necrosis and lack of fracture healing, confirmed by histopathology. Conclusion. DEMRI is a clinically useful tool in managing Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  19. Report on emerging technologies for translational bioinformatics: a symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldron Levi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With over 20 million formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue samples archived each year in the United States alone, archival tissues remain a vast and under-utilized resource in the genomic study of cancer. Technologies have recently been introduced for whole-transcriptome amplification and microarray analysis of degraded mRNA fragments from FFPE samples, and studies of these platforms have only recently begun to enter the published literature. Results The Emerging Technologies for Translational Bioinformatics symposium on gene expression profiling for archival tissues featured presentations of two large-scale FFPE expression profiling studies (each involving over 1,000 samples, overviews of several smaller studies, and representatives from three leading companies in the field (Illumina, Affymetrix, and NuGEN. The meeting highlighted challenges in the analysis of expression data from archival tissues and strategies being developed to overcome them. In particular, speakers reported higher rates of clinical sample failure (from 10% to 70% than are typical for fresh-frozen tissues, as well as more frequent probe failure for individual samples. The symposium program is available at http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/ffpe. Conclusions Multiple solutions now exist for whole-genome expression profiling of FFPE tissues, including both microarray- and sequencing-based platforms. Several studies have reported their successful application, but substantial challenges and risks still exist. Symposium speakers presented novel methodology for analysis of FFPE expression data and suggestions for improving data recovery and quality assessment in pre-analytical stages. Research presentations emphasized the need for careful study design, including the use of pilot studies, replication, and randomization of samples among batches, as well as careful attention to data quality control. Regardless of any limitations in quantitave transcriptomics for

  20. Breast imaging reports for malignant lesions: are we maintaining recommended BI-RADS® lexicon standards?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masroor, Imrana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad; Sakhawat, Saima; Beg, Madiha; Sohail, Saba; Ahmed, Rashid; Irfan-Ul-Haq; Mehboob, Javed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate mammography reports for diagnosed breast cancer cases in major government and private centers in Karachi, Pakistan, with respect to concordance with the Breast Imaging Reports And Data System (BI-RADS ® ) lexicon. A prospective, descriptive, multicenter study was conducted in the radiology sections of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Pakistan Naval Station Shifa Hospital, Advanced Radiology Clinic, Karachi Institute of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, and Civil Hospital Karachi between May and October 2010 after approval from the ethical review committee of Aga Khan University. Mammograms reported as BI-RADS category 4 and 5 were included in the study. Mammograms reported as BI-RADS category 0, 1, 2 and 3 were excluded. Fifty reports were collected from each center. Data were collected about the clinical indication, breast density, location and description of the lesion, calcification, and comments on axillary lymph nodes. This description was compared with the BI-RADS lexicon. The mean age of the patients was 50 ± 12 years. The clinical indication, breast parenchymal density, lesion location, and presence of calcification were better described by the private centers, while description of lymph node status was better stated by the government centers. This difference was statistically significant, except for lesion description. The description of masses by the two reporting groups was comparable. Mammographic reporting of malignant breast lesions in the private sector is more in line with the BI-RADS lexicon, as compared with government sector hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Lymph node documentation was better in government sector reports

  1. The feasibility of using a baculovirus vector to deliver the sodium-iodide symporter gene as a reporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Xiang; Li Biao; Wang Jun; Yin Hongyan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhang Yifan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200025 (China)], E-mail: zhangyifan1992@yahoo.com.cn

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of baculovirus vectors in transducing FTC-133 cells and to examine the feasibility of using baculovirus vectors for the delivery of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) gene as a reporter through co-transduction to monitor the expression of the target gene. Method: Two recombinant baculoviruses were constructed to express NIS and green fluorescent protein (GFP) respectively. FTC-133, 8050C, SW1116, A549 cells, were infected with Bac-GFP. The infection efficiency of Bac-GFP and the intensity of fluorescence, in either the presence or absence of sodium butyrate, were monitored by flow cytometry. The iodine uptake by FTC-133 cells infected with Bac-NIS was measured using a {gamma} counter. FTC-133 cells were infected with a mixture of equal amounts of Bac-NIS and Bac-GFP at different setting of multiplicity of infection (MOI). The changes of GFP fluorescence intensity and iodine uptake were monitored 24 h after infection in the coinfected cells. Results: We have successfully constructed recombinant baculoviruses carrying NIS and GFP under the control of the cytomegalovirus IE-1 promoter. We found that transduced efficiency of baculovirus in 8505C, SW1116, A549 cells are low in absence of sodium butyrate. Yet Bac-GFP infects FTC-133 cells at a high efficiency, 77.67%, 85.57% and 93.23% with MOI of 100, 200 and 400, respectively. The fluorescence intensity of the Bac-GFP infected tumor cells correlated positively with the MOI of the virus. Sodium butyrate induction increased both the infection efficiency and the fluorescence intensity, but increase of infection efficiency was insignificant in FTC-133 cells. Reporter gene (GFP) expression in FTC-133 is stable within 7 days after infection. The radioactivity incorporated by the tumor cells infected with Bac-NIS correlated positively with the MOI of Bac-NIS as well. In tumor cells co-infected with Bac-NIS and Bac-GFP, the amount of radioactivity incorporated significantly correlated with

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of penile metastases: a report on five cases

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    Lau, T.N. [Singapore General Hospital, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology; Wakeley, C.J.; Goddard, P. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, (United Kingdom). Department of Clinical Radiology

    1999-08-01

    Five cases of penile metastases are presented. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans were performed in all patients. In some, coronal images were also obtained. The penile metastases were most often seen as discrete masses in the corpora cavernosa or corpus spongiosum. An atypical pattern of diffuse infiltration is also illustrated. Limitations of cavernosography, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) are discussed. The magnetic resonance (MR) features of penile metastases and possible role MR may have in the management of these patients are described. Metastatic deposits in the penis are uncommon. First described by Eberth in 1870 in a patient with a primary rectal carcinoma, there have since been over 300 cases reported in the literature. The imaging of penile metastases is, however, less clearly defined. Until now, cavernosography, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been used. These techniques have limitations. Only recently has magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) been employed. We describe five cases of penile metastases evaluated with MRI and discuss the role and features of penile metastases on MRI. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 4 figs.