WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported musculoskeletal pain

  1. [Musculoskeletal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casser, H-R; Schaible, H-G

    2015-10-01

    Among the clinically relevant pain conditions, pain in the musculoskeletal system is most frequent. This article reports extensive epidemiological data on musculoskeletal system pain in Germany and worldwide. Since back pain is most frequent, the diagnostics and therapeutic algorithms of acute, recurring, and chronic lower back pain in Germany will be particularly addressed. The importance of the physiologic-organic, the cognitive-emotional, the behavioral, and the social level to diagnostics and treatment will be discussed. We will also focus on osteoarthritic pain and address its epidemiology, clinical importance, and significance for the health care system. This article will list some reasons why the musculoskeletal system in particular is frequently the site of chronic pain. The authors believe that these reasons are to be sought in the complex structures of the musculoskeletal system; in the particular sensitivity of the deep somatic nociceptive system for long-term sensitization processes, as well as the ensuing nervous system reactions; and in the interactions between the nervous and immune systems. The article will give some insights into the research carried out on this topic in Germany.

  2. Self-reported musculoskeletal pain predicts long-term increase in general health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, Jan; Davidsen, Michael; Søgaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    reported during the past two weeks from the Danish National Cohort Study were merged with data from the Danish National Health Insurance Registry and the National Patient Registry containing information on consultations in the Danish primary and secondary care sector. Absolute and relative rates for all......Aims: Musculoskeletal pain and disability is a modern epidemic and a major reason for seeking health care. The aim of this study is to determine absolute and relative rates of care seeking over 20 years for adults reporting musculoskeletal complaints. Methods: Interview data on musculoskeletal pain...... to any of the outcomes. CONCLUSIONS SELF-REPORT OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN REPORTED WITHIN THE PAST TWO WEEKS PREDICTS A STATISTICALLY SIGNIFICANT LONG-TERM INCREASE IN GENERAL USE OF HEALTH CARE SERVICES IN BOTH THE PRIMARY AND THE SECONDARY HEALTH CARE SECTOR:...

  3. Musculoskeletal pain and reported workplace assault: a prospective study of clinical staff in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Helena; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca J

    2014-02-01

    This study examined prospectively the effect of workplace violence on musculoskeletal symptoms among nursing home workers. Previously we reported a cross-sectional relationship between physical assaults at work and musculoskeletal pain. This follow-up provides stronger evidence of the effect of workplace violence on musculoskeletal outcomes within the same workforce over two years. Nursing home workers who responded to three consecutive annual surveys formed the study cohort (n = 344). The outcomes were any musculoskeletal pain, widespread pain, pain intensity, pain interference with work and sleep, and co-occurring pain with depression. The main predictor was self-reported physical assault at work during the 3 months preceding each survey. Prevalence ratios (PRs) were assessed with log-binomial regression, adjusting for other workplace and individual factors. Every fourth nursing home worker, and 34% of nursing aides, reported persistent workplace assault over the 2 years. Among respondents assaulted frequently, two thirds experienced moderate to extreme musculoskeletal pain, and more than 50% had pain interfering with work and/or sleep. Baseline exposure to assault predicted pain outcomes 1 year later. Repeated exposure was associated with a linear increase over 2 years in the risks of pain intensity, interference with work, and interference with sleep; co-occurring pain and depression had an adjusted PR of 3.6 (95% CI = 1.7-7.9). Workplace assault, especially when repeated over time, increases the risk of pain that may jeopardize workers' ability to remain employed. More effective assault prevention would protect and support the workforce needed to care for our increasing elderly and disabled population.

  4. Pain and musculoskeletal pain syndromes in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Aura Ligia; Moraes, Ana Julia Pantoja; Leone, Claudio; Doria-Filho, Ulysses; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2006-06-01

    The presence of musculoskeletal pain was evaluated in adolescents. Pain was reported by 40% of respondents, benign joint hypermobility syndrome by 10%, myofascial syndrome by 5%, tendonitis by 2%, and fibromialgia by 1%. Logistical regression analysis indicated that sex and age were predictive of pain.

  5. Self-reported Work Ability and Work Performance in Workers with Chronic Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H.J.; Reneman, M.F.; Groothoff, J.W.; Geertzen, J.H.; Brouwer, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess self-reported work ability and work performance of workers who stay at work despite chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP), and to explore which variables were associated with these outcomes. Methods In a cross-sectional study we assessed work ability (Work Ability Index, s

  6. Examination of musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunse, Mads Hostrup; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Vach, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Chest pain may be caused by joint and muscle dysfunction of the neck and thorax (termed musculoskeletal chest pain). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine inter-observer reliability of the diagnosis 'musculoskeletal chest pain' in patients with acute chest pain of non-cardiac origin...

  7. A record review of reported musculoskeletal pain in an Ontario long term care facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphreys B Kim

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal (MSK pain is one of the leading causes of chronic health problems in people over 65 years of age. Studies suggest that a high prevalence of older adults suffer from MSK pain (65% to 80% and back pain (36% to 40%. The objectives of this study were: 1. To investigate the period prevalence of MSK pain and associated subgroups in residents of a long-term care (LTC facility. 2. To describe clinical features associated with back pain in this population. 3. To identify associations between variables such as age, gender, cognitive status, ambulatory status, analgesic use, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis with back pain in a long-term care facility. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted using a purposive sampling approach of residents' clinical charts from a LTC home in Toronto, Canada. All medical records for LTC residents from January 2003 until March 2005 were eligible for review. However, facility admissions of less than 6 months were excluded from the study to allow for an adequate time period for patient medical assessments and pain reporting/charting to have been completed. Clinical data was abstracted on a standardized form. Variables were chosen based on the literature and their suggested association with back pain and analyzed via multivariate logistic regression. Results 140 (56% charts were selected and reviewed. Sixty-nine percent of the selected residents were female with an average age of 83.7 years (51–101. Residents in the sample had a period pain prevalence of 64% (n = 89 with a 40% prevalence (n = 55 of MSK pain. Of those with a charted report of pain, 6% (n = 5 had head pain, 2% (n = 2 neck pain, 21% (n = 19 back pain, 33% (n = 29 extremity pain and 38% (n = 34 had non-descriptive/unidentified pain complaint. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that osteoporosis was the only significant association with back pain from the variables studied (P = 0.001. Conclusion

  8. [Musculoskeletal-related chest pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, C; Witte, T

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 10-50% of chest pains are caused by musculoskeletal disorders. The association is twice as frequent in primary care as in emergency admissions. This article provides an overview of the most important musculoskeletal causes of chest pain and on the diagnostics and therapy. A selective search and analysis of the literature related to the topic of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain were carried out. Non-inflammatory diseases, such as costochondritis and fibromyalgia are frequent causes of chest pain. Inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are much less common but are more severe conditions and therefore have to be diagnosed and treated. The diagnostics and treatment often necessitate interdisciplinary approaches. Chest pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases always represents a diagnosis by exclusion of other severe diseases of the heart, lungs and stomach. Physiotherapeutic and physical treatment measures are particularly important, including manual therapy, transcutaneous electrical stimulation and stabilization exercises, especially for functional myofascial disorders.

  9. Orthopedic Health: Targeting Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Targeting Musculoskeletal Pain Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Ph.D., Chief of the Cartilage Biology and Orthopaedics Branch, holds a vial containing knee cartilage that ...

  10. Musculoskeletal pain in Dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Batista e Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the frequency of musculoskeletal pain in dental students. Methods: A descriptive study of observational and cross-sectional approach in which was used an Ergonomics and Posture Questionnaire for Dentists adapted by the researchers, associated with the Cooler Quiz. The sample comprised 43 students who attended between the 6th, 8th and 10th academic periods. The data were submitted to descriptive analysis and expressed as percentages, means and standard deviations, also maximum and minimum. For the comparative analysis between the variables, we used the chi-square test, chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher exact test, when necessary, considering the significance level of 5%. Results: Among the students surveyed 20 (46.51% were men and 23 (53.5% women with a mean age of 23.14 ± 10.24 years, maximum of 35 years and minimum of 19. It was found that 40 (93.02% reported pain in some part of the body, 23 (53.5% in the upper limbs, 20 (46.5% in the lower limbs and 37 (86% in axial skeleton, with no difference between genders (p = 0.59. Pain intensity was classified as mild 10 (25%, moderate 21(52.5% and severe 7 (17.5%. In the assessment we evidenced the direct correlation between the hours of trainning and the intensity of pain. Conclusions: The results of the survey showed that the students assessed developed high frequency of musculoskeletal pain and that pain was associated with hours of daily training held during graduation at the dental clinic.

  11. Musculoskeletal etiologies of pelvic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    Several musculoskeletal diagnoses are frequently concomitant with pelvic floor pathology and pain. The definition of pelvic pain itself often depends on the medical specialist evaluating the patient. Because there is variability among disorders associated with pelvic pain, patients may seek treatment for extended periods as various treatment options are attempted. Further, health care providers should recognize that there may not be a single source of dysfunction. This article discusses the musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic girdle (structures within the bony pelvis) and their association with lumbar spine and hip disorders.

  12. The Development and Validation of Hundred Paisa Pain Scale for Measuring Musculoskeletal Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Anwar, Dilshad; Nezamuddin, M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The reduction in the pain intensity is one of the most important outcome measures in musculoskeletal disorders. The assessment of pain required reliable and valid scale. The aims of this prospective observational study were to develop and evaluate concurrent validity and test–retest reliability of hundred paisa pain scale (HPPS) for measuring musculoskeletal pain. A consecutive 74 patients with musculoskeletal pain with a wide variety of diagnoses were enrolled. Patients reported the...

  13. Association of psychological distress and work psychosocial factors with self-reported musculoskeletal pain among secondary school teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamri, E. N.; Moy, F. M.; Hoe, V. C. W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain is common among teachers. Work-related psychosocial factors are found to be associated with the development of musculoskeletal pain, however psychological distress may also play an important role. Objectives To assess the prevalence of self-reported low back pain (LBP), and neck and/or shoulder pain (NSP) among secondary school teachers; and to evaluate the association of LBP and NSP with psychological distress and work-related psychosocial factors. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted among teachers in the state of Penang, Malaysia. The participants were recruited via a two stage sampling method. Information on demographic, psychological distress, work-related psychosocial factors, and musculoskeletal pain (LBP and NSP) in the past 12 months was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Poisson regression was used to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) for the associations between psychological distress and work-related psychosocial factors with LBP and NSP. Results The prevalence of self-reported LBP and NSP among 1482 teachers in the past 12 months was 48.0% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 45.2%, 50.9%) and 60.1% (95% CI 57.4%, 62.9%) respectively. From the multivariate analysis, self-reported LBP was associated with teachers who reported severe to extremely severe depression (PR: 1.71, 95% CI 1.25, 2.32), severe to extremely severe anxiety (1.46, 95% CI 1.22, 1.75), high psychological job demand (1.29, 95% CI 1.06, 1.57), low skill discretion (1.28, 95% CI 1.13, 1.47) and poorer mental health (0.98, 95% CI 0.97, 0.99). Self-reported NSP was associated with mild to moderate anxiety (1.18, 95% CI 1.06, 1.33), severe to extremely severe anxiety (1.25, 95% CI 1.09, 1.43), low supervisory support (1.13, 95% CI 1.03, 1.25) and poorer mental health (0.98, 95% CI 0.97, 0.99). Conclusions Self-reported LBP and NSP were common among secondary school teachers. Interventions targeting psychological distress and work

  14. Pressure pain sensitivity maps, self-reported musculoskeletal disorders and sickness absence among cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Asbjørn Thalund; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2011-01-01

     months among cleaners. METHODS: About 29 cleaners filled out a self-administered questionnaire regarding health, work-related measures and musculoskeletal disorders. Subsequently, PPTs were measured at (1) tibialis anterior (control location, 1 point), (2) the neck-shoulder (48 points) and (3) the low...... back regions (27 points). LTSA was defined as ten or more consecutive workdays with sick leave. RESULTS: The PPT maps revealed the spatial heterogeneity in mechanical sensitivity among cleaners. The level of pain in the neck and dominant shoulder and upper back within the last 7 days correlated...... negatively with most PPT measurements. The group of cleaners with LTSA had significantly lower levels of PPT (large effects) in the neck-shoulder region than the cleaners with no LTSA (P ...

  15. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Kamper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have little empirical evidence to underpin their clinical practice. In this article we summarise the state of the evidence concerning MSK pain in children and adolescents, and offer suggestions for future research. Results Rates of self-reported MSK pain in adolescents are similar to those in adult populations and they are typically higher in teenage girls than boys. Epidemiological research has identified conditions such as back and neck pain as major causes of disability in adolescents, and in up to a quarter of cases there are impacts on school or physical activities. A range of physical, psychological and social factors have been shown to be associated with MSK pain report, but the strength and direction of these relationships are unclear. There are few validated instruments available to quantify the nature and severity of MSK pain in children, but some show promise. Several national surveys have shown that adolescents with MSK pain commonly seek care and use medications for their condition. Some studies have revealed a link between MSK pain in adolescents and chronic pain in adults. Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain conditions are often recurrent in nature, occurring throughout the life-course. Attempts to understand these conditions at a time close to their initial onset may offer a better chance of developing effective prevention and treatment strategies.

  16. Musculoskeletal Pain, Self-reported Physical Function, and Quality of Life in the Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Michalsky, Marc P.; Jenkins, Todd M.; Baughcum, Amy; Zeller, Meg H.; Brandt, Mary L.; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M.; Chen, Mike K.; Inge, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Obesity is associated with chronic musculoskeletal pain and is a risk factor for disability and osteoarthritis. OBJECTIVES To describe the prevalence, sites, and intensity of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents with severe obesity; to evaluate associations between musculoskeletal pain and self-reported physical function as well as weight-related quality of life; and to evaluate the association between musculoskeletal pain and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Teen–Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) is a prospective, observational study that collects standardized data on adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery at 5 US centers. We examined baseline data from this cohort between February 28, 2007, and December 30, 2011. We excluded adolescents with Blount disease and slipped capital femoral epiphyses. A total of 233 participants were included in these analyses. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We assessed musculoskeletal pain and pain intensity of the lower back, hips, knees, and ankles/feet using the visual analog scale, categorizing musculoskeletal pain into lower back pain, lower extremity (hips, knees, and feet/ankles combined) pain, and no pain. We assessed self-reported physical function status with the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index and assessed weight-related quality of life with the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life–Kids measure. We adjusted for sex, race, age at surgery, body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), and clinical depressive symptoms in regression analyses. RESULTS Among the 233 participants, the mean (SD) age at surgery was 17.1 (1.56) years and the median BMI was 50.4. Participants were predominantly female (77%), white (73%), and non-Hispanic (93%). Among the participants, 49% had poor functional status and 76% had musculoskeletal pain. Lower back pain was prevalent (63%), followed by ankle

  17. Prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases is high

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S.J. Picavet (Susan); J.M.W. Hazes (Mieke)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: To present the prevalence of self reported musculoskeletal diseases, the coexistence of these diseases, the test-retest reliability with six months in between, and the association with musculoskeletal pain symptoms. METHODS: Twelve layman descriptions of com

  18. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steve J; Henschke, Nicholas; Hestbaek, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have litt...

  19. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steve J; Henschke, Nicholas; Hestbaek, Lise;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have litt...

  20. [Clinical characteristics and multidisciplinary management of chronic musculoskeletal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shinsuke; Ushida, Takahiro; Inoue, Masayuki

    2012-11-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, affecting hundreds of millions of people around the world. In industrialized countries, which have increasingly aging populations, chronic musculoskeletal pain has become a significant health care burden and major issue in the 1980s and 1990s. On January 13, 2000, The Bone and Joint Decade was formally launched at the headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland. This global campaign aimed to improve the quality of life for people who have musculoskeletal conditions. Complying with this trend, large-scale surveys have been conducted in Europe and the US in recent years to evaluate the effect of chronic pain on society, but in Japan, there has been a paucity of basic information on the status of chronic musculoskeletal pain. We organized a postal survey designed to quantify and describe the prevalence and distribution of chronic pain in the Japanese community. We found that chronic pain of moderate to severe intensity occurs in 17.2%. Chronic pain had a significant impact on the occupational and social relationships, and it seriously affected their psychological conditions and quality of life. Such disabling chronic pain is regarded as the result of interrelated physical, psychological, and social or occupational factors requiring multidisciplinary intervention. We introduce a multidisciplinary clinical approach and report on novel multimodal methodologies -- for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  1. Does musculoskeletal discomfort at work predict future musculoskeletal pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg - Reenen, H.H. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.; Grinten, M.P. van der; Mechelen, W. van; Bongers, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this prospective cohort study was to evaluate if peak or cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort may predict future low-back, neck or shoulder pain among symptom-free workers. At baseline, discomfort per body region was rated on a 10-point scale six times during a working day. Questio

  2. Does musculoskeletal discomfort at work predict future musculoskeletal pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamberg - Reenen, H.H. van; Beek, A.J. van der; Blatter, B.; Grinten, M.P. van der; Mechelen, W. van; Bongers, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this prospective cohort study was to evaluate if peak or cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort may predict future low-back, neck or shoulder pain among symptom-free workers. At baseline, discomfort per body region was rated on a 10-point scale six times during a working day. Questio

  3. Musculoskeletal pain and physical functioning in the oldest old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Thinggaard, M; Christensen, K

    2013-01-01

    of the nationwide Danish 1905 cohort study. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed as reported pain in back, hips or knees when moving or resting. Physical performance measures included maximum grip strength and habitual walking speed. Disability in performing activities of daily living was defined as the need...

  4. MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Acute musculoskeletal insult (injury and surgery) is very common. It is also one of ... Data Source:The material source is from various published articles in books and journals. ..... after the onset of symptoms, locking the gate after the.

  5. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Lars Louis; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Pedersen, MT, Andersen, LL, Jørgensen, MB, Søgaard, K, and Sjøgaard, G. Effect of specific resistance training on musculoskeletal pain symptoms: Dose-response relationship. J Strength Cond Res 27(1): 229-235, 2013-The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-response of strength...... training for relieving musculoskeletal pain in female office workers. The relation between the dose of training in terms of total training volume (sets × repetitions × load reported in training diaries) during a 16-week strength training program and changes in pain (calculated as pain index, 0-100%, from...... self-reported intensities and durations of pain in the upper body and low back) was determined by regression analysis. The women were part of a randomized controlled trial with specific strength training (SRT), all-round physical exercise (APE), and a reference group (REF). Results showed that pain...

  6. Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions in Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune Mygind; Thorhauge, Kirsten; Forman, Axel;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions based on a standardized clinical examination of patients with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) who were referred to a specialized tertiary care center for laparoscopic examination. In addition, we...... stratified levels of self-reported pelvic pain, self-rated health, education, and work status based on musculoskeletal dysfunction status. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional design to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with CPP who were referred to a tertiary care......: Ninety-four patients returned the questionnaire, completed the clinical examination, and fulfilled the inclusion criteria. More than half of the referred patients with CPP (48 out of 94) had musculoskeletal dysfunctions in the lumbar/pelvic region. No statistically significant differences were found...

  7. Sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; de Vet, Henrica C W; Picavet, H Susan J

    2007-05-20

    Cross-sectional population-based study. To study sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain (MP): limited functioning, work leave or disability, and healthcare use. MP is a major public health problem in developed countries due to high prevalence rates and considerable consequences. There are indications that consequences of MP differ for men and women. Data of a Dutch population-based study were used, limited to persons 25 to 64 years of age (n = 2517). Data were collected by a postal questionnaire. Women with any MP report more healthcare use for MP, i.e., contact with a medical caregiver and use of medicines than men, while men report more work disability (ever in life) due to low back pain only, irrespective of work status. None of the sex differences can be explained by age, household composition, educational level, smoking status, overweight, physical activity, and pain catastrophizing. Older age was related to more limited functioning due to MP (women), work disability due to MP (men), and healthcare use due to MP (men and women). A one-person household was associated with work disability (women) and use of medicines (men). Low educational level was associated with limited functioning (men), work leave (men), contact with a medical caregiver (men), and work disability (men and women). Smoking was associated with limited functioning (men), work leave (women), and healthcare use (women). Physical inactivity was associated with limited functioning due to MP in women. Pain catastrophizing was associated with limited functioning, work leave, and healthcare use (men and women) and work disability (men). Consequences of MP show a slightly different pattern for men and women. Women with any MPreport more healthcare use for MP, while men report more work disability due to low back pain only. These sex differences can not be explained by general risk factors, but associations between these factors and consequences of MP show some sex differences.

  8. Musculoskeletal pain and the reproductive life stage in women: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frange, C; Hirotsu, C; Hachul, H; Pires, J S; Bittencourt, L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between reproductive life stage, pain perception and musculoskeletal pain complaint in a representative sample of women from São Paulo, Brazil. Methods A population-based survey was carried out with 574 women who were classified as being in the premenopausal or postmenopausal stage. They answered questions about pain perception and musculoskeletal pain. Follicle stimulating hormone was collected to confirm menopausal condition along with clinical evaluation. Results In the whole sample, we found a prevalence of 56% for pain perception and 20.2% for complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Regarding the topography of musculoskeletal pain, the distributions were similar among the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. No significant association was found between reproductive life stage and pain perception, as 58.1% of the premenopausal group and 52.0% of the postmenopausal group reported pain. Similarly, there was no significant association between menopausal stage and musculoskeletal pain, as 19.5% and 21.6% of the premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively, complained of musculoskeletal pain. There was no significant association of postmenopausal stage (early or late) with pain perception or musculoskeletal pain. The use of analgesics was significantly higher in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women (p musculoskeletal pain nor pain perception were associated with the reproductive life stage, showing that both parameters was independent from the menopausal status in the studied women.

  9. Is neuropathic pain underdiagnosed in musculoskeletal pain conditions? The Danish PainDETECTive study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    In all, 19-22% of the adult Danish population suffer from chronic pain - most frequently in the musculoskeletal system. Different pain management strategies depending on pain mechanism (neuropathic/nociceptive) make diagnosing the pain condition especially important.......In all, 19-22% of the adult Danish population suffer from chronic pain - most frequently in the musculoskeletal system. Different pain management strategies depending on pain mechanism (neuropathic/nociceptive) make diagnosing the pain condition especially important....

  10. Physical activities at work and risk of musculoskeletal pain and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Korshøj, Mette; Lagersted-Olsen, Julie;

    2013-01-01

    Among blue-collar workers, high physical work demands are generally considered to be the main cause of musculoskeletal pain and work disability. However, current available research on this topic has been criticised for using self-reported data, cross-sectional design, insufficient adjustment...... for potential confounders, and inadequate follow-up on the recurrent and fluctuating pattern of musculoskeletal pain. Recent technological advances have provided possibilities for objective diurnal field measurements of physical activities and frequent follow-up on musculoskeletal pain.The main aim...... of musculoskeletal pain among blue-collar workers....

  11. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of long-standing musculoskeletal pain and adaptations in response to physical rehabilitation is important for developing optimal treatment strategies. The influence of central adaptations of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain remains...

  12. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of long-standing musculoskeletal pain and adaptations in response to physical rehabilitation is important for developing optimal treatment strategies. The influence of central adaptations of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain remains...

  13. Sleep patterns in female adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Lisa J; Logan, Deirdre E; Mindell, Jodi A

    2005-01-01

    This study examined sleep patterns in female adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Twenty-six participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain completed questionnaires during their clinic visit, and three 24-Hour Sleep Patterns Interviews during the following 2 weeks. Compared to normative data (Acebo & Carskadon, 2002), adolescents with chronic pain reported similar total sleep time (TST) and bedtimes. However, study participants reported significantly longer sleep onset latency, more night wakings, a later morning wake time, and more symptoms of daytime sleepiness. Pain improved after sleep for 27% of the study sample, and was associated with longer TST. Finally, depression and anxiety were related to daytime sleepiness, but not total sleep time or sleep onset latency. Female adolescents with chronic pain either may be more sensitive to the chronic sleep debt that is common in this age group, or they may experience underlying physiological sleep disrupters (e.g., periodic limb movement disorder) or sleep abnormalities (e.g., alpha-delta intrusions) not measured in this study. Additional research is needed to examine the complex relation between sleep and chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  14. Evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayloo, Amba; Cvengros, Teresa; Marella, Srimannarayana

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal causes of chest pain. Conditions such as costochondritis, rib pain caused by stress fractures, slipping rib syndrome, chest wall muscle injuries, fibromyalgia, and herpes zoster are discussed, with emphasis on evaluation and treatment of these and other disorders. Many of these conditions can be diagnosed by the primary care clinician in the office by history and physical examination. Treatment is also discussed, including description of manual therapy and exercises as needed for some of the conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence and Characteristics of Musculoskeletal Pain in Korean Farmers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Min, David; Baek, Sora; Park, Hee-Won; Lee, Sang-Ah; Moon, Jiyoung; Yang, Jae E; Kim, Ki Sung; Kim, Jee Yong; Kang, Eun Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and characteristics of musculoskeletal pain (MSK) pain in Korean farmers using initial survey data of Farmers' Cohort for Agricultural Work-Related MSK pain (FARM) study. Farmers...

  16. Work Ergonomic Hazards for Musculoskeletal Pain among University Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunisa CHAIKLIENG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional analytic study aimed to investigate ergonomic hazards in the workplace for musculoskeletal pain among university office workers. There were 142 full-time office staff from Khon Kaen University. Demographic characteristics and musculoskeletal pain were evaluated from a structured questionnaire. Ergonomic workstations, i.e. size of table, seat, work area and illuminations were measured at the workstations and anthropometric parameters were determined. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis which were percentage, mean, and standard deviation. Inferential statistics were chi-square test and the student t-test at 95 % confidence interval. The results showed that 81.7 % of office workers were female, the mean age was 38.0 ± 10.0 years, the average work experience was 12.3 ± 10.8 years. One-month prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 69.0 %. The onset of symptoms was during working hours and the majorly reported the cause as prolonged sitting in the same posture at work (73.3 %. From measurements, 55.8 % of all workstations had insufficient illumination being lower than the minimum standard requirement (400 lux. Most workstations (75.6 % had significantly inappropriate height (above elbow height of workers at p < 0.001. From questionnaires, the seat height was significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain (p = 0.034. Moreover, anthropometric characteristics of musculoskeletal pain cases (i.e. buttock-popliteal length, hip breadth, sitting elbow height were significantly different from healthy office workers (p < 0.05. The findings suggest that ergonomic workstations need to be improved appropriately for individual workers and improvements in working conditions following standard requirements should be considered.

  17. The role of sensitization in musculoskeletal shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Borstad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral and central sensitization are neurophysiological processes that can prolong painful conditions. Painful shoulder conditions are often persistent, perhaps due to the presence of sensitization.Method:This manuscript summarizes six studies that have evaluated those with musculoskeletal shoulder pain for the presence of sensitization.Results:All six manuscripts report evidence of peripheral sensitization, while central sensitization was described in five of the studies. The chronicity of symptoms in subjects who were included in the studies is probably influencing this finding. The primary somatosensory test used to assess sensitization in these studies was Pressure Pain Threshold, a test for lowered nociceptive thresholds.Discussion:It appears that peripheral sensitization manifests consistently in those with musculoskeletal shoulder pathology, probably due to the inflammatory processes related to tissue injury. Central sensitization, while not universally present, was reported in a majority of the manuscripts. Because central sensitization is thought to be a key step on the pathway to chronic pain, evidence for its presence in those with shoulder pain is significant. Clinicians should expect the presence of sensitization with shoulder pathology and make appropriate choices about interventions so as not to exacerbate pain.

  18. Musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievert, Lynnette Leidy; Goode-Null, Susan K

    2005-06-01

    Worldwide, complaints of musculoskeletal pain are more frequent than complaints of hot flashes amongst women of menopausal age. The purpose of this study was to examine musculoskeletal pain among women of menopausal age in the city of Puebla, Mexico. An opportunity sample was recruited from public parks and markets, with representation from all social classes (n=755). Mean age was 50.1 years, and the majority were employed as saleswomen in small businesses. Symptom frequencies were collected by open-ended interviews and with a structured symptom list that queried symptom experience during the two weeks prior to interview. In response to open-ended questions, "dolores de huesos" (bone pain) was volunteered by 47% of respondents as a symptom associated with menopause, second only to hot flashes (53%). From the structured symptom list, 55.8% and 55.6% reported back pain and joint stiffness during the two weeks prior to interview. Women with back pain and joint stiffness were less likely to report being active during their leisure time (p<.01). The results of backwards stepwise logistic regressions indicate that women with back pain were more likely to be older, with less education, a higher BMI, and ate less meat. Women with joint pain were more likely to be post-menopausal, with less education, more children, a higher BMI, and were likely to drink milk and coffee more than once/week but less than once/day. While menopause is not necessarily a risk factor for musculoskeletal pain, it is important to recognize the pervasiveness of this complaint among women of menopausal age.

  19. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    Background: A large proportion of surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience musculoskeletal pain in the upper body possibly due to awkward and long-term static positions. This can be detrimental for workability and health. The objective of the present review is to sum up...... in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...

  20. Chronic pelvic pain: comorbidity between chronic musculoskeletal pain and vulvodynia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pelvic pain (CPP is a common condition that has a major impact on the quality of life of both men and women. Male CPP is usually attributable to well-defined urogenital conditions (most frequently infectious/non infectious prostatic diseases or musculoskeletal or bowel diseases, whereas the features of female CPP are much more complex and are of particular clinical and epidemiological importance. It is a multifactorial syndrome that can be due to diseases of the urogenital, gastrointestinal, or musculoskeletal systems, or to neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders. It is not always easy to identify its predominant pathogenesis, although it often occurs as a central sensitization syndrome triggered by an initial stimulus which is no longer detectable and only manifests itself clinically through pain. In this respect, there are some very interesting relationships between vulvodynia and fibromyalgic syndrome, as identified in a preliminary study of women with chronic musculoskeletal pain in which it was demonstrated that vulvar pain plays an important role, although it is often overlooked and undiagnosed.

  1. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, S; Tribler, J; Snorgaard, O

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors.......The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors....

  2. Interrelationships between chronic tension-type headache, musculoskeletal pain, and vitamin D deficiency: Is osteomalacia responsible for both headache and musculoskeletal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache, musculoskeletal symptoms, and vitamin D deficiency are common in the general population. However, the interrelations between these three have not been delineated in the literature. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively studied a consecutive series of patients who were diagnosed as having chronic tension-type headache (CTTH and were subjected to the estimation of serum vitamin D levels. The subjects were divided into two groups according to serum 25(OH D levels as normal (>20 ng/ml or vitamin D deficient (<20 ng/ml. Results: We identified 71 such patients. Fifty-two patients (73% had low serum 25(OH D (<20 ng/dl. Eighty-three percent patients reported musculoskeletal pain. Fifty-two percent patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for chronic widespread pain. About 50% patients fulfilled the criteria for biochemical osteomalacia. Low serum 25(OH D level (<20 ng/dl was significantly associated with headache, musculoskeletal pain, and osteomalacia. Discussion: These suggest that both chronic musculoskeletal pain and chronic headache may be related to vitamin D deficiency. Musculoskeletal pain associated with vitamin D deficiency is usually explained by osteomalacia of bones. Therefore, we speculate a possibility of osteomalacia of the skull for the generation of headache (osteomalacic cephalalgia?. It further suggests that both musculoskeletal pain and headaches may be the part of the same disease spectrum in a subset of patients with vitamin D deficiency (or osteomalacia, and vitamin D deficiency may be an important cause of secondary CTTH.

  3. Factors related to seeking health care among adolescents with musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paananen, Markus V; Taimela, Simo P; Tammelin, Tuija H; Kantomaa, Marko T; Ebeling, Hanna E; Taanila, Anja M; Zitting, Paavo J; Karppinen, Jaro I

    2011-04-01

    Musculoskeletal pain is common among adolescents, but little is known about the factors that affect seeking health care for the problem. We examined the care-seeking pattern among adolescents reporting musculoskeletal pain. The study consisted of adolescents aged 16 years from the 1986 Northern Finland Birth Cohort who responded to a mailed questionnaire in 2001 and reported musculoskeletal pain over the preceding 6 months (n=5052). Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess whether enabling resources, need factors, personal health habits, and psychological problems were associated with seeking health care for musculoskeletal pain. Musculoskeletal pain during the preceding 6 months was reported by 68% of boys and 83% of girls in the study population. Only 16% of boys and 20% of girls reporting pain had sought medical care. Among both boys and girls, care-seeking was associated with being a member of a sports club (boys, odds ratio [OR] 2.1; girls, OR 1.5) and having one (boys, OR 2.1; girls, OR 1.8) or at least 2 (boys, OR 2.2; girls, OR 2.1) other health disorders. In addition, it was associated with a high physical activity level (OR 1.5) and low self-rated (OR 1.5) health among girls. Reporting pain in other anatomical areas decreased the likelihood of seeking care for pain among both genders. In conclusion, relatively few adolescents with musculoskeletal pain had consulted a health professional for the problem. Being physically active (trauma), participating in organized sport (accessibility of care), and having other health problems may explain why an adolescent seeks care for musculoskeletal pain.

  4. Musculo-skeletal pain, psychological distress, and hormones during the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finset, Arnstein; Øverlie, Inger; Holte, Arne

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between sex hormones (estradiol, testosterone, androstendione, DHEA-S) and prolactin on one hand and musculo-skeletal pain and psychological distress on the other during the menopausal transition. Fifty-seven regularly menstruating women, who were studied over five consecutive years, who reached menopause before the fifth assessment, and did not use hormone replacement therapy were included in the study. Hormones were sampled and a questionnaire including questions on psychological distress and musculo-skeletal pain were administered at the five points of assessment. Data on last year before menopause (T1), first (T2) and second (T3) year after menopause are reported. DHEA-S, but neither testosterone nor androstendione, was inversely related to distress and pain. Pain contributed to the variance of DHEA-S over the menopausal transition, whereas DHEA-S levels did not predict pain or distress when baseline levels were controlled for. Prolactin was at T1 and T2 positively associated with distress and at T2 positively associated with musculo-skeletal pain. Musculo-skeletal pain pre-menopause was significantly related to estradiol. DHEA-S was negatively associated, and prolactin positively associated with musculo-skeletal pain and psychological distress. Whereas post-menopause DHEA-S levels were influenced by pain scores, no significant effect of pre-menopause hormones on post-menopause pain and distress was found.

  5. Measuring Musculoskeletal Pain in Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaleff, Zoe A; Kamper, Steven J; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2017-01-01

    Synopsis Accurate, reliable, and timely assessment of pain is critical for effective management of musculoskeletal pain conditions. The assessment of pain in infants, children, and adolescents with and without cognitive impairment can be particularly challenging for clinicians for a number of rea...

  6. Sleep, stress, neurocognitive profile and healthrelated quality of life in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Molina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to measure levels of sleep, stress, and depression, as well as health-related quality of life, and to assess the neurocognitive profiles in a sample of adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Nineteen adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain and 20 age-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated regarding their levels of sleep and stress, as well as quality of life, and underwent neurocognitive testing. RESULTS: The sample groups consisted predominantly of females (84%, and the socioeconomic status did not differ between the two groups. In addition, the occurrence of depressive symptoms was similar between the two groups; specifically, 26% of the idiopathic musculoskeletal pain patients and 30% of the control subjects had scores indicative of depression. Teenagers in the group with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain reported poorer quality of life and sleep scores than those in the control group. Regarding stress, patients had worse scores than the control group; whereas 79% of the adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain met the criteria for a diagnosis of stress, only 35% of the adolescents in the control group met the criteria. In both groups, we observed scores that classified adolescents as being in the resistance phase (intermediate and exhaustion phase (pathological of distress. However, the idiopathic musculoskeletal pain group more frequently reported symptomatic complaints of physical and emotional distress. The neurocognitive assessment showed no significant impairments in either group. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain did not exhibit cognitive impairments. However, adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain did experience intermediate to advanced psychological distress and lower health-related quality of life, which may increase their risk of cognitive dysfunction in the future.

  7. Prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Østergaard, Helle; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fishermen work in a physically challenging work environment. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey in a random sample of Danish fishermen was done with application of the ...... demanding and impacting their musculoskeletal pain. Potential explanation for this unexpected result like increased work pressure and reduced financial attractiveness in small scale commercial fishery needs to be confirmed in future research....

  8. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Construction Workers in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alghadir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence, characteristics, and distribution of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire about musculoskeletal pain in different parts of the body was completed by 165 construction workers from the construction industries in Dammam and Riyadh cities. The descriptive data were analyzed using chi-square test. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Eighty (48.5% of the responding workers had pain in neck, shoulders, lower back, hand, knee, or ankle. The majority of respondents had low back pain (50% followed by knee pain (20%. The average intensity of pain at all sites during activity and rest was 6.65 and 3.59, respectively. Thirty-four (42.5% respondents had dull aching pain and 24 (30% had cramping pain. There was an association between years of experience, duration of break during work, and use of protective equipment with the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in construction workers (P<0.05. Most of the workers complaining of pain got medical treatment (62.5% and only 25% received physical therapy. It can be concluded from this study that the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among construction workers in Saudi Arabia is high.

  9. Perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain are prevalent and significantly associated in adolescents: an epidemiological cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerås, Berit; Sigmundsson, Hermundur; Haga, Monika

    2015-10-23

    Long-term musculoskeletal pain and negative stress are health risks with adverse long-term health effects, and these health risks seem to increase among young people. The mechanisms behind this are unclear. There is a need for a better understanding of perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents, in order to improve health promotion and treatment approaches in this group. Objectives were to evaluate the current prevalence of perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain in 15 and 16 year olds, to explore stress-pain associations and the probability that perceived stress (PSQ) was related to the reporting of pain and variations in pain, and to investigate possible differences in stress between different types of musculoskeletal pain in the adolescents. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Elementary schools participated. The outcomes were stress (Perceived stress questionnaire; PSQ) and musculoskeletal pain (pain/no pain, pain sites, pain duration and pain intensity (Visual analogue scale; VAS). Fifty-one point two percent (N = 422) reported pain, of which 70.8 % reported long-term pain. Some more girls (57.9 %) reported pain. 22.0 % of the study population reported moderate to severe stress (PSQ ≥ 0.45), of which 79.6 % were bothered by pain (Pearson Chi-square 38.47, p ≤ .001). All stress and pain variables were significantly associated (p stress (PSQ) (r = 0.40). Perceived stress (PSQ) was associated with the reporting of pain among the adolescents (Odds Ratio [OR] 1.68) and could explain some of the variation in pain intensity (VAS; β = 0.15, p stress (PSQ) between different types of musculoskeletal pain. There was high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain, long-term pain and moderate to severe stress (PSQ ≥ 0.45) in this study sample. Perceived stress (PSQ) was related to the reporting of musculoskeletal pain among the adolescents and could explain some of the variation in pain intensity (VAS) and number of pain

  10. Patterns of musculoskeletal pain in the population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvigsen, J; Davidsen, M; Hestbaek, L

    2013-01-01

    complaint. METHODS: Using data from an interview-based health survey of a nationally representative sample of the adult Danish population in 1991 (n = 4817), we describe the co-occurrence of musculoskeletal complaints. Using latent class analysis, we identify clusters of musculoskeletal complaints. RESULTS...

  11. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons. In this ......BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal pain is the most common occupational disease in Europe. Surgeons with awkward and static working postures are no exception. Robotic-assisted laparoscopy has been postulated to be superior to conventional laparoscopy regarding the ergonomic strain for surgeons......, and comparative data on surgeons' physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10-16) out of 18. DISCUSSION: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  12. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence...

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders self-reported by supermarket employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Almeida M. da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of self-reported pains in employees of a supermarket chain. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional observational study conducted in a supermarket chain in the city of São Paulo from January 2011 to February 2012, with a sample of 300 employees. Information on sociodemographics, physical activity and characterization of the labor process were collected. It was assumed as the outcome the reports of symptoms of musculoskeletal pain obtained through The Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. For statistical analysis, frequencies and percentages were calculated. Results: The population was mostly composed of young, single women who attended up to the 2nd year of high school. Only 25 % of employees performed physical activities. All employees had presented sometype of musculoskeletal symptoms in the last 12 months, and half of them (50% had three or more symptoms. The pain predominantly occurred in the lower limbs, followed by the thoracic and lumbar spine. Age may be associated with the onset of neck pain. In addition, the job is associated with pain in elbows, lumbar spine and legs. Finally, the lumbar spine is the region with the highest association among the independent variables. Conclusion: It was verified that the employees investigated in the supermarket chain presented a prevalence of pains or some type of musculoskeletal symptom in the past 12 months in the lower limb, regions that make up the spine, wrists, fingers and hands. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p13

  14. Work-site musculoskeletal pain risk estimates by trained observers--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Pieter; Kingma, Idsart; Boot, Cécile R L; Douwes, Marjolein; Bongers, Paulien M; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain (MSP) risk assessments by trained observers are often used in ergonomic practice; however, the validity may be questionable. We investigated the predictive value of work-site MSP risk estimates in a prospective cohort study of 1745 workers. Trained observers estimated the risk of MSP (neck, shoulder or low-back pain) using a three-point scale (high, moderate and low risk) after observing a video of randomly selected workers representing a task group. Associations of the estimated risk of pain and reported pain during a three-year follow-up were assessed using logistic regression. Estimated risk of neck and shoulder pain did (odds ratio, OR: 1.45 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.01-2.08); 1.64 (95% CI: 1.05-2.55)), however, estimated risk of low-back pain did not significantly predict pain (OR: 1.27 (95% CI: 0.91-1.79)). The results show that observers were able to estimate the risk of shoulder and neck pain, whereas they found it difficult to estimate the risk of low-back pain. Practitioner Summary: Work-related musculoskeletal pain risk assessments by observers are often used in ergonomic practice. We showed that observers were able to estimate shoulder and neck pain risk, but had difficulties to estimate the risk of low-back pain. Therefore, observers' risk estimates might provide a useful method for musculoskeletal pain risk assessments.

  15. A Systematic Review of Dextrose Prolotherapy for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Ross A.; Lackner, Johanna B.; Steilen-Matias, Danielle; Harris, David K.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to systematically review dextrose (d-glucose) prolotherapy efficacy in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES Electronic databases PubMed, Healthline, OmniMedicalSearch, Medscape, and EMBASE were searched from 1990 to January 2016. STUDY SELECTION Prospectively designed studies that used dextrose as the sole active prolotherapy constituent were selected. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers rated studies for quality of evidence using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database assessment scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs, for level of evidence using a modified Sackett scale, and for clinically relevant pain score difference using minimal clinically important change criteria. Study population, methods, and results data were extracted and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS Fourteen RCTs, 1 case–control study, and 18 case series studies met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Pain conditions were clustered into tendinopathies, osteoarthritis (OA), spinal/pelvic, and myofascial pain. The RCTs were high-quality Level 1 evidence (Physiotherapy Evidence Database ≥8) and found dextrose injection superior to controls in Osgood–Schlatter disease, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, traumatic rotator cuff injury, knee OA, finger OA, and myofascial pain; in biomechanical but not subjective measures in temporal mandibular joint; and comparable in a short-term RCT but superior in a long-term RCT in low back pain. Many observational studies were of high quality and reported consistent positive evidence in multiple studies of tendinopathies, knee OA, sacroiliac pain, and iliac crest pain that received RCT confirmation in separate studies. Eighteen studies combined patient self-rating (subjective) with psychometric, imaging, and/or biomechanical (objective) outcome measurement and found both positive subjective and objective outcomes in 16 studies and positive

  16. Organizing workplace health literacy to reduce musculoskeletal pain and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Anne Konring; Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Punnett, Laura; Rod, Morten Hulvej; Jørgensen, Marie Birk

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous initiatives to improve the working environment for nursing aides, musculoskeletal disorders (pain) is still a considerable problem because of the prevalence, and pervasive consequences on the individual, the workplace and the society. Discrepancies between effort and effect of workplace health initiatives might be due to the fact that pain and the consequences of pain are affected by various individual, interpersonal and organizational factors in a complex interact...

  17. The role of myofascial trigger points in musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Simons, David; Cuadrado, Maria Luz; Pareja, Juan

    2007-10-01

    Neck and head pain syndromes are common problems seen in clinical practice. Pain features of commonly designated idiopathic neck pain and some primary headaches (ie, tension-type headache or migraine) fit the descriptions of referred pain originating in muscle trigger points (TrPs). This article discusses the scientific evidence supporting the role of muscle TrPs in chronic musculo-skeletal disorders of the neck and head. The relevance of referred pain elicited by muscle TrPs in patients with neck pain has been investigated in few studies. Some authors found that both muscle TrPs in neck-shoulder muscles and cervical joint dysfunctions contribute at the same time to neck pain perception. Furthermore, it seems that referred pain originated in muscle TrPs could also contribute to neck symptoms perceived by subjects after a rear-end crash. In addition, several recent studies reported that both TTH and migraine are associated with referred pain from TrPs in the suboccipital, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, temporalis, or superior oblique muscles. Referred pain elicited by active TrPs mimics the pain areas observed during head pain attacks in these primary headaches. Based on available data, it seems that the pain profile of neck and head syndromes may be provoked referred pain from TrPs in the posterior cervical, head, and shoulder muscles. Additional studies are needed to delineate more information on the relation between muscle TrPs and musculoskeletal pain syndromes of the head and neck.

  18. Duloxetine in the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith EJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Howard S Smith,1 Eric J Smith,2 Benjamin R Smith21Department of Anesthesiology, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY; 2The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USAAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain is among the most frequent painful complaints that healthcare providers address. The bulk of these complaints are chronic low back pain and chronic osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States. It is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by a loss of cartilage, and occurs most often in older persons. The management of osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain may involve both nonpharmacologic (eg, weight loss, resistive and aerobic exercise, patient education, cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacologic approaches. Older adults with severe osteoarthritis pain are more likely to take analgesics than those with less severe pain. The pharmacologic approaches to painful osteoarthritis remain controversial, but may include topical as well as oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, duloxetine, and opioids. The role of duloxetine for musculoskeletal conditions is still evolving.Keywords: pain, musculoskeletal, duloxetine, osteoarthritis, low back, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

  19. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dental practitioners in Davangere, Karnataka: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D J Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite numerous advances in dentistry many occupational health problems still persist in modern dentistry, of which the most common is a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD and pain is the most common symptom of MSD. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among the dental practitioners in Davangere and the prevalence of pain in different anatomic location. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 70 dental practitioners residing in Davangere city. A self-designed questionnaire containing eight questions was self-administered to all the available dentists at their place of work. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi- square test. Results: The prevalence of at least one musculoskeletal pain among the dentists was found to be 34.71%, and they reported a higher frequency of pain in the neck region (71%. Conclusions: Among the dentists practicing in Davangere, there was relatively lower prevalence of at least one musculoskeletal pain and the most common site of pain was neck region.

  20. Musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents: Risk factors and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Jawad; Fares, Mohamad Y; Fares, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Neck pain is a major public health concern that has been extensively studied in adults but not in children and adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to explore musculoskeletal neck pain in children and adolescents, as well as to discuss its possible risk factors and complications. Participants were patients under 18 years of age, who had presented to the clinic (Beirut, Lebanon) in 2015, with nonspecific neck pain. They were examined and asked to evaluate and localize the pain. Neck positioning during various activities along with other complications were explored. Patients reporting pain associated with congenital or systemic diseases and fractures were excluded. Two-hundred-and-seven children and adolescents presented with nonspecific neck pain. Musculoskeletal neck pain with spasm was diagnosed in 180 patients (N = 180). Participants did not show any findings on physical examination and radiological studies, and had no comorbidities. More females (57%) than males (43%) and more adolescents (60%) than children (40%) were affected. All the 180 participants (100%) reported flawed flexion of their back and neck while studying and/or using smartphones and tablets. Eye symptoms were reported in 21% of the cases, and parents of most participants (82%) reported a change in the psychological and social behavior of their children. Musculoskeletal neck pain is an important disease in children and adolescents with numerous risk factors contributing to its development. Increased stresses regarding the cervical spine may lead to cervical degeneration along with other developmental, medical, psychological, and social complications.

  1. The effect of musculoskeletal pain on motor activity and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, M; Jull, G; Wright, A

    2001-06-01

    Aberrant movement patterns and postures are obvious to clinicians managing patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, some changes in motor function that occur in the presence of pain are less apparent. Clinical and basic science investigations have provided evidence of the effects of nociception on aspects of motor function. Both increases and decreases in muscle activity have been shown, along with alterations in neuronal control mechanisms, proprioception, and local muscle morphology. Various models have been proposed in an attempt to provide an explanation for some of these changes. These include the vicious cycle and pain adaptation models. Recent research has seen the emergence of a new model in which patterns of muscle activation and recruitment are altered in the presence of pain (neuromuscular activation model). These changes seem to particularly affect the ability of muscles to perform synergistic functions related to maintaining joint stability and control. These changes are believed to persist into the period of chronicity. This review shows current knowledge of the effect of musculoskeletal pain on the motor system and presents the various proposed models, in addition to other shown effects not covered by these models. The relevance of these models to both acute and chronic pain is considered. It is apparent that people experiencing musculoskeletal pain exhibit complex motor responses that may show some variation with the time course of the disorder.

  2. Comparison of work-related fear-avoidance beliefs across different anatomical locations with musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon CB

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Corey B Simon¹, Sandra E Stryker², Steven Z George³1Department of Physical Therapy, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA; 2Life’s Work Physical Therapy, Portland, Oregon, USA; 3Department of Physical Therapy and Center for Pain Research and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USABackground: The influence of work-related fear-avoidance on pain and function has been consistently reported for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain. Emerging evidence suggests similar influences exist for other anatomical locations of musculoskeletal pain, such as the cervical spine and extremities. However, research is limited in comparing work-related fear-avoidance and associations with clinical outcomes across different anatomical locations. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between work-related fear-avoidance, gender, and clinical outcomes across four different musculoskeletal pain locations for patients being treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting.Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data obtained prospectively from a cohort of 313 participants receiving physical therapy from an outpatient clinic.Results: No interaction was found between gender and anatomical location of musculoskeletal pain on work-related fear-avoidance scores. Work-related fear-avoidance scores were higher in the cervical group versus the lower extremity group; however, there were no other differences across anatomical locations. Work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake pain intensity in patients with spine pain but not extremity pain. Conversely, work-related fear-avoidance influenced intake function for participants with extremity pain but not spine pain. Similar results were observed for change scores, with higher work-related fear-avoidance being associated with more, not less, change in pain

  3. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A...Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial fdfdf 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0163 5c. PROGRAM...approval and initiated enrollment. 15. SUBJET TERMS Auricular Therapy; Musculoskeletal Pain 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  4. Patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy for musculoskeletal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserley-Feeney, Sarah N

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite emphasis on patient centred healthcare, healthcare professionals have been slow to use validated measurements of patient satisfaction in physiotherapy practice. The aim of this cross sectional survey was to measure patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy in Ireland, for patients with musculoskeletal pain, using a previously validated survey instrument. METHODS: A multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire \\'PTOPS\\

  5. Stem cells for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luminita Labusca; Florin Zugun-Eloae; Kaveh Mashayekhi

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal-related pain is one of the most disablinghealth conditions affecting more than one third of theadult population worldwide. Pain from various mechanismsand origins is currently underdiagnosed and undertreated.The complexity of molecular mechanisms correlating painand the progression of musculoskeletal diseases is notyet fully understood. Molecular biomarkers for objectiveevaluation and treatment follow-up are needed as a steptowards targeted treatment of pain as a symptom or as adisease. Stem cell therapy is already under investigationfor the treatment of different types of musculoskeletalrelatedpain. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapiesare already being tested in various clinical trials that usemusculoskeletal system-related pain as the primary orsecondary endpoint. Genetically engineered stem cells,as well as induced pluripotent stem cells, offer promisingnovel perspectives for pain treatment. It is possible that amore focused approach and reassessment of therapeuticgoals will contribute to the overall efficacy, as well asto the clinical acceptance of regenerative medicinetherapies. This article briefly describes the principal typesof musculoskeletal-related pain and reviews the stemcell-based therapies that have been specifically designedfor its treatment.

  6. Long-term adolescent multi-site musculoskeletal pain is associated with psychological distress and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Juha; Eskola, Pasi J; Ohtonen, Hanni-Rosa; Paananen, Markus; Jokelainen, Jari; Timonen, Markku; Vahtera, Jussi; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Karppinen, Jaro

    2017-02-01

    Although several studies have shown that adolescent musculoskeletal pain is associated with psychological problems in a cross-sectional setting, the associations of long-term musculoskeletal pain with psychological distress and anxiety are not known. The study included 1773 adolescents belonging to the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. They received a postal questionnaire at the age of 16years and a follow-up questionnaire two years later. The first inquiry contained questions about the sites of musculoskeletal pain; the second had the same pain questions, along with measures of distress and anxiety. Risk ratios (RR) were assessed by log-linear regression analysis. Multi-site musculoskeletal pain (in ≥2 body locations) at both 16 and 18years was common, reported by 53% of girls and 30% of boys. Multi-site pain at both ages, compared to those with multi-site pain neither at 16 nor 18years, was associated with psychological distress at the age of 18 among both girls (RR 1.8 95% CI 1.2-2.7) and boys (RR 3.5 95% CI 2.1-5.9). For anxiety, the corresponding relative risks were 1.5 (95% CI 1.0-2.2) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.4-2.3), respectively. For short-term multi-site pain (prevalent only at the age of 16 or 18), these relative risks were between 0.8 and 2.3. Adolescents with long-term multi-site pain have higher levels of distress and anxiety than those without or with only short-term multi-site pain. Associations were found in both genders, but the relationship between pain and distress was more pronounced among boys. The associations had modest effect strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Individual expectation: an overlooked, but pertinent, factor in the treatment of individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialosky, Joel E; Bishop, Mark D; Cleland, Joshua A

    2010-09-01

    Physical therapists consider many factors in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. The current literature suggests expectation is an influential component of clinical outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain for which physical therapists frequently do not account. The purpose of this clinical perspective is to highlight the potential role of expectation in the clinical outcomes associated with the rehabilitation of individuals experiencing musculoskeletal pain. The discussion focuses on the definition and measurement of expectation, the relationship between expectation and outcomes related to musculoskeletal pain conditions, the mechanisms through which expectation may alter musculoskeletal pain conditions, and suggested ways in which clinicians may integrate the current literature regarding expectation into clinical practice.

  8. Extensive Validation of the Pain Disability Index in 3 Groups of Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, Remko; Koke, Albere J. A.; Vroomen, C.A.J.; Stegeman, Patrick; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Coppes, Maarten H.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional study design was performed. Objective. To validate the pain disability index (PDI) extensively in 3 groups of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Summary of Background Data. The PDI is a widely used and studied instrument for disability related to various pain syndrom

  9. Extensive Validation of the Pain Disability Index in 3 Groups of Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, Remko; Koke, Albere J. A.; Vroomen, C.A.J.; Stegeman, Patrick; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Coppes, Maarten H.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A cross-sectional study design was performed. Objective. To validate the pain disability index (PDI) extensively in 3 groups of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Summary of Background Data. The PDI is a widely used and studied instrument for disability related to various pain

  10. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and association with computer and videogame use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Georgia Rodrigues Reis; Pitangui, Ana Carolina Rodarti; Xavier, Michele Katherine Andrade; Correia-Júnior, Marco Aurélio Valois; De Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in high school adolescents from public schools and its association with electronic device use. The sample consisted of 961 boys and girls aged 14-19 years who answered a questionnaire regarding the use of computers and electronic games, and questions about pain symptoms and physical activity. Furthermore, anthropometric assessments of all volunteers were performed. The chi-squared test and a multiple logistic regression model were used for the inferential analysis. The presence of musculoskeletal pain symptoms was reported by 65.1% of the adolescents, being more prevalent in the thoracolumbar spine (46.9%), followed by pain in the upper limbs, representing 20% of complaints. The mean time of use for computers and electronic games was 1.720 and 583 minutes per week, respectively. The excessive use of electronic devices was demonstrated to be a risk factor for cervical and lumbar pain. Female gender was associated with the presence of pain in different body parts. Presence of a paid job was associated with cervical pain. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents, as well as an increased amount of time using digital devices was observed. However, it was only possible to observe an association between the increased use of these devices and the presence of cervical and low back pain. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and association with computer and videogame use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Rodrigues Reis Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This study investigated the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in high school adolescents from public schools and its association with electronic device use. Methods: The sample consisted of 961 boys and girls aged 14–19 years who answered a questionnaire regarding the use of computers and electronic games, and questions about pain symptoms and physical activity. Furthermore, anthropometric assessments of all volunteers were performed. The chi-squared test and a multiple logistic regression model were used for the inferential analysis. Results: The presence of musculoskeletal pain symptoms was reported by 65.1% of the adolescents, being more prevalent in the thoracolumbar spine (46.9%, followed by pain in the upper limbs, representing 20% of complaints. The mean time of use for computers and electronic games was 1.720 and 583 minutes per week, respectively. The excessive use of electronic devices was demonstrated to be a risk factor for cervical and lumbar pain. Female gender was associated with the presence of pain in different body parts. Presence of a paid job was associated with cervical pain. Conclusion: A high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents, as well as an increased amount of time using digital devices was observed. However, it was only possible to observe an association between the increased use of these devices and the presence of cervical and low back pain.

  12. Pain assessment strategies in patients with musculoskeletal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carotti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid and reliable assessment of pain is fundamental for both clinical trials and effective pain management. The nature of pain makes objective measurement impossible. Chronic musculoskeletal pain assessment and its impact on physical, emotional and social functions require multidimensional qualitative tools and healthrelated quality of life instruments. The recommendations concerning outcome measurements for pain trials are useful for making routine assessments that should include an evaluation of pain, fatigue, disturbed sleep, physical functioning, emotional functioning, patient global ratings of satisfaction, and quality of life. Despite the growing availability of instruments and theoretical publications related to measuring the various aspects of chronic pain, there is still little agreement and no unified approach has been devised. There is, therefore, still a considerable need for the development of a core set of measurement tools and response criteria, as well as for the development and refinement of the related instruments, standardized assessor training, the cross-cultural adaptation of health status questionnaires, electronic data capture, and the introduction of valid, reliable and responsive standardized quantitative measurement procedures into routine clinical care. This article reviews a selection of the instruments used to assess chronic musculoskeletal pain, including validated newly developed and well-established screening instruments, and discusses their advantages and limitations.

  13. Central hypersensitivity in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Clinical research has consistently detected alteration in central pain processing leading to hypersensitivity. Most methods used in humans are reliable and have face validity to detect widespread central hypersensitivity. However, construct validity is difficult to investigate due to lack of gold standards. Reference values in the pain-free population have been generated, but need replication. Research on pain biomarkers that reflect specific central hypersensitivity processes is warranted. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic value of central hypersensitivity. Most medications acting at central level and some non-pharmacological approaches, including psychological interventions, are likely to attenuate central hypersensitivity.

  14. Central hypersensitivity in chronic musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Clinical research has consistently detected alteration in central pain processing leading to hypersensitivity. Most methods used in humans are reliable and have face validity to detect widespread central hypersensitivity. However, construct validity is difficult to investigate due to lack of gold...... standards. Reference values in the pain-free population have been generated, but need replication. Research on pain biomarkers that reflect specific central hypersensitivity processes is warranted. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic value of central hypersensitivity. Most medications acting at central...... level and some non-pharmacological approaches, including psychological interventions, are likely to attenuate central hypersensitivity....

  15. Association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Lene Lehmann; Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Koch, Markus; Tveter, Anne Therese; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2017-03-21

    Construction and health care workers have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders, and they are assumed to have physically demanding jobs. Profession- and gender-specific associations between individual capacity and musculoskeletal pain have not been sufficiently investigated. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between individual capacity (maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) and handgrip strength) and musculoskeletal pain among construction and health care workers. This cross-sectional study examined 137 construction and health care workers (58 women and 79 men) with a mean age of 41.8 years (standard deviation 12). Aerobic capacity was indirectly assessed by the Åstrand cycle test, and strength was assessed by a handgrip test. Musculoskeletal pain was described by total pain, divided into neck, shoulder, and low back pain, during the last 12 months, and it was dichotomized in below or above 30 days. Logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between V̇O2max, strength, and musculoskeletal pain in the total study sample and separately for construction and health care workers. Analyses were adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and selected mechanical and psychosocial factors. Every second participant (51.8%) reported pain in either neck, shoulders or low back for more than 30 days during the last 12 months. Among the health care workers, a small but significant association was found between a high V̇O2max, high handgrip strength, and a low level of musculoskeletal pain. No association was found for the construction workers. An association between V̇O2max, handgrip strength, and musculoskeletal pain was found for health care workers but not for construction workers. These results indicate that activities promoting individual capacity may reduce musculoskeletal pain for health care workers.

  16. Patient Satisfaction with private Physiotherapy for musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserley-Feeney, Sarah N; Phelan, Martin; Duffy, Fionnuala; Roush, Susan; Cairns, Melinda C; Hurley, Deirdre A

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite emphasis on patient centred healthcare, healthcare professionals have been slow to use validated measurements of patient satisfaction in physiotherapy practice. The aim of this cross sectional survey was to measure patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy in Ireland, for patients with musculoskeletal pain, using a previously validated survey instrument. Methods A multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire 'PTOPS', which assesses patient satisfaction with outpatient physiotherapy treatment, was translated from American English to European English, and relevant demographic and global satisfaction items were included. This was then circulated to patients with musculoskeletal pain (n = 240) for anonymous completion and return to the research team. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, v.12). Results In total 55% (n = 131/240) of questionnaires were returned. Just over half of the respondents were male (53.4%, n = 70), with a mean age (SD) of 37.7 years (12.4), and had previous experience of physiotherapy (65.6%, n = 86). The most common site of musculoskeletal pain was spinal (51.5% n = 66). The mean (SD) number of treatments was 8.3 (8.3), at a mean total cost (SD) of €350.2 (€322.8). The 'PTOPS' questionnaire categorised and scored satisfaction items under four domains, Enhancer, Detractor, Location and Cost. The mean score (SD), optimum score, and scoring range for each domain were: 'Enhancer' 41.2 (3.8), 50, 10–50; 'Detractor' 19.4 (4.4), 10, 10–50; 'Location' 28.0 (4.1), 35, 7–35; 'Cost' 18.9 (2.8), 7, 7–35. "Overall satisfaction with physiotherapy experience" was scored on a five-point scale "excellent to poor", with a modal response of "Very Good" (42%; n = 55). Conclusion This study measured patient satisfaction with private physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal pain in Ireland using a previously validated outcome measure and provides a template for future studies of

  17. Role of calcitonin in management of musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Arendt-Nielsen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin was discovered more than 40 years ago and the scientific community continues to debate the primary and secondary pharmacological actions of calcitonin. Presently calcitonin is accepted by agencies only for treatment of osteoporosis, but many studies have indicated an effect on pain in many different experimental settings both pre-clinically and clinically. The effects of calcitonin on clinical pain conditions have received increasing attention in the past decades, although a consensus on mode of action and potential indications still has to be reached. Several key advances in the pain field may enable a deeper understanding of the putative analgesic effects of calcitonin. Most studies have focused on the effect of calcitonin on musculoskeletal pain problems. Ample lines of independent evidence suggest that calcitonin exerts putative analgesic effects. Well-designed clinical trials, particularly in the field of musculoskeletal pain, are needed to validate fragmented evidence of analgesic actions. This in combination with advanced mechanism-based pain assessment tools can provide new insight into the role of calcitonin, alone or in combination with other compounds, in management of pain.

  18. Emotion Work and Musculoskeletal Pain in Supermarket Cashiers: A Test of a Sleep-Mediation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria U. Kottwitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive movement and a lack of postural change are known risk factors for musculoskeletal pain in cashiers. This study tests emotional dissonance – the demand to keep being polite to impolite customers – as an additional risk factor. Furthermore, sleep problems are expected to mediate the link between emotion work and musculoskeletal pain. Data contains 103 female supermarket cashiers from three supermarkets of a large retailer responded to a questionnaire (participation rate 60.6%. An open question asked for the most negative job facets in daily work. Standardized questionnaire were used to assess emotional dissonance, sleep problems and musculoskeletal pain. Responses to the open question showed experience of unkind customers as the most prevalent negative experience at work reported by 47.6% of cashiers, followed by prolonged sitting (8.7%. Emotional dissonance was a significant predictor of neck and back pain when BMI, age, part-time work, and change of hand function during their shift (work rotation were controlled (β = .30, p < .01. Moreover, sleep problems were confirmed as a mediator with respect to neck and back pain (B = .21, SE = .10, CI = 02–.22. No mediation was found in prediction of pain in arms and shoulders or hips, legs, and feet. Emotional dissonance in work of cashiers appeared as a unique risk factor of neck and back pain. Work design should pay more attention to the social demands of cashier work.

  19. Musculoskeletal Pain in Trombonists: Results from the UNT Trombone Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Eric; Klinge, Derek; Chesky, Kris

    2016-06-01

    The trombone is a popular, versatile, and unique member of the brass family of musical instruments. Yet the musculoskeletal health concerns of trombonists are grossly understudied. The purpose of this study was to develop and apply a novel online research strategy for assessing musical and non-musical demographics along with prevalence, frequency, intensity, quality, timing, and location of site-specific trombone-related pain. Of the 316 trombonist respondents to this open survey, 76.6% (n=242) experienced trombone-related pain in one or more sites over the past year. Lip was the site with the highest prevalence rate for pain (23%). Selected pain sites were outlined in three primary clusters of musculoskeletal sites: 1) the lips and jaw region, 2) left upper extremity, and 3) back region. Over 35% (n=114) reported that trombone-related pain prevented playing their instrument. Site-specific characteristics of pain suggest that future epidemiologic studies seek to better understand location-specific intensity, frequency, quality, and timing of pain. Such details will assist educators, performers, and clinicians understand, prevent, and treat musculoskeletal problems associated with learning and performing musical instruments.

  20. Treatment of musculo-skeletal pain in haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2017-09-19

    Musculo-skeletal pain treatment is inadequate in many haemophilic patients. Analgesics are used only by 36% of adult patients. FVIII/FIX intravenous infusion is mainly used to lessen pain, followed in frequency by usage of NSAIDS (primarily COX-2 inhibitors). In about 30% of patients, pain continues after infusion of F VIII/IX. In acute haemarthroses pain treatment must continue until total disappearance (checked by ultrasonography) and include haematologic treatment, short-term rest of the involved joint, cryotherapy, joint aspiration and analgesic medication (paracetamol in mild pain, metamizole for more intense pain, and in a few precise patients, soft opioids such as codeine or tramadol). In the circumstance of intolerable pain we should use morphine hydrochloride either by continual infusion or a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump, determined by the age, mental condition and grade of observance of the patient. Epidural blocks utilizing bupivacaine and fentanyl may be very efficacious as well. Three main strategies to alleviate chronic musculo-skeletal pain secondary to haemophilic arthropathy (joint degeneration) exist: pharmacologic management, physical medicine and rehabilitation, and intra-articular injections. As for pharmacologic management, NSAIDs (ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, robecoxib) are better than paracetamol. The advantages of tramadol or tramadol/paracetamol and non-tramadol opioids are scanty. With respect to physical medicine and rehabilitation, there is insufficient confirmation that a brace has supplementary favourable effect compared with isolated pharmacologic management. Land-based curative exercise and watery exercise have at the minimum a tiny short-run benefit. Curative ultrasound can be helpful (poor quality of evidence). The efficacy of transcutaneous electrostimulation (TENS) for pain mitigation has not been proved. Electrical stimulation treatment can procure notable ameliorations. With respect to intra

  1. Work-Related Psychosocial Factors and Mental Health Problems Associated with Musculoskeletal Pain in Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Freimann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common cause of incapacity among nurses. This study aimed to report the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among hospital nurses and to explore the associations of work-related psychosocial factors and mental health problems with musculoskeletal pain. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital during April and May 2011. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations between dependent and independent variables. Results. Analysis was based on 404 nurses (45% of the hospital’s nursing population. The overall prevalence of MSP was 70% in the past year and 64% in the past month. Lower back (57% and neck (56% were the body areas most commonly painful in the past year. Higher quantitative and emotional demands, work pace, low justice and respect in the workplace, influence on work organisation, and role conflicts were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain among nurses (p<0.05. All mental health problems and most strongly somatic stress symptoms were associated with musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions. Work-related psychosocial risk factors and mental health problems, especially somatic stress symptoms, have an important impact on the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among university hospital nurses.

  2. Dose–response relationship between sports activity and musculoskeletal pain in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Kamada, Masamitsu; Abe, Takafumi; Kitayuguchi,Jun; Imamura, Fumiaki; Lee, I-Min; Kadowaki, Masaru; Sawada, Susumu S; Miyachi, Motohiko; Matsui, Yuzuru; Uchio, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Wolters Kluwer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000529 Physical activity has multiple health benefits, but may also increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal pain. However, the relationship between physical activity and musculoskeletal pain has not been well-characterized. This study examined the dose–response relationship between sports activity and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents. Two school-based...

  3. Musculoskeletal injuries and pain in dancers: a systematic review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Craig L; Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assemble and synthesize the best available literature from 2004 to 2008 on musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. MEDLINE and CINAHL were the primary sources of data. Indexed terms such as dance, dancer, dancing, athletic injuries, occupational injuries, sprains and strains, musculoskeletal diseases, bone density, menstruation disturbances, and eating disorders were used to search the databases. Citations were screened for relevance using a priori criteria, and relevant studies were critically reviewed for scientific merit by the best-evidence synthesis method. After screening, 19 articles were found to be scientifically admissible. Data from accepted studies were abstracted into evidence tables relating to: prevalence and associated factors; incidence and risk factors; intervention; and injury characteristics and prognosis of musculoskeletal injury and pain in dancers. Principal findings included: a high prevalence and incidence of lower extremity, hip and back injuries; preliminary evidence that psychosocial and psychological issues such as stress and coping strategies affect injury frequency and duration; history of a previous lateral ankle sprain is associated with an increased risk of ankle sprain in the contralateral ankle in dance students; fatigue may play a role in ACL injury in dancers; acute hamstring strains in dancers affect tendon more than muscle tissue, often resulting in prolonged absence from dance. It is concluded that, while there are positive developments in the literature on the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and prevention of MSK injuries and pain in dancers, much room for improvement remains. Suggestions for future research are offered.

  4. Combination therapy for pain in musculoskeletal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When managing patients with locomotor pathology, serious attention is paid to symptomatic therapy aimed at eliminating the unpleasant manifestations of the disease. At the same time, rational analgesia is of the greatest importance. If acute pain should be arrested, parenteral or tableted formulations of fast-acting analgesics are used for days. Longer analgesic therapy especially for clinically relevant inflammation is based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID having analgesic and anti-inflammatory effectiveness and good tolerance. The level of analgesia may be increased, by combining NSAID with tramadol and paracetamol. When clinical muscular spasm is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic pain, it is expedient to prescribe myorelaxants that have an analgesic potential and are able to potentiate the analgesic effect of NSAID.

  5. Combination therapy for pain in musculoskeletal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev

    2012-01-01

    When managing patients with locomotor pathology, serious attention is paid to symptomatic therapy aimed at eliminating the unpleasant manifestations of the disease. At the same time, rational analgesia is of the greatest importance. If acute pain should be arrested, parenteral or tableted formulations of fast-acting analgesics are used for days. Longer analgesic therapy especially for clinically relevant inflammation is based on the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) having a...

  6. Dimensions of "unidimensional" ratings of pain and emotions in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Alexa; Suman, Anna Lisa; Rendo, Carmela Anna; Biasi, Giovanni; Marcolongo, Roberto; Carli, Giancarlo

    2007-08-01

    The use of unidimensional scales to measure pain intensity has been criticised because of the multidimensional nature of pain. We conducted multiple linear regression analyses to determine which dimensions of pain--sensory versus affective--predicted scores on unidimensional scales measuring pain intensity and emotions in 109 Italian women suffering from chronic, non-malignant musculoskeletal pain. We then compared the results with earlier findings in two groups of cancer patients suffering from acute post-operative pain and chronic cancer-related pain, respectively. Age, physical capacity and scores on the multidimensional affect and pain survey (MAPS) were used to predict patients' ratings on one visual analogue scale (VAS) and three numerical rating scales (NRS) measuring pain intensity, anxiety and depressed mood. Unidimensional pain intensity ratings were predicted better from sensory than from affective pain predictors, and the affective predictors made no unique contribution (NRS), or only a very small one (VAS). Both sensory and emotional pain aspects were unique predictors of NRS anxiety and depression. Therefore, in contrast to earlier findings in two different types of cancer patients, in subjects affected by chronic non-malignant musculoskeletal pain, the scores on unidimensional pain intensity scales mainly reflect sensory pain dimensions, supporting the discriminant validity of the NRS and VAS used. However, the patients had some difficulty in distinguishing between sensory and emotional information. For this reason, several unidimensional scales to rate pain intensity and emotions separately should be used to obtain a complete picture of the status and needs of any given patient.

  7. Prognostic factors for short-term improvement in acute and persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Jennifer E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the costs associated with the management of musculoskeletal pain in primary care, predicting the course of these conditions remains a research priority. Much of the research into prognostic indicators however considers musculoskeletal conditions in terms of single pain sites whereas in reality, many patients present with pain in more than one site. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors for early improvement in primary care consulters with acute and persistent musculoskeletal conditions across a range of pain sites. Methods Consecutive patients with a new episode of musculoskeletal pain completed self-report questionnaires at baseline, and then again at the 4/5th treatment visit, and if they were still consulting, at the 10th visit. The outcome was defined as patient self-report improvement sufficient to make a meaningful difference. Independent predictors of outcome were identified using multivariate regression analyses. Results Acute (th visit. Several variables at baseline were associated with improvement at the 4/5th visit, but the predictive models were weak and unable to discriminate between patients who were improved and those who were not. In contrast, it was possible to elicit a predictive model for improvement later on at the 10th visit, but only in patients with persistent pain. Being employed, reporting a decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour at the 4/5th visit, and being better by the 4/5th visit, were all independently associated with improvement. This model accounted for 34.3% (p Conclusions We were unable to identify baseline characteristics that predicted early outcome in musculoskeletal pain patients. However, early self-reported improvement and decline in work fear-avoidance behaviour as predictors of later improvement highlighted the importance of speedy recovery in persistent musculoskeletal pain consulters. Our findings reinforce the elusive nature of baseline predictors, and

  8. Reference Values of the Pain Disability Index in Patients With Painful Musculoskeletal and Spinal Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soer, Remko; Koke, Albere J. A.; Speijer, Bert L. G. N.; Vroomen, Patrick C. A. J.; Smeets, Rob J. E. M.; Coppes, Maarten H.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Gross, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. Cross-sectional study. Objective. To examine reference data for the Pain Disability Index (PDI) in Dutch and Canadian patient samples with a variety of musculoskeletal pain disorders and to test which potential factors are independently associated with the PDI score. Summary of Backgro

  9. Preliminary evaluation of a multidisciplinary pain management program for children and adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Blecourt, A. C. E.; Schiphorst Preuper, H. R.; Van der Schans, C. P.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reneman, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the outcome of a multidisciplinary pain management program for children and adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods. Study design: exploratory retrospective cohort study. The study sample consisted of a cohort of 70 children and adolescents ( age: 8 - 21 years) wi

  10. Preliminary evaluation of a multidisciplinary pain management program for children and adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Blecourt, A. C. E.; Schiphorst Preuper, H. R.; Van der Schans, C. P.; Groothoff, J. W.; Reneman, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the outcome of a multidisciplinary pain management program for children and adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods. Study design: exploratory retrospective cohort study. The study sample consisted of a cohort of 70 children and adolescents ( age: 8 - 21 years) wi

  11. Musculoskeletal symptoms and computer use among Finnish adolescents - pain intensity and inconvenience to everyday life: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakala Paula T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal symptoms among adolescents are related to the time spent using a computer, but little is known about the seriousness of the symptoms or how much they affect everyday life. The purpose of the present study was to examine the intensity of musculoskeletal pain and level of inconvenience to everyday life, in relation to time spent using a computer. Methods In a survey, 436 school children (12 to 13 and 15 to 16 years of age, answered a questionnaire on musculoskeletal and computer-associated musculoskeletal symptoms in neck-shoulder, low back, head, eyes, hands, and fingers or wrists. Pain intensity (computer-associated symptoms and inconvenience to everyday life (musculoskeletal symptoms were measured using a visual analogue scale. Based on the frequency and intensity, three categories were formed to classify pain at each anatomic site: none, mild, and moderate/severe. The association with time spent using the computer was analyzed by multinomial logistic regression. Results Moderate/severe pain intensity was most often reported in the neck-shoulders (21%; head (20%; and eyes (14%; and moderate/severe inconvenience to everyday life was most often reported due to head (29%, neck-shoulders (21%, and low back (16% pain. Compared with those using the computer less than 3.6 hours/week, computer use of ≥ 14 hours/week, was associated with moderate/severe increase in computer-associated musculoskeletal pain at all anatomic sites (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9-4.4, and moderate/severe inconvenience to everyday life due to low back (OR = 2.5 and head (OR = 2.0 pain. Conclusions Musculoskeletal symptoms causing moderate/severe pain and inconvenience to everyday life are common among adolescent computer users. Daily computer use of 2 hours or more increases the risk for pain at most anatomic sites.

  12. Attachment, symptom severity, and depression in medically unexplained musculoskeletal pain and osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Schroeter

    Full Text Available Attachment insecurity relates to the onset and course of chronic pain via dysfunctional reactions to pain. However, few studies have investigated the proportion of insecure attachment styles in different pain conditions, and results regarding associations between attachment, pain severity, and disability in chronic pain are inconsistent. This study aims to clarify the relationships between insecure attachment and occurrence or severity of chronic pain with and without clearly defined organic cause. To detect potential differences in the importance of global and romantic attachment representations, we included both concepts in our study.85 patients with medically unexplained musculoskeletal pain (UMP and 89 patients with joint pain from osteoarthritis (OA completed self-report measures of global and romantic attachment, pain intensity, physical functioning, and depression.Patients reporting global insecure attachment representations were more likely to suffer from medically unexplained musculoskeletal pain (OR 3.4, compared to securely attached patients. Romantic attachment did not differ between pain conditions. Pain intensity was associated with romantic attachment anxiety, and this relationship was more pronounced in the OA group compared to the UMP group. Both global and romantic attachment anxiety predicted depression, accounting for 15% and 17% of the variance, respectively. Disability was independent from attachment patterns.Our results indicate that global insecure attachment is associated with the experience of medically unexplained musculoskeletal pain, but not with osteoarthritis. In contrast, insecure attachment patterns seem to be linked to pain intensity and pain-related depression in unexplained musculoskeletal pain and in osteoarthritis. These findings suggest that relationship-informed focused treatment strategies may alleviate pain severity and psychological distress in chronic pain independent of underlying pathology.

  13. Pain Management in the Emergency Chain: The Use and Effectiveness of Pain Management in Patients With Acute Musculoskeletal Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.J.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Berben, Sivera A.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; Vugt, van Arie B.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and h

  14. Pain management in the emergency chain: the use and effectiveness of pain management in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, J.G.; IJzerman, M.J.; Gaakeer, M.I.; Berben, S.A.; Eenennaam, F.L. van; Vugt, A.B. van; Doggen, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint in emergency care, its management is often neglected, placing patients at risk for insufficient pain relief. Our aim is to investigate how often pain management is provided in the prehospital phase and emergency department (ED) and

  15. A nurse-initiated pain protocol in the ED improves pain treatment in patients with acute musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, Jorien G.J.; Berben, Sivera A.; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Gaakeer, Menno I.; Eenennaam, Fred L.; Vugt, van Arie B.; Doggen, Carine J.M.

    2016-01-01

    While acute musculoskeletal pain is a frequent complaint, its management is often neglected. An implementation of a nurse-initiated pain protocol based on the algorithm of a Dutch pain management guideline in the emergency department might improve this. A pre–post intervention study was performed as

  16. Association between Vitamin D Deficiency and Unexplained Musculoskeletal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Hafezi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Vitamin D is an essential element for establishing bone and muscle structures. Unexplained musculoskeletal (MSK pain is a common problem in elderly. The aim of this study is investigation of association between vitamin D defi­ciency and unexplained MSK pain."nMethods: In order to quantify serum levels of vitamin D and other biochemical parameters, serum samples were taken from 1105 subjects aged from 17 to 79 years old, selected based on randomized clustered sampling from 50 blocks in Tehran Unex­plained MSK pain was assessed based on the verbal rating scale."nResults: Prevalence of MSK pain was 4.4% in the group with normal serum vitamin D, 4.9% in the group of mild vitamin D deficiency, 7.4% in the group of moderate vitamin D deficiency and 11.3% in the group of severe vitamin D deficiency. There was also a relative risk for unexplained MSK pain of severe vitamin D deficiency of 1.26 (95%CI: 1.01-1.72. Odds Ra­tio was 4.65 (CI95%:1.25-17.3 in this women. We found quite a high prevalence of unexplained MSK pain in people partici­pated in our study.  We also found a Conclusion: Positive relationship between BMI and unexplained MSK pain. "nConclusion: vitamin D deficiency may be a major cause of unexplained MSK pain especially in older women.

  17. Musculoskeletal pain and posture decrease step length in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Rachmawati

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pain of the musculoskeletal system, especially low back pain, is one of the most frequent problems with a high risk of disability. The aim of this research study was to determine the existence of an association between low back pain on one hand, posture and step length on the other. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 77 healthy young adult subjects. Step length was measured with the Biodex Gait Trainer 2 (230 VAC. The study results indicate that 62.3% of the young adult subjects had suffered from low back pain. There was no significant association between gender and pain. In male subjects no significant association was found between pain on one hand and mean difference in step length and posture on the other. However, in female subjects with abnormal posture, there was a highly significant difference in left step length between subjects with back pain and those without (p=0.007. The results of a multiple regression analysis indicate that posture has the greatest influence on left step length (B=4.135; 95% Confidence Interval 0.292-7.977. It is recommended that in the examination of low back pain an assessment be made of posture, step length and difference in step lengths.

  18. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders : prevention report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podniece, Z.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.

    2008-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can interfere with activities at work and can lead to reduced productivity, sickness absence and chronic occupational disability. The aim of this report is to systematic evaluate the effectiveness of interventions at the workplace since 2002 and to

  19. Work-Related Psychosocial Factors and Mental Health Problems Associated with Musculoskeletal Pain in Nurses: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimann, Tiina; Pääsuke, Mati; Merisalu, Eda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common cause of incapacity among nurses. This study aimed to report the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among hospital nurses and to explore the associations of work-related psychosocial factors and mental health problems with musculoskeletal pain. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital during April and May 2011. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the associations between dependent and independent variables. Results. Analysis was based on 404 nurses (45% of the hospital's nursing population). The overall prevalence of MSP was 70% in the past year and 64% in the past month. Lower back (57%) and neck (56%) were the body areas most commonly painful in the past year. Higher quantitative and emotional demands, work pace, low justice and respect in the workplace, influence on work organisation, and role conflicts were significantly associated with musculoskeletal pain among nurses (p pain. Conclusions. Work-related psychosocial risk factors and mental health problems, especially somatic stress symptoms, have an important impact on the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain among university hospital nurses.

  20. Topical NSAIDs for acute musculoskeletal pain in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew; Gaskell, Helen; McIntyre, Mairead; Wiffen, Philip J

    2015-06-11

    Use of topical NSAIDs to treat acute musculoskeletal conditions has become widely accepted because they can provide pain relief without associated systemic adverse events. This review is an update of 'Topical NSAIDs for acute pain in adults' originally published in Issue 6, 2010. To determine the efficacy and safety of topically applied NSAIDs in acute musculoskeletal pain in adults. We searched the Cochrane Register of Studies Online, MEDLINE, and EMBASE to February 2015. We sought unpublished studies by asking personal contacts and searching online clinical trial registers and manufacturers websites. For the earlier review, we also searched our own in-house database and contacted manufacturers. We included randomised, double-blind, active or placebo (inert carrier)-controlled trials in which treatments were administered to adults with acute pain resulting from strains, sprains or sports or overuse-type injuries (twisted ankle, for instance). There had to be at least 10 participants in each treatment arm, with application of treatment at least once daily. Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate the risk ratio and numbers needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) or additional harmful outcome (NNH) compared with placebo or other active treatment. We reported 95% confidence intervals (CI). We were particularly interested to compare different formulations (gel, cream, plaster) of individual NSAIDs. For this update we added 14 new included studies (3489 participants), and excluded four studies. We also identified 20 additional reports of completed or ongoing studies that have not been published in full. The earlier review included 47 studies.This update included 61 studies. Most compared topical NSAIDs in the form of a gel, spray, or cream with a similar topical placebo; 5311 participants were treated with a topical NSAID, 3470 with placebo

  1. Regular use of medication for musculoskeletal pain and risk of long-term sickness absence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M. D.; Thorsen, S. V.;

    2016-01-01

    , body mass index, smoking, leisure physical activity, job group, physical activity at work, psychosocial work environment, pain intensity, mental health and chronic disease. RESULTS: In 2010, the proportion of regular pain medication users due to musculoskeletal disorders was 20.8%: 13.4% as over...... be an early indicator that musculoskeletal pain can lead to serious consequences such as long-term sickness absence. SIGNIFICANCE: Use of medication due to musculoskeletal pain is prospectively associated with long-term sickness absence even when adjusted for pain intensity. Use of pain medication can...

  2. Central Hyperexcitability in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Conceptual Breakthrough with Multiple Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lidbeck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of dysfunctional pain processing in the central nervous system have contributed much knowledge about the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Many common chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes - including regional myofascial pain syndromes, whiplash pain syndromes, refractory work-related neck-shoulder pain, certain types of chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia and others - may essentially be explained by abnormalities in central pain modulation. The growing awareness of dysfunctional central pain modulation may be a conceptual breakthrough leading to a better understanding of common chronic pain disorders. A new paradigm will have multiple clinical implications, including re-evaluation of clinical practice routines and rehabilitation methods, and will focus on controversial issues of medicolegal concern. The concept of dysfunctional central pain processing will also necessitate a mechanism-based classification of pain for the selection of individual treatment and rehabilitation programs for subgroups of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain due to different pathophysiological mechanisms.

  3. Cross-sectional associations between occupational factors and musculoskeletal pain in women teachers, nurses and sonographers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Inger; Gremark Simonsen, Jenny; Dahlqvist, Camilla; Axmon, Anna; Karlson, Björn; Björk, Jonas; Nordander, Catarina

    2016-01-18

    It is usually assumed that musculoskeletal pain is associated with both the physical workload and the psychosocial work environment, as well as with personal and lifestyle factors. This study aims to ascertain the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in women with varying or different occupational exposures, and to explore the associations between musculoskeletal pain and the occupational and personal factors. A questionnaire on physical, psychosocial and individual factors was answered by 1591 women in five occupational groups with contrasting occupational exposures (teachers, anaesthetic, theatre, and assistant nurses, and sonographers). The outcome measure was musculoskeletal pain (in a new model based on frequency and intensity of complaints the preceding year) from the neck, shoulders, hands, lower back and feet. Neck pain was equally frequent among teachers, assistant nurses and sonographers, and less frequent in anaesthetic and theatre nurses. The sonographers experienced the highest prevalence of shoulder pain, while the assistant nurses were the most affected in the wrists and hands, lower back, and feet. The teachers reported the highest scores in most of the psychosocial dimensions. The theatre nurses scored highest in strenuous work postures and movements (mechanical exposure index, MEI), and the assistant nurses in physical activity and lifting (physical exposure index, PHYI). Multivariable models in the total population showed that both the physical workload and the psychosocial work environment were associated with pain in all body regions, though different factors affected different regions. Pain in the neck, shoulders, hands and lower back was strongly associated with a high MEI and high job demands, while pain in the feet was associated with a high PHYI and a high BMI. A young age was associated with pain in the neck, and an older age was associated with pain in the hands and feet. Lack of time for personal recovery was associated with pain in the

  4. Risk factors for development of non-specific musculoskeletal pain in preteens and early adolescents: a prospective 1-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinen Anssi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal pain symptoms are common in children and adolescents. These symptoms have a negative impact on children's physical and emotional well-being, but their underlying aetiology and risk factors are still poorly understood. Most of the previous cohort studies were conducted among mid and/or late adolescents and were mainly focused on a specific pain location (e.g. low back pain or neck pain. The purpose of this study is to estimate occurrence of new-onset pain symptoms, in all musculoskeletal locations, in preteens and early adolescents and investigate risk factors for development of these symptoms. Methods 1756 schoolchildren (mean age 10.8 were recruited from schools in southern Finland. Information was extracted as to whether they experienced musculoskeletal pain and a total of 1192 children were identified as free of musculoskeletal pain symptoms. Information was collected on factors which could potentially predict the development of musculoskeletal pain: headache, abdominal pain, sadness/feeling down, day-time tiredness, difficulty in falling asleep, waking up during nights, level of physical activity and hypermobility. These children were followed-up 1-year later and those with new episodes of non-traumatic and traumatic musculoskeletal pain symptoms were identified. Results A total of 1113 schoolchildren (93% of baseline pain-free children were found at one-year follow-up. New episodes of musculoskeletal pain were reported by 21.5% of these children. Of them 19.4% reported non-traumatic pain and 4.0% reported traumatic pain. The neck was the most commonly reported site with non-traumatic pain, while the lower limb was the most common site for traumatic pain. The independent risk factors for non-traumatic musculoskeletal pain were headache (OR = 1.68, [95% CI 1.16–2.44] and day-time tiredness (OR = 1.53, [95% CI 1.03–2.26]. The risk factors for traumatic musculoskeletal pain were vigorous exercise (OR = 3

  5. Body mass index and musculoskeletal pain: is there a connection?

    OpenAIRE

    Seaman, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most common complaints that patients report to physicians and two-thirds of the population has an elevated body mass index (BMI), indicating they are either overweight or obese. It was once assumed that extra body weight would stress the low back and lead to pain, however, researchers have reported inconsistencies association between body weight and back pain. In contrast, more recent studies do indicate that an elevated BMI is associated with back pain and ...

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høilund-Carlsen Poul

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute chest pain is a major health problem all over the western world. Active approaches are directed towards diagnosis and treatment of potentially life threatening conditions, especially acute coronary syndrome/ischemic heart disease. However, according to the literature, chest pain may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect of various treatments are lacking. Methods/Design We present an ongoing trial on the potential usefulness of chiropractic diagnosis and treatment in patients dismissed from an acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome. The aims are to determine the proportion of patients in whom chest pain may be of musculoskeletal rather than cardiac origin and to investigate the decision process of a chiropractor in diagnosing these patients; further, to examine whether chiropractic treatment can reduce pain and improve physical function when compared to advice directed towards promoting self-management, and, finally, to estimate the cost-effectiveness of these procedures. This study will include 300 patients discharged from a university hospital acute chest pain clinic without a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome or any other obvious cardiac or non-cardiac disease. After completion of the clinic's standard cardiovascular diagnostic procedures, trial patients will be examined according to a standardized protocol including a a self-report questionnaire; b a semi-structured interview; c a general health examination; and d a specific manual examination of the muscles and joints of the neck, thoracic spine, and thorax in order to determine whether the pain is likely to be of musculoskeletal origin. To describe the patients status with

  7. Musculoskeletal neck and back pain in undergraduate dental students at a UK dental school - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, S; Ide, M

    2016-09-09

    Objective Limited data exist on musculoskeletal problems within dental students: we aimed to determine the prevalence of these disorders.Design Single centre cross-sectional study.Setting A UK Dental School 2015.Methods Students completed a modified Nordic pain questionnaire.Main outcome measures Self-reported frequency and severity of pain, fitness and coping strategies.Results 63% of 390 respondents were female and 75% aged under 23. Seventy-nine percent experienced pain with 42% experiencing pain for 30 or more days in the past year. Lower back pain was most common (54%) and was most frequently the worst area of pain (48%). Thirty-six percent reported pain lasting at least four hours. The mean 'average pain intensity' VAS score was 3.81/10 (sd = 1.75) and mean 'worst pain intensity' was 5.56 (sd = 2.10). More females reported neck pain (58% versus 37%, P pain intensity' (mean 4.02, sd 1.82 versus 3.43 sd 1.55, P = 0.012. Daily stretching was used by 55.7% of respondents, and this positively correlated with 'average' and 'worst pain intensity' (P = 0.096 and P = 0.001) scores. Eighteen percent sought professional help to manage pain.Conclusion Musculoskeletal pain is a problem for dental students. Education in self-care may be helpful; however, assessments of possible interventions are needed.

  8. Staying at work with chronic musculoskeletal pain: A new reference for pain rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Haitze; Brouwer, Sandra; Groothoff, J.W.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP) results often in work disability and sick-leave, confronting employers, insurance companies, and society with considerable costs. However, a substantial amount of workers stay at work despite CMP. It is currently unknown on which fa

  9. Predictors of multidisciplinary treatment outcome in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Waaksma, Berend R.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica; Stewart, Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present study aimed to identify predictors of rehabilitation outcome for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) and psychological problems. Methods: A retrospective cohort study including 230 adult patients with CMP admitted for multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation. Potential

  10. A sailor's pain: Veterans' musculoskeletal disorders, chronic pain, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James M; Chiasson, Roland; Loisel, Patrick; Besemann, Lt Col Markus; Pranger, Tina

    2009-11-01

    A few years after leaving the navy, a 50-year-old Veteran* presents to a new family physician with chronic knee and back pain. He is seeking a new physician for opioid and benzodiazepine refills, referrals for ongoing acupuncture and massage therapy, and completion of Veteran Affairs Canada (VAC) disability claim forms for his back. He was medically released at the rank of Petty Officer owing to knee impairment secondary to a fracture sustained aboard ship. He twice strained his back on deployments, but did not develop chronic low back pain until after leaving the Canadian Forces (CF). On release from the CF he completed comprehensive medical, psychosocial, and vocational rehabilitation in the VAC Rehabilitation Program for disability related to his knee impairment. Lately, chronic low back pain prevents him from continuing civilian employment and enjoying life.The physician takes the Veteran's history, performs appropriate physical examination and diagnostic investigations, and obtains previous medical records. The physician diagnoses chronic mechanic allow back pain and knee osteoarthritis, and is concerned about the Veteran's mental health. When the family physician tries to explore the mental health differential diagnosis, the Veteran initially becomes upset,but he responds to motivational interviewing. The physician books follow-up appointments to develop a therapeutic relationship with the Veteran and completes the VAC forms. With consent, the physician also sends a referral letter to the VAC district office, outlining the Veteran's health issues. The client is found to be eligible to re-enter the VAC Rehabilitation Program to manage disability related to his back pain. The Veteran is ultimately able to withdraw from chronic opiate and benzodiazepine medications and optimize his participation in life.

  11. Unique Contributions of Body Diagram Scores and Psychosocial Factors to Pain Intensity and Disability in Patients With Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel I; Lentz, Trevor A; George, Steven Z

    2017-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective cross-sectional cohort of military patients with musculoskeletal pain. Background Body diagrams are used to document symptoms and can also serve as a proxy to assess psychological influence. However, literature to support this is conflicting. Objectives To (1) examine the unique contribution of pain and nonpain symptom distribution to magnitude of self-reported pain intensity and disability, and (2) assess the moderating influence of psychological factors and body diagram score on concurrent pain intensity and disability. Methods Pain, numbness, and tingling were denoted on a body diagram at initial evaluation. Fear-avoidance beliefs, pain catastrophizing, and region-specific self-reported disability measures were collected. The contributions of pain and nonpain symptom distribution to pain intensity and disability were assessed to determine which body diagram symptom scoring method (pain only, nonpain, or composite) was appropriate for subsequent analyses. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were then used to determine the moderating effects of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire and the body diagram score on concurrent pain and disability. Results The Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire explained between 16% and 17% of the variance in pain intensity, and 8% of variance in disability (all, Pintensity (all, Pintensity. The positive relationship between composite symptom score and concurrent pain intensity is stronger for patients with low catastrophizing. Conclusion The clinical utility of body diagrams with low symptom distribution may be improved by concomitant assessment of pain catastrophizing and warrants further longitudinal investigation. Level of Evidence Symptom prevalence, level 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(2):88-96. Epub 5 Nov 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.6778.

  12. Risk factors for musculoskeletal pain amongst nurses in Estonia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimann, Tiina; Coggon, David; Merisalu, Eda; Animägi, Liina; Pääsuke, Mati

    2013-12-01

    Routine statistics indicate a high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Estonia. We aimed to describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain (MSP) amongst Estonian nurses, and to explore associations with personal characteristics and occupational risk factors. As a part of an international investigation (the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID) study), a cross-sectional survey was carried out amongst registered nurses at Tartu University Hospital, focusing on pain at six anatomical sites (low back, neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist/hand and knee) lasting for more than a day during the past year and past month. Associations with regional and multi-site (≥2 anatomical sites) pain were analysed by logistic regression. Analysis was based on 221 female nurses (response rate 57%). The overall prevalence of MSP was 84% in the past year and 69% in the past month. The prevalence of multi-site pain was 60% in the past year and 40% in the past month. Low back, neck and knee were the sites most commonly painful. Pain in the past year tended to be more frequent at older ages, and with higher emotional exhaustion, and at most sites, with poor self-rated health, and reported distress from somatic symptoms. Multi-site pain was also significantly associated with older age and tendency to somatise. The prevalence of MSP among Estonian nurses is high. Psychological risk factors such as somatising tendency have an important impact. However, none of the risk factors examined seems likely to explain the high frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Estonia.

  13. Decrease in musculoskeletal pain after 4 and 12 months of an aerobic exercise intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshøj, Mette; Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Lidegaard, Mark

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain is high in jobs with high physical work demands. An aerobic exercise intervention targeting cardiovascular health was evaluated for its long term side effects on musculoskeletal pain. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate if aerobic exercise af...

  14. Exploring the Associations between Sleep Problems and Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in Adolescents: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Harrison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of musculoskeletal chronic pain in adolescents is estimated to be approximately 4% to 40%. The development of musculoskeletal pain during teenage years could have a marked impact on physical, psychological and social well-being.

  15. Validation of the Hanyang Pain Scale for clerical workers with musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh KY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ki Young Oh Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, Republic of Korea Purpose: The visual analog scale (VAS is the most widely used scale for pain assessment. However, its reflection of time-, sleep-, work-, psychological-, and reward-related pain characteristics is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a new pain scale, the Hanyang Pain Scale (HPS, evaluate its reliability, and assess its agreement with currently used scales. Subjects and methods: The HPS comprises a 10 cm long visual vertical bar, similar to the VAS, with eleven simple evaluation sentences related to pain frequency, work, and sleep. We selected 1,037 clerical workers as study subjects and conducted medical examinations through interviews, physical examinations, and musculoskeletal pain assessments tools including the VAS, HPS, and McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ. The reliability of the HPS and its agreement with VAS and MPQ were statistically analyzed. Results: HPS test–retest reliability was very high (Pearson correlation coefficient =0.902. In particular, HPS test–retest reliability in the weak pain group (<4 points for both VAS and HPS was greater (Pearson correlation coefficient =0.863 than that of VAS (0.721. Therefore, the HPS showed consistent pain assessment results in cases of relatively weak pain. Correlation was high between HPS and VAS scores (Spearman’s ρ =0.526 and satisfactory between HPS and MPQ scores (Spearman’s ρ =0.367. Conclusion: The newly developed HPS has high reliability and strong agreement with other currently widely used scales. In particular, HPS was more consistent than the VAS for relatively weak pain. Based on these findings, the HPS can be considered a useful pain assessment tool for clerical workers. Further clinical research on musculoskeletal diseases and on workers in other fields is required. Keywords: clerical workers, Hanyang Pain Scale, pain assessment

  16. Using Guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of controlled clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sun-Mi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guasha is a therapeutic method for pain management using tools to scrape or rub the surface of the body to relieve blood stagnation. This study aims to systematically review the controlled clinical trials on the effectiveness of using Guasha to treat musculoskeletal pain. Methods We searched 11 databases (without language restrictions: MEDLINE, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Korean Studies Information (KSI, DBPIA, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI, KoreaMed, Research Information Service System (RISS, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI and the Cochrane Library. The search strategy was Guasha (OR scraping AND pain. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane criteria (i.e. sequence generation, blinding, incomplete outcome measures and allocation concealment. Results Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs and two controlled clinical trials (CCTs were included in the present study. Two RCTs compared Guasha with acupuncture in terms of effectiveness, while the other trials compared Guasha with no treatment (1 trial, acupuncture (4 trials, herbal injection (1 trial and massage or electric current therapy (1 trial. While two RCTs suggested favorable effects of Guasha on pain reduction and response rate, the quality of these RCTs was poor. One CCT reported beneficial effects of Guasha on musculoskeletal pain but had low methodological quality. Conclusion Current evidence is insufficient to show that Guasha is effective in pain management. Further RCTs are warranted and methodological quality should be improved.

  17. Biomarkers for Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions: Use of Brain Imaging and Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Sevel, Landrew; Letzen, Janelle; Robinson, Michael; Staud, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain condition often shows poor correlations between tissue abnormalities and clinical pain. Therefore, classification of pain conditions like chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia depends mostly on self report and less on objective findings like X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. However, recent advances in structural and functional brain imaging have identified brain abnormalities in chronic pain conditions that can be used for illness classification. Because the analysis of complex and multivariate brain imaging data is challenging, machine learning techniques have been increasingly utilized for this purpose. The goal of machine learning is to train specific classifiers to best identify variables of interest on brain MRIs (i.e., biomarkers). This report describes classification techniques capable of separating MRI-based brain biomarkers of chronic pain patients from healthy controls with high accuracy (70-92%) using machine learning, as well as critical scientific, practical, and ethical considerations related to their potential clinical application. Although self-report remains the gold standard for pain assessment, machine learning may aid in the classification of chronic pain disorders like chronic back pain and fibromyalgia as well as provide mechanistic information regarding their neural correlates.

  18. Work-related Musculoskeletal Pain among Different Dental Specialists in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawi, Natheer H; Khatib, Hiba El; Rajoub, Lin; El-Sayed, Mariem; Naji, Rawand; Youssef, Reem; Kawas, Sausan Al

    2016-08-01

    Dentists are at a very high risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The present study aimed at studying the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among different dental specialists in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and correlating the region of pain with the type of clinical work done by the specialists. A sample of more than 100 dentists was chosen randomly from different emirates in UAE. An interview questionnaire was administered regarding the number of years of experience and the presence, region, duration, and type of musculoskeletal pain they experienced. Musculoskeletal pain is experienced by 83.3% of periodontists, 80% of conservative dentists, 77.8% of endodon-tists, 72.7% of orthodontists, 70% of oral surgeons, 63.6% of prosthodontists, 63% of general dental practitioners, and 50% of pedodontists. The results have also indicated that the region of experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty. From those dentists who experience work-related musculoskeletal pain, 80% of conservative dentists experience pain in neck and shoulders, 66.7% of periodontists, and 54.5% of orthodontists experience pain in the lower back region. More than 50% of endodontists experience pain in the neck and shoulders regions, and 39% of general dental practitioners who experience pain in the neck region. Preventive measures need to be taken to decrease the risk of dentists and dental specialists developing work-related musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among registered general dental practitioners and dental specialists in UAE was not clearly documented. The study results indicated that the region that experienced musculoskeletal pain does vary according to the specialty.

  19. Work-related determinants of multi-site musculoskeletal pain among employees in the health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Subas; Nygård, Clas-Håkan; Oakman, Jodi

    2016-06-16

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain is a major occupational problem. Those with pain in multiple sites usually report worse health outcomes than those with pain in one site. This study explored prevalence and associated predictors of multi-site pain in health care sector employees. Survey responses from 1348 health care sector employees across three organisations (37% response rate) collected data on job satisfaction, work life balance, psychosocial and physical hazards, general health and work ability. Musculoskeletal discomfort was measured across 5 body regions with pain in ≥ 2 sites defined as multi-site pain. Generalized linear models were used to identify relationships between work-related factors and multi-site pain. Over 52% of the employees reported pain in multiple body sites and 19% reported pain in one site. Poor work life balance (PRR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.06-5.14). physical (PRR = 7.58, 95% CI = 4.89-11.77) and psychosocial (PRR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.00-2.57) hazard variables were related to multi-site pain (after controlling for age, gender, health and work ability. Older employees and females were more likely to report multi-site pain. Effective risk management of work related multi-site pain must include identification and control of psychosocial and physical hazards.

  20. Depressive Symptoms, Anatomical Region, and Clinical Outcomes for Patients Seeking Outpatient Physical Therapy for Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Beneciuk, Jason M.; Valencia, Carolina; Werneke, Mark W.; Hart, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinical guidelines advocate the routine identification of depressive symptoms for patients with pain in the lumbar or cervical spine, but not for other anatomical regions. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and impact of depressive symptoms for patients with musculoskeletal pain across different anatomical regions. Design This was a prospective, associational study. Methods Demographic, clinical, depressive symptom (Symptom Checklist 90–Revised), and outcome data were collected by self-report from a convenience sample of 8,304 patients. Frequency of severe depressive symptoms was assessed by chi-square analysis for demographic and clinical variables. An analysis of variance examined the influence of depressive symptoms and anatomical region on intake pain intensity and functional status. Separate hierarchical multiple regression models by anatomical region examined the influence of depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Results Prevalence of severe depression was higher in women, in industrial and pain clinics, and in patients who reported chronic pain or prior surgery. Lower prevalence rates were found in patients older than 65 years and those who had upper- or lower-extremity pain. Depressive symptoms had a moderate to large effect on pain ratings (Cohen d=0.55–0.87) and a small to large effect on functional status (Cohen d=0.28–0.95). In multivariate analysis, depressive symptoms contributed additional variance to pain intensity and functional status for all anatomical locations, except for discharge values for the cervical region. Conclusions Rates of depressive symptoms varied slightly based on anatomical region of musculoskeletal pain. Depressive symptoms had a consistent detrimental influence on outcomes, except on discharge scores for the cervical anatomical region. Expanding screening recommendations for depressive symptoms to include more anatomical regions may be indicated in physical therapy

  1. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy A. McGeary

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS pain rating, disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale, and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed.

  2. Words that describe chronic musculoskeletal pain: implications for assessing pain quality across cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Saurab Sharma,1 Anupa Pathak,2 Mark P Jensen3 1Department of Physiotherapy, Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences, Dhulikhel Hospital Kathmandu University Hospital, Dhulikhel, 2Department of Physiotherapy, Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences, Dhulikhel, Kavre, Nepal; 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Background: People from different cultures who speak different languages may experience pain differently. This possible variability has important implications for evaluating the validity of pain quality measures that are directly translated into different languages without cultural adaptations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of language and culture on the validity of pain quality measures by comparing the words that individuals with chronic pain from Nepal use to describe their pain with those used by patients from the USA. Methods: A total of 101 individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain in Nepal were asked to describe their pain. The rates of the different pain descriptor domains and phrases used by the Nepali sample were then compared to the published rates of descriptors used by patients from the USA. The content validity of commonly used measures for assessing pain quality was then evaluated. Results: While there was some similarity between patients from Nepal and the USA in how they describe pain, there were also important differences, especially in how pain quality was described. For example, many patients from Nepal used metaphors to describe their pain. Also, the patients from Nepal often used a category of pain descriptor – which describes a physical state – not used by patients from the USA. Only the original McGill Pain Questionnaire was found to have content validity for assessing pain quality in patients from Nepal, although other existing pain quality measures could be adapted to be content valid by adding one or two additional descriptors

  3. Construction workers working in musculoskeletal pain and engaging in leisure-time physical activity: Findings from a mixed-methods pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.; Lowe, Kincaid; Herrick, Robert; Kenwood, Christopher; Gagne, Joshua J.; Becker, Jamie F.; Schneider, Scott; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background While exercise has been shown beneficial for some musculoskeletal pain conditions, construction workers who are regularly burdened with musculoskeletal pain may engage less in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) due to pain. In a small pilot study, we investigate how musculoskeletal pain may influence participation in LTPA among construction workers. Methods A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design was employed using a jobsite-based survey (n=43) among workers at two commercial construction sites and one focus group (n=5). Results Over 93% of these construction workers reported engaging in LTPA and 70% reported musculoskeletal pain. Fifty-seven percent of workers who met either moderate or vigorous LTPA guidelines reported lower extremity pain (i.e. ankle, knee) compared with 21% of those who did not engage in either LTPA (p=0.04). Focus group analyses indicate that workers felt they already get significant physical activity out of their job because they are “moving all the time and not sitting behind a desk.” Workers also felt they “have no choice but to work through pain and discomfort [as the worker] needs to do anything to get the job done.” Conclusion Pilot study findings suggest that construction workers not only engage in either moderate or vigorous LTPA despite musculoskeletal pain but workers in pain engage in more LTPA than construction workers without pain. PMID:24760608

  4. Pheochromocytoma presenting as musculoskeletal pain from bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, M.D.; Braunstein, E.M.; Shapiro, B.

    1987-10-01

    Six patients presented with musculoskeletal pain resulting from destructive bone lesions. These patients were ultimately shown to have metastatic pheochromocytoma. None of the cases exhibited typical symptoms of metastatic pheochromocytoma, nor was it suspected at the time of presentation. In three patients, hypertension caused pheochromocytoma to be considered as a diagnosis. The three remaining patients, all of whom had documented hypertension in the past, underwent bone biopsy. Two of these patients became markedly hypertensive in the postoperative period. Malignant pheochromocytoma may present with metastatic skeletal disease in some patients in whom the presence of hypertension as well as a carefully elicited history may suggest the diagnosis. In such patients, the possibility of pheochromocytoma should be taken into account, as biopsy may trigger a hypertensive crisis in patients not under adrenergic blockade.

  5. Generic prognostic factors for musculoskeletal pain in primary care: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus, Majid; Campbell, Paul; Mallen, Christian D; van der Windt, Danielle A W

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To summarise the evidence for generic prognostic factors across a range of musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions. Setting primary care. Methods and outcomes Comprehensive systematic literature review. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsychINFO and EMBASE were searched for prospective cohort studies, based in primary care (search period—inception to December 2015). Studies were included if they reported on adults consulting with MSK conditions and provided data on associations between baseline characteristics (prognostic factors) and outcome. A prognostic factor was identified as generic when significantly associated with any outcome for 2 or more different MSK conditions. Evidence synthesis focused on consistency of findings and study quality. Results 14 682 citations were identified and 78 studies were included (involving more than 48 000 participants with 18 different outcome domains). 51 studies were on spinal pain/back pain/low back pain, 12 on neck/shoulder/arm pain, 3 on knee pain, 3 on hip pain and 9 on multisite pain/widespread pain. Total quality scores ranged from 5 to 14 (mean 11) and 65 studies (83%) scored 9 or more. Out of a total of 78 different prognostic factors for which data were provided, the following factors are considered to be generic prognostic factors for MSK conditions: widespread pain, high functional disability, somatisation, high pain intensity and presence of previous pain episodes. In addition, consistent evidence was found for use of pain medications not to be associated with outcome, suggesting that this factor is not a generic prognostic factor for MSK conditions. Conclusions This large review provides new evidence for generic prognostic factors for MSK conditions in primary care. Such factors include pain intensity, widespread pain, high functional disability, somatisation and movement restriction. This information can be used to screen and select patients for targeted treatment in clinical research as well as to inform the

  6. Laser acupuncture for treating musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Dina; McDonough, Suzanne; Bleakley, Chris; Baxter, George David; Tumilty, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Laser acupuncture has been studied extensively over several decades to establish evidence-based clinical practice. This systematic review aims to evaluate the effects of laser acupuncture on pain and functional outcomes when it is used to treat musculoskeletal disorders and to update existing evidence with data from recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A computer-based literature search of the databases MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTSDiscus, Cochrane Library, PubMed, Current Contents Connect, Web of Science, and SCOPUS was used to identify RCTs comparing between laser acupuncture and control interventions. A meta-analysis was performed by calculating the standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals, to evaluate the effect of laser acupuncture on pain and functional outcomes. Included studies were assessed in terms of their methodological quality and appropriateness of laser parameters. Forty-nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Two-thirds (31/49) of these studies reported positive effects, were of high methodological quality, and reported the dosage adequately. Negative or inconclusive studies commonly failed to demonstrate these features. For all diagnostic subgroups, positive effects for both pain and functional outcomes were more consistently seen at long-term follow-up rather than immediately after treatment. Moderate-quality evidence supports the effectiveness of laser acupuncture in managing musculoskeletal pain when applied in an appropriate treatment dosage; however, the positive effects are seen only at long-term follow-up and not immediately after the cessation of treatment.

  7. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Pain and Generalised Joint Hypermobility among Jazz Musicians in Swedish Big Bands

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and generalised joint hypermobility (GJH) among professional jazz musicians in Swedish big bands and to investigate possible associations between GJH and pain.Methods: An existing health questionnaire developed for professional orchestra musicians, including the 5-part questionnaire for GJH [1], the standardised Nordic questionnaire for musculoskeletal pain disorders [2] and additional specific questions abo...

  8. Effect of physical exercise interventions on musculoskeletal pain in all body regions among office workers: A one-year randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L.; Christensen, Karl Bang; Holtermann, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated effects of physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain symptoms in all regions of the body, as well as on other musculoskeletal pain in association with neck pain. A single blind randomized controlled trial testing a one-year exercise intervention was performed among 549...... office workers; specific neck/shoulder resistance training, all-round physical exercise, or a reference intervention. Pain symptoms were determined by questionnaire screening of twelve selected body regions. Case individuals were identified for each body region as those reporting pain intensities...... group (Pphysical...

  9. A randomized clinical trial of chiropractic treatment and self-management in patients with acute musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner;

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported short-term follow-up from a pragmatic randomized clinical trial comparing 2 treatments for acute musculoskeletal chest pain: (1) chiropractic treatment and (2) self-management. Results indicated a positive effect in favor of the chiropractic treatment after 4 and 12...

  10. Chronic musculoskeletal pain in chronic fatigue syndrome: recent developments and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Meeus, Mira; De Meirleir, Kenny

    2006-08-01

    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) experience chronic musculoskeletal pain which is even more debilitating than fatigue. Scientific research data gathered around the world enables clinicians to understand, at least in part, chronic musculoskeletal pain in CFS patients. Generalized joint hypermobility and benign joint hypermobility syndrome appear to be highly prevalent among CFS sufferers, but they do not seem to be of any clinical importance. On the other hand, pain catastrophizing accounts for a substantial portion of musculoskeletal pain and is a predictor of exercise performance in CFS patients. The evidence concerning pain catastrophizing is supportive of the indirect evidence of a dysfunctional pain processing system in CFS patients with musculoskeletal pain. CFS sufferers respond to incremental exercise with a lengthened and accentuated oxidative stress response, explaining muscle pain, postexertional malaise, and the decrease in pain threshold following graded exercise in CFS patients. Applying the scientific evidence to the manual physiotherapy profession, pacing self-management techniques and pain neurophysiology education are indicated for the treatment of musculoskeletal pain in CFS patients. Studies examining the effectiveness of these strategies for CFS patients are warranted.

  11. Avoiding the impact of musculoskeletal pain on quality of life in children with hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, David D

    2008-01-01

    The most frequent, severe clinical manifestation of hemophilia is hemarthrosis, which often develops at a young age and is initiated by repeated joint bleeds. Blood within a joint results in inflammation and hypertrophy of synovial membranes, causing increased vascularization of the joint and bone degeneration. In addition, hemarthrosis is associated with pain, impaired mobility, and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Although data on the effect of joint pain on pediatric HRQoL are currently lacking, both health-related outcome and treatment-experience studies reported the benefits of early identification, assessment, and treatment of pain in improving patient outcome and HRQoL. Ultimately, prevention of bleeding through aggressive treatment of joint bleeds and prophylaxis with factor concentrates are key to ensuring the best musculoskeletal outcome for pediatric patients with hemophilia.

  12. Recognition of central sensitization in patients with musculoskeletal pain: Application of pain neurophysiology in manual therapy practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Houdenhove, B. Van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2010-01-01

    Central sensitization plays an important role in the pathophysiology of numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders, yet it remains unclear how manual therapists can recognize this condition. Therefore, mechanism based clinical guidelines for the recognition of central sensitization in patients with mus

  13. Effects on musculoskeletal pain, work ability and sickness absence in a 1-year randomised controlled trial among cleaners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie B.; Faber, Anne; Hansen, Jørgen V.;

    2011-01-01

    or CBTr compared with REF was found in conservative ITT analyses. However, explorative analyses revealed a treatment effect for musculoskeletal pain of the PCT. People with chronic neck/shoulder pain at baseline were more frequently non-chronic at follow-up after PCT compared with REF (p = 0.05). The PCT...... intervention appeared effective for reducing chronic neck/shoulder pain among the female cleaners. It is recommended that future interventions among similar high-risk job groups focus on the implementation aspects of the interventions to maximise outcomes more distal from the intervention such as work ability......Only a few workplace initiatives among cleaners have been reported, even though they constitute a job group in great need of health promotion. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of either physical coordination training or cognitive behavioural training on musculoskeletal pain...

  14. Exploring attentional bias for real-world, pain-related information in chronic musculoskeletal pain using a novel change detection paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoth, Daniel E; Ma, Yizhu; Liossi, Christina

    2015-08-01

    Attentional biases for pain-related words and images have commonly been reported in individuals with chronic pain. In former studies, however, pain-related stimuli have been presented without context, for example, facial expressions of pain with no accompanying information regarding the location, severity, or cause of pain or injury. The present study investigated attentional biases for pain-related information using complex, real-world scenes in an ecologically valid experimental paradigm. Participants with chronic musculoskeletal pain (n=20) and healthy, pain-free controls (n=23) completed a version of the change detection paradigm, the flicker task, which requires participants to detect a single difference between 2 otherwise identical versions of the same scene. These change-scenes were presented in a continuous cycle for approximately 3 minutes, with an unrelated distractor-scene interspersed between. Both pain-related and neutral scenes were used in 4 experimental conditions: change-pain/distractor-pain, change-pain/distractor-neutral, change-neutral/distractor-pain, and change-neutral/distractor-neutral. Individuals with chronic musculoskeletal pain, relative to healthy control participants, took significantly longer to detect changes when the change-scene was pain-related. Within-group analysis showed healthy control participants to take significantly longer to detect changes in neutral change-scenes compared with pain-related change-scenes. This study is the first to show individuals with chronic pain possess attentional biases for pain-related information presented as part of complex, real-world scenes. Possible future research includes the use of real-world scenes in visual-search paradigms modifying attentional biases, and exploration into the relations and effects of combined cognitive biases (eg, attention, memory, and interpretation) in chronic pain.

  15. How to explain central sensitization to patients with 'unexplained' chronic musculoskeletal pain : Practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Jo; van Wilgen, C. Paul; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; van Ittersum, Miriam; Meeus, Mira

    2011-01-01

    Central sensitization provides an evidence-based explanation for many cases of 'unexplained' chronic musculoskeletal pain. Prior to commencing rehabilitation in such cases, it is crucial to change maladaptive illness perceptions, to alter maladaptive pain cognitions and to reconceptualise pain. This

  16. Staying at work with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain : a qualitative study of workers' experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Haitze J.; Brouwer, Sandra; Groothoff, Johan W.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP) have decreased work ability. The majority, however, stays at work despite their pain. Knowledge about workers who stay at work despite chronic pain is limited, narrowing our views on work participation. The aim of this study

  17. How to explain central sensitization to patients with 'unexplained' chronic musculoskeletal pain : Practice guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Jo; van Wilgen, C. Paul; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; van Ittersum, Miriam; Meeus, Mira

    2011-01-01

    Central sensitization provides an evidence-based explanation for many cases of 'unexplained' chronic musculoskeletal pain. Prior to commencing rehabilitation in such cases, it is crucial to change maladaptive illness perceptions, to alter maladaptive pain cognitions and to reconceptualise pain. This

  18. Chronic musculoskeletal pain: review of mechanisms and biochemical biomarkers as assessed by the microdialysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdle B

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Björn Gerdle,1,2 Bijar Ghafouri,1,3 Malin Ernberg,4 Britt Larsson1,21Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Pain and Rehabilitation Centre, County Council of Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden; 3Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Dental Medicine, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, SwedenAbstract: Chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions are multifaceted, and approximately 20% of the adult population lives with severe chronic pain, with a higher prevalence in women and in lower income groups. Chronic pain is influenced by and interacts with physical, emotional, psychological, and social factors, and a biopsychosocial framework is increasingly applied in clinical practice. However, there is still a lack of assessment procedures based on the activated neurobiological pain mechanisms (ie, the biological part of the biopsychosocial model of pain, which may be a necessary step for further optimizing outcomes after treatments for patients with chronic pain. It has been suggested that chronic pain conditions are mainly driven by alterations in the central nervous system with little or no peripheral stimuli or nociception. In contrast, other authors argue that such central alterations are driven by peripheral alterations and nociceptive input. Microdialysis is an in vivo method for studying local tissue alterations and allows for sampling of substances in the interstitium of the muscle, where nociceptor free nerve endings are found close to the muscle fibers. The extracellular matrix plays a key role in physiologic functions of cells, including the primary afferent nociceptor. The present review mainly concerns the results of microdialysis studies and how they can contribute to the understanding of activated peripheral nociceptive and pain

  19. Effects of Self Stretching on Pain and Musculoskeletal Symptom of Bus Drivers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Gak, Hwang Bo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal symptoms, pain and risk of postures as well as the effects of stretching exercise on the work-related symptoms and pain of bus drivers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-one drivers were randomly recruited from a bus corporation for this study. Information about pain levels, painful regions, and general characteristics of subjects was obtained using the symptom research form (KOSHA Code H-30-2003). The level of pain was assessed ...

  20. Sleep, stress, neurocognitive profile and healthrelated quality of life in adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Molina; Flávia Heloísa Dos Santos; Terreri,Maria Teresa R. A.; Melissa Mariti Fraga; Simone Guerra Silva; Hilário,Maria Odete E.; Len, Claudio A. [UNIFESP

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to measure levels of sleep, stress, and depression, as well as health-related quality of life, and to assess the neurocognitive profiles in a sample of adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: Nineteen adolescents with idiopathic musculoskeletal pain and 20 age-matched healthy control subjects were evaluated regarding their levels of sleep and stress, as well as quality of life, and underwent neurocognitive testing. RESULTS: The sample...

  1. From acute musculoskeletal pain to chronic widespread pain and fibromyalgia: application of pain neurophysiology in manual therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Van Houdenhove, Boudewijn

    2009-02-01

    During the past decade, scientific research has provided new insight into the development from an acute, localised musculoskeletal disorder towards chronic widespread pain/fibromyalgia (FM). Chronic widespread pain/FM is characterised by sensitisation of central pain pathways. An in-depth review of basic and clinical research was performed to design a theoretical framework for manual therapy in these patients. It is explained that manual therapy might be able to influence the process of chronicity in three different ways. (I) In order to prevent chronicity in (sub)acute musculoskeletal disorders, it seems crucial to limit the time course of afferent stimulation of peripheral nociceptors. (II) In the case of chronic widespread pain and established sensitisation of central pain pathways, relatively minor injuries/trauma at any locations are likely to sustain the process of central sensitisation and should be treated appropriately with manual therapy accounting for the decreased sensory threshold. Inappropriate pain beliefs should be addressed and exercise interventions should account for the process of central sensitisation. (III) However, manual therapists ignoring the processes involved in the development and maintenance of chronic widespread pain/FM may cause more harm then benefit to the patient by triggering or sustaining central sensitisation.

  2. Clinical course and prognosis of musculoskeletal pain in patients referred for physiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Vos Andersen, Nils-Bo; Kent, Peter; Hjort, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Danish patients with musculoskeletal disorders are commonly referred for primary care physiotherapy treatment but little is known about their general health status, pain diagnoses, clinical course and prognosis. The objectives of this study were to 1) describe the clinical course...... of patients with musculoskeletal disorders referred to physiotherapy, 2) identify predictors associated with a satisfactory outcome, and 3) determine the influence of the primary pain site diagnosis relative to those predictors. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study of patients (n = 2,706) newly...... referred because of musculoskeletal pain to 30 physiotherapy practices from January 2012 to May 2012. Data were collected via a web-based questionnaire 1-2 days prior to the first physiotherapy consultation and at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months, from clinical records (including primary musculoskeletal symptom...

  3. Coping with Musculoskeletal Pain: Implications for Office Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztug, Ozhan; Cowie, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to understand how office workers cope with back, neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders at work (and their implications for work). A small (N = 120) questionnaire survey collected information about potential participants' background and history of musculoskeletal disorders. These data were used to inform…

  4. The effect of neuroscience education on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Butler, David S; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of neuroscience education (NE) for pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental studies including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized clinical trials, and case series evaluating the effect of NE on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress for chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional limitations: studies published in English, published within the last 10 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures of pain, disability, anxiety, and stress. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. This review includes 8 studies comprising 6 high-quality RCTs, 1 pseudo-RCT, and 1 comparative study involving 401 subjects. Most articles were of good quality, with no studies rated as poor or fair. Heterogeneity across the studies with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, established compelling evidence that NE may be effective in reducing pain ratings, increasing function, addressing catastrophization, and improving movement in chronic MSK pain. For chronic MSK pain disorders, there is compelling evidence that an educational strategy addressing neurophysiology and neurobiology of pain can have a positive effect on pain, disability, catastrophization, and

  5. The efficacy of pain neuroscience education on musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Zimney, Kory; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina

    2016-07-01

    Systematic review of randomized control trials (RCTs) for the effectiveness of pain neuroscience education (PNE) on pain, function, disability, psychosocial factors, movement, and healthcare utilization in individuals with chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on 11 databases. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental RCTs evaluating the effect of PNE on chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional Limitations: Studies published in English, published within the last 20 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Study quality of the 13 RCTs used in this review was assessed by 2 reviewers using the PEDro scale. Narrative summary of results is provided for each study in relation to outcomes measurements and effectiveness. Current evidence supports the use of PNE for chronic MSK disorders in reducing pain and improving patient knowledge of pain, improving function and lowering disability, reducing psychosocial factors, enhancing movement, and minimizing healthcare utilization.

  6. Psychological stress and musculoskeletal pain: the moderating effect of childhood and adulthood trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, April

    2015-01-01

    The aetiology of widespread musculoskeletal pain is complex. Psychological stress is a robust predictor of symptom onset and persistence but not everyone who experiences stress goes on to develop widespread pain. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to ascertain whether individuals with a history of trauma have an increased susceptibility to widespread pain when they experience psychological stress; to identify psychosocial mediators of the stress pain relationship, and ascerta...

  7. Effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, DeokJu; Cho, MiLim; Park, Yunhee; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain. [Subjects] Between September 2, 2013 and November 3, 2013, an exercise program was performed in 88 students from S University in K city (male students, n = 34; female students, n = 54). [Methods] The exercise program for posture correction was performed for 20 minutes per session, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Pain levels were measured using a pain scale, and pain levels be...

  8. Has the prevalence of invalidating musculoskeletal pain changed over the last 15 years (1993-2006)? A Spanish population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Silvia; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Villanueva-Martínez, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to estimate the prevalence and time trend of invalidating musculoskeletal pain in the Spanish population and its association with socio-demographic factors, lifestyle habits, self-reported health status, and comorbidity with other diseases analyzing data from 1993-2006 Spanish National Health Surveys (SNHS). We analyzed individualized data taken from the SNHS conducted in 1993 (n = 20,707), 2001 (n = 21,058), 2003 (n = 21,650) and 2006 (n = 29,478). Invalidating musculoskeletal pain was defined as pain suffered from the preceding 2 weeks that decreased main working activity or free-time activity by at least half a day. We analyzed socio-demographic characteristics, self-perceived health status, lifestyle habits, and comorbid conditions using multivariate logistic regression models. Overall, the prevalence of invalidating musculoskeletal pain in Spanish adults was 6.1% (95% CI, 5.7-6.4) in 1993, 7.3% (95% CI, 6.9-7.7) in 2001, 5.5% (95% CI, 5.1-5.9) in 2003 and 6.4% (95% CI 6-6.8) in 2006. The prevalence of invalidating musculoskeletal pain among women was almost twice that of men in every year (P postural hygiene, physical exercise, and how to prevent obesity and sedentary lifestyle habits should be provided by Public Health Services. This population-based study indicates that invalidating musculoskeletal pain that reduces main working activity is a public health problem in Spain. The prevalence of invalidating musculoskeletal pain was higher in women than in men and associated to lower income, poor sleeping, worse self-reported health status, and other comorbid conditions. Further, the prevalence of invalidating musculoskeletal pain increased from 1993 to 2001, but remained stable from the last years (2001 to 2006).

  9. Pattern and Pain Assessment of Musculoskeletal Disorders Attending to Physiotherapy Services in Selected Physiotherapy Centres of Dhaka City

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ruhul Amin; Sanjida Akhter; Kazi Afzalur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, affecting hundreds of millions of people around the world. Among different modalities of treatment and management for musculoskeletal pain, physiotherapy might be cost-effective. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the pattern and pain assessment of musculoskeletal disorders attending to physiotherapy services in selected physiotherapy centers of Dhaka city. ...

  10. Treatment expectations among adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and their parents before an initial pain clinic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guite, Jessica W.; Kim, Sohee; Chen, Chia-Pei; Sherker, Jennifer L.; Sherry, David D.; Rose, John B.; Hwang, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To understand expectations regarding treatment recommendations among treatment-seeking adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain and their parents. Methods A total of 102 adolescent-parent dyads were recruited at the time of initial contact with a multidisciplinary pain management clinic. Each participant completed reports of adolescent pain intensity and disability, biopsychosocial perspective of pain, and treatment expectations related to recommendations and feedback for a vignette description of an adolescent presenting at an initial multidisciplinary pain clinic evaluation. Results Descriptive findings for individual treatment expectations and adolescent-parent dyad agreement statistics were examined. Slight to fair levels of agreement occurred for 50% of the expectations assessed. The strongest shared expectations were for recommendations to return to school, pursue psychological counseling, and pursue PT/OT treatment. Stronger agreement occurred for items reflecting alternative, emotional, behavioral, and activity recommendations with weaker agreement for medical interventions (eg, medication and surgery). Correlations emerged between individual expectations and adolescent pain intensity, disability, with the greatest number of significant relationships found for adolescent and parent expectations and biopsychosocial perspectives of pain. Discussion Our results document that adolescents and parents show modest levels of agreement on expectations for treatment at the time of an initial pain clinic evaluation. This may relate to expectations being internal perspectives not clearly expressed within families; thus, the initial treatment consultation may provide an important opportunity to create and align appropriate expectations. Implications of our findings are considered with respect to education, treatment, and future research to understand factors that contribute to treatment adherence and outcomes. PMID:23446075

  11. [Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis. Differential diagnosis of "common" musculoskeletal pain during pregnancy and lactation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, U; Clauss, M; Bürki, N; Lutz, T; Ilchmann, T

    2010-11-01

    Musculoskeletal pain during pregnancy and lactation is a common finding. Differential diagnoses range from"normal" findings to disturbances in bone metabolism and pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO). Imaging options are limited due to pregnancy, and laboratory diagnostics are time-consuming. Treatment of PAO with physiotherapy, pain killers and substitution of vitamin D and calcium leads to a rapid recovery from symptoms.

  12. Basal inflammation and innate immune response in chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, E.; Vogelzangs, N.; MacFarlane, G.J.; Geenen, R.; Smit, J.H.; Dekker, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system may play a role in chronic pain, although study findings are inconsistent. This cross-sectional study examined whether basal inflammatory markers and the innate immune response are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain.

  13. Trajectories of musculoskeletal shoulder pain after spinal cord injury : Identification and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriks-Hoogland, Inge E.; Hoekstra, Trynke; de Groot, Sonja; Stucki, Gerold; Post, Marcel W.; van der Woude, Lucas H.

    Objective/Background: Although shoulder pain is a problem in up to 86% of persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI), so far, no studies have empirically identified longitudinal patterns (trajectories) of musculoskeletal shoulder pain after SCI. The objective of this study was: (1) to identify distinct

  14. Reconstruction of the decision-making process in assessing musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Vach, Werner; Hartvigsen, Jan;

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the most important determinants from the patient history and clinical examination in diagnosing musculoskeletal chest pain (MSCP) in patients with acute noncardiac chest pain when supported by a structured protocol and to construct a decision tree...

  15. Effects of self stretching on pain and musculoskeletal symptom of bus drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Gak, Hwang Bo

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal symptoms, pain and risk of postures as well as the effects of stretching exercise on the work-related symptoms and pain of bus drivers. [Subjects and Methods] Eighty-one drivers were randomly recruited from a bus corporation for this study. Information about pain levels, painful regions, and general characteristics of subjects was obtained using the symptom research form (KOSHA Code H-30-2003). The level of pain was assessed on a scale of numeric rating scale (NRS) which is divided by 10. Ergonomic posture assessment was conducted using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA). Self-stretching exercise was performed for 4 weeks by the bus drivers who suffered from neck and shoulder pain. [Results] Musculoskeletal symptoms were present in the order of shoulder, neck, lower back and lower extremities. Compared with other jobs, the final score, and the action level of bus drivers were very high, showing 57.6% of action levels 3 and 4. A statistically significant decrease of pain was shown after the self-stretching intervention. There was also a significant decrease of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulders after the self-stretching exercise. [Conclusion] Performing stretching for musculoskeletal symptoms had a positive influence on the symptoms and reduced pain.

  16. Trajectories of musculoskeletal shoulder pain after spinal cord injury : Identification and predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriks-Hoogland, Inge E.; Hoekstra, Trynke; de Groot, Sonja; Stucki, Gerold; Post, Marcel W.; van der Woude, Lucas H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/Background: Although shoulder pain is a problem in up to 86% of persons with a spinal cord injury (SCI), so far, no studies have empirically identified longitudinal patterns (trajectories) of musculoskeletal shoulder pain after SCI. The objective of this study was: (1) to identify distinct

  17. Extensive validation of the pain disability index in 3 groups of patients with musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soer, Remko; Köke, Albère J A; Vroomen, Patrick C A J; Stegeman, Patrick; Smeets, Rob J E M; Coppes, Maarten H; Reneman, Michiel F

    2013-04-20

    A cross-sectional study design was performed. To validate the pain disability index (PDI) extensively in 3 groups of patients with musculoskeletal pain. The PDI is a widely used and studied instrument for disability related to various pain syndromes, although there is conflicting evidence concerning factor structure, test-retest reliability, and missing items. Additionally, an official translation of the Dutch language version has never been performed. For reliability, internal consistency, factor structure, test-retest reliability and measurement error were calculated. Validity was tested with hypothesized correlations with pain intensity, kinesiophobia, Rand-36 subscales, Depression, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, Quality of Life, and Work Status. Structural validity was tested with independent backward translation and approval from the original authors. One hundred seventy-eight patients with acute back pain, 425 patients with chronic low back pain and 365 with widespread pain were included. Internal consistency of the PDI was good. One factor was identified with factor analyses. Test-retest reliability was good for the PDI (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.76). Standard error of measurement was 6.5 points and smallest detectable change was 17.9 points. Little correlations between the PDI were observed with kinesiophobia and depression, fair correlations with pain intensity, work status, and vitality and moderate correlations with the Rand-36 subscales and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. The PDI-Dutch language version is internally consistent as a 1-factor structure, and test-retest reliable. Missing items seem high in sexual and professional items. Using the PDI as a 2-factor questionnaire has no additional value and is unreliable.

  18. Psychosocial Work Factors and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Cross-Sectional Study among Swedish Flight Baggage Handlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva L. Bergsten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Flight baggage handlers sort and load luggage to airplanes. This study aimed at investigating associations between psychosocial exposures and low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs among Swedish flight baggage handlers. Methods. A questionnaire addressing MSDs (Standardized Nordic Questionnaire and psychosocial factors (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, COPSOQ was answered by 525 baggage handlers in six Swedish airports. Results. Low back (LBP and shoulder pain (SP were reported by 70% and 60%, respectively. Pain was reported to interfere with work (PIW by 30% (low back and 18% (shoulders, and intense pain (PINT occurred in 34% and 28% of the population. Quality of leadership was the most dissatisfying psychosocial factor, while the most positive was social community at work. Low ratings in the combined domain Work organization and job content were significantly associated with PIW in both low back and shoulders (Adjusted Hazard Ratios 3.65 (95% CI 1.67–7.99 and 2.68 (1.09–6.61 while lower ratings in the domain Interpersonal relations and leadership were associated with PIW LBP (HR 2.18 (1.06–4.49 and PINT LBP and SP (HRs 1.95 (1.05–3.65 and 2.11 (1.08–4.12. Conclusion. Severity of pain among flight baggage handlers was associated with psychosocial factors at work, suggesting that they may be a relevant target for intervention in this occupation.

  19. Perceived Injustice Moderates the Relationship between Pain and Depressive Symptoms among Individuals with Persistent Musculoskeletal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney Scott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Numerous investigations report that depressive symptoms frequently coexist with persistent pain. However, evidence suggests that symptoms of depression are not an inevitable consequence of pain. Diathesis-stress formulations suggest that psychological factors interact with the stress of pain to heighten the risk of depressive symptoms. Perceptions of injustice have recently emerged as a factor that may interact with the stress of pain to increase depressive symptoms.

  20. The influence of perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain on work performance and work ability in Swedish health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegård, A; Larsman, P; Hadzibajramovic, E; Ahlborg, G

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of perceived stress and musculoskeletal ache/pain, separately and in combination, at baseline, on self-rated work ability and work performance at two-year follow-up. Survey data were collected with a 2-year interval. Health care workers participating at both waves were included. Inclusion criteria were good self-reported work ability and unchanged self-rated work performance at baseline, resulting in 770 participants; 617 women and 153 men. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed using the question "How often do you experience pain in joints and muscles, including the neck and low back?", perceived stress with a modified version of a single item from the QPS-Nordic questionnaire, work performance by the question "Have your work performance changed during the preceding 12 months?" and work ability by a single item from the work ability index. Associations between baseline data and the two outcomes at follow-up were analysed by means of the log binomial model and expressed as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). A combination of frequent musculoskeletal pain and perceived stress constituted the highest risk for reporting decreased work performance (RR 1.7; CI 1.28-2.32) and reduced work ability (RR 1.7; CI 1.27-2.30) at follow-up. Separately, frequent pain, but not stress, was clearly associated with both outcomes. The results imply that proactive workplace interventions in order to maintain high work performance and good work ability should include measures to promote musculoskeletal well-being for the employees and measures, both individual and organizational, to minimize the risk of persistent stress reactions.

  1. Orofacial pain--Part I: Assessment and management of musculoskeletal and neuropathic causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlani, Eleni; Balciunas, Birute A; Grace, Edward G

    2005-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a common complaint, affecting the lives of millions of people around the world. Chronic orofacial pain often constitutes a challenging diagnostic problem that can be complicated by psychosocial factors and typically requires multidisciplinary treatment approaches. The fundamental prerequisite for successful management of orofacial pain is an accurate diagnosis. Generating a differential diagnosis, which will ultimately lead to a definite diagnosis, requires thorough knowledge of the diagnostic range of orofacial pain. There is a vast array of orofacial pain categories including: (1) musculoskeletal, (2) neuropathic, (3) vascular, (4) neurovascular, (5) idiopathic, (6) pain caused by local, distant, or systemic pathology, and (7) psychogenic. This article presents the salient clinical features and the therapeutic approaches for the various subtypes of musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain. Musculoskeletal pain is the most prevalent orofacial pain, with temporomandibular disorders and tension-type headache being the main examples. Neuropathic pain develops secondary to neural injury and/or irritation and can be distinguished into episodic, including trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, as well as continuous, such as herpetic and postherpetic neuralgia, traumatic neuralgia, and Eagle's syndrome.

  2. Chronic musculoskeletal pain in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo; Meirleir, Kenny De

    2007-05-01

    In addition to debilitating fatigue the majority of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) experience chronic widespread pain. Conducting a systematic review to critically assess the existing knowledge on chronic pain in CFS. We focussed on the definition, the prevalence and incidence, the aetiology, the relevance and the therapy strategy for chronic musculoskeletal pain and post-exertional pain in CFS. To identify relevant articles, we searched eight medical search engines. The search terms "chronic fatigue syndrome" AND "pain", "nociception", "arthralgia" and "myalgia", were used to identify articles concerning pain in CFS. Included articles were reviewed by two blinded researchers. Twenty-five articles and two abstract were identified and selected for further appraisal. Only 11 search results focussed on musculoskeletal pain in CFS patients. Regarding the standardized review of the articles, a 96% agreement between the researchers was observed. There is no consensus in defining chronic widespread pain in CFS, and although there is little or no strong proof for the exact prevalence, chronic pain is strongly disabling in CFS. Aetiological theories are proposed (sleep abnormalities, tryptophan, parovirus-B, hormonal and brain abnormalities and central sensitisation) and a reduction of pain threshold after exercise has been shown. Furthermore depression seemed not related to pain in CFS and a staphylococcus toxoid vaccine caused no significant pain reduction. The results from the systematic review highlight the clinical importance of chronic pain in CFS, but only few studies addressing the aetiology or treatment of chronic pain in CFS are currently available.

  3. Psychological Distress and Pain Reporting in Australian Coal Miners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy N. Carlisle

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The study findings support the existence of widespread musculoskeletal pain among the coal-mining workforce, and this pain is associated with increased psychological distress. Operators (truck drivers and workers reporting poor sleep quality during work periods are most likely to report increased distress, which highlights the importance of supporting the mining workforce for sustained productivity.

  4. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Francisco; Gonzales, Boris; Bayo, Miguel Ángel; Luna, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) is a very common symptom in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics associated with CMP in patients with advanced CKD not on dialysis, and to analyse their relation with other uraemic symptoms and their prognosis significance. Cross-sectional study to analyse the uraemic symptoms of an unselected cohort of patients with CKD stage 4-5 pre-dialysis. In order to characterise patients with CMP, demographic and anthropometric data were collected, as well as data on comorbidities and kidney function. In addition, inflammatory parameters, uric parameters, bone mineral metabolism including 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-OHCC), creatine kinase and drugs of potential interest including allopurinol, statins and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents were recorded. The study group consisted of 1169 patients (mean age 65±15 years, 54% male). A total of 38% of patients complained of CMP, and this symptom was more prevalent in women than in men (49 vs. 28%; P<.0001). Muscle weakness, pruritus, muscle cramps, ecchymosis, insomnia, oedema and dyspnoea were the most common symptoms associated with CMP. There were no significant associations between serum levels of creatine kinase, 25-OHCC, treatment with allopurinol, statins or erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and CMP. The female gender, elderly age, obesity, comorbidity (mainly diabetes, heart failure or COPD), and elevated levels of inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and non-neutrophilic leukocytes) were the best determinants of CMP. While patients with CMP showed a worse survival rate, a multivariate analysis adjusted for demographic data ruled out the independent association of CMP with mortality. CMP is highly prevalent in patients with advanced CKD and is associated with other common symptoms of chronic uraemia. As with the general population, elderly age, the

  5. Young people's experiences of persistent musculoskeletal pain, needs, gaps and perceptions about the role of digital technologies to support their co-care: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Joanne E; Chua, Jason; Schütze, Robert; Wark, John D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate young people's experiences of persistent musculoskeletal pain, including care needs and current service gaps as well as perceptions about the role of digital technologies to support their co-care. Methods A qualitative study employing two independent data collection modes: in-depth individual semistructured interviews and focus groups. Setting Community settings throughout Australia. Participants Participants were included if they had experienced persistent musculoskeletal pain of >3-month duration with an average of ≥3 on the visual analogue scale over the preceding 3 months, including non-specific conditions (eg, low back pain) and specific conditions (eg, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other systemic arthritides), with/without pre-existing or current diagnosed mental health conditions. 23 young people (87.0% women; mean (SD) age: 20.8 (2.4) years) from across 6 Australian jurisdictions participated. Almost two-thirds of participants with persistent musculoskeletal pain reported comorbid mental health conditions. Main outcome measures Inductive and deductive approaches to analyse and derive key themes from verbatim transcripts. Results Participants described their daily experiences of living with persistent musculoskeletal pain, their fears and the challenges imposed by the invisibility of pain, and the two-way relationship between their pain and mental well-being. A lack of relevant and accessible information and resources tailored to young people's unique needs, integrated and youth-relevant healthcare services and adequately skilled healthcare practitioners were identified as key care gaps. Participants strongly advocated for the use of digital technologies to improve access to age-appropriate resources and support for co-care. Conclusions Young people living with persistent musculoskeletal pain described the absence of age-appropriate pain services and clearly articulated their perceptions on the role of, and opportunities

  6. Taking responsibility for the early assessment and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Nadine E; Hartvigsen, Jan; Croft, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Musculoskeletal pain is common across all populations and costly in terms of impact on the individual and, more generally, on society. In most health-care systems, the first person to see the patient with a musculoskeletal problem such as back pain is the general practitioner, and access...... to other professionals such as physiotherapists, chiropractors, or osteopaths is still either largely controlled by a traditional medical model of referral or left to self-referral by the patient. In this paper, we examine the arguments for the general practitioner-led model and consider the arguments...

  7. Central hyperexcitability as measured with nociceptive flexor reflex threshold in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Edwin Choon Wyn; Sterling, Michele; Stone, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal conditions are increasingly conceived as involving altered central nervous system processing, and impaired nociceptive flexor reflex (NFR) appears to reflect altered central nervous system processing. The primary objective was to synthesize the evidence for impaired NFR in these conditions. The secondary objective was to evaluate the NFR stimuli parameters employed by reviewed studies. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library were searched from the mid-1960s to June 2010. Experimental reports were systematically reviewed and meta-analysis (where possible) was performed. NFR thresholds and parameters of NFR stimuli were extracted. Sixteen trials were identified, 11 of which were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Compared to healthy controls, standardized mean differences in NFR threshold were significantly lower in subjects with primary headache (-0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.77 to -0.13, P=0.005), fibromyalgia (-0.63; 95% CI -0.93 to -0.34, Ppain (-1.51; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.93, Pcentral hyperexcitability in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Our review also suggests that shorter inter-pulse duration tends to yield smaller variability in NFR threshold. However, further research investigating optimal stimulation parameters is still warranted.

  8. Musculoskeletal pain among critical-care nurses by availability and use of patient lifting equipment: an analysis of cross-sectional survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Jeong; Faucett, Julia; Gillen, Marion; Krause, Niklas

    2013-12-01

    Patient handling is a major risk factor for musculoskeletal injuries among nurses. Lifting equipment is a main component of safe patient handling programs that aim to prevent musculoskeletal injury. However, the actual levels of lift availability and usage are far from optimal. To examine the effect of patient lifting equipment on musculoskeletal pain by level of lift availability and lift use among critical-care nurses. A cross-sectional postal survey of a random sample of 361 critical-care nurses in the United States. The survey collected data on low-back, neck, and shoulder pain, lift availability, lift use, physical and psychosocial job factors, and sociodemographics. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by three types of measures: any pain, work-related pain, and major pain. Multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the associations between musculoskeletal pain and lift variables, controlling for demographic and job factors. Less than half (46%) of respondents reported that their employer provided lifts. Of 168 nurses who had lifts in their workplace, the level of lift availability was high for 59.5%, medium for 25.0%, and low for 13.7%; the level of lift use was high for 32.1%, medium for 31.5%, and low for 31.5%. Significant associations were found between lift availability and work-related low-back and shoulder pain. Compared to nurses without lifts, nurses reporting high-level lift availability were half as likely to have work-related low-back pain (OR=0.50, 95% CI 0.26-0.96) and nurses reporting medium-level lift availability were 3.6 times less likely to have work-related shoulder pain (OR=0.28, 95% CI 0.09-0.91). With respect to lift use, work-related shoulder pain was three times less common among nurses reporting medium-level use (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.12-0.93); any neck pain was three times more common among nurses reporting low-level use (OR=3.13, 95% CI 1.19-8.28). Greater availability and use of lifts were associated with less

  9. Development and Validation of the Keele Musculoskeletal Patient Reported Outcome Measure (MSK-PROM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C Hill

    Full Text Available To develop and validate a patient report outcome measure (PROM for clinical practice that can monitor health status of patients with a range of musculoskeletal (MSK disorders.Constructs for inclusion in the MSK-PROM were identified from a consensus process involving patients with musculoskeletal conditions, clinicians, purchasers of healthcare services, and primary care researchers. Psychometric properties of the brief tool, including face and construct validity, repeatability and responsiveness were assessed in a sample of patients with musculoskeletal pain consulting physiotherapy services in the United Kingdom (n=425.The consensus process identified 10 prioritised domains for monitoring musculoskeletal health status: pain intensity, quality of life, physical capacity, interference with social/leisure activities, emotional well-being, severity of most difficult thing, activities and roles, understanding independence, and overall impact. As the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L is a widely adopted PROMs tool and covers the first four domains listed, to reduce patient burden to a minimum the MSK-PROM was designed to capture the remaining six prioritised domains which are not measured by the EQ-5D-5L. The tool demonstrated excellent reliability, construct validity, responsiveness and acceptability to patients and clinicians for use in clinical practice.We have validated a brief patient reported outcome measure (MSK-PROM for use in clinical practice to measure musculoskeletal health status and monitor outcomes over time using domains that are meaningful to patients and sensitive to change. Further work will establish whether the MSK-PROM is useful in other musculoskeletal healthcare settings.

  10. Persistent musculoskeletal pain and productive employment; a systematic review of interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakman, Jodi; Keegel, Tessa; Kinsman, Natasha; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-03-01

    A systematic analysis of the literature was undertaken to determine which characteristics of workplace interventions are most effective in assisting people with persistent musculoskeletal pain (PMP) to remain productively employed. Databases of Medline, PsychINFO, CINAHL and Embase were searched using MeSH and other relevant terms. Studies that reported on interventions at, or involving, the workplace were included. Interventions were considered as either focused on the individual or multilevel. Outcome measures assessed included: job loss, productivity, sick leave, pain and cost benefit. A quality assessment was undertaken using GRADE criteria with development of impact statements to synthesise the results. Eighteen relevant articles (14 studies) were identified for inclusion in the review. No high-level evidence for workplace interventions to assist people with PMP were identified. Low numbers of participants and limited studies resulted in downgrading of evidence. However, individually focused interventions will probably reduce job loss and sick leave, but are unlikely to reduce pain. Multilevel focused interventions will probably result in decreased sick leave and provide some cost benefit. The evidence on productivity was limited and of poor quality. Further research is required because sustainable employment for individuals with PMP is important and understanding what works is necessary to ensure effective workplace interventions are developed.

  11. Musculoskeletal pain in Arctic indigenous and non-indigenous adolescents, prevalence and associations with psychosocial factors: A population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Eckhoff, Christian; Kvernmo, Siv

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in otherwise healthy adolescents. In recent years widespread musculoskeletal pain, in contrast to single site pain, and associating factors has been emphasized. Musculoskeletal pain has not been examined in Arctic indigenous adolescents. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of widespread musculoskeletal pain and its association with psychosocial factors, with emphasis on gender- and ethnic differences (Sami vs. non-Sami), and the influence of pain rela...

  12. Prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen - results from a cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Østergaard, Helle; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    compared to low work load. Multinomial logistic regression models showed that workload was the only predictor for all pain sites, in particular regarding upper and lower limb pain. CONCLUSION: Although changes were implemented to improve the fishermen's work environment, the work continues to be physically......BACKGROUND: Fishermen work in a physically challenging work environment. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey in a random sample of Danish fishermen was done with application...... of the Nordic questionnaire regarding musculoskeletal pain considering lower back, shoulders, hand neck, knee, upper back elbow, hip and feet. In total, 270 fishermen participated in the study (response rate: 28%). Workload, vessel type, skipper, duration of work, sideline occupation, days/weeks of fishing...

  13. Musculoskeletal pain in Dentistry students - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p150

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Rocha de Siqueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive study of observational and cross-sectional approach in which was used an Ergonomics and Posture Questionnaire for Dentists adapted by the researchers, associated with the Cooler Quiz. The sample comprised 43 students who attended between the 6th, 8th and 10th academic periods. The data were submitted to descriptive analysis and expressed as percentages, means and standard deviations, also maximum and minimum. For the comparative analysis between the variables, we used the chi-square test, chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher exact test, when necessary, considering the significance level of 5%. Results: Among the students surveyed 20 (46.51% were men and 23 (53.5% women with a mean age of 23.14 ± 10.24 years, maximum of 35 years and minimum of 19. It was found that 40 (93.02% reported pain in some part of the body, 23 (53.5% in the upper limbs, 20 (46.5% in the lower limbs and 37 (86% in axial skeleton, with no difference between genders (p = 0.59. Pain intensity was classified as mild 10 (25%, moderate 21(52.5% and severe 7 (17.5%. In the assessment we evidenced the direct correlation between the hours of trainning and the intensity of pain. Conclusions: The results of the survey showed that the students assessed developed high frequency of musculoskeletal pain and that pain was associated with hours of daily training held during graduation at the dental clinic.

  14. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain among postgraduate students and faculties of dental colleges in Bengaluru city, India: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vanishree

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are problems of the musculoskeletal system that significantly cost workplace problems thus affecting occupational health, productivity, and career of the working population. Dentists are prone to many work related occupational hazards. Aim: To assess the prevalence and distribution of symptoms of MSD among postgraduates and faculties attached to dental colleges in Bengaluru city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among all the postgraduate students and faculties working in various dental colleges of Bengaluru city, India. A self-administered questionnaire was used for recording demographic data and to collect information related to musculoskeletal symptoms and the location of musculoskeletal pain among dentists in Bengaluru city. The data were collected compiled and analyzed using SPSS software version 21. Descriptive statistics was done. The findings were compared across study subjects using Chi-square test and Spearman correlation. Results: The prevalence of MSD among males was 40.25% and females were 59.75% and this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.03. The symptoms were higher in dentists practicing for more than 10 years. Lower back pain and shoulder pain were the most commonly reported complaints by dentists. The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was 41.35% for dentists in the age group of 26–30 years. The frequency of musculoskeletal pain among female dentists was nearly double that of males (P = 0.009. Conclusion: This study suggests that dentists in Bengaluru do experience a certain amount of occupation-related health problems. The study found overall high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms (64% among dentists in Bengaluru city.

  15. Factors promoting staying at work in people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H.J.; Reneman, M.F.; Groothoff, J.W.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Brouwer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify determinants for staying at work (SAW) in workers with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Method: A systematic review of factors that promote SAW in workers with CMP. We searched the databases of PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included studies

  16. Work-site musculoskeletal pain risk estimates by trained observers - a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, P.; Kingma, I.; Boot, C.R.L.; Douwes, M.; Bongers, P.M.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain (MSP) risk assessments by trained observers are often used in ergonomic practice; however, the validity may be questionable. We investigated the predictive value of work-site MSP risk estimates in a prospective cohort study of 1745 workers. Trained observers estimat

  17. Work-site musculoskeletal pain risk estimates by trained observers - a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, P.; Kingma, I.; Boot, C.R.L.; Douwes, M.; Bongers, P.M.; Dieën, J.H. van

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal pain (MSP) risk assessments by trained observers are often used in ergonomic practice; however, the validity may be questionable. We investigated the predictive value of work-site MSP risk estimates in a prospective cohort study of 1745 workers. Trained observers

  18. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia: effective therapy for musculoskeletal pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2007-12-01

    Acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting and for postoperative dental pain. Several recent randomized trials have provided strong evidence for beneficial AP effects on chronic low-back pain and pain from knee osteoarthritis. For many other chronic pain conditions, including headaches, neck pain, and fibromyalgia, the evidence supporting AP's efficacy is less convincing. AP's effects on experimental pain appear to be mediated by analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes considerable time to develop and to resolve. Thus, some of the long-term effects of AP analgesia cannot be explained by placebo mechanisms. Furthermore, it appears that some forms of AP are more effective for providing analgesia than others. Particularly, electro-AP seems best to activate powerful opioid and non-opioid analgesic mechanisms.

  19. Measuring Musculoskeletal Pain in Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaleff, Zoe A; Kamper, Steven J; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2017-01-01

    , developmental stage, ability to communicate), and the context in which the interaction takes place (eg, familiarity with the setting and physiological and psychological state). As a result, pain is frequently not assessed or measured during the consultation, and in many instances, is underestimated...... and undertreated in this population. The purpose of this paper is to provide clinicians with an overview of scales that can be used to measure pain in infants, children, and adolescents. Specifically, the paper reviews the various approaches to measure pain intensity, identifies factors that can influence the pain...... experience, expression, and assessment in infants, children, and adolescents, provides age appropriate suggestions for measuring pain intensity in patients with and without cognitive impairment, and identifies ways to assess the impact of pain using multidimensional pain scales. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther...

  20. Fantom pain: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Sanja S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Phantom limb pain is a common problem after limb amputation (41-85%. It is described as an extremely painful sensation in the missing part of the body that can last for hours, days or even years. It is considered to arise from cortical reorganization, although many factors can increase the risk of phantom limb pain: pain before surgery, age and sex of the patients, the time elapsed since surgery, stump pain, inadequate prosthesis. Phantom limb pain therapy is very complicated. Case report We reported a case of 80-year-old patient suffering from phantom limb pain and phantom sensation 25 years after the amputation of his left leg due to the injury. The patient has pain at the site of amputation, sensation that he has the leg and that it occupies an unusual position and almost daily exhausting phantom limb pain (6-9 visual analogue scale - VAS with disturbed sleep and mood. We managed to reduce the pain under 4 VAS and decrease the patient suffering by combining drugs from the group of coanalgetics (antidepressants, antiepileptics, non-pharmacological methods (transcutaneous electroneurostimulation - TENS, mirror therapy and femoral nerve block in the place of disarticulation of the left thigh. Conclusion Phantom limb pain therapy is multimodal, exhausting for both the patient and the physician and it is often unsuccessful. The combination of different pharmacological and non-pharmacological modalities can give satisfactory therapeutic response.

  1. Effect of Individually Tailored Biopsychosocial Workplace Interventions on Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Stress Among Laboratory Technicians: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Kenneth; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Schraefel, M C; Sjogaard, Gisela; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    the change in stress as outcome. Limitations of behavioral interventions include the inability to blind participants to which intervention they receive. Self-reported outcomes are a limitation as they may be influenced by placebo effects and outcome expectations. We observed significant reductions in chronic musculoskeletal pain following a 10-week individually adjusted multifaceted intervention with physical training emphasizing dynamic joint mobility and mindfulness coupled with fear-avoidance and de-catastrophizing behavioral therapy compared to a reference group encouraged to follow on-going company health initiatives. A higher dose of physical-cognitive training appears to facilitate pain reduction, whereas a higher dose of mindfulness appears to increase pain. Hence, combining physical training with mindfulness may not be an optimal strategy for pain reduction. NCT02047669.

  2. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain syndromes in primary healthcare unit workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Diana Goldenberg Meirelles Mariano da Costa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of pain syndromes and theirrelation with stress in healthcare workers at primary healthcareunits. Methods: A total of 540 workers of 10 primary healthcareunits were assessed in partnership with the Hospital Israelita AlbertEinstein (HIAE, in São Paulo, in 2005, through the Prevalence of PainSyndromes in the General Population Survey and the Lipp’s StressSymptom Inventory for Adults. Statistical analysis was carriedthrough univariate and multivariate analyses using accurate binarylogistic regression models adjusted for the following variables: stress,sex, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Ratios were compared usingFisher-Freeman-Halton test. Results: 86.93% were women, 54.63%of females were married, the majority worked at daytime and hadattended high school. General prevalence of pain was 54.26% (56.57%of women and 38.24% of men. Schooling was inversely proportionalto onset of pain. Health agents were twice more likely to presentpain than other professionals. Pain likelihood increased by 1.98%each year, and by 20.7% within 10 years. The groups with chronicpain presented statistical significance with stress (p < 0.001.There was no statistical difference in use of medications, number ofphysiotherapy sessions and lost work days in the groups with chronicpain when compared with the group with acute pain. Both chronicand acute pain groups were statistically significant in all variableswhen compared with the group with no pain. Stress, dyslipidemiaand arterial hypertension were positively associated with pain.Employees with stress presented a 4.19-fold higher likelihood ofpresenting pain as compared to those with no stress. Conclusion:The prevalence of pain syndromes among primary healthcare unitsworkers was 54.63%, and it was influenced by schooling and stresslevels. Most workers affected were female. Preventive measuresmust be established for healthcare workers.

  3. Rapid muscle activation and force capacity in conditions of chronic musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Holtermann, Andreas; Jørgensen, Marie B

    2008-01-01

    during the stable high-force phase of maximal voluntary shoulder abduction, whereas rapid capacity was determined as the steepest slope of the torque-time and EMG-time curves, defined as rate of torque development and rate of EMG rise. Intensity of pain was registered prior to the test on a visual......-analogue-scale. FINDINGS: Peak torque was 18% lower at 115 degrees shoulder joint angle in women with myalgia compared with healthy controls (PRate of torque development was 33-54% lower (P...BACKGROUND: The association between musculoskeletal pain and decreased maximal muscle strength capacity has been extensively studied, but knowledge about functional rapid force capacity in conditions of chronic musculoskeletal pain is lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate rapid...

  4. Topical NSAIDs for chronic musculoskeletal pain: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Sheena

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A previous systematic review reported that topical NSAIDs were effective in relieving pain in chronic conditions like osteoarthritis and tendinitis. More trials, a better understanding of trial quality and bias, and a reclassification of certain drugs necessitate a new review. Methods Studies were identified by searching electronic databases, and writing to manufacturers. We identified randomised, double blind trials comparing topical NSAID with either placebo or another active treatment, in adults with chronic pain. The primary outcome was a reduction in pain of approximately 50% at two weeks, and secondary outcomes were local and systemic adverse events and adverse event-related withdrawals. Relative benefit and number-needed-to-treat (NNT, and relative harm and number-needed-to-harm (NNH were calculated, and the effects of trial quality, validity and size, outcome reported, and condition treated, were examined by sensitivity analyses. Results Twelve new trials were added to 13 trials from a previous review. Fourteen double blind placebo-controlled trials had information from almost 1,500 patients. Topical NSAID was significantly better than placebo with relative benefit 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.7 to 2.2, NNT 4.6 (95% confidence interval 3.8 to 5.9. Results were not affected by trial quality, validity or size, outcome reported, or condition treated. Three trials with 764 patients comparing a topical with an oral NSAID found no difference in efficacy. Local adverse events (6%, systemic adverse events (3%, or the numbers withdrawing due to an adverse event were the same for topical NSAID and placebo. Conclusions Topical NSAIDs were effective and safe in treating chronic musculoskeletal conditions for two weeks. Larger and longer trials are necessary to fully elucidate the place of topical NSAIDs in clinical practice.

  5. Poor sitting posture and a heavy schoolbag as contributors to musculoskeletal pain in children: an ergonomic school education intervention program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syazwan, AI; Azhar, MN Mohamad; Anita, AR; Azizan, HS; Shaharuddin, MS; Hanafiah, J Muhamad; Muhaimin, AA; Nizar, AM; Rafee, B Mohd; Ibthisham, A Mohd; Kasani, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a multidisciplinary, interventional, ergonomic education program designed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal problems by reducing schoolbag weight and correcting poor sitting posture. Methods Data were collected twice before and twice following intervention using the Standardized Nordic Body Map Questionnaire, a rapid upper limb assessment for posture evaluation, and schoolbag weight measurement in children aged 8 and 11 years attending two schools within the central region of Malaysia. Results Students who received the ergonomic intervention reported significant improvements in their sitting posture in a classroom environment and reduction of schoolbag weight as compared with the controls. Conclusion A single-session, early intervention, group ergonomics education program for children aged 8 and 11 years is appropriate and effective, and should be considered as a strategy to reduce musculoskeletal pain among schoolchildren in this age group. PMID:22003301

  6. Prevalence of cricket-related musculoskeletal pain among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International cricket studies mostly concentrate on young fast- bowlers and their ... no studies have investigated injuries and pain among schoolboy cricket players in .... the hips after the ball has been released, causing the abdominal and.

  7. Non-pharmacological treatment of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Afton L; Williams, David A

    2011-04-01

    Individuals with chronic widespread pain, including those with fibromyalgia, pose a particular challenge to treatment, given the modest effectiveness of pharmacological agents for this condition. The growing consensus indicates that the best approach to treatment involves the combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Several non-pharmacological interventions, particularly exercise and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), have garnered good evidence of effectiveness as stand-alone, adjunctive treatments for patients with chronic pain. In this article, evidenced-based, non-pharmacological management techniques for chronic widespread pain are described by using two broad categories, exercise and CBT. The evidence for decreasing pain, improving functioning and changing secondary symptoms is highlighted. Lastly, the methods by which exercise and CBT can be combined for a multi-component approach, which is consistent with the current evidence-based guidelines of several American and European medical societies, are addressed.

  8. The musculoskeletal abnormalities of the Similaun Iceman ("ÖTZI"): clues to chronic pain and possible treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, Walter F; Tocchio, Shannon; Kean, Mary; Rainsford, K D

    2013-02-01

    In 1991, a deceased human male was found frozen in a glacier pool in the Italian Alps in north west Italy, and is now carefully preserved in the South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology, in Bolzano, Italy. The bodily tissues of the 5,300 year old male (colloquially referred to as the Iceman or Ötzi) were well preserved despite damage related to freezing, and glacial movement. Associated articles of well-preserved clothing, tools, weapons and other devices were also present and have been studied in detail. Clinical examination and imaging investigations have also shown that the Icemen had experienced possible illnesses in his lifetime and had identifiable areas of arthritis and musculoskeletal injury. This report includes some key observations on the musculoskeletal state of Ötzi and reference to the involvement of tattoo markings. Some aspects about the aetiology of his abnormalities and inflammatory arthritis are considered along with possible treatments that he might have employed. We (WFK and MK) undertook a clinical musculoskeletal examination of the Iceman, details of which with available photographs and radiographic imaging pertaining to the musculoskeletal findings of the Iceman are reported here. The skin of the Iceman has numerous linear carbon tattoos, which are not of a decorative type. These have been presumed to possibly be "medicinal" tattoos administered for therapeutic reasons and may have been used in acupuncture-like treatment of pain. Spinal imaging identified areas of spinal damage and our observations have provided clues as to possible sites of spinal initiated pain and hence sites for administration of the "medicinal" tattoos. We observed body areas of the Iceman, in which imaging demonstrated arthritis and other forms of long-term musculoskeletal damage, but which do not have adjacent or corresponding "medicinal" tattoos. We contend that the back and leg "medicinal" tattoos correspond directly to sites of chronic right knee and right ankle pain

  9. Three job stress models and their relationship with musculoskeletal pain in blue- and white-collar workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herr, R.M.; Bosch, J.A.; Loerbroks, A.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Jarczok, M.N.; Fischer, J.E.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Musculoskeletal pain has been found to co-occur with psychosocial job stress. However, different conceptualizations of job stress exist, each emphasizing different aspects of the work environment, and it is unknown which of these aspects show the strongest associations with musculoskelet

  10. Cost-effectiveness of chiropractic care versus self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Sørensen, Jan; Vach, Werner;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To assess whether primary sector healthcare in the form of chiropractic care is cost-effective compared with self-management in patients with musculoskeletal chest pain, that is, a subgroup of patients with non-specific chest pain. METHODS AND RESULTS: 115 adults aged 18-75 years with acute......, non-specific chest pain of musculoskeletal origin were recruited from a cardiology department in Denmark. After ruling out acute coronary syndrome and receiving usual care, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain were randomised to 4 weeks of community-based chiropractic care (n=59) or to a single......-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36)) were compared in cost-effectiveness analyses over 12 months from baseline. Mean costs were €2183 lower for the group with chiropractic care, but not statistically significant (95% CI -4410.5 to 43.0). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio...

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of vitamin D deficiency in patients with widespread musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Çidem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is a worldwide common health problems. Vitamin D deficiency in adults has been associated with proximal muscle weakness, skeletal mineralization defect, and an increased risk of falling. Patients with vitamin D deficiency commonly complain of widespread pain in the body. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in patients complaining of widespread musculoskeletal pain. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 8457 patients with widespread musculoskeletal pain (7772 females, 685 males, aged 46.7 (range 20-100 years were included. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured with ELISA method. Patients were classified into two groups: 1 Patients with vitamin D deficiency (20 ng/ml. Results: Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was found to be 71.7%. A binary logistic regression model showed that low 25(OHVit D level was associated with gender, age and month in which 25(OH hypovitaminosis was determined. The risk of low 25(OH Vit D was found to be 2.15 times higher in female patients and 1.52 times higher on March and 1.55 times higher on April. Conclusion: This study indicates that Vitamin D deficiency should be taken into consideration in patients with widespread musculoskeletal pain, and some precautions such as sunbathe during summer should be recommended patients having risk of vitamin D deficiency. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 48-491

  12. Effectiveness of an educational intervention on levels of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy for patients with musculoskeletal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Eliza Mi-Ling; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Chair, Sek-Ying

    2010-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the effectiveness of a pain management educational intervention on level of pain, anxiety and self-efficacy among patients with musculoskeletal trauma and consequent orthopaedic surgery. Substantial evidence supports the use of preoperative education to improve patient outcomes. Educational interventions are common in preparing patients for orthopaedic surgery. A pre- and post-test design (quasi-experimental) was employed in 2006 with patients assigned either to a control (usual care) or an experimental group (usual care plus educational intervention). The 30-minute educational intervention consisted of information about pain, coping strategies and breathing relaxation exercises. The outcome measures were scores for pain, anxiety, self-efficacy, analgesic use and length of hospital stay and these were measured before surgery and on day 2, day 4, day 7, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. A total of 125 patients completed the study (control, n = 63; experimental = 62). The experimental group reported statistically significantly lower levels of pain, less anxiety and better self-efficacy during hospitalization (before surgery to day 7), as compared to the control group. The experimental group had more requests for analgesics at day 2 only. There were no statistically significant effects on length of stay. At the 3-month evaluation, a statistically significant effect on anxiety level was found in favour of the experimental group. Patients may benefit from this educational intervention in terms of relieving pain, anxiety and improving self-efficacy, and the educational intervention could be incorporated as part of routine care to prepare musculoskeletal trauma patients for surgery.

  13. Comparison of musculoskeletal pain between depressed and non-depressed industrial workers and investigation of its influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Davoudian Talab

    2015-12-01

      Conclusion: The higher score of depression among workerswith musculoskeletal pain can be due to failure in pain relief achievement. Psychological problemsthatoccurfollowingchronicpainarerelated to continuous discomfort, frustration and thinking about the pain. This situation causes the feelings of inadequacy and inefficiency and consequently the increase ofprobability of depression.

  14. Strategies for prevention and management of musculoskeletal conditions. Neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Irene; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this article was to summarise the existing evidence concerning interventions for non-specific neck pain. Neck-and-shoulder pain is commonly experienced by both adolescents and adults. Although the prevalence appears to vary among different nations, the situation is essentially the same, at least in the industrialised nations. Explanations for the wide variation in incidence and prevalence include various methodological issues. Back and neck disorders represent one of the most common causes for both short- and long-term sick leave and disability pension. Evidenced risk factors for the onset and maintenance of non-specific neck and back pain include both individual and work-related psychosocial factors. Based on the existing evidence different forms of exercise can be strongly recommended for at-risk populations, as well as for the acute and chronic non-specific neck pain patient. Furthermore, for symptom relief this condition can be treated with transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, low level laser therapy, pulse electromagnetic treatment or radiofrequency denervation.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal chest pain: design of a multi-purpose trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette J; Christensen, Henrik W; Vach, Werner

    2008-01-01

    manipulation of the cervical and thoracic spine, mobilisation, and soft tissue techniques. b) Advice promoting self-management and individual instructions focusing on posture and muscle stretch (advice group). Outcome measures are pain, physical function, overall health, self-perceived treatment effect...... may also be due to a variety of extra-cardiac disorders including dysfunction of muscles and joints of the chest wall or the cervical and thoracic part of the spine. The diagnostic approaches and treatment options for this group of patients are scarce and formal clinical studies addressing the effect...... spine, and thorax in order to determine whether the pain is likely to be of musculoskeletal origin. To describe the patients status with regards to ischemic heart disease, and to compare and indirectly validate the musculoskeletal diagnosis, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is performed in all patients...

  16. Vitamin D reduces musculoskeletal pain after infusion of zoledronic acid for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Antonino; Morabito, Nancy; Atteritano, Marco; Basile, Giorgio; Cucinotta, Domenico; Lasco, Antonino

    2012-04-01

    The acute-phase response (APR) is a frequent occurrence after infusion of zoledronic acid and is caused by activation of γδ T cells. Vitamin D receptor is expressed in immune cells, and vitamin D has immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this prospective study was to test the effect of vitamin D (cholecalciferol) on the incidence of APR and intensity of pain in women undergoing infusion of zoledronic acid for postmenopausal osteoporosis. 60 women were enrolled and randomized into two groups. At baseline, 30 women received an oral bolus of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU), while another 30 women received placebo. On day 5 both groups were treated with a single infusion of zoledronic acid (5 mg) and received a daily supplementation of calcium (1,000 mg) and vitamin D (800 IU). Patients were clinically evaluated and inflammatory markers were assayed before zoledronic acid administration and every 24 h for the following 2 days. The onset of APR has been defined by the occurrence of fever or at least one of the typical symptoms, such as musculoskeletal pain after zoledronic acid infusion. Intensity of pain was measured by a one-dimensional scale (0 = no pain, 10 = unbearable pain). APR developed in 66.6% of patients, with no significant difference between groups. The vitamin group experienced less musculoskeletal pain [median 1 (0-4) vs. 2 (1-8), P osteoporosis.

  17. Perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain are prevalent and significantly associated in adolescents : An epidemiological cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Østerås, Berit; Sigmundsson, Hermundur; Haga, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term musculoskeletal pain and negative stress are health risks with adverse long-term health effects, and these health risks seem to increase among young people. The mechanisms behind this are unclear. There is a need for a better understanding of perceived stress and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents, in order to improve health promotion and treatment approaches in this group. Methods Objectives were to evaluate the current prevalence of perceived stress and musculoskele...

  18. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiana Cristina Taubert de Freitas-Swerts; Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz Robazzi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain. METHOD: quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages...

  19. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and its association with the use of electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Saueressig,Ingrid Becker; Oliveira,Valéria Mayaly Alves de; Xavier,Michelle Katherine Andrade; Santos,Luan Ricardo Alves dos; Silva,Kelvin Mikael Araújo; Araújo,Rodrigo Cappato de

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of electronic devices has reconfigured the daily life of adolescents; however, their excessive use may be associated to health problems. This study aimed at observing the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among adolescents and its association with the use of computers and videogames. METHODS: Sample was made up of 265 adolescents of both genders (14 to 19 years old), students of a public school, who have answered a questionnaire about the use of el...

  20. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in adolescents and association with computer and videogame use

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study investigated the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in high school adolescents from public schools and its association with electronic device use. Methods: The sample consisted of 961 boys and girls aged 14–19 years who answered a questionnaire regarding the use of computers and electronic games, and questions about pain symptoms and physical activity. Furthermore, anthropometric assessments of all volunteers were performed. The chi-squared test and a ...

  1. Organizing workplace health literacy to reduce musculoskeletal pain and consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Konring; Holtermann, Andreas; Mortensen, Ole Steen

    2015-01-01

    for communication and action about pain prevention in the organization. 2) Organizing a fixed 3-weekly structured dialogue between each employee and her/his supervisor, with particular focus on developing specific plans to prevent and reduce pain and its consequences. This enables the workplace to generate...... knowledge about employee resources and health challenges and to act and convey this knowledge into initiatives at the workplace. DISCUSSION: Previous studies to improve health literacy have primarily targeted patients or specific deprived groups in health care or community settings. Recently the idea...... workplace health literacy is very limited but points at the importance of educating employees to be able to access, appraise and apply health information and of organizing the infrastructure and communication in the organization. This study suggests a concrete operationalization of health literacy...

  2. Image-guided cryoablation for the treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease: a single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prologo, J.D. [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology and Image-Guided Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Passalacqua, Matthew; Patel, Indravadan; Bohnert, Nathan [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Corn, David J. [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The role of image-guided thermal ablation techniques for the nonoperative local management of painful osseous metastatic disease has expanded during recent years, and several advantages of cryoablation in this setting have emerged. The purpose of this study is to retrospectively evaluate and report a single-center experience of CT-guided percutaneous cryoablation in the setting of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. This study was approved by the institutional review board and is compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Electronic medical records of all patients who underwent percutaneous image-guided palliative cryoablation at our institution were reviewed (n = 61). An intent-to-treat analysis was performed. Records were reviewed for demographic data and anatomical data, primary tumor type, procedure details, and outcome - including change in analgesic requirements (expressed as morphine equivalent dosages), pain scores (utilizing the clinically implemented visual analog scale), subsequent therapies (including radiation and/or surgery), and complications during the 24 h following the procedure and at 3 months. Patients were excluded (n = 7) if data were not retrospectively identifiable at the defined time points. Fifty-four tumors were ablated in 50 patients. There were statistically significant decreases in the median VAS score and narcotic usage at both 24 h and 3 months (p < 0.000). Six patients (11 %) incurred complications related to their therapy. Two patients had no relief at 24 h, of which both reported worsened pain at 3 months. One patient had initial relief but symptom recurrence at 3 months. Four patients went on to have radiation therapy of the ablation site at some point following the procedure. CT-guided cryoablation is a safe, effective, reproducible procedural option for the nonoperative local treatment of painful musculoskeletal metastatic disease. (orig.)

  3. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius. An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university including jobs characterized by intensive computer work. The first 100 positive replies entered the study. Among these inclusion criteria were pain intensity in the neck/shoulder of at least 3 on a 0-9 scale. Exclusion criteria were cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease. Before and after the intervention period the participants replied to a questionnaire about musculoskeletal disorders and work disability, and underwent a standardized clinical examination of the neck and shoulder girdle. Further, on a weekly basis the participants log pain intensity of the neck and shoulder during the previous week. The primary outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 10 based on the weekly pain registration and results

  4. [Musculoskeletal chronic pains and Vitamin D deficiency. Study before after in general practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goaziou, Marie-France; Bodier, Edwige; Souweine, Gilbert; Moreau, Alain; Perdrix, Corinne; Flori, Marie; Dupraz, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the correction of vitamin D deficiency (defined by a rate≤50 nmol/l) on the pain, fatigue and quality of life. A pragmatic prospective study was conducted in Rhone-Alpes area, in general practices between February 1 and April 30, 2009. All patients aged 18 to 50 years consulting for diffuse musculoskeletal pain and/or chronic unexplained fatigue, with the only abnormality deficient serum vitamin D were enrolled in this study. They might agree to complete questionnaires on quality of life, pain assessment and control their vitamin D levels after treatment. Forty-nine complete records were analyzed. The deficiency was severe (mean 26 nmol/l). High doses of vitamin were necessary to correct deficiency, between 400,000 to 600,000 units. The correction of vitamin D deficiency resulted in a significant decrease in the level of pain intensity according to verbal rating scale (P=0.034) and the Digital Scale (Pshopping, cleaning, walking for more than a kilometer (P<0.001) and dressing (P=0.012). The correction has had a positive impact both physical, mental and social activities. Non-specific musculoskeletal pain or unexplained asthenia are common in primary care. Make a dosage of vitamin D and correct deficits is a necessity before performing complex and expensive examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effectiveness of education based on neuroscience in the treatment of musculoskeletal chronic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenda-Gago, J D; Espejo-Antunez, L

    2017-07-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most frequent health, economic and social problems. Given this, numerous approaches have been described, one of which is pain neuroscience education. To examine the effectiveness of pain neuroscience education in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders with chronic pain and to explore the impact of specific aspects of the technique on its effectiveness. Relevant studies published between 2000 and 2015 were identified by searching PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. Studies identified by electronic searches were screened against a set of pre-defined inclusion criteria. PEDro and SIGN scales were used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. Ten studies were included in this systematic review. The main outcomes that were measured were pain, disability, neurophysiology pain test, attitudes and beliefs, fear-avoidance beliefs, self-care, kinesiophobia, quality of life and algometry. The results suggest that pain neuroscience education is effective in the short term and medium/long term for pain relief, either alone or combined with multimodal treatment. It was also effective in normalizing cognitions about pain, fear-avoidance beliefs, and self-care. Despite some evidence for a positive effect in the short and medium/long term, the heterogeneity in the technical aspects used does not allow the obtaining of conclusive results.

  6. Hypermobility in Adolescent Athletes: Pain, Functional Ability, Quality of Life, and Musculoskeletal Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Heidi; Pedersen, Trine Lykke; Junge, Tina

    2017-01-01

    athletes, and to study the association of GJH with pain, function, HRQoL, and musculoskeletal injuries. Methods A total of 132 elite-level adolescent athletes (36 adolescent boys, 96 adolescent girls; mean ± SD age, 14.0 ± 0.9 years), including ballet dancers (n = 22), TeamGym gymnasts (n = 57), and team......-reported questionnaires, and part of physical performance was assessed by 4 postural-sway tests and 2 single-legged hop-for-distance tests. Results Overall prevalence rates for GJH4, GJH5, and GJH6 were 27.3%, 15.9%, and 6.8%, respectively, with a higher prevalence of GJH4 in ballet dancers (68.2%) and TeamGym gymnasts...... significantly larger center-of-pressure path length across sway tests. Conclusion For ballet dancers and TeamGym gymnasts, the prevalence of GJH4 was higher than that of team handball players. For ballet dancers, the prevalence of GJH5 and GJH6 was higher than that of team handball players and the general...

  7. Psychosocial work aspects, stress and musculoskeletal pain among musicians. A systematic review in search of correlates and predictors of playing-related pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacukowicz, Aleksandra

    2016-06-16

    Musicians face numerous psychosocial and physical demands at work resulting in high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. Unlike physical risks, little is known about psychosocial work factors influencing such health problems in this particular group. The paper aimed to identify psychosocial work demands resulting in musculoskeletal problems among musicians. A systematic review was undertaken to find data linking psychosocial work demands or stress with musculoskeletal disorders among musicians. The exploration of databases resulted in nine research studies linking psychosocial aspects of work or stress with musculoskeletal problems among musicians. The analyzed studies linked psychosocial aspects with musculoskeletal problems in three ways - showing proportions of people indicating particular causes of pain, indicating correlations between these variables or performing regression analysis showing psychosocial predictors of musculoskeletal pain. Only a few studies have undertaken the issue of psychosocial risk factors for musculoskeletal problems among musicians. The results revealed that some psychosocial aspects of work, e.g. long hours at work, work content, high job demands, low control/influence, lack of social support, were related to musculoskeletal pain, however, the methods and results were inconsistent. The extant studies employed variety of definitions of psychosocial aspects that hindered the possibility for consistent conclusions. Basing on those conclusions, future directions were offered.

  8. Associations Between Body Mass Index and Musculoskeletal Pain and Related Symptoms in Different Body Regions Among Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Moreira-Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obesity rates are high among employed adults and have shown a consistent increase over the past few decades. Musculoskeletal disorders related to work are a major cause of disability in working individuals. The objective of this study was to verify the associations between weight status and musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms in different body regions among workers. The sample comprised 203 factory workers. Anthropometric measures were assessed with standardized protocols and body mass index (BMI was calculated. Participants were classified as nonoverweight (BMI ≤ 24.9 kg/m2 or overweight/obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms was assessed with the Nordic Questionnaire of Osteoarticular Symptoms. The association of BMI and musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms was analyzed with logistic regression. Overweight/obese participants were more likely to have musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms in the shoulders (odds ratio [OR] = 2.129, p = .023. Our results emphasize the need of worksite interventions to promote healthy weight as a way to prevent musculoskeletal pain and related symptoms.

  9. Role of yoga and physical activity in work-related musculoskeletal disorders among dentists

    OpenAIRE

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Work-related musculoskeletal pain is one of the occupational hazards in dentists. Aims: To find the prevalence and severity of musculoskeletal pain in dentists, to compare musculoskeletal pain among dentists practicing yoga, those practicing physical activities, and those without any physical activity, and also to know the effects of sex, age, and workload on musculoskeletal pain. Materials and Methods: A self-reporting work-related questionnaire and the Nordic questionnaire for a...

  10. Factor analyses for the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire for working and nonworking patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soer, Remko; Vroomen, Patrick; Stewart, Roy; Coppes, Maarten; Stegeman, Patrick; Dijkstra, Pieter; Reneman, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire (ÖMPQ) has good psychometric properties to predict return to work in patients with acute low back pain. Although it is used in patients with chronic back pain and nonworkers, there is no evidence on the factor structure of the ÖMPQ in these populations. This is deemed an important prerequisite for future prediction studies. This study aimed to analyze the factor structure of the ÖMPQ in working and nonworking patients with chronic back pain. This is a cross-sectional study in a university-based spine center. The patient sample consists two cohorts of working and nonworking adult patients (>18 years) with specific and nonspecific chronic back pain. The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed in working (N=557) and nonworking (N=266) patients for three, four, five, and six factors identified in literature. A goodness of fit index was calculated by a chi-square. Root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) was calculated, and the number of factors identified was based on RMSEA values 0.90 are considered to indicate acceptable fit. In working patients, a five-factor solution had the best fit (RMSEA0.90), but substantial adaptations should be made to get proper fit (removal of the work-related items). In nonworking patients, a four-factor analysis had the best fit (RMSEAback pain. Substantial adaptations should be made to obtain a factor structure with acceptable fit. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Musculoskeletal Pain as a Marker of Health Quality. Findings from the Epidemiological Sleep Study among the Adult Population of Sao Paulo City.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suely Roizenblatt

    Full Text Available We are witnessing the growth of urban populations, particularly in the developing world. São Paulo, the largest city in South America, continues to grow, and this growth is dramatically effecting the environment and human health. The aim of this study was to estimate the point prevalence of chronic pain in São Paulo city dwellers and to explore the influence of aspects related to urbanicity.A two-stage cluster randomized sample included 1100 individuals of the city of Sao Paulo, representing the population proportionally in terms of gender, age and social classes in 2007. For this observational cross-sectional study, the household sample was interviewed using validated questionnaires for sociodemographic aspects, the Beck inventories for anxiety and depression, the WHOQoL-REF for quality of life, the Chalder Fatigue Scale. Musculoskeletal pain was defined as diffuse pain or pain located in the back, joints or limbs. Data regarding sleep complaints and polysomnography were obtained from the Epidemiologic Sleep Study conducted in São Paulo city in 2007.The prevalence estimate of chronic musculoskeletal pain was approximately 27%, with a female/male ratio of approximately 2.6/1. The predictors were being in the age-range of 30-39 years, low socioeconomic and schooling levels, obesity, sedentarism, fatigue, non-restorative sleep, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep quality, poor life quality, anxiety and depression symptoms. Psychological wellbeing was the main discriminator between responders with chronic musculoskeletal pain and the controls, followed by depression for the participants with poor psychological wellbeing, and fatigue, for the remaining ones. Insomnia syndrome was the third-level discriminator for those with fatigue, whereas sleep quality for those without fatigue.Musculoskeletal pain was frequently reported by São Paulo city dwellers and its correlates with psychological and sleep aspects are suggestive of a response to urbanicity

  12. Self-reported pain and disability outcomes from an endogenous model of muscular back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Steven Z

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to develop an induced musculoskeletal pain model of acute low back pain and examine the relationship among pain, disability and fear in this model. Methods Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in 52 healthy volunteers (23 women, 17 men; average age 22.4 years; average BMI 24.3 using fatiguing trunk extension exercise. Measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and location, and disability, were tracked for one week after exercise. Results Pain intensity ranged from 0 to 68 with 57.5% of participants reporting peak pain at 24 hours and 32.5% reporting this at 48 hours. The majority of participants reported pain in the low back with 33% also reporting pain in the legs. The ratio of unpleasantness to intensity indicated that the sensation was considered more unpleasant than intense. Statistical differences were noted in levels of reported disability between participants with and without leg pain. Pain intensity at 24 hours was correlated with pain unpleasantness, pain area and disability. Also, fear of pain was associated with pain intensity and unpleasantness. Disability was predicted by sex, presence of leg pain, and pain intensity; however, the largest amount of variance was explained by pain intensity (27% of a total 40%. The second model, predicting pain intensity only included fear of pain and explained less than 10% of the variance in pain intensity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a significant association between pain and disability in this model in young adults. However, the model is most applicable to patients with lower levels of pain and disability. Future work should include older adults to improve the external validity of this model.

  13. The Effect of Dexamethasone Iontophoresis on Decreasing Pain and Improving Function in Patients With Musculoskeletal Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher D; Lauber, Christine A; Cappaert, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Clinical Scenario: Iontophoresis is a method of local transfer of ionized medicated and nonmedicated substances through the skin and into the target tissues using magnetic polarization. The anti-inflammatory properties exhibited by dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DEX) combined with iontophoresis make it a potentially desirable treatment for clinicians wishing to administer a noninvasive localized drug concentration without having a large systemic concentration of that drug. Since concurrent treatments are commonly used in clinical practice, many of the published studies that included the use of DEX also used concurrent treatments. However, this may make it difficult for clinicians to determine the individual effectiveness of DEX iontophoresis in treating musculoskeletal conditions. Focused Clinical Question: Does DEX iontophoresis, alone, decrease pain and improve function in patients with musculoskeletal conditions when compared with placebo or control?

  14. Does obesity modify the relationship between exposure to occupational factors and musculoskeletal pain in men? Results from the GAZEL cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Evanoff

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze relationships between physical occupational exposures, post-retirement shoulder/knee pain, and obesity. METHODS: 9 415 male participants (aged 63-73 in 2012 from the French GAZEL cohort answered self-administered questionnaires in 2006 and 2012. Occupational exposures retrospectively assessed in 2006 included arm elevation and squatting (never, <10 years, ≥10 years. "Severe" shoulder and knee pain were defined as ≥5 on an 8-point scale. BMI was self-reported. RESULTS: Mean BMI was 26.59 kg/m2 +/-3.5 in 2012. Long-term occupational exposure to arm elevation and squatting predicted severe shoulder and knee pain after retirement. Obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2 was a risk factor for severe shoulder pain (adjusted OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03, 1.90. Overweight (adjusted OR 1.71; 1.28,2.29 and obesity (adjusted OR 3.21; 1.90,5.41 were risk factors for severe knee pain. In stratified models, associations between long-term squatting and severe knee pain varied by BMI. CONCLUSION: Obesity plays a role in relationships between occupational exposures and musculoskeletal pain. Further prospective studies should use BMI in analyses of musculoskeletal pain and occupational factors, and continue to clarify this relationship.

  15. Poor sitting posture and a heavy schoolbag as contributors to musculoskeletal pain in children: an ergonomic school education intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syazwan AI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AI Syazwan1, MN Mohamad Azhar1, AR Anita1, HS Azizan1, MS Shaharuddin2, J Muhamad Hanafiah3, AA Muhaimin4, AM Nizar5, B Mohd Rafee1,6, A Mohd Ibthisham7, Adam Kasani71Environmental and Occupational Medicine Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Environmental and Occupational Health Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Health Services Management Unit, Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 4Department of Environmental Management, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 5Pharmacology Unit, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 6Ergonomic Division, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai, Johor, MalaysiaObjectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a multidisciplinary, interventional, ergonomic education program designed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal problems by reducing schoolbag weight and correcting poor sitting posture.Methods: Data were collected twice before and twice following intervention using the Standardized Nordic Body Map Questionnaire, a rapid upper limb assessment for posture evaluation, and schoolbag weight measurement in children aged 8 and 11 years attending two schools within the central region of Malaysia.Results: Students who received the ergonomic intervention reported significant improvements in their sitting posture in a classroom environment and reduction of schoolbag weight as compared with the controls.Conclusion: A single-session, early

  16. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of shortening rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain; Design of a RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterschoot, F.P.C.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pain Rehabilitation Programs (PRP's) are proven effective for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Evidence about the relationship of dose on the effect of PRP however, is unavailable. We hypothesized that shortening PRP will not be inferior to care as usual. The ai

  17. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain, stress and work ability among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jay, Kenneth; Petersen, Mikkel Brandt; Sundstrup, Emil

    2014-01-01

    biopsychosocial intervention strategy on musculoskeletal pain, stress and work disability in lab technicians with a history of musculoskeletal pain at a single worksite in Denmark. METHODS/DESIGN: In this single-blind two-armed parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment, participants...... by questionnaire (modified visual analogue scale 0-10). DISCUSSION: This study will provide experimental evidence to guide workplace initiatives designed towards reducing chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02047669.......BACKGROUND: Among laboratory technicians, the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain is widespread possibly due to typical daily work tasks such as pipetting, preparing vial samples for analysis, and data processing on a computer including mouse work - all tasks that require precision in motor...

  18. Fitness training and its effect on musculoskeletal pain in professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramel, E; Thorsson, O; Wollmer, P

    1997-10-01

    In a controlled, prospective, randomized study, half of the dancers in a professional ballet company were asked to do extra self-administered fitness training, while the other half became the control group. The aim was to examine if the dancers in the training group would be able to keep up the extra training during a regular season and to examine its effect on their maximum oxygen uptake and on their self-estimated musculoskeletal pain. The training group increased their oxygen uptake more than the control group. The self-estimated functional inability because of pain (SEFIP) indicated significantly less pain the week after the première for the study population taken as a whole, but not for the two groups when considered separately. The training group claimed that the fitness training had helped them to cope with the psychological strain during rehearsals.

  19. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions...... with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university...... training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training...

  20. The reported incidence of work-related musculoskeletal disease in the UK: MOSS 1997-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, N M; Meyer, J D; Chen, Y; Holt, D L; McDonald, J C

    2001-10-01

    Consultant rheumatologists participate in surveillance of work-related musculoskeletal conditions under the Musculoskeletal Occupational Surveillance Scheme (MOSS), which has been in operation since 1997. During the first 3 years of the scheme, an estimated total of 8070 cases and 8442 diagnoses were obtained, an average of slightly less than 2700 estimated cases each year. Disorders of the upper limb accounted for approximately 66% (5502) of the total, with hand/wrist/arm conditions (3693 cases) comprising the majority of these. Conditions of the lumbar spine and trunk (13% of cases), the cervical spine (12%) and the shoulder (12%) were also frequently reported. Pain with ill-defined pathology was reported in 35% of cases with hand and forearm disorders. Overall, 82% of cases were related to repetitive rather than single injury. The largest numbers of cases were seen in workers in craft occupations (1659) and in clerical and secretarial workers (1524). High rates of musculoskeletal conditions, particularly of upper limb disorders, are notable in mining. In most occupations, and overall, women were at greater risk than men.

  1. Relationship of musculoskeletal pain with physical and functional variables and with postural changes in school children from 6 to 12 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. L. Pereira

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Painful disorders can affect children and adolescents, causing distress and significant demand for health services. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and its relation to age, sex, body mass index (BMI, how to carry school supplies, postures used in ADLs, outside school physical exercises and postural changes in students. METHOD: Cross-sectional exploratory study with a convenience sample consisted of 262 schoolchildren aged 6 to 12 years (137 female. Data collection was conducted by questionnaire containing personal data, presence and location of pain, means of transportation and illustrative figures for choosing the way of carrying school supplies and postures ADL's. Postural evaluation was performed by observational analysis and body mass index calculated from information on height, weight, age and sex. Descriptive analysis was carried out with numbers and percentages. For inferential statistics, comparison of average age according to the presence of pain was performed by Kruskal-Wallis with Dunn's post-test. Categorical variables were compared with chi-square test. RESULTS: The presence of musculoskeletal pain was reported by 51.1% of the students and 38.93% had pain in only one region. The most affected regions were legs, spine, arms and shoulders. The pain increased with age and with physical activity. CONCLUSIONS: In the our sample, 51.1% of students reported pain and 38.93% reported pain in only one region. There was no association between the presence of pain and sex, BMI, how to carry school supplies, postures used in ADLs and postural changes. The increasing age and physical exercise influenced significantly the presence of pain.

  2. Physical Activity Level and Sport Participation in Relation to Musculoskeletal Pain in a Population-Based Study of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddal, Maren Hjelle; Stensland, Synne Øien; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Johnsen, Marianne Bakke; Zwart, John-Anker; Storheim, Kjersti

    2017-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain among adolescents is high, and pain in adolescence increases the risk of chronic pain in adulthood. Studies have shown conflicting evidence regarding associations between physical activity and musculoskeletal pain, and few have evaluated the potential impact of sport participation on musculoskeletal pain in adolescent population samples. Purpose: To examine the associations between physical activity level, sport participation, and musculoskeletal pain in the neck and shoulders, low back, and lower extremities in a population-based sample of adolescents. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence 4. Methods: Data from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (Young-HUNT3) were used. All 10,464 adolescents in the Nord-Trøndelag county of Norway were invited, of whom 74% participated. Participants were asked how often they had experienced pain, unrelated to any known disease or acute injury, in the neck and shoulders, low back, and lower extremities in the past 3 months. The associations between (1) physical activity level (low [reference], medium or high) or (2) sport participation (weekly compared with no/infrequent participation) and pain were evaluated using logistic regression analyses, stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, socioeconomic status, and psychological distress. Results: The analyses included 7596 adolescents (mean age, 15.8 years; SD, 1.7). Neck and shoulder pain was most prevalent (17%). A moderate level of physical activity was associated with reduced odds of neck and shoulder pain (OR = 0.79 [95% CI, 0.66-0.94]) and low back pain (OR = 0.75 [95% CI, 0.62-0.91]), whereas a high level of activity increased the odds of lower extremity pain (OR = 1.60 [95% CI, 1.29-1.99]). Participation in endurance sports was associated with lower odds of neck and shoulder pain (OR = 0.79 [95% CI, 0.68-0.92]) and low back pain (OR = 0.77 [95% CI, 0.65-0.92]), especially among girls. Participation in technical

  3. Central adaptation of pain perception in response to rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Christoffer H; Sundstrup, Emil;

    2012-01-01

    pain remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of neck/shoulder resistance training on pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a non-painful reference muscle of the leg (tibialis anterior) in adults with neck/shoulder pain. STUDY DESIGN...... of pain 186 days during the previous year, computer use 93% of work time) were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of specific resistance training for the neck/shoulder muscles for 2 or 12 minutes per day 5 times a week, or weekly information on general health (control group). Primary outcomes were changes...... in PPT of the painful neck/shoulder muscles (upper trapezius) and a distant non-painful reference muscle (tibialis anterior) at 10 weeks. RESULTS: PPT of both the trained painful trapezius and the non-trained reference muscle of the leg increased more in the training groups compared with the control...

  4. Frequency and risk factors of musculoskeletal pain in nurses at a tertiary centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attar, Suzan Mansour

    2014-01-25

    Musculoskeletal complaints are an important occupational problem; nevertheless, few studies have targeted nurses in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among nursing personnel at a tertiary centre in Jeddah. A comparative cross-sectional study was performed in which full-time registered nurses from four different departments (n = 200) were selected for analysis between September 1, 2011 and February 29, 2012. Musculoskeletal symptoms over the past year were assessed using the Nordic Standardised Musculoskeletal Questionnaire. In addition to demographic questions, the researcher evaluated employment history, physical risk factors at work, and general health status. In this study, approximately 85% of the nurses reported experiencing at least one musculoskeletal symptom. Musculoskeletal symptoms occurred most commonly in the lower back (65.7%), ankles and feet (41.5%), and shoulders (29%). Prolonged working hours and being underweight were significantly associated with the development of these symptoms (OR 3.66, 95% CI 1.24-10.79, P = 0.018, and OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.37-5.93, P = 0.004, respectively). Working in the surgical department was a greater risk factor for low back pain compared with working in other departments. WMSDs are common among our nurses, and back pain is the most common symptom. As prolonged working hours and being underweight were factors that contributed most to WMSDs, decreasing shift durations or offering nutrition educational programmes may be suitable solutions. However, further studies are required to examine the best modality for decreasing the occurrence of WMSDs.

  5. Staying at work with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain: a qualitative study of workers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geertzen Jan HB

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP have decreased work ability. The majority, however, stays at work despite their pain. Knowledge about workers who stay at work despite chronic pain is limited, narrowing our views on work participation. The aim of this study was to explore why people with CMP stay at work despite pain (motivators and how they manage to maintain working (success factors. Methods A semi-structured interview was conducted among 21 subjects who stay at work despite CMP. Participants were included through purposeful sampling. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and imported into computer software Atlas.ti. Data was analyzed by means of thematic analysis. The interviews consisted of open questions such as: "Why are you working with pain?" or "How do you manage working while having pain?" Results A total of 16 motivators and 52 success factors emerged in the interviews. Motivators were categorized into four themes: work as value, work as therapy, work as income generator, and work as responsibility. Success factors were categorized into five themes: personal characteristics, adjustment latitude, coping with pain, use of healthcare services, and pain beliefs. Conclusions Personal characteristics, well-developed self-management skills, and motivation to work may be considered to be important success factors and prerequisites for staying at work, resulting in behaviors promoting staying at work such as: raising adjustment latitude, changing pain-coping strategies, organizing modifications and conditions at work, finding access to healthcare services, and asking for support. Motivators and success factors for staying at work may be used for interventions in rehabilitation and occupational medicine, to prevent absenteeism, or to promote a sustainable return to work. This qualitative study has evoked new hypotheses about staying at work; quantitative studies on staying at

  6. Dose-response relationship between sports activity and musculoskeletal pain in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Masamitsu; Abe, Takafumi; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Imamura, Fumiaki; Lee, I-Min; Kadowaki, Masaru; Sawada, Susumu S; Miyachi, Motohiko; Matsui, Yuzuru; Uchio, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Physical activity has multiple health benefits but may also increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal pain (MSP). However, the relationship between physical activity and MSP has not been well characterized. This study examined the dose-response relationship between sports activity and MSP among adolescents. Two school-based serial surveys were conducted 1 year apart in adolescents aged 12 to 18 years in Unnan, Japan. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 2403 students. Associations between time spent in organized sports activity and MSP were analyzed cross-sectionally (n = 2403) and longitudinally (n = 374, students free of pain and in seventh or 10th grade at baseline) with repeated-measures Poisson regression and restricted cubic splines, with adjustment for potential confounders. The prevalence of overall pain, defined as having pain recently at least several times a week in at least one part of the body, was 27.4%. In the cross-sectional analysis, sports activity was significantly associated with pain prevalence. Each additional 1 h/wk of sports activity was associated with a 3% higher probability of having pain (prevalence ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.04). Similar trends were found across causes (traumatic and nontraumatic pain) and anatomic locations (upper limbs, lower back, and lower limbs). In longitudinal analysis, the risk ratio for developing pain at 1-year follow-up per 1 h/wk increase in baseline sports activity was 1.03 (95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.05). Spline models indicated a linear association (P adolescents played sports, the more likely they were to have and develop pain.

  7. Staying at work with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain: a qualitative study of workers' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Haitze J; Brouwer, Sandra; Groothoff, Johan W; Geertzen, Jan H B; Reneman, Michiel F

    2011-06-03

    Many people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP) have decreased work ability. The majority, however, stays at work despite their pain. Knowledge about workers who stay at work despite chronic pain is limited, narrowing our views on work participation. The aim of this study was to explore why people with CMP stay at work despite pain (motivators) and how they manage to maintain working (success factors). A semi-structured interview was conducted among 21 subjects who stay at work despite CMP. Participants were included through purposeful sampling. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and imported into computer software Atlas.ti. Data was analyzed by means of thematic analysis. The interviews consisted of open questions such as: "Why are you working with pain?" or "How do you manage working while having pain?" A total of 16 motivators and 52 success factors emerged in the interviews. Motivators were categorized into four themes: work as value, work as therapy, work as income generator, and work as responsibility. Success factors were categorized into five themes: personal characteristics, adjustment latitude, coping with pain, use of healthcare services, and pain beliefs. Personal characteristics, well-developed self-management skills, and motivation to work may be considered to be important success factors and prerequisites for staying at work, resulting in behaviors promoting staying at work such as: raising adjustment latitude, changing pain-coping strategies, organizing modifications and conditions at work, finding access to healthcare services, and asking for support. Motivators and success factors for staying at work may be used for interventions in rehabilitation and occupational medicine, to prevent absenteeism, or to promote a sustainable return to work. This qualitative study has evoked new hypotheses about staying at work; quantitative studies on staying at work are needed to obtain further evidence.

  8. Vitamin D status in patients with musculoskeletal pain, fatigue and headache: a cross-sectional descriptive study in a multi-ethnic general practice in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Kirsten Valebjørg; Brekke, Mette; Gjelstad, Svein; Lagerløv, Per

    2010-09-01

    To investigate vitamin D levels in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal pain, headache, and fatigue. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A health center in Oslo, Norway, with a multi-ethnic population. A total of 572 patients referred by a general practitioner (GP) for an examination of hypovitaminosis D who reported musculoskeletal pain, headache, or fatigue. The patients' native countries were: Norway (n = 249), Europe, America, and South-East Asia (n = 83), and the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia (n = 240). Both genders and all ages were included. Vitamin D levels (25-hydroxyvitamin D) in nmol/L. Hypovitaminosis D (25-hydroxyvitamin D < 50 nmol/L) was found in 58% of patients. One-third of ethnic Norwegians had hypovitaminosis D, while 83% of patients from the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia had hypovitaminosis D with minimal seasonal variation of levels. One in two women from these countries had a vitamin D level below 25 nmol/L. Mean vitamin D level was lower in patients with headaches compared with patients with other symptoms. Some 15% of patients with low (< 50 nmol/L) vitamin D levels reported headaches, compared with 5% of those with normal vitamin D levels. Our study shows a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with non-specific musculoskeletal pain, headache, or fatigue for whom the GP had suspected a low vitamin D level. Hypovitaminosis D was not restricted to immigrant patients. These results indicate that GPs should maintain awareness of hypovitaminosis D and refer patients who report headaches, fatigue, and musculoskeletal pain with minimal sun exposure and a low dietary vitamin D intake for assessment.

  9. Physical therapists should integrate illness perceptions in their assessment in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain; a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilgen, Paul; Beetsma, Anneke; Neels, Hedwig; Roussel, Nathalie; Nijs, Jo

    2014-06-01

    In the past decade, scientific evidence has shown that the biomedical model falls short in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. To understand musculoskeletal pain and a patient's health behavior and beliefs, physical therapists should assess the illness perceptions of their patients. In this quantitative study, we audiotaped the assessments of 19 primary care physical therapists on 27 patients and analyzed if and how illness perceptions were assessed. The Common Sense Model was used as the theoretical framework. We conclude that some of the domains of the Common Sense Model were frequently asked for (identity, causes and consequences), while others (timeline, treatment control, coherence, emotional representation) were used less frequently or seldom mentioned. The overall impression was that the assessments of the physical therapists were still bio-medically oriented in these patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  10. Musculo-skeletal pain among 40- and 45-year olds in Oslo: differences between two socioeconomically contrasting areas, and their possible explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Mette; Hjortdahl, Per

    2004-01-01

    Background The objective of the study was to compare the prevalence and severity of musculo-skeletal pain between two socioeconomically contrasting areas in Oslo, Norway, and to explore possible explanatory factors. Methods Questionnaire survey, carried out as part of The Oslo Health Study in 2000–2001. Data from 821 persons (40 and 45 year old) living in a less affluent inner city area (called east) were compared with 854 persons living in an affluent area of the city (called west). Bivariate comparisons (chi square test) and multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate differences between the samples. Results 61 % in east and 56 % in west (p Musculo-skeletal pain is reported by 55–60 % of middle aged persons in Oslo during a four week period, and must be considered a normal phenomenon. Poor social conditions, inactivity, mental health problems and being an immigrant imply increased risk of more severe symptoms with a concomitant demand of health care. PMID:15494077

  11. Whose pain is it anyway? Comparability of pain reports from children and their parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, S. J.; Dissing, K. B.; Hestbaek, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that prevalence of pain, and especially chronic pain in children and adolescents, is not only responsible for considerable personal suffering but also for a substantial economic burden. In addition to its contemporaneous burden, pain in adolescents is an important...... independently asked whether the child had experienced musculoskeletal pain in the previous week. The children were between the ages of 10 and 14 years old. Parents provided answers via text message and children were questioned in person at their school. Crosstabulations were presented to assess the concordance...... of a report of any pain and of pain specific to one of the defined regions; spine, upper limb, or lower limb. Concordance between parent and child report was expressed as percentage agreement and kappa values. All cases were coded as concordant or discordant for the analyses investigating the influence...

  12. Patient utilities in chronic musculoskeletal pain: how useful is the standard gamble method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, M E; Vlaeyen, J W; Rutten-van Mölken, M P; van der Linden, S M

    1999-03-01

    assess partly different, but nevertheless complementary aspects of health-related quality of life. It is therefore recommended to include in economic evaluation studies both domain-specific measures and valuation measures. Finally, in chronic musculoskeletal pain patients, RS scores were found to be more responsive in detecting significant changes in preferences than SG scores. For use in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, the RS is preferred to the SG for establishing accurate decisions about the impact of new interventions on their health outcomes.

  13. Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Rachel; Shepstone, Lee; Daniell, Helena; Sweeting, David; Lewis, Jeremy; Jerosch-Herold, Christina

    2013-07-08

    People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain. A comprehensive search was undertaken of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL and AMED (from inception to January 2013). Prospective studies of participants with shoulder pain receiving physiotherapy which investigated the association between baseline prognostic factors and change in pain and function over time were included. Study selection, data extraction and appraisal of study quality were undertaken by two independent assessors. Quality criteria were selected from previously published guidelines to form a checklist of 24 items. The study protocol was prospectively registered onto the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews. A total of 5023 titles were retrieved and screened for eligibility, 154 articles were assessed as full text and 16 met the inclusion criteria: 11 cohort studies, 3 randomised controlled trials and 2 controlled trials. Results were presented for the 9 studies meeting 13 or more of the 24 quality criteria. Clinical and statistical heterogeneity resulted in qualitative synthesis rather than meta-analysis. Three studies demonstrated that high functional disability at baseline was associated with poor functional outcome (p ≤ 0.05). Four studies demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between longer duration of shoulder pain and poorer outcome. Three studies, demonstrated a significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between increasing age and poorer function; three studies demonstrated no association (p > 0

  14. A background to acupuncture and its use in chronic painful musculoskeletal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter

    2006-09-01

    This article gives a brief description of the origins of acupuncture and describes some of the underlying philosophy behind this treatment and attempts to place it in context of the traditional Chinese medicine genre within which acupuncture is set. The article then explains the difference between traditional and Western style acupuncture and explains how point selection is made. The use of acupuncture is steadily increasing for a variety of reasons, it is a very safe intervention particularly when compared to conventional treatment and its lack of serious side effects might in part account for some of its popularity. The science behind acupuncture is also explored in terms of its underlying mechanisms and includes pain gate, endogenous opioids, diffuse noxious inhibitory control, serotonin and bioelectricity as possible explanations. The efficacy of acupuncture for a range of chronic musculoskeletal conditions is then explored and it is concluded that acupuncture has a place in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain and in particular osteo-arthritis (OA). Where degenerative conditions are involved, acupuncture clearly cannot provide a 'cure' but can provide symptomatic relief, often over a prolonged period.

  15. Effect of vitamin D on musculoskeletal pain and headache: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial among adult ethnic minorities in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Kirsten V; Madar, Ahmed A; Brekke, Mette; Meyer, Haakon E; Natvig, Bård; Mdala, Ibrahimu; Lagerløv, Per

    2014-12-01

    Immigrants from South Asia, the Middle East, and Africa living in Northern Europe frequently have low vitamin D levels and more pain compared to the native Western population. The aim of this study was to examine whether daily vitamin D3 (25 μg/d or 10 μg/d) supplementation for 16 weeks would improve musculoskeletal pain or headache compared to placebo. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial recruited 251 participants aged 18 to 50 years, and 215 (86%) attended the follow-up visit. The pain measures were occurrence, anatomical localization, and degree of musculoskeletal pain, as measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) score during the past 2 weeks. Headache was measured with VAS and the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6) questionnaire. At baseline, females reported more pain sites (4.7) than males (3.4), and only 7% reported no pain in the past 2 weeks. During the past 4 weeks, 63% reported headache with a high mean HIT-6 score of 60 (SD 7). At follow-up, vitamin D level, measured as serum 25(OH)D3, increased from 27 nmol/L to 52 nmol/L and from 27 nmol/L to 43 nmol/L in the 25-μg and 10-μg supplementation groups, respectively, whereas serum 25(OH)D3 did not change in the placebo group. Pain scores and headache scores were improved at follow-up compared with baseline. The use of vitamin D supplements, however, showed no significant effect on the occurrence, anatomical localization, and degree of pain or headache compared to placebo. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychosocial stress and multi-site musculoskeletal pain: a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sembajwe, Grace; Tveito, Torill Helene; Hopcia, Karen; Kenwood, Christopher; O'Day, Elizabeth Tucker; Stoddard, Anne M; Dennerlein, Jack T; Hashimoto, Dean; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between psychosocial factors at work and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care workers. In a survey of 1,572 workers from two hospitals, occupational psychosocial factors and health outcomes of workers with single and multi-site pain were evaluated using items from the Job Content Questionnaire that was designed to measure psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support. An adapted Nordic Questionnaire provided data on the musculoskeletal pain outcome. Covariates included body mass index, age, gender, and occupation. The analyses revealed statistically significant associations between psychosocial demands and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among patient care associates, nurses, and administrative personnel, both men and women. Supervisor support played a significant role for nurses and women. These results remained statistically significant after adjusting for covariates. These results highlight the associations between workplace psychosocial strain and multi-site musculoskeletal pain, setting the stage for future longitudinal explorations. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the visual analogue scale for pain in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Anne M; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R; Balk, Gerlof A; Stewart, Roy E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cut-off points on the visual analogue scale (VAS) to distinguish among mild, moderate, and severe pain, in relation to the following: pain-related interference with functioning; verbal description of the VAS scores; and latent class analysis for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A total of 456 patients were included. Pain was assessed using the VAS and verbal rating scale; functioning was assessed using the domains of the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36). Eight cut-off point schemes were tested using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), ordinal logistic regression, and latent class analysis. The study results showed that VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 corresponded to mild interference with functioning, whereas 3.5 to 6.4 implied moderate interference, and ⩾ 6.5 implied severe interference. VAS scores ⩽ 3.4 were best described for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain as mild pain, 3.5 to 7.4 as moderate pain, and ⩾ 7.5 as severe pain. Latent class analysis found that a 3-class solution fitted best, resulting in the classes 0.1 to 3.8, 3.9 to 5.7, and 5.8 to 10 cm. Findings from our study agree with those of some other studies, although many other studies found different optimal cut-off point schemes. As there appear to be no universally accepted cut-off points, and in view of the low-to-moderate associations between VAS scores and functioning and between VAS and verbal rating scale scores, the correct classification of VAS scores as mild, moderate. or severe in clinical practice seems doubtful.

  18. A Case Report on Upper Extremity Pain of Cardiac Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Altınbilek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity pain can originate from the musculoskeletal system, or be a reflection of problems originating from various organs. Therefore, it is highly important to perform a detailed clinical evaluation on patients during differential diagnosis. In this case report, we present a 61 year-old male patient who was admitted with pain in both upper extremities and the upper back that presumed to be of cardiac origin following our clinical evaluations. The patient was referred to the cardiology department, where he was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. The patient’s complaints of pain were fully resolved through the application of an intracoronary stent.

  19. Social capital in relation to depression, musculoskeletal pain, and psychosomatic symptoms: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starrin Bengt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social capital has lately received much attention in health research. The present study investigated whether two measures of subjective social capital were related to psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression in a large population of Swedish adolescents. Methods A total of 7757 13-18 year old students anonymously completed the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2008 which included questions on sociodemographic background, neighbourhood social capital, general social trust, and ill health. Results Low neighbourhood social capital and low general social trust were associated with higher rates of psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression. Individuals with low general social trust had more than three times increased odds of being depressed, three times increased odds of having many psychosomatic symptoms, and double the odds of having many symptoms of musculoskeletal pain. Conclusions The findings make an important contribution to the social capital - health debate by demonstrating relations between social capital factors and self-reported ill health in a young population.

  20. Effect of kinesiology taping on pain in individuals with musculoskeletal injuries: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo, Alicia M; Cara, Ed Le; Myer, Gregory D

    2014-05-01

    Kinesiology tape, an elastic tape used by sports medicine clinicians to enhance sports performance in athletes, is purported to facilitate a reduction in pain during physical activity in individuals with orthopedic injuries, but high-quality literature on this topic remains scarce. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to critically examine and review the existing literature to evaluate the effect of kinesiology tape application on pain in individuals with musculoskeletal injury. English-language publications from 2003 to 2013 were surveyed by searching SPORTDiscus, Scopus, ScienceDirect, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PubMed, and PEDro databases using the terms kinesio tap*, kinesiology tap*, kinesiotap*, and pain. Thirteen articles investigating the effects of kinesiology tape application on pain with at least level II evidence were selected. The combined results of this meta-analysis indicate that kinesiology tape may have limited potential to reduce pain in individuals with musculoskeletal injury; however, depending on the conditions, the reduction in pain may not be clinically meaningful. Kinesiology tape application did not reduce specific pain measures related to musculoskeletal injury above and beyond other modalities compared in the context of included articles. We suggest that kinesiology tape may be used in conjunction with or in place of more traditional therapies, and further research that employs controlled measures compared with kinesiology tape is needed to evaluate efficacy.

  1. Fulminant musculoskeletal and neurologic sarcoidosis: case report and literature update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, Ashley; Hammer, Richard; Evenski, Andrea; Crim, Julia [University of Missouri at Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We report a case of fulminant sarcoidosis in a 28-year-old man presenting with skin nodules, multifocal small and large joint arthralgias, and blurred vision. Characteristic bone, soft tissue, articular, and CNS findings were evident on multimodality imaging. Bony abnormalities included near-complete destruction of a distal phalanx, ''lace-like'' lucent lesions, erosive arthritis, lytic lesions with and without sclerotic margins, and bone marrow replacement visible only on MRI. The extent of bony disease at time of presentation was unusual. We review the widely varying reported prevalence of imaging findings of bony sarcoidosis in the literature, and discuss reasons for this variability. We found that musculoskeletal findings at US and MRI were less specific than radiographic and CT findings, but were useful in quantifying extent of disease. (orig.)

  2. Disabling musculoskeletal pain in working populations: Is it the job, the person, or the culture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, David; Ntani, Georgia; Palmer, Keith T.; Felli, Vanda E.; Harari, Raul; Barrero, Lope H.; Felknor, Sarah A.; Gimeno, David; Cattrell, Anna; Serra, Consol; Bonzini, Matteo; Solidaki, Eleni; Merisalu, Eda; Habib, Rima R.; Sadeghian, Farideh; Masood Kadir, M.; Warnakulasuriya, Sudath S.P.; Matsudaira, Ko; Nyantumbu, Busisiwe; Sim, Malcolm R.; Harcombe, Helen; Cox, Ken; Marziale, Maria H.; Sarquis, Leila M.; Harari, Florencia; Freire, Rocio; Harari, Natalia; Monroy, Magda V.; Quintana, Leonardo A.; Rojas, Marianela; Salazar Vega, Eduardo J.; Harris, E. Clare; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Martinez, J. Miguel; Delclos, George; Benavides, Fernando G.; Carugno, Michele; Ferrario, Marco M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Chatzi, Leda; Bitsios, Panos; Kogevinas, Manolis; Oha, Kristel; Sirk, Tuuli; Sadeghian, Ali; Peiris-John, Roshini J.; Sathiakumar, Nalini; Wickremasinghe, A. Rajitha; Yoshimura, Noriko; Kelsall, Helen L.; Hoe, Victor C.W.; Urquhart, Donna M.; Derrett, Sarah; McBride, David; Herbison, Peter; Gray, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To compare the prevalence of disabling low back pain (DLBP) and disabling wrist/hand pain (DWHP) among groups of workers carrying out similar physical activities in different cultural environments, and to explore explanations for observed differences, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in 18 countries. Standardised questionnaires were used to ascertain pain that interfered with everyday activities and exposure to possible risk factors in 12,426 participants from 47 occupational groups (mostly nurses and office workers). Associations with risk factors were assessed by Poisson regression. The 1-month prevalence of DLBP in nurses varied from 9.6% to 42.6%, and that of DWHP in office workers from 2.2% to 31.6%. Rates of disabling pain at the 2 anatomical sites covaried (r = 0.76), but DLBP tended to be relatively more common in nurses and DWHP in office workers. Established risk factors such as occupational physical activities, psychosocial aspects of work, and tendency to somatise were confirmed, and associations were found also with adverse health beliefs and group awareness of people outside work with musculoskeletal pain. However, after allowance for these risk factors, an up-to 8-fold difference in prevalence remained. Systems of compensation for work-related illness and financial support for health-related incapacity for work appeared to have little influence on the occurrence of symptoms. Our findings indicate large international variation in the prevalence of disabling forearm and back pain among occupational groups carrying out similar tasks, which is only partially explained by the personal and socioeconomic risk factors that were analysed. PMID:23688828

  3. Motor Cortex Excitability and BDNF Levels in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain According to Structural Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumo, Wolnei; Deitos, Alícia; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Fabiana; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Lopes Tarragó, Maria da Graça; Souza, Andressa; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    than in OA and healthy subjects. Likewise, the inter-hemispheric disinhibition as well as the dysfunction in the descending pain modulatory system is higher in chronic pain without tissue injury compared to a structural lesion. In addition, they suggest that a greater level of serum BDNF may be involved in the processes that mediate the disinhibition of motor cortex excitability, as well as the function of descending inhibitory pain modulation system, independently of the physiopathology mechanism of musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  4. Motor Cortex Excitability and BDNF Levels in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain According to Structural Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caumo, Wolnei; Deitos, Alícia; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Fabiana; Dussán-Sarria, Jairo Alberto; Lopes Tarragó, Maria da Graça; Souza, Andressa; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    MPS than in OA and healthy subjects. Likewise, the inter-hemispheric disinhibition as well as the dysfunction in the descending pain modulatory system is higher in chronic pain without tissue injury compared to a structural lesion. In addition, they suggest that a greater level of serum BDNF may be involved in the processes that mediate the disinhibition of motor cortex excitability, as well as the function of descending inhibitory pain modulation system, independently of the physiopathology mechanism of musculoskeletal pain syndromes. PMID:27471458

  5. Motor cortex excitability and BDNF levels in chronic musculoskeletal pain according to structural pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alícia Deitos

    2016-07-01

    the dysfunction in the descending pain modulatory system is higher in chronic pain without tissue injury compared to a structural lesion. In addition, they highlight that a greater level of serum BDNF mediated the disinhibition of motor cortex excitability, as well the function of descending inhibitory pain modulation system, independently of the physiopathology mechanism of musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  6. Intelligent Physical Exercise Training in a Workplace Setting Improves Muscle Strength and Musculoskeletal Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Dalager

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess effects of 1-year Intelligent Physical Exercise Training (IPET on musculoskeletal health. Methods. Office workers were randomized 1 : 1 to a training group, TG (N=193, or a control group, CG (N=194. TG received 1 h supervised high intensity IPET every week within working hours for 1 year and was recommended to perform 30 min of moderate intensity physical activity for 6 days a week during leisure. The IPET program was based on baseline health measures. Results. No baseline differences were present. An intention-to-treat analysis showed significant between-group effect for muscle strength but not for musculoskeletal pain. However, a per-protocol analysis of those with an adherence of ≥70% demonstrated a significant between-group effect for neck pain during the past three months. Several significant within-group changes were present, where TG and TG ≥ 70% demonstrated clinically relevant pain reductions whereas minimal reductions were seen for CG. Conclusion. IPET and recommendations of moderate intensity physical activity demonstrated significant between-group effect on muscle strength. Interestingly, significant within-group reductions in musculoskeletal pain were seen not only in TG but also in CG. This may underlie the lack of such between-group effect and shows that a possible positive side effect of merely drawing attention can improve musculoskeletal health.

  7. Workers Who Stay at Work Despite Chronic Nonspecific Musculoskeletal Pain : Do They Differ from Workers with Sick Leave?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H.J.; Reneman, M.F.; Groothoff, J.W.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Brouwer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Most workers with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain (CMP) do not take sick leave, nor consult a health care professional or search vocational rehabilitation. Yet, the knowledge of many researchers, clinicians and policy makers is largely based on people with CMP who discontinue work.

  8. Measurement Structure of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire-24 in a Sample of Individuals with Musculoskeletal Pain: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Yi; Jochman, Joseph; Fujikawa, Mayu; Strand, David; Cheing, Gladys; Lee, Gloria; Chan, Fong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the factorial structure of the "Coping Strategy Questionnaire"-24 (CSQ-24) in a sample of Canadians with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Method: The sample included 171 workers' compensation clients (50.9% men) recruited from outpatient rehabilitation facilities in Canada. Mean age of participants was 42.45 years (SD =…

  9. Type D personality is a risk factor for psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condén, Emelie; Leppert, Jerzy; Ekselius, Lisa; Åslund, Cecilia

    2013-01-21

    Type D personality, or the "distressed personality", is a psychosocial factor associated with negative health outcomes, although its impact in younger populations is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Type D personality and the associations between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescences. A population-based, self-reported cross-sectional study conducted in Västmanland, Sweden with a cohort of 5012 students in the age between 15-18 years old. The participants completed the anonymous questionnaire Survey of Adolescent Life in Västmanland 2008 during class hour. Psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain were measured through index measuring the presence of symptoms and how common they were. DS14 and its two component subscales of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI) were measured as well. There was a difference depending on sex, where 10.4% among boys and 14.6% among girls (p = personality. Boys and girls with a Type D personality had an approximately 2-fold increased odds of musculoskeletal pain and a 5-fold increased odds of psychosomatic symptoms. The subscale NA explained most of the relationship between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain. No interaction effect of NA and SI was found. There was a strong association between Type D personality and both psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain where adolescent with a type D personality reported more symptoms. The present study contributes to the mapping of the influence of Type D on psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents.

  10. Pattern and Pain Assessment of Musculoskeletal Disorders Attending to Physiotherapy Services in Selected Physiotherapy Centres of Dhaka City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ruhul Amin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, affecting hundreds of millions of people around the world. Among different modalities of treatment and management for musculoskeletal pain, physiotherapy might be cost-effective. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the pattern and pain assessment of musculoskeletal disorders attending to physiotherapy services in selected physiotherapy centers of Dhaka city. Materials and method: It was a cross sectional study. Sample size was 400 and a pre-tested, modified, semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 16.0. Results: Majority of the respondents (69.2% belonged to 46-65 year age group with least in extreme age groups. Mean±SD of age was 33.58±12.33 years. Most of the respondents were male (69.2%. Study revealed that neck pain (75.2% was the major complaint followed by back pain (48.00%. Regarding pattern of pain, intermittent (73.2% type was predominant. Muscle spasm (29.2% was the main cause for musculoskeletal pain followed by degenerative diseases (27.5%. Of the respondents 55.00% received traction, 91.25% exercise, 21.25% manipulation, 97.95% short wave diathermy, 85.00% ultrasound therapy, 33.75% infra red ray, and 12.75% electrical stimulation as physiotherapy treatment. There were statistically significant difference between sex and severity of pain (p=0.019, educational status and pain persisting time in years (p=0.000. There was also statistically highly significant difference between severity of pain responses before and after physiotherapy treatment (p=0.000. Conclusion: Study concluded that common areas of musculoskeletal pain were neck followed by back and shoulder and pain characteristics were intermittent, radiating, numbness, burning in nature. Respondents had taken medication and different type of physiotherapy services, including traction

  11. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Taubert de Freitas-Swerts

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain.METHOD: quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages: first: pre-test with the application of the questionnaires to the subjects; second: Workplace Exercise taking place twice a week, for 15 minutes, during a period of 10 weeks; third: post-test in which the subjects answered the questionnaires again. For data analysis, the descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistics were used through the Wilcoxon Test.RESULTS: work-related stress was present in the assessed workers, but there was no statistically significant reduction in the scores after undergoing Workplace Exercise. However, there was a statistically significant pain reduction in the neck, cervical, upper, middle and lower back, right thigh, left leg, right ankle and feet.CONCLUSION: the Workplace Exercise promoted a significant pain reduction in the spine, but did not result in a significant reduction in the levels of work-related stress.

  12. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain1

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas-Swerts, Fabiana Cristina Taubert; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain. METHOD: quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages: first: pre-test with the application of the questionnaires to the subjects; second: Workplace Exercise taking place twice a week, for 15 minutes, during a period of 10 weeks; third: post-test in which the subjects answered the questionnaires again. For data analysis, the descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistics were used through the Wilcoxon Test. RESULTS: work-related stress was present in the assessed workers, but there was no statistically significant reduction in the scores after undergoing Workplace Exercise. However, there was a statistically significant pain reduction in the neck, cervical, upper, middle and lower back, right thigh, left leg, right ankle and feet. CONCLUSION: the Workplace Exercise promoted a significant pain reduction in the spine, but did not result in a significant reduction in the levels of work-related stress. PMID:25296147

  13. Physical functioning, pain and quality of life after amputation for musculoskeletal tumours: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, S; Grimer, R J; Cool, P; Murray, S A; Briggs, T; Fulton, J; Grant, K; Gerrand, C H

    2015-09-01

    Patients who have limb amputation for musculoskeletal tumours are a rare group of cancer survivors. This was a prospective cross-sectional survey of patients from five specialist centres for sarcoma surgery in England. Physical function, pain and quality of life (QOL) outcomes were collected after lower extremity amputation for bone or soft-tissue tumours to evaluate the survivorship experience and inform service provision. Of 250 patients, 105 (42%) responded between September 2012 and June 2013. From these, completed questionnaires were received from 100 patients with a mean age of 53.6 years (19 to 91). In total 60 (62%) were male and 37 (38%) were female (three not specified). The diagnosis was primary bone sarcoma in 63 and soft-tissue tumour in 37. A total of 20 tumours were located in the hip or pelvis, 31 above the knee, 32 between the knee and ankle and 17 in the ankle or foot. In total 22 had hemipelvectomy, nine hip disarticulation, 35 transfemoral amputation, one knee disarticulation, 30 transtibial amputation, two toe amputations and one rotationplasty. The Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) differed by amputation level, with poorer scores at higher levels (p amputation level is linked to physical function, but not QOL or pain measures. Pain and physical function significantly impact on QOL. These results are helpful in managing the expectations of patients about treatment and addressing their complex needs. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  14. The Discriminative validity of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" as mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: Empirical evidence of discriminative validity is required to justify the use of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminative validity of mechanisms-based classifications of pain by identifying discriminatory clusters of clinical criteria predictive of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" pain in patients with low back (+\\/- leg) pain disorders. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional, between-patients design using the extreme-groups method. Four hundred sixty-four patients with low back (+\\/- leg) pain were assessed using a standardized assessment protocol. After each assessment, patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various clinical criteria. RESULTS: Multivariate analyses using binary logistic regression with Bayesian model averaging identified a discriminative cluster of 7, 3, and 4 symptoms and signs predictive of a dominance of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central sensitization" pain, respectively. Each cluster was found to have high levels of classification accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, positive\\/negative predictive values, positive\\/negative likelihood ratios). DISCUSSION: By identifying a discriminatory cluster of symptoms and signs predictive of "nociceptive," "peripheral neuropathic," and "central" pain, this study provides some preliminary discriminative validity evidence for mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain. Classification system validation requires the accumulation of validity evidence before their use in clinical practice can be recommended. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  15. Combination treatment of physical modalities in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain syndromes: a prospective-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Pieber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of combinations of several physical therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain syndromes by a prospective, controlled study. Forty patients (5 men and 35 women, 18-80 years with musculoskeletal pain syndrome were included. Thirty patients were assigned to the intervention group and 10 patients to the control group. The intervention group received a combination of physical therapies according to the clinical needs (electrotherapy, fango packs, mud packs, ultrasound, massage, exercise therapy. Treatment consisted of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any physical therapy in the waiting period. The intervention group was examined at the beginning and the end of the treatment period. The control group was evaluated at the beginning and the end of the waiting period (before their physical therapy treatment started. Main outcome measurements were: Visual analogue scale for pain (VAS; Timed Get up and Go Test (TUG; Functional Reach Test (FRT. In addition bodily, emotional and social functioning was accessed by selected ICF-Items and items of the SF-36 health survey (SF-36. The main outcome measures showed significant improvement in the intervention group compared to the control group. Furthermore, ICF- and SF-36-Items also improved. In conclusion significant pain relief and improvement of function was achieved by a combination treatment of physical therapies in patients with musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  16. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel; Jay, Kenneth; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2015-03-01

    Numerous studies has shown that regular physical exercise can reduce musculoskeletal pain, but the optimal setting to achieve high adherence and effectiveness remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of workplace versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers. The randomized controlled trial (RCT) comprised 200 female healthcare workers from 18 departments at 3 hospitals. Participants were randomly allocated at the cluster level to ten weeks of: (i) workplace physical exercise (WORK) performed during working hours for 5×10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (ii) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5×10 minutes per week. Both groups received ergonomic counseling on patient handling and use of lifting aides. Average pain intensity (0-10 scale) in the low back and neck/shoulder was the primary outcome. Per week, 2.2 (SD 1.1) and 1.0 (SD 1.2) training sessions were performed in WORK and HOME groups, respectively. Pain intensity, back muscle strength and use of analgesics improved more following WORK than HOME (PWorkplace physical exercise is more effective than home-based exercise in reducing musculoskeletal pain, increasing muscle strength and reducing the use of analgesics among healthcare workers.

  17. Intramuscular Hemangioma Mimicking Myofascial Pain Syndrome : A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Miriam; Kang, Yoon Kyoo; Kim, In Jong; Park, Yoon Kun

    2007-01-01

    Intramuscular hemangioma, an infrequent but important cause of musculoskeletal pain, is often difficult to establish the diagnosis clinically. This report describes a case of a 32-yr-old woman who presented with severe left calf pain for 10 yr. Initial conservative treatments consisting of intramuscular electrical stimulation, herb medication, acupuncture, and intramuscular lidocaine injection under the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome in other facilities, failed to alleviate the symptoms. On physical examination, there was no motor weakness or sensory change. Conventional radiography of the leg revealed a soft tissue phlebolith. Conventional angiography study showed hemangioma. Intramuscular hemangioma within the soleus muscle was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Following surgical excision of the hemangioma, the patient's symptom resolved completely. Intramuscular hemangioma is a rare cause of calf pain and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with muscle pain, particularly if associated with a soft tissue mass, fails to respond to conservative treatment. PMID:17596677

  18. Position Statement of the Israeli Society for Musculoskeletal Medicine on Intramuscular Stimulation for Myofascial Pain Syndrome-A Delphi Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratmansky, Motti; Minerbi, Amir; Kalichman, Leonid; Kent, John; Wende, Osnat; Finestone, Aharon S; Vulfsons, Simon

    2017-04-01

    To develop consensus on a position paper on the use of intramuscular stimulation (IMS) for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) by physicians in Israel. The Israeli Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine ran a modified Delphi process to gather opinions from a multidisciplinary expert panel. Eight experts in the treatment of MPS were chosen and asked to participate, and six participated. The position paper was iterated three times. After three iterations, general consensus was reached by all six experts. The general statement that was agreed on was: "IMS is one of the preferred treatments for myofascial pain syndrome. The treatment is evidence-based, effective, safe, and inexpensive. The position of the Israeli Society of Musculoskeletal Medicine is that the treatment should be taught and used by all primary care physicians and those physicians in other areas of medicine who deal with pain in their work." The position paper is a basis for clinical work and education programs for physicians interested in a better understanding and ability to treat patients with a musculoskeletal complaint or manifestation of disease. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  19. Type D personality is a risk factor for psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condén Emelie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type D personality, or the “distressed personality”, is a psychosocial factor associated with negative health outcomes, although its impact in younger populations is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Type D personality and the associations between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescences. Methods A population-based, self-reported cross-sectional study conducted in Västmanland, Sweden with a cohort of 5012 students in the age between 15–18 years old. The participants completed the anonymous questionnaire Survey of Adolescent Life in Västmanland 2008 during class hour. Psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain were measured through index measuring the presence of symptoms and how common they were. DS14 and its two component subscales of negative affectivity (NA and social inhibition (SI were measured as well. Results There was a difference depending on sex, where 10.4% among boys and 14.6% among girls (p =  Conclusions There was a strong association between Type D personality and both psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain where adolescent with a type D personality reported more symptoms. The present study contributes to the mapping of the influence of Type D on psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents.

  20. Effect of electroacupuncture on opioid consumption in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Charlie CL

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is common and has been increasingly managed by opioid medications, of which the long-term efficacy is unknown. Furthermore, there is evidence that long-term use of opioids is associated with reduced pain control, declining physical function and quality of life, and could hinder the goals of integrated pain management. Electroacupuncture (EA has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative opioid consumption. Limited evidence suggests that acupuncture could assist patients with chronic pain to reduce their requirements for opioids. The proposed research aims to assess if EA is an effective adjunct therapy to standard pain and medication management in reducing opioids use by patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Methods In this multicentre, randomised, sham-acupuncture controlled, three-arm clinical trial, 316 patients regularly taking opioids for pain control and meeting the defined selection criteria will be recruited from pain management centres and clinics of primary care providers in Victoria, Australia. After a four-week run-in period, the participants are randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups to receive EA, sham EA or no-EA with a ratio of 2:1:1. All participants receive routine pain medication management delivered and supervised by the trial medical doctors. Twelve sessions of semi-structured EA or sham EA treatment are delivered over 10 weeks. Upon completion of the acupuncture treatment period, there is a 12-week follow-up. In total, participants are involved in the trial for 26 weeks. Outcome measures of opioid and non-opioid medication consumption, pain scores and opioid-related adverse events are documented throughout the study. Quality of life, depression, function, and attitude to pain medications are also assessed. Discussion This randomised controlled trial will determine whether EA is of significant clinical value in assisting the management of

  1. The effect of Kinesiotape application on functional performance in surgeons who have musculo-skeletal pain after performing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Nihan; Bicici, Seda; Baltaci, Gul; Caner, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons make up a unique group that is at risk for developing work-related musculoskeletal symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Kinesiotape technique on pain and functional performance in surgeons who have musculoskeletal system pain after performing surgery. 32 surgeons between the ages of 27 and 44 yrs working in a university hospital were included. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the surgeons' neck and low back pain and the Oswestry Low Back and Neck Disability Indexes were used to determine the impact of pain on daily living activities. First, surgeons were evaluated without Kinesiotape application, then evaluated again on the first day and fourth day of Kinesiotape application. The results showed that surgeons had a significant reduction in neck and low back pain (p < 0.05). There were improvements in both Oswestry Low Back Disability Index and Neck Disability Index scores when compared with their initial status (p < 0.05). After Kinesiotape application, neck and low back range of motions' scores showed an increase (p < 0.05). Findings demonstrated that Kinesio taping would be an effective method for reducing neck and low back pain and improving functional performance.

  2. Effects of aerobic exercise on pain sensitivity, heart rate recovery, and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öte Karaca, Şeyda; Demirsoy, Nesrin; Günendi, Zafer

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise on pain perception, sensitivity, and health-related quality of life; to assess its effect on parasympathetic tonus by analysis of heart rate recovery; and to examine the effects of parasympathetic tone on pain sensitivity in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Fifty patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain were randomized into two groups: control group (C group) and aerobic exercise group (AE group). Both groups received conventional physical therapy for 2 weeks; the AE group performed submaximal aerobic exercise on a treadmill for 30 min additionally. Exercise test, pressure-pain threshold measurement, short form-36, and visual analog scale were administered initially and finally for evaluation. Visual analog scale scores in both groups decreased significantly after treatment (Pexercise test duration was significant in the AE group compared with the C group (P=0.0002). Heart rate recovery did not change with therapy in the groups. For short form-36, the AE group showed alterations in role limitations because of physical problems and general health perceptions; both groups showed a significant improvement in the physical function and bodily pain subscales, but mental health significantly improved only in C group. Short-term aerobic exercise along with conventional physical therapy decreased pain sensitivity and increased aerobic capacity, with significant improvements in health-related quality of life.

  3. Threshold of musculoskeletal pain intensity for increased risk of long-term sickness absence among female healthcare workers in eldercare.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars L Andersen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Musculoskeletal disorders increase the risk for absenteeism and work disability. However, the threshold when musculoskeletal pain intensity significantly increases the risk of sickness absence among different occupations is unknown. This study estimates the risk for long-term sickness absence (LTSA from different pain intensities in the low back, neck/shoulder and knees among female healthcare workers in eldercare. METHODS: Prospective cohort study among 8,732 Danish female healthcare workers responding to a questionnaire in 2004-2005, and subsequently followed for one year in a national register of social transfer payments (DREAM. Using Cox regression hazard ratio (HR analysis we modeled risk estimates of pain intensities on a scale from 0-9 (reference 0, where 0 is no pain and 9 is worst imaginable pain in the low back, neck/shoulders and knees during the last three months for onset of LTSA (receiving sickness absence compensation for at least eight consecutive weeks during one-year follow-up. RESULTS: During follow-up, the 12-month prevalence of LTSA was 6.3%. With adjustment for age, BMI, smoking and leisure physical activity, the thresholds of pain intensities significantly increasing risk of LTSA for the low back (HR 1.44 [95%CI 1.07-1.93], neck/shoulders (HR 1.47 [95%CI 1.10-1.96] and knees (HR 1.43 [95%CI 1.06-1.93] were 5, 4 and 3 (scale 0-9, respectively, referencing pain intensity of 0. CONCLUSION: The threshold of pain intensity significantly increasing the risk for LTSA among female healthcare workers varies across body regions, with knee pain having the lowest threshold. This knowledge may be used in the prevention of LTSA among health care workers.

  4. Multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence as a predictor of medical and social welfare benefits in young adulthood: The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhoff, C; Straume, B; Kvernmo, S

    2017-07-06

    Pain in adolescence is associated with mental health problems, the main reason for work disability in young adults. This study explores the relationship between multisite musculoskeletal pain in adolescence and later medical (sickness and medical rehabilitation benefits) and social welfare benefits, adjusted for sociodemographic, adolescent psychosocial and mental health problems. Data were obtained by linkage between the National Insurance Registry (2003-11) and the Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study, a school-based survey in North Norway (2003-05), accepted by 3987 fifteen- to sixteen-year-olds (68% of the total population). The start of the follow-up time was July 1st of the corresponding year the participants responded to the health study. Musculoskeletal pain was measured by the number of musculoskeletal pain sites. We found a positive linear relationship between adolescent musculoskeletal pain sites and the occurrence of medical and social welfare benefits in young adulthood (p ≤ 0.001). Adolescent musculoskeletal pain was a significant predictor of sickness (p adolescent psychosocial and mental health problems. The most important adolescent psychosocial predictors were externalizing problems, less parental involvement and adverse life events. Adolescent multisite musculoskeletal pain was found to be an important predictor of later sickness and social welfare benefit receipt from adolescence to young adulthood. Adolescents with multisite musculoskeletal pain are at substantially increased risk of health and social difficulties into young adulthood. Identification and interventions for these adolescent problems could alleviate this risk and be a sound socioeconomic investment. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  5. Association between sense of coherence and health-related quality of life among primary care patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbler, Neale R; Kroenke, Kurt; Outcalt, Samantha; Bair, Matthew J; Krebs, Erin; Wu, Jingwei; Yu, Zhangsheng

    2013-12-26

    Sense of Coherence (SOC) is a measure of an individual's capacity to use various coping mechanisms and resources when faced with a stressor. Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent and disabling conditions in clinical practice. This study examines the extent to which a strong SOC is associated with less pain and better health related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with chronic pain. We analyzed data from the Stepped Care to Optimize Pain care Effectiveness (SCOPE) trial which enrolled 250 patients with persistent (3 months or longer) musculoskeletal pain who were receiving care in an United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care clinic. The abbreviated three-item SOC scale was used to measure personal coping capability. Participants were categorized into Strong SOC (score 0-1) and Weak SOC (score 2-6). The Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was used to assess the severity and disability associated with pain. Additionally, pain self-efficacy (ASES) and catastrophizing (CSQ) were assessed. HRQoL was assessed with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) social functioning, vitality, and general health subscales. Multiple linear regression models were performed to examine whether SOC was independently associated with pain-specific and HRQoL outcomes, after adjusting for sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics, medical comorbidities and major depression. Of the 250 study patients, 61% had a strong SOC whereas 39% had a weak SOC. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that a strong SOC was significantly associated with better general health, vitality, social functioning and pain self-efficacy as well as less pain catastrophizing. These significant findings were partially attenuated, but remained statistically significant, after controlling for major depression. SOC was not significantly associated with pain severity or pain disability. A strong SOC is associated with better HRQoL and self-efficacy as well as less

  6. Prescribing Generic Medication in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Patients: An Issue of Representations, Trust, and Experience in a Swiss Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piguet, Valérie; D'Incau, Stéphanie; Besson, Marie; Desmeules, Jules; Cedraschi, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Parallel to an ever stronger advocacy for the use of generics, various sources of information report concerns regarding substitution. The literature indicates that information regarding substitution is not univocal. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore patients' representations regarding generics in patients suffering from non-specific disabling chronic musculoskeletal pain, as these patients are confronted with the issue of the prescription and/or substitution of original formulations with generics. Qualitative methods were selected because the aim was to access the range of patients' representations and to consider their conceptions. Standardized face-to-face semi-structured interviews were used, and transcripts were submitted to content analysis. Patients' representations suggest that they might be confident in taking a generic medication: when he/she has an understanding of generics as resulting from a development process that has become part of the public domain; the generic medication is prescribed by the physician; each prescription is discussed, i.e., the patient is prescribed the generic version of a given medication and not a generic medication. Economic arguments are not sufficient to justify substitution, and may even raise issues calling upon cognitive dissonance. Even in non-life-threatening diseases, negative cues require attention and need be de-emphasized - in particular lower price as an indication of lower quality, and generic status as contradictory with advocating individualization of medication.

  7. Prescribing Generic Medication in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain Patients: An Issue of Representations, Trust, and Experience in a Swiss Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Piguet

    Full Text Available Parallel to an ever stronger advocacy for the use of generics, various sources of information report concerns regarding substitution. The literature indicates that information regarding substitution is not univocal. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore patients' representations regarding generics in patients suffering from non-specific disabling chronic musculoskeletal pain, as these patients are confronted with the issue of the prescription and/or substitution of original formulations with generics.Qualitative methods were selected because the aim was to access the range of patients' representations and to consider their conceptions. Standardized face-to-face semi-structured interviews were used, and transcripts were submitted to content analysis.Patients' representations suggest that they might be confident in taking a generic medication: when he/she has an understanding of generics as resulting from a development process that has become part of the public domain; the generic medication is prescribed by the physician; each prescription is discussed, i.e., the patient is prescribed the generic version of a given medication and not a generic medication.Economic arguments are not sufficient to justify substitution, and may even raise issues calling upon cognitive dissonance. Even in non-life-threatening diseases, negative cues require attention and need be de-emphasized - in particular lower price as an indication of lower quality, and generic status as contradictory with advocating individualization of medication.

  8. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders : back to work report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinder, A.; Yeomans, L.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.; Verjans, M.; Muylaert, K.; Broeck, V.de; Buffet, M.A.; Nevala, N.

    2007-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are impairments of bodily structures, such as muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments, nerves or the localised blood circulation system. MSDs can interfere with activities at work, and can cause an increase in sickness absence, and chronic occupational

  9. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Calculosis in Fibromyalgia Patients: Impact on Musculoskeletal Pain, Somatic Hyperalgesia and Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Raffaele; Affaitati, Giannapia; Massimini, Francesca; Tana, Claudio; Innocenti, Paolo; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2016-01-01

    Fibromyalgia, a chronic syndrome of diffuse musculoskeletal pain and somatic hyperalgesia from central sensitization, is very often comorbid with visceral pain conditions. In fibromyalgia patients with gallbladder calculosis, this study assessed the short and long-term impact of laparoscopic cholecystectomy on fibromyalgia pain symptoms. Fibromyalgia pain (VAS scale) and pain thresholds in tender points and control areas (skin, subcutis and muscle) were evaluated 1week before (basis) and 1week, 1,3,6 and 12months after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in fibromyalgia patients with symptomatic calculosis (n = 31) vs calculosis patients without fibromyalgia (n. 26) and at comparable time points in fibromyalgia patients not undergoing cholecystectomy, with symptomatic (n = 27) and asymptomatic (n = 28) calculosis, and no calculosis (n = 30). At basis, fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis patients presented a significant linear correlation between the number of previously experienced biliary colics and fibromyalgia pain (direct) and muscle thresholds (inverse)(pfibromyalgia pain significantly increased and all thresholds significantly decreased at 1week and 1month (1-way ANOVA, pFibromyalgia pain and thresholds returned to preoperative values at 3months, then pain significantly decreased and thresholds significantly increased at 6 and 12months (pfibromyalgia patients undergoing cholecystectomy thresholds did not change; in all other fibromyalgia groups not undergoing cholecystectomy fibromyalgia pain and thresholds remained stable, except in fibromyalgia+symptomatic calculosis at 12months when pain significantly increased and muscle thresholds significantly decreased (pfibromyalgia symptoms and that laparoscopic cholecystectomy produces only a transitory worsening of these symptoms, largely compensated by the long-term improvement/desensitization due to gallbladder removal. This study provides new insights into the role of visceral pain comorbidities and the effects of

  10. Taking Care : NSAIDs in the treatment of musculoskeletal complaints in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Koffeman (Aafke)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Musculoskeletal complaints form a common problem in the general population. A 2006 study into self-reported chronic complaints of the musculoskeletal system found a prevalence of around 40%. When asked whether any musculoskeletal pain had been experienced over the past

  11. Is there really a relationship between serum vitamin D (25OHD) levels and the musculoskeletal pain associated with statin intake? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, Claudia Alejandra; Nishishinya, Maria Betina

    Musculoskeletal pain associated to statin use, is the most common adverse event, leading to cessation of treatment. Several studies proposed Vitamin D deficiency to increase the risk of pain associated to statin intake. To evaluate whether vitamin D status is linked to musculoskeletal pain associated to statin use. We performed a systematic review based on electronic searches through MEDLINE, Cochrane Central and EMBASE to identify studies that 1) included patients on statin therapy 2) with vitamin D serum levels assessment, 3) in relation to musculoskeletal pain. The electronic search identified 127 potentially eligible studies, of which three were included and analysed in the present study. The heterogeneity of studies did not allow metanalysis. A systematic review and two cohort studies not included in the previous systematic review, revealed a statistically significant association of vitamin D deficit in patients with musculoskeletal pain on statin therapy. The displayed evidence suggests a significant association between 25OHD serum levels<30ng/ml and the presence of musculoskeletal pain in patients on statin therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions among Indian Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Pregnancy triggers a wide range of changes in a woman’s body leading to various musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Most commonly reported musculoskeletal discomforts by pregnant women are low back pain and symphysis pubis pain. The culture and the environmental factors may influence the discomforts experienced by a pregnant woman. There is a dearth of literature in India, regarding the common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by a pregnant woman, and hence this study. Method. A questionnaire to identify the musculoskeletal dysfunction was developed; content was validated and was translated to local languages through parallel back translation. 261 primiparous pregnant women participated in the study and filled the questionnaire in their native language. Results. Among the musculoskeletal dysfunctions reported by the pregnant women, 64.6% reported calf muscle cramps, 37.1% reported foot pain, and 33.7% experienced low back pain in their third trimester. In the second trimester, common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by the women were that of calf pain (47.8%, low back pain (42%, and pelvic girdle pain (37%. Conclusion. Musculoskeletal dysfunctions and general discomforts very commonly affect the activities of daily living of pregnant women. Understanding the common discomforts during various trimesters of pregnancy will help to develop a comprehensive program for prevention and cure.

  13. Prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions among Indian pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Preetha; Maiya, Arun G; Kumar, Pratap; Kamath, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy triggers a wide range of changes in a woman's body leading to various musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Most commonly reported musculoskeletal discomforts by pregnant women are low back pain and symphysis pubis pain. The culture and the environmental factors may influence the discomforts experienced by a pregnant woman. There is a dearth of literature in India, regarding the common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by a pregnant woman, and hence this study. A questionnaire to identify the musculoskeletal dysfunction was developed; content was validated and was translated to local languages through parallel back translation. 261 primiparous pregnant women participated in the study and filled the questionnaire in their native language. Among the musculoskeletal dysfunctions reported by the pregnant women, 64.6% reported calf muscle cramps, 37.1% reported foot pain, and 33.7% experienced low back pain in their third trimester. In the second trimester, common musculoskeletal dysfunctions experienced by the women were that of calf pain (47.8%), low back pain (42%), and pelvic girdle pain (37%). Musculoskeletal dysfunctions and general discomforts very commonly affect the activities of daily living of pregnant women. Understanding the common discomforts during various trimesters of pregnancy will help to develop a comprehensive program for prevention and cure.

  14. Musculo-skeletal pain among 40- and 45-year olds in Oslo: differences between two socioeconomically contrasting areas, and their possible explanations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjortdahl Per

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the study was to compare the prevalence and severity of musculo-skeletal pain between two socioeconomically contrasting areas in Oslo, Norway, and to explore possible explanatory factors. Methods Questionnaire survey, carried out as part of The Oslo Health Study in 2000–2001. Data from 821 persons (40 and 45 year old living in a less affluent inner city area (called east were compared with 854 persons living in an affluent area of the city (called west. Bivariate comparisons (chi square test and multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate differences between the samples. Results 61 % in east and 56 % in west (p Conclusion Musculo-skeletal pain is reported by 55–60 % of middle aged persons in Oslo during a four week period, and must be considered a normal phenomenon. Poor social conditions, inactivity, mental health problems and being an immigrant imply increased risk of more severe symptoms with a concomitant demand of health care.

  15. Management of musculoskeletal pain in retail drug outlets within a Nigerian community: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdu-Aguye, Samirah N; Shehu, Aishatu; Ahmad, Ubaidullah I

    2017-01-01

    This work aimed to describe attitudes and practices of both community pharmacies and patent and proprietary medicine vendor (PPMV) outlets towards over-the-counter (OTC) analgesic use for musculoskeletal pain states within Zaria, Nigeria. The study was carried out in 2 phases from May to August 2016. Phase one was a cross-sectional survey of 40 retail drug outlets (10 community pharmacies and 30 PPMVs). A simulated patient scenario of a young adult male complaining of acute onset back pain was used to collect data on the type and quality of analgesic recommended, duration of consultation, as well as nature of information provided during the drug dispensing process. The second phase involved semi structured interviews with 7 drug vendors (4 pharmacists and 3 patent medicine vendors). The interviewees were asked questions to assess their knowledge of analgesics as well as what type of analgesic they would recommend in three hypothetical patient scenarios. A wide variety of therapeutic agents were recommended for the simulated patient. Majority of these drugs were oral analgesics and contained NSAIDS either alone or in combination. Less than half of both patent medicine outlets and pharmacies (26.7% and 40% respectively) provided the simulated patient with information on duration of therapy, and asked the patient questions about their past medical and medication history (30% and 33.3% respectively). All analgesics purchased from the pharmacies were registered with the Nigerian drug regulatory agency and had expiry dates compared to only 66.7% and 90% of those bought from patent medicine outlets. Interviewed drug vendors admitted to obtaining a large amount of their knowledge on analgesics from drug information leaflets and prior learning. They also showed some knowledge deficits when questioned on side effects of analgesics and appropriate drug selection in the hypothetical scenarios. There are problems with both the OTC analgesics recommended, and the counselling

  16. Management of musculoskeletal pain in retail drug outlets within a Nigerian community: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdu-Aguye SN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work aimed to describe attitudes and practices of both community pharmacies and patent and proprietary medicine vendor (PPMV outlets towards over-the-counter (OTC analgesic use for musculoskeletal pain states within Zaria, Nigeria. Methods: The study was carried out in 2 phases from May to August 2016. Phase one was a cross-sectional survey of 40 retail drug outlets (10 community pharmacies and 30 PPMVs. A simulated patient scenario of a young adult male complaining of acute onset back pain was used to collect data on the type and quality of analgesic recommended, duration of consultation, as well as nature of information provided during the drug dispensing process. The second phase involved semi structured interviews with 7 drug vendors (4 pharmacists and 3 patent medicine vendors. The interviewees were asked questions to assess their knowledge of analgesics as well as what type of analgesic they would recommend in three hypothetical patient scenarios. Results: A wide variety of therapeutic agents were recommended for the simulated patient. Majority of these drugs were oral analgesics and contained NSAIDS either alone or in combination. Less than half of both patent medicine outlets and pharmacies (26.7% and 40% respectively provided the simulated patient with information on duration of therapy, and asked the patient questions about their past medical and medication history (30% and 33.3% respectively. All analgesics purchased from the pharmacies were registered with the Nigerian drug regulatory agency and had expiry dates compared to only 66.7% and 90% of those bought from patent medicine outlets. Interviewed drug vendors admitted to obtaining a large amount of their knowledge on analgesics from drug information leaflets and prior learning. They also showed some knowledge deficits when questioned on side effects of analgesics and appropriate drug selection in the hypothetical scenarios. Conclusions: There are problems with both

  17. Study protocol for a multicentre randomized controlled trial on effectiveness of an outpatient multimodal rehabilitation program for adolescents with chronic musculoskeletal pain (2B Active)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Carolien; Goossens, Mariëlle E J B; Bastiaenen, Caroline H.G.; Verbunt, Jeanine A M C F

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) in adolescents can influence functioning and well-being, and has negative consequences for families and society as well. According to the Fear Avoidance Model, fear of movement and pain catastrophizing can influence the occurrence and maintenance of chr

  18. Impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of neck and upper extremities on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. IJzelenberg (Wilhelmina); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: To describe the presence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities among industrial workers with low back pain, and to examine whether it has an impact on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain. METHODS: A self admini

  19. Does an Exercise Intervention Improving Aerobic Capacity Among Construction Workers Also Improve Musculoskeletal Pain, Work Ability, Productivity, Perceived Physical Exertion, and Sick Leave?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Bültmann, Ute;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether an exercise intervention shown to increase aerobic capacity, would also lead to less musculoskeletal pain; improved work ability, productivity, and perceived physical exertion; and less sick leave. METHODS:: Sixty-seven construction workers were randomized...... into an exercise group training 3 × 20 minutes per week and a control group. Questionnaires and text messages were completed before and after the 12-week intervention. RESULTS:: No significant changes were found in musculoskeletal pain, work ability, productivity, perceived physical exertion, and sick leave...... with the intervention. Questionnaires and text messages provided similar results of pain and work ability. CONCLUSIONS:: Although the intervention improved aerobic capacity, it was not successful in improving musculoskeletal pain and other work-related factors. A detectable improvement presumably requires a more...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Mimicking Orofacial Pain: A Unique Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveenkumar Ramdurg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic neuroma (AN, also called vestibular schwannoma, is a tumor composed of Schwann cells that most frequently involve the vestibular division of the VII cranial nerve. The most common symptoms include orofacial pain, facial paralysis, trigeminal neuralgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, and imbalance that result from compression of cranial nerves V–IX. Symptoms of acoustic neuromas can mimic and present as temporomandibular disorder. Therefore, a thorough medical and dental history, radiographic evaluation, and properly conducted diagnostic testing are essential in differentiating odontogenic pain from pain that is nonodontogenic in nature. This article reports a rare case of a young pregnant female patient diagnosed with an acoustic neuroma located in the cerebellopontine angle that was originally treated for musculoskeletal temporomandibular joint disorder.

  1. Pre-operative diclofenac HPβCD for pain control of needle biopsy in musculoskeletal neoplasm: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arienzo, Antonio; Beltrami, Giovanni; Mancini, Daniele; Scoccianti, Guido; Cuomo, Pierluigi; Muratori, Francesco; Matera, Davide; Ippolito, Massimiliano; Mondanelli, Nicola; Frenos, Filippo; Totti, Francesca; Capanna, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Needle biopsy is the main standard method used for diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumors of the limbs and superficial trunk. Pain control during this procedure is through the use of Local Anaestetic (L.A.). In order to achieve a complete pain control in our cases, recently we started using diclofenac HPβCD 50 mg via s.c. preoperativly. We present the clinical results of a non-randomized study of two eterogeneous groups of patients: "Experimental" Group (1): diclofenac HPβCD 50 mg via s.c. one hour before surgical procedure, local anesthesia and ev. diclofenac HPβCD 50 mg via s.c. 12 hours postoperative; "Conventional" Group (2): local anesthesia and ev. postoperative tramadol 100 mg via oral for pain control. In October 2014, at the Department of Orthopedic Oncology and Reconstructive Surgery of Florence, 37 musculoskeletal biopsies for a bone or a soft tissue lesion were performed. Exclusion criteria for this study were: known allergies to lidocaine, diclofenac, tramadol; known gastric or duodenal ulcers; known gastrointestinal bleed or perforation; refusal of the patients to collaborate. For one or more of these reasons, 6 patients were excluded from this study. In the Group 1, 10 patients (59%) referred no pain during the surgical procedure (8/14 biopsies on soft tissue and 2/3 on bone). In 5 cases (29%) no exacerbation of previous chronic pain, and in 2 cases (12%) a progression of local pain after biopsy (average 1 points higher in the VAS). In Group 2, only 6 patients (42%) did not have any pain during the procedure, 4 (29%) no exacerbation of previous chronic pain and 4 (29%) a progression of local pain (average 2 points higher in the VAS). Despite similar results in both Groups, Group 1 seemed to have a mild better control of perioperative pain. The use of diclofenac HPβCD 50 mg preoperative seems to be a rational approach for minimizing perioperative pain and the preliminary data of our study seem encouraging. Obviously many bias are present in this

  2. Differences in symptoms, functioning, and quality of life between women on long-term sick-leave with musculoskeletal pain with and without concomitant depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunilla Brodda; Linder, Jürgen; Ekholm, Kristina Schüldt; Ekholm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to describe the differences in symptoms, functioning and quality of life between women on long-term sick-leave due to protracted musculoskeletal pain with and without concomitant depression. Descriptive and comparisons with/without comorbid depression. 332 female patients were examined by three specialist physicians in psychiatry, orthopedic surgery, and rehabilitation medicine and assigned to four groups according to the ICD-10 diagnoses: low back/joint disorders (LBJ, n = 150), myalgia (M, n = 43), fibromyalgia (FM, n = 87), or depression without somatic pain diagnosis (DE, n = 52). Patients with somatic pain conditions LBJ, M, or FM showed more activity-related difficulties if concomitant depression was present during the activities 'focusing attention', 'making decisions', and 'undertaking a single task'; and in the domains 'energy level', 'memory functions', 'emotional functions', and 'optimism/pessimism'. Patients with FM and concomitant depression perceived higher pain intensity than patients in group DE. No statistically significant differences in physically related activities were noted between each of the somatic pain conditions with and without coexisting depression. FM patients with coexisting depression reported fewer painful sites on their pain drawings compared with FM-patients without depression. Patients with LBJ or FM and concomitant depression reported lower quality of life in the dimensions vitality, social functioning, emotional role, and mental health. Comorbid depression affected disability and restricted working capacity by reducing mental activity and functioning but not by affecting physical activity problems. Women on long-term sick-leave, who have concomitant depression with LBJ or FM, also have more difficulties in focusing attention, making decisions, and carrying out tasks, and with memory functions and optimism/pessimism, as well as reduced quality of life in the dimensions of vitality, social functioning, emotional role

  3. Effect of Video-Based versus Personalized Instruction on Errors during Elastic Tubing Exercises for Musculoskeletal Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Schraefel, M. C.; Brandt, M.;

    2014-01-01

    only instruction in four typical neck/shoulder/arm rehabilitation exercises using elastic tubing. At a 2-week follow-up, the participants' technical execution was assessed by two blinded physical therapists using a reliable error assessment tool. The error assessment was based on ordinal deviation.......002). For the remaining three exercises the normalized error score did not differ. In conclusion, when instructing simple exercises to reduce musculoskeletal pain the use of video material is a cost-effective solution that can be implemented easily in corporations with challenging work schedules not allowing for a fixed...

  4. Type D personality is a risk factor for psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescents: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Condén Emelie; Leppert Jerzy; Ekselius Lisa; Åslund Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Type D personality, or the “distressed personality”, is a psychosocial factor associated with negative health outcomes, although its impact in younger populations is unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Type D personality and the associations between Type D personality and psychosomatic symptoms and musculoskeletal pain among adolescences. Methods A population-based, self-reported cross-sectional study conducted in Västmanland, Sweden wit...

  5. Validation of the French Version of the “Patterns of Activity Measure” in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, François

    2017-01-01

    Background. The “Patterns of Activity Measure” (POAM-P) is a self-administered questionnaire that assesses “avoidance”, “pacing” and “overdoing” activity patterns in chronic pain patients. Objectives. To adapt the POAM-P to French (“POAM-P/F”) and test its validity and reliability in Chronic Musculo-Skeletal Pain patients (CMSP). Methods. We followed the recommended procedure for translation of questionnaires. Five hundred and ninety five inpatients, admitted to a tertiary rehab center in the French-speaking part of Switzerland for chronic pain after orthopedic trauma, were included (sex ratio M/F = 4.36, mean age 43 ± 12). Face, content and criterion validities, internal consistency and reliability were assessed. Data included: TAMPA Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI), Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results. Face and content validities were checked during the translation process. Correlations between POAM-P/F-avoidance and TSK, POAM-P/F-pacing and CPCI-pacing, POAM-P/F-overdoing and CPCI-task persistence were highly significant (r > 0.3, p 0.8) and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients > 0.8). They correlated very differently with the other scales. Discussion and Conclusion. The three POAM-P/F subscales clearly assess different behaviors in CMSP. The POAM-P/F is a suitable questionnaire for classifying French speaking CMSP into avoiders, pacers or overdoers.

  6. A prospective study of the impact of musculoskeletal pain and radiographic osteoarthritis on health related quality of life in community dwelling older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laslett Laura L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain and radiographic changes are common in persons with osteoarthritis, but their relative contributions to quality of life are unknown. Methods Prospective cohort study of 1098 men and women aged 50–80 years, randomly selected from the electoral roll. Participants were interviewed at baseline and approximately 2.6 and five years later. Participants self-reported prior diagnosis of arthritis and presence of joint pain. Joint space narrowing (JSN and osteophytes at the hip and knee were assessed by X-ray. Quality of life (QoL was assessed using the Assessment of QoL (AQoL instrument. Data was analysed using linear regression and mixed modelling. Results The median AQoL score at baseline was 7.0, indicating very good QoL. Prevalence of pain ranged from 38-62%. Over five years of observation, pain in the neck, shoulders, back, hips, hands, knees and feet were all independently and negatively associated with QoL, in a dose–response relationship. Diagnosed osteoarthritis at all sites was associated with poorer QoL but after adjustment for pain, this only remained significant at the back. Radiographic OA was not associated with QoL. While AQoL scores declined over five years, there was no evidence of an interaction between pain and time. Conclusions Pain is common in older adults, is stable over time, and the strongest musculoskeletal correlate of QoL. It also mediates the association between diagnosed OA and QoL. Since the same factors were associated with quality of life over time as at baseline, this suggests that quality of life tracks over a five year period.

  7. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/16j

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasvinder A Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed.

  8. Late diagnosis of lateral meningocele syndrome in a 55-year-old woman with symptoms of joint instability and chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ritelli, Marco; Brancati, Francesco; De Bernardo, Carmelilia; Colombi, Marina; Grammatico, Paola

    2014-02-01

    Lateral meningocele syndrome (LMS) is a rare hereditary connective tissue disorder characterized by pan-spinal meningoceles, specific facial dysmorphism, skeletal and soft tissue abnormalities, and hypotonia and/or muscle weakness. LMS has been observed in eleven patients with two instances of vertical transmission, and seven sporadic cases with an age at diagnosis ranging from 25 months to 33 years. We report on a further observation of LMS in a 55-year-old woman presenting with a long history of joint instability, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and iatrogenic bladder and anorectal dysfunction due to irreversible nerve damage after surgical excision of a meningeal cyst. Her clinical characteristics are compared with those of previously reported patients, as well as two further cases originally diagnosed with Hajdu-Cheney and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes, but displaying typical features of LMS.

  9. Pain originating from the sacroiliac joint is a common non-traumatic musculoskeletal complaint in elite inline-speedskaters - an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhe Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study design Observational study Objectives To investigate common non-traumatic musculoskeletal complaints of the low back in elite inline-speedskaters of the German national team. Summary of background data Traumatic injuries associated with falls or collisions are well documented in speedskaters but so far no studies have investigated non-traumatic low back pain. Previously, the sacroiliac joint was suspected as a frequent origin of complaint, we aimed to investigate this assumption. Methods Two chiropractors examined elite inline-speedskaters of the German national team during three sports events between summer 2010 and 2011. A test cluster of five provocative tests for the sacroiliac joint was selected based on reliability and validity. Results A total of 37 examinations were conducted on 34 athletes with low back pain during the three sport events. The reported pain intensities ranged from mild to moderate pain (VAS 23.4 ± 13.4 to 35.1 ± 19.2. About 90% of cases showed involvement of the SI joint of which again 90% presented with left sided symptoms. Conclusions Non-traumatic complaints of the low back originating from the left sacroiliac joint frequently occur in competitive inline speedskaters.

  10. Neutrophil counts distinguish between malignancy and arthritis in children with musculoskeletal pain: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agodi Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify the predictive factors for malignancies using basic clinical and laboratory information in children presenting with musculoskeletal pain and eventually diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA or malignancy. Methods A retrospective case–control chart review research examining laboratory data from patients referred for musculoskeletal pain in 2001–2010 and diagnosed with malignancy or JIA was performed. The validity of each test for the diagnosis of neoplasia was assessed by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values (PPV, negative predictive values (NPV and likelihood ratios. Results A total of 134 patients were enrolled. Statistically significant differences were found in neutrophil count, Hb, LDH, IgA and C4 values, ANA, anti-EA EBV IgG and anti-CMV IgG titres. High LDH value and anti-CMV IgG were the most predictive factors for neoplasia. High specificity factors for neoplasia were abnormal values of neutrophil count, Hb, IgA and C4, and the presence of anti-EA EBV and anti-CMV IgG. High PPV were recorded for abnormal neutrophil count, Hb value and anti-CMV titre. A low NPV was found only for anti-EA EBV and anti-CMV titres. Conclusions In this setting of patients, minimum changes in neutrophil count, particularly if associated with low Hb and high LDH levels, are to be thoroughly considered, because they appear as the most predictive factors for the diagnosis of tumour.

  11. Pain, range of motion and activity level as correlates of dynamic balance among elderly people with musculoskeletal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, A I; Ababio, E; Antwi-Baffoe, S; Seidu, M A; Adjei, D N

    2014-12-01

    Assessment of impairment and disability measures on dynamic balance status of elderly patients is well documented in the rehabilitation of neuromuscular disorders. Few studies however considered similar evaluation in musculoskeletal disorders. To determine the influence of pain, hip range of motion and level of activity on dynamic balance among elderly people with hip osteoarthritis (OA). Elderly patients with hip OA participated in the cross-sectional survey. The impairment measures were assessed using the visual analogue scale and double-arm universal goniometer whilst their levels of activity were assessed with the Barthel Index. Participants performed Turn-180 on two trials by taking steps clockwise and anti-clockwise round a sturdy arm chair. The total number of steps taken to complete each Turn- 180 was determined. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize data whilst Pearson moment correlation coefficient determined the correlations of the variables at 95% confidence interval. The study involved 87 participants comprising 40(46%) males and 47(54%) females. The age of the participants ranged from 60 to 74 years with a mean of 65.8±4.5 years. There was a positive and significant correlation (r=0.596; pbalance of the sampled elderly patients was considerably influenced by pain, hip flexibility and level of activity, thereby putting premium on the assessment of the variables during musculoskeletal rehabilitation of elderly patients.

  12. Musculoskeletal neck-shoulder pain : a new ambulant myofeedback intervention approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voerman, Gerritje Evelien

    2007-01-01

    Persisting musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder region are highly prevalent and associated with high health care and community costs in industrialized countries. The mechanisms underlying the development and perpetuation of these complaints have not fully been identified yet, but explanat

  13. Sprengel's Deformity Associated with Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions and Renal Anomalies: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Kariminasab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sprengel's deformity is a rare congenital anomaly of the shoulder girdle. The deformity is due to failure of descent of the scapula in intrauterine life. Case Presentation. We report a case of unilateral Sprengel's deformity associated with several other musculoskeletal and renal disorders consisting of absence of pectoralis major, weakness of trapezius and serratus anterior muscles, one kidney agenesis, and severe hydronephrosis of the other kidney in a 7-year-old boy. Conclusion. Sprengel's deformity can be associated with other musculoskeletal abnormalities and it is much more than a cosmetic problem.

  14. Investigation of the relationship between carrying school bags (handbags and backpacks) and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pains among 12-15 year old students in Shiraz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arghavani, Farshad; Zamanian, Zahra; Ghanbary, Ali; Hassanzadeh, Jafar

    2014-04-01

    Inappropriate school bags put students at risk of musculoskeletal problems and early fatigue. Heavy bags can change the body posture and the musculoskeletal system must react appropriately in order to compensate for this stress. It is recommended that the weight of a school bag must not be more than 10% of the student's body weight and the weight must be placed on both shoulders. The present study aimed to identify the risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders by comparing the prevalence of musculoskeletal pains among the students. The present descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in different educational districts of Shiraz. The study samples were selected using cluster sampling method. In this study, 800 students marked their painful areas on body maps and the SPSS statistical software (v. 11.5) was used to analyze the data. The results showed that among the students who used backpacks, 48.9% carried the weight on both shoulders, 40.4% carried the weight on their right shoulders, and 10.6% used their left shoulders. Besides, 68.02% of the students carrying handbags often used their right shoulders, while 31.98% used their left shoulders. The study results showed that similar to other countries, Iranian students also mostly made use of backpacks. Moreover, the musculoskeletal pains were most prevalent in the shoulders, which is in line with many other studies conducted on the issue.

  15. Advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapists are effective and safe in managing patients with acute low back pain presenting to emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, James M; Kinsella, Rita M; Cary, Belinda A; Burge, Angela T; Kimmel, Lara A; Harding, Paula

    2017-05-25

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare emergency department (ED) key performance indicators for patients presenting with low back pain and seen by an advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapist (AMP) with those seen by other non-AMP clinicians (ED doctors and nurse practitioners).Methods A retrospective audit (October 2012-September 2013) was performed of data from three metropolitan public hospital EDs to compare patients with low back pain seen by AMP and non-AMP clinicians. Outcome measures included ED length of stay, ED wait time, admission rates and re-presentation to the ED.Results One thousand and eighty-nine patients with low back pain were seen during AMP service hours (360 in the AMP group, 729 in the non-AMP group). Patients seen by the AMP had a significantly shorter ED wait time (median 13 vs 32min; Pback pain when managed by an AMP compared with patients seen by doctors and nurse practitioners.What is known about the topic? There is a growing body of literature regarding the role of AMPs in the Australian healthcare system in providing clinical services for patients with musculoskeletal conditions, including settings such as the ED. AMPs have proven to be safe and cost-effective, achieving high patient satisfaction and improved patient outcomes. However, there is little to no information regarding their effect on ED metrics, such as ED length of stay, wait time and admission rates for patients presenting to the ED with low back pain.What does this paper add? This paper demonstrates improved ED metrics for patients presenting to the ED with low back pain when seen by an AMP compared with patients seen by doctors and nurse practitioners. The specific improved metrics for these patients were decreased admission rates, decreased ED length of stay and decreased wait time.What are the implications for clinicians? This paper provides evidence that the AMPs effectively discharge patients admitted to the ED in a timely manner, without evidence of

  16. Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain in China and Exercise Intervention%我国慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛现状与运动疗法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于涛

    2016-01-01

    Recently ,more and more evidence suggests that the prevalence of chronic musculo‐skeletal pain continues increasing .Moreover ,not only the old people ,but also the young people are found to be susceptible to chronic musculoskeletal pain .Although chronic musculoskeletal pain is not life‐threatening ,it leads to low mood ,low efficiency in work ,and consequently af‐fects the working capability and the life quality .However ,the effects of the traditional treat‐ment for chronic musculoskeletal pain are not satisfying .Therefore ,new treatment is needed for this issue .For this purpose ,we studied the characteristics of chronic musculoskeletal pain in China and discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the available treatments for chronic musculoskeletal pain .We emphasized on the effect and mechanism of the new‐coming exercise intervention for chronic musculoskeletal pain ,aiming to shed light on the novel treatment meth‐od for the chronic musculoskeletal pain .%近年来,慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛的发病率不断攀升,而且易患人群也从中老年人扩大到青少年。虽然慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛不危及生命,但是,长期的疼痛不但会导致工作情绪低落、工作效率下降,还可能产生精神抑郁从而严重影响患者的工作能力以及生活质量。而现有治疗手段的效果却并不令人满意,因此,急需一种积极有效的治疗方法。从我国的慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛的发病特点入手,分析现有治疗手段的优势和不足,重点介绍近年来不断兴起的运动干预疗法及其在慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛中的效果和机制研究,旨在为慢性肌肉骨骼疼痛的有效治疗寻求新的方向。

  17. Procedure-related musculoskeletal symptoms in gastrointestinal endoscopists in Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in gastrointestinal endoscopists in Korea. METHODS: A survey of musculoskeletal symptoms, using a self-administered questionnaire, was conducted on 55 endoscopists practicing in general hospitals or health promotion centers. RESULTS: Forty-nine (89.1%) endoscopists reported musculoskeletal pain on at least one anatomic location and 37 (67.3%) endoscopists complained of pain at rest. Twenty-six (47.3%) endoscopists had severe musculoskeletal pain defined as a visual analogue score greater than 5.5. Factors related to the development of severe pain were (1) standing position during upper endoscopy, (2) specific posture/ habit during endoscopic procedures, and (3) multiple symptomatic areas. Finger pain was more common in beginners, whereas shoulder pain was more common in experienced endoscopists. Sixteen percent of symptomatic endoscopists have modified their practice or reduced the number of endoscopic examinations. Only a few symptomatic endoscopists had sought professional consultation with related specialists. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in endoscopists is very high. The location of pain was different between beginners and experienced endoscopists. Measures for the prevention and adequate management of endoscopy-related musculoskeletal symptoms are necessary.

  18. Validation of the French Version of the “Patterns of Activity Measure” in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Benaim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The “Patterns of Activity Measure” (POAM-P is a self-administered questionnaire that assesses “avoidance”, “pacing” and “overdoing” activity patterns in chronic pain patients. Objectives. To adapt the POAM-P to French (“POAM-P/F” and test its validity and reliability in Chronic Musculo-Skeletal Pain patients (CMSP. Methods. We followed the recommended procedure for translation of questionnaires. Five hundred and ninety five inpatients, admitted to a tertiary rehab center in the French-speaking part of Switzerland for chronic pain after orthopedic trauma, were included (sex ratio M/F = 4.36, mean age 43±12. Face, content and criterion validities, internal consistency and reliability were assessed. Data included: TAMPA Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK, Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI, Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Results. Face and content validities were checked during the translation process. Correlations between POAM-P/F-avoidance and TSK, POAM-P/F-pacing and CPCI-pacing, POAM-P/F-overdoing and CPCI-task persistence were highly significant (r>0.3, p 0.8 and test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients > 0.8. They correlated very differently with the other scales. Discussion and Conclusion. The three POAM-P/F subscales clearly assess different behaviors in CMSP. The POAM-P/F is a suitable questionnaire for classifying French speaking CMSP into avoiders, pacers or overdoers.

  19. Primary care clinician adherence to guidelines for the management of chronic musculoskeletal pain: results from the study of the effectiveness of a collaborative approach to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, Kathryn; Doak, Melanie N; Denneson, Lauren; Crutchfield, Megan; Soleck, Geoffrey; Dickinson, Kathryn C; Gerrity, Martha S; Dobscha, Steven K

    2011-10-01

    We assessed primary care clinician-provided guideline-concordant care as documented in patients' medical records, predictors of documented guideline-concordant care, and its association with pain-related functioning. Patients were participants in a randomized trial of collaborative care for chronic musculoskeletal pain. The intervention featured patient and primary care clinician education, symptom monitoring and feedback to clinicians by the intervention team. To assess concordance with the evidence-based treatment guidelines upon which our intervention was based, we developed an 8-item chart review tool, the Pain Process Checklist (PPC). We then reviewed electronic medical records for 365 veteran patients treated by 42 primary care clinicians over 12 months. Intervention status, demographic, and clinical variables were tested as predictors of PPC scores using generalized estimating equations (GEE). GEE was also used to test whether PPC scores predicted treatment response (≥30% decrease in Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire score). Rates of documented guideline-concordant care varied widely among PPC items, from 94% of patients having pain addressed to 17% of patients on opioids having side effects addressed. Intervention status was unrelated to item scores, and PPC-7 totals did not differ significantly between intervention and treatment-as-usual patients (61.2%, standard error [SE] = 3.3% vs 55.2%, SE = 2.6%, P = 0.15). In a multivariate model, higher PPC-7 scores were associated with receiving a prescription for opioids (odds ratio [OR] = 1.07, P = 0.007) and lower PPC-7 scores with patient age (10-year difference OR = 0.97, P = 0.004). Finally, intervention patients who received quantitative pain and depression assessments were less likely to respond to treatment (assessed vs not: 18% vs 33%, P = 0.008, and 13% vs 28%, P = 0.001, respectively). As measured by medical record review, additional training and clinician feedback did not increase provision of

  20. Does an Exercise Intervention Improving Aerobic Capacity Among Construction Workers Also Improve Musculoskeletal Pain, Work Ability, Productivity, Perceived Physical Exertion, and Sick Leave? A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Bultmann, Ute; Sjogaard, Gisela; Sogaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether an exercise intervention shown to increase aerobic capacity, would also lead to less musculoskeletal pain; improved work ability, productivity, and perceived physical exertion; and less sick leave. Methods: Sixty-seven construction workers were randomized into an ex

  1. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain : A synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakke, Sandra E.; Soer, Remko; Takken, Tim; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prog

  2. Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_166848.html Fish Eaters Report Less Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Study suggests most fish may play role ... reduce the pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis, a new study says. Prior studies have shown ...

  3. Relationship of musculoskeletal pain with physical and functional variables and with postural changes in school children from 6 to 12 years of age

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela S. L. Pereira; Castro,Shamyr S.; Dernival Bertoncello; Renata Damião; Walsh,Isabel A. P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Painful disorders can affect children and adolescents, causing distress and significant demand for health services. OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and its relation to age, sex, body mass index (BMI), how to carry school supplies, postures used in ADLs, outside school physical exercises and postural changes in students. METHOD: Cross-sectional exploratory study with a convenience sample consisted of 262 schoolchildren aged 6 to 12 years (137 ...

  4. Pain Report and Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Operantly Conditioned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, Richel; Vuurman, Eric; Lamers, Theo; Breukelen, van Gerard; Jongen, Ellen; Rijnen, Heidi; Maessen, Christa; Hermens, Hermie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to answer the ques- tion whether pain report can be increased and decreased by operant conditioning. We predicted that the conditioned pain effects would remain significant after correction for social desirability and fantasy proneness. Furthermore, we

  5. Pain Report and Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Operantly Conditioned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, Richel; Vuurman, Eric; Lamers, Theo; van Breukelen, Gerard; Jongen, Ellen; Rijnen, Heidi; Maessen, Christa; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to answer the ques- tion whether pain report can be increased and decreased by operant conditioning. We predicted that the conditioned pain effects would remain significant after correction for social desirability and fantasy proneness. Furthermore, we

  6. The meanings given to gender in studies on multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain - a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren, Christina; Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine; Hamberg, Katarina; Johansson, Eva E; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess and describe the meanings given to "gender" in scientific publications that evaluate multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary or multimodal rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. A systematic literature search for papers evaluating multimodal rehabilitation was conducted. The PubMed and EBSCO databases were searched from 1995 to 2015. Two or three researchers independently read each paper, performed a quality assessment and coded meanings of gender using qualitative content analysis. Twenty-seven papers were included in the review. Gender was used very differently in the MMR studies investigated but primarily it referred to factual differences between men and women. Only one paper provided a definition of the concept of gender and how it had been used in that study. In the content analysis, the meaning of gender formed three categories: "Gender as a factual difference", "The man is the ideal" and "Gender as a result of social role expectations". The meaning of the concept of gender in multimodal rehabilitation is undefined and needs to be developed further. The way the concept is used should be defined in the design and evaluation of multimodal rehabilitation in future studies. Implications for rehabilitation Healthcare professionals should reflect on gender relations in encounters with patients, selection of patients into rehabilitation programs and design of programs. In rehabilitation for chronic pain the patients' social circumstances and cultural context should be given the same consideration as biological sex and pain symptoms.

  7. Use of botulinum toxin-A for musculoskeletal pain in patients with whiplash associated disorders [ISRCTN68653575

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiplash associated disorder is commonly linked to motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries. Cervical injury is attributed to rapid extension followed by neck flexion. The exact pathophysiology of whiplash is uncertain but probably involves some degree of aberrant muscle spasms and may produce a wide range of symptoms. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological agents for initial treatment of whiplash-associated pain are oral muscle relaxants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, potential systemic adverse effects limit these agents. Physical interventions such as mobilization, manipulation, and exercises have proved beneficial for pain and dysfunction but only on a time-limited basis. Little evidence suggests that physical therapy specifically aimed at the musculature (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasonography, heat, ice, and acupuncture improves prognosis in acute whiplash associated disorder. A new approach to treatment is the use of botulinum toxin, which acts to reduce muscle spasms. Methods/design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial and botulinum toxin-A (Botox® injections will be compared with placebo injections. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of Botox® in the management of musculoskeletal pain in whiplash associated disorders. Discussion Botulinum toxin type-A toxin has been studied in small trials on whiplash associated disorder patients and has generally been found to relieve pain and improve range of motion. Specifically, we seek to assess the efficacy of Botox® in reducing pain and to improve the cervical spine range of movement, during the 6-month trial period.

  8. Self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Marc O; Finan, Patrick H; Dolman, Andrew J; Subramanian, Subu; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Jamison, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the association between self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain. The potential moderators of the association between reports of side effects and pain-related activity interference were also examined. A total of 111 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain were asked to provide, once a month for a period of 6 months, self-reports of medication use and the presence of any perceived side effects (eg, nausea, dizziness, headaches) associated with their medications. At each of these time points, patients were also asked to provide self-reports of pain intensity, negative affect, and pain-related activity interference. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that month-to-month increases in perceived medication side effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference (P effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference even after controlling for the influence of patient demographics, pain intensity, and negative affect. This study provides preliminary evidence that reports of medication side effects are associated with heightened pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain beyond the influence of other pain-relevant variables. The implications of our findings for clinical practice and the management of patients with chronic pain conditions are discussed.

  9. Discordance between self-reported arthritis and musculoskeletal signs and symptoms in older women

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, TKT; Parkinson, Lynne; Cunich, Michelle; Byles, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Arthritis is a gendered disease where women have a higher prevalence and more disability than men with arthritis of the same age. Health survey data is a major source of information for monitoring of the burden of arthritis. The validity of self-reported arthritis and the determinants of its accuracy among women have not been thoroughly studied. The objectives of this study were to: 1) examine the agreement between self-report diagnosed arthritis and musculoskeletal signs and sympt...

  10. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara

    2015-01-01

    ) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On two different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analogue scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity......, as well as pressure pain threshold (PPT) with handheld pressure algometry were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after the cold-pressor induced CPM. Good to excellent intraclass correlations (ICCs: 0.60 - 0.90) were demonstrated for manual.......05). TSP were increased in women compared with men (PCPM demonstrated as increased cPPT, cPTT and reduced TSP (P

  11. A Randomized Trial of Musculoskeletal Pain Treatment in a Military Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    and psychosocial variables, please the attached appendices. Variable OR Conclusion Met Medical Board within One Year after FORT OR=1.8 Control...Headache=01 Fibromyalgia = 08 Myofac. Pain = 15 RSD/CRPS=02 HTN= 09 Other = 16 IBS = 03 Other chron... Fibromyalgia = 08 Myofac. Pain = 15 RSD/CRPS=02 HTN= 09 Other = 16 IBS = 03 Other chron pain=10 N/A=-9 TMD = 04

  12. Dor musculoesquelética idiopática difusa na infância e na adolescência Diffuse idiopathic musculoskeletal pain in childhood and adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Molina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: A dor musculoesquelética difusa idiopática persistente ou intermitente é definida pela presença de dor com duração de três meses ou mais, sem etiologia aparente, e tem acometido cada vez mais crianças e adolescentes. Este estudo objetivou relatar dois pacientes com dor incapacitante submetidos à abordagem e ao tratamento multiprofissional, além de discutir o tratamento conduzido, por meio de revisão da literatura atual. DESCRIÇÃO DO CASO: O primeiro caso é de uma menina com nove anos de idade, com histórico de cefaleia, dor mus-culoesquelética e dor abdominal há dois anos, período no qual apresentou quatro episódios de ausência de marcha, sem causas orgânicas aparentes. O segundo caso refere-se a uma adolescente de 14 anos com lombalgia diária há 14 meses de forte intensidade, com irradiação para membros inferiores, acompanhada de cefaleia, fadiga e adinamia. Ambas apresentavam exame físico normal, exceto pela presença de alodínia (caso 1 e pontos de fibromialgia (caso 2; além de exames subsidiários normais, sem justificativas orgânicas para as queixas dolorosas. Houve melhora clínica significativa após diagnóstico e tratamento diferencial por meio de abordagem multiprofissional (médico, psicólogo, fisioterapeuta e nutricionista, com retomada das atividades regulares pelas pacientes. COMENTÁRIOS: A atuação integrada da equipe em um curto período de tempo proporcionou às pacientes a retomada de suas atividades normais, visto que fatores emocionais, físicos e nutricionais relacionam-se à dor.OBJECTIVE: Persistent or intermittent diffuse idiopathic musculoskeletal pain is defined by the presence of pain over three months with no apparent etiology. The diagnosis of this condition in children and adolescents is increasing. The objective of this study was to report the cases of two patients with disabling pain that received multidiscipli-nary treatment and to review the current literature about this

  13. The relationship between sitting posture and seated-related upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain in computing South African adolescents: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Yolandi; Louw, Quinette; Grimmer, Karen; Jordaan, Esmè

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that consistent sitting for prolonged periods is associated with upper quadrant musculoskeletal pain (UQMP). It is unclear whether postural alignment is a significant risk factor. The aim of the prospective study (2010-2011) was to ascertain if three-dimensional sitting postural angles, measured in a real-life school computer classroom setting, predict seated-related UQMP. Asymptomatic Grade 10 high-school students, aged 15-17 years, undertaking Computer Application Technology, were eligible to participate. Using the 3D Posture Analysis Tool, sitting posture was measured while students used desk-top computers. Posture was reported as five upper quadrant angles (Head flexion, Neck flexion; Craniocervical angle, Trunk flexion and Head lateral bending). The Computer Usage Questionnaire measured seated-related UQMP and hours of computer use. The Beck Depression Inventory and the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children assessed psychosocial factors. Sitting posture, computer use and psychosocial factors were measured at baseline. UQMP was measured at six months and one-year follow-up. 211, 190 and 153 students participated at baseline, six months and one-year follow-up respectively. 34.2% students complained of seated-related UQMP during the follow-up period. Increased head flexion (HF) predicted seated-related UQMP developing over time for a small group of students with pain scores greater than the 90th pain percentile, adjusted for age, gender, BMI, computer use and psychosocial factors (p = 0.003). The pain score increased 0.22 points per 1° increase in HF. Classroom ergonomics and postural hygiene should therefore focus on reducing large HF angles among computing adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. STUDY DESIGN: This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA...... region separately showed significant pain reductions of the neck, shoulders, upper back and lower back, as well as a tendency for hand pain. Within the PCMT group, general linear models adjusted for age, baseline pain, and stress levels showed significant associations for the change in pain...... with the number of physical-cognitive training sessions per week (-0.60 [95%CI -0.95 to -0.25]) and the number of mindfulness sessions (0.15 [95%CI 0.02 to 0.18]). No such associations were found with the change in stress as outcome. LIMITATIONS: Limitations of behavioral interventions include the inability...

  15. Associations between work family conflict, emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal pain, and gastrointestinal problems in a sample of business travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Maria Therese; Rundmo, Torbjørn

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the associations among work-family conflict (WFC), emotional exhaustion, musculoskeletal (MS) pain, and gastrointestinal problems on a sample of business travelers (n = 2,093). An additional aim was to examine differences in the mentioned relationships among three traveler groups: commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. The study was conducted in a large Norwegian oil and gas company, and the company's business travel database was utilized to examine business travel. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed significant relations between WFC and emotional exhaustion and between emotional exhaustion and health problems. Contrary to the expectations, no direct association was found between WFC and health problems. However, we found that emotional exhaustion mediated the relation between WFC and health outcomes. The results from multi-group analysis revealed that associations among WFC, emotional exhaustion, and health-outcomes showed a similar pattern for commuters, national travelers, and international travelers. However, the association between emotional exhaustion and MS pain proved to be significantly stronger for the commuter group compared to the national and international travel groups. Practical implications and the consequences of these findings for future research are discussed.

  16. The Persian Version of Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire: Translation and Evaluation of its Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, S. Elham; Hafizi, Sina; Shahi, Mohammad Hosein Pourgharib; Kordi, Ramin; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Arbabi, Mohammad; Nejatisafa, Ali-Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Screening of psychosocial risk factors for chronic low back pain (LBP) is essential. The Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire (ÖMPSQ) is one of the most recognized and widely used instruments for this purpose. This study aimed to translate the ÖMPSQ into Persian, to adapt it for Iranian culture, and to investigate its psychometric properties. Methods: Using a linguistic methodology, the ÖMPSQ was translated into Persian according to the World Health Organization guideline. A total of 106 patients with LBP participated in the study. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated. Concurrent validity was estimated with Pearson's correlation between the ÖMPSQ and short form health survey (SF-12), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and visual analog scale (VAS). Factor analysis was used to evaluate dimensionality. Results: The content validity index was 0.80. The instrument had a good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.82) and internal consistency (Cronbach's α =0.82). Factor analysis indicates that factorial structure of Persian version was similar to original questionnaire. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.252–0.639, P psychology domain of ÖMPSQ (r = −0.364, P psychology domain of ÖMPSQ was found (r = 0.49, P cultural equivalent for original English version. PMID:28348724

  17. Musculoskeletal pain among postmenopausal women in Nigeria: Association with overall and central obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoyemi O. Ogwumike, PhD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Lower extremity and back pain symptoms were the most prevalent. For overall and central obesity directly associated with MSP, WHtR seemed the best obesity screening tool for MSP in postmenopausal women.

  18. Pain-related musculoskeletal disorders, psychological comorbidity, and the relationship with physical and mental well-being in Gulf War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, Helen Louise; McKenzie, Dean Philip; Forbes, Andrew Benjamin; Roberts, Minainyo Helen; Urquhart, Donna Michelle; Sim, Malcolm Ross

    2014-04-01

    Occupational activities such as lifting loads, working in constrained spaces, and training increase the risk of pain-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in military veterans. Few studies have investigated MSD and psychological disorder in veterans, and previous studies had limitations. This cross-sectional study compared pain-related MSD and psychological comorbidity and well-being between 1381 male Australian 1990-1991 Gulf War veterans (veterans) and a military comparison group (n=1377, of whom 39.6% were serving and 32.7% had previously deployed). At a medical assessment, 2000-2002, reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis or rheumatism, back or neck problems, joint problems, and soft tissue disorders were rated by medical practitioners as nonmedical, unlikely, possible, or probable diagnoses. Only probable MSDs were analysed. Psychological disorders in the past 12 months were measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) assessed 4-week physical and mental well-being. Almost one-quarter of veterans (24.5%) and the comparison group (22.4%) reported an MSD. Having any or specific MSD was associated with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but not alcohol disorders. Physical and mental well-being was poorer in those with an MSD compared to those without, in both study groups (eg, veterans with any MSD, difference in SF-12 physical component summary scale medians = -10.49: 95% confidence interval -12.40, -8.57), and in those with MSD and psychological comorbidity compared with MSD alone. Comorbidity of any MSD and psychological disorder was more common in veterans, but MSDs were associated with depression, PTSD, and poorer well-being in both groups. Psychological comorbidity needs consideration in MSD management. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess directionality and causality. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. Comparison of the efficacy of electromyographic biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and conservative medical interventions in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, H; Birbaumer, N

    1993-08-01

    In this study, three types of treatments for chronic musculoskeletal pain were compared. Fifty-seven patients who suffered from chronic back pain and 21 patients who suffered from temporomandibular pain and dysfunction were randomly assigned to either electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or conservative medical treatment. At posttreatment, improvements were noted in all three treatment groups, with the biofeedback group displaying the most substantial change. At the 6- and 24-month follow-up, only the biofeedback group maintained significant reductions in pain severity, interference, affective distress, pain-related use of the health care system, stress-related reactivity of the affected muscles, and an increase in active coping self-statements. Treatment outcome was predicted by chronicity and treatment-specific variables. Analysis of attrition showed a significant effect for therapist and extent of somatic pathology. Results suggest that pain patients who suffer from musculoskeletal pain problems and display few physical disabilities may profit the most from short-term EMG biofeedback treatment.

  20. Musculoskeletal Health Conditions Represent a Global Threat to Healthy Aging: A Report for the 2015 World Health Organization World Report on Ageing and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Andrew M; Cross, Marita J; Hoy, Damian G; Sànchez-Riera, Lídia; Blyth, Fiona M; Woolf, Anthony D; March, Lyn

    2016-04-01

    Persistent pain, impaired mobility and function, and reduced quality of life and mental well-being are the most common experiences associated with musculoskeletal conditions, of which there are more than 150 types. The prevalence and impact of musculoskeletal conditions increase with aging. A profound burden of musculoskeletal disease exists in developed and developing nations. Notably, this burden far exceeds service capacity. Population growth, aging, and sedentary lifestyles, particularly in developing countries, will create a crisis for population health that requires a multisystem response with musculoskeletal health services as a critical component. Globally, there is an emphasis on maintaining an active lifestyle to reduce the impacts of obesity, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes in older people. Painful musculoskeletal conditions, however, profoundly limit the ability of people to make these lifestyle changes. A strong relationship exists between painful musculoskeletal conditions and a reduced capacity to engage in physical activity resulting in functional decline, frailty, reduced well-being, and loss of independence. Multilevel strategies and approaches to care that adopt a whole person approach are needed to address the impact of impaired musculoskeletal health and its sequelae. Effective strategies are available to address the impact of musculoskeletal conditions; some are of low cost (e.g., primary care-based interventions) but others are expensive and, as such, are usually only feasible for developed nations. In developing nations, it is crucial that any reform or development initiatives, including research, must adhere to the principles of development effectiveness to avoid doing harm to the health systems in these settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pregnancy-related severe pelvic girdle pain caused by unilateral noninfectious sacroiliitis. A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahovic, D; Laktasic-Zerjavic, N; Tudor, K I; Mercep, I; Prutki, M; Anic, B

    2014-09-01

    Pelvic girdle pain during and after pregnancy is the clinical syndrome of persistent musculoskeletal pain localized in the posterior and/or anterior aspect of the pelvis originating from sacroiliac joints and/or pubic symphysis due to dynamic instability. We report the case of severe and disabling postpartum pelvic girdle pain caused by unilateral noninfectious sacroiliitis which resolved after 2 months by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and physical therapy. A short literature review is given on epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, therapy, and prognosis of pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain.

  2. A pilot cluster randomised controlled trial to investigate the addition of direct access to physiotherapy to usual GP-led primary care for adults with musculoskeletal pain: the STEMS pilot trial protocol (ISRCTN23378642).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Annette; Tooth, Stephanie; Protheroe, Joanne; Salisbury, Chris; Ogollah, Reuben O; Jowett, Sue; Hay, Elaine M; Foster, Nadine E

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems are common, accounting for up to 30 % of general practitioner (GP) consultations and are a major cause of chronic disability worldwide. Demand for health care for musculoskeletal conditions is likely to continue to rise given the ageing population and the increasing impact of these common painful conditions. Physiotherapists are well equipped to deliver evidence-based management for these conditions. Direct access allows patients to access physiotherapy without seeing their GP or another referring practitioner first; however, for most patients in the UK, access to National Health Service physiotherapy is controlled through GP referral. The aim of this pilot, pragmatic, cluster trial is to assess the feasibility of a future large trial to compare the clinical and cost-effectiveness of the additional offer of direct access to physiotherapy versus continuing with usual GP-led primary care alone for adults with common musculoskeletal problems. The pilot will focus on process outcomes to assess feasibility, although performance of the likely outcomes of a main trial will also be assessed. This is a two-arm parallel, cluster RCT where GP practices are the units of randomisation (the clusters), yet data are collected from individual patients with musculoskeletal problems (the participants). A direct access service will be set up in the participating physiotherapy service to provide the option of direct access to patients of the intervention arm practices. Inclusion criteria are broad to reflect the 'real-world' operation of an NHS physiotherapy direct access service for patients with musculoskeletal pain. Data collection will be through patient self-reported questionnaires at baseline, 2, 6 and 12 months and medical record review. No previous trials have been conducted into direct access to physiotherapy for patients with musculoskeletal problems. The strengths of the STEMS pilot trial are its size, the length of follow-up, and collection of

  3. Effect of workplace- versus home-based physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain among healthcare workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus D.; Sundstrup, Emil; Brandt, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    ×10 minutes per week and up to 5 group-based coaching sessions on motivation for regular physical exercise, or (ii) home-based physical exercise (HOME) performed during leisure time for 5×10 minutes per week. Both groups received ergonomic counseling on patient handling and use of lifting aides. Average pain...

  4. Reliability and validity of the visual analogue scale for disability in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Posthumus, Jitze B.; Stewart, Roy E.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the reliability and concurrent validity of a visual analogue scale (VAS) for disability as a single-item instrument measuring disability in chronic pain patients was the objective of the study. For the reliability study a test-retest design and for the validity study a cross-sectional d

  5. Evaluation of a multicomponent programme for the management of musculoskeletal pain and depression in primary care: a cluster-randomised clinical trial (the DROP study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragonès, Enric; López-Cortacans, Germán; Caballero, Antonia; Piñol, Josep Ll; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Elisabet; Rambla, Concepció; Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Miró, Jordi

    2016-03-16

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain and depression are very common in primary care patients. Furthermore, they often appear as comorbid conditions, resulting in additive effect on adverse health outcomes. On the basis of previous studies, we hypothesise that depression and chronic musculoskeletal pain may benefit from an integrated management programme at primary care level. We expect positive effects on both physical and psychological distress of patients. To determine whether a new programme for an integrated approach to chronic musculoskeletal pain and depression leads to better outcomes than usual care. Cluster-randomised controlled trial involving two arms: a) control arm (usual care); and b) intervention arm, where patients participate in a programme for an integrated approach to the pain-depression dyad. Primary care centres in the province of Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain, Participants: We will recruit 330 patients aged 18-80 with moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain (Brief Pain Inventory, average pain subscale ≥5) for at least 3 months, and with criteria for major depression (DSM-IV). A multicomponent programme according to the chronic care model. The main components are care management, optimised antidepressant treatment, and a psychoeducational group action. Blind measurements: The patients will be monitored through blind telephone interviews held at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Severity of pain and depressive symptoms, pain and depression treatment response rates, and depression remission rates. The outcomes will be analysed on an intent-to-treat basis and the analysis units will be the individual patients. This analysis will consider the effect of the study design on any potential lack of independence between observations made within the same cluster. The protocol was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Jordi Gol Primary Care Research Institute (IDIAP), Barcelona, (P14/142). This project strengthens and improves treatment approaches for a major

  6. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain: A synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prognostic factors, classified according to the dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Candidate systematic reviews were identified in electronic medical ...

  7. Social capital in relation to depression, musculoskeletal pain, and psychosomatic symptoms: a cross-sectional study of a large population-based cohort of Swedish adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Starrin Bengt; Åslund Cecilia; Nilsson Kent W

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Social capital has lately received much attention in health research. The present study investigated whether two measures of subjective social capital were related to psychosomatic symptoms, musculoskeletal pain, and depression in a large population of Swedish adolescents. Methods A total of 7757 13-18 year old students anonymously completed the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2008 which included questions on sociodemographic background, neighbourhood social capit...

  8. Prevalent musculoskeletal pain as a correlate of previous exposure to torture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dorte Reff; Montgomery, Edith; Bojholm, S;

    2006-01-01

    at a rehabilitation clinic for torture victims. The interview focused on exposure to torture and somatic symptoms prevalent at examination. RESULTS: The mean number of times imprisoned was 2.3; the mean number of months imprisoned was 19.7; the mean duration from initial imprisonment to final release was 3.7 years...... (OR 3.89, 95% CI 1.49-10.20) and with the cumulative number of physical torture methods exposed to. Pain in the back was associated with sexual torture (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.07-7.12). Besides beating of the lower extremities (OR 5.98, 95% CI 2.47-14.48), the strongest predictor for pain in the feet...

  9. Effect of individually tailored biopsychosocial workplace interventions on chronic musculoskeletal pain and stress among laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kenneth Jay; Brandt, Mikkel; Hansen, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    2014 (follow-up). METHODS: Participants (n = 112) were allocated to receive either physical, cognitive, and mindfulness group-based training (PCMT group) or a reference group (REF) for 10 weeks at the worksite. PCMT consisted of 4 major elements: 1) resistance training individually tailored to the pain......, as outcome measures. RESULTS: A significant (P difference at follow-up of -1.0 (95%CI: -1.4 to -0.6). No significant effect on stress was observed (treatment by time P = 0.16). Exploratory analyses for each body...... pain using individually tailored physical and cognitive elements. STUDY DESIGN: This trial uses a single-blind randomized controlled design with allocation concealment in a 2-armed parallel group format among laboratory technicians. The trial "Implementation of physical exercise at the Workplace (IRMA...

  10. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Musculoskeletal Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System? Ultrasound is safe ...

  11. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 2 of 3: symptoms and signs of peripheral neuropathic pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'peripheral neuropathic pain\\' (PNP) refers to pain arising from a primary lesion or dysfunction in the peripheral nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of PNP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of PNP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of two symptoms and one sign predictive of PNP, including: \\'Pain referred in a dermatomal or cutaneous distribution\\

  12. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 3 of 3: symptoms and signs of nociceptive pain in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'nociceptive pain\\' (NP) refers to pain attributable to the activation of the peripheral receptive terminals of primary afferent neurones in response to noxious chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. The symptoms and signs associated with clinical classifications of NP have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of NP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol after which their pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist indicating the presence\\/absence of various symptoms and signs. A regression analysis identified a cluster of seven clinical criteria predictive of NP, including: \\'Pain localised to the area of injury\\/dysfunction\\

  13. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research.

  14. Keele Aches and Pains Study protocol: validity, acceptability, and feasibility of the Keele STarT MSK tool for subgrouping musculoskeletal patients in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paul Campbell,1 Jonathan C Hill,1 Joanne Protheroe,1 Ebenezer K Afolabi,1 Martyn Lewis,1 Ruth Beardmore,1 Elaine M Hay,1 Christian D Mallen,1 Bernadette Bartlam,1 Benjamin Saunders,1 Danielle A van der Windt,1 Sue Jowett,2 Nadine E Foster,1 Kate M Dunn1 1Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre, Research Institute of Primary Care and Health Sciences, Keele University, Keele, 2Health Economics Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Musculoskeletal conditions represent a considerable burden worldwide, and are predominantly managed in primary care. Evidence suggests that many musculoskeletal conditions share similar prognostic factors. Systematically assessing patient’s prognosis and matching treatments based on prognostic subgroups (stratified care has been shown to be both clinically effective and cost-effective. This study (Keele Aches and Pains Study aims to refine and examine the validity of a brief questionnaire (Keele STarT MSK tool designed to enable risk stratification of primary care patients with the five most common musculoskeletal pain presentations. We also describe the subgroups of patients, and explore the acceptability and feasibility of using the tool and how the tool is best implemented in clinical practice. The study design is mixed methods: a prospective, quantitative observational cohort study with a linked qualitative focus group and interview study. Patients who have consulted their GP or health care practitioner about a relevant musculoskeletal condition will be recruited from general practice. Participating patients will complete a baseline questionnaire (shortly after consultation, plus questionnaires 2 and 6 months later. A subsample of patients, along with participating GPs and health care practitioners, will be invited to take part in qualitative focus groups and interviews. The Keele STarT MSK tool will be refined based on face, discriminant, construct, and predictive validity at baseline and 2

  15. Understanding work related musculoskeletal pain: does repetitive work cause stress symptoms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH

    2005-01-01

    for development of regional pain in repetitive work, stress symptoms would likely be on the causal path. AIMS: To examine whether objective measures of repetitive monotonous work are related to occurrence and development of stress symptoms. METHODS: In 1994-95, 2033 unskilled workers with continuous repetitive...... work and 813 workers with varied work were enrolled. Measures of repetitiveness and force requirements were quantified using video observations to obtain individual exposure estimates. Stress symptoms were recorded at baseline and after approximately one, two, and three years by the Setterlind Stress...... Profile Inventory. RESULTS: Repetitive work, task cycle time, and quantified measures of repetitive upper extremity movements including force requirements were not related to occurrence of stress symptoms at baseline or development of stress symptoms during three years of follow up. CONCLUSIONS...

  16. The Association between Chronic Widespread Musculoskeletal Pain, Depression and Fatigue Is Genetically Mediated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Burri

    Full Text Available Chronic widespread muscoloskeletal pain (CWP is prevalent in the general population and associated with high health care costs, so understanding the risk factors for chronic pain is important for both those affected and for society. In the present study we investigated the underlying etiological structure of CWP to understand better the association between the major clinical features of fatigue, depression and dihydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS using a multivariate twin design.Data were available in 463 UK female twin pairs including CWP status and information on depression, chronic fatigue and serum DHEAS levels. High to moderate heritabilities for all phenotypes were obtained (42.58% to 74.24%. The highest phenotypic correlation was observed between fatigue and CWP (r = 0.45, and the highest genetic correlation between CWP and fatigue (rg = 0.78. Structural equation modeling revealed the AE Cholesky model to provide the best model of the observed data. In this model, two additive genetic factors could be detected loading heavily on CWP-A2 explaining 40% of the variance and A3 20%. The factor loading heaviest on DHEAS showed only a small loading on the other phenotypes and none on fatigue at all. Furthermore, one distinct non-shared environmental factor loading specifically on CWP-but not on any of the other phenotypes-could be detected suggesting that the association between CWP and the other phenotypes is due only to genetic factors.Our results suggest that CWP and its associated features share a genetic predisposition but that they are relatively distinct in their environmental determinants.

  17. Cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain on the visual analogue scale for pain in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R. Schiphorst; Balk, Gerlof A.; Stewart, Roy E.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find the cut-off points on the visual analogue scale (VAS) to distinguish among mild, moderate, and severe pain, in relation to the following: pain-related interference with functioning; verbal description of the VAS scores; and latent class analysis for patients with ch

  18. Assessment of the impact of lifting device use on low back pain and musculoskeletal injury claims among nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdorf, Alex; Koppelaar, Elin; Evanoff, Bradley

    2013-07-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effect of manually lifting patients on the occurrence of low back pain (LBP) among nurses, and (2) to estimate the impact of lifting device use on the prevention of LBP and musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) injury claims. A literature search of PubMed, Embase and Web of Science identified studies with a quantitative assessment of the effect of manually lifting patients on LBP occurrence and studies on the impact of introducing lifting devices on LBP and MSD injury claims. A Markov decision analysis model was constructed for a health impact assessment of patient lifting device use in healthcare settings. The best scenario, based on observational and experimental studies, showed a maximum reduction in LBP prevalence from 41.9% to 40.5% and in MSD injury claims from 5.8 to 5.6 per 100 work-years. Complete elimination of manually lifting patients would reduce the LBP prevalence to 31.4% and MSD injury claims to 4.3 per 100 work-years. These results were sensitive to the strengths of the association between manually patient lifting and LBP as well as the prevalence of manual lifting of patients. A realistic variant of the baseline scenario requires well over 25 000 healthcare workers to demonstrate effectiveness. This study indicates that good implementation of lifting devices is required to noticeably reduce LBP and injury claims. This health impact assessment may guide intervention studies as well as implementation of programmes to reduce manual lifting of patients in healthcare settings.

  19. Chronic Pain: The Impact on Academic, Social, and Emotional Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Jason M.; Gfroerer, Susan D.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pain is persistent and recurrent pain that tends to fluctuate in severity, quality, regularity, and predictability. It can occur in a single or multiple body regions or organ systems. Some of the most frequently reported types of chronic pain include headaches, recurrent abdominal pain (RAP), and musculoskeletal pain. In contrast to acute…

  20. Musculoskeletal problems in stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Musculoskeletal problems in stoke survivors are common reasons for disability and pain. Shoulder pain is present in 24% of stroke survivors among all complications, second only to depression in 26%. Diagnosis and treatment of the various shoulder pain etiologies can significantly improve quality of life in these patients. This article reviews the common etiologies and treatments of shoulder and hip pain in stroke survivors.

  1. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Trial PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert Alan Bonakdar MD FAAFP University of California La Jolla, CA. 92093-0804 CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: REPORT DATE...October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012...Randomized Trial fdfdf 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER Robert Alan Bonakdar MD 5f

  2. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the “Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)” and the “International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)” recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased

  3. Effects of Muscle Fatigue, Creep, and Musculoskeletal Pain on Neuromuscular Responses to Unexpected Perturbation of the Trunk: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Jacques; Lardon, Arnaud; Boivin, Frédéric; Dugas, Claude; Descarreaux, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Trunk neuromuscular responses have been shown to adapt under the influence of muscle fatigue, as well as spinal tissue creep or even with the presence of low back pain (LBP). Despite a large number of studies exploring how these external perturbations affect the spinal stability, characteristics of such adaptations remains unclear. Aim: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the quality of evidence of studies investigating trunk neuromuscular responses to unexpected trunk perturbation. More specifically, the targeted neuromuscular responses were trunk muscle activity reflex and trunk kinematics under the influence of muscle fatigue, spinal creep, and musculoskeletal pain. Methods: A research of the literature was conducted in Pubmed, Embase, and Sport-Discus databases using terms related to trunk neuromuscular reflex responses, measured by electromyography (baseline activity, reflex latency, and reflex amplitude) and/or trunk kinematic, in context of unexpected external perturbation. Moreover, independent variables must be either trunk muscle fatigue or spinal tissue creep or LBP. All included articles were scored for their electromyography methodology based on the "Surface Electromyography for the Non-Invasive Assessment of Muscles (SENIAM)" and the "International Society of Electrophysiology and Kinesiology (ISEK)" recommendations whereas overall quality of articles was scored using a specific quality checklist modified from the Quality Index. Meta-analysis was performed on reflex latency variable. Results: A final set of 29 articles underwent quality assessments. The mean quality score was 79%. No effect of muscle fatigue on erector spinae reflex latency following an unexpected perturbation, nor any other distinctive effects was found for back muscle fatigue and reflex parameters. As for spinal tissue creep effects, no alteration was found for any of the trunk reflex variables. Finally, the meta-analysis revealed an increased erector

  4. Do Exercisers With Musculoskeletal Injuries Report Symptoms of Depression and Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Gudex, Claire; Andersen, Kjeld; Bojesen, Anders Bo; Jørgensen, Uffe

    2017-09-05

    Sports injuries in athletes can lead to negative emotional responses in terms of anger, anxiety, confusion, and sadness. Severe injuries can be understood as a stressful life event with increased levels of psychological distress, but injury assessment and rehabilitation typically focuses on somatic symptoms. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of depression and emotional stress, and measure self-rated health in regular exercisers presenting to a sports medicine clinic with musculoskeletal injury. The secondary aim was to identify psychosocial factors associated with depression in injured exercisers and the potential need for psychological counselling. A cross-sectional survey study. A sports medicine clinic for injuries of the foot, knee, or shoulder. Regular exercisers with present injuries (n=694) and exercisers without injuries (n=494). Regular exercisers were defined as those undertaking moderate exercise at least once a week. A questionnaire survey completed on paper by patients in a sports medicine clinic and a web-based version completed by online sports communities. Participants completed the Major Depression Inventory (MDI), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), health-related quality of life (EQ-5D-5L), and questions on sociodemographics, exercise habits, and injury history. Symptoms of depression were reported by 12% of injured exercisers and 5% of non-injured controls (psports medicine clinic for musculoskeletal injury, and supplemental clinical psychological interview for suspected depression or stress-related psychopathology.

  5. Musculoskeletal pain among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech, Katrine Tholstrup;

    2016-01-01

    , and comparative data on surgeons’ physical workload with robotic-assisted laparoscopy and conventional laparoscopy. Studies only describing a single surgical modality were excluded. We applied the checklist, STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE), to assess the quality...... fulfilled the criteria of STROBE, with an average score of 13 (range 10–16) out of 18. Discussion: Results, mainly self-reported measures, suggest that robotic-assisted laparoscopy is less strenuous compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, results are limited by the large methodological...

  6. Risk and prognostic factors for non-specific musculoskeletal pain: a synthesis of evidence from systematic reviews classified into ICF dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakke, Sandra E; Soer, Remko; Takken, Tim; Reneman, Michiel F

    2009-12-15

    A wide variety of risk factors for the occurrence and prognostic factors for persistence of non-specific musculoskeletal pain (MSP) are mentioned in the literature. A systematic review of all these factors is not available. Thus a systematic review was conducted to evaluate MSP risk factors and prognostic factors, classified according to the dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Candidate systematic reviews were identified in electronic medical journal databases, including the articles published between January 2000 and January 2008 that employed longitudinal cohort designs. The GRADE Working Group's criteria for assessing the overall level of evidence were used to evaluate the reviews. Nine systematic reviews were included, addressing a total of 67 factors. High evidence supported increased mobility of the lumbar spine and poor job satisfaction as risk factors for low back pain. There was also high evidence for intense pain during the onset of shoulder and neck pain and being middle aged as risk factors for shoulder pain. High evidence was also found for several factors that were not prognostic factors. For whiplash-associated disorders these factors were older age, being female, having angular deformity of the neck, and having an acute psychological response. Similarly, for persistence of low back pain, high evidence was found for having fear-avoidance beliefs and meagre social support at work. For low back pain, high evidence was found for meagre social support and poor job content at work as not being risk factors.

  7. What is the role of lifestyle behaviour change associated with non-communicable disease risk in managing musculoskeletal health conditions with special reference to chronic pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Söderlund, Anne

    2015-04-13

    Other than activity and exercise, lifestyle practices such as not smoking and healthy nutrition, well established for preventing and managing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (i.e., heart disease, cancer, hypertension, stroke, obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and obesity), are less emphasized in the physical therapy guidelines for addressing chronic pain, e.g., back pain. This state-of-the-art review examines the relationships between lifestyle behaviours and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain, and their clinical and research implications. A state-of-the-art review was conducted to synthesize evidence related to lifestyle factors (not smoking, healthy diet, healthy weight, optimal sleep and manageable stress, as well as physical activity) and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain. The findings support that health behaviour change competencies (examination/assessment and intervention/treatment) may warrant being included in first-line management of chronic pain, either independently or in conjunction with conventional physical therapy interventions. To address knowledge gaps in the literature however three lines of clinical trial research are indicated: 1) to establish the degree to which traditional physical therapy interventions prescribed for chronic pain augment the benefits of lifestyle behaviour change; 2) to establish the degree to which adopting healthier lifestyle practices, avoids or reduces the need for conventional physical therapy; and 3) to establish whether patients/clients with healthier lifestyles and who have chronic pain, respond more favourably to conventional physical therapy interventions than those who have less healthy lifestyles. Lifestyle behaviour change is well accepted in addressing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. Compelling evidence exists however supporting the need for elucidation of the role of negative lifestyle behaviours on the incidence of chronic

  8. Musculoskeletal Pain in High-G Aircraft Training Programs: A Survey of Student and Instructor Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    of high-G AC, with NP being most common. MS symptoms were reported in 95% during advanced combat maneuvers ( ACM ), with check-6 and forward bent...occurred with ACM . Lighter helmets, regular neck exercises, and pre-flight stretching were potential measures to reduce high-G neck injuries [8...the cervical spine under high-G and during turning movements during ACM , but added x-rays to evaluate for cervical disc degeneration [7]. This

  9. Cut-Off Points for Mild, Moderate, and Severe Pain on the Numeric Rating Scale for Pain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: Variability and Influence of Sex and Catastrophizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Köke, Albère J. A.; Oosterwijk, René F. A.; Swaan, Jeannette L.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.; Schiphorst Preuper, Henrica R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The 0–10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) is often used in pain management. The aims of our study were to determine the cut-off points for mild, moderate, and severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain, to measure the variability of the optimal cut-off points, and to determine the influence of patients’ catastrophizing and their sex on these cut-off points. Methods: 2854 patients were included. Pain was assessed by the NRS, functioning by the Pain Disability Index (PDI) and catastrophizing by the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS). Cut-off point schemes were tested using ANOVAs with and without using the PSC scores or sex as co-variates and with the interaction between CP scheme and PCS score and sex, respectively. The variability of the optimal cut-off point schemes was quantified using bootstrapping procedure. Results and conclusion: The study showed that NRS scores ≤ 5 correspond to mild, scores of 6–7 to moderate and scores ≥8 to severe pain in terms of pain-related interference with functioning. Bootstrapping analysis identified this optimal NRS cut-off point scheme in 90% of the bootstrapping samples. The interpretation of the NRS is independent of sex, but seems to depend on catastrophizing. In patients with high catastrophizing tendency, the optimal cut-off point scheme equals that for the total study sample, but in patients with a low catastrophizing tendency, NRS scores ≤ 3 correspond to mild, scores of 4–6 to moderate and scores ≥7 to severe pain in terms of interference with functioning. In these optimal cut-off schemes, NRS scores of 4 and 5 correspond to moderate interference with functioning for patients with low catastrophizing tendency and to mild interference for patients with high catastrophizing tendency. Theoretically one would therefore expect that among the patients with NRS scores 4 and 5 there would be a higher average PDI score for those with low

  10. The effect of acupuncture therapy on pain perception and coping strategies: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamus, Dorit; Meshulam-Atzmon, Vered; Pintov, Shay; Jacoby, Rebecca

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on the perception of pain and coping strategies, thus focusing on the psychological aspects of pain. The study was conducted in two complementary and alternative medicine clinics of public hospitals. Forty-one patients scheduled for routine acupuncture therapy because of chronic musculoskeletal pain were recruited for the study to receive eight acupuncture treatments. Twenty-four patients completed the treatment schedule and filled two self-reported questionnaires before and after therapy: (1) Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R); and (2) Coping Strategies questionnaire (Brief COPE). A significant improvement was found in the following measures related to pain perception: timeline (chronic versus acute), treatment control, and personal control. Additionally, significant improvement was displayed in three measures related to coping strategies: positive reframing, religion, and venting. The results indicate that acupuncture therapy might be efficient in changing patient's pain perception from chronic to acute and in enhancing their sense of personal and treatment control over their pain. In addition, acupuncture therapy partially improved coping strategies. The present study provides further validation for acupuncture therapy in pain and highlights its possible role in affecting the psychological aspects of pain.

  11. Working conditions and musculoskeletal pain among Brazilian pottery workers Condições de trabalho e dor osteomuscular entre ceramistas brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina de Souza Melzer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the municipality of Pedreira in São Paulo State, Brazil, a large number of workers from the ceramic industry have left their jobs because of work related musculoskeletal disorders. The objectives of this study were to describe the work conditions pertaining to the ceramic industry, to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and to identify the associations between symptoms and organizational, biomechanical, psychosocial and individual variables. Nine ceramic manufacturers participated. The activities of 18 individuals were analyzed through direct observation. All workers answered a questionnaire about work and health (n = 235. The results found that the general working conditions in the pottery manufacturers were poor. A 38.5% prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was found. Repetition, tool use, lack of control over decisions, worries regarding work demands, relationship issues, work dissatisfaction and the wish to move on to another function were all associated with pain. We concluded that musculoskeletal pain is one of the outcomes of elevated human requirements resulting from working conditions and organization in the ceramic industry.No Município de Pedreira, São Paulo, Brasil, um grande número de trabalhadores das indústrias cerâmicas se afasta do trabalho em conseqüência de distúrbios osteomusculares relacionados ao trabalho. Os objetivos deste estudo foram descrever as condições de trabalho, determinar a prevalência de dor e identificar associações entre sintomas e variáveis organizacionais, biomecânicas, psicossociais e individuais. Nove indústrias participaram do estudo. As atividades de 18 pessoas foram analisadas através de observações diretas. Todos os trabalhadores responderam a um questionário sobre trabalho e saúde (n = 235. Os resultados indicaram que as condições de trabalho nas indústrias cerâmicas estudadas eram ruins. Foi encontrada uma prevalência de 38,5% de dor. Repetitividade, utiliza

  12. Postural Preference and Musculoskeletal Complaints in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Corey A; Strauss, Robert A; Best, Alvin M

    2017-04-26

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons traditionally have musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this study was to determine the postural preferences of oral and maxillofacial surgeons and their effect on musculoskeletal pain. The authors designed and implemented a cross-sectional study. The association of demographic characteristics with postural preferences and use of loupes was explored. Then, the relation of demographic characteristics, postural preferences, and use of loupes to painful musculoskeletal complaints was analyzed. Contingency analysis was used to compare participants' responses and multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify relevant predictor variables. The sample was composed of 153 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of which 32% indicated that they had ever had pain attributable to their practice that lasted longer than 2 weeks. Practitioners reported neck and back pain as being most common. Eighty-four percent of practitioners stood for extractions and placement of implants. Those who stood did so for visibility. Practitioners who sat indicated they did so for orthopedic reasons (P < .001). Thirty-one percent of practitioners indicated loupes use. Those who used loupes were more likely to report pain (P = .022). Most respondents stood and did not use loupes. Those who did use loupes were more likely to report pain. Those who stood did so for visibility; those who sat did so for orthopedic reasons. Almost one third of respondents reported pain lasting at least 2 weeks during practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  14. A cross-sectional study of self-reported back and neck pain among English schoolchildren and associated physical and psychological risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sam; Buckle, Peter; Stubbs, David

    2007-11-01

    This study set out to identify the associations between ergonomics and other factors with back and neck pain among schoolchildren. Self-reported questionnaires were used to record health outcomes and potential risk factors in state schools. Six hundred and seventy-nine schoolchildren from Surrey in the United Kingdom aged 11-14 years took part. Twenty-seven percent of children reported having neck pain, 18% reported having upper back pain, and 22% reported having low back pain. A forward stepwise logistic regression was performed with pain categories the dependent variables. Neck pain was significantly associated with school furniture features, emotional and conduct problems, family history of low back pain and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Upper back pain was associated with school bag weight (3.4-4.45 kg), school furniture features, emotional problems and previous treatment for musculoskeletal disorders. Low back pain was associated with school furniture features, emotional problems, family history and previous injury or accident. It is important to recognise the influence of physical, psychological and family factors in children's pain.

  15. Sleep Fragmentation Exacerbates Mechanical Hypersensitivity and Alters Subsequent Sleep-Wake Behavior in a Mouse Model of Musculoskeletal Sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation, or sleep disruption, enhances pain in human subjects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in our society, and constitutes a tremendous public health burden. Although preclinical models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain demonstrate effects on sleep, few studies focus on musculoskeletal pain. We reported elsewhere in this issue of SLEEP that musculoskeletal sensitization alters sleep of mice. In this study we hypothesize that sleep fragmentation during the development of musculoskeletal sensitization will exacerbate subsequent pain responses and alter sleep-wake behavior of mice. Design: This is a preclinical study using C57BL/6J mice to determine the effect on behavioral outcomes of sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization. Methods: Musculoskeletal sensitization, a model of chronic muscle pain, was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0) into the gastrocnemius muscle, spaced 5 days apart. Musculoskeletal sensitization manifests as mechanical hypersensitivity determined by von Frey filament testing at the hindpaws. Sleep fragmentation took place during the consecutive 12-h light periods of the 5 days between intramuscular injections. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature were recorded from some mice at baseline and for 3 weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization. Mechanical hypersensitivity was determined at preinjection baseline and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after sensitization. Two additional experiments were conducted to determine the independent effects of sleep fragmentation or musculoskeletal sensitization on mechanical hypersensitivity. Results: Five days of sleep fragmentation alone did not induce mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization resulted in prolonged and exacerbated mechanical hypersensitivity. Sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization had an effect on

  16. Pain and Prejudice: Does Collecting Information From the Standpoint of Exposed Workers Improve Scientific Examination of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messing, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The meaning, feasibility, and importance of scientific objectivity have been debated among public health scientists. The debate is particularly relevant to occupational health, because of frequent opposition between employer and worker interests. This article suggests that the concept of standpoint (J. Eakin) may be more useful than that of objectivity in framing discussion of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. Studies done from a "worker" standpoint can, for example, investigate and characterize environmental risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders, while studies from an "employer" standpoint may concentrate on identifying individual workers likely to report work-related musculoskeletal disorders or those for whom consequences of work-related musculoskeletal disorders are more severe. Within "worker" standpoints, a distinction between "high-prestige worker" and "lower-prestige worker" standpoints can be identified in the current scientific debate about the health costs and benefits of prolonged standing vs prolonged sitting at work. Contact with workers, particularly lower-prestige workers, is critical to developing and sustaining a worker-based standpoint among researchers in occupational health. This contact can be facilitated by formal collaborations between universities and unions or other community groups.

  17. Future Directions for Pain Management: Lessons from the Institute of Medicine Pain Report and the National Pain Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Sean

    2016-02-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine Relieving Pain in America Report and the soon to be released National Pain Strategy, pain affects over 100 million Americans and costs our country in over $500 billion per year. We have a greater appreciation for the complex nature of pain and that it can develop into a disease in itself. As such, we need more efforts on prevention of chronic pain and for interdisciplinary approaches. For precision pain medicine to be successful, we need to link learning health systems with pain biomarkers (eg, genomics, proteomics, patient reported outcomes, brain markers) and its treatment.

  18. A study of the psychometric properties of 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 in a large population of people with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltychev, Mikhail; Bärlund, Esa; Mattie, Ryan; McCormick, Zachary; Paltamaa, Jaana; Laimi, Katri

    2017-02-01

    To assess the validity of the Finnish translation of the 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS 2.0). Cross-sectional cohort survey study. Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine outpatient university clinic. The 501 consecutive patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Exploratory factor analysis and a graded response model using item response theory analysis were used to assess the constructs and discrimination ability of WHODAS 2.0. The exploratory factor analysis revealed two retained factors with eigenvalues 5.15 and 1.04. Discrimination ability of all items was high or perfect, varying from 1.2 to 2.5. The difficulty levels of seven out of 12 items were shifted towards the elevated disability level. As a result, the entire test characteristic curve showed a shift towards higher levels of disability, placing it at the point of disability level of +1 (where 0 indicates the average level of disability within the sample). The present data indicate that the Finnish translation of the 12-item WHODAS 2.0 is a valid instrument for measuring restrictions of activity and participation among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  19. Self-reported pain severity, quality of life, disability, anxiety and depression in patients classified with 'nociceptive', 'peripheral neuropathic' and 'central sensitisation' pain. The discriminant validity of mechanisms-based classifications of low back (±leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-04-01

    Evidence of validity is required to support the use of mechanisms-based classifications of pain clinically. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminant validity of \\'nociceptive\\' (NP), \\'peripheral neuropathic\\' (PNP) and \\'central sensitisation\\' (CSP) as mechanisms-based classifications of pain in patients with low back (±leg) pain by evaluating the extent to which patients classified in this way differ from one another according to health measures associated with various dimensions of pain. This study employed a cross-sectional, between-subjects design. Four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (±leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Clinicians classified each patient\\'s pain using a mechanisms-based classification approach. Patients completed a number of self-report measures associated with pain severity, health-related quality of life, functional disability, anxiety and depression. Discriminant validity was evaluated using a multivariate analysis of variance. There was a statistically significant difference between pain classifications on the combined self-report measures, (p = .001; Pillai\\'s Trace = .33; partial eta squared = .16). Patients classified with CSP (n = 106) reported significantly more severe pain, poorer general health-related quality of life, and greater levels of back pain-related disability, depression and anxiety compared to those classified with PNP (n = 102) and NP (n = 256). A similar pattern was found in patients with PNP compared to NP. Mechanisms-based pain classifications may reflect meaningful differences in attributes underlying the multidimensionality of pain. Further studies are required to evaluate the construct and criterion validity of mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain.

  20. Characteristics of chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents attending a rheumatology outpatients clinic: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic non-specific musculoskeletal pain (CNSMSP may develop in childhood and adolescence, leading to disability and reduced quality of life that continues into adulthood. The purpose of the study was to build a biopsychosocial profile of children and adolescents with CNSMSP. Methods CNSMSP subjects (n = 30, 18 females, age 7-18 were compared with age matched pain free controls across a number of biopsychosocial domains. Results In the psychosocial domain CNSMSP subjects had increased levels of anxiety and depression, and had more somatic pain complaints. In the lifestyle domain CNSMSP subjects had lower physical activity levels, but no difference in television or computer use compared to pain free subjects. Physically, CNSMSP subjects tended to sit with a more slumped spinal posture, had reduced back muscle endurance, increased presence of joint hypermobility and poorer gross motor skills. Conclusion These findings support the notion that CNSMSP is a multidimensional biopsychosocial disorder. Further research is needed to increase understanding of how the psychosocial, lifestyle and physical factors develop and interact in CNSMSP.

  1. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial Using a Low-Frequency Magnetic Field in the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex W Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to a specific pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF has been shown to produce analgesic (antinociceptive effects in many organisms. In a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial, patients with either chronic generalized pain from fibromyalgia (FM or chronic localized musculoskeletal or inflammatory pain were exposed to a PEMF (400 μT through a portable device fitted to their head during twice-daily 40 min treatments over seven days. The effect of this PEMF on pain reduction was recorded using a visual analogue scale. A differential effect of PEMF over sham treatment was noticed in patients with FM, which approached statistical significance (P=0.06 despite low numbers (n=17; this effect was not evident in those without FM (P=0.93; n=15. PEMF may be a novel, safe and effective therapeutic tool for use in at least certain subsets of patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain. Clearly, however, a larger randomized, double-blind clinical trial with just FM patients is warranted.

  2. University students' notebook computer use: lessons learned using e-diaries to report musculoskeletal discomfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K; Foley, G; Punnett, L; Hall, V; Gore, R; Brownson, E; Ansong, E; Markowitz, J; McKinnon, M; Steinberg, S; Ing, A; Wuest, Ellen; Dibiccari, Leah

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to identify if notebook accessories (ergonomic chair, desktop monitor and notebook riser) combined with a wireless keyboard, mouse and participatory ergonomics training would have the greatest impact on reducing self-reported upper extremity musculoskeletal discomfort in university students. In addition to pre-post computing and health surveys, the Ecological Momentary Assessment was used to capture change in discomfort over time using a personal digital assistant (PDA) as the e-diary. The PDA was programmed with a survey containing 45 questions. Four groups of university students were randomised to either intervention (three external computer accessories) or to control. Participants reported less discomfort with the ergonomic chair and notebook riser based on the pre-post survey data and the e-diary/PDA ANOVA analysis. However, the PDA data, adjusted for the effect of hours per day of computer use, showed no benefit of the chair and limited benefit from the riser. Statement of Relevance:University students' use of notebook computers has increased. This study found evidence of a positive effect of an adjustable chair or notebook riser when combined with ergonomic training on reducing discomfort. Daily notebook computer use of 4 h was confirmed as a risk factor. Without some form of ergonomic intervention, these students are likely to enter the workforce with poor computing habits, which places them on the road to future injuries as technology continues to play a dominant role in their lives.

  3. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain - a comparison of those who meet criteria for fibromyalgia and those who do not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cöster, Lars; Kendall, Sally; Gerdle, Björn; Henriksson, Chris; Henriksson, Karl G; Bengtsson, Ann

    2008-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is currently classified as chronic widespread pain with widespread allodynia to pressure pain. There are few data describing pain characteristics, quality of life, consequences for daily living, and psychosocial status in patients who meet the classification criteria for fibromyalgia proposed by the American College of Rheumatology compared with patients with chronic widespread pain but not widespread allodynia. This study used a randomly selected sample from the general population. A postal questionnaire and a pain mannequin were sent to 9952 people. The response rate was 76.7%. The pain drawings showed that 345 people had widespread pain; that is, they noted pain in all four extremities and axially. Clinical examination, which included a manual tender point examination, was performed in 125 subjects. These people answered commonly used questionnaires on pain, quality of life, coping strategies, depression, and anxiety. Compared with chronic widespread pain without widespread allodynia, fibromyalgia was associated with more severe symptoms/consequences for daily life and higher pain severity. Similar coping strategies were found. Chronic widespread pain without widespread allodynia to pressure pain was found in 4.5% in the population and fibromyalgia in 2.5%.

  4. Primary care approaches to musculoskeletal multiple-site joint pain pharmacological therapy: a survey of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Rafi; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Wise, Elspeth; Conaghan, Philip G

    2014-10-01

    Chronic multiple-site joint pain (MSJP) due to osteoarthritis and soft tissue disorders is common in people over 50 years old and associated with poor outcomes. This study examined current pharmacological approaches to MSJP management in primary care. One hundred and fifty general practitioners (GPs) attending an educational seminar participated in an electronic survey (mean response rate 96%). Most GPs reported treating multiple painful joints concurrently (78%) compared with focusing on a single joint (21%). The majority believed there was no difference in analgesia for different disorders when selecting paracetamol (84%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID)/COX-2 inhibitors (57%) or opioids (70%). When optimising therapy, intra-class optimisation (increase NSAID dose 41%, change to another NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor 30%) was preferred to inter-class step up therapy (add opioid 23%, change to opioid 6%). For NSAID gastrointestinal intolerance, the preference was to add a gastro-protective agent (74%). There is a need to better characterise MSJP and examine optimal pharmacotherapy regimens.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of 40-hour versus 100-hour vocational rehabilitation on work participation for workers on sick leave due to subacute or chronic musculoskeletal pain : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beemster, Timo T.; van Velzen, Judith M.; van Bennekom, Coen A. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Reneman, Michiel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although vocational rehabilitation is a widely advocated intervention for workers on sick leave due to subacute or chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain, the optimal dosage of effective and cost-effective vocational rehabilitation remains unknown. The objective of this paper is to

  6. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports.

  7. Evaluation of eperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal spasm associated with low back pain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Chandanwale

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Eperisone hydrochloride is a centrally acting muscle relaxant inhibiting the pain reflex pathway, having a vasodilator effect. Aims : To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of eperisone in patients with acute musculoskeletal spasm associated with low back pain. Settings and Design : Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentric trial conducted at five tertiary care orthopedic centers across India. Materials and Methods : It was planned to enroll 240 patients of either sex between 18-60 years with acute musculoskeletal spasm (AMSP with low back pain (LBP due to spondylosis deformans, prolapsed disc or muscle sprain. Patients with other associated unrelated spasm conditions were excluded. Assessments were done for finger-to-floor distance (FFD, lumbar pain, Lasegue′s sign, tenderness of vertebral muscles, need for rescue medication and response to therapy for efficacy and tolerability. Statistical Analysis : Parametric data were analyzed by ′t′ test and ANOVA, and non-parametric data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney ′U′ test and Kruskall-Wallis test. Proportions were compared using Fischer′s (Chi-square test. Results : Two hundred and forty patients were randomized to receive eperisone 150 mg/day in three divided doses (n=120 or placebo (n=120 for 14 days, of which 15 patients did not complete and 225 patients completed the study (eperisone, 112 and placebo, 113. Significantly greater improvement in FFD (P<0.001 from baseline on Day 14 was seen with eperisone (150.66 to 41.75 compared to placebo (138.51 to 101.60. Improvements in other parameters were greater with the eperisone group. For 89 (79.46% patients the therapy was rated as good-excellent with eperisone compared to 43 (38.05% patients with placebo. Nausea, abdominal pain, headache and dizziness were the common adverse events with both therapies. Rescue drug was needed by 40 (35.71% eperisone patients and 83 (73.45% placebo patients

  8. Chronic pelvic pain arising from dysfunctional stabilizing muscles of the hip joint and pelvis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is a very annoying condition that is responsible for substantial suffering and medical expense. But dealing with this pain can be tough, because there are numerous possible causes for the pelvic pain such as urologic, gynecologic, gastrointestinal, neurologic, or musculoskeletal problems. Of these, musculoskeletal problem may be a primary cause of chronic pelvic pain in patients with a preceding trauma to the low back, pelvis, or lower extremities. Here, we report...

  9. Body Pain Reporting in Tricare Eligible Beneficiaries with Orofacial Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    strategies of World War II veterans with phantom limb pain. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 14(4), 290-294. 44. Madland G, Feinmann C. (2001). Chronic...Fibromyalgia IBS ................................................. Irritable bowel syndrome IRB...complaints (Yunus 2008). Co-morbid conditions include fibromyalgia (FM), chronic fatigue syndrome , headache, panic disorder, gastroesophageal

  10. Beyond conformity: Social influences on pain reports and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Leonie; Wager, Tor D

    2016-02-01

    Social information can profoundly influence behavior, but its effects are often explained in terms of "conformity," implying effects on decision-making and communication rather than deeper sensory modulation. We examined whether information about other people's pain reports affected both participants' pain experience and skin conductance responses (SCR) during pain. Sixty volunteers experienced painful heat stimulation preceded by 2 kinds of informational cues: (a) nonreinforced social information indicating low or high pain ratings from previous participants; and (b) reinforced conditioned stimuli (CSlow, CShigh). Both high-pain social information and CShigh cues enhanced pain and SCRs relative to their respective controls, with particularly robust effects of social information. Effects of both manipulations on both pain and SCRs were mediated by trial-by-trial pain expectancies. These results demonstrate strong social influences on pain and autonomic responses, and suggest that expectations from multiple sources can influence pain physiology independent of reinforcement.

  11. Construction of a web-based questionnaire for longitudinal investigation of work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and performance impairments in high-performance marine craft populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Martire, Riccardo; de Alwis, Manudul Pahansen; Äng, Björn Olov; Garme, Karl

    2017-07-20

    High-performance marine craft personnel (HPMCP) are regularly exposed to vibration and repeated shock (VRS) levels exceeding maximum limitations stated by international legislation. Whereas such exposure reportedly is detrimental to health and performance, the epidemiological data necessary to link these adverse effects causally to VRS are not available in the scientific literature, and no suitable tools for acquiring such data exist. This study therefore constructed a questionnaire for longitudinal investigations in HPMCP. A consensus panel defined content domains, identified relevant items and outlined a questionnaire. The relevance and simplicity of the questionnaire's content were then systematically assessed by expert raters in three consecutive stages, each followed by revisions. An item-level content validity index (I-CVI) was computed as the proportion of experts rating an item as relevant and simple, and a scale-level content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) as the average I-CVI across items. The thresholds for acceptable content validity were 0.78 and 0.90, respectively. Finally, a dynamic web version of the questionnaire was constructed and pilot tested over a 1-month period during a marine exercise in a study population sample of eight subjects, while accelerometers simultaneously quantified VRS exposure. Content domains were defined as work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and human performance, and items were selected to reflect these constructs. Ratings from nine experts yielded S-CVI/Ave of 0.97 and 1.00 for relevance and simplicity, respectively, and the pilot test suggested that responses were sensitive to change in acceleration and that the questionnaire, following some adjustments, was feasible for its intended purpose. A dynamic web-based questionnaire for longitudinal survey of key variables in HPMCP was constructed. Expert ratings supported that the questionnaire content is relevant, simple and sufficiently comprehensive, and the pilot test suggested

  12. Estimating the prevalence of chronic pain: validation of recall against longitudinal reporting (the HUNT pain study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landmark, Tormod; Romundstad, Pål; Dale, Ola; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-07-01

    Methods for classifying chronic pain in population studies are highly variable, and prevalence estimates ranges from 11% to 64%. Limited knowledge about the persistence of pain and the validity of recall questions defining chronic pain make findings difficult to interpret and compare. The primary aim of the current study was to characterize the persistence of pain in the general population and to validate recall measures against longitudinal reporting of pain. A random sample of 6419 participants from a population study (the HUNT 3 study in Norway) was invited to report pain on the SF-8 verbal pain rating scale every 3 months over a 12-month period and to report pain lasting more than 6 months at 12-month follow-up. Complete data were obtained from 3364 participants. Pain reporting was highly stable (intraclass correlation 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.67), and the prevalence of chronic pain varied considerably according to level of severity and persistence: 31% reported mild pain or more, whereas 2% reported severe pain on 4 of 4 consecutive measurements. When defined as moderate pain or more on at least 3 of 4 consecutive measurements, the prevalence was 26%. Compared with the longitudinal classification, a cross-sectional measure of moderate pain or more during the last week on the SF-8 scale presented a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 84%, and a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 90% when combined with a 6-month recall question. Thus pain reporting in the general population is stable and cross-sectional measures may give valid prevalence estimates of chronic pain.

  13. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among physical therapists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheen Iqbal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health professions like dentistry, nursing and physical therapy have been reported at high risk for developing workrelated musculoskeletal disorders. Results of studies conducted in these occupational groups may help formulate prevention strategies. However, no such data among physical therapists has been reported in India. Material and Methods: We conducted an online survey among 100 physiotherapists in Delhi. Results: The response rate was 75%. The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders is found to be high since 92% of them reported to feel some pain after joining physical therapy which affects daily activities and even sometimes forces them to change their work. Physical therapists specialty, gender, furniture used in clinic and duration of patient contact are found to be related to the pain development (p < 0.05. Conclusions: We need to emphasize the role of ergonomics and techniques of patient handling in development of work-related pain symptoms. Med Pr 2015;66(4:459–469

  14. Nursing Home - Pain - Percentage of Residents Reporting Pain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Adequate pain management is an important indicator of quality of care and quality of life. Nursing home staff should check patients regularly to see if they are...

  15. Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Saygi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy, typically seen as a serious childhood migraine attack which is followed by ptosis and diplopia due to oculomotor nerve palsy. This is regarded as a form of migraine in the previous classifications but according to the latest classification of the International Headache Society has been recognized as cranial neuralgia. Due to the poor pathological and radiological findings of oculomotor nerve during attack, it is difficult to make differential diagnosis. In this manuscript we report 11-year-old female patient with ophtalmoplegic migraine. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 938-941

  16. Self-reported chronic pain is associated with physical performance in older people leaving aged care rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira LS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Leani Souza Máximo Pereira,1,2 Catherine Sherrington,2,3 Manuela L Ferreira,2 Anne Tiedemann,2,3 Paulo H Ferreira,4 Fiona M Blyth,5 Jacqueline CT Close,3,6 Morag Taylor,3,6 Stephen R Lord3 1Department of Physiotherapy, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy, and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil; 2Musculoskeletal Division, The George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Neuroscience Research Australia, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; 4Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 5Pain Management and Research Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 6Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Background/objectives: The impact of pain on the physical performance of patients in aged care rehabilitation is not known. The study sought to assess 1 the prevalence of pain in older people being discharged from inpatient rehabilitation; 2 the association between self-reported pain and physical performance in people being discharged from inpatient rehabilitation; and 3 the association between self-reported pain and physical performance in this population, after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Methods: This was an observational cross-sectional study of 420 older people at two inpatient aged care rehabilitation units. Physical performance was assessed using the Lower Limb Summary Performance Score. Pain was assessed with questions about the extent to which participants were troubled by pain, the duration of symptoms, and the impact of chronic pain on everyday activity. Depression and the number of comorbidities were assessed by questionnaire and medical file audit. Cognition was assessed with the Mini-Mental State Examination. Results: Thirty percent of participants reported chronic pain (pain

  17. Treatment paradox in musculo-skeletal tuberculosis in an immunocompetent adult male; a case report from a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaskar, Priyanka; Rana, Geetika; Anuradha; Duggal, Nandini; Arora, Jyoti

    2015-04-01

    Paradoxical reactions like immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) as seen with patients on retroviral treatment in HIV infection, have also been identified in HIV sero-negative patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis especially lymph-node tuberculosis. Musculo-skeletal tuberculosis presenting as a cold abscess of the anterior chest wall is a rare entity which poses diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. A 35-year-old immunocompetent male came with complains of painless lump on right side of his chest over 9th and 10th intercostal space which gradually increased and extended upto 11th rib area. Clinically, diagnosis of cold abscess was made and anti-tubercular therapy (ATT) was started. Despite of being on ATT for 3 weeks, patient developed pain and signs of inflammation. Fluid was aspirated and sent for biochemical and microbiological investigations. The aspirated fluid was positive for acid fast bacilli by ZN stain and grew Mycobacterium tuberculosis in culture, sensitive to first line ATT. Pyogenic and fungal culture was negative. This case presented as an anterior chest wall cold abscess which deteriorated on initiation of first line ATT, thus creating a suspicion of resistance to ATT which was cleared on ATT susceptibility testing. Hence, this case underlines the possibility of treatment paradoxes seen in immunocompetent musculo-skeletal tuberculosis.

  18. Microlaparoscopic Conscious Pain Mapping in the Evaluation of Chronic Pelvic Pain: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a debilitating, life-altering syndrome that negatively affects a woman's quality of life and personal relationships. Many women continue to suffer with pelvic pain despite having undergone multiple medical and surgical treatments. Unfortunately, some women are incorrectly labeled as having psychological illness when organic disease may be present. I report a case of a woman who underwent multiple pelvic and abdominal surgeries before the cause of her pain was identified through microlaparoscopic conscious pain mapping. PMID:12004805

  19. Ergonomic Assessment and Musculoskeletal Health of the Underprivileged School Children in Pune, India

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra Rajan; Anand Koti

    2013-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal health in schoolchildren is a global health problem. The objective of the current study was to assess ergonomic be¬havior and muscu-loskeletal health in urban poor schoolchildren in Pune, India. Methods: Sixty-five (29 male students) slum dwelling schoolchildren were assessed for their ergonomics using a validated and reliable tool. Results: Average age was 13 years. Out of 65 students, 36 reported pres¬ence of musculoskeletal pain. In addition, 78.5% had bad ergon...

  20. Intelligent Physical Exercise Training proves effective in enhancing muscle strength and reducing musculoskeletal pain in a workplace setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Justesen, Just Bendix; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    Background: Physical exercise training interventions at the workplace may cause health benefits but not all employees may benefit from the same program despite having the same occupational exposure. The present aim was to individually tailor Intelligent Physical Exercise Training (IPET) for office...... workers based on health checks and to assess the effect on musculoskeletal health (Sjøgaard G et al. BMC Public Health 2014, 14:652). Methods: Office workers were at each of 6 companies randomized 1:1 to a training group, TG (N=194) or a reference group, REF (N=195). TG received one-hour supervised high...... balance. In total 32 individual training programs were developed but 9 of those covered more than 85 % of the participants’ needs, most of which included neck/shoulder strength training and cardio training. Trial registration was in ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01366950. Results: There were no baseline...

  1. STYLE AND AUTHORSHIP IN PAIN REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Piccardi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of reports on sorrow and pain, this paper attempts to investigate how speakers find relief and internal resources to reconstruct their lives by means of a narrative. The proposed reflections derive from two correlated experiences: (i the observation of the speeches of mothers and fathers who belong to a group that supports grieving parents (speeches that promoted a favorable development of the mourning period; and (ii the fact that the researcher herself had the opportunity to participate as the co-author of an unusual story: one involving a transsexual who underwent sex reassignment surgery and later wrote about the experience in order to transform pain into narrative. In the two cases, curative effects were noticed as well as identity empowerment, both stemming from the process of narrativization of pain. The peculiarities of such textual construction co-operate to put the notions of authorship and style into question, the definitions of which are located between a conventional way of understanding these notions (related to an autonomist conception of the language subject and a discursive way (related to a social and historical conception of the subject. We made use of reflections proposed by Possenti (1988, 2009, 2012, who draws on the notion of author, according to Foucault (1969, and questions the notion of style. The perspective that runs through all the parts of the reflection in this paper is Pragmatics, which understands language as being performative (AUSTIN: 1975 and a place of excellence for the construction of identity (RAJAGOPALAN: 2003, 2006. From a narrative construction standpoint, this paper takes the reflections of Paul Ricoeur (2010 mostly into account.

  2. Musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Baur-Melnyk, A.; Glaser, C. [Univ. of Munich-Grosshadern Campus (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2008-07-01

    The book covers on musculoskeletal imaging epidemiology and imaging signs for the following topics: tumours, inflammatory diseases, degenerative diseases, metabolic disorders, developmental disorders, osteonecrosis, intra-articular lesions, ligament and tendon injuries, fractures and dislocations.

  3. Effect of Video-Based versus Personalized Instruction on Errors during Elastic Tubing Exercises for Musculoskeletal Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Jay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace interventions have shown beneficial results of resistance training for chronic pain in the neck, shoulder, and arm. However, studies have relied on experienced exercise instructors, which may not be an available resource at most workplaces. The objective of this study is to evaluate the technical performance level of upper limb rehabilitation exercises following video-based versus personalized exercise instruction. We recruited 38 laboratory technicians and office workers with neck/shoulder pain for a two-week exercise training period receiving either (1 personal and video or (2 video only instruction in four typical neck/shoulder/arm rehabilitation exercises using elastic tubing. At a 2-week follow-up, the participants’ technical execution was assessed by two blinded physical therapists using a reliable error assessment tool. The error assessment was based on ordinal deviation of joint position from the ideal position of the shoulder, elbow, and wrist in a single plane by visual observation. Of the four exercises only unilateral shoulder external rotation had a higher normalized error score in the V group of 22.19 (9.30 to 12.64 (6.94 in the P group (P=0.002. For the remaining three exercises the normalized error score did not differ. In conclusion, when instructing simple exercises to reduce musculoskeletal pain the use of video material is a cost-effective solution that can be implemented easily in corporations with challenging work schedules not allowing for a fixed time of day to go see a personal trainer.

  4. Mechanisms-based classifications of musculoskeletal pain: part 1 of 3: symptoms and signs of central sensitisation in patients with low back (± leg) pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smart, Keith M

    2012-08-01

    As a mechanisms-based classification of pain \\'central sensitisation pain\\' (CSP) refers to pain arising from a dominance of neurophysiological dysfunction within the central nervous system. Symptoms and signs associated with an assumed dominance of CSP in patients attending for physiotherapy have not been extensively studied. The purpose of this study was to identify symptoms and signs associated with a clinical classification of CSP in patients with low back (± leg) pain. Using a cross-sectional, between-subjects design; four hundred and sixty-four patients with low back (± leg) pain were assessed using a standardised assessment protocol. Patients\\' pain was assigned a mechanisms-based classification based on experienced clinical judgement. Clinicians then completed a clinical criteria checklist specifying the presence or absence of various clinical criteria. A binary logistic regression analysis with Bayesian model averaging identified a cluster of three symptoms and one sign predictive of CSP, including: \\'Disproportionate, non-mechanical, unpredictable pattern of pain provocation in response to multiple\\/non-specific aggravating\\/easing factors\\

  5. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM), is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of...

  6. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the s...

  7. A case report of a patient with upper extremity symptoms: differentiating radicular and referred pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daub Clifford W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar upper extremity symptoms can present with varied physiologic etiologies. However, due to the multifaceted nature of musculoskeletal conditions, a definitive diagnosis using physical examination and advanced testing is not always possible. This report discusses the diagnosis and case management of a patient with two episodes of similar upper extremity symptoms of different etiologies. Case Presentation On two separate occasions a forty-four year old female patient presented to a chiropractic office with a chief complaint of insidious right-sided upper extremity symptoms. During each episode she reported similar pain and parasthesias from her neck and shoulder to her lateral forearm and hand. During the first episode the patient was diagnosed with a cervical radiculopathy. Conservative treatment, including manual cervical traction, spinal manipulation and neuromobilization, was initiated and resolved the symptoms. Approximately eighteen months later the patient again experienced a severe acute flare-up of the upper extremity symptoms. Although the subjective complaint was similar, it was determined that the pain generator of this episode was an active trigger point of the infraspinatus muscle. A diagnosis of myofascial referred pain was made and a protocol of manual trigger point therapy and functional postural rehabilitative exercises improved the condition. Conclusion In this case a thorough physical evaluation was able to differentiate between radicular and referred pain. By accurately identifying the pain generating structures, the appropriate rehabilitative protocol was prescribed and led to a successful outcome for each condition. Conservative manual therapy and rehabilitative exercises may be an effective treatment for certain cases of cervical radiculopathy and myofascial referred pain.

  8. Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Froud, Robert; Eldridge, Sandra; Kovacs, Francisco;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain is a common and expensive health complaint. Many low back pain trials have been conducted, but these are reported in a variety of ways and are often difficult to interpret. AIM: To facilitate consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for future low back pain...... commonly used in back pain trials, are reported using between-group mean differences (accompanied by minimally important difference (between-group/population-level) thresholds where these exist), the proportion of participants improving and deteriorating according to established and relevant minimally...... pain experts reached a high level of consensus on a statement recommending reporting methods for patient-reported outcomes in future low back pain trials. The statement has the potential to increase interpretability and improve patient care....

  9. Building An Intelligent Wearable Movement Tracking Device to address Psychological Barriers to Mobility in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temitayo A. Olugbade

    2015-10-01

    We are, furthermore, exploring the possibility of a wearable recognition system. To enable this, we investigate the minimization of the number of anatomical segments that need to be tracked to recognize the psychological states. In the case of pain level recognition, we found that collectively for the three movement types considered, the movement of the head, torso, left arm,

  10. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H; Bandholm, T; Thorborg, K; Zebis, M K; Andersen, L L

    2014-10-01

    Therapists commonly use elastic bands in resistance exercises during rehabilitation of smaller muscles, such as in the shoulder. However, the effectiveness has not yet been investigated for larger muscle groups. This study investigates muscle activity during lower extremity exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg press showed higher activity than lunges with elastic resistance for the vasti and rectus femoris (P < 0.01), whereas lunges with elastic resistance showed higher activity of gluteus maximus, hamstrings, and erector spinae (P < 0.01). Gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip did not influence these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P < 0.01). Lunges with elastic resistance induce high levels of muscle activity in all the large muscle groups at the hip, knee, and back. Importantly, the efficiency of these exercises was equally high regardless of gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip, whereas pain in the lower back led to altered activation strategies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Alcohol Habits in Patients with Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain: Comparison with a Matched Control Group from the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin Bronner, Kerstin Birgitta; Wennberg, Peter; Kallmen, Hakan; Schult, Marie-Louise Birgitta

    2012-01-01

    This prospective study aimed to describe alcohol habits in patients with chronic pain compared with those in a matched control group from the general Swedish population. In total, 100 consecutive patients enrolled were matched against 100 individuals in a control group on the basis of age and sex. Alcohol habits were measured using the Alcohol Use…

  12. The relationship between perceived promotion of autonomy/dependence and pain-related disability in older adults with chronic pain: the mediating role of self-reported physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Marta; Bernardes, Sónia F; Goubert, Liesbet

    2016-08-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent among older adults and is usually associated with high levels of functional disability. Social support for the promotion of functional autonomy and dependence has been associated with pain-related disability and self-reported physical functioning. Nevertheless, these relationships need further inquiry. Our aims were to investigate: (1) the relationship between perceived promotion of autonomy/dependence and pain-related disability and (2) the extent to which self-reported physical functioning mediated these relationships. 118 older adults (Mage = 81.0) with musculoskeletal chronic pain completed the Portuguese versions of the revised formal social support for Autonomy and Dependence in Pain Inventory, the pain severity and interference scales of the Brief Pain Inventory, and the physical functioning scale of the Medical Outcomes Study-Short-Form 36 v2. Higher levels of perceived promotion of autonomy were associated with lower pain-related disability; this relationship was partially mediated by self-reported physical functioning (B = -.767, p autonomy and dependence for managing older adults' experience of chronic pain.

  13. Acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in transverse myelitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghela, Sonia A; Donnellan, Clare P

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the use of acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in a 49 year old woman with a recent diagnosis of transverse myelitis with paraplegia, sensory disturbance, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. She was receiving intensive in-patient multi-disciplinary rehabilitation but was struggling to participate fully due to pain and poor sleep quality. She received a course of acupuncture in addition to standard care and reported substantial benefits including reduction in pain, improved sleep and mood, and reduction in daytime fatigue. Effective symptom control allowed this patient to participate more fully in her rehabilitation programme. Reduction of knee pain and sleep disturbance was maintained until discharge, 15 weeks after the last acupuncture treatment. This case report suggests that acupuncture may be an option to consider for other patients with pain or sleep disturbance that is interfering with their rehabilitation programme.

  14. Phantom limb pain from spinal sarcoma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ernesto; Dangaria, Harsh T

    2013-07-01

    Phantom limb pain is a frequent sequela of amputation. A high prevalence of residual limb pain and back pain also exists among amputees. We present a case of a new-onset severe phantom limb pain resulting from a metastatic spinal mass in an 81-year-old patient with a history of malignant sarcoma and an old hip disarticulation amputation. The metastatic lesion, upon imaging, was found to involve the L3 vertebra and caused moderate compression of the thecal sac on the right and severe right lateral recess stenosis. After the mass was resected, the patient's phantom limb pain resolved. Our case report demonstrates that spinal metastatic pathologies may be a cause of phantom limb pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of new-onset phantom limb pain or a change in phantom limb pain.

  15. Self-reported prevalence, pain intensity and risk factors of low back pain in adolescent rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Leo; Perich, Debra; Burnett, Angus; Campbell, Amity; O'Sullivan, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain, the related pain intensity and the rowing-related aggravating factors for low back pain in adolescent rowers who participated in school-level competitions. The secondary objective was to determine whether between-gender differences existed in these data. Retrospective cross-sectional survey 130 adolescent male and 235 adolescent female rowers aged between 14 and 16 years were recruited in this study. Participants completed a questionnaire to determine their lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain, their pain intensity and rowing-related factors that aggravated their low back pain. A high lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain were found in both adolescent male (93.8% and 64.6%, respectively) and female (77.9% and 52.8%, respectively) rowers. A significant between-gender difference was reported for both statistics (ppain intensity via a visual analog scale was found for males (4.1/10) when compared to females (5.0/10). Similar rowing-related aggravating factors were reported by males and females although fewer males reported that lifting the rowing shell aggravated their low back pain. A high lifetime and point prevalence of low back pain was reported by the adolescent rowers recruited in this study. While a greater proportion of adolescent male rowers reported low back pain, they reported a lower intensity of pain when compared to their female counterparts. Coaches, clinicians and rowers should be made aware of these findings such that future research and development can focus on promoting pain management strategies in this sport. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Peter L; Biswas, Anita C; Batt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    Chest pain in the athlete has a wide differential diagnosis. Pain may originate from structures within the thorax, such as the heart, lungs or oesophagus. However, musculoskeletal causes of chest pain must be considered. The aim of this review is to help the clinician to diagnose chest wall pain in athletes by identifying the possible causes, as reported in the literature. Musculoskeletal problems of the chest wall can occur in the ribs, sternum, articulations or myofascial structures. The cause is usually evident in the case of direct trauma. Additionally, athletes' bodies may be subjected to sudden large indirect forces or overuse, and stress fractures of the ribs caused by sporting activity have been extensively reported. These have been associated with golf, rowing and baseball pitching in particular. Stress fractures of the sternum reported in wrestlers cause pain and tenderness of the sternum, as expected. Diagnosis is by bone scan and limitation of activity usually allows healing to occur. The slipping rib syndrome causes intermittent costal margin pain related to posture or movement, and may be diagnosed by the 'hooking manoeuvre', which reproduces pain and sometimes a click. If reassurance and postural advice fail, good results are possible with resection of the mobile rib. The painful xiphoid syndrome is a rare condition that causes pain and tenderness of the xiphoid and is self-limiting. Costochondritis is a self-limiting condition of unknown aetiology that typically presents with pain around the second to fifth costochondral joints. It can be differentiated from Tietze's syndrome in which there is swelling and pain of the articulation. Both conditions eventually settle spontaneously although a corticosteroid injection may be useful in particularly troublesome cases. The intercostal muscles may be injured causing tenderness between the ribs. Other conditions that should be considered include epidemic myalgia, precordial catch syndrome and referred pain

  17. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H

    2014-01-01

    . Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg...... these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P 

  18. Hypoalgesia after exercise and the cold pressor test is reduced in chronic musculuskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vægter, Henrik Bjarke; Handberg, Gitte; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In chronic pain patients, impaired conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) have been reported. No studies have compared CPM and EIH in chronic musculoskeletal pain patients with high pain sensitivity (HPS) and low pain sensitivity (LPS). MATERIALS.......005). Pain tolerance increased after the cold pressor test and exercise in both groups (PCPM and EIH were partly impaired in chronic pain patients with high versus less pain sensitivity, suggesting that the CPM and EIH responses depend on the degree of pain sensitivity. This has clinical...

  19. Auricular Therapy for Treatment of Musculoskeletal Pain in the Setting of Deployed Military Personnel: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    opportunities or there is nothing significant to report during this reporting period, state “ Nothing to Report.” Describe opportunities for training and...there is nothing significant to report during this reporting period, state “ Nothing to Report.” Describe how the results were disseminated to...research nurse support, would not be feasible. Nothing to Report 5 What do you plan to do during the next reporting period to accomplish the goals

  20. Evaluation of an evidence based quality improvement innovation for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain in an accident and emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potier, Tara; Tims, Emily; Kilbride, Cherry; Rantell, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a five stage pilot study which initially consisted of a review of 75 case notes of people attending an emergency department (ED) in an inner London Teaching Hospital with musculoskeletal (MSK) low back pain (LBP). This review highlighted inconsistencies in how they were assessed and managed across and within different staff groups. We found patient documentation was often incomplete and that a biomedical model approach to the management of these patients was common. As a result, four further stages in the project were conducted. Our primary aim was to evaluate the impact of implementing a locally developed quality improvement intervention for the assessment and treatment of MSK LBP in this ED. Secondary aims were to explore the user experience of the new pathway, measured by the patient experience questionnaire (PEQ), and any associated health economic costs of changes in practice. The quality improvement intervention consisted of an evidence based low back pain pathway (EBLBPP), a staff educational program, and a patient education booklet. We undertook a retrospective baseline audit of 100 clinical records of patients was undertaken prior to the instigation of the quality improvement intervention, and four months post implementation. The pre-defined variables of interest were: documentation of the case history, examination, classification of back pain (and if correct), prescribed management and if the documentation was compliant with medico-legal standards. All patients in the study were sent a PEQ to complete and return in a self-addressed envelope. Estimated health costs associated with each patient episode of care were calculated including re-attendance episodes for any people presenting with MSK LBP within a four week period. There was a significant improvement in all areas evaluated post implementation in all groups (simple, referred and simple, referred and serious spinal pathology combined). In particular; screening for red flags (22%) and

  1. Children's self-reported pain at the dentist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, J.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to get an insight into the pain report of children over two sequential dental visits. Furthermore, it was studied whether age, previous dental experience, level of dental anxiety and injection site were of influence on the self-reported pain of children during the

  2. Children's self-reported pain at the dentist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versloot, J.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to get an insight into the pain report of children over two sequential dental visits. Furthermore, it was studied whether age, previous dental experience, level of dental anxiety and injection site were of influence on the self-reported pain of children during the fir

  3. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  4. PERIODONTAL DISEASE AS AN ETIOLOGY OF OROFACIAL AND MUSCOSKELETAL PAINS IN WOMEN (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial pain includes pain associated with the hard and soft tissues of the head, face, neck, and all of the intraoral structures. Upon painful episodes, consuming analgesics, or traditional medicine are relatively common. It is also a common sense that high cholesterol and hypertension may contribute to the pain. Since most pain sufferers are women, estrogen is proposed to be a modulator of pain perception. Nevertheless, the mechanism of pain modulation in women is still in controversy. Systemic manifestations of periodontal disease are widely accepted. However, the role of periodontal disease as an etiology of orofacial and musculoskeletal pain is rarely discussed. Recent study in medical psychoneuroimmunology may reveal the possibility of periodontal disease as an etiology of these painful symptoms. The objective of this study is to reveal the possibility of periodontal disease as an etiology of orofacial and musculoskeletal pain, resulting in the disappearing of the symptoms. Regarding to the amazing results, the conclusion is that especially in women, periodontal disease cause orofacial and muscoskeletal pain especially in women.

  5. Are self-reported pain characteristics, classified using the PainDETECT questionnaire, predictive of outcome in people with low back pain and associated leg pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsø, Lars; Kent, Peter M; Albert, Hanne B

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the PainDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ) classification was predictive of outcomes at 3 and 12 months follow-up in low back pain (LBP) patients with associated leg pain. Identification of clinically important subgroups and targeted treatment is believed to...... to be important in LBP care. The PD-Q is designed to classify whether a person has neuropathic pain, based on their self-reported pain characteristics. However, it is unknown whether this classification is a prognostic factor or predicts treatment response....

  6. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  7. Self-Reported Neuropathic Pain Characteristics of Women With Provoked Vulvar Pain: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargie, Emma; Gilron, Ian; Pukall, Caroline F

    2017-04-01

    Provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) is a common chronic genital pain condition affecting approximately 12% of premenopausal women. Although parallels have been drawn between PVD and neuropathic pain (NP), no studies have examined self-reported NP characteristics in PVD. To explore pain symptoms that resemble NP reported by those with PVD and compare responses with those with an established NP condition. Women with provoked vulvar pain (PVP; n = 65) completed online questionnaires designed to assess characteristics of NP. Responses were compared with those of women with postherpetic neuralgia (PHN; n = 30). In addition to a range of descriptive questions, participants completed the McGill Pain Questionnaire, the Self-Complete Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms (S-LANSS), the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI), and the Pain Quality Assessment Scale (PQAS). PVP exhibits some neuropathic characteristics, typically evoked pain (as opposed to the more constant pain of PHN) indicative of allodynia and hyperalgesia. Specifically, women with PVP scored, on average, higher than the NP cutoff on the S-LANSS, and there were no significant differences between women with PVP and those with PHN on some NPSI subscales. However, women with PHN reported more NP symptoms on the PQAS, S-LANSS, and other NPSI subscales. Validated NP questionnaires could be of particular use for health care professionals who need a more efficient way to assess symptoms of patients with PVP and should be included in future studies investigating the mechanisms and treatment of this pain. This study takes a unique approach to the examination of PVP by using multiple validated NP measures to compare pain characteristics with those of a group of participants with PHN, an established NP condition. However, it is limited by self-reported data not confirmed with clinical examination, small size of the PHN group, and the severity of the pain experienced in the PVP group. Women with PVP report

  8. Musculoskeletal manifestations and autoantibodies in children and adolescents with leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Neder; Daniel A. Rondon; Silvana S. Cury; Clovis A. da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate musculoskeletal involvement and autoantibodies in pediatric leprosy patients. Methods: 50 leprosy patients and 47 healthy children and adolescents were assessed according to musculoskeletal manifestations (arthralgia, arthritis, and myalgia), musculoskeletal pain syndromes (juvenile fibromyalgia, benign joint hypermobility syndrome, myofascial syndrome, and tendinitis), and a panel of autoantibodies and cryoglobulins. Health assessment scores and treatment were perfor...

  9. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis with multifocal musculoskeletal disease involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. McConnell, DO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of disseminated coccidioidomycosis with multifocal musculoskeletal involvement. The patient presented to the emergency department with left shoulder pain and swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed enhancing soft tissue masses, bony lesions, and fluid collections in and around the glenohumeral joint with involvement of the proximal humerus, glenoid, and rotator cuff musculature. Multiple additional areas of involvement were subsequently discovered. Fungal cultures confirmed coccidioidomycosis infection at all surgical sites with superimposed polymicrobial bacterial infection in the left shoulder.

  10. Widespread pain - do pain intensity and care-seeking influence sickness absence? - A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Søren; Christiansen, David Høyrup; Jensen, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    pain and sickness absence has not been studied. Additionally it is unknown whether care-seeking in general practice due to musculoskeletal disorders has a positive or negative impact on future absenteeism. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of pain intensity on the association...... between number of musculoskeletal pain sites and sickness absence, and to analyze the impact on absenteeism from care-seeking in general practice due to musculoskeletal disorders.METHODS: 3745 Danish adults registered with eight General Practitioners (GPs) in one primary medical center reported location...... the results. Similar findings were observed for sickness absence of shorter duration, although the association was weaker. Care-seeking in general practice due to musculoskeletal disorders did not overall alter the odds of later sickness absence.CONCLUSION: Pain intensity and care-seeking due...

  11. Effects of Emotion on Pain Reports, Tolerance and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie E Carter; McNeil, Daniel W.; Vowles, Kevin E; Sorrell, John T.; Turk, Cynthia L; Ries, Barry J; Hopko, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of specific emotional states on a laboratory pain task were tested by examining the behavioural, verbal and psychophysiological responses of 80 student volunteers (50% female). Participants were assigned to one of four Velten-style emotion-induction conditions (ie, anxiety, depression, elation or neutral). The sexes of experimenters were counterbalanced. Overt escape behaviour (ie, pain tolerance), pain threshold and severity ratings, verbal reports of emotion and physiological me...

  12. Anklebone pain during menstruation: A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng; YU Yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Case Introduction The patient, a business woman, firsted visit on October 28, 2004. Chief complaint: In the recent half year, she felt pain in left ankle during menstruation and had difficult in walking. After treatment by maternity hospital, there was no effect. Then a herbalist doctor prescribed 20 doses Jiawei Xiaoyao Powder,but the left ankle pain wasn't relieved. So she came to the acupuncture and moxibustion department.

  13. Factor associated with self-reported work-related musculoskeletal disorders in Brazilian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Ada Ávila; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva

    2017-06-01

    To describe the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) and analyze the factors associated with this outcome in the Brazilian population. In this cross-sectional, population-based study, we use data from the National Survey on Health (PNS) of 2013. The sample was composed of 60,202 Brazilians aged 18 years or older. The outcome variable was the occurrence of self-reported WMSD. Sociodemographic and occupational characteristics, personal resources, and health conditions were investigated as explanatory variables. Analyses were performed with the software Stata 12.0 and considered the weighting imposed by the sampling design of the study. Then, univariate and multivariate binary logistic models were carried out, considering a significance level of 5%. The results obtained indicated that the prevalence of WMSD in the Brazilian population was of 2.5%, ranging from 0.2% (Acre) to 4.2% (Santa Catarina). The factors associated with a greater chance of occurrence of WMSD were: female sex (OR = 2.33; 95%CI 1.72-3.15); be temporarily away from work (OR = 2.44; 95%CI 1.41-4.23); be exposed to noise at the workplace (OR = 2.16; 95%CI 1.68-2.77); seniority equal to or greater than 4.5 years at the current job (OR = 1.37; 95%CI 1.09-1.72); participate in volunteer work (OR = 1.65; 95%CI 1.25-2.17); report medical diagnosis of arthritis or rheumatism (OR = 2.40; 95%CI 1.68-3.44); and depression (OR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.86-3.31). On the other hand, factors associated with less chance of WMSD were: not having a partner (OR = 0.73; 95%CI 0.37-0.71) and working in an open environment (OR = 0.51; 95%CI 0.37-0.71). The associated factors and the prevalence found indicate regional and gender differences. Special attention to comorbidities and environmental noise monitoring would benefit the health of workers in the Country. Descrever a prevalência de distúrbio osteomuscular relacionado ao trabalho (Dort) e analisar os fatores associados com esse desfecho na popula

  14. Musculoskeletal disorders and symptom severity among Australian dental hygienists

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie J. Hayes; SMITH, Derek R.; Taylor, Jane A

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent literature has identified that musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) are a significant occupational health issue for both dentists and dental hygienists. Research on the occupational health of dental hygienists is lacking in Australia, which is of particular concern given that it is a rapidly growing field in this country. The aims of this research are to investigate the prevalence of MSD and correlating regions of pain among Australian dental hygienists. A self-reporting question...

  15. Painful Ejaculation with Cyclobenzaprine: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly B. Kraus, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Painful ejaculation is likely an underreported side effect of tricyclic antidepressants and cyclobenzaprine use. Fortunately, these symptoms are reversible and discontinuation of these medications is typically an effective cure. Kraus MB, Wie CS, Gorlin AW, Wisenbaugh ES, and Rosenfeld DM. Painful ejaculation with cyclobenzaprine: A case report and literature review. Sex Med 2015;3:343–345.

  16. Musculoskeletal symptoms in an adolescent athlete population: a comparative study

    OpenAIRE

    Legault, Élise P; Descarreaux, Martin; Cantin, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal pain, symptoms or injuries are prevalent in the adolescent athlete population as well as in the general adolescent population, and often have significant consequences on their future musculoskeletal health. However, differences between these two populations in regards to their musculoskeletal health are not known and have not yet been explored. Therefore, the main objectives of this study are to 1) compare the 6-month prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and their...

  17. Treatment Guidelines for Rheumatologic Manifestations of Sjögren's Syndrome: Use of Biologic Agents, Management of Fatigue, and Inflammatory Musculoskeletal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsons, Steven E; Vivino, Frederick B; Parke, Ann; Carteron, Nancy; Sankar, Vidya; Brasington, Richard; Brennan, Michael T; Ehlers, William; Fox, Robert; Scofield, Hal; Hammitt, Katherine M; Birnbaum, Julius; Kassan, Stuart; Mandel, Steven

    2017-04-01

    The Sjögren's Syndrome Foundation clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are designed to improve quality and consistency of care in Sjögren's syndrome by offering recommendations for management. Management questions for the systemic manifestations of Sjögren's syndrome were posed by the CPG committee with input from patients and rheumatologists. Clinical questions were assigned to a topic review group that performed systematic reviews and data extraction and drafted guidelines. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendation were rated using the American Society of Clinical Oncology's modification of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. Guideline recommendations were reviewed by a consensus expert panel (CEP) composed of 30-40 clinicians from academia and community practices, as well as registered nurses and patients, using a modified Delphi process. A CEP agreement level of 75% was set as a minimum for adoption of a guideline recommendation. Consensus was achieved for 19 recommendations; for 11 additional modules, available data were insufficient to allow a recommendation to be formulated. Of the 19 recommendations, 15 required 1 Delphi round, 2 required 2 rounds, and 2 required 3 rounds. Key recommendations include a decision tree for the use of oral disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for inflammatory musculoskeletal pain, use of self-care measures and advice regarding exercise to reduce fatigue, and the use of rituximab in selected clinical settings for oral and ocular dryness and for certain extraglandular manifestations, including vasculitis, severe parotid swelling, inflammatory arthritis, pulmonary disease, and mononeuritis multiplex. The CPG committee strongly discouraged the use of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors for sicca symptoms and for the majority of clinical contexts in primary Sjögren's syndrome. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Musculoskeletal sporotrichosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.C.; Destouet, J.M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic, indolent, fungal infection that rarely involves the musculoskeletal system. The etiologic agent, Sporothrix schenckii, is ubiquitous in nature and has been isolated from soil, timber, decaying vegetation, and a variety of foliage. The organism gains entrance to the body through trauma to the skin or, in rare instances, by inhalation. The vast majority of infections in humans is characterized by nodular or ulcerated lesions of the cutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics. Osteoarticular involvement may occur either by contiguous spread from a cutaneous focus, through direct inoculation of tissue by the organism, or by hematogenous dissemination. The rarity of musculoskeletal sporotrichosis often causes a delay in diagnosis which leads to inappropriate therapy and permanent deformity in some patients. Three cases which show a spectrum of bone and joint involvement are presented.

  19. The burden of musculoskeletal conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Palazzo

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Despite the burden of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs, these conditions probably deserve more attention from public health authorities in several countries including developed ones. We assessed their contribution to disability. METHODS: Data on disabilities associated with RMDs were extracted from the national 2008-2009 Disability-Health Survey of 29,931 subjects representative of the population in France. We used the core set of disability categories for RMDs of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for analysis. Diagnosis and disabilities were self-reported. We assessed the risk of disability associated with RMDs using odds ratios (ORs and the societal impact of RMDs using the average attributable fraction (AAF. RESULTS: Overall 27.7% (about 17.3 million people (95% CI 26.9-28.4% of the population reported having RMDs. The most prevalent RMDs were low back pain (12.5%, 12.1-13.1 and osteoarthritis (12.3%, 11.8-12.7. People reporting osteoarthritis were more disabled in walking (adjusted OR 1.9, 1.7-2.2 than those without. People reporting inflammatory arthritis were more limited in activities of daily living (from 1.4, 1.2-1.8 for walking to 2.1, 1.5-2.9 for moving around. From a societal perspective, osteoarthritis was the main contributor to activity limitations (AAF 22% for walking difficulties. Changing jobs was mainly attributed to neck pain (AAF 13% and low back pain (11.5%. CONCLUSION: RMDs are highly prevalent and significantly affect activity limitations and participation restrictions. More effort is needed to improve care and research in this field.

  20. Effects of Emotion on Pain Reports, Tolerance and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie E Carter

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of specific emotional states on a laboratory pain task were tested by examining the behavioural, verbal and psychophysiological responses of 80 student volunteers (50% female. Participants were assigned to one of four Velten-style emotion-induction conditions (ie, anxiety, depression, elation or neutral. The sexes of experimenters were counterbalanced. Overt escape behaviour (ie, pain tolerance, pain threshold and severity ratings, verbal reports of emotion and physiological measures (ie, electrocardiogram, corrugator and trapezium electromyogram were recorded. A pressure pain task was given before and after the emotion induction. As predicted, those who participated in the anxiety or depression condition showed reduced pain tolerance after induction of these negative emotions; pain severity ratings became most pronounced in the depression condition. Emotion induction did not have a discernable effect on pain tolerance or severity ratings in the elation condition. A pattern of participant and experimenter sex effects, as well as trials effects, was seen in the physiological data. The influence of negative affective states (ie, anxiety and depression on acute pain are discussed along with the unique contributions of behavioural, verbal and physiological response systems in understanding the interactions of pain and emotions.

  1. Musculoskeletal disorders among robotic surgeons: A questionnaire analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Giberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Robotic surgical systems offer better workplace in order to relieve surgeons from prolonged physical efforts and improve their surgical outcomes. However, robotic surgery could produce musculoskeletal disorders due to the prolonged sitting position of the operator, the fixed position of the console viewer and the movements of the limbs. Until today, no one study has been reported concerning the association between robotics and musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this work was verify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Italian robotic surgeons. Material and methods: Between July 2011 and April 2012 a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire was delivered to thirty-nine Italian robotic centres. Twentytwo surgeons (56% returned the questionnaires but only seventeen questionnaires (43.5% were evaluable. Results: Seven surgeons (41.2% reported musculoskeletal disorders, by since their first use of the robot which significantly persisted during the daily surgical activity (P < 0.001. Regarding the body parts affected, musculoskeletal disorders were mainly reported in the cervical spine (29.4% and in the upper limbs (23.5%. Six surgeons (35.3% defined the robotic console as less comfortable or neither comfortable/uncomfortable with a negative influence on their surgical procedures. Conclusions: In spite of some important limitations, our data showed musculoskeletal disorders due to posture discomfort with negative impact on daily surgical activity among robotic surgeons. These aspects could be due to the lack of ergonomic seat and to the fixed position of the console viewer which could have produced an inadequate spinal posture. The evaluation of these postural factors, in particular the development of an integrated and more ergonomic chair, could further improve the comfort feeling of the surgeon at the console and probably his surgical outcomes.

  2. Frequency and risk factors of musculoskeletal pain in nurses at a tertiary centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Attar, Suzan Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal complaints are an important occupational problem; nevertheless, few studies have targeted nurses in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among nursing personnel at a tertiary centre in Jeddah. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was performed in which full-time registered nurses from four different departments (n = 200) were selected for analysis between Septembe...

  3. Musculoskeletal challenges of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaki, M

    1998-06-01

    Reduction in the biomechanical competence of the axial skeleton can result in challenging complications. Osteoporosis consists of a heterogeneous group of syndromes in which bone mass per unit volume is reduced in otherwise normal bone, which results in more fragile bone. The geriatric population has an increased risk for debilitating postural changes because of several factors. The two most apparent factors are involutional loss of functional muscle motor units and the greater prevalence of osteoporosis in this population. Obviously, the main objective of rehabilitation is to prevent fractures rather than to treat the complications. These complications can vary from "silent" compression fractures of vertebral bodies, to sacral insufficiency fractures, to "breath-taking" fractures of the spine or femoral neck. The exponential loss of bone at the postmenopausal stage is not accompanied by an incremental loss of muscle strength. The loss of muscle strength follows a more gradual course and is not affected significantly by a sudden hormonal decline, as is the case with bone loss. This muscle loss may contribute to osteoporosis-related skeletal disfigurations. In men and women, the combination of aging and reduction of physical activity can affect musculoskeletal health, and contribute to the development of bone fragility. The parallel decline in muscle mass and bone mass with age is more than a coincidence, and inactivity may explain some of the bone loss previously associated with aging per se. Kyphotic postural change is the most physically disfiguring and psychologically damaging effect of osteoporosis and can contribute to an increment in vertebral fractures and the risk of falling. Axial skeletal fractures, such as fracture of the sacral alae (sacral insufficiency fracture) and pubic rami, may not be found until radiographic changes are detected. Management of chronic pain should include not only improvement of muscle strength and posture but also, at times

  4. Musculoskeletal Injuries among ERCP Endoscopists in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead O’Sullivan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are few reports in the literature describing musculoskeletal complaints among endoscopists, and none are specific to those who perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP.

  5. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls and young women employees of textile industries in Tamil Nadu, India - a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeline, Gnanaselvam Nancy; Bobby, Joseph

    2017-05-24

    Musculoskeletal disorders are common in those employed in the textile industry. The aim of the study is to assess musculoskeletal disorders among adolescent girls who are current employees of textile industries in comparison with the adolescent girls and young women who are past employees of textile industries and adolescent girls who have never been employed in the textile industry. Methodology This is a cross-sectional study. A total of 321 subjects, 107 in each study group were sampled. Standardized nordic questionnaires (SNQ) was used to assess musculoskeletal symptoms. Results More than half of the current employees (67.28%) and past employees (67.28%) reported musculoskeletal pain. Among the never been employed, 18.69% reported musculoskeletal pain. Neck and shoulder were the most common sites of musculoskeletal pain among the current employees (49.5% and 50.5%, respectively) and the past employees (45.8% and 49.5%, respectively). In the regression model, having ever been diagnosed for anemia (AOR 6.57, 95% CI 1.4 to 30.76), working for more than 48 h in a week (AOR 3.37, 95% CI 1.53 to 7.41) and the presence of depression (AOR 6.6, 95% CI 1.48 to 29.36) were significantly associated with the presence of musculoskeletal pain in the study participants. Conclusion Musculoskeletal disorders are a major occupational health problem among the adolescent and young women employees of textile industries. Working hours should be fixed at 48 h per week and anemia and depression should be treated to avert the work related musculoskeletal disorders in the study population.

  6. The First National Pain Medicine Summit--final summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, Philipp M; Brock, Charles; David, Jose; Crossno, Ronald; Gitlow, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Pain is ubiquitous. At some point in time it affects everyone. For many millions pain becomes chronic, a scourge that impacts every facet of life-work, hobbies, family relations, social fabric, finances, happiness, mood, and even the very essence of identity. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), pain is one of our most important national public health problems, a silent epidemic. In 1998, NIH reported that the annual amount spent on health care, compensation, and litigation related to pain had reached one hundred billion dollars ($100,000,000,000). Considering that health care costs have doubled since then, it is not unreasonable to assume that the costs related to pain care have doubled as well. Millions of patients suffer needlessly with acute pain, with cancer pain, and with chronic pain. The ineffective management of pain results in an escalating cascade of health care issues. Acute pain that is not treated adequately and promptly results in persistent pain that eventually causes irreversible changes in the nervous system. This translates into progressive bio-psycho-social epiphenomena resulting in further pain and disability. It creates a vicious cycle transforming a functional human being into an invalid who becomes a burden to family, to society, and to oneself. In the face of adequate medical science, adequate technical skills, and adequate resources the reality of delayed and inadequate pain care is paradoxical. This dilemma deserves close scrutiny and effective remediation. The American Medical Association (AMA), long dedicated to the need to improve pain care in this country, has been faced with this reality. It was from this vision that the idea of holding a Pain Medicine Summit was conceived. Resolution 321 (A-08) set in motion a process that would bring together a diverse group of stakeholders for the purpose of discussing the present and future status of pain care; a process that culminated in a broad-based coalition of physicians

  7. The role of tramadol in pain management in Latin America: a report by the Change Pain Latin America Advisory Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Garcia, Joäo Batista; Lech, Osvandré; Campos Kraychete, Durval; Rico, María Antonieta; Hernández-Castro, John Jairo; Colimon, Frantz; Guerrero, Carlos; Sempértegui Gallegos, Manuel; Lara-Solares, Argelia; Flores Cantisani, José Alberto; Amescua-Garcia, César; Guillén Núñez, María Del Rocío; Berenguel Cook, María Del Rosario; Jreige Iskandar, Aziza; Bonilla Sierra, Patricia

    2017-09-01

    Change Pain Latin America (CPLA) was created to enhance chronic pain understanding and develop pain management improving strategies in this region. During its seventh meeting (August 2016), the main objective was to discuss tramadol's role in treating pain in Latin America. Furthermore, potential pain management consequences were considered, if tramadol was to become more stringently controlled. Key topics discussed were: main indications for prescribing tramadol, its pharmacological characteristics, safety and tolerability, effects of restrictions on its availability and use, and consequent impact on pain care quality. The experts agreed that tramadol is used to treat a wide spectrum of non-oncological pain conditions (e.g. post-surgical, musculoskeletal, post-traumatic, neuropathic, fibromyalgia), as well as cancer pain. Its relevance when treating special patient groups (e.g. the elderly) is recognized. The main reasons for tramadol's high significance as a treatment option are: its broad efficacy, an inconspicuous safety profile and its availability, considering that access to strong analgesics - mainly controlled drugs (classical opioids) - is highly restricted in some countries. The CPLA also agreed that tramadol is well tolerated, without the safety issues associated with long-term nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use, with fewer opioid-like side effects than classical opioids and lower abuse risk. In Latin America, tramadol is a valuable and frequently used medication for treating moderate to severe pain. More stringent regulations would have significant impact on its availability, especially for outpatients. This could cause regression to older and frequently inadequate pain management methods, resulting in unnecessary suffering for many Latin American patients.

  8. Patellofemoral pain: Challenging current practice - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin E; Hendrick, Paul; Logan, Pip

    2016-04-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common problem in young people, with 1 in 6 suffering at any one time. It is unclear which management approach is the optimal method for treating PFP in the long term, with traditional physiotherapy examination focusing on assessing for specific structural dysfunction. A rationale for a different assessment and treatment approach, one that moves the focus away from a biomedical/tissue pathology model towards one directed at the neurophysiology of pain, has been suggested. The patient was a 21 year old male with a 6 year history of PFP with previous failed physiotherapeutic treatment. He reported previous multiple healthcare practitioners' advice to avoid activities that were painful as reasons for being unable to participate in sporting activities. No specific structural testing was performed, such as specific muscle strength, length, foot position, patella movement and position, or movement patterns. Descriptions of tissue based pathology models of pain, e.g. patella mal-tracking, were actively discouraged and challenged. The patient was taught to perform one uncomfortable/painful exercise as part of his rehabilitation programme twice a day. The patient achieved 80% improvement in his symptoms over 7 appointments and a return to physical activity following a 5 month rehabilitation programme purposively designed to elicit pain by means of gradually exercising and loading the tissues. This case report highlights the need for further research into exercise protocols for patients suffering with PFP based upon neurophysiology models of pain.

  9. Annual consultation prevalence of regional musculoskeletal problems in primary care: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Regional musculoskeletal pain such as back or shoulder pain are commonly reported symptoms in the community. The extent of consultation to primary care with such problems is unknown as a variety of labels may be used to record such consultations. The objective was to classify musculoskeletal morbidity codes used in routine primary care by body region, and to determine the annual consultation prevalence of regional musculoskeletal problems. Methods Musculoskeletal codes within the Read morbidity Code system were identified and grouped by relevant body region by four GPs. Consultations with these codes were then extracted from the recorded consultations at twelve general practices contributing to a general practice consultation database (CiPCA). Annual consultation prevalence per 10,000 registered persons for the year 2006 was determined, stratified by age and gender, for problems in individual regions and for problems affecting multiple regions. Results 5,908 musculoskeletal codes were grouped into regions. One in seven of all recorded consultations were for a musculoskeletal problem. The back was the most common individual region recorded (591 people consulting per 10,000 registered persons), followed by the knee (324/10,000). In children, the foot was the most common region. Different age and gender trends were apparent across body regions although women generally had higher consultation rates. The annual consultation-based prevalence for problems encompassing more than one region was 556 people consulting per 10,000 registered persons and increased in older people and in females. Conclusions There is an extensive and varied regional musculoskeletal workload in primary care. Musculoskeletal problems are a major constituent of general practice. The output from this study can be used as a resource for planning future studies. PMID:20598124

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factor of Neck Pain in Elderly Korean Community Residents

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition, which causes substantial medical cost. In Korea, prevalence of neck pain in community based population, especially in elderly subjects, has scarcely been reported. We evaluated the prevalence, the severity and the risk factors of neck pain in elderly Korean community residents. Data for neck pain were collected for 1,655 subjects from a rural farming community. The point, 6-months and cumulative lifetime prevalence of neck pain was obtained in ...

  11. The Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Chinese older Adults in the Greater Chicago Area—Findings from the PINE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqi Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal disorders affect many older adults and are a major public health concern due to rising prevalence. However, there is a paucity of research regarding the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms in minority older adults, especially in older Chinese adults in the U.S. This study aims to provide an overall estimate on the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among Chinese older adults in the U.S. and examine the correlations between sociodemographic characteristics, self-reported health measures, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Data was collected through the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE study. This community-based participatory research study surveyed a total of 3,159 Chinese older adults aged 60 and above. Review of Systems (ROS was used to assess individual perceptions of musculoskeletal symptoms. We found 67% of participants experience musculoskeletal symptoms. Muscle or joint pain (55.3% and back pain (34.5% were the most prevalent types of symptoms. Being female (r = 0.18, having lower education (r = 0.15, living fewer years in the community (r = 0.05, having a lower overall health status (r = 0.22, and having a lower quality of life (r = 0.08 were all significantly correlated with reporting musculoskeletal symptoms. Our findings show that musculoskeletal symptoms are a common health concern among Chinese older adults, and that certain subsets of the population, related to sociodemographic factors, are more likely to experience these symptoms. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted to determine causality as well as changes in musculoskeletal symptoms burden.

  12. Characteristics of visual disturbances reported by subjects with neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treleaven, Julia; Takasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Visual symptoms are often reported by patients with neck pain. The aim of the study was to report on the prevalence and most troublesome visual disturbances in subjects with neck pain. Seventy subjects with neck pain and seventy healthy control subjects answered questions about the presence and magnitude (/12) - product of frequency (0-4) and intensity (0-3) of each of 16 visual symptoms noted to be associated with neck pain and other possible causes. A visual complaint index (VCI) (/168) was generated from the sum of the magnitude rating of 14 significant symptoms. The neck pain group had significantly (P > 0.05) greater prevalence and magnitude of 14/16 visual complaints and VCI (mean 27.4) compared to control subjects (mean 6.2). The most prevalent symptoms were 'need to concentrate to read' (70%) and 'sensitivity to light' (58.6%). The least prevalent were 'double vision' (28.6%) and 'dizzy reading' (38.6%). The most troublesome symptoms (greatest magnitude) were 'need to concentrate to read' (3.4/12), 'visual fatigue' (3/12), 'difficulty judging distances' (2.1/12) and 'sensitivity to light' (2.1/12) while the least troublesome complaints were 'double vision' (0.5/12), 'red eyes' (1/12) and 'spots and words moving' (1/12). The characteristics of the visual symptoms were mostly consistent for those previously associated with neck pain. Subjects with traumatic neck pain had a significantly higher VCI compared to those with idiopathic neck pain. The results could help with differential diagnosis. The visual symptoms might be related to eye movement control disturbances in neck pain, however further research is required.

  13. Pain among professional orchestral musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard Andersen, Lotte; Roessler, Kirsten K; Eichberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Professional musicians experience high rates of musculoskeletal pain, but only few studies have investigated how this pain is accepted by musicians.......Professional musicians experience high rates of musculoskeletal pain, but only few studies have investigated how this pain is accepted by musicians....

  14. Estimating the burden of musculoskeletal disorders in the community: the comparative prevalence of symptoms at different anatomical sites, and the relation to social deprivation

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Epidemiologically-based rheumatology healthcare needs assessment requires an understanding of the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in the community, of the reasons why people consult in primary care, and of the proportion of people who would benefit from referral to secondary care and paramedical services. This paper reports the first phase of such a needs assessment exercise.
SPECIFIC OBJECTIVE—To estimate the relative frequency of musculoskeletal pain in diff...

  15. Self-reported somatosensory symptoms of neuropathic pain in fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain correlate with tender point count and pressure-pain thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amris, Kirstine; Jespersen, Anders; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Widespread pain and pain hypersensitivity are the hallmark of fibromyalgia, a complex pain condition linked to central sensitization. In this study the painDETECT questionnaire (PDQ), validated to identify neuropathic pain and based on pain quality items, was applied in a cross-sectional sample...... of patients with chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aims of the study were to assess the patient-reported sensory neuropathic symptoms by PDQ and to correlate these with tender point (TP) count and pressure-pain thresholds. Eighty-one patients (75 F, 6 M) with CWP (ACR-criteria) filled in the PDQ. Manual TP...... examination was conducted according to ACR guidelines. Computerized cuff pressure algometry was used for the assessment of pressure-pain detection thresholds (PDT, unit: kPa) and pressure-pain tolerance thresholds (PTT, unit: kPa). Mean TP count was 14.32 (range: 2-18), mean PDQ score 22.75 (range: 5...

  16. Increased bias to report heat or pain following emotional priming of pain-related fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwilliam, S S; Derbyshire, S W G

    2008-07-01

    Emotional and attentional factors have been identified to play a significant role in modulating pain perception with negative emotions increasing pain sensitivity. Recent studies suggest that fearful images may activate the attentional components of fear driven behaviours and facilitate an attentional bias or sensitivity toward noxious stimuli. The current investigation examines whether priming of pain-related fear will affect performance by increasing sensitivity to punctuate heat stimuli. A modified version of the visual dot probe task was employed to provide priming of pain-related fear and a heat detection task was used to measure the effects of priming on sensitivity. The results indicated a significant facilitation of heat and pain perception at varying temperatures following emotional priming. In particular, there was an increase in the bias toward reporting a heat stimulus following emotional priming. The findings emphasise the efficacy of the visual dot probe task as a method of priming and provide a possible method for probing hypervigilance in chronic pain patients.

  17. Chronic pelvic pain due to pelvic lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsu Wakimoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM, a rare multisystem disease affecting mainly young women, is characterized by an abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells in the lungs. We report a case of endometriosis with chronic pelvic pain due to pelvic LAM. A 41-year-old gravida 1, para 1 woman had been experiencing intermittent left pelvic pain for several years. She also complained of dyspnea on effort 2 years previously, and was diagnosed with pulmonary LAM. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging showed a right ovarian endometriotic cyst and a left pelvic mass. She was referred to our hospital for the treatment of pelvic pain; she underwent laparoscopic cystectomy of the right ovarian endometriotic cyst. Her left pelvic cyst was found in the retroperitoneal space, and biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of LAM. Therefore, we suggest that LAM localized in the pelvis should be considered when a patient with pulmonary LAM presents with pelvic pain or abdominal distention.

  18. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  19. Low back pain post partum - A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-23

    Sacral stress fracture is an unusual source of low back pain and can be easily confused with a number of other clinical conditions seen in physiotherapy clinics. The purpose of this case report is to describe the case of a patient presenting with low back pain post partum illustrating pertinent aspects of differential diagnosis and issues of management. A 31 year old female presented complaining of low back pain since the birth of her second child 11 months earlier. Subjective and objective examination led the Therapist to consider a diagnosis of sacral stress fracture. This diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. Three months after presenting to physiotherapy the patient was pain free and had returned to all aspects of her daily life without any difficulties. Clinicians must be aware of the less common pathologies in any hypotheses development. A careful history and physical examination and broad hypotheses generation will ensure that patients are accurately diagnosed and receive appropriate and effective treatments.

  20. Whose pain is it anyway?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steven J; Dissing, Kristina Boe; Hestbaek, Lise

    2016-01-01

    and 334 child-parent pairs who were independently asked whether the child had experienced musculoskeletal pain in the previous week. Children were between the ages of 10 and 14 years old. Parents provided answers via text message and children were questioned in person or via questionnaire at their school...... between the child and parent. Child age and gender did not influence the likelihood of agreement. CONCLUSION: Children often experience pain that is not reported by their parents resulting in poor concordance between pain reports from the two sources. While it is not possible to say which is more valid we...

  1. Musculoskeletal problems among pregnant women: a facility based survey in Odisha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasobant S, Nibedita S, Saswata S, Arnansu M, Kirti S

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic medical conditions are in focus for the development of strategies aimed at improving population health worldwide. This is also true for chronic pain conditions leading to impaired or non-existent ability to exercise, as physical inactivity is associated with the development of chronic diseases. Musculoskeletal disorders constitute an estimated 90% of all chronic pain, of which back pain contributes to a high extent. During the time of pregnancy many hormonal and anatomical changes that affect the musculoskeletal system in the female body, which may cause various musculoskeletal complaints, predispose to injury, or alter the course of pre-existing conditions. Though Obstetric physiotherapy is an essential part of maternal health care and promotion; still it is not well known in developing countries like India. So this current study aimed to address common musculoskeletal complaints arising among the women during prenatal period in Odisha. Methodology: A cross sectional study was designed in rural & urban area health facilities targeting the pregnant women of Odisha. Total of 410 pregnant women from selected facilities of two different regions of Odisha- Eastern (Urban and Western (Rural were interviewed with a structured validated questionnaire. Statistical analysis compared the independent variables of participants with Musculoskeletal Pain using independent sample t-test for continuous variables and chi-square for ordinal/nominal variables has been reported considering null hypothesis to be significant if p-value is <0.05 which is level of significance. Results: About half (50.7% of the participants reported symptoms at least in one part of their bodies, over the pregnancy period. Among these, acute Low back pain was the highest of 55.6% and 35.4% of chronic, followed by acute ankle pain (25.9% and knee pain (16.6%. Neck pain (4.9%, Shoulder pain (4.4% were the least reported among all participants. The MSDs pain is more

  2. THE PREVALENCE OF MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS AMONG BUS DRIVERS IN TRICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are widespread in many countries around the world. It has been reported that about 58 percent of the world's population over the age of 10 years spent one third of their life span at work. The population at a high risk include nursing facilities, transportation, mining, food processing, leather tanning, heavy and light manufacturing. Transport workers have been found to be at high risk of developing work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs. There has been literature evidence regarding the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in bus drivers of various cities of different countries. But no study has been done so far in Tricity (Chandigarh, Panchkula and Mohali for the same. The purpose of this study is to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs among bus drivers of Tricity. Methods: 300 bus drivers were included in the study according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The standardized Nordic questionnaire for musculoskeletal disorder and a self administered questionnaire were filled by therapist after the personal interview of each driver. Results: Unpaired t test was used to measure the difference in variable of two groups and Karl Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to determine the correlation between two entities. In the present study, the subjects were in the age group of 25 to 50 years. Out of the total sample of 300 male bus drivers in Tricity, 159 reported that they had WRMSDs. The prevalence of WRMSDs among bus drivers in Tricity was 53%. In present study, the prevalence of low back pain was highest among the bus drivers that are 30.3%, then neck pain 17.3%, knee pain 14.7%, shoulder 6.3%, ankle and feet 5.7%, upper back 4%, hip and thigh 4%, elbow 1.3% and wrist and hand 1.3%. Thus low back pain, neck pain and knee pain are the most prevalent WRMSDs amongst bus drivers. Conclusions: Work-related biomechanical

  3. Musculoskeletal symptoms in support staff in a large telecommunication company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagarasanu, Mircea; Kumar, Shrawan

    2006-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent and severity of the musculoskeletal problems in office workers in a telecommunication company. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders' symptoms, their perceived intensity and interaction with ability to work among office workers. The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire and Cornell Hand Discomfort Questionnaire developed by the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University were used on a sample of 140 office workers in a telecommunication company. Discomfort/pain/ache at the wrist level was reported by 86.5% for the left side and 95.5% for the right side. Additionally, discomfort/pain/ache was reported by 77.5% of the sample for neck and 31% of the sample for the left and 50% for the right shoulder region. At the hand site, the area in the distal proximity of the wrist was the most affected site being indicated in 90% of cases for left side and 95% of cases for the right side. An overview of problems associated with the body parts in office work may allow targeted prevention and intervention.

  4. A Rare Case of Parkinson's Disease with Severe Neck Pain Owing to Crowned Dens Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain is regarded as one of the most common nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). In particular, musculoskeletal pain has been reported as the most common type of PD-associated pain. Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Case Presentation: This report describes the case of an 87-year-old woman who had severe bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, gait disturbance and nec...

  5. Partners' Empathy Increases Pain Ratings: Effects of Perceived Empathy and Attachment Style on Pain Report and Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurter, Sarah; Paloyelis, Yannis; de C. Williams, Amanda C.; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Pain can be influenced by its social context. We aimed to examine under controlled experimental conditions how empathy from a partner and personal attachment style affect pain report, tolerance, and facial expressions of pain. Fifty-four participants, divided into secure, anxious, and avoidant attachment style groups, underwent a cold pressor task with their partners present. We manipulated how much empathy the participants perceived that their partners had for them. We observed a significant main effect of perceived empathy on pain report, with greater pain reported in the high perceived empathy condition. No such effects were found for pain tolerance or facial display. We also found a significant interaction of empathy with attachment style group, with the avoidant group reporting and displaying less pain than the secure and the anxious groups in the high perceived empathy condition. No such findings were observed in the low empathy condition. These results suggest that empathy from one's partner may influence pain report beyond behavioral reactions. In addition, the amount of pain report and expression that people show in high empathy conditions depends on their attachment style. Perspective Believing that one's partner feels high empathy for one's pain may lead individuals to rate the intensity of pain as higher. Individual differences in attachment style moderate this empathy effect. PMID:24953886

  6. Ergonomic Assessment and Musculoskeletal Health of the Underpri¬vileged School Children in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra Rajan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal health in schoolchildren is a global health problem. The objective of the current study was to assess ergonomic be¬havior and muscu-loskeletal health in urban poor schoolchildren in Pune, India. Methods: Sixty-five (29 male students slum dwelling schoolchildren were assessed for their ergonomics using a validated and reliable tool. Results: Average age was 13 years. Out of 65 students, 36 reported pres¬ence of musculoskeletal pain. In addition, 78.5% had bad ergonomics when lifting books. Sitting posture was poor in 67.7%, while 50.8% dem¬onstrated bad posture while using a computer. As far as the female stu¬dents were concerned, it was seen that out of 36 students, 55.6% com¬plained of presence of pain. Out of the 20 students who reported pain, 70% had a score lower than 7.5 on ergonomic score assessment (indicative of bad ergonomics. When the male students were considered, out of 29 students, 65.5% reported presence of pain. Out of the 19 students who reported pain, close to 79% demonstrated bad ergonomics. Conclusion: There is presence of musculoskeletal aches and pains in this under-privileged section of the society, including demonstration of bad er¬gonomics and postures while performing activities in school. Thus, mus¬culoskeletal health prob-lems exist in urban slum schoolchildren. It is im¬portant to identify health problems at an early stage in both boys and girls. Children are the future of the nation and hence, identification of health issues early in life and preventing them from becoming chronic is of utmost importance.

  7. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among cashew factory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, N; Ramachandra, Kamath; Arun G, Maiya; Asha, Kamath

    2012-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) are impairments of the bodily structures, such as muscles, joints, tendons, ligaments, nerves, or the localized blood circulation system, which are caused or aggravated primarily by the performance of work and by the effects of the immediate environment in which work is carried out. Types of work in the cashew factory include cutting, peeling, grading, packing, and boiling. All these activities have risk factors for the musculoskeletal disorders, which include repetition, contact stress, forceful contraction, awkward postures, as well as sustained positions. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to find out the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among cashew factory workers. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 246 cashew factory workers, working in a randomly selected factory of a selected locality in Karkala taluk of Udupi district, Karnataka. Participants' name, age, gender, literacy level, income, type of work, duration of employment, hours of work per day, hand dominance, pain and discomfort status were obtained by structured interview. A total of 246 cashew factory workers participated in the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 14. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the data. Around 28.5% (n = 70) reported pain, whereas 71.5% (n = 176) of workers did not report pain. The largest number of workers (n = 22; 32.4%) complained of pain in the knee, followed by back (n = 21; 30.9%) and then shoulder (n = 8; 11.8%). Seventy percent of the workers who reported pain were having more than 5 years of work experience. A 68.6% (n = 48) of the workers who reported pain were in the cutting category, followed by the grading (17%; n = 12), boiling (8.6%; n = 6), and peeling (5.7%; n = 4) categories. Prevalence of pain and discomfort among workers was 28.5%, which is a not ignorable and has to be addressed. Self-reported pain and discomfort were more prevalent in knee, followed by

  8. Differences in prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among computer and non-computer users in a Nigerian population: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanniyi O

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Literature abounds on the prevalent nature of Self Reported Musculoskeletal Symptoms (SRMS among computer users, but studies that actually compared this with non computer users are meagre thereby reducing the strength of the evidence. This study compared the prevalence of SRMS between computer and non computer users and assessed the risk factors associated with SRMS. Methods A total of 472 participants comprising equal numbers of age and sex matched computer and non computer users were assessed for the presence of SRMS. Information concerning musculoskeletal symptoms and discomforts from the neck, shoulders, upper back, elbows, wrists/hands, low back, hips/thighs, knees and ankles/feet were obtained using the Standardized Nordic questionnaire. Results The prevalence of SRMS was significantly higher in the computer users than the non computer users both over the past 7 days (χ2 = 39.11, p = 0.001 and during the past 12 month durations (χ2 = 53.56, p = 0.001. The odds of reporting musculoskeletal symptoms was least for participants above the age of 40 years (OR = 0.42, 95% CI = 0.31-0.64 over the past 7 days and OR = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.47-0.77 during the past 12 months and also reduced in female participants. Increasing daily hours and accumulated years of computer use and tasks of data processing and designs/graphics significantly (p Conclusion The prevalence of SRMS was significantly higher in the computer users than the non computer users and younger age, being male, working longer hours daily, increasing years of computer use, data entry tasks and computer designs/graphics were the significant risk factors for reporting musculoskeletal symptoms among the computer users. Computer use may explain the increase in prevalence of SRMS among the computer users.

  9. Exercise Based- Pain Relief Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zadeh, Mahdi Hossein

    in the current study was to use exercise induced- muscle damage followed by ECC as an acute pain model and observe its effects on the sensitivity of the nociceptive system and blood supply in healthy subjects. Then, the effect of a repeated bout of the same exercise as a healthy pain relief strategy......Exercise-based pain management programs are suggested for relieving from musculoskeletal pain; however the pain experienced after unaccustomed, especially eccentric exercise (ECC) alters people´s ability to participate in therapeutic exercises. Subsequent muscle pain after ECC has been shown...... to cause localized pressure pain and hyperalgesia. A prior bout of ECC has been repeatedly reported to produce a protective adaptation known as repeated bout effect (RBE). One of the main scopes of the current project was to investigate the adaptations by which the RBE can be resulted from. The approach...

  10. Congenial Insensitivity to Pain with Anhydroses (CIPA: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbabi Kalati F.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autonomic neuropathy is a rare disorder inherited as insensitivity to pain and temperature. It has been divided into five groups, the fourth of which named congenital insensitivity to pain with anhydrosis, (CIPA is the most common type of this disorder. CIPA is a recessive inherited condition with courses of idiopathic fever, reduction of sweat glands secretion despite having normal glands, insensitivity to pain and temperature changes, and mild mental retardation. Oral symptoms due to their severe abuse in these patients are considerable. Gas shock tongue, lips and other oral mucosa have been reported.Case Report: Examination of a 15 month old boy revealed severe oral ulcers and burns in the fingers of both hands due to contact with the heater. Pathological studies and special attention to specific aspects of the patient revelead that he was insensitive to pain and thermal stimulation and was diagnosed as a possible case of CIPA.Conclusion: CIPA is a autosomal recessive disorder which is very rare in childhood, as insensitivity to pain or the incidence of abuse and lack of objective response to pain in people with peripheral and central nervous system are normal. Tyrosine gene defect related to gene code provided membrane tyrosine has been identified in these patients. Mutation in this gene results in insensitivity to pain, anhydrosis, self abuse, and mental retardation and is associated with cancer. More than half of the patients die before the age of three. Oral manifestations of this syndrome are the characteristics of the disorder and can help to make an early diagnosis.

  11. A population in pain: report from the Olmsted County health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Emmeline A; Wollan, Peter C; Melton, L Joseph; Yawn, Barbara P

    2008-03-01

    Pain is poorly understood on a population level. This study provides updated estimates of the prevalence, location, severity, and impact of pain in a U.S. community and discusses current definitions of "chronic" pain. We mailed four-page surveys to a random sample of 5,897 adult residents of Olmsted County, MN. The survey asked about participant pain (location, duration, severity, and impact), as well as satisfaction with pain-related health care. Of the 3,575 responders (61%), 64.4% reported having chronic pain (>3 months' duration); 6.9% reported subacute pain (1-3 months); and 9.9% reported acute pain (<1 month). Body regions with the highest prevalence of pain were the head (31.9%), lower back (37.7%), and joints (59.5%). Chronic pain sufferers had more days per months with pain, more moderate or severe pain, and greater levels of interference with general activities and sleep than the people with acute and subacute pain. Almost two-thirds of those with chronic pain (63%) reported multiple pain locations. Several chronic pain sufferers gave fair or poor ratings for the quality of care (13.3% of those rating) or the effectiveness of treatment (28.1%) for pain. The prevalence of chronic pain is high, often in more than one location, and over 21% of chronic pain sufferers report dissatisfaction with current care.

  12. Women, but not men, report increasingly more pain during repeated (un)predictable painful electrocutaneous stimulation: Evidence for mediation by fear of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulders, Ann; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2012-05-01

    An abundance of animal research suggests that fear inhibits pain whereas anxiety increases it. Human studies on this topic are more scarce, and the existing evidence seems rather inconsistent. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the divergent effects of both negative emotional states-that is, pain-related fear and anxiety on pain sensitivity and unpleasantness. Possible sex-related differences were also under investigation, as well as the potential mediational role of fear of movement-related pain on the differences in pain intensity and unpleasantness between both sexes. We employed a voluntary joystick movement paradigm using movements as conditioned stimuli (CSs) and a painful electrocutaneous stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus. Healthy participants received predictable shocks in one condition and unpredictable shocks in another condition. The former procedure is known to induce fear of movement-related pain to the CS+ movement (movement consistently followed by pain), whereas the latter procedure induces (contextual) pain-related anxiety. Results showed that fear of movement-related pain indeed resulted in decreased pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings, while pain-related anxiety led to increased pain intensity/unpleasantness reports. Further, the anticipated sex difference was modulated by time. That is, women gradually reported more pain/unpleasantness, whereas men do not show such a sensitization effect. Moreover, this sex-specific sensitization is partially mediated by (conditioned) fear of movement-related pain. Women also report increasingly more fear of pain over conditioning blocks, while men do not. These results might be interesting in the light of the overrepresentation of women in a number of clinical pain conditions as well as anxiety disorders.

  13. Backpack-related musculoskeletal symptoms among Nigerian secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzat, T K; Abdulkareem, T A; Akinyinka, O O; Fatoye, F A

    2014-09-01

    Musculoskeletal discomfort in schoolchildren is significantly related to the weight and mode of carrying backpack to school. Prevalence and patterns of musculoskeletal discomfort among Nigerian secondary school students carrying backpack was investigated. Systematic sampling technique was used in the selection of the participating junior secondary schools for this study. Participants comprised 1,785 students aged 10-15 years. Standardised Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire was used to collect information on musculoskeletal pain. Backpack weight and participants' body weight were measured using a weighing scale. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain intensity. Gender differences in backpack weight, backpack percentage and musculoskeletal discomfort were studied using Mann-Whitney U test; Kruskal-Wallis test was used to study the influence of backpack carrying style on musculoskeletal discomfort; and Spearman rho correlation to determine the relationships between backpack weight, backpack to body weight ratio, age and pain intensity. There were 882 boys and 903 girls recruited into the study. Shoulder pain was the most prevalent discomfort (63.5 %), and pain was significantly higher in girls (p = 0.013). There were weak relationships between pain intensity, body weight and backpack to body weight ratio (r range 0.433-0.442; p backpack weight and age (r = 0.892; p backpack weight and body weight (r = 0.136; p backpack may predispose to musculoskeletal pain. Parents, teachers and clinicians can influence the mode of carrying backpack by secondary school students.

  14. Self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Kim; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P

    2004-01-01

    No epidemiological evidence of an association between silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease has been found. Based on case reports, it has been hypothesized that silicone breast implants may be associated with a unique rheumatic symptom cluster termed "atypical connective tissue d...

  15. Unusual site of recurrent musculoskeletal hydatid cyst: Case report and brief review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panagiotis G Drimousis; Konstantinos M Stamou; Athanasios Koutras; Dimitrios Konstantinos Tsekouras; George Zografos

    2006-01-01

    A case of a large multiplex recurrent hydatid cyst involving the left gluteal muscle and the left iliopsoas,accompanied with degeneration of the musculature of the left upper leg is presented along with a review of the relevant literature. Very few such cases have been reported worldwide. The presented case is also distinguished by the involvement of muscles of distant anatomic areas.

  16. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study to Investigate the Utility of a Picture Imagination Task in Investigating Neural Responses in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain to Daily Physical Activity Photographs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann M Taylor

    Full Text Available Pain-related anxiety and fear are associated with increased difficulties in attention, increased awareness of pain, impaired disengagement from pain, and can moderate the effects of attentional coping attempts. Accurately assessing the direct impact of pain-related anxiety and fear on pain behavior has proved difficult. Studies have demonstrated no or limited influence of pain-related fear and anxiety on behavior but this may be due to inherent problems with the scales used. Neuroimaging has improved the understanding of neural processes underlying the factors that influence pain perception. This study aimed to establish if a Picture and Imagination Task (PIT, largely developed from the Photographs of Daily Activity (PHODA assessment tool, could help explore how people living with chronic pain process information about daily activities. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to compare brain responses in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMSKP (n = 15 and healthy controls (n = 15. Subjects were asked to imagine how they would feel mentally and physically if asked to perform daily activities illustrated in PIT. The results found that a number of regions involved in pain processing saw increased BOLD activation in patients compared with controls when undertaking the task and included the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus and inferior and superior parietal cortices. Similarly, increased BOLD responses in patients compared to controls in the frontal pole, paracingulate and the supplementary motor cortex may be suggestive of a memory component to the responses The amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, substantia nigra/ventral tegmentum, putamen, thalamus, pallidum, inferior parietal (supramarginal and angular gyrus and cingulate cortex were also seen to have greater differences in BOLD signal changes in patients compared with controls and many of these regions are also associated

  17. Pelvic musculoskeletal infection in infants -- diagnostic difficulties and radiological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, S E; Carty, H

    1997-10-01

    Musculoskeletal infection involving the pelvis has rarely been reported in infants. When such infections involve the pelvic muscles they are generally believed to result from secondary spread from adjacent structures. We report five cases of primary pelvic musculoskeletal infection affecting infants pelvic musculoskeletal infection in infants and the role of the various radiological investigations in its diagnosis is discussed.

  18. Usage report of pharmacopuncture in musculoskeletal patients visiting Korean medicine hospitals and clinics in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Shin, Joon-Shik; Lee, Jinho; Kim, Me-Riong; Park, Ki Byung; Lee, Hwa Dong; Lee, Yoonmi; Hong, Jungwan; Ha, In-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacopuncture is a relatively new acupuncture therapy combining acupuncture with herbal medicine. While pharmacopuncture is applied extensively in Korean medicine treatment, there are no clinical reports regarding what types of pharmacopuncture are used for which diseases. Methods Data was extracted retrospectively from the electronic medical records of all inpatients and outpatients at 12 Korean medicine hospitals and clinics during the period of December 17, 2010 to October 2,...

  19. Neck pain and anxiety do not always go together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Roessler, Kirsten K; Larsen, Anders H

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Chronic pain and psychosocial distress are generally thought to be associated in chronic musculoskeletal disorders such as non-specific neck pain. However, it is unclear whether a raised level of anxiety is necessarily a feature of longstanding, intense pain amongst patient and general...... population sub-groups. In a cohort of 70 self-selected female, non-specific neck pain sufferers, we observed relatively high levels of self-reported pain of 4.46 (measured on the 11 point numerical pain rating scale (NRS-101)) and a longstanding duration of symptoms (156 days/year). However, the mean anxiety...

  20. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Wintermeyer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  1. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  2. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D's central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  3. International spinal cord injury musculoskeletal basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Burns, A S; Curt, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International....

  4. Obesity-Related Adipokines Predict Patient-Reported Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Gandhi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Increasingly, an inflammatory modulating effect of adipokines within synovial joints is being recognized. To date, there has been no work examining a potential association between the presence of adipokines in the shoulder and patient-reported outcomes. This study undertakes an investigation assessing these potential links. Methods: 50 osteoarthritis patients scheduled for shoulder surgery completed a pre-surgery questionnaire capturing demographic information including validated, patient-reported function (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire and pain (Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire measures. Synovial fluid (SF samples were analyzed for leptin, adiponectin, and resistin levels using Milliplex MAP assays. Linear regression modeling was used to assess the association between adipokine levels and patient-reported outcomes, adjusted for age, sex, BMI, and disease severity. Results: 54% of the cohort was female (n = 27. The mean age (SD of the sample was 62.9 (9.9 years and the mean BMI (SD was 28.1 (5.4 kg/m2. From regression analyses, greater SF leptin and adiponectin levels, but not regarding resistin, were found to be associated with greater pain (p Conclusions: The identified association between shoulder-derived SF leptin and adiponectin and shoulder pain is likely explained by the pro-inflammatory characteristics of the adipokines and represents potentially important therapeutic targets.

  5. JOA back pain evaluation questionnaire: initial report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Mitsuru; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Konno, Shinichi; Miyamoto, Masabumi; Seichi, Atsushi; Shimamura, Tadashi; Shirado, Osamu; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Takeshita, Katsushi; Tani, Toshikazu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Wada, Eiji; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Tanaka, Takashi; Hirota, Yoshio

    2007-09-01

    There is no widely accepted objective evaluation for lumbar spine disorders. New outcome measures should be patient-oriented and should measure symptoms and self-reported functional status in multiple dimensions. The aim of this study was to identify items to be included in the disease-specific quality of life (QOL) questionnaire for the assessments of patients with lumbar spine disorders. The draft of the QOL questionnaire that consisted of a total of 60 items, including 24 items derived from the Japanese version of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and 36 items derived from the Japanese version of Short Form 36 (SF-36), were administered to patients and controls. After obtaining written informed consent, the following data were collected from the patient group (n = 328) and the control group (n = 213): (1) background characteristics, including age, diagnosis, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, and finger to floor distance; (2) responses to the questionnaire; (3) the identification rate by discrimination analysis to select the candidates for adoption and by adopting explanatory variables. The items to be excluded were determined by examining the explanatory variables, which were selected after the discrimination analysis, by setting the candidate to-be-excluded items as an objective variable. Based on the distribution of the responses, two items, RDQ-15 and RDQ-19, were excluded. From the results of the correlation coefficient calculation for each question in the patient group, 33 items were excluded and 27 candidate items were adopted. Based on the adoption explanatory variable used in the discrimination analysis, 25 of the 27 candidate items for adoption were accepted. This study identified the 25 specific questionnaire items that should be included in the questionnaire to evaluate QOL of patients with various lumbar spine disorders.

  6. Musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunting, K L; Welch, L S; Cuccherini, B A; Seiger, L A

    1994-02-01

    This study ascertained the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms among electricians, in order to evaluate the prevalence of cumulative trauma disorders (CTD) in this population. We adapted the CTD surveillance questionnaire used by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to assess the prevalence of neck, shoulder, elbow, hand/wrist, back, and knee symptoms in the year prior to the survey. Questionnaires were completed by 308 apprentices and journeymen enrolled in training classes at the local union hall. The participants were relatively young individuals, and 86% of the participants were currently working as electricians. Participants reported a high prevalence of symptoms which occurred more than three times during the past year or which lasted more than 1 week. Back symptoms and hand/wrist symptoms were experienced most frequently, by about half the population, while elbow symptoms were reported by only 15% of participants. Symptom prevalence was lower, but still notable, when defined as symptoms which had occurred at least once a month or lasted more than a week in the past year. Eighty-two percent of participants reported at least one musculoskeletal symptom using the most inclusive definition, while 57% reported two or more symptoms. This survey highlights that: 1) low back discomfort is common in young construction workers, and resulted in medical care, missed work, or light duty for almost 35% of the participants; 2) neck discomfort is also very common and required doctor visits or work modification for almost one quarter of the participants; 3) these construction workers continued to work with symptoms that are classifiable as a CTD; and 4) history of injury is correlated with the subsequent prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms.

  7. Predictors of high score patient-reported barriers to controlling cancer pain: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung Hye; Oh, Sung Yong; Chisholm, Gary; Lee, Jung-Ae; Lee, Jae Jin; Park, Keon Woo; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Song, Hun Ho; Lee, Keehyun; Zang, Dae Young; Kim, Ho Young; Choi, Dae Ro; Kim, Hyo Jung; Kim, Jung Han; Jung, Joo Young; Jang, Geundoo; Kim, Hyeong Su; Won, Ji Yun; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Pain is one of the most common and devastating symptoms in cancer patients, and misunderstandings on the patient's part can cause major obstacles in pain management. We evaluated factors associated with patient's high barrier score to managing cancer-associated pain by having 201 patients complete the Korean Barriers Questionnaire II, the Brief Pain Inventory--Korean, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30, and the Korean Beck Depression Inventory. The Pain Management Index (PMI) was also assessed. The patients were from nine oncology clinics in university hospitals and a veterans' hospital in South Korea. The median pain score (0-10 scale) was 4, with a median percentage of pain improvement during the last 24 h of 70 %. A total of 150 patients (75 %) received strong opioids, and 177 (88 %) achieved adequate analgesia (positive PMI). Mean scores ± SD for the Barriers Questionnaire II ranged from 1.5 ± 1 to 2.8 ± 1.1, with the harmful effects subscale the highest. In the multiple regression model, depression was significantly associated with total barrier score to pain management (p Management of cancer pain should include screening for depression, and management of depression could reduce patient-reported barriers to pain management.

  8. PREVALENCE OF OBESITY AMONG MUSCULOSKELETAL PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Salah Uddin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to identify the prevalence of obesity among the musculoskeletal patients who attended musculoskeletal department of Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paraleysed (CRP to receive physiotherapy service. The study was conducted in order to find the information related to demography, prevalence of obesity by age and sex, the main musculoskeletal disorder among the obese participants, as well as the distribution of chronic disease including hypertension and diabetes among the obese participants. Methodology: A cross sectional survey was conducted to collect data from 162 participants aged between 18-75 years. Results: Prevalence of obesity was 12.3%, with 55% were ≥ 50 years and 45% were < 50 years, 60% of whom were females and 40% were males. Out of 162, 20 patients were obese who complained at least one musculoskeletal problem. Among the 20 patients osteoarthritis of the knee (10, 50% was the most common musculoskeletal disorder followed by low back pain (7, 35%, ankle sprain (1, 5%, neck pain (1, 5% and calcaneal spur (1, 5%. Most of the obese shared that they had no hypertension (13, 65% and diabetes (17, 85% where rest of the patients suffered with hypertension (7, 35% and diabetes (3, 15%. Conclusion: Prevalence of obesity is rapidly increasing day by day in the world. Now-a-days obesity is a burning question. It is essential to identify the prevalence of obesity among musculoskeletal patients of Bangladesh.

  9. Development and initial cohort validation of the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) for use across musculoskeletal care pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathan C; Kang, Sujin; Benedetto, Elena; Myers, Helen; Blackburn, Steven; Smith, Stephanie; Hay, Elaine; Rees, Jonathan; Beard, David; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Barker, Karen; Ellis, Benjamin; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Price, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Current musculoskeletal outcome tools are fragmented across different healthcare settings and conditions. Our objectives were to develop and validate a single musculoskeletal outcome measure for use throughout the pathway and patients with different musculoskeletal conditions: the Arthritis Research UK Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ). Setting A consensus workshop with stakeholders from across the musculoskeletal community, workshops and individual interviews with a broad mix of musculoskeletal patients identified and prioritised outcomes for MSK-HQ inclusion. Initial psychometric validation was conducted in four cohorts from community physiotherapy, and secondary care orthopaedic hip, knee and shoulder clinics. Participants Stakeholders (n=29) included primary care, physiotherapy, orthopaedic and rheumatology patients (n=8); general practitioners, physiotherapists, orthopaedists, rheumatologists and pain specialists (n=7), patient and professional national body representatives (n=10), and researchers (n=4). The four validation cohorts included 570 participants (n=210 physiotherapy, n=150 hip, n=150 knee, n=60 shoulder patients). Outcome measures Outcomes included the MSK-HQ's acceptability, feasibility, comprehension, readability and responder burden. The validation cohort outcomes were the MSK-HQ's completion rate, test–retest reliability and convergent validity with reference standards (EQ-5D-5L, Oxford Hip, Knee, Shoulder Scores, and the Keele MSK-PROM). Results Musculoskeletal domains prioritised were pain severity, physical function, work interference, social interference, sleep, fatigue, emotional health, physical activity, independence, understanding, confidence to self-manage and overall impact. Patients reported MSK-HQ items to be ‘highly relevant’ and ‘easy to understand’. Completion rates were high (94.2%), with scores normally distributed, and no floor/ceiling effects. Test–retest reliability was excellent, and

  10. The McGill Pain Questionnaire in Amharic: Zwai Health Center patients' reports on the experience of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Frances E; Hiwot, Mismay G; Arega, Adefris; Molla, Mesfin; Samson, S; Seyoum, Nebyou; Ressom, Shewangizaw; Worku, Solomon; Mulatu, Mesfin; Egale, Tewedros

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents for the first time an Amharic translation of the McGill Pain Questionnaire developed by Melzack and used in many countries around the world. It allows for a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the intensity, location, and nature of experienced pain, as well as conditions that relieve pain. Data collected from one hundred patients attending the Zwai Health Center indicated that 81% reported pain at the time, one-quarter of whom were in severe pain. The most commonly chosen descriptors were: burning, stabbing, sore, gnawing, aching, and cramping. Descriptors were often associated with certain diagnoses: burning with gastrointestinal problems, stabbing with respiratory diseases, and gnawing or aching with myalgia/neuralgia. Approximately 40% of those in pain had previously sought relief from a clinic or pharmacy and were attending the center because the pain persisted. Analgesics were more likely to be prescribed for those in mild pain, while other medication without analgesics were prescribed for those in severe pain. The McGill Pain Questionnaire--Amharic (MPQ-Am) could be a useful tool for future studies of illness-specific pain, and of the effectiveness of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical strategies for pain management.

  11. Diagnosis and initial management of musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Aaron K; Shrader, M Wade; Falk, Miranda N; Segal, Lee S

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an invasive fungal infection caused by the inhalation of aerosolized spores of Coccidioides spp., which reside in the arid soil of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. Approximately two thirds of cases are asymptomatic, and the remainder usually present with mild flu-like symptoms. Dissemination of coccidioidomycosis is rare, and can lead to extrapulmonic diseases including meningitis, osteomyelitis, and skin and soft-tissue involvement. The purpose of this study is to report our experience with musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis in children. This was a retrospective chart review of patients with musculoskeletal infection with Coccidioides spp. at a tertiary care pediatric hospital from 1997 to 2010, identified by a search of ICD-9 codes and hospital diagnoses. Demographic and clinical data were collected from medical records, including the age of the patient, sex, white blood cell count, immunocompetence, length of stay, location of involvement, and initial treatment. In total, 20 children were identified with musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis. The mean age was 12.3 years (range, 2 to 17 y) at time of diagnosis. Diagnostic criteria included positive imaging tests (plain film+MRI), serologic positive titers, and/or biopsy with positive cultures. The most common presenting symptom was bone pain (100%); only 3 (15%) patients had accompanying signs/symptoms of pulmonary infection. Only 2 (5%) patients had a white blood cell count >15×10/L (5%). Locations of infection included the foot (28%), knee (14%), spine (12%), forearm (10%), lower leg (6%), and other sites (30%). Fluconazole was the most common antifungal agent used (75%). Surgical intervention was required in 10 (50%) patients. This is the first series that has described musculoskeletal coccidioidomycosis exclusively in children. This study suggests that the initial presentation of this disease can be nonspecific and difficult to recognize in children. Clinicians should

  12. Work-related stress and quality of life among Iranian blue-collar workers with self-reported low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir-Mokamelkhah, Elaheh; Bahrami-Ahmadi, Amir; Aghili, Negar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Impairment in quality of life and mental health had been reported in the previous studies as the results of musculoskeletal disorders among workers. Mental health has a wide concept and contains different disorders including anxiety, depression or even decreased quality of life, all of which having challengeable impacts on work- related characters such as work productivity and absensism. The present study aimed at evaluating work- related stress and quality of life among Iranian blue-collar workers of Fars ABFA Company with selfreported low back pain. Methods: In the present study, we focused on the low back pain among 451 blue-collar workers and assessed their work- related stress and quality of life status using DASS-21 and short form questionnaire (SF-36), respectively. Independent sample t-test was used to compare the qualitative variables, and chi-square test was utilized for statistical analysis of the qualitative variables. Results: Mean of the total score of quality of life among workers with low back pain was significantly lower than in those workers without low back pain. The mean of work- related stress score was significantly higher in workers with low back pain than in workers without low back pain. The mean quality of life subdomains in patients with low back pain was significantly lower than in workers without low back pain. Conclusion: Findings of the present study revealed that workers with low back pain had lower quality of life score and higher work- related stress score. These findings should be considered in designing preventive programs rather than controlling the pain.

  13. Is there significant correlation between self-reported low back pain visual analogue scores and low back pain scores determined by pressure pain induction matching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, David A; Lewis, John E; Gao, Jinrun

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether self-reported visual analogue scale (VAS) low back pain (LBP) scores are valid against matched psychophysically induced pressure pain scores. Two hundred thirty-six chronic LBP patients (some with neck pain) reported their LBP and neck pain scores on a VAS immediately before psychophysical pressure pain induction used to determine pain threshold (PTHRE), pain tolerance (PTOL), and a psychophysical pressure pain score which matched (PMAT) their current LBP. Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficients were calculated between reported VAS neck scores, reported VAS LBP scores, and the psychophysically determined LBP PMAT scores. The PMAT scores were calculated utilizing PTOL only and both PTOL and PTHRE. There was a significant correlation between the LBP PMAT scores and the reported LBP VAS scores for both types of psychophysical LBP PMAT score calculations; however, there were insignificant correlations between the LBP PMAT scores and reported neck VAS scores. Chronic LBP patients can match their self-reported VAS LBP scores to psychophysically determined LBP PMAT scores. As such, self-reported VAS chronic LBP scores appear to be valid against one type of psychophysical measurement.

  14. PAIN INTENSITY AND PAIN INTERFERENCE AMONG TRAUMA PATIENTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deya Prastika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of trauma has been high and has gained attention worldwide. The energy involved in trauma results in specific tissue damage. Such tissue damage generally leads to pain. The high pain intensity possibly is consequence of trauma due to transfer energy to the body from external force and absorbed in wide area. This pain affected patients’ physical and psychological function, in which well known as pain interference. Objective: The aim of this review is to describe the pain intensity and pain interference among trauma patients. Method: A systematic search of electronic databases (CINHAL, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Google scholar was conducted for quantitative and qualitative studies measuring pain intensity and pain interference. The search limited to hospitalized trauma patients in adult age. Results: The search revealed 678 studies. A total of 10 descriptive studies examined pain intensity and pain interference and met inclusion criteria. The pain intensity and pain interference was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Pain intensity of hospitalized trauma patients were moderate to severe. These including 6 studies in orthopedic trauma, one study in musculoskeletal, two in studies in combinational between orthopedic and musculoskeletal, and two studies in burn injury. Moreover, the patients also reported pain was relentless & unbearable. In accordance, data showed that pain interference was moderate to severe from six studies. These studies result in vary of functional interference. However, those studies examined pain interference on sleep, enjoyment of life, mood, relationship with other, walking, general activity, and walking. Conclusion: The evidence from 10 studies included in this review indicates that hospitalized trauma patients perceived moderate to severe pain intensity and pain interference. Further research is needed to better evaluate the pain of hospitalized trauma patients.

  15. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, M; Guzzo, M P; Spinelli, F R; Atzeni, F; Sarzi-Puttini, P; Conti, F; Iannuccelli, C

    2014-06-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM), is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  16. Pain and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Franco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is an autoimmune disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations involving virtually the entire body. The pain in SLE can have different causes. The SLE classification criteria include mainly the musculoskeletal manifestations of pain, which are commonly reported as initial symptoms of SLE, such as arthralgia, arthritis and/or myalgia. Chronic widespread pain, which is typical of fibromyalgia (FM, is frequently associated with SLE. The aim of this review is to describe widespread pain and fatigue in SLE, and the association of SLE and FM. Although secondary FM is not correlated with the disease activity, it may interfere with the daily activities of SLE patients. Therefore it is necessary to identify its symptoms and treat them promptly to improve the quality of life of patients. In conclusion, it is essential to identify the origin of pain in SLE in order to avoid dangerous over-treatment in patients with co-existing widespread pain and FM.

  17. The interaction between pain, pain-related fear of movement and productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sell, Lea; Lund, Henrik Lambrecht; Holtermann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Scale for Kinesiophobia and productivity and musculoskeletal pain by self-reported measures. Sickness absence records for construction of WAI were obtained from the workplace. RESULTS: There was a 77% response rate with 350 employees included in the final analysis. Among employees with only moderate...

  18. Fibromyalgia: generalized pain intolerance and manifold symptom reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, L G; Block, S R; Gratwick, G M

    1988-08-01

    We tested the current criteria for fibromyalgia. Pain tolerance was measured at tender point and control point sites using a pressure algometer, and responses to 6 standard psychological self-reports were obtained from 125 patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Among patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, published symptom criteria for fibromyalgia did not correlate significantly with the number of tender points. Only lower generalized pressure point pain tolerance distinguished fibromyalgia from other generalized nonarticular rheumatism. Generalized nonarticular rheumatism mean scores were much higher than controls on tests measuring the tendency to report physical symptoms, including headaches and functional bowel syndrome. It is probable that patients with fibromyalgia do not differ in any important physical or psychological respect from other patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism except for the presence of tender points. However, the presence of tender points is merely a reflection of the patient's general pressure pain sensitivity and is not indicative of any special localized pathological phenomenon. The concept of fibromyalgia as an entity separate from the rest of generalized nonarticular rheumatism may be an artifact of a physician's approach to the patient. Most patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism demonstrate an abnormally high frequency of reporting manifold disagreeable symptoms and probably come to the attention of many medical disciplines.