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Sample records for reported muc1 protein

  1. Analysis of a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and human mucin 1 (MUC1) conjugate protein in a MUC1-tolerant mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkhasov, Julia; Alvarez, M Lucrecia; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Mason, Hugh S; Walmsley, Amanda M; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2010-12-01

    Since epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) is associated with several adenocarcinomas at the mucosal sites, it is pertinent to test the efficacy of a mucosally targeted vaccine formulation. The B subunit of the Vibrio cholerae cholera toxin (CTB) has great potential to act as a mucosal carrier for subunit vaccines. In the present study we evaluated whether a MUC1 tandem repeat (TR) peptide chemically linked to CTB would break self-antigen tolerance in the transgenic MUC1-tolerant mouse model (MUC1.Tg) through oral or parenteral immunizations. We report that oral immunization with the CTB-MUC1 conjugate along with mucosal adjuvant, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) did not break self-antigen tolerance in MUC1.Tg mice, but induced a strong humoral response in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. However, self-antigen tolerance in the MUC1.Tg mouse model was broken after parenteral immunizations with different doses of the CTB-MUC1 conjugate protein and with the adjuvant CpG ODN co-delivered with CTB-MUC1. Importantly, mice immunized systemically with CpG ODN alone and with CTB-MUC1 exhibited decreased tumor burden when challenged with a mammary gland tumor cell line that expresses human MUC1.

  2. Analysis of a Cholera Toxin B Subunit (CTB) and Human Mucin 1 (MUC1) Conjugate Protein in a MUC1 Tolerant Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkhasov, Julia; Alvarez, M. Lucrecia; Pathangey, Latha B.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Mason, Hugh S.; Walmsley, Amanda M.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    Since epithelial mucin 1 (MUC1) is associated with several adenocarcinomas at mucosal sites, it is pertinent to test the efficacy of a mucosally targeted vaccine formulation. The B subunit of the Vibrio cholerae cholera toxin (CTB) has great potential to act as a mucosal carrier for subunit vaccines. In the present study we evaluated whether a MUC1 tandem repeat (TR) peptide chemically linked to CTB would break self-antigen tolerance in the transgenic MUC1 tolerant mouse model (MUC1.Tg) through oral or parenteral immunizations. We report that oral immunization with the CTB-MUC1 conjugate along with mucosal adjuvant, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), did not break self-antigen tolerance in MUC1.Tg mice, but induced a strong humoral response in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. However, self-antigen tolerance in the MUC1.Tg mouse model was broken after parenteral immunizations with different doses of the CTB-MUC1 conjugate protein and with the adjuvant CpG ODN co-delivered with CTB-MUC1. Importantly, mice immunized systemically with CpG ODN alone and with CTB-MUC1 exhibited decreased tumor burden when challenged with a mammary gland tumor cell line that expresses human MUC1. PMID:20824430

  3. Molecular interactions between MUC1 epithelial mucin, β-catenin, and CagA proteins

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    Wei eGuang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-8-driven neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa is pathognomonic of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. Our prior study showed that ectopic over-expression of MUC1 in human AGS gastric epithelial cells reduced H. pylori-stimulated IL-8 production compared with cells expressing MUC1 endogenously. Conversely, Muc1 knockout (Muc1-/- mice displayed an increased level of transcripts encoding the keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, the murine equivalent of human IL-8, in gastric mucosa compared with Muc1(+/+ mice during experimental H. pylori infection. The current study tested the hypothesis that a decreased IL-8 level observed following MUC1 over-expression is mediated through the ability of MUC1 to associate with β-catenin, thereby inhibiting H. pylori-induced β-catenin nuclear translocation. Increased neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected Muc1(-/- mice was observed compared with Muc1(+/+ wild type littermates, thus defining the functional consequences of increased KC expression in the Muc1-null animals. Protein co-immunoprecipitation (coIP studies using lysates of untreated or H. pylori-treated AGS cells demonstrated that (a MUC1 formed a coIP complex with β-catenin and CagA, (b MUC1 over-expression reduced CagA/β-catenin coIP, and (c in the absence of MUC1 over-expression, H. pylori infection increased the nuclear level of β-catenin, (d whereas MUC1 over-expression decreased bacteria-driven β-catenin nuclear localization. These results suggest that manipulation of MUC1 expression in gastric epithelia may be an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit H. pylori-dependent IL-8 production, neutrophil infiltration, and stomach inflammation.

  4. MUC1 expression and anti-MUC1 serum immune response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC): a multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabassa, Martín E; Croce, María V; Pereyra, Adrián; Segal-Eiras, Amada

    2006-01-01

    HNSCC progression to adjacent tissue and nodes may be mediated by altered glycoproteins and glycolipids such as MUC1 mucin. This report constitutes a detailed statistical study about MUC1 expression and anti-MUC1 immune responses in relation to different clinical and pathological parameters which may be useful to develop new anti HNSCC therapeutic strategies. Fifty three pre treatment HNSCC patients were included: 26 (49.1%) bearing oral cavity tumors, 17 (32.1%) localized in the larynx and 10 (18.8%) in the pharynx. Three patients (5.7%) were at stage I, 5 (9.4%) stage II, 15 (28.3%) stage III and 30 (56.6%) at stage IV. MUC1 tumor expression was studied by immunohistochemistry employing two anti-MUC1 antibodies: CT33, anti cytoplasmic tail MUC1 polyclonal antibody (Ab) and C595 anti-peptidic core MUC1 monoclonal antibody. Serum levels of MUC1 and free anti-MUC1 antibodies were detected by ELISA and circulating immune complexes (CIC) by precipitation in polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3.5%; MUC1 isolation from circulating immune complexes was performed by protein A-sepharose CL-4B affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Statistical analysis consisted in Multivariate Principal Component Analysis (PCA); ANOVA test (Tukey's test) was employed to find differences among groups; nonparametrical correlations (Kendall's Tau) were applied when necessary. Statistical significance was set to p < 0.05 in all cases. MUC1 cytoplasmic tail was detected in 40/50 (80%) and MUC1 protein core in 9/50 (18%) samples while serum MUC1 levels were elevated in 8/53 (15%) patients. A significant statistical correlation was found between MUC1 serum levels and anti-MUC1 IgG free antibodies, while a negative correlation between MUC1 serum levels and anti-MUC1 IgM free antibodies was found. Circulating immune complexes were elevated in 16/53 (30%) samples and were also statistically associated with advanced tumor stage. MUC1 was identified as an antigenic component

  5. Complex of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in Colon Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascio, Sandra; Finn, Olivera J.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that CIN85, an 85 KDa protein known to be involved in tumor cell migration and metastasis through its interaction with Cbl, associates with MUC1 in tumor cells. MUC1/CIN85 complex also regulates migration and invasion of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we examined specifically human colon carcinoma tissue microarrays (TMA) by immunohistochemistry for the expression of MUC1 and CIN85 and their potential role in cancer progression and metastasis. We detected a significant increase in expression of both MUC1 and CIN85 associated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. We further investigated if Cbl could also be present in the MUC1/CIN85 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that Cbl co-localized both with CIN85 and with MUC1 in a human colon cancer cell line. To begin to investigate the in vivo relevance of MUC1 overexpression and association with CIN85 and Cbl in cancer development and progression, we used human MUC1 transgenic mice that express MUC1 on the colonic epithelial cells, treated with azoxymethane to initiate and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) to promote colorectal carcinogenesis. MUC1.Tg mice showed higher tumor incidence and decreased survival when compared with wild-type mice. Consistent with the in vitro data, the association of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl was detected in colon tissues of AOM/DSS-treated MUC1 transgenic mice. MUC1/CIN85/Cbl complex appears to contribute to promotion and progression of colon cancer and thus increased expression of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in early stage colon cancer might be predictive of poor prognosis

  6. Complex of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in Colon Cancer Progression and Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascio, Sandra, E-mail: sac131@pitt.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, E1040 Biomedical Science Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Fondazione Ri.Med, via Bandiera, Palermo 90133 (Italy); Finn, Olivera J., E-mail: sac131@pitt.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, E1040 Biomedical Science Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    We previously reported that CIN85, an 85 KDa protein known to be involved in tumor cell migration and metastasis through its interaction with Cbl, associates with MUC1 in tumor cells. MUC1/CIN85 complex also regulates migration and invasion of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we examined specifically human colon carcinoma tissue microarrays (TMA) by immunohistochemistry for the expression of MUC1 and CIN85 and their potential role in cancer progression and metastasis. We detected a significant increase in expression of both MUC1 and CIN85 associated with advanced tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. We further investigated if Cbl could also be present in the MUC1/CIN85 complex. Co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that Cbl co-localized both with CIN85 and with MUC1 in a human colon cancer cell line. To begin to investigate the in vivo relevance of MUC1 overexpression and association with CIN85 and Cbl in cancer development and progression, we used human MUC1 transgenic mice that express MUC1 on the colonic epithelial cells, treated with azoxymethane to initiate and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) to promote colorectal carcinogenesis. MUC1.Tg mice showed higher tumor incidence and decreased survival when compared with wild-type mice. Consistent with the in vitro data, the association of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl was detected in colon tissues of AOM/DSS-treated MUC1 transgenic mice. MUC1/CIN85/Cbl complex appears to contribute to promotion and progression of colon cancer and thus increased expression of MUC1, CIN85 and Cbl in early stage colon cancer might be predictive of poor prognosis.

  7. MUC1 Expression by Immunohistochemistry Is Associated with Adverse Pathologic Features in Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Study.

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    Okyaz Eminaga

    Full Text Available The uncertainties inherent in clinical measures of prostate cancer (CaP aggressiveness endorse the investigation of clinically validated tissue biomarkers. MUC1 expression has been previously reported to independently predict aggressive localized prostate cancer. We used a large cohort to validate whether MUC1 protein levels measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC predict aggressive cancer, recurrence and survival outcomes after radical prostatectomy independent of clinical and pathological parameters.MUC1 IHC was performed on a multi-institutional tissue microarray (TMA resource including 1,326 men with a median follow-up of 5 years. Associations with clinical and pathological parameters were tested by the Chi-square test and the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Relationships with outcome were assessed with univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models and the Log-rank test.The presence of MUC1 expression was significantly associated with extracapsular extension and higher Gleason score, but not with seminal vesicle invasion, age, positive surgical margins or pre-operative serum PSA levels. In univariable analyses, positive MUC1 staining was significantly associated with a worse recurrence free survival (RFS (HR: 1.24, CI 1.03-1.49, P = 0.02, although not with disease specific survival (DSS, P>0.5. On multivariable analyses, the presence of positive surgical margins, extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, as well as higher pre-operative PSA and increasing Gleason score were independently associated with RFS, while MUC1 expression was not. Positive MUC1 expression was not independently associated with disease specific survival (DSS, but was weakly associated with overall survival (OS.In our large, rigorously designed validation cohort, MUC1 protein expression was associated with adverse pathological features, although it was not an independent predictor of outcome after radical prostatectomy.

  8. Flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate human serum MUC1-Tn antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Clausen, Henrik; Germeraad, Wilfred T V

    2011-01-01

    Mucin-1 (MUC1) is a heavily O-glycosylated, transmembrane protein that is expressed on the apical surface of most secretory epithelia. In malignantly transformed epithelia, MUC1 has lost its apical distribution, is underglycosylated and is secreted into the circulation. Due to the underglycosylat......Mucin-1 (MUC1) is a heavily O-glycosylated, transmembrane protein that is expressed on the apical surface of most secretory epithelia. In malignantly transformed epithelia, MUC1 has lost its apical distribution, is underglycosylated and is secreted into the circulation. Due...... to detect antibodies binding to the underglycosylated MUC1 protein. This cellular system is complementary to the previously published methods to detect MUC1 serum antibodies, since the antibodies to the native protein are evaluated and therefore it can be effectively used for MUC1 antibody monitoring...... in vaccination studies as well as for functional assays....

  9. Novel MUC1 aptamer selectively delivers cytotoxic agent to cancer cells in vitro.

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    Yan Hu

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a primary treatment for cancer, but its efficacy is often limited by the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Targeted drug delivery may reduce the non-specific toxicity of chemotherapy by selectively directing anticancer drugs to tumor cells. MUC1 protein is an attractive target for tumor-specific drug delivery owning to its overexpression in most adenocarcinomas. In this study, a novel MUC1 aptamer is exploited as the targeting ligand for carrying doxorubicin (Dox to cancer cells. We developed an 86-base DNA aptamer (MA3 that bound to a peptide epitope of MUC1 with a K(d of 38.3 nM and minimal cross reactivity to albumin. Using A549 lung cancer and MCF-7 breast cancer cells as MUC1-expressing models, MA3 was found to preferentially bind to MUC1-positive but not MUC1-negative cells. An aptamer-doxorubicin complex (Apt-Dox was formulated by intercalating doxorubicin into the DNA structure of MA3. Apt-Dox was found capable of carrying doxorubicin into MUC1-positive tumor cells, while significantly reducing the drug intake by MUC1-negative cells. Moreover, Apt-Dox retained the efficacy of doxorubicin against MUC1-positive tumor cells, but lowered the toxicity to MUC1-negative cells (P<0.01. The results suggest that the MUC1 aptamer may have potential utility as a targeting ligand for selective delivery of cytotoxic agent to MUC1-expressing tumors.

  10. Androgen-Dependent Regulation of Human MUC1 Mucin Expression

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    Stephen Mitchell

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available MUC1 mucin is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen, progesterone, and glucocorticoids. Our objective was to determine whether androgen receptor. (20AR activation regulates expression of MUC1. The following breast and prostatic cell lines were phenotyped and grouped according to AR and MUC1protein expression: 1 AR+MUCi + [DAR17+19. (20AR transfectants of DU-145, ZR-75-1, MDA-MB-453, and T47D]; 2 AR-MUCi+ [DZeoi. (20AR- vector control, DU-145, BT20, MDA-MB231, and MCF7]; 3 AIR +MUCi -. (20LNCaP and LNCaP-r. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTT assay in the presence of synthetic androgen R1881, 0.1 pM to 1 µM. Cell surface MUC1expression was determined by flow cytometry in the presence or absence of oestradiol, medroxy progesterone acetate or R1881, with and without 4 hydroxy-flutamide. (204-OH, a nonsteroidal AR antagonist. The functional significance of MUC1expression was investigated with a cell-cell aggregation assay. Only AR+ MUC1 + cell lines showed a significant increase in MUC1expression with AR activation. (20P. (20range =.01 to .0001, reversed in the presence of 4-OHF. Cell proliferation was unaffected. Increased expression of MUC1was associated with a significant. (20P. (20range =.002 to .001 reduction in cell-cell adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first description of androgen-dependent regulation of MUC1mucin. This is also functionally associated with decreased cell-cell adhesion, a recognised feature of progressive malignancy. These findings have important implications for physiological and pathological processes.

  11. The MUC1 extracellular domain subunit is found in nuclear speckles and associates with spliceosomes.

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    Priyadarsini Kumar

    Full Text Available MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB. While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC

  12. Targeting MUC1-C suppresses polycomb repressive complex 1 in multiple myeloma.

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    Tagde, Ashujit; Markert, Tahireh; Rajabi, Hasan; Hiraki, Masayuki; Alam, Maroof; Bouillez, Audrey; Avigan, David; Anderson, Kenneth; Kufe, Donald

    2017-09-19

    The polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) includes the BMI1, RING1 and RING2 proteins. BMI1 is required for survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. The MUC1-C oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed by MM cells, activates MYC and is also necessary for MM cell survival. The present studies show that targeting MUC1-C with (i) stable and inducible silencing and CRISPR/Cas9 editing and (ii) the pharmacologic inhibitor GO-203, which blocks MUC1-C function, downregulates BMI1, RING1 and RING2 expression. The results demonstrate that MUC1-C drives BMI1 transcription by a MYC-dependent mechanism. MUC1-C thus promotes MYC occupancy on the BMI1 promoter and thereby activates BMI1 expression. We also show that the MUC1-C→MYC pathway induces RING2 expression. Moreover, in contrast to BMI1 and RING2, we found that MUC1-C drives RING1 by an NF-κB p65-dependent mechanism. Targeting MUC1-C and thereby the suppression of these key PRC1 proteins was associated with downregulation of the PRC1 E3 ligase activity as evidenced by decreases in ubiquitylation of histone H2A. Targeting MUC1-C also resulted in activation of the PRC1-repressed tumor suppressor genes, PTEN, CDNK2A and BIM . These findings identify a heretofore unrecognized role for MUC1-C in the epigenetic regulation of MM cells.

  13. MUC1 enhances invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells by inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

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    Roy, L D; Sahraei, M; Subramani, D B; Besmer, D; Nath, S; Tinder, T L; Bajaj, E; Shanmugam, K; Lee, Y Y; Hwang, S I L; Gendler, S J; Mukherjee, P

    2011-03-24

    Increased motility and invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells are associated with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snai1 and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that trigger this process by repressing E-cadherin and enhancing vimentin and N-cadherin protein expression. However, the mechanisms that regulate this activation in pancreatic tumors remain elusive. MUC1, a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is associated with the most invasive forms of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDA). In this study, we show that over expression of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer cells triggers the molecular process of EMT, which translates to increased invasiveness and metastasis. EMT was significantly reduced when MUC1 was genetically deleted in a mouse model of PDA or when all seven tyrosines in the cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 were mutated to phenylalanine (mutated MUC1 CT). Using proteomics, RT-PCR and western blotting, we revealed a significant increase in vimentin, Slug and Snail expression with repression of E-Cadherin in MUC1-expressing cells compared with cells expressing the mutated MUC1 CT. In the cells that carried the mutated MUC1 CT, MUC1 failed to co-immunoprecipitate with β-catenin and translocate to the nucleus, thereby blocking transcription of the genes associated with EMT and metastasis. Thus, functional tyrosines are critical in stimulating the interactions between MUC1 and β-catenin and their nuclear translocation to initiate the process of EMT. This study signifies the oncogenic role of MUC1 CT and is the first to identify a direct role of the MUC1 in initiating EMT during pancreatic cancer. The data may have implications in future design of MUC1-targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer.

  14. Cooperative interaction of MUC1 with the HGF/c-Met pathway during hepatocarcinogenesis.

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    Bozkaya, Giray; Korhan, Peyda; Cokaklı, Murat; Erdal, Esra; Sağol, Ozgül; Karademir, Sedat; Korch, Christopher; Atabey, Neşe

    2012-09-11

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced c-Met activation is known as the main stimulus for hepatocyte proliferation and is essential for liver development and regeneration. Activation of HGF/c-Met signaling has been correlated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin, whose over-expression is reported in most cancers. Many of the oncogenic effects of MUC1 are believed to occur through the interaction of MUC1 with signaling molecules. To clarify the role of MUC1 in HGF/c-Met signaling, we determined whether MUC1 and c-Met interact cooperatively and what their role(s) is in hepatocarcinogenesis. MUC1 and c-Met over-expression levels were determined in highly motile and invasive, mesenchymal-like HCC cell lines, and in serial sections of cirrhotic and HCC tissues, and these levels were compared to those in normal liver tissues. Co-expression of both c-Met and MUC1 was found to be associated with the differentiation status of HCC. We further demonstrated an interaction between c-Met and MUC1 in HCC cells. HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation decreased this interaction, and down-regulated MUC1 expression. Inhibition of c-Met activation restored HGF-mediated MUC1 down-regulation, and decreased the migratory and invasive abilities of HCC cells via inhibition of β-catenin activation and c-Myc expression. In contrast, siRNA silencing of MUC1 increased HGF-induced c-Met activation and HGF-induced cell motility and invasion. These findings indicate that the crosstalk between MUC1 and c-Met in HCC could provide an advantage for invasion to HCC cells through the β-catenin/c-Myc pathway. Thus, MUC1 and c-Met could serve as potential therapeutic targets in HCC.

  15. Cooperative interaction of MUC1 with the HGF/c-Met pathway during hepatocarcinogenesis

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    Bozkaya Giray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF induced c-Met activation is known as the main stimulus for hepatocyte proliferation and is essential for liver development and regeneration. Activation of HGF/c-Met signaling has been correlated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. MUC1 is a transmembrane mucin, whose over-expression is reported in most cancers. Many of the oncogenic effects of MUC1 are believed to occur through the interaction of MUC1 with signaling molecules. To clarify the role of MUC1 in HGF/c-Met signaling, we determined whether MUC1 and c-Met interact cooperatively and what their role(s is in hepatocarcinogenesis. Results MUC1 and c-Met over-expression levels were determined in highly motile and invasive, mesenchymal-like HCC cell lines, and in serial sections of cirrhotic and HCC tissues, and these levels were compared to those in normal liver tissues. Co-expression of both c-Met and MUC1 was found to be associated with the differentiation status of HCC. We further demonstrated an interaction between c-Met and MUC1 in HCC cells. HGF-induced c-Met phosphorylation decreased this interaction, and down-regulated MUC1 expression. Inhibition of c-Met activation restored HGF-mediated MUC1 down-regulation, and decreased the migratory and invasive abilities of HCC cells via inhibition of β-catenin activation and c-Myc expression. In contrast, siRNA silencing of MUC1 increased HGF-induced c-Met activation and HGF-induced cell motility and invasion. Conclusions These findings indicate that the crosstalk between MUC1 and c-Met in HCC could provide an advantage for invasion to HCC cells through the β-catenin/c-Myc pathway. Thus, MUC1 and c-Met could serve as potential therapeutic targets in HCC.

  16. MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes eradicate tumors when adoptively transferred in vivo.

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    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Tinder, T L; Sterner, C J; Gendler, S J

    2001-03-01

    We have reported previously that MUC1 transgenic mice with spontaneous tumors of the pancreas (designated MET) naturally develop MHC class I-restricted, MUC1-specific CTLs as tumors progress (P. Mukherjee et al., J. Immunol., 165: 3451-3460, 2000). From these MET mice, we have isolated, expanded, and cloned naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs in vitro. In this report, we show that the CTL line is predominantly CD8+ T cells and expresses T-cell receptor Vbeta chains 5.1/5.2, 11, 13, and 2 and Valpha chains 2, 8.3, 3.2, and 11.1/11.2. These CTLs recognize several epitopes on the MUC1 tandem repeat with highest affinity to APGSTAPPA. The CTL clone, on the other hand, is 100% CD8+ cells and expresses a single Vbeta chain of 5.1/5.2 and Valpha2. It recognizes only the H-2Db class I-restricted epitope of MUC1, APGSTAPPA. When adoptively transferred, the CTLs were effective in eradicating MUC1-expressing injected tumor cells including mammary gland cells (C57mg) and B16 melanomas. These results suggest that MUC1-specific CTLs are capable of possibly preventing, or at least substantially delaying, MUC1-expressing tumor formation. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that demonstrates that the naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs isolated from one tumor model has antitumor effects on other MUC1-expressing tumors in vivo. Therefore, our data confirm that MUC1 is an important tumor rejection antigen and can serve as a target for immunotherapy.

  17. MUC1-C Represses the Crumbs Complex Polarity Factor CRB3 and Downregulates the Hippo Pathway

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    Alam, Maroof; Bouillez, Audrey; Tagde, Ashujit; Ahmad, Rehan; Rajabi, Hasan; Maeda, Takahiro; Hiraki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yozo; Kufe, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity and epithelial integrity are maintained in part by the Crumbs (CRB) complex. The C-terminal subunit of MUC1 (MUC1-C) is a transmembrane protein that is expressed at the apical border of normal epithelial cells and aberrantly at high levels over the entire surface of their transformed counterparts. However, it is not known if MUC1-C contributes to this loss of polarity that is characteristic of carcinoma cells. Here it is demonstrated that MUC1-C downregulates expression of the Crumbs complex CRB3 protein in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. MUC1-C associates with ZEB1 on the CRB3 promoter and represses CRB3 transcription. Notably, CRB3 activates the core kinase cassette of the Hippo pathway, which includes LATS1 and LATS2. In this context, targeting MUC1-C was associated with increased phosphorylation of LATS1, consistent with activation of the Hippo pathway, which is critical for regulating cell contact, tissue repair, proliferation and apoptosis. Also shown is that MUC1-C-mediated suppression of CRB3 and the Hippo pathway is associated with dephosphorylation and activation of the oncogenic YAP protein. In turn, MUC1-C interacts with YAP, promotes formation of YAP/β-catenin complexes and induces the WNT target gene MYC. These data support a previously unrecognized model in which targeting MUC1-C in TNBC cells (i) induces CRB3 expression, (ii) activates the CRB3-driven Hippo pathway, (iii) inactivates YAP, and thereby (iv) suppresses YAP/β-catenin-mediated induction of MYC expression. Implications These findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for the MUC1-C oncoprotein in the regulation of polarity and the Hippo pathway in breast cancer. PMID:27658423

  18. MicroRNA-128 suppresses paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer by inhibiting MUC1-C and BMI-1 in cancer stem cells.

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    Koh, Hyebin; Park, Hyeri; Chandimali, Nisansala; Huynh, Do Luong; Zhang, Jiao Jiao; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Gera, Meeta; Kim, Nameun; Bak, Yesol; Yoon, Do-Young; Park, Yang Ho; Kwon, Taeho; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2017-12-15

    The existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is the main reason for failure of cancer treatment caused by drug resistance. Therefore, eradicating cancers by targeting CSCs remains a significant challenge. In the present study, because of the important role of BMI-1 proto-oncogene, polycomb ring finger (BMI-1) and C-terminal Mucin1 (MUC1-C) in tumor growth and maintenance of CSCs, we aimed to confirm that microRNA miR-128, as an inhibitor of BMI-1 and MUC1-C, could effectively suppress paclitaxel (PTX)-resistant lung cancer stem cells. We showed that CSCs have significantly higher expression levels of BMI-1, MUC1-C, stemness proteins, signaling factors, and higher malignancy compared with normal tumor cells. After transfection with miR-128, the BMI-1 and MUC1-C levels in CSCs were suppressed. When miR-128 was stably expressed in PTX-resistant lung cancer stem cells, the cells showed decreased proliferation, metastasis, self-renewal, migration, invasive ability, clonogenicity, and tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo and increased apoptosis compared with miR-NC (negative control) CSCs. Furthermore, miR-128 effectively decreased the levels of β-catenin and intracellular signaling pathway-related factors in CSCs. MiR-128 also decreased the luciferase activity of MUC1 reporter constructs and reduced the levels of transmembrane MUC1-C and BMI-1. These results suggested miR-128 as an attractive therapeutic strategy for PTX-resistant lung cancer via inhibition of BMI-1 and MUC1-C.

  19. Decreased expression of MUC1 induces apoptosis and inhibits migration in pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells via regulation of Slug pathway.

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    Zhao, Ping; Meng, Meng; Xu, Bin; Dong, Aiping; Ni, Guangzhen; Lu, Lianfang

    2017-12-06

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed in > 60% of human pancreatic cancers (PCs), and is associated with poor prognosis and enhanced metastasis. Here, we report the effect of silencing MUC1 expression on the growth, migration and invasive ability of pancreatic cancer cells, and explored its mechanisms. We observed that siRNA mediated suppression of the MUC1 expression significantly reduced invasive and migrative capability and induced apoptosis of the pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. We found that Slug was inhibited in the MUC1 siRNA transfected PANC-1 cells (MUC1 siRNA/PANC-1 cells). Expression of PUMA and E-cadherin was increased in the MUC1 siRNA/PANC-1 cells. PANC-1 cells overexpressing full long Slug gene (when transfected with Slug cDNA plasmid) significantly inhibited PUMA and E-cadherin expression in the MUC1 siRNA/PANC-1 cells. Silencing PUMA expression inhibited apoptosis in the MUC1 siRNA transfected PANC-1 cells (MUC1 siRNA/PANC-1 cells). Silencing E-cadherin expression restored the invasion and migration ability in the MUC1 siRNA/PANC-1 cells. We therefore concluded that silencing MUC1 expression inhibited migration and invasion, and induced apoptosis of PANC-1 cells via downregulation of Slug and upregulation of Slug dependent PUMA and E-cadherin expression. MUC1 could serve as a potential therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

  20. MUC1-specific CTLs are non-functional within a pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

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    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Madsen, C S; Tinder, T L; Jacobs, F; Parker, J; Agrawal, B; Longenecker, B M; Gendler, S J

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive, treatment refractory disease and is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. In humans, 90% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas over-express altered forms of a tumor-associated antigen, MUC1 (an epithelial mucin glycoprotein), which is a target for immunotherapy. Using a clinically relevant mouse model of pancreas cancer that demonstrates peripheral and central tolerance to human MUC1 and develops spontaneous tumors of the pancreas, we have previously reported the presence of functionally active, low affinity, MUC1-specific precursor cytotoxic T cells (pCTLs). Hypothesis for this study is that MUC1-based immunization may enhance the low level MUC1-specific immunity that may lead to an effective anti-tumor response. Data demonstrate that MUC1 peptide-based immunization elicits mature MUC1-specific CTLs in the peripheral lymphoid organs. The mature CTLs secrete IFN-gamma and are cytolytic against MUC1-expressing tumor cells in vitro. However, active CTLs that infiltrate the pancreas tumor microenvironment become cytolytically anergic and are tolerized to MUC1 antigen, allowing the tumor to grow. We demonstrate that the CTL tolerance could be reversed at least in vitro with the use of anti-CD40 co-stimulation. The pancreas tumor cells secrete immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 and TGF-beta that are partly responsible for the down-regulation of CTL activity. In addition, they down-regulate their MHC class I molecules to avoid immune recognition. CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells, which secrete IL-10, were also found in the tumor environment. Together these data indicate the use of several immune evasion mechanisms by tumor cells to evade CTL killing. Thus altering the tumor microenvironment to make it more conducive to CTL killing may be key in developing a successful anti-cancer immunotherapy.

  1. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes toward immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

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    Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Basu, Gargi D; Bradley, Judy M; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2008-09-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune-competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial preneoplastic lesions and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IDO compared with PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased proinflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease, which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer.

  2. MUC1 enhances tumor progression and contributes towards immunosuppression in a mouse model of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Basu, Gargi D.; Bradley, Judy M.; Schettini, Jorge; Million, Arefayene; Skaar, Todd

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a membrane tethered mucin glycoprotein, is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in >80% of human ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has been elusive, partly due to the lack of an appropriate model. We report the characterization of a novel mouse model that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule (PDA.MUC1 mice). Pancreatic tumors arise in an appropriate MUC1-tolerant background within an immune competent host. Significant enhancement in the development of pancreatic intraepithelial pre-neoplastic lesions (PanINs) and progression to adenocarcinoma is observed in PDA.MUC1 mice, possibly due to increased proliferation. Tumors from PDA.MUC1 mice express higher levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and indoleamine 2,3, dioxygenase compared to PDA mice lacking MUC1, especially during early stages of tumor development. The increased pro-inflammatory milieu correlates with an increased percentage of regulatory T cells and myeloid suppressor cells in the pancreatic tumor and tumor draining lymph nodes. Data shows that during pancreatic cancer progression, MUC1-mediated mechanisms enhance the onset and progression of the disease which in turn regulate the immune responses. Thus, the mouse model is ideally-suited for testing novel chemopreventive and therapeutic strategies against pancreatic cancer. PMID:18713982

  3. Muc1 based breast cancer vaccines: role of post translational modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, M.; Khurshid, R.; Nagra, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccine development is one of the most promising fields in cancer research. After autologous transplantation, due to low tumour burden, patients are more likely to respond immunologically to a cancer vaccine. MUC1 with its adhesive and anti adhesive functions, immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive activities, is therefore a good candidate for breast cancer vaccine. A structure-based insight into the immunogenicity of natural MUC1 glyco forms, of its sub-domains, motifs and post translational modification like glycosylation and myriostoylation may aid the design of tumour vaccines. Primary sequences of human MUC1 were retrieved from the SWISSPROT data bank. Protein pattern search: The primary sequence of Human MUC1 was searched at PROSITE (a dictionary of protein sites and patterns) database. Our study observes that post-translational modifications play an important role in presenting MUC1 as a candidate for breast cancer vaccine. It is found that the phosphorylation and glycosylation of important functional motifs of MUC1 may take part in the production of cytokines that may provide immunization. (author)

  4. Mucin 1 (MUC1 is a novel partner for MAL2 in breast carcinoma cells

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    McGuckin Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MAL2 gene, encoding a four-transmembrane protein of the MAL family, is amplified and overexpressed in breast and other cancers, yet the significance of this is unknown. MAL-like proteins have trafficking functions, but their molecular roles are largely obscure, partly due to a lack of known binding partners. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screening of a breast carcinoma cDNA expression library was performed using a full-length MAL2 bait, and subsequent deletion mapping experiments were performed. MAL2 interactions were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation analyses and confocal microscopy was employed to compare protein sub-cellular distributions. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of membranes extracted in cold Triton X-100 was employed to compare protein distributions between Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble fractions. Results The tumor-associated protein mucin 1 (MUC1 was identified as a potential MAL2 partner, with MAL2/MUC1 interactions being confirmed in myc-tagged MAL2-expressing MCF-10A cells using co-immunoprecipitation assays. Deletion mapping experiments demonstrated a requirement for the first MAL2 transmembrane domain for MUC1 binding, whereas the MAL2 N-terminal domain was required to bind D52-like proteins. Confocal microscopy identified cytoplasmic co-localisation of MUC1 and MAL2 in breast cell lines, and centrifugation of cell lysates to equilibrium in sucrose density gradients demonstrated that MAL2 and MUC1 proteins were co-distributed between Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble fractions. However co-immunoprecipitation analyses detected MAL2/MUC1 interactions in Triton X-100-soluble fractions only. Myc-MAL2 expression in MCF-10A cells was associated with both increased MUC1 detection within Triton X-100-soluble and -insoluble fractions, and increased MUC1 detection at the cell surface. Conclusion These results identify MUC1 as a novel MAL2 partner, and suggest a role for MAL2 in regulating MUC1

  5. Targeting MUC1-C suppresses BCL2A1 in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraki, Masayuki; Maeda, Takahiro; Mehrotra, Neha; Jin, Caining; Alam, Maroof; Bouillez, Audrey; Hata, Tsuyoshi; Tagde, Ashujit; Keating, Amy; Kharbanda, Surender; Singh, Harpal; Kufe, Donald

    2018-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2-related protein A1 (BCL2A1) is a member of the BCL-2 family of anti-apoptotic proteins that confers resistance to treatment with anti-cancer drugs; however, there are presently no agents that target BCL2A1. The MUC1-C oncoprotein is aberrantly expressed in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and promotes anti-cancer drug resistance. The present study demonstrates that targeting MUC1-C genetically and pharmacologically in TNBC cells results in the downregulation of BCL2A1 expression. The results show that MUC1-C activates the BCL2A1 gene by an NF-κB p65-mediated mechanism, linking this pathway with the induction of EMT. The MCL-1 anti-apoptotic protein is also of importance for the survival of TNBC cells and is an attractive target for drug development. We found that inhibiting MCL-1 with the highly specific MS1 peptide results in the activation of the MUC1-C→NF-κB→BCL2A1 pathway. In addition, selection of TNBC cells for resistance to ABT-737, which inhibits BCL-2, BCL-xL and BCL-W but not MCL-1 or BCL2A1, is associated with the upregulation of MUC1-C and BCL2A1 expression. Targeting MUC1-C in ABT-737-resistant TNBC cells suppresses BCL2A1 and induces death, which is of potential therapeutic importance. These findings indicate that MUC1-C is a target for the treatment of TNBCs unresponsive to agents that inhibit anti-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family.

  6. Acquired resistance to HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG and increased metastatic potential are associated with MUC1 expression in colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Ban, Li-Li; Luo, Gang; Li, Zhi-Yao; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Wang, Xi-Cai; Jin, Cong-Guo; Ye, Jia-Gui; Ma, Ding-Ding; Xie, Qing; Huang, You-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of many proteins. The chaperoning of oncoproteins by HSP90 enhances the survival, growth, and invasive potential of cancer cells. HSP90 inhibitors are promising new anticancer agents, in which the benzoquinone ansamycin 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is currently in clinical evaluation. However, the implications of acquired resistance to this class of drug remain largely unexplored. In the present study, we have generated isogenic human colon cancer cell lines that are resistant to 17-AAG by continued culturing in the compound. Cross-resistance was found with another HSP90 inhibitor 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. The resistant cells showed obvious morphology changes with a metastatic phenotype and significant increases in migration and adhesion to collagens. Western blotting analysis of epithelial-mesenchymal transition molecular markers found that expression of E-cadherin downregulated, whereas expression of N-cadherin and β-catenin upregulated in the resistant cells. Mucin 1 (MUC1) has been reported to mediate metastasis as well as chemical resistance in many cancers. Here, we found that MUC1 expression was significantly elevated in the acquired drug resistance cells. 17-AAG treatment could decrease MUC1 more in parental cells than in acquired 17-AAG-resistant cells. Further study found that knockdown of MUC1 expression by small interfering RNA could obviously re-sensitize the resistant cells to 17-AAG treatment, and decrease the cell migration and adhesion. These were coupled with a downregulation in N-cadherin and β-catenin. The results indicate that HSP90 inhibitor therapies in colon carcinomas could generate resistance and increase metastatic potential that might mediated by upregulation of MUC1 expression. Findings from this study further our understanding of the potential clinical effects of HSP90-directed therapies in

  7. MUC1 (CD227) interacts with lck tyrosine kinase in Jurkat lymphoma cells and normal T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Gendler, S J

    2005-01-01

    MUC1 (CD227) is a large transmembrane epithelial mucin glycoprotein, which is aberrantly overexpressed in most adenocarcinomas and is a target for immune therapy for epithelial tumors. Recently, MUC1 has been detected in a variety of hematopoietic cell malignancies including T and B cell lymphomas and myelomas; however, its function in these cells is not clearly defined. Using the Jurkat T cell lymphoma cell line and normal human T cells, we demonstrate that MUC1 is not only expressed in these cells but is also phosphorylated upon T cell receptor (TCR) ligation and associates with the Src-related T cell tyrosine kinase, p56lck. Upon TCR-mediated activation of Jurkat cells, MUC1 is found in the low-density membrane fractions, where linker of T cell activation is contained. Abrogation of MUC1 expression in Jurkat cells by MUC1-specific small interfering RNA resulted in defects in TCR-mediated downstream signaling events associated with T cell activation. These include reduction in Ca2+ influx and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, leading to a decrease in CD69 expression, proliferation, and interleukin-2 production. These results suggest a regulatory role of MUC1 in modulating proximal signal transduction events through its interaction with proteins of the activation complex.

  8. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and CD137 co-stimulation in a spontaneous breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Tinder, Teresa L; Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Chen, Lieping; Gendler, Sandra J

    2004-01-01

    To study immunology in breast tumors, we have utilized a mammary gland adenocarcinoma model in which mice develop spontaneous tumors of the mammary gland which are initiated at puberty and express a human tumor antigen, MUC1. MUC1 (CD227) is over-expressed in 90% of human breast cancers and its glycosylation status and pattern of expression in cancer cells is altered. Humoral and cellular responses to MUC1 have been reported in breast cancer patients and therefore, MUC1 is being evaluated as a target for immune intervention. This mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer allows the evaluation of anti-MUC1 immune responses at all stages of the disease. In this report, we review the model as it pertains to a) the development of the tumor, b) MUC1 expression, and the native immune responses against MUC1 as tumors progress, and c) the immune suppressive microenvironment within the developing tumor. Finally, we report our latest findings describing the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (MUC1-CTL) in these mice and discuss ways to increase their effectiveness by agonistic monoclonal antibody against CD137 T cell costimulatory molecule.

  10. MUC1-specific immune therapy generates a strong anti-tumor response in a MUC1-tolerant colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Pathangey, L B; Bradley, J B; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Akporiaye, E T; Gendler, S J

    2007-02-19

    A MUC1-based vaccine was used in a preclinical model of colon cancer. The trial was conducted in a MUC1-tolerant immune competent host injected with MC38 colon cancer cells expressing MUC1. The vaccine included: MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, MHC class II-restricted pan-helper-peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Immunization was successful in breaking MUC1 self-tolerance, and in eliciting a robust anti-tumor response. The vaccine stimulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) helper and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells against MUC1 and other undefined MC38 tumor antigens. In the prophylactic setting, immunization caused complete rejection of tumor cells, while in the therapeutic regimen, tumor burden was significantly reduced.

  11. Characterization of a novel weak interaction between MUC1 and Src-SH3 using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunasekara, Nirosha [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, 5B4.21 WCM Health Science Centre, 8440-112th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R7 (Canada); Sykes, Brian, E-mail: brian.sykes@ualberta.ca [Department of Biochemistry, 4-19B Medical Sciences Bldg., University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H7 (Canada); Hugh, Judith, E-mail: judithh@ualberta.ca [Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Alberta, 5B4.21 WCM Health Science Centre, 8440-112th Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2R7 (Canada)

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1 binds the Src-SH3 domain potentially triggering Src dependent cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR Spectroscopy was used to monitor MUC1-CD and Src SH3 domain titrations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MUC1-CD peptides bind with a low affinity (K{sub d} of 2-3 mM) to a non-canonical site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weak interactions may mediate dynamic processes like migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MUC1-CD and Src-SH3 interaction may be a prime target to inhibit cell migration. -- Abstract: Breast cancer causes death through cancer cell migration and subsequent metastasis to distant organs. In vitro, the MUC1 mucin can mediate breast cancer cell migration by binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). This migration is dependent on MUC1 cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) activation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Src, possibly through competitive displacement of an inhibitory Src intramolecular SH3 binding. Therefore, we characterized the binding site and affinity of the MUC1-CD for Src-SH3 using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to monitor the titration of the {sup 15}N labeled Src-SH3 domain with synthetic native and mutant peptides of MUC1-CD. The results revealed that the dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for the interaction of the native MUC1-CD peptides and Src-SH3 domain was weak with a K{sub d} of 2-3 mM. Notably, the SH3 residues most perturbed upon peptide binding were located outside the usual hydrophobic binding cleft in a previously described alternate binding site on the Src-SH3, suggesting that MUC1-CD binds to a non-canonical site. The binding characteristics outlined here suggest that the interaction between Src-SH3 and MUC1-CD represents a novel weak electrostatic interaction of the type which is increasingly recognized as important in transient and dynamic protein complexes required for cell migration and signal transduction. As such, this

  12. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S., E-mail: renu-wadhwa@aist.go.jp; Wadhwa, Renu, E-mail: renu-wadhwa@aist.go.jp [Cell Proliferation Research Group and DBT-AIST International Laboratory for Advanced Biomedicine, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST Central 4), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein.

  13. A bioinformatics prediction approach towards analyzing the glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of epithelial membrane antigen (EMA/MUC1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA or MUC1) is a heavily glycosylated, type I transmembrane glycoprotein commonly expressed by epithelial cells of duct organs. It has been shown to be aberrantly glycosylated in several diseases including cancer. Protein sequence based annotation and analysis of glycosylation profile of glycoproteins by robust computational and comprehensive algorithms provides possible insights to the mechanism(s) of anomalous glycosylation. In present report, by using a number of bioinformatics applications we studied EMA/MUC1 and explored its trans-membrane structural domain sequence that is widely subjected to glycosylation. Exploration of different extracellular motifs led to prediction of N and O-linked glycosylation target sites. Based on the putative O-linked target sites, glycosylated moieties and pathways were envisaged. Furthermore, Protein network analysis demonstrated physical interaction of EMA with a number of proteins and confirmed its functional involvement in cell growth and proliferation pathways. Gene Ontology analysis suggested an involvement of EMA in a number of functions including signal transduction, protein binding, processing and transport along with glycosylation. Thus, present study explored potential of bioinformatics prediction approach in analyzing glycosylation, co-expression and interaction patterns of EMA/MUC1 glycoprotein

  14. Impact of MUC1 mucin downregulation in the phenotypic characteristics of MKN45 gastric carcinoma cell line.

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    Natália R Costa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastric carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. The high mortality associated with this disease is in part due to limited knowledge about gastric carcinogenesis and a lack of available therapeutic and prevention strategies. MUC1 is a high molecular weight transmembrane mucin protein expressed at the apical surface of most glandular epithelial cells and a major component of the mucus layer above gastric mucosa. Overexpression of MUC1 is found in approximately 95% of human adenocarcinomas, where it is associated with oncogenic activity. The role of MUC1 in gastric cancer progression remains to be clarified. METHODOLOGY: We downregulated MUC1 expression in a gastric carcinoma cell line by RNA interference and studied the effects on cellular proliferation (MTT assay, apoptosis (TUNEL assay, migration (migration assay, invasion (invasion assay and aggregation (aggregation assay. Global gene expression was evaluated by microarray analysis to identify alterations that are regulated by MUC1 expression. In vivo assays were also performed in mice, in order to study the tumorigenicity of cells with and without MUC1 downregulation in MKN45 gastric carcinoma cell line. RESULTS: Downregulation of MUC1 expression increased proliferation and apoptosis as compared to controls, whereas cell-cell aggregation was decreased. No significant differences were found in terms of migration and invasion between the downregulated clones and the controls. Expression of TCN1, KLK6, ADAM29, LGAL4, TSPAN8 and SHPS-1 was found to be significantly different between MUC1 downregulated clones and the control cells. In vivo assays have shown that mice injected with MUC1 downregulated cells develop smaller tumours when compared to mice injected with the control cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that MUC1 downregulation alters the phenotype and tumorigenicity of MKN45 gastric carcinoma cells and also the expression of several

  15. Electrochemical Sandwich Immunoassay for the Ultrasensitive Detection of Human MUC1 Cancer Biomarker

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    Zahra Taleat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sandwich immunoassay for the ultrasensitive detection of human MUC1 cancer biomarker using protein G-functionalized magnetic beads (MBs and graphite-based screen-printed electrodes (SPEs was developed. Magnetic beads were employed as the platforms for the immobilization and immunoreaction process. A pair of primary and secondary antibodies was used to capture the MUC1 protein. After labeling with a third antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP, the resulting conjugate was trapped at the surface of the graphite-based SPEs and MUC1 determination was carried out by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 0.4 V upon H2O2 addition using acetaminophen (APAP as the redox mediator. A linear relationship was obtained for the detection of human MUC1 over a range of 0–25 ppb with the lowest detection limit of 1.34 ppb when HRP was applied as a label. Preliminary experiments were performed using disposable electrochemical sensors in order to optimize some parameters (i.e., incubation times, concentrations, and blocking agent.

  16. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von; Moreno, Maria; Verheijen, René H. M.

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer

  17. Natural and Induced Humoral Responses to MUC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensdorff-Pouilly, Silvia von, E-mail: s.vonmensdorff@vumc.nl; Moreno, Maria [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam 1081 HV (Netherlands); Verheijen, René H. M. [Department of Woman & Baby, Division of Surgical & Oncological Gynaecology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht 3508 GA (Netherlands)

    2011-07-29

    MUC1 is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the ductal cell surface of glandular epithelial cells. Loss of polarization, overexpression and aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 in mucosal inflammation and in adenocarcinomas induces humoral immune responses to the mucin. MUC1 IgG responses have been associated with a benefit in survival in patients with breast, lung, pancreatic, ovarian and gastric carcinomas. Antibodies bound to the mucin may curb tumor progression by restoring cell-cell interactions altered by tumor-associated MUC1, thus preventing metastatic dissemination, as well as counteracting the immune suppression exerted by the molecule. Furthermore, anti-MUC1 antibodies are capable of effecting tumor cell killing by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Although cytotoxic T cells are indispensable to achieve anti-tumor responses in advanced disease, abs to tumor-associated antigens are ideally suited to address minimal residual disease and may be sufficient to exert adequate immune surveillance in an adjuvant setting, destroying tumor cells as they arise or maintaining occult disease in an equilibrium state. Initial evaluation of MUC1 peptide/glycopeptide mono and polyvalent vaccines has shown them to be immunogenic and safe; anti-tumor responses are scarce. Progress in carbohydrate synthesis has yielded a number of sophisticated substrates that include MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes that are at present in preclinical testing. Adjuvant vaccination with MUC1 glycopeptide polyvalent vaccines that induce strong humoral responses may prevent recurrence of disease in patients with early stage carcinomas. Furthermore, prophylactic immunotherapy targeting MUC1 may be a strategy to strengthen immune surveillance and prevent disease in subjects at hereditary high risk of breast, ovarian and colon cancer.

  18. Preparation and preliminary studies of [64Cu]-antiMUC-1 for breast cancer targeting

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    Behrouz Alirezapour

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available PR81 is a monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to MUC1 that over expressed on breast tumors. PR81 is considered a suitable targeting molecule that was radiolabeled using Cu-64 for positron imaging studies. The monoclonal antibody was conjugated with DOTA moiety and after purification was evaluated for radiochemical purity, immunoreactivity, cell toxicity and structure integrity as well as biodistribution study in normal rats. The radiolabeled antibody prepared with acceptable radiochemical purity (> 93.2 ± 0.6 %, ITLC; specific activity; 4.6 µCi/µg, protein structure integration, significant cytotoxicity and significant immunoreactivity retention was assessed by radioimmunoassay (RIA. Animal biodistribution of the 64Cu-DOTA-PR81 was consistent with other radiolabeled antibodies. The results showed that 64Cu-DOTA-PR81 may be considered for tumor imaging for ultimate diagnosis and follow-up of MUC1 expression in oncology.

  19. Phase I dose escalation pharmacokinetic assessment of intravenous humanized anti-MUC1 antibody AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Mark D; Borges, Virginia F; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Shapiro, Charles; Perez, Susan; Wang, Karen; Schaedli Stark, Franziska; Courtenay Luck, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    MUC1 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that establishes a molecular barrier at the epithelial surface and engages in morphogenetic signal transduction. Alterations in MUC1 glycosylation accompany the development of cancer and influence cellular growth, differentiation, transformation, adhesion, invasion, and immune surveillance. A 20-amino-acid tandem repeat that forms the core protein of MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in the majority of epithelial tumors. AS1402 (formerly R1550) is a humanized IgG1k monoclonal antibody that binds to PDTR sequences within this tandem repeat that are not exposed in normal cells. AS1402 is a potent inducer of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), specifically against MUC1-expressing tumor cells. The objective of this study was to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of AS1402 monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic MUC1-positive breast cancer that had progressed after anthracyclines- and taxane-based therapy. Patients received AS1402 over a 1- to 3-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion at doses between 1 and 16 mg/kg, with repeated dosing every 1 to 3 weeks (based on patient-individualized PK assessment) until disease progression. Serum AS1402 levels were measured at multiple times after i.v. administration. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses were measured to determine the immunogenicity of AS1402. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and were used to assess dose dependency across the dose range studied. Twenty-six patients were treated. AS1402 was generally well tolerated. Two grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events were reported, both at the 3-mg/kg dose. Neither was observed in expanded or subsequent dosing cohorts. No anti-human antibodies were detected. Plasma concentrations of AS1402 appeared to be proportional to dose within the 1- to 16-mg/kg dose range assessed, with a mean terminal half-life of 115.4 +/- 37.1 hours

  20. The membrane-associated MUC1 improves adhesion of salivary MUC5B on buccal cells. Application to development of an in vitro cellular model of oral epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ployon, Sarah; Belloir, Christine; Bonnotte, Aline; Lherminier, Jeannine; Canon, Francis; Morzel, Martine

    2016-01-01

    The mucosal pellicle is a thin layer of salivary proteins, mostly MUC5B mucins, anchored to epithelial oral cells. This pellicle is involved in protection of oral mucosae against abrasion, pathogenic microorganisms or chemical xenobiotics. The present study aimed at studying the involvement of MUC1 in mucosal pellicle formation and more specifically in salivary MUC5B binding using a cell-based model of oral epithelium. MUC1 mRNAs were not detected in TR146 cells, and therefore a stable cell line named TR146/MUC1 expressing this protein was developed by transfection. TR146 and TR146/MUC1 were incubated with human saliva in order to evaluate retention of MUC5B by epithelial cells. The cell surface of both TR146 and TR146/MUC1 was typical of a squamous non-keratinized epithelium, with the presence of numerous microplicae. After incubation for 2h with saliva diluted in culture medium (1:1) and two washes with PBS, saliva deposits on cells appeared as a loose filamentous thin network. MUC5B fluorescent immunostaining evidenced a heterogeneous lining of confluent cell cultures by this salivary mucin but with higher fluorescence on TR146/MUC1 cells. Semi-quantification of MUC5B bound to cells confirmed a better retention by TR146/MUC1, evaluated by Dot Blot (+34.1%, p<0.05) or by immunocytochemistry (+44%, p<0.001). The membrane-bound mucin MUC1 is a factor enhancing the formation of the mucosal pellicle by increasing the binding of salivary MUC5B to oral epithelial cells. An in vitro model suitable to study specifically the function and properties of the mucosal pellicle is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of [⁶⁴Cu]-DOTA-PR81 radioimmunoconjugate for MUC-1 positive PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alirezapour, Behrouz; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Rajabifar, Saeed; Mohammadnejad, Javad; Paknejad, Malihe; Maadi, Ehsan; Moradkhani, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer radioimmunoscintigraphy targeting MUC1 expression is a growing field of work in nuclear medicine research. PR81 is a monoclonal antibody that binds with high affinity to MUC1, which is over expressed on breast tumors. In this study, we report production, quality control and preclinical qualifications of a copper-64 labeled PR81 for PET imaging of breast cancer. PR81 was conjugated with DOTA-NHS-ester and purified by molecular filtration followed by chelate:mAb ratio determination by spectrophotometric method. DOTA-PR81 was labeled with (64)Cu followed by radiochemical purity, in vitro stability, in vitro internalization and immunoreactivity determination. The tissue biodistribution of the (64)Cu-DOTA-PR81 and (64)Cu-DOTA-hIgG was evaluated in BALB/c mice with breast carcinoma tumors using tissue counting and imaging. The radiochemical purity of radioimmunoconjugate was >95±1.9% (ITLC) (specific activity; 4.6 μCi/μg). The average number of chelators per antibody was 3.4±0.3:1. The (64)Cu-DOTA-PR81 showed immunoreactivity towards MUC1 antigen and MCF7 cell line with significant in vitro stability (>89% in PBS and 78±0.5% in human serum) over 48 h. Maximum internalized activity of radiolabeled PR81 in 4-8 h was 81.5%. The biodistribution and scintigraphy studies showed the accumulation of the complex at the site of tumors with high sensitivity and specificity compared to control probes. The results showed that (64)Cu-DOTA-PR81 may be considered as a potential PET tracer for diagnosis and follow-up of MUC1 expression in oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ERK and PI3K regulate different aspects of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mammary tumor cells induced by truncated MUC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, Galit; Gaziel, Avital; Wreschner, Daniel H.; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) integrates changes to cell morphology and signaling pathways resulting from modifications to the cell's transcriptional response. Different combinations of stimuli ignite this process in the contexts of development or tumor progression. The human MUC1 gene encodes multiple alternatively spliced forms of a polymorphic oncoprotein that is aberrantly expressed in epithelial malignancies. MUC1 is endowed with various signaling modules and has the potential to mediate proliferative and morphological changes characteristic of the progression of epithelial tumors. The tyrosine-rich cytoplasmic domain and the heavily glycosylated extracellular domain both play a role in MUC1-mediated signal transduction. However, the attribution of function to specific domains of MUC1 is difficult due to the concomitant presence of multiple forms of the protein, which stem from alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage. Here we show that DA3 mouse mammary tumor cells stably transfected with a truncated genomic fragment of human MUC1 undergo EMT. In their EMT, these cells demonstrate altered [i] morphology, [ii] signaling pathways and [iii] expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Similarly to well characterized human breast cancer cell lines, cells transfected with truncated MUC1 show an ERK-dependent increased spreading on fibronectin, and a PI3K-dependent enhancement of their proliferative rate.

  3. MUC1 intra-cellular trafficking is clathrin, dynamin, and rab5 dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaolong; Yuan Zhenglong; Chung, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    MUC1, a transmembrane glycoprotein, is abnormally over-expressed in most human adenocarcinomas. MUC1 association with cytoplasmic cell signal regulators and nuclear accumulation are important for its tumor related activities. Little is known about how MUC1 translocates from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm. In this study, live cell imaging was used to study MUC1 intracellular trafficking. The interaction between EGFR and MUC1 was mapped by FRET analysis and EGF stimulated MUC1 endocytosis was observed directly through live cell imaging. MUC1-CT endocytosis was clathrin and dynamin dependent. Rab5 over-expression resulted in decreased cell membrane localization of MUC1, with accumulation of MUC1 endocytic vesicles in the peri-nuclear region. Conversely, over-expression of a Rab5 dominant negative mutant (S34N) resulted in redistribution of MUC1 from the peri-nuclear region to the cytoplasm. Collectively, these results indicated that MUC1 intra-cellular trafficking occurs through a regulated process that was stimulated by direct EGFR and MUC1 interaction, mediated by clathrin coated pits that were dynamin dependent and regulated by Rab5

  4. Distinguishing Truncated and Normal MUC1 Glycoform Targeting from Tn-MUC1-Specific CAR T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posey, Avery D; Clausen, Henrik; June, Carl H

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) demonstrate potent clinical antitumor effects in a variety of blood cancers. However, clinical activity in solid tumors has been disappointing and toxicity has been a serious concern (Lamers et al., 2013; Morgan et al., 2010......). We recently found that a CAR composed of a scFv antibody fragment specific for the Tn-glycoform of MUC1 had potent activity in preclinical models of blood cancer and adenocarcinoma (Posey et al., 2016)....

  5. Rise and fall of an anti-MUC1 specific antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Thie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, human antibodies with good affinity and specificity for MUC1, a transmembrane protein overexpressed on breast cancers and ovarian carcinomas, and thus a promising target for therapy, were very difficult to generate.A human scFv antibody was isolated from an immune library derived from breast cancer patients immunised with MUC1. The anti-MUC1 scFv reacted with tumour cells in more than 80% of 228 tissue sections of mamma carcinoma samples, while showing very low reactivity with a large panel of non-tumour tissues. By mutagenesis and phage display, affinity of scFvs was increased up to 500fold to 5,7×10(-10 M. Half-life in serum was improved from below 1 day to more than 4 weeks and was correlated with the dimerisation tendency of the individual scFvs. The scFv bound to T47D and MCF-7 mammalian cancer cell lines were recloned into the scFv-Fc and IgG format resulting in decrease of affinity of one binder. The IgG variants with the highest affinity were tested in mouse xenograft models using MCF-7 and OVCAR tumour cells. However, the experiments showed no significant decrease in tumour growth or increase in the survival rates. To study the reasons for the failure of the xenograft experiments, ADCC was analysed in vitro using MCF-7 and OVCAR3 target cells, revealing a low ADCC, possibly due to internalisation, as detected for MCF-7 cells.Antibody phage display starting with immune libraries and followed by affinity maturation is a powerful strategy to generate high affinity human antibodies to difficult targets, in this case shown by the creation of a highly specific antibody with subnanomolar affinity to a very small epitope consisting of four amino acids. Despite these "best in class" binding parameters, the therapeutic success of this antibody was prevented by the target biology.

  6. Chemoenzymatically synthesized multimeric Tn/STn MUC1 glycopeptides elicit cancer-specific anti-MUC1 antibody responses and override tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise; Reis, Celso A; Tarp, Mads A

    2005-01-01

    The MUC1 mucin represents a prime target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is abundantly expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in carcinomas. Attempts to generate strong humoral immunity to MUC1 by immunization with peptides have generally failed partly because of tolerance. In this stu...

  7. In vivo and in vitro studies of MUC1 regulation in sheep endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheem, Kabir A; Marei, Waleed F A; Campbell, Bruce K; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression of mucin 1 (MUC1) mRNA and protein in sheep endometrium at different time points during follicular and luteal phases of estrous cycle, and also determined the effect of steroid hormone treatments and interferon tau (IFNτ) on MUC1 mRNA expression in endometrial cell culture in vitro. In experiment one, 15 Welsh mountain ewes were synchronized to a common estrus and killed at precise stages of estrous cycle corresponding to (1) pre-LH peak, (2) LH peak, (3) post-LH peak, (4) early luteal, and (5) mid-luteal. Reproductive tracts were harvested and mRNA was extracted from the endometrial tissues. Parts of the uterine horns were fixed for immunohistochemistry. In experiment two, mixed populations of ovine endometrial cells (from slaughterhouse material collected at the postovulatory stage of the estrous cycle) were cultured to 70% confluence before treatment with (1) progesterone (P4, 10 ng/mL, for 48 hours), (2) estradiol (E2, 100 pg/mL, for 48 hours), or with (3) E2 priming for 12 hours (100 pg/mL) followed by P4 (10 ng/mL) for 36 hours. These were compared with: (4) IFNτ (10 ng/mL, for 48 hours), and (5) basic medium (Dulbecco Modified Eagle Medium /F12) as control. The results showed that MUC1 mRNA and protein expression in sheep endometrium were highest during the midluteal stage and very low during the post-LH period compared with the other stages (P < 0.05). MUC1 immunostaining in the luminal epithelium was apically restricted and was not significantly different across all stages of estrous cycle except at the post-LH peak where it was significantly low. In cell culture, MUC1 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated by both steroids either singly or in combination (P < 0.05), and downregulated in the presence of IFNτ. In conclusion, endometrial MUC1 expression is cyclically regulated by both E2 and P4in vivo and in vitro, and directly downregulated by IFNτ treatment in vitro. Copyright © 2016

  8. Muc1 deficiency exacerbates pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kosuke; Zemskova, Marina A; Hanss, Alec D; Kim, Marianne M; Summer, Ross; Kim, Kwang Chul

    2017-11-25

    MUC1 (MUC in human and Muc in animals) is a membrane-tethered mucin expressed on the apical surface of lung epithelial cells. However, in the lungs of patients with interstitial lung disease, MUC1 is aberrantly expressed in hyperplastic alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cells and alveolar macrophages (AM), and elevated levels of extracellular MUC1 are found in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the serum of these patients. While pro-fibrotic effects of extracellular MUC1 have recently been described in cultured fibroblasts, the contribution of MUC1 to the pathobiology of pulmonary fibrosis is unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that MUC1 deficiency would reduce susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis in a mouse model of silicosis. We employed human MUC1 transgenic mice, Muc1 deficient mice and wild-type mice on C57BL/6 background in these studies. Some mice received a one-time dose of crystalline silica instilled into their oropharynx in order to induce pulmonary fibrosis and assess the effects of Muc1 deficiency on fibrotic and inflammatory responses in the lung. As previously described in other mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis, we found that extracellular MUC1 levels were markedly increased in whole lung tissues, BALF and serum of human MUC1 transgenic mice after silica. We also detected an increase in total MUC1 levels in the lungs of these mice, indicating that production as well as release contributed to elevated levels after lung injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that increased MUC1 expression was mostly confined to ATII cells and AMs in areas of fibrotic remodeling, illustrating a pattern similar to the expression of MUC1 in human fibrotic lung tissues. However, contrary to our hypothesis, we found that Muc1 deficiency resulted in a worsening of fibrotic remodeling in the mouse lung as judged by an increase in number of silicotic nodules, an increase in lung collagen deposition and an increase in the severity of pulmonary inflammation

  9. Investigating MUC1/ICAM-1 Binding Induced Signaling in Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    at the molecular weight expected for a CD8/MUC1 dimer (Fig 4.9C). MUC1-CD contains SH2 and SH3 binding domains which act to recruit Src kinase To...recruitment of Src kinase , we assayed dimerization in MUC1-CFP-Fv cells with SH2 and/or SH3 domains mutated (Fig 4.11). As described below, MUC1-CFP-Fv...contains SH2 and SH3 binding domains for Src kinase . MUCI-CFP-Fv cells with mutations of the SH2 (Y46F; b.SH2) and/ or the putative Src SH3 binding

  10. MUC1-C integrates PD-L1 induction with repression of immune effectors in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillez, A; Rajabi, H; Jin, C; Samur, M; Tagde, A; Alam, M; Hiraki, M; Maeda, T; Hu, X; Adeegbe, D; Kharbanda, S; Wong, K-K; Kufe, D

    2017-07-13

    Immunotherapeutic approaches, particularly programmed death 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) blockade, have improved the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), supporting the premise that evasion of immune destruction is of importance for NSCLC progression. However, the signals responsible for upregulation of PD-L1 in NSCLC cells and whether they are integrated with the regulation of other immune-related genes are not known. Mucin 1 (MUC1) is aberrantly overexpressed in NSCLC, activates the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65→︀ZEB1 pathway and confers a poor prognosis. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C activates PD-L1 expression in NSCLC cells. We show that MUC1-C increases NF-κB p65 occupancy on the CD274/PD-L1 promoter and thereby drives CD274 transcription. Moreover, we demonstrate that MUC1-C-induced activation of NF-κB→︀ZEB1 signaling represses the TLR9 (toll-like receptor 9), IFNG, MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and GM-CSF genes, and that this signature is associated with decreases in overall survival. In concert with these results, targeting MUC1-C in NSCLC tumors suppresses PD-L1 and induces these effectors of innate and adaptive immunity. These findings support a previously unrecognized central role for MUC1-C in integrating PD-L1 activation with suppression of immune effectors and poor clinical outcome.

  11. Purification of MUC1 from Bovine Milk-Fat Globules and Characterization of a Corresponding Full-Length cDNA Clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Lone Tjener; Andersen, Mikkel Holmen; Nielsen, Rune

    2001-01-01

    acid sequences obtained by peptide mapping. The complete amino acid sequence of MUC1 was determined by cloning and sequencing the corresponding bovine mammary gland cDNA, which was shown to encode a protein of 580 amino acid residues comprising a cleavable signal peptide of 22 residues. The deduced...

  12. MUC1 selectively targets human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Youp Park

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine whether MUC1 antibody conjugated with a fluorophore could be used to visualize pancreatic cancer. Anti-MUC1 (CT2 antibody was conjugated with 550 nm or 650 nm fluorophores. Nude mouse were used to make subcutaneous and orthotopic models of pancreatic cancer. Western blot and flow cytometric analysis confirmed the expression of MUC1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines including BxPC-3 and Panc-1. Immunocytochemistry with fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody demonstrated fluorescent areas on the membrane of Panc-1 cancer cells. After injecting the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies via the tail vein, subcutaneously transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 tumors emitted strong fluorescent signals. In the subcutaneous tumor models, the fluorescent signal from the conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody was noted around the margin of the tumor and space between the cells. The conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody bound the tumor in orthotopically-transplanted Panc-1 and BxPC-3 models enabling the tumors to be imaged. This study showed that fluorophore conjugated anti-MUC1 antibodies could visualize pancreatic tumors in vitro and in vivo and may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  13. MUC1-C activates polycomb repressive complexes and downregulates tumor suppressor genes in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hasan; Hiraki, Masayuki; Kufe, Donald

    2018-04-01

    The PRC2 and PRC1 complexes are aberrantly expressed in human cancers and have been linked to decreases in patient survival. MUC1-C is an oncoprotein that is also overexpressed in diverse human cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. Recent studies have supported a previously unreported function for MUC1-C in activating PRC2 and PRC1 in cancer cells. In the regulation of PRC2, MUC1-C (i) drives transcription of the EZH2 gene, (ii) binds directly to EZH2, and (iii) enhances occupancy of EZH2 on target gene promoters with an increase in H3K27 trimethylation. Regarding PRC1, which is recruited to PRC2 sites in the hierarchical model, MUC1-C induces BMI1 transcription, forms a complex with BMI1, and promotes H2A ubiquitylation. MUC1-C thereby contributes to the integration of PRC2 and PRC1-mediated repression of tumor suppressor genes, such as CDH1, CDKN2A, PTEN and BRCA1. Like PRC2 and PRC1, MUC1-C is associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program, cancer stem cell (CSC) state, and acquisition of anticancer drug resistance. In concert with these observations, targeting MUC1-C downregulates EZH2 and BMI1, inhibits EMT and the CSC state, and reverses drug resistance. These findings emphasize the significance of MUC1-C as a therapeutic target for inhibiting aberrant PRC function and reprogramming the epigenome in human cancers.

  14. Potential for novel MUC1 glycopeptide-specific antibody in passive cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Wandall, Hans H; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2013-01-01

    MUC1 is an important target for antibodies in passive cancer immunotherapy. Antibodies against mucin glycans or mucin peptide backbone alone may give rise to cross reactivity with normal tissues. Therefore, attempts to identify antibodies against cancer-specific MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes havebeen...

  15. Rise and Fall of an Anti-MUC1 Specific Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiandong; von Wasielewski, Reinhard; Bastert, Gunther; Schirrmann, Thomas; Esteves, Isabel Tourais; Behrens, Christian K.; Fournes, Bénédict; Fournier, Nathalie; de Romeuf, Christophe; Hust, Michael; Dübel, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background So far, human antibodies with good affinity and specificity for MUC1, a transmembrane protein overexpressed on breast cancers and ovarian carcinomas, and thus a promising target for therapy, were very difficult to generate. Results A human scFv antibody was isolated from an immune library derived from breast cancer patients immunised with MUC1. The anti-MUC1 scFv reacted with tumour cells in more than 80% of 228 tissue sections of mamma carcinoma samples, while showing very low reactivity with a large panel of non-tumour tissues. By mutagenesis and phage display, affinity of scFvs was increased up to 500fold to 5,7×10−10 M. Half-life in serum was improved from below 1 day to more than 4 weeks and was correlated with the dimerisation tendency of the individual scFvs. The scFv bound to T47D and MCF-7 mammalian cancer cell lines were recloned into the scFv-Fc and IgG format resulting in decrease of affinity of one binder. The IgG variants with the highest affinity were tested in mouse xenograft models using MCF-7 and OVCAR tumour cells. However, the experiments showed no significant decrease in tumour growth or increase in the survival rates. To study the reasons for the failure of the xenograft experiments, ADCC was analysed in vitro using MCF-7 and OVCAR3 target cells, revealing a low ADCC, possibly due to internalisation, as detected for MCF-7 cells. Conclusions Antibody phage display starting with immune libraries and followed by affinity maturation is a powerful strategy to generate high affinity human antibodies to difficult targets, in this case shown by the creation of a highly specific antibody with subnanomolar affinity to a very small epitope consisting of four amino acids. Despite these “best in class” binding parameters, the therapeutic success of this antibody was prevented by the target biology. PMID:21264246

  16. Mannan-MUC1-pulsed dendritic cell immunotherapy: a phase I trial in patients with adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, Bruce E; Zhao, Anne; White, Shane; Gan, Hui; Hamilton, Kate; Xing, Pei-Xiang; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Vaughan, Hilary; Karanikas, Vaios; Kyriakou, Peter; McKenzie, Ian F C; Mitchell, Paul L R

    2006-02-01

    Tumor antigen-loaded dendritic cells show promise for cancer immunotherapy. This phase I study evaluated immunization with autologous dendritic cells pulsed with mannan-MUC1 fusion protein (MFP) to treat patients with advanced malignancy. Eligible patients had adenocarcinoma expressing MUC1, were of performance status 0 to 1, with no autoimmune disease. Patients underwent leukapheresis to generate dendritic cells by culture ex vivo with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 4 for 5 days. Dendritic cells were then pulsed overnight with MFP and harvested for reinjection. Patients underwent three cycles of leukapheresis and reinjection at monthly intervals. Patients with clinical benefit were able to continue with dendritic cell-MFP immunotherapy. Ten patients with a range of tumor types were enrolled, with median age of 60 years (range, 33-70 years); eight patients were of performance status 0 and two of performance status 1. Dendritic cell-MFP therapy led to strong T-cell IFNgamma Elispot responses to the vaccine and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses at injection sites in nine patients who completed treatments. Immune responses were sustained at 1 year in monitored patients. Antibody responses were seen in three patients only and were of low titer. Side effects were grade 1 only. Two patients with clearly progressive disease (ovarian and renal carcinoma) at entry were stable after initial therapy and went on to further leukapheresis and dendritic cell-MFP immunotherapy. These two patients have now each completed over 3 years of treatment. Immunization produced T-cell responses in all patients with evidence of tumor stabilization in 2 of the 10 advanced cancer patients treated. These data support further clinical evaluation of this dendritic cell-MFP immunotherapy.

  17. MUC1 positive cutaneous metastasis with transepidermal elimination from a breast carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna A

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amalia Luna, Maria Emilia Merino, Cecilio G Alberdi, Martin C Abba, Amada Segal-Eiras, Maria Virginia Croce Center of Basic and Applied Immunological Research, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of La Plata, Argentina Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cutaneous metastases from internal malignancies. Generally, the neoplastic cells are located in the dermis or hypodermis, while a finding of transepidermal elimination on cutaneous metastases is exceptional. In this report we present a patient with perforating cutaneous metastases from breast cancer with mucin 1 expression. Cutaneous, bone, lung, and hepatic lesions were detected two years after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. Keywords: breast cancer, cutaneous metastasis, transepidermal elimination, MUC1

  18. MUC1-C activates EZH2 expression and function in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hasan; Hiraki, Masayuki; Tagde, Ashujit; Alam, Maroof; Bouillez, Audrey; Christensen, Camilla L; Samur, Mehmet; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2017-08-07

    The EZH2 histone methyltransferase is a member of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) that is highly expressed in diverse human cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. MUC1-C is an oncoprotein that is similarly overexpressed in carcinomas and has been linked to epigenetic regulation. A role for MUC1-C in regulating EZH2 and histone methylation is not known. Here, we demonstrate that targeting MUC1-C in diverse human carcinoma cells downregulates EZH2 and other PRC2 components. MUC1-C activates (i) the EZH2 promoter through induction of the pRB→E2F pathway, and (ii) an NF-κB p65 driven enhancer in exon 1. We also show that MUC1-C binds directly to the EZH2 CXC region adjacent to the catalytic SET domain and associates with EZH2 on the CDH1 and BRCA1 promoters. In concert with these results, targeting MUC1-C downregulates EZH2 function as evidenced by (i) global and promoter-specific decreases in H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), and (ii) activation of tumor suppressor genes, including BRCA1. These findings highlight a previously unreported role for MUC1-C in activating EZH2 expression and function in cancer cells.

  19. MUC-1-ESA+ progenitor cells in normal benign and malignant human breast epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xinquan; Li, Huixiang; Xu, Kejia; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2009-01-01

    The existence of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells has been demonstrated in MUC-1-/ ESA+ subpopulations of breast epithelial cells. However, knowledge about the expression and localization in benign and malignant breast lesions is unknown. Using a double-staining immunohistochemistry method, we investigated MUC-1-/ESA+ cells in 10 normal breast tissues, 49 cases with fibrocystic disease, 40 fibroadenomas, 36 invasive ductal carcinomas and the breast cancer ce...

  20. Human milk blocks DC-SIGN - pathogen interaction via MUC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eKoning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of breastfeeding are well-recognized and include both immediate neonatal protection against pathogens, as well as long term protection against allergies and autoimmune diseases. Although several proteins have been identified to have anti-viral or anti-bacterial effects like secretory IgA or lactoferrin, the mechanisms of immune modulation are not fully understood. Recent studies identified important beneficial effects of glycans in human milk, such as those expressed in oligosaccharides or on glycoproteins. Glycans are recognized by the carbohydrate receptors C-type lectins on DC and specific tissue macrophages, which exert important functions in immune modulation and immune homeostasis. A well-characterized C-type lectin is DC-SIGN, which binds terminal fucose. The present study shows that in human milk, MUC1 is the major milk glycoprotein that binds to the lectin domain of DC-SIGN and prevents pathogen interaction through the presence of Lewis x-type oligosaccharides. Surprisingly, this was specific for human milk, as formula, bovine or camel milk did not show any presence of proteins that interacted with DC-SIGN. The expression of DC-SIGN is found in young infants along the entire gastro-intestinal tract. Our data thus suggest the importance of human milk glycoproteins for blocking pathogen interaction to DC in young children. Moreover, a potential benefit of human milk later in life in shaping the infants immune system through DC-SIGN cannot be ruled out.

  1. No evidence of association of MUC-1 genetic polymorphism with embryo implantation failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.B. Dentillo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy loss can be caused by several factors involved in human reproduction. Although up to 50% of cases remain unexplained, it has been postulated that the major cause of failed pregnancy is an error of embryo implantation. Transmembrane mucin-1 (MUC-1 is a glycoprotein expressed on the endometrial cell surface which acts as a barrier to implantation. The gene that codes for this molecule is composed of a polymorphic tandem repeat of 60 nucleotides. Our objective was to determine if MUC-1 genetic polymorphism is associated with implantation failure in patients with a history of recurrent abortion. The study was conducted on 10 women aged 25 to 35 years with no history of successful pregnancy and with a diagnosis of infertility. The control group consisted of 32 patients aged 25 to 35 years who had delivered at least two full-term live children and who had no history of abortions or fetal losses. MUC-1 amplicons were obtained by PCR and observed on agarose and polyacrylamide gel after electrophoresis. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in the number of MUC-1 variable number of tandem repeats between these groups (P > 0.05. Our results suggest that there is no effect of the polymorphic MUC-1 sequence on the implantation failure. However, the data do not exclude MUC-1 relevance during embryo implantation. The process is related to several associated factors such as the mechanisms of gene expression in the uterus, specific MUC-1 post-translational modifications and appropriate interactions with other molecules during embryo implantation.

  2. MUC1-C Oncoprotein Integrates a Program of EMT, Epigenetic Reprogramming and Immune Evasion in Human Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Hasan; Kufe, Donald

    2017-08-01

    The MUC1 gene evolved in mammalian species to provide protection of epithelia. The transmembrane MUC1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) signals stress to the interior of the epithelial cell and, when overexpressed as in most carcinomas, functions as an oncoprotein. MUC1-C induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by activating the inflammatory NF-κB p65 pathway and, in turn, the EMT-transcriptional repressor ZEB1. Emerging evidence has indicated that MUC1-C drives a program integrating the induction of EMT with activation of stem cell traits, epigenetic reprogramming and immune evasion. This mini-review focuses on the potential importance of this MUC1-C program in cancer progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-expression of HER3 and MUC1 is associated with a favourable prognosis in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine O; Borre, Michael; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the functional impact of the interaction of MUC1 with the epidermal growth factor receptors HER3 and HER4 in patients with bladder cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we examined MUC1 expression in 82 bladder...... the prognostic value of MUC1 (P = 0.488). MUC1 expression had no correlation with survival, tumour stage or grade, or to the prognostic value of HER4. CONCLUSIONS: A high MUC1 expression was associated with a favourable prognosis in patients with bladder cancer when the expression of HER3 was also high....... This suggests an involvement of HER3 in MUC1 function in bladder cancer....

  4. A soluble form of Siglec-9 provides an antitumor benefit against mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomioka, Yukiko, E-mail: ytomi@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Morimatsu, Masami, E-mail: mmorimat@vetmed.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Disease Model Innovation, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0815 (Japan); Laboratory of Laboratory Animal Science and Medicine, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0818 (Japan); Nishijima, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nishijma@nubio.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Usui, Tatsufumi, E-mail: usutatsu@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); Yamamoto, Sayo, E-mail: ysayo@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Suyama, Haruka, E-mail: sharuka@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ozaki, Kinuyo, E-mail: k-ozaki@anim.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Center of Biomedical Research, Research Center for Human Disease Modeling, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ito, Toshihiro, E-mail: toshiito@muses.tottori-u.ac.jp [Avian Zoonosis Research Center, Faculty of Agriculture, Tottori University, Tottori 680-8553 (Japan); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Tumor-associated antigen MUC1 binds to Siglec-9. • Soluble Siglec-9 reduced proliferation of MUC1-positive tumor in transgenic mice. • Soluble Siglec-9 and MUC1 on tumor cells were colocalized in transgenic mice. • MUC1 expression on tumor cells were reduced in soluble Siglec-9 transgenic mice. - Abstract: Tumor-associated MUC1 binds to Siglec-9, which is expected to mediate tumor cell growth and negative immunomodulation. We hypothesized that a soluble form of Siglec-9 (sSiglec-9) competitively inhibits a binding of MUC1 to its receptor molecules like human Siglec-9, leading to provide antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor, and generated transgenic mouse lines expressing sSiglec-9 (sSiglec-9 Tg). When mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 were intraperitoneally transplanted into sSiglec-9 Tg, tumor proliferation was slower with the lower histological malignancy as compared with non-transgenic mice. The sSiglec-9 was detected in the ascites caused by the tumor in the sSiglec-9 Tg, and sSiglec-9 and MUC1 were often colocalized on surfaces of the tumor cells. PCNA immunohistochemistry also revealed the reduced proliferation of the tumor cells in sSiglec-9 Tg. In sSiglec-9 Tg with remarkable suppression of tumor proliferation, MUC1 expressions were tend to be reduced. In the ascites of sSiglec-9 Tg bearing the tumor, T cells were uniformly infiltrated, whereas aggregations of degenerative T cells were often observed in the non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that sSiglec-9 has an antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor in the transgenic mice, which may avoid the negative immunomodulation and/or suppress tumor-associated MUC1 downstream signal transduction, and subsequent tumor proliferation.

  5. A soluble form of Siglec-9 provides an antitumor benefit against mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 in transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomioka, Yukiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Usui, Tatsufumi; Yamamoto, Sayo; Suyama, Haruka; Ozaki, Kinuyo; Ito, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tumor-associated antigen MUC1 binds to Siglec-9. • Soluble Siglec-9 reduced proliferation of MUC1-positive tumor in transgenic mice. • Soluble Siglec-9 and MUC1 on tumor cells were colocalized in transgenic mice. • MUC1 expression on tumor cells were reduced in soluble Siglec-9 transgenic mice. - Abstract: Tumor-associated MUC1 binds to Siglec-9, which is expected to mediate tumor cell growth and negative immunomodulation. We hypothesized that a soluble form of Siglec-9 (sSiglec-9) competitively inhibits a binding of MUC1 to its receptor molecules like human Siglec-9, leading to provide antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor, and generated transgenic mouse lines expressing sSiglec-9 (sSiglec-9 Tg). When mammary tumor cells expressing MUC1 were intraperitoneally transplanted into sSiglec-9 Tg, tumor proliferation was slower with the lower histological malignancy as compared with non-transgenic mice. The sSiglec-9 was detected in the ascites caused by the tumor in the sSiglec-9 Tg, and sSiglec-9 and MUC1 were often colocalized on surfaces of the tumor cells. PCNA immunohistochemistry also revealed the reduced proliferation of the tumor cells in sSiglec-9 Tg. In sSiglec-9 Tg with remarkable suppression of tumor proliferation, MUC1 expressions were tend to be reduced. In the ascites of sSiglec-9 Tg bearing the tumor, T cells were uniformly infiltrated, whereas aggregations of degenerative T cells were often observed in the non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that sSiglec-9 has an antitumor benefit against MUC1-expressing tumor in the transgenic mice, which may avoid the negative immunomodulation and/or suppress tumor-associated MUC1 downstream signal transduction, and subsequent tumor proliferation

  6. Autoantibodies to aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 in early stage breast cancer are associated with a better prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Ola; Bueti, Deanna; Burford, Brian

    2011-01-01

    associated glycoforms of MUC1 in a proportion of early breast cancer patients (54/198). Five positive sera were selected for detailed definition of the reactive epitopes using on chip glycosylation technology and a panel of glycopeptides based on a single MUC1 tandem repeat carrying specific glycans...

  7. Targeting of the MUC1-C Oncoprotein in Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    separated by infiltrates of inflammatory cells and the presence of crypt abscess (lower left panel). With progression to dysplasia, the crypts are...Rajabi, H, et al., MUC1-C oncoprotein induces TCF7L2 activation and promotes cyclin D1 expression in human breast cancer cells. J Biol Chem, 2012

  8. Relationships between oral MUC1 expression and salivary hormones in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Yoon-Young; Chang, Ji-Youn; Kho, Hong-Seop

    2017-06-01

    To investigate possible relationships among oral mucosal epithelial MUC1 expression, salivary female gonadal hormones and stress markers, and clinical characteristics in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Thirty post-menopausal female patients with BMS (60.0±5.0 years) were included. Clinical and psychological evaluations were performed and the expression level of oral mucosal epithelial MUC1 was analyzed. The levels of cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 17β-estradiol, progesterone, chromogranin A, and blood contamination were determined from unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) and stimulated whole saliva (SWS) samples. Salivary progesterone level had significant positive correlations with oral mucosal epithelial MUC1 expression level and with salivary cortisol and DHEA levels. The salivary level of 17β-estradiol showed significant positive correlations with period of symptom duration, severity of effects of oral complaints on daily life, and results from psychological evaluations. Cortisol level in UWS and cortisol/DHEA ratio in UWS and SWS had negative correlations with severity of oral burning sensation significantly. The severity of taste disturbance had positive correlations with results from psychometry significantly. Dysregulated psychoendocrinological interactions might affect oral mucosal MUC1 expression and severity of oral burning sensation in post-menopausal BMS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor-associated Tn-MUC1 glycoform is internalized through the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin and delivered to the HLA class I and II compartments in dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Napoletano, Chiara; Rughetti, Aurelia; Agervig Tarp, Mads P

    2007-01-01

    . This results in the expression of tumor-associated glycoforms and in MUC1 carrying the tumor-specific glycan Tn (GalNAcalpha1-O-Ser/Thr). Glycopeptides corresponding to three tandem repeats of MUC1, enzymatically glycosylated with 9 or 15 mol of GalNAc, were shown to specifically bind and to be internalized...... and ELISA done on subcellular fractions of iDCs showed that the Tn-MUC1 glycopeptides colocalized with HLA class I and II compartments after internalization. Importantly, although Tn-MUC1 recombinant protein was bound and internalized by MGL, the glycoprotein entered the HLA class II compartment......, but not the HLA class I pathway. These data indicate that MGL expressed on iDCs is an optimal receptor for the internalization of short GalNAcs carrying immunogens to be delivered into HLA class I and II compartments. Such glycopeptides therefore represent a new way of targeting the HLA class I and II pathways...

  10. Prognostic Significance of Mucin Antigen MUC1 in Various Human Epithelial Cancers: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Fuquan; Zhao, Hongwei; An, Guangyu; Feng, Guosheng

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mucin antigen MUC1 plays a fundamental role in the initiation and progression of several types of epithelial carcinomas. However, whether the expression of MUC1 on tumor cells is associated with patients' survival remains controversial. Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, and Grey literature were searched up to 15 August 2015 for eligible studies of the association between the MUC1 expression and overall survival (OS) in various epithelial cancers. The hazard ratio (HR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated from the included studies. Moreover, the odds ratio (OR) was also extracted to evaluate the association between the clinicopathological parameters of participants and MUC1 expression. A total of 3425 patients covering 23 studies were included in the analysis. The pooled results showed that positive MUC1 staining was a negative predictor of OS (HRFEM = 1.98,95% CIFEM: 1.76-2.22, PFEM = 0.479; HRREM = 2.16,95% CIREM: 1.58-2.94, PREM = 0.355) in various epithelial carcinomas. Subgroup analysis revealed that the increased MUC1 expression was significantly associated with poor OS in patients with gastric cancer (HRFEM = 2.12, 95%CIFEM: 1.75-2.57, PFEM = 0.359; HRREM = 1.89, 95% CIREM: 1.05-3.41, PREM = 0.238), colorectal cancer (HRFEM = 1.73, 95%CIFEM: 1.41-2.13, PFEM = 0.048; HRREM = 2.00,95% CIREM: 1.46-2.73, PREM = 0.019), cholangiocarcinoma (HRFEM = 2.52, 95% CIFEM: 1.42-4.49, PFEM = 0.252; HRREM = 2.34, 95% CIREM: 1.30-4.22, PREM = 0.244), and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (HRFEM = 2.14, 95% CIFEM: 1.46-3.14, PFEM = 0.591; HRREM = 2.81, 95% CIREM: 1.40-5.64, PREM = 0.280). In addition, MUC1 overexpression was more likely to be found in colorectal cancer patients with an advanced tumor node metastasis stage (ORREM = 1.55, 95% CIREM: 1.06-2.27; PREM = 0

  11. Prognostic Significance of Mucin Antigen MUC1 in Various Human Epithelial Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Fuquan; Zhao, Hongwei; An, Guangyu; Feng, Guosheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Accumulating evidence indicates that mucin antigen MUC1 plays a fundamental role in the initiation and progression of several types of epithelial carcinomas. However, whether the expression of MUC1 on tumor cells is associated with patients’ survival remains controversial. Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, and Grey literature were searched up to 15 August 2015 for eligible studies of the association between the MUC1 expression and overall survival (OS) in various epithelial cancers. The hazard ratio (HR) and its 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated from the included studies. Moreover, the odds ratio (OR) was also extracted to evaluate the association between the clinicopathological parameters of participants and MUC1 expression. A total of 3425 patients covering 23 studies were included in the analysis. The pooled results showed that positive MUC1 staining was a negative predictor of OS (HRFEM = 1.98,95% CIFEM: 1.76–2.22, PFEM = 0.479; HRREM = 2.16,95% CIREM: 1.58–2.94, PREM = 0.355) in various epithelial carcinomas. Subgroup analysis revealed that the increased MUC1 expression was significantly associated with poor OS in patients with gastric cancer (HRFEM = 2.12, 95%CIFEM: 1.75–2.57, PFEM = 0.359; HRREM = 1.89, 95% CIREM: 1.05–3.41, PREM = 0.238), colorectal cancer (HRFEM = 1.73, 95%CIFEM: 1.41–2.13, PFEM = 0.048; HRREM = 2.00,95% CIREM: 1.46–2.73, PREM = 0.019), cholangiocarcinoma (HRFEM = 2.52, 95% CIFEM: 1.42–4.49, PFEM = 0.252; HRREM = 2.34, 95% CIREM: 1.30–4.22, PREM = 0.244), and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (HRFEM = 2.14, 95% CIFEM: 1.46–3.14, PFEM = 0.591; HRREM = 2.81, 95% CIREM: 1.40–5.64, PREM = 0.280). In addition, MUC1 overexpression was more likely to be found in colorectal cancer patients with an advanced tumor node metastasis stage (ORREM = 1.55, 95

  12. Induction of protective and therapeutic anti-pancreatic cancer immunity using a reconstructed MUC1 DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rong, Yefei; Jin, Dayong; Wu, Wenchuan; Lou, Wenhui; Wang, Danshong; Kuang, Tiantao; Ni, Xiaoling; Qin, Xinyu

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a common, highly lethal disease with a rising incidence. MUC1 is a tumor-associated antigen that is over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Active immunotherapy that targets MUC1 could have great treatment value. Here we investigated the preventive and therapeutic effect of a MUC1 DNA vaccine on the pancreatic cancer. MUC1-various tandem repeat units(VNTR) DNA vaccine was produced by cloning one repeat of VNTR and inserting the cloned gene into the pcDNA3.1. In the preventive group, female C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS; and challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell. In the therapeutic group the mice were challenged with panc02-MUC1 or panc02 cell, and then immunized with the vaccine, pcDNA3.1 or PBS. The tumor size and the survival time of the animals were compared between these groups. The DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could raise cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity specific for MUC1. In the preventive experiment, the mice survival time was significantly longer in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). In the therapeutic experiment, the DNA vaccine prolonged the survival time of the panc02-MUC1-bearing mice (P < 0.05). In both the preventive and therapeutic experiments, the tumor size was significantly less in the vaccine group than in the control groups (P < 0.05). This pcDNA3.1-VNTR vaccine, however, could not prevent the mice attacked by panc02 cells and had no therapeutic effect on the mice attacked by panc02 cells. The MUC1 DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-VNTR could induce a significant MUC1-specific CTL response; and had both prophylactic and therapeutic effect on panc02-MUC1 tumors. This vaccine might be used as a new adjuvant strategy against pancreatic cancer

  13. Targeting of the MUC1-C Oncoprotein in Colitis-Associated Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    effect- level isobologram analysis is shown for ED 90 (), ED 75 (+) and ED 50 (×) with the right side panel indicating the CI index for the...was generated by exposing the cells to fixed IC50 ratios of GO-203, GSK1120212 and the GO- 203/GSK1120212 combination. The multiple effect- level ...Kharbanda S, and Kufe D, MUC1 oncoprotein blocks GSK3β -mediated phosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin. Cancer Res, 2005. 65:10413-22. 11. Rajabi

  14. Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease: Clinical Presentation of Patients With ADTKD-UMOD and ADTKD-MUC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayasreh, Nadia; Bullich, Gemma; Miquel, Rosa; Furlano, Mónica; Ruiz, Patricia; Lorente, Laura; Valero, Oliver; García-González, Miguel Angel; Arhda, Nisrine; Garin, Intza; Martínez, Víctor; Pérez-Gómez, Vanessa; Fulladosa, Xavier; Arroyo, David; Martínez-Vea, Alberto; Espinosa, Mario; Ballarín, Jose; Ars, Elisabet; Torra, Roser

    2018-05-18

    Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) is a rare underdiagnosed cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). ADTKD is caused by mutations in at least 4 different genes: MUC1, UMOD, HNF1B, and REN. Retrospective cohort study. 56 families (131 affected individuals) with ADTKD referred from different Spanish hospitals. Clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic data were collected, and genetic testing for UMOD, MUC1, REN, and HNF1B was performed. Hyperuricemia, ultrasound findings, renal histology, genetic mutations. Age at ESRD, rate of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate. ADTKD was diagnosed in 25 families (45%), 9 carried UMOD pathogenic variants (41 affected members), and 16 carried the MUC1 pathogenic mutation c.(428)dupC (90 affected members). No pathogenic variants were identified in REN or HNF1B. Among the 77 individuals who developed ESRD, median age at onset of ESRD was 51 years for those with ADTKD-MUC1 versus 56 years (P=0.1) for those with ADTKD-UMOD. Individuals with the MUC1 duplication presented higher risk for developing ESRD (HR, 2.24; P=0.03). The slope of decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate showed no significant difference between groups (-3.0mL/min/1.73m 2 per year in the ADTKD-UMOD group versus -3.9mL/min/1.73m 2 per year in the ADTKD-MUC1 group; P=0.2). The prevalence of hyperuricemia was significantly higher in individuals with ADTKD-UMOD (87% vs 54%; P=0.006). Although gout occurred more frequently in this group, the difference was not statistically significant (24% vs 7%; P=0.07). Relatively small Spanish cohort. MUC1 analysis limited to cytosine duplication. The main genetic cause of ADTKD in our Spanish cohort is the MUC1 pathogenic mutation c.(428)dupC. Renal survival may be worse in individuals with the MUC1 mutation than in those with UMOD mutations. Clinical presentation does not permit distinguishing between these variants. However, hyperuricemia and gout are more frequent in individuals

  15. The Cytoplasmic Domain of MUC1 Induces Hyperplasia in the Mammary Gland and Correlates with Nuclear Accumulation of β-Catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Haiying; Yao, Yixin; Liao, Xiaodong; Xie, Yiqun; Yang, Jie; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Long; Lu, Shunyuan; Kuang, Ying; Gu, Mingmin; Fei, Jian; Wang, Zhugang; Huang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in up to 90% of breast carcinomas. A previous in vitro study by our group demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 (MUC1-CD), the minimal functional unit of MUC1, contributes to the malignant phenotype in cells by binding directly to β-catenin and protecting β-catenin from GSK3β-induced degradation. To understand the in vivo role of MUC1-CD in breast development, we generated a MUC1-CD transgenic mouse model under the control of the MMTV promoter in a C57BL/6J background, which is more resistant to breast tumor. We show that the expression of MUC1-CD in luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland induced a hyperplasia phenotype characterized by the development of hyper-branching and extensive lobuloalveoli in transgenic mice. In addition to this hyperplasia, there was a marked increase in cellular proliferation in the mouse mammary gland. We further show that MUC1-CD induces nuclear localization of β-catenin, which is associated with a significant increase of β-catenin activity, as shown by the elevated expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc in MMTV-MUC1-CD mice. Consistent with this finding, we observed that overexpression of MUC1-C is associated with β-catenin nuclear localization in tumor tissues and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc in breast carcinoma specimens. Collectively, our data indicate a critical role for MUC1-CD in the development of mammary gland preneoplasia and tumorigenesis, suggesting MUC1-CD as a potential target for the diagnosis and chemoprevention of human breast cancer. PMID:21533058

  16. The cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 induces hyperplasia in the mammary gland and correlates with nuclear accumulation of β-catenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available MUC1 is an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in up to 90% of breast carcinomas. A previous in vitro study by our group demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 (MUC1-CD, the minimal functional unit of MUC1, contributes to the malignant phenotype in cells by binding directly to β-catenin and protecting β-catenin from GSK3β-induced degradation. To understand the in vivo role of MUC1-CD in breast development, we generated a MUC1-CD transgenic mouse model under the control of the MMTV promoter in a C57BL/6J background, which is more resistant to breast tumor. We show that the expression of MUC1-CD in luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland induced a hyperplasia phenotype characterized by the development of hyper-branching and extensive lobuloalveoli in transgenic mice. In addition to this hyperplasia, there was a marked increase in cellular proliferation in the mouse mammary gland. We further show that MUC1-CD induces nuclear localization of β-catenin, which is associated with a significant increase of β-catenin activity, as shown by the elevated expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc in MMTV-MUC1-CD mice. Consistent with this finding, we observed that overexpression of MUC1-C is associated with β-catenin nuclear localization in tumor tissues and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc in breast carcinoma specimens. Collectively, our data indicate a critical role for MUC1-CD in the development of mammary gland preneoplasia and tumorigenesis, suggesting MUC1-CD as a potential target for the diagnosis and chemoprevention of human breast cancer.

  17. Design of α-S-Neoglycopeptides Derived from MUC1 with a Flexible and Solvent-Exposed Sugar Moiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas-Ocáriz, Víctor; Compañón, Ismael; Aydillo Miguel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    in solution have been evaluated by combining NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. The linker plays a key role in the modulation of the conformation of these compounds at different levels, blocking a direct contact between the sugar moiety and the backbone, promoting a helix-like conformation...... for the glycosylated residue and favoring the proper presentation of the sugar unit for molecular recognition events. The feasibility of these novel compounds as mimics of MUC1 antigens has been validated by the X-ray diffraction structure of one of these unnatural derivatives complexed to an anti-MUC1 monoclonal...

  18. Aberrantly glycosylated MUC1 is expressed on the surface of breast cancer cells and a target for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrsen, Kirstine; Madsen, Caroline B; Rasch, Morten G

    2013-01-01

    to Tn-MUC1 was investigated using BiaCore. The availability of Tn-MUC1 on the surface of breast cancer cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, followed by in vitro assessment of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by mAb 5E5. Biacore analysis...

  19. The Use of Fluoroproline in MUC1 Antigen Enables Efficient Detection of Antibodies in Patients with Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somovilla, Víctor J; Bermejo, Iris A.; Albuquerque, Inês S; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Castro-López, Jorge; García-Martín, Fayna; Compañón, Ismael; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Asensio, Juan L.; Avenoza, Alberto; Busto, Jesús H.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Corzana, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    A structure-based design of a new generation of tumor-associated glycopeptides with improved affinity against two anti-MUC1 antibodies is described. These unique antigens feature a fluorinated proline residue, such as a (4S)-4-fluoro-l-proline or 4,4-difluoro-l-proline, at the most immunogenic

  20. Microvesicle Cargo of Tumor-Associated MUC1 to Dendritic Cells Allows Cross-presentation and Specific Carbohydrate Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rughetti, Aurelia; Rahimi, Hassan; Belleudi, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated glycoproteins are a group of antigens with high immunogenic interest: The glycoforms generated by the aberrant glycosylation are tumor-specific and the novel glycoepitopes exposed can be targets of tumor-specific immune responses. The MUC1 antigen is one of the most relevant tumo...

  1. MUC1 in human milk blocks transmission of human immunodeficiency virus from dendritic cells to T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeland, E.; Jong, de M.A.W.P.; Nabatov, A.; Kalay, H.; Kooijk, van Y.; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.

    2009-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) occurs frequently via breast-feeding. HIV-1 targets DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells (DCs) in mucosal areas that allow efficient transmission of the virus to T cells. Here, we demonstrate that the epithelial mucin MUC1, abundant in milk,

  2. Detection of glyco-mucin profiles improves specificity of MUC16 and MUC1 biomarkers in ovarian serous tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Sara; da Silva, Lara Patricia Marcos; Pereira, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The CA125 assay detects circulating MUC16 and is one of the most widely used cancer biomarkers for the follow-up of ovarian cancer. We previously demonstrated that detection of aberrant cancer-associated glycoforms of MUC16 as well as MUC1 in circulation could improve the yield of these serum ass...

  3. KL-6, a human MUC1 mucin, promotes proliferation and survival of lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Hattori, Noboru; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Hirasawa, Yutaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2005-01-01

    The serum level of KL-6, a MUC1 mucin, is a clinically useful marker for various interstitial lung diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that KL-6 promotes chemotaxis of human fibroblasts. However, the pathophysiological role of KL-6 remains poorly understood. Here, we further investigate the functional aspects of KL-6 in proliferation and apoptosis of lung fibroblasts. KL-6 accelerated the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of all human lung fibroblasts examined. An anti-KL-6 monoclonal antibody counteracted both of these effects induced by KL-6 on human lung fibroblasts. The pro-fibroproliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of KL-6 are greater than and additive to those of the maximum effective concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β. These findings indicate that increased levels of KL-6 in the epithelial lining fluid may stimulate fibrotic processes in interstitial lung diseases and raise the possibility of applying an anti-KL-6 antibody to treat interstitial lung diseases

  4. The Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoforms of MUC1, MUC1-Tn and sialyl-Tn, Are Expressed in COSMC Wild-Type Cells and Bind the C-Type Lectin MGL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Beatson

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation occurs in the majority of human cancers and changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation are key events that play a role in the induction of invasion and metastases. These changes generate novel cancer-specific glyco-antigens that can interact with cells of the immune system through carbohydrate binding lectins. Two glyco-epitopes that are found expressed by many carcinomas are Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr and STn (NeuAcα2,6GalNAc-Ser/Thr. These glycans can be carried on many mucin-type glycoproteins including MUC1. We show that the majority of breast cancers carry Tn within the same cell and in close proximity to extended glycan T (Galβ1,3GalNAc the addition of Gal to the GalNAc being catalysed by the T synthase. The presence of active T synthase suggests that loss of the private chaperone for T synthase, COSMC, does not explain the expression of Tn and STn in breast cancer cells. We show that MUC1 carrying both Tn or STn can bind to the C-type lectin MGL and using atomic force microscopy show that they bind to MGL with a similar dead adhesion force. Tumour associated STn is associated with poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy in breast carcinomas, inhibition of DC maturation, DC apoptosis and inhibition of NK activity. As engagement of MGL in the absence of TLR triggering may lead to anergy, the binding of MUC1-STn to MGL may be in part responsible for some of the characteristics of STn expressing tumours.

  5. Feasibility study of Anti-MUC1 aptamer use as vector target director of 1,10 phenantrolin for radiosensitization of breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Laís Nascimento

    2017-01-01

    With the rising incidence of cancer and this disease as global public health dilemma, there is an alarming need of studying new cancer therapies. To achieve the development of efficient agents is essential to understand the fundamental mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Overexpression of proteins in malignant tissues, in contrast to expression of the proteins found in normal tissues of the same organ, is crucially important and of great interest for the characterization of potential tumor biomarkers. Following this premise, MUC1 glycoprotein was selected as a therapeutic target in a breast cancer model. In order to determine the viability of the aptA aptamer as radiosensitizers carrier, the toxic compound 1,10 phenanthroline, complexed with Fe(II) was intercalated in the aptamers. The dissociation constant was found at a value of Kd = 30 μM. The selective binding and internalization of the compound was demonstrated. Based on these data, the aptA can be used as carrying vector of molecules such as 1,10-phenanthroline. As a next stage, the evaluation of its in vitro potential as radiosensitizers with the use of ionizing radiation will be done. (author)

  6. Associations of genetic variants in the PSCA, MUC1 and PLCE1 genes with stomach cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Sun

    Full Text Available Several genetic variants including PSCA rs2294008 C>T and rs2976392 G>A, MUC1 rs4072037 T>C, and PLCE1 rs2274223 A>G have shown significant association with stomach cancer risk in the previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs.To evaluate associations of these SNPs in the Han Chinese, an independent hospital based case-control study was performed by genotyping these four polymorphisms in a total of 692 stomach cancer cases and 774 healthy controls acquired by using frequency matching for age and gender. False-positive report probability (FPRP analysis was also performed to validate all statistically significant findings.In the current study, significant association with stomach cancer susceptibility was observed for all the four polymorphisms of interest. Specifically, a significant increased stomach cancer risk was associated with PSCA rs2294008 (CT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.07-1.74, and CT/TT vs.CC: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.63, PSCA rs2976392 (AG vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.02-1.65, and AG/AA vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.00-1.59, or PLCE1 rs2274223 (AG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15-1.90, and AG/GG vs. AA: adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14-1.84, respectively. In contrast, MUC1 rs4072037 was shown to decrease the cancer risk (CT vs. TT: adjusted OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.60-0.98. Patients with more than one risk genotypes had significant increased risk to develop stomach cancer (adjusted OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.03-1.64, when compared with those having 0-1 risk genotypes. Stratified analysis indicated that the increased risk was more pronounced in younger subjects, men, ever smokers, smokers with pack years ≤ 27, patients with high BMI, or non-cardia stomach cancer.This study substantiated the associations between four previous reported genetic variants and stomach cancer susceptibility in an independent Han Chinese population. Further studies with larger sample size and different

  7. Epitopes of MUC1 Tandem Repeats in Cancer as Revealed by Antibody Crystallography: Toward Glycopeptide Signature-Guided Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally O-glycosylated MUC1 tandem repeat glycopeptide epitopes expressed by multiple types of cancer have long been attractive targets for therapy in the race against genetic mutations of tumor cells. Glycopeptide signature-guided therapy might be a more promising avenue than mutation signature-guided therapy. Three O-glycosylated peptide motifs, PDTR, GSTA, and GVTS, exist in a tandem repeat HGVTSAPDTRPAPGSTAPPA, containing five O-glycosylation sites. The exact peptide and sugar residues involved in antibody binding are poorly defined. Co-crystal structures of glycopeptides and respective monoclonal antibodies are very few. Here we review 3 groups of monoclonal antibodies: antibodies which only bind to peptide portion, antibodies which only bind to sugar portion, and antibodies which bind to both peptide and sugar portions. The antigenicity of peptide and sugar portions of glyco-MUC1 tandem repeat were analyzed according to available biochemical and structural data, especially the GSTA and GVTS motifs independent from the most studied PDTR. Tn is focused as a peptide-modifying residue in vaccine design, to induce glycopeptide-binding antibodies with cross reactivity to Tn-related tumor glycans, but not glycans of healthy cells. The unique requirement for the designs of antibody in antibody-drug conjugate, bi-specific antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptors are also discussed.

  8. Cancer-associated autoantibodies to MUC1 and MUC4--a blinded case–control study of colorectal cancer in UK collaborative trial of ovarian cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Nøstdal, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    of colorectal cancer diagnosis and healthy controls. Subsequently, the selected biomarkers were evaluated in a blinded nested case–control study using stored serum samples from among the 50,640 women randomized to the multimodal arm of the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS), where......, at 95% specificity. IgA to MUC4 glycoforms were unable to discriminate between cases and controls in the UKCTOCS sera. Additional analysis was undertaken by combining the data of MUC1-STn and MUC1-Core3 with previously generated data on autoantibodies to p53 peptides, which increased the sensitivity...

  9. The Breast Cancer-Associated Glycoforms of MUC1, MUC1-Tn and sialyl-Tn, Are Expressed in COSMC Wild-Type Cells and Bind the C-Type Lectin MGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beatson, Richard; Maurstad, Gjertrud; Picco, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation occurs in the majority of human cancers and changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation are key events that play a role in the induction of invasion and metastases. These changes generate novel cancer-specific glyco-antigens that can interact with cells of the immune system through...... carbohydrate binding lectins. Two glyco-epitopes that are found expressed by many carcinomas are Tn (GalNAc-Ser/Thr) and STn (NeuAcα2,6GalNAc-Ser/Thr). These glycans can be carried on many mucin-type glycoproteins including MUC1. We show that the majority of breast cancers carry Tn within the same cell...

  10. Single molecule real time sequencing in ADTKD-MUC1 allows complete assembly of the VNTR and exact positioning of causative mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenzel, Andrea; Altmueller, Janine; Ekici, Arif B.; Popp, Bernt; Stueber, Kurt; Thiele, Holger; Pannes, Alois; Staubach, Simon; Salido, Eduardo; Nuernberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Richard; Reis, Andre; Rump, Patrick; Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Wolf, Matthias T. F.; Wiesener, Michael; Huettel, Bruno; Beck, Bodo B.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the Mucin-1 (MUC1) gene has been identified as a causal gene of autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease (ADTKD). Most causative mutations are buried within a GC-rich 60 basepair variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR), which escapes identification by massive parallel

  11. Autoantibodies to MUC1 glycopeptides cannot be used as a screening assay for early detection of breast, ovarian, lung or pancreatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burford, B; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Graham, R

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been detected in sera before diagnosis of cancer leading to interest in their potential as screening/early detection biomarkers. As we have found autoantibodies to MUC1 glycopeptides to be elevated in early-stage breast cancer patients, in this study we analysed these autoanti...

  12. Mucin architecture behind the immune response : Design, evaluation and conformational analysis of an antitumor vaccine derived from an unnatural MUC1 fragment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Supekar, Nitin T.; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Bermejo, Iris A.; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Asensio, Juan L.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Busto, Jesús H.; Avenoza, Alberto; Boons, Geert Jan; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Corzana, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A tripartite cancer vaccine candidate, containing a quaternary amino acid (α-methylserine) in the most immunogenic domain of MUC1, has been synthesized and examined for antigenic properties in transgenic mice. The vaccine which is glycosylated with GalNAc at the unnatural amino acid, was capable of

  13. Human Milk Blocks DC-SIGN-Pathogen Interaction via MUC1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, Nathalie; Kessen, Sabine F M; Van Der Voorn, J Patrick; Appelmelk, Ben J; Jeurink, Prescilla V; Knippels, Leon M J; Garssen, Johan; Van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of breastfeeding are well-recognized and include both immediate neonatal protection against pathogens and long-term protection against allergies and autoimmune diseases. Although several proteins have been identified to have anti-viral or anti-bacterial effects like secretory IgA

  14. A Novel Association and Therapeutic Targeting of Neuropilin-1 and MUC1 in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    be potentially translated to human clinical trials. Other Achievements References 1. Besmer DM, Curry JM, Roy LD, Tinder TL, Sahraei M, Schettini J...containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2. J Cell Sci 2009, 122(Pt 18):3385-3392. 4. Roy LD, Sahraei M, Subramani DB, Besmer D, Nath S, Tinder TL, Bajaj E

  15. The Construction of Chimeric T-Cell Receptor with Spacer Base of Modeling Study of VHH and MUC1 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Pirooznia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive cell immunotherapy with the use of chimeric receptors leads to the best and most specific response against tumors. Chimeric receptors consist of a signaling fragment, extracellular spacer, costimulating domain, and an antibody. Antibodies cause immunogenicity; therefore, VHH is a good replacement for ScFv in chimeric receptors. Since peptide sequences have an influence on chimeric receptors, the effect of peptide domains on each other's conformation were investigated. CD3Zeta, CD28, VHH and CD8α, and FcgIIα are used as signaling moieties, costimulating domain, antibody, and spacers, respectively. To investigate the influence of the ligation of spacers on the conformational structure of VHH, models of VHH were constructed. Molecular dynamics simulation was run to study the influence of the presence of spacers on the conformational changes in the binding sites of VHH. Root mean square deviation and root mean square fluctuation of critical segments in the binding site showed no noticeable differences with those in the native VHH. Results from molecular docking revealed that the presence of spacer FcgIIα causes an increasing effect on VHH with MUC1 interaction. Each of the constructs was transformed into the Jurkat E6.1. Expression analysis and evaluation of their functions were examined. The results showed good expression and function.

  16. MUC1 gene polymorphism in three Nelore lines selected for growth and its association with growth and carcass traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Fabio Ricardo Pablos; Maione, Sandra; Sartore, Stefano; Soglia, Dominga; Spalenza, Veronica; Cauvin, Elsa; Martelli, Lucia Regina; Mercadante, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti; Sacchi, Paola; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Rasero, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the VNTR polymorphism of the mucin 1 gene (MUC1) in three Nelore lines selected for yearling weight to determine whether allele and genotype frequencies of this polymorphism were affected by selection for growth. In addition, the effects of the polymorphism on growth and carcass traits were evaluated. Birth, weaning and yearling weights, rump height, Longissimus muscle area, backfat thickness, and rump fat thickness, were analyzed. A total of 295 Nelore heifers from the Beef Cattle Research Center, Instituto de Zootecnia de Sertãozinho, were used, including 41 of the control line, 102 of the selection line and 152 of the traditional. The selection and traditional lines comprise animals selected for higher yearling weight, whereas control line animals are selected for yearling weight close to the average. Five alleles were identified, with allele 1 being the most frequent in the three lines, especially in the lines selected for higher means for yearling weight. Heterozygosity was significantly higher in the control line. Association analyses showed significant effects of allele 1 on birth weight and weaning weight while the allele 3 exert significant effects on yearling weight and back fat thickness. Despite these findings, application of this marker to marker-assisted selection requires more consistent results based on the genotyping of a larger number of animals in order to increase the accuracy of the statistical analyses.

  17. Relação entre a expressão da MUC1 e os estadiamentos TNM e Astler-Coller no câncer colorretal Relation between the expression of MUC1 and TNM and Astler-Coller staging systems in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Gabriela Melo Morais

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A expressão de marcadores tumorais que se correlacionam com a agressividade dos cânceres vem sendo investigada com vigor. Tendo o câncer colorretal significativa incidência, biomarcadores que possam avaliá-lo quanto a esse aspecto, não são exceção nesta investigação. OBJETIVO: estabelecer a relação entre agressividade do câncer colorretal de acordo com os estadiamentos TNM e Astler-Coller e a expressão da Mucina1 (MUC1 em uma determinada amostra de tumores. METODOLOGIA: foram examinados 36 cânceres colorretais ressecados pelos coloproctologistas do Hospital Universitário da UFAL quanto à presença de uma reação imuno-histoquímica positiva para MUC1 em padrão citoplasmático. Em seguida, correlacionou-se esta com os estádios dos tumores. RESULTADOS: A imunoexpressão da MUC1 ocorreu em 50% dos casos. Destes, 61% estavam entre os estádios T3 e T4; 39% entre N1 e N2; todos os casos do estudo eram M0; e 40% encontravam-se entre os estádios C1 e C3 de Astler-Coller. Avaliada a positividade por cada estádio em separado, percebeu-se que estes aumentaram proporcionalmente, principalmente em relação aos estadios "N" e Astler-Coller. CONCLUSÃO: a ausência da reatividade imuno-histoquímica à MUC1 não excluiu a possibilidade de evolução para um estadio avançado. Porém, sua presença denota a evolução do câncer colorretal para estádios mais agressivos.The expression of tumor markers that correlates with the aggressiveness of cancers has been strongly investigated. Having colorectal cancer a significant incidence, biomarkers that can evaluate it concerning this aspect are not an exception in this inquiry. AIM: To establish a relation between aggressiveness of colorectal cancer according to TNM and Astler-Coller staging systems and the expression of Mucin1 (MUC1 in a determined sample of tumors. METHODS: 36 colorectal cancers resected by proctologists of the University Hospital of UFAL were examined regarding the

  18. Feasibility study of Anti-MUC1 aptamer use as vector target director of 1,10 phenantrolin for radiosensitization of breast cancer cells; Estudo da viabilidade do uso do aptâmero Anti-MUC1 como vetor alvo direcionador de 1,10 fenantrolina para radio sensibilização de células de câncer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Laís Nascimento

    2017-07-01

    With the rising incidence of cancer and this disease as global public health dilemma, there is an alarming need of studying new cancer therapies. To achieve the development of efficient agents is essential to understand the fundamental mechanisms of carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Overexpression of proteins in malignant tissues, in contrast to expression of the proteins found in normal tissues of the same organ, is crucially important and of great interest for the characterization of potential tumor biomarkers. Following this premise, MUC1 glycoprotein was selected as a therapeutic target in a breast cancer model. In order to determine the viability of the aptA aptamer as radiosensitizers carrier, the toxic compound 1,10 phenanthroline, complexed with Fe(II) was intercalated in the aptamers. The dissociation constant was found at a value of Kd = 30 μM. The selective binding and internalization of the compound was demonstrated. Based on these data, the aptA can be used as carrying vector of molecules such as 1,10-phenanthroline. As a next stage, the evaluation of its in vitro potential as radiosensitizers with the use of ionizing radiation will be done. (author)

  19. Pretargeting of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with bispecific anti-MUC1/anti-Ga chelate antibodies and immunoscintigraphy with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuhmacher, Jochen; Klivenyi, Gabor; Kaul, Sepp; Henze, Marcus; Matys, Ronald; Hauser, Harald; Clorius, John

    2001-01-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of combining enhanced tumor-to-tissue contrast and PET imaging for immunoscintigraphic tumor localization in pancreas and colon carcinoma bearing nude mice. Contrast enhancement was obtained with a multistep targeting technique that consists of the sequential administration of an antitumor/antihapten bispecific antibody (BS-MAb), a blocker to saturate the antihapten binding sites of the BS-MAb that remains in circulation, and a low molecular weight Ga chelate, labeled with the positron emitter 68 Ga, which serves as the hapten. To evaluate the efficacy of this pretargeting technique for breast cancer localization, we synthesized a BS-MAb from the F(ab') 2 fragments of the anti-MUC1 MAb 12H12 which reacts with the vast majority of human breast carcinomas, and the F(ab') fragment of an anti-Ga chelate MAb using a bifunctional chemical linker. The BS-MAb was tested for its affinity and its biokinetics in nude mice bearing a human mammary carcinoma. Equilibrium binding of the BS-MAb for mammary carcinoma cells was low (1.2 x 10 7 M -1 ) while the binding capacity of cells was high (8.4 x 10 6 BS-MAbs per cell). Tumor uptake of the 67 Ga labeled chelate in pretargeted animals was to 5.8 ± 0.8% iD/g resulting in a tumor-to-blood ratio of 2.6 at 1h postinjection. This compares with a ratio of 0.65 and 0.85 obtained with 125 I-labeled native 12H12 at 24h and 48h postinjection. No difference in the tumor uptake of both the 68 Ga and 67 Ga labeled chelate was observed. PET imaging of mice, started 1h postinjection of the 68 Ga chelate, clearly visualized all tumors

  20. Pretargeting of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with bispecific anti-MUC1/anti-Ga chelate antibodies and immunoscintigraphy with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuhmacher, Jochen; Klivenyi, Gabor; Kaul, Sepp; Henze, Marcus; Matys, Ronald; Hauser, Harald; Clorius, John

    2001-10-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of combining enhanced tumor-to-tissue contrast and PET imaging for immunoscintigraphic tumor localization in pancreas and colon carcinoma bearing nude mice. Contrast enhancement was obtained with a multistep targeting technique that consists of the sequential administration of an antitumor/antihapten bispecific antibody (BS-MAb), a blocker to saturate the antihapten binding sites of the BS-MAb that remains in circulation, and a low molecular weight Ga chelate, labeled with the positron emitter {sup 68}Ga, which serves as the hapten. To evaluate the efficacy of this pretargeting technique for breast cancer localization, we synthesized a BS-MAb from the F(ab'){sub 2} fragments of the anti-MUC1 MAb 12H12 which reacts with the vast majority of human breast carcinomas, and the F(ab') fragment of an anti-Ga chelate MAb using a bifunctional chemical linker. The BS-MAb was tested for its affinity and its biokinetics in nude mice bearing a human mammary carcinoma. Equilibrium binding of the BS-MAb for mammary carcinoma cells was low (1.2 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1}) while the binding capacity of cells was high (8.4 x 10{sup 6} BS-MAbs per cell). Tumor uptake of the {sup 67}Ga labeled chelate in pretargeted animals was to 5.8 {+-} 0.8% iD/g resulting in a tumor-to-blood ratio of 2.6 at 1h postinjection. This compares with a ratio of 0.65 and 0.85 obtained with {sup 125}I-labeled native 12H12 at 24h and 48h postinjection. No difference in the tumor uptake of both the {sup 68}Ga and {sup 67}Ga labeled chelate was observed. PET imaging of mice, started 1h postinjection of the {sup 68}Ga chelate, clearly visualized all tumors.

  1. Localized Chemical Remodeling for Live Cell Imaging of Protein-Specific Glycoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jingjing; Bao, Lei; Li, Siqiao; Zhang, Yi; Feng, Yimei; Ding, Lin; Ju, Huangxian

    2017-07-03

    Live cell imaging of protein-specific glycoforms is important for the elucidation of glycosylation mechanisms and identification of disease states. The currently used metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE) technology permits routinely global chemical remodeling (GCM) for carbohydrate site of interest, but can exert unnecessary whole-cell scale perturbation and generate unpredictable metabolic efficiency issue. A localized chemical remodeling (LCM) strategy for efficient and reliable access to protein-specific glycoform information is reported. The proof-of-concept protocol developed for MUC1-specific terminal galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) combines affinity binding, off-on switchable catalytic activity, and proximity catalysis to create a reactive handle for bioorthogonal labeling and imaging. Noteworthy assay features associated with LCM as compared with MOE include minimum target cell perturbation, short reaction timeframe, effectiveness as a molecular ruler, and quantitative analysis capability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Expressão de CDX2 e mucinas (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC e MUC6 em esôfago de Barrett antes e após fundoplicatura de Nissen Expression of CDX2 and mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC and MUC6 in Barrett's esophagus before and after Nissen fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Rodrigues de Meirelles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O esôfago de Barrett (EB corresponde à substituição do epitélio escamoso por um do tipo intestinal, em resposta ao refluxo crônico nos pacientes com doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE. É um importante precursor do adenocarcinoma esofágico. A fundoplicatura de Nissen (FN é uma cirurgia antirrefluxo que visa a reduzir a agressão à mucosa esofágica. Alterações no padrão de expressão imuno-histoquímica de mucinas e de CDX2 no EB antes e depois da FN podem ser úteis na identificação de um padrão de expressão desses marcadores e, eventualmente, na identificação de casos com risco de evolução para malignidade. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar e comparar a imunoexpressão de CDX2 e mucinas no EB de pacientes com DRGE submetidos à FN antes e após a cirurgia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 25 pacientes com diagnóstico de DRGE e EB submetidos à FN, acompanhados por, pelo menos, três anos. Foram feitos análise histológica e estudo imuno-histoquímico das biópsias endoscópicas antes e após a cirurgia, comparando-se a inflamação e a imunoexpressão de MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6 e CDX2. Estimou-se a porcentagem de células com expressão para os marcadores estudados na mucosa de Barrett: 0%-25%, 25%-75% e 75%-100% das células positivas. Foram utilizados os testes de McNemar e Stuart-William e adotou-se o nível de 5% de significância estatística. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: Não houve diferenças significativas quanto a presença ou intensidade de inflamação, nem da imunoexpressão de mucinas e CDX2 no EB antes e após a FN. O tratamento cirúrgico não influenciou a mudança da expressão dessas glicoproteínas no EB.INTRODUCTION: Barrett´s esophagus (BE is characterized by the exchange of esophageal squamous epithelium for intestinal type in response to chronic reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD.It is an important precursor of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Nissen

  3. A randomized phase II study of immunization with dendritic cells modified with poxvectors encoding CEA and MUC1 compared with the same poxvectors plus GM-CSF for resected metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Marshall, John L; Garrett, Christopher; Chang, David Z; Aklilu, Mebea; Crocenzi, Todd S; Cole, David J; Dessureault, Sophie; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Onaitis, Mark; Clary, Bryan M; Hsu, David; Devi, Gayathri R; Bulusu, Anuradha; Annechiarico, Robert P; Chadaram, Vijaya; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether 1 of 2 vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) and poxvectors encoding CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and MUC1 (PANVAC) would lengthen survival in patients with resected metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recurrences after complete resections of metastatic CRC remain frequent. Immune responses to CRC are associated with fewer recurrences, suggesting a role for cancer vaccines as adjuvant therapy. Both DCs and poxvectors are potent stimulators of immune responses against cancer antigens. Patients, disease-free after CRC metastasectomy and perioperative chemotherapy (n = 74), were randomized to injections of autologous DCs modified with PANVAC (DC/PANVAC) or PANVAC with per injection GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Endpoints were recurrence-free survival overall survival, and rate of CEA-specific immune responses. Clinical outcome was compared with that of an unvaccinated, contemporary group of patients who had undergone CRC metastasectomy, received similar perioperative therapy, and would have otherwise been eligible for the study. Recurrence-free survival at 2 years was similar (47% and 55% for DC/PANVAC and PANVAC/GM-CSF, respectively) (χ P = 0.48). At a median follow-up of 35.7 months, there were 2 of 37 deaths in the DC/PANVAC arm and 5 of 37 deaths in the PANVAC/GM-CSF arm. The rate and magnitude of T-cell responses against CEA was statistically similar between study arms. As a group, vaccinated patients had superior survival compared with the contemporary unvaccinated group. Both DC and poxvector vaccines have similar activity. Survival was longer for vaccinated patients than for a contemporary unvaccinated group, suggesting that a randomized trial of poxvector vaccinations compared with standard follow-up after metastasectomy is warranted. (NCT00103142).

  4. Interpretive Reporting of Protein Electrophoresis Data by Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Thomas S.; Losos, Frank J.; Kessler, G. Frederick

    1982-01-01

    A microcomputer based system for interpretive reporting of protein electrophoretic data has been developed. Data for serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid protein electrophoreses as well as immunoelectrophoresis can be entered. Patient demographic information is entered through the keyboard followed by manual entry of total and fractionated protein levels obtained after densitometer scanning of the electrophoretic strip. The patterns are then coded, interpreted, and final reports generated. In most cases interpretation time is less than one second. Misinterpretation by computer is uncommon and can be corrected by edit functions within the system. These discrepancies between computer and pathologist interpretation are automatically stored in a data file for later review and possible program modification. Any or all previous tests on a patient may be reviewed with graphic display of the electrophoretic pattern. The system has been in use for several months and is presently well accepted by both laboratory and clinical staff. It also allows rapid storage, retrieval and analysis of protein electrophoretic datab.

  5. Expression of Mucin-1 in multiple myeloma and its precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrulis, Mindaugas; Ellert, Elena; Mandel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Recent reports suggest a possible role for extracellular (MUC1N) and transmembrane (MUC1C) subunits of Mucin 1 (MUC1) in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM). Nuclear translocation of MUC1C is involved in activation of various oncogenic signalling pathways and both MUC1 subunits...

  6. Relative quantification of protein-protein interactions using a dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaizheng Jia

    Full Text Available The identification and quantitative analysis of protein-protein interactions are essential to the functional characterization of proteins in the post-proteomics era. The methods currently available are generally time-consuming, technically complicated, insensitive and/or semi-quantitative. The lack of simple, sensitive approaches to precisely quantify protein-protein interactions still prevents our understanding of the functions of many proteins. Here, we develop a novel dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay by combining a biotinylated Firefly luciferase pull-down assay with a dual luciferase reporter assay. The biotinylated Firefly luciferase-tagged protein enables rapid and efficient isolation of a putative Renilla luciferase-tagged binding protein from a relatively small amount of sample. Both of these proteins can be quantitatively detected using the dual luciferase reporter assay system. Protein-protein interactions, including Fos-Jun located in the nucleus; MAVS-TRAF3 in cytoplasm; inducible IRF3 dimerization; viral protein-regulated interactions, such as MAVS-MAVS and MAVS-TRAF3; IRF3 dimerization; and protein interaction domain mapping, are studied using this novel assay system. Herein, we demonstrate that this dual luciferase reporter pull-down assay enables the quantification of the relative amounts of interacting proteins that bind to streptavidin-coupled beads for protein purification. This study provides a simple, rapid, sensitive, and efficient approach to identify and quantify relative protein-protein interactions. Importantly, the dual luciferase reporter pull-down method will facilitate the functional determination of proteins.

  7. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  8. Proteins in growth regulation during early development. Comprehensive three year report, 1974--1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, N.W.

    1977-08-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: response of embryo regions to nutrition; synthesis of serum proteins by the yolk-sac; serum protein synthesis in relation to protein nutrition, protease secretion, teratogenic agents, genetic abnormalities, yolk-sac cell cultures, and cell free systems; and effects of serum proteins on rat embryos, chick embryos without yolk-sacs, and isolated brains. (HLW)

  9. Cyclin B1 Destruction Box-Mediated Protein Instability: The Enhanced Sensitivity of Fluorescent-Protein-Based Reporter Gene System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The periodic expression and destruction of several cyclins are the most important steps for the exact regulation of cell cycle. Cyclins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system during cell cycle. Besides, a short sequence near the N-terminal of cyclin B called the destruction box (D-box; CDB is also required. Fluorescent-protein-based reporter gene system is insensitive to analysis because of the overly stable fluorescent proteins. Therefore, in this study, we use human CDB fused with both enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at C-terminus and red fluorescent protein (RFP, DsRed at N-terminus in the transfected human melanoma cells to examine the effects of CDB on different fluorescent proteins. Our results indicated that CDB-fused fluorescent protein can be used to examine the slight gene regulations in the reporter gene system and have the potential to be the system for screening of functional compounds in the future.

  10. A selection that reports on protein-protein interactions within a thermophilic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Peter Q; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2010-07-01

    Many proteins can be split into fragments that exhibit enhanced function upon fusion to interacting proteins. While this strategy has been widely used to create protein-fragment complementation assays (PCAs) for discovering protein-protein interactions within mesophilic organisms, similar assays have not yet been developed for studying natural and engineered protein complexes at the temperatures where thermophilic microbes grow. We describe the development of a selection for protein-protein interactions within Thermus thermophilus that is based upon growth complementation by fragments of Thermotoga neapolitana adenylate kinase (AK(Tn)). Complementation studies with an engineered thermophile (PQN1) that is not viable above 75 degrees C because its adk gene has been replaced by a Geobacillus stearothermophilus ortholog revealed that growth could be restored at 78 degrees C by a vector that coexpresses polypeptides corresponding to residues 1-79 and 80-220 of AK(Tn). In contrast, PQN1 growth was not complemented by AK(Tn) fragments harboring a C156A mutation within the zinc-binding tetracysteine motif unless these fragments were fused to Thermotoga maritima chemotaxis proteins that heterodimerize (CheA and CheY) or homodimerize (CheX). This enhanced complementation is interpreted as arising from chemotaxis protein-protein interactions, since AK(Tn)-C156A fragments having only one polypeptide fused to a chemotaxis protein did not complement PQN1 to the same extent. This selection increases the maximum temperature where a PCA can be used to engineer thermostable protein complexes and to map protein-protein interactions.

  11. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of mucins and other extracellular proteins is an important event in carcinogenesis and the resulting cancer associated glycans have been suggested as targets in cancer immunotherapy. We assessed the role of O-linked GalNAc glycosylation on antigen uptake, processing......, and presentation on MHC class I and II molecules. The effect of GalNAc O-glycosylation was monitored with a model system based on ovalbumin (OVA)-MUC1 fusion peptides (+/- glycosylation) loaded onto dendritic cells co-cultured with IL-2 secreting OVA peptide-specific T cell hybridomas. To evaluate the in vivo...

  12. Using the 2A Protein Coexpression System: Multicistronic 2A Vectors Expressing Gene(s) of Interest and Reporter Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Garry A; Ryan, Martin D

    2018-01-01

    To date, a huge range of different proteins-many with cotranslational and posttranslational subcellular localization signals-have been coexpressed together with various reporter proteins in vitro and in vivo using 2A peptides. The pros and cons of 2A co-expression technology are considered below, followed by a simple example of a "how to" protocol to concatenate multiple genes of interest, together with a reporter gene, into a single gene linked via 2As for easy identification or selection of transduced cells.

  13. CASE REPORT CASE CASE Protein-losing enteropathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings of renal and liver function tests were normal. On physical ... A lower radiation burden, faster background clearance and higher in vitro and in ... does not allow quantification of protein loss due to its short physical half-life. On the ...

  14. Hepatitis C virus expressing reporter tagged NS5A protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C reporter viruses containing Core through NS2 of prototype isolates of all major HCV genotypes and the remaining genes of isolate JFH1, by insertion of reporter genes in domain III of HCV NS5A were developed. A deletion upstream of the inserted reporter gene sequence conferred favorable...... growth kinetics in Huh7.5 cells to these viruses. These reporter viruses can be used for high throughput analysis of drug and vaccine candidates as well as patient samples. JFH1-based intergenotypic recombinants with genotype specific homotypic 5'UTR, or heterotypic 5'UTR (either of genotype 1a (strain H...

  15. The Role of IDO in Muc1 Targeted Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Besmer*, Teresa L. Tinder , Lopamudra Das Roy, Joseph Lustgarten, Sandra J. Gendler, Pinku Mukherjee Intratumoral Delivery of CpG-Conjugated Anti...3073-87. Epub 2012 Jan 11. PMID: 22238308 3. Mahnaz Sahraei , Lopamudra Das Roy , Jennifer Curry , Teresa Tinder , Sritama Nath , Dahlia M...10.1038/onc.2011.651 4. Dahlia M. Besmer , Dr. Jennifer M. Curry , Dr. Lopamudra D. Roy , Ms. Teresa L. Tinder , Ms. Mahnaz M. Sahraei , Dr

  16. Vector prime/protein boost vaccine that overcomes defects acquired during aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Y.; Akbulut, H.; Maynard, J.

    2006-01-01

    We showed that the Ad-sig-TAA/ecdCD40L vaccine induces a tumor suppressive immune response to the hMUC-1 and rH2N tumor-associated self Ags (TAA) and to the Annexin A1 tumor vascular Ag, even in mice in which anergy exists to these Ags. When the TAA/ecdCD40L protein is given s.c. as a boost...... following the Ad-sig-TAA/ecdCD40L vector, the levels of the TAA-specific CD8 T cells and Abs increase dramatically over that seen with vector alone, in young (2-mo-old) as well as old (18-mo-old) mice. The Abs induced against hMUC-1 react with human breast cancer. This vaccine also induces a 4-fold...... decrement of negative regulatory CD4CD25FOXP3-T cells in the tumor tissue of 18-mo-old mice. These results suggest that the Ad-sig-TAA/ecdCD40L vector prime-TAA/ecdCD40L protein boost vaccine platform may be valuable in reducing postsurgery recurrence in a variety of epithelial neoplasms....

  17. Phosphate sensing by fluorecent reporter proteins embedded in poly-acrylamide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Scharff-Poulsen, Anne Marie; Gu, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Phosphate sensors were developed by embedding fluorescent reporter proteins (FLIPPi) in polyacrylamide nanoparticles; with diameters from 40 to 120 nm. The sensor activity and protein loading efficiency varied according to nanoparticle composition, that is, the total monomer content (% T) and the......, in nanoparticles for, for example, sensing, biological catalysis, and gene delivery.......Phosphate sensors were developed by embedding fluorescent reporter proteins (FLIPPi) in polyacrylamide nanoparticles; with diameters from 40 to 120 nm. The sensor activity and protein loading efficiency varied according to nanoparticle composition, that is, the total monomer content (% T......) and the cross-linker content (% C). Nanoparticles with 28% T and 20% C were considered optimal as a result of relatively high loading efficiency (50.6%) as well as high protein activity (50%). The experimental results prove that the cross-linked polyacrylamide matrix could protect FLIPPi from degradation...

  18. Sytemic lupus erythematosus presenting with protein losing enteropathy in a resource limited centre: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratnayake Eranda C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is a disease which may initially present with varying symptoms, most commonly a photosensitive rash and arthritis. Protein losing enteropathy is a recognized but rare presenting manifestation. Diagnosing protein losing enteropathy in resource limited centres is challenging but possible through the exclusion of other possible causes of hypoalbunaemia. Case Presentation We report a case of protein losing gastroenteropathy secondary to intestinal lymphangiectasia as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus in a 57 year old Sri Lankan (South Asian male patient. The diagnosis was made by the exclusion of other causes of hypoalbuminaemia as the gold standard investigations for protein losing enteropathy were not available at this centre. Conclusions Protein losing enteropathy is a diagnosis of exclusion in resource limited centres in the world. Systemic lupus erythematosus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy. Intestinal lymphangiectasia should also be recognized as a possible pathophysiological mechanism.

  19. Visualization of Host-Polerovirus Interaction Topologies Using Protein Interaction Reporter Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Chavez, Juan D; Alexander, Mariko M; Ramsey, John; Eng, Jimmy K; Mahoney, Jaclyn; Gray, Stewart M; Bruce, James E; Cilia, Michelle

    2016-02-15

    Demonstrating direct interactions between host and virus proteins during infection is a major goal and challenge for the field of virology. Most protein interactions are not binary or easily amenable to structural determination. Using infectious preparations of a polerovirus (Potato leafroll virus [PLRV]) and protein interaction reporter (PIR), a revolutionary technology that couples a mass spectrometric-cleavable chemical cross-linker with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we provide the first report of a host-pathogen protein interaction network that includes data-derived, topological features for every cross-linked site that was identified. We show that PLRV virions have hot spots of protein interaction and multifunctional surface topologies, revealing how these plant viruses maximize their use of binding interfaces. Modeling data, guided by cross-linking constraints, suggest asymmetric packing of the major capsid protein in the virion, which supports previous epitope mapping studies. Protein interaction topologies are conserved with other species in the Luteoviridae and with unrelated viruses in the Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae. Functional analysis of three PLRV-interacting host proteins in planta using a reverse-genetics approach revealed a complex, molecular tug-of-war between host and virus. Structural mimicry and diversifying selection-hallmarks of host-pathogen interactions-were identified within host and viral binding interfaces predicted by our models. These results illuminate the functional diversity of the PLRV-host protein interaction network and demonstrate the usefulness of PIR technology for precision mapping of functional host-pathogen protein interaction topologies. The exterior shape of a plant virus and its interacting host and insect vector proteins determine whether a virus will be transmitted by an insect or infect a specific host. Gaining this information is difficult and requires years of experimentation. We used protein interaction

  20. Investigation of protein binding of radiogallium. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffer, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    The main objective of the contract is to study aspects of the localization of gallium-67 in tumor are reported and compared with a new tumor imaging agent, specifically radiolabeled monoclonal tumor antibody. Our studies have demonstrated that phosphate compounds used in bone imaging do not significantly influence gallium-67 localization, that the adenosine triphosphate cannot be used to enhance gallium-67 uptake in malignant tissue, and that gallium-67 has higher affinity than radiolabeled anti-p97 for melanoma, even in tumors which produce significant amounts of p97 antigen on their cell surface. 23 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Luciferase NanoLuc as a reporter for gene expression and protein levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masser, Anna E; Kandasamy, Ganapathi; Kaimal, Jayasankar Mohanakrishnan; Andréasson, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Reporter proteins are essential tools in the study of biological processes and are employed to monitor changes in gene expression and protein levels. Luciferases are reporter proteins that enable rapid and highly sensitive detection with an outstanding dynamic range. Here we evaluated the usefulness of the 19 kDa luciferase NanoLuc (Nluc), derived from the deep sea shrimp Oplophorus gracilirostris, as a reporter protein in yeast. Cassettes with codon-optimized genes expressing yeast Nluc (yNluc) or its destabilized derivative yNlucPEST have been assembled in the context of the dominant drug resistance marker kanMX. The reporter proteins do not impair the growth of yeast cells and exhibit half-lives of 40 and 5 min, respectively. The commercial substrate Nano-Glo® is compatible with detection of yNluc bioluminescence in yeast using standard commercial substrate. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Spatial separation and bidirectional trafficking of proteins using a multi-functional reporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaubert Dieter H

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to specifically label proteins within living cells can provide information about their dynamics and function. To study a membrane protein, we fused a multi-functional reporter protein, HaloTag®, to the extracellular domain of a truncated integrin. Results Using the HaloTag technology, we could study the localization, trafficking and processing of an integrin-HaloTag fusion, which we showed had cellular dynamics consistent with native integrins. By labeling live cells with different fluorescent impermeable and permeable ligands, we showed spatial separation of plasma membrane and internal pools of the integrin-HaloTag fusion, and followed these protein pools over time to study bi-directional trafficking. In addition to combining the HaloTag reporter protein with different fluorophores, we also employed an affinity tag to achieve cell capture. Conclusion The HaloTag technology was used successfully to study expression, trafficking, spatial separation and real-time translocation of an integrin-HaloTag fusion, thereby demonstrating that this technology can be a powerful tool to investigate membrane protein biology in live cells.

  3. Estimating the wound healing ability of bioactive milk proteins using an optimized cell based assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Steffen; Andreasen, Trine; Rasmussen, Jan Trige

    Milk contains many different proteins of which the larger constituents like the caseins and major whey constituents are well characterized. We have for some time been studying the structure and function of proteins associated with the milk fat globule membrane like lactadherin, MUC1/15, xanthine...... oxidoreductase along with minor whey constituents like osteopontin, EPV20 etc. The enterocyte migration rate is a key parameter in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and intestinal repair when recovering from infection or intestinal diseases like Crohns and ulcerative colitis. We developed a novel in vitro wound...... healing assay to determine the bioactive effects of various milk proteins using human small intestine cells grown on extracellular matrix. Silicone inserts are placed in a 96-well plate and enterocytes seeded around it, creating a monolayer with a cell free area. In current ongoing experiments, various...

  4. Effect of secretory pathway gene overexpression on secretion of a fluorescent reporter protein in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg

    2016-01-01

    roles in the process have been identified through transcriptomics. The assignment of function to these genes has been enabled in combination with gene deletion studies. In this work, 14 genes known to play a role in protein secretion in filamentous fungi were overexpressed in Aspergillus nidulans....... The background strain was a fluorescent reporter secreting mRFP. The overall effect of the overexpressions could thus be easily monitored through fluorescence measurements, while the effects on physiology were determined in batch cultivations and surface growth studies. Results: Fourteen protein secretion...... pathway related genes were overexpressed with a tet-ON promoter in the RFP-secreting reporter strain and macromorphology, physiology and protein secretion were monitored when the secretory genes were induced. Overexpression of several of the chosen genes was shown to cause anomalies on growth, micro...

  5. Animal proteins in feed : annual report 2009-2010 of the Dutch National Reference Laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Groot, M.J.; Ossenkoppele, J.S.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2011-01-01

    RIKILT serves as the only official control laboratory for animal proteins in feeds in the Netherlands in the framework of Directive 882/2004/EC. As National Reference Laboratory (NRL), RIKILT participated in 2 annual proficiency tests during the reporting period, in 2 additional interlaboratory

  6. Reef-coral proteins as visual, non-destructive reporters for plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenck, A; Pugieux, C; Turner, M; Dunn, M; Stacy, C; Tiozzo, A; Dunder, E; van Grinsven, E; Khan, R; Sigareva, M; Wang, W C; Reed, J; Drayton, P; Oliver, D; Trafford, H; Legris, G; Rushton, H; Tayab, S; Launis, K; Chang, Y-F; Chen, D-F; Melchers, L

    2003-11-01

    Recently, five novel fluorescent proteins have been isolated from non-bioluminescent species of reef-coral organisms and have been made available through ClonTech. They are AmCyan, AsRed, DsRed, ZsGreen and ZsYellow. These proteins are valuable as reporters for transformation because they do not require a substrate or external co-factor to emit fluorescence and can be tested in vivo without destruction of the tissue under study. We have evaluated them in a large range of plants, both monocots and dicots, and our results indicate that they are valuable reporting tools for transformation in a wide variety of crops. We report here their successful expression in wheat, maize, barley, rice, banana, onion, soybean, cotton, tobacco, potato and tomato. Transient expression could be observed as early as 24 h after DNA delivery in some cases, allowing for very clear visualization of individually transformed cells. Stable transgenic events were generated, using mannose, kanamycin or hygromycin selection. Transgenic plants were phenotypically normal, showing a wide range of fluorescence levels, and were fertile. Expression of AmCyan, ZsGreen and AsRed was visible in maize T1 seeds, allowing visual segregation to more than 99% accuracy. The excitation and emission wavelengths of some of these proteins are significantly different; the difference is enough for the simultaneous visualization of cells transformed with more than one of the fluorescent proteins. These proteins will become useful tools for transformation optimization and other studies. The wide variety of plants successfully tested demonstrates that these proteins will potentially find broad use in plant biology.

  7. Aerosol delivery of Akt controls protein translation in the lungs of dual luciferase reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, A M; Hwang, S-K; Kim, T-H; Cho, C-S; Hua, J; Nah, W-S; Kwon, J-T; Kim, J-S; Chang, S-H; Yu, K-N; Park, S-J; Bhandari, D R; Lee, K-H; An, G-H; Beck, G R; Cho, M-H

    2007-03-01

    Lung cancer has emerged as a leading cause of cancer death in the world; however, most of the current conventional therapies are not sufficiently effective in altering the progression of disease. Therefore, development of novel treatment approaches is needed. Although several genes and methods have been used for cancer gene therapy, a number of problems such as specificity, efficacy and toxicity reduce their application. This has led to re-emergence of aerosol gene delivery as a noninvasive method for lung cancer treatment. In this study, nano-sized glucosylated polyethyleneimine (GPEI) was used as a gene delivery carrier to investigate the effects of Akt wild type (WT) and kinase deficient (KD) on Akt-related signaling pathways and protein translation in the lungs of CMV- LucR-cMyc-IRES-LucF dual reporter mice. These mice are a powerful tool for the discrimination between cap-dependent/-independent protein translation. Aerosols containing self-assembled nano-sized GPEI/Akt WT or GPEI/Akt KD were delivered into the lungs of reporter mice through nose-only-inhalation-chamber with the aid of nebulizer. Aerosol delivery of Akt WT caused the increase of protein expression levels of Akt-related signals, whereas aerosol delivery of Akt KD did not. Furthermore, dual luciferase activity assay showed that aerosol delivery of Akt WT enhanced cap-dependent protein translation, whereas a reduction in cap-dependent protein translation by Akt KD was observed. Our results clearly showed that targeting Akt may be a good strategy for prevention as well as treatment of lung cancer. These studies suggest that our aerosol delivery is compatible for in vivo gene delivery which could be used as a noninvasive gene therapy in the future.

  8. InXy and SeXy, compact heterologous reporter proteins for mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Lesage, Guillaume; Baba, Marie Daoud-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-10-15

    Mammalian reporter proteins are essential for gene-function analysis, drugscreening initiatives and as model product proteins for biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Bacillus subtilis can maintain its metabolism by secreting Xylanase A (XynA), which converts xylan into shorter xylose oligosaccharides. XynA is a family 11 xylanase monospecific for D-xylose containing substrates. Mammalian cells transgenic for constitutive expression of wild-type xynA showed substantial secretion of this prokaryotic enzyme. Deletion analysis confirmed that a prokaryotic signal sequence encoded within the first 81 nucleotides was compatible with the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. Codon optimization combined with elimination of the prokaryotic signal sequence resulted in an exclusively intracellular mammalian Xylanase A variant (InXy) while replacement by an immunoglobulin-derived secretion signal created an optimal secreted Xylanase A derivative (SeXy). A variety of chromogenic and fluorescence-based assays adapted for use with mammalian cells detected InXy and SeXy with high sensitivity and showed that both reporter proteins resisted repeated freeze/thaw cycles, remained active over wide temperature and pH ranges, were extremely stable in human serum stored at room temperature and could independently be quantified in samples also containing other prominent reporter proteins such as the human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and the Bacillus stearothermophilus-derived secreted alpha-amylase (SAMY). Glycoprofiling revealed that SeXy produced in mammalian cells was N- glycosylated at four different sites, mutation of which resulted in impaired secretion. SeXy was successfully expressed in a variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cells following transient transfection and transduction with adeno-associated virus particles (AAV) engineered for constitutive SeXy expression. Intramuscular injection of transgenic AAVs into mice showed significant SeXy levels in the bloodstream

  9. The first report of prion-related protein gene (PRNT) polymorphisms in goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Byung-Hoon

    2017-06-01

    Prion protein is encoded by the prion protein gene (PRNP). Polymorphisms of several members of the prion gene family have shown association with prion diseases in several species. Recent studies on a novel member of the prion gene family in rams have shown that prion-related protein gene (PRNT) has a linkage with codon 26 of prion-like protein (PRND). In a previous study, codon 26 polymorphism of PRND has shown connection with PRNP haplotype which is strongly associated with scrapie vulnerability. In addition, the genotype of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at codon 26 of PRND is related to fertilisation capacity. These findings necessitate studies on the SNP of PRNT gene which is connected with PRND. In goat, several polymorphism studies have been performed for PRNP, PRND, and shadow of prion protein gene (SPRN). However, polymorphism on PRNT has not been reported. Hence, the objective of this study was to determine the genotype and allelic distribution of SNPs of PRNT in 238 Korean native goats and compare PRNT DNA sequences between Korean native goats and several ruminant species. A total of five SNPs, including PRNT c.-114G > T, PRNT c.-58A > G in the upstream of PRNT gene, PRNT c.71C > T (p.Ala24Val) and PRNT c.102G > A in the open reading frame (ORF) and c.321C > T in the downstream of PRNT gene, were found in this study. All five SNPs of caprine PRNT gene in Korean native goat are in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with a D' value of 1.0. Interestingly, comparative sequence analysis of the PRNT gene revealed five mismatches between DNA sequences of Korean native goats and those of goats deposited in the GenBank. Korean native black goats also showed 5 mismatches in PRNT ORF with cattle. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic research of the PRNT gene in goat.

  10. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babbitt, P.C.; Bagos, P.G.; Bairoch, A.; Bateman, A.; Chatonnet, A.; Chen, M.J.; Craik, D.J.; Finn, R.D.; Gloriam, D.; Haft, D.H.; Henrissat, B.; Holliday, G.L.; Isberg, V.; Kaas, Q.; Landsman, D.; Lenfant, N.; Manning, G.; Nagano, N.; Srinivasan, N.; O'Donovan, C.; Pruitt, K.D.; Sowdhamini, R.; Rawlings, N.D.; Saier, M.H., Jr.; Sharman, J.L.; Spedding, M.; Tsirigos, K.D.; Vastermark, A.; Vriend, G.

    2015-01-01

    During 11-12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from

  11. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Patricia C; Bagos, Pantelis G; Bairoch, Amos; Bateman, Alex; Chatonnet, Arnaud; Chen, Mark Jinan; Craik, David J; Finn, Robert D; Gloriam, David; Haft, Daniel H; Henrissat, Bernard; Holliday, Gemma L; Isberg, Vignir; Kaas, Quentin; Landsman, David; Lenfant, Nicolas; Manning, Gerard; Nagano, Nozomi; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; O'Donovan, Claire; Pruitt, Kim D; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Rawlings, Neil D; Saier, Milton H; Sharman, Joanna L; Spedding, Michael; Tsirigos, Konstantinos D; Vastermark, Ake; Vriend, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    During 11-12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from protein databases from the large Bioinformatics centres (including UniProt and RefSeq). The retreat was divided into five sessions: (1) key challenges, (2) the databases represented, (3) best practices for maintenance and curation, (4) information flow to and from large data centers and (5) communication and funding. An important outcome of this meeting was the creation of a Specialist Protein Resource Network that we believe will improve coordination of the activities of its member resources. We invite further protein database resources to join the network and continue the dialogue.

  12. Creating a specialist protein resource network: a meeting report for the protein bioinformatics and community resources retreat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babbitt, Patricia C.; Bagos, Pantelis G.; Bairoch, Amos

    2015-01-01

    During 11–12 August 2014, a Protein Bioinformatics and Community Resources Retreat was held at the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. This meeting brought together the principal investigators of several specialized protein resources (such as CAZy, TCDB and MEROPS) as well as those from...... protein databases from the large Bioinformatics centres (including UniProt and RefSeq). The retreat was divided into five sessions: (1) key challenges, (2) the databases represented, (3) best practices for maintenance and curation, (4) information flow to and from large data centers and (5) communication...

  13. Chemical effects of ionizing radiation on the individual amino acids within intact and pure protein molecules. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidberg, F.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: gamma radiation induced chemical and molecular weight changes in proteins; the free radical pattern for the irradiated protein; similarities in the mechanism of action of ionizing and of uv radiation; and spin trapping in the study of gamma radiolysis

  14. Shift in the isoelectric-point of milk proteins as a consequence of adaptive divergence between the milks of mammalian species.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khaldi, Nora

    2011-07-29

    Abstract Background Milk proteins are required to proceed through a variety of conditions of radically varying pH, which are not identical across mammalian digestive systems. We wished to investigate if the shifts in these requirements have resulted in marked changes in the isoelectric point and charge of milk proteins during evolution. Results We investigated nine major milk proteins in 13 mammals. In comparison with a group of orthologous non-milk proteins, we found that 3 proteins κ-casein, lactadherin, and muc1 have undergone the highest change in isoelectric point during evolution. The pattern of non-synonymous substitutions indicate that selection has played a role in the isoelectric point shift, since residues that show significant evidence of positive selection are much more likely to be charged (p = 0.03 for κ-casein; p < 10-8 for muc1). However, this selection does not appear to be solely due to adaptation to the diversity of mammalian digestive systems, since striking changes are seen among species that resemble each other in terms of their digestion. Conclusion The changes in charge are most likely due to changes of other protein functions, rather than an adaptation to the different mammalian digestive systems. These functions may include differences in bioactive peptide releases in the gut between different mammals, which are known to be a major contributing factor in the functional and nutritional value of mammalian milk. This raises the question of whether bovine milk is optimal in terms of particular protein functions, for human nutrition and possibly disease resistance. This article was reviewed by Fyodor Kondrashov, David Liberles (nominated by David Ardell), and Christophe Lefevre (nominated by Mark Ragan).

  15. A Novel Reporter Rat Strain That Conditionally Expresses the Bright Red Fluorescent Protein tdTomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Igarashi

    Full Text Available Despite the strength of the Cre/loxP recombination system in animal models, its application in rats trails that in mice because of the lack of relevant reporter strains. Here, we generated a floxed STOP tdTomato rat that conditionally expresses a red fluorescent protein variant (tdTomato in the presence of exogenous Cre recombinase. The tdTomato signal vividly visualizes neurons including their projection fibers and spines without any histological enhancement. In addition, a transgenic rat line (FLAME that ubiquitously expresses tdTomato was successfully established by injecting intracytoplasmic Cre mRNA into fertilized ova. Our rat reporter system will facilitate connectome studies as well as the visualization of the fine structures of genetically identified cells for long periods both in vivo and ex vivo. Furthermore, FLAME is an ideal model for organ transplantation research owing to improved traceability of cells/tissues.

  16. Reporter-Based Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis: A Functional Genomics Approach for Investigating Transcript or Protein Abundance Using Fluorescent Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttert, Hendrikje; Mattiazzi Usaj, Mojca; Rosebrock, Adam P; Andrews, Brenda J

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter genes have long been used to quantify various cell features such as transcript and protein abundance. Here, we describe a method, reporter synthetic genetic array (R-SGA) analysis, which allows for the simultaneous quantification of any fluorescent protein readout in thousands of yeast strains using an automated pipeline. R-SGA combines a fluorescent reporter system with standard SGA analysis and can be used to examine any array-based strain collection available to the yeast community. This protocol describes the R-SGA methodology for screening different arrays of yeast mutants including the deletion collection, a collection of temperature-sensitive strains for the assessment of essential yeast genes and a collection of inducible overexpression strains. We also present an alternative pipeline for the analysis of R-SGA output strains using flow cytometry of cells in liquid culture. Data normalization for both pipelines is discussed.

  17. PIN-G – A novel reporter for imaging and defining the effects of trafficking signals in membrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Weiwen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of protein trafficking signals, and their interacting mechanisms, is a fundamental objective of modern biology. Unfortunately, the analysis of trafficking signals is complicated by their topography, hierarchical nature and regulation. Powerful strategies to test candidate motifs include their ability to direct simpler reporter proteins, to which they are fused, to the appropriate cellular compartment. However, present reporters are limited by their endogenous expression, paucity of cloning sites, and difficult detection in live cells. Results Consequently, we have engineered a mammalian expression vector encoding a novel trafficking reporter – pIN-G – consisting of a simple, type I integral protein bearing permissive intra/extracellular cloning sites, green fluorescent protein (GFP, cMyc and HA epitope tags. Fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical assays of transfected HEK293 cells, confirm the size, topology and surface expression of PIN-G. Moreover, a pIN-G fusion construct, containing a Trans-Golgi Network (TGN targeting determinant, internalises rapidly from the cell surface and localises to the TGN. Additionally, another PIN-G fusion protein and its mutants reveal trafficking determinants in the cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of Kv1.4 voltage-gated potassium channels. Conclusion Together, these data indicate that pIN-G is a versatile, powerful, new reporter for analysing signals controlling membrane protein trafficking, surface expression and dynamics.

  18. A maize spermine synthase 1 PEST sequence fused to the GUS reporter protein facilitates proteolytic degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruri-López, Israel; Rodríguez-Kessler, Margarita; Rodríguez-Hernández, Aída Araceli; Becerra-Flora, Alicia; Olivares-Grajales, Juan Elías; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Polyamines are low molecular weight aliphatic compounds involved in various biochemical, cellular and physiological processes in all organisms. In plants, genes involved in polyamine biosynthesis and catabolism are regulated at transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational level. In this research, we focused on the characterization of a PEST sequence (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine) of the maize spermine synthase 1 (ZmSPMS1). To this aim, 123 bp encoding 40 amino acids of the C-terminal region of the ZmSPMS1 enzyme containing the PEST sequence were fused to the GUS reporter gene. This fusion was evaluated in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines and onion monolayers transient expression system. The ZmSPMS1 PEST sequence leads to specific degradation of the GUS reporter protein. It is suggested that the 26S proteasome may be involved in GUS::PEST fusion degradation in both onion and Arabidopsis. The PEST sequences appear to be present in plant spermine synthases, mainly in monocots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Case report: a novel KERA mutation associated with cornea plana and its predicted effect on protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Harris, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    individuals, hypotrichosis was found. KERA was screened for mutations using Sanger sequencing. We detected a novel KERA variant, p.(Ile225Thr), that segregates with the disease in the homozygous form. The three-dimensional structure of keratocan protein was modelled, and we showed that this missense variation...... of the keratocan gene (KERA) on chromosome 12q22. To date, only nine different disease-associated KERA mutations, including four missense mutations, have been described. Case presentation: In this report, we present clinical data from a Turkish family with autosomal recessive cornea plana. In some of the affected...... are predicted to result in destabilization of the protein. Conclusion: We present the 10th pathogenic KERA mutation identified so far. Protein modelling is a useful tool in predicting the effect of missense mutations. This case underline the importance of the leucin rich repeat domain for the protein function...

  20. Coexistence of protease sensitive and resistant prion protein in 129VV homozygous sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Martínez Ana B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The coexistence of different molecular types of classical protease-resistant prion protein in the same individual have been described, however, the simultaneous finding of these with the recently described protease-sensitive variant or variably protease-sensitive prionopathy has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been reported. Case presentation A 74-year-old Caucasian woman showed a sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease clinical phenotype with reactive depression, followed by cognitive impairment, akinetic-rigid Parkinsonism with pseudobulbar syndrome and gait impairment with motor apraxia, visuospatial disorientation, and evident frontal dysfunction features such as grasping, palmomental reflex and brisk perioral reflexes. She died at age 77. Neuropathological findings showed: spongiform change in the patient’s cerebral cortex, striatum, thalamus and molecular layer of the cerebellum with proteinase K-sensitive synaptic-like, dot-like or target-like prion protein deposition in the cortex, thalamus and striatum; proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the same regions; and elongated plaque-like proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Molecular analysis of prion protein after proteinase K digestion revealed decreased signal intensity in immunoblot, a ladder-like protein pattern, and a 71% reduction of PrPSc signal relative to non-digested material. Her cerebellum showed a 2A prion protein type largely resistant to proteinase K. Genotype of polymorphism at codon 129 was valine homozygous. Conclusion Molecular typing of prion protein along with clinical and neuropathological data revealed, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of the coexistence of different protease-sensitive prion proteins in the same patient in a rare case that did not fulfill the current clinical diagnostic criteria for either probable or possible sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. This highlights the

  1. Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) as a reporter gene for the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Riedel; Gautier Calmin; Lassaad Belbahri; Francois Lefort; Monika Gotz; Stefan Wagner; Sabine. Werres

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Phytophthora ramorum strains that produce green fluorescent protein (GFP) constitutively were obtained after stable DNA integration using a polyethylene glycol and CaCl2-based transformation protocol. Green fluorescent protein production was studied in developing colonies and in different propagules of the pathogen...

  2. Thrombotic CV Stroke in a Young Male with Hyperhomocysteinemia and Protein S Deficiency: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilima Shah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke in young poses a major health problem. Thrombophilic factors have been implicated in 4-8% of the young strokes worldwide. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis but there are few data regarding its role in acute arterial thrombosis without any previous lesion. Overall estimated incidence of deep vein thrombosis is 1 per 1000 persons with Protein S deficiency but very few studies suggest association between arterial thrombosis with Protein S deficiency. We present a case of 18 year old boy who presented to us with acute onset right sided hemiplegia and aphasia whose laboratory findings were suggestive of hyperhomocyseinemia and Protein S deficiency.

  3. Multiplex PCR assay for detection of recombinant genes encoding fatty acid desaturases fused with lichenase reporter protein in GM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevets, Iryna N; Shimshilashvili, Hristina R; Gerasymenko, Iryna M; Sindarovska, Yana R; Sheludko, Yuriy V; Goldenkova-Pavlova, Irina V

    2010-07-01

    Thermostable lichenase encoded by licB gene of Clostridium thermocellum can be used as a reporter protein in plant, bacterial, yeast, and mammalian cells. It has important advantages of high sensitivity and specificity in qualitative and quantitative assays. Deletion variants of LicB (e.g., LicBM3) retain its enzymatic activity and thermostability and can be expressed in translational fusion with target proteins without compromising with their properties. Fusion with the lichenase reporter is especially convenient for the heterologous expression of proteins whose analysis is difficult or compromised by host enzyme activities, as it is in case of fatty acid desaturases occurring in all groups of organisms. Recombinant desaturase-lichenase genes can be used for creating genetically modified (GM) plants with improved chill tolerance. Development of an analytical method for detection of fused desaturase-lichenase transgenes is necessary both for production of GM plants and for their certification. Here, we report a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method for detection of desA and desC desaturase genes of cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Synechococcus vulcanus, respectively, fused to licBM3 reporter in GM plants.

  4. Identification of a progenitor cell population destined to form fracture fibrocartilage callus in Dickkopf-related protein 3-green fluorescent protein reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yu; Adams, Douglas; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Yoshida, Ryu; Kamimura, Masayuki; Itoi, Eiji; Rowe, David W

    2016-11-01

    Fracture healing is a complex biological process involving the proliferation of mesenchymal progenitor cells, and chondrogenic, osteogenic, and angiogenic differentiation. The mechanisms underlying the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate Dickkopf-related protein 3 (Dkk3) expression in periosteal cells using Dkk3-green fluorescent protein reporter mice. We found that proliferation of mesenchymal progenitor cells began in the periosteum, involving Dkk3-positive cell proliferation near the fracture site. In addition, Dkk3 was expressed in fibrocartilage cells together with smooth muscle α-actin and Col3.6 in the early phase of fracture healing as a cell marker of fibrocartilage cells. Dkk3 was not expressed in mature chondrogenic cells or osteogenic cells. Transient expression of Dkk3 disappeared in the late phase of fracture healing, except in the superficial periosteal area of fracture callus. The Dkk3 expression pattern differed in newly formed type IV collagen positive blood vessels and the related avascular tissue. This is the first report that shows Dkk3 expression in the periosteum at a resting state and in fibrocartilage cells during the fracture healing process, which was associated with smooth muscle α-actin and Col3.6 expression in mesenchymal progenitor cells. These fluorescent mesenchymal lineage cells may be useful for future studies to better understand fracture healing.

  5. The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology

    2013-03-22

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify

  6. Antithrombin deficiency and decreased protein C activity in a young man with venous thromboembolism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Tian, Min; Cui, Guanglin; Wang, Dao Wen

    2018-06-01

    Antithrombin and protein C are two crucial members in the anticoagulant system and play important roles in hemostasis. Mutations in SERPINC1 and PROC lead to deficiency or dysfunction of the two proteins, which could result in venous thromboembolism (VTE). Here, we report a Chinese 22-year-old young man who developed recurrent and serious VTE in cerebral veins, visceral veins, and deep veins of the lower extremity. Laboratory tests and direct sequencing of PROC and SERPINC1 were conducted for the patient and his family members. Coagulation tests revealed that the patient presented type I antithrombin deficiency combined with decreased protein C activity resulting from a small insertion mutation c.848_849insGATGT in SERPINC1 and a short deletion variant c.572_574delAGA in PROC. This combination of the two mutations was absent in 400 healthy subjects each from southern and northern China. Then, we summarized all the mutations of the SERPINC1 and PROC gene reported in the Chinese Han population. This study demonstrates that the combination of antithrombin deficiency and decreased protein C activity can result in severe VTE and that the coexistence of different genetic factors may increase the risk of VTE.

  7. Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein BAG3 in human choroidal melanoma: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Tatsuya; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Ishii, Yoko; Hayashi, Atsushi

    2017-06-01

    Bcl-2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), a co-chaperone of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), exerts anti-apoptotic effects in various malignant tumors. However, relationships between choroidal melanoma and BAG3 are poorly studied. This study investigated the expression of BAG3 in a case of human choroidal melanoma. Funduscopy, computed tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography with the intravenous injection of N-isopropyl-p-[ 123 I] iodoamphetamine strongly indicated choroidal melanoma in a 68-year-old woman. Accordingly, we carried out an enucleation and pathological diagnosis. Proteins and total RNA were extracted from normal retinochoroidal and tumor tissues. Proteins were also extracted from ocular nevus tissues of other patients. We examined the expression of BAG3 protein and mRNA using Western blotting and the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for melan-A, HMB-45, and S-100. Histopathology confirmed a choroidal melanoma. The expression of BAG3 protein and mRNA in the choroidal melanoma tissue was upregulated with respect to both normal retinochoroidal tissue and ocular nevus tissues from other patients. Because BAG3 may inhibit apoptosis of choroidal melanoma and facilitate its survival, overexpression of this gene product may be a prognostic marker and therapeutic target.

  8. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bajar, Bryce T.; Wang, Emily S.; Lam, Amy J.; Kim, Bongjae B.; Jacobs, Conor L.; Howe, Elizabeth S.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lin, Michael Z.; Chu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use F?rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intra...

  9. Fluorescent Reporters and Biosensors for Probing the Dynamic Behavior of Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. González-Vera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Probing the dynamic activities of protein kinases in real-time in living cells constitutes a major challenge that requires specific and sensitive tools tailored to meet the particular demands associated with cellular imaging. The development of genetically-encoded and synthetic fluorescent biosensors has provided means of monitoring protein kinase activities in a non-invasive fashion in their native cellular environment with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, we review existing technologies to probe different dynamic features of protein kinases and discuss limitations where new developments are required to implement more performant tools, in particular with respect to infrared and near-infrared fluorescent probes and strategies which enable improved signal-to-noise ratio and controlled activation of probes.

  10. Protein-losing Enteropathy Caused by Intestinal or Colonic Lymphangiectasia Complicated by Sporadic Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Koichi; Yoshimi, Kaku; Shibuya, Tomoyoshi; Hayashi, Takuo; Mitani, Keiko; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Ichikawa, Masako; Asao, Tetsuhiko; Suzuki, Yohei; Sato, Tadashi; Shiota, Satomi; Kodama, Yuzo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2017-01-01

    This report describes two patients with sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis complicated by protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). Imaging studies indicated retroperitoneal lymphangioleiomyomas and abnormalities of the adjacent digestive tract. Endoscopic mucosal biopsy revealed colonic lymphangiectasia in one patient; whereas the site in the other patient was intestinal. Treatment with sirolimus led to the complete resolution of PLE within several months; additionally, marked shrinkage was observed in the lymphangioleiomyomas of both cases. These findings suggest that colonic or intestinal lymphatic congestion due to neighboring lymphangioleiomyomas was the mechanism for the development of PLE. At the time of writing this report, the beneficial effect of sirolimus has lasted for more than 3 years.

  11. Identifying Key Proteins in Hg Methylation Pathways of Desulfovibrio by Global Proteomics, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Anne O. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Miller, Susan M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Wall, Judy [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry; Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-06-18

    Elemental mercury, Hg(0) is a contaminant at many DOE sites, especially at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where the spread of spilled Hg and its effects on microbial populations have been monitored for decades. To explore the microbial interactions with Hg, we have devised a global proteomic approach capable of directly detecting Hg-adducts of proteins. This technique developed in the facultative anaerobe, Escherichia coli, allows us to identify the proteins most vulnerable to acute exposure to organomercurials phenyl- and ethyl-mercury (as surrogates for the highly neurotoxic methyl-Hg) (Polacco, et al, 2011). We have found >300 such proteins in all metabolic functional groups and cellular compartments; most are highly conserved and can serve as markers for acute Hg exposure (Zink, et al. 2016, in preparation). We have also discovered that acute Hg exposure severely disrupts thiol, iron and redox homeostases, and electrolyte balance (LaVoie, et al., 2015) Thus, we proposed to bring these techniques to bear on the central problem of identifying the cellular proteins involved in bacterial uptake and methylation of mercury and its release from the cell.

  12. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 in augmentation procedures: case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiz, Jaques; Padovan, Luis Eduardo Marques; Claudino, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    To successfully rehabilitate edentulous patients using endosseous implants, there must be enough available bone. Several techniques have been proposed for augmentation of sites with insufficient bone volume. Although autogenous bone has long been considered the gold standard for such procedures, the limited availability of graft material and a high morbidity rate are potential disadvantages of this type of graft. An alternative is to use recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2), which is able to support bone regeneration in the oral environment. These cases demonstrate the applicability of rhBMP-2 in maxillary sinus elevation and augmentation procedures in the maxilla to enable dental implant placement. The use of rhBMP-2 in alveolar augmentation procedures had several clinical benefits for these patients.

  13. The accumulation of a platelet protein, thrombospondin, at the site of arterial thrombus formation: Preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlman, S.B.; Hammes, R.J.; Besozzi, M.C.; Folts, J.D.; Mosher, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    There are many methods available for the detection of thrombosis, none of which are noninvasive, rapid and accurate. Thrombosponding is a platelet protein that is present in the developing thrombus and may be an effective substance to use for imaging thrombosis. Vascular stenosis and thrombosis were produced in coronary, carotid and femoral arteries in eleven adult mongrel dogs. 131 I labeled thrombosponding was administered to each animal to determine whether the radiotracer accumulated at the site of thrombus formation. The radioactivity per gram of vessels with thrombi was significantly different from the control vessels or whole blood (p=0.0037 and p=0.015, respectively, paired t-test). This preliminary work suggests that iodinated thrombosponding accumulates at the site of thrombus formation. Labeled thrombosponding may be a rapid, safe and accurate method of detecting arterial thrombosis. (orig.)

  14. Fusions between green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase as sensitive and vital bifunctional reporters in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaedvlieg, N E; Schlaman, H R; Admiraal, P C; Wijting, S E; Stougaard, J; Spaink, H P

    1998-11-01

    By fusing the genes encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) we have created a set of bifunctional reporter constructs which are optimized for use in transient and stable expression studies in plants. This approach makes it possible to combine the advantage of GUS, its high sensitivity in histochemical staining, with the advantages of GFP as a vital marker. The fusion proteins were functional in transient expression studies in tobacco using either DNA bombardment or potato virus X as a vector, and in stably transformed Arabidopsis thaliana and Lotus japonicus plants. The results show that high level of expression does not interfere with efficient stable transformation in A. thaliana and L. japonicus. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy we show that the fusion constructs are very suitable for promoter expression studies in all organs of living plants, including root nodules. The use of these reporter constructs in the model legume L. japonicus offers exciting new possibilities for the study of the root nodulation process.

  15. Improving brightness and photostability of green and red fluorescent proteins for live cell imaging and FRET reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajar, Bryce T; Wang, Emily S; Lam, Amy J; Kim, Bongjae B; Jacobs, Conor L; Howe, Elizabeth S; Davidson, Michael W; Lin, Michael Z; Chu, Jun

    2016-02-16

    Many genetically encoded biosensors use Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) to dynamically report biomolecular activities. While pairs of cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins (FPs) are most commonly used as FRET partner fluorophores, respectively, green and red FPs offer distinct advantages for FRET, such as greater spectral separation, less phototoxicity, and lower autofluorescence. We previously developed the green-red FRET pair Clover and mRuby2, which improves responsiveness in intramolecular FRET reporters with different designs. Here we report the engineering of brighter and more photostable variants, mClover3 and mRuby3. mClover3 improves photostability by 60% and mRuby3 by 200% over the previous generation of fluorophores. Notably, mRuby3 is also 35% brighter than mRuby2, making it both the brightest and most photostable monomeric red FP yet characterized. Furthermore, we developed a standardized methodology for assessing FP performance in mammalian cells as stand-alone markers and as FRET partners. We found that mClover3 or mRuby3 expression in mammalian cells provides the highest fluorescence signals of all jellyfish GFP or coral RFP derivatives, respectively. Finally, using mClover3 and mRuby3, we engineered an improved version of the CaMKIIα reporter Camuiα with a larger response amplitude.

  16. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    hMUC-1/ecdCD40L protein (F): bacterial cell lysate (), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)- conjugated hMUC-1 Ag with (E) and without (‚) IFA, and PBS...antimouse CD11C antibody were added to the purified DCs. (iii) Cells exposed to a laser excitatory for phycoerythrin. (iv) Cells exposed to a laser ...under nondenaturing conditions was close to 3 Figure 4. The ecdhMUC1 protein released from Ad-sig-ecdhMUC1/ecdCD40L vector–infected cells forms

  17. Fiscal 2000 research report on the technology for utilizing intracellular protein transport; 2000 nendo saibonai tanpakushitsu yuso kino riyo gijutsu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Research was conducted for the establishment of 'intracellular transport engineering' for collecting eucaryotic proteins having cytotoxicity and activated proteins having escaped decomposition into an appropriate intracellular organelle by artificially manipulating the intracellular transport system for proteins in eucaryotes. In this fiscal year, element technologies and tasks necessary for the transport and activation of intracellular proteins in eucaryotes are extracted, and research was conducted on relevant patents. In a survey of the latest trends of research and development, attention was directed mainly at cells or organelles, and the details of progress in the last one year were investigated and reported, which were related to the functions of single membrane organelles excluding for double membrane bound organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplast, etc., that have unique DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) and to the molecular mechanism of transport of protein to each organelle. Furthermore, relative to each organelle, deployment of protein transport function application technology was taken up. (NEDO)

  18. Targeting MUC1 mediated tumor stromal metabolic interaction in Triple negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    were suspended in 200 µl of LC-MS grade water and centrifuged to collect the water - soluble supernatants. The combined supernatants were concentrated...suspended in equal volumes of LC-MS grade water and 10 µl were utilized for LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method described...AcCoA), α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), solute carrier family 1 member 5 (SLC1A5), tricarboxyic acid cycle (TCA cycle), transcription factor (TF) and

  19. Targeting MUC1-Mediated Tumor-Stromal Metabolic Interaction in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    were suspended in 200 µl of LC-MS grade water and centrifuged to collect the water - soluble supernatants. The combined supernatants were concentrated...suspended in equal volumes of LC-MS grade water and 10 µl were utilized for LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method described...AcCoA), α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), solute carrier family 1 member 5 (SLC1A5), tricarboxyic acid cycle (TCA cycle), transcription factor (TF) and

  20. Effect of MUC1 Expression on EGFR Endocytosis and Degradation in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    AR), heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), betacellulin (BTC), epiregulin ( EPR ), and epigen [reviewed in (Schroeder & Lee, 1997) and (Strachan et al., 2001...of erbB1, it also promotes its internalization. This apparent paradox may be explained by one of two non-exclusive hypotheses. The first is that

  1. Role of zein proteins in structure and assembly of protein bodies and endosperm texture. Progress report and appendix 1 - preliminary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larkins, B.

    1997-05-01

    Although funding for this project was initiated less than two years ago, we have made significant progress with our research objectives. We have cloned the gene responsible for the fl2 mutation. In fl2, the mutant phenotype appears to result from a defective signal peptide in an alpha-zein protein. As a consequence, the signal peptide remains attached when the protein accumulates in the protein body. A mutation like fl2 could explain other semidominant and dominant opaque mutants on the basis of abnormal zein polypeptides. A manuscript describing the research that led to the cloning of fl2 is in press, and a second manuscript on the characterization of this gene has been prepared for publication. We found that increased amounts of the 27-kD gamma-zein protein enlarge the proportion of vitreous endosperm and increases the hardness of o2 mutants. This protein also enhances these properties in wild type seeds. The mechanism by which the gamma-zein protein brings about these changes is unclear, and is under investigation. We have found and characterized several mutants that reduce gamma-zein synthesis. The mutations do not significantly affect synthesis of any other type of zein protein. They appear to create an opaque phenotype by reducing the number rather than the size of protein bodies. Interestingly, the mutant seeds fail to germinate. A manuscript describing one of these mutants, o15, has been prepared for publication. We have created a number of transgenic tobacco plants that can produce alpha-, beta-, gamma(27-kD)-, or delta-zeins, as well as combinations of these proteins. Analysis of seeds from these plants and crosses of these plants has shown that tobacco endosperm can serve as a heterologous system to study zein interactions. We have obtained evidence that interactions between alpha- and gamma-zein proteins are required for stable accumulation of alpha-zeins in the endosperm. These and other preliminary results are illustrated in Appendix 1.

  2. Cytokine Expression in CD3+ Cells in an Infant with Food Protein-Induced Enterocolitis Syndrome (FPIES: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES is a non-IgE-mediated food allergy characterized by severe vomiting, diarrhea, and often failure to thrive in infants. Symptoms typically resolve after the triggering food-derived protein is removed from the diet and recur within few hours after the re-exposure to the causal protein. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms and a positive food challenge. In this study, we report a case of FPIES to rice in an 8-month-old boy. We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC to rice and we measured the intracellular T cell expression of interleukin-4 (IL-4; IL-10, and interferon (IFN- pre-and post-challenge during an acute FPIES reaction and when tolerance to rice had been achieved. For the first time we describe an increase in T cell IL-4 and decrease in IFN- expression after a positive challenge with rice (i.e. rice triggered a FPIES attack and an increase in T cell IL-10 expression after rice challenge 6 months later after a negative challenge (i.e., the child had acquired tolerance to rice in an 8 month old with documented FPIES to rice. A Th2 activation associated with high IL-4 levels may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease. On the other hand, T cell-derived IL-10 may play a role in the acquisition of immunotolerance by regulating the Th1 and Th2 responses.

  3. Transfection of Eimeria mitis with yellow fluorescent protein as reporter and the endogenous development of the transgenic parasite.

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    Mei Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advancements have been made in the genetic manipulation of apicomplexan parasites. Both the in vitro transient and in vivo stable transfection of Eimeria tenella have been developed successfully. Herein, we report the transient and stable transfection of Eimeria mitis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sporozoites of E. mitis transfected with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP expression plasmid were inoculated into chickens via the cloacal route. The recovered fluorescent oocysts were sorted by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS and then passaged 6 generations successively in chickens. The resulting population was analyzed by genome walking and Western blot. The endogenous development of the transgenic E. mitis was observed and its reproduction potential was tested. The stable transfection of E. mitis was developed. Genome walking confirmed the random integration of plasmid DNA into the genome; while Western blot analysis demonstrated the expression of foreign proteins. Constitutive expression of EYFP was observed in all stages of merogony, gametogony and sporogony. The peak of the transgenic oocyst output was delayed by 24 h and the total oocyst reproduction was reduced by 7-fold when compared to the parental strain. CONCLUSION: Stable transfection of E. mitis was successfully developed. The expression of foreign antigens in the transgenic parasites will facilitate the development of transgenic E. mitis as a vaccine vector.

  4. Monitoring the Induction of Heat Shock Factor 1/Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression following 17-Allylamino-Demethoxygeldanamycin Treatment by Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Reporter Gene Imaging

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    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cell response to proteotoxic cell stresses is mediated primarily through activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1. This transcription factor plays a major role in the regulation of the heat shock proteins (HSPs, including HSP70. We demonstrate that an [124I]iodide-pQHNIG70 positron emission tomography (PET reporter system that includes an inducible HSP70 promoter can be used to image and monitor the activation of the HSF1/HSP70 transcription factor in response to drug treatment (17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-AAG]. We developed a dual imaging reporter (pQHNIG70 for noninvasive imaging of the heat shock response in cell culture and living animals previously and now study HSF1/HSP70 reporter activation in both cell culture and tumor-bearing animals following exposure to 17-AAG. 17-AAG (10–1,000 nM induced reporter expression; a 23-fold increase was observed by 60 hours. Good correspondence between reporter expression and HSP70 protein levels were observed. MicroPET imaging based on [124I]iodide accumulation in pQHNIG70-transduced RG2 xenografts showed a significant 6.2-fold reporter response to 17-AAG, with a corresponding increase in tumor HSP70 and in tumor human sodium iodide symporter and green fluorescent protein reporter proteins. The HSF1 reporter system can be used to screen anticancer drugs for induction of cytotoxic stress and HSF1 activation both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. A patient with C protein deficiency and multiple thromboses. case report Paciente con deficiencia de proteína C y múltiples trombosis: reporte de caso

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    Alejandro Román González

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Inherited thrombophilias are an important group of diseases that should be taken into account in the study of patients with thromboembolic disease, particularly in those whose clinical presentation includes frequent and recurrent thrombotic episodes at young age, in unusual sites, and a familial history of thrombosis. We report the case of a patient with C protein deficiency which developed deep venous thromboses of both legs when he was 36 and 37 years old. At 51 years of age he suffered from mesenteric thrombosis requiring surgical treatment and small intestine transplantation. His father had deep venous thrombosis. This is the first report of C protein deficiency in the Colombian literature. Other inherited thrombophilias such as the G20210A mutation in the prothrombin gene and actor V Leiden were absent. Se debe considerar un estado de hipercoagulabilidad primaria o trombofilia heredada en los pacientes con enfermedad tromboembólica venosa. La sospecha clínica se debe dirigir a los pacientes con presentación temprana, recurrente, familiar o en sitios anatómicos poco usuales. En este reporte se describe el caso de un paciente con déficit de proteína C de la coagulación, quien desarrolló trombosis venosa profunda del miembro inferior derecho a los 36 años y un año después, trombosis venosa profunda del miembro inferior izquierdo. A la edad de 51 años presentó trombosis de vasos mesentéricos que condujo a una resección intestinal extensa lo que obligó a un trasplante de intestino delgado. Su padre había presentado trombosis venosa de los miembros inferiores. Se descartó la presencia asociada de la mutación G20210A de la protrombina y del Factor V Leiden. Hasta donde sabemos, es el primer caso de deficiencia de proteína C de la coagulación informado en la literatura colombiana.

  6. Effect of radiation on proteins and radiation effects in biochemistry and organic chemistry. Final report, October 15, 1957--October 14, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolbert, B.M.

    1974-01-01

    A summary is made of a fifteen year study of chemical effects of radiation of amino acids and proteins. Included is a list of publications: 54 papers, reports and abstracts, and 10 M.S. and Ph.D theses. The report concludes with details of the final two studies done under this contract. These are, first, a study of post-irradiation effects of various gases on gamma irradiated lysozyme. This study showed that H 2 S, O 2 , NO, and N 2 O treatment changed the amount of aggregation products, and also that a certain amount of the irradiated lysozyme was subject to main chain cleavage. The second was a study of proteins in rabbit eye lens cataracts induced by x-irradiation or a high galactose diet. The cataract proteins were more soluble in water than normal proteins, and were present in lower amounts in the eye lens

  7. A quasi-lentiviral green fluorescent protein reporter exhibits nuclear export features of late human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Marcus; Ludwig, Christine; Kehlenbeck, Sylvia; Jungert, Kerstin; Wagner, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that Rev-dependent expression of HIV-1 Gag from CMV immediate early promoter critically depends on the AU-rich codon bias of the gag gene. Here, we demonstrate that adaptation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to HIV codon bias is sufficient to turn this hivGFP RNA into a quasi-lentiviral message following the rules of late lentiviral gene expression. Accordingly, GFP expression was significantly decreased in transfected cells strictly correlating with reduced RNA levels. In the presence of the HIV 5' major splice donor, the hivGFP RNAs were stabilized in the nucleus and efficiently exported to the cytoplasm following fusion of the 3' Rev-responsive element (RRE) and coexpression of HIV-1 Rev. This Rev-dependent translocation was specifically inhibited by leptomycin B suggesting export via the CRM1-dependent pathway used by late lentiviral transcripts. In conclusion, this quasi-lentiviral reporter system may provide a new platform for developing sensitive Rev screening assays

  8. Combining Optical Reporter Proteins with Different Half-lives to Detect Temporal Evolution of Hypoxia and Reoxygenation in Tumors

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    Pierre Danhier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we have developed a hypoxia response element driven imaging strategy that combined the hypoxia-driven expression of two optical reporters with different half-lives to detect temporal changes in hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF activity. For this purpose, human prostate cancer PC3 cells were transfected with the luciferase gene fused with an oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD-luc and a variant of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Both ODD-luciferase and EGFP were under the promotion of a poly-hypoxia-response element sequence (5xHRE. The cells constitutively expressed tdTomato red fluorescent protein. For validating the imaging strategy, cells were incubated under hypoxia (1% O2 for 48 hours and then reoxygenated. The luciferase activity of PC3-HRE-EGFP/HRE-ODD-luc/tdtomato cells detected by bioluminescent imaging rapidly decreased after reoxygenation, whereas EGFP levels in these cells remained stable for several hours. After in vitro validation, PC3-HRE-EGFP/HRE-ODD-luc/tdtomato tumors were implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically in nude male mice and imaged in vivo and ex vivo using optical imaging in proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate differences in optical patterns between EGFP expression and bioluminescence. This novel "timer" imaging strategy of combining the short-lived ODD-luciferase and the long-lived EGFP can provide a time frame of HRE activation in PC3 prostate cancer cells and will be useful to understand the temporal changes in hypoxia and HIF activity during cancer progression and following treatments including HIF targeting strategies.

  9. Very bright orange fluorescent plants: endoplasmic reticulum targeting of orange fluorescent proteins as visual reporters in transgenic plants

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    Mann David GJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of fluorescent protein (FP genes as real-time visual markers, both transiently and stably, has revolutionized plant biotechnology. A palette of colors of FPs is now available for use, but the diversity has generally been underutilized in plant biotechnology. Because of the green and far-red autofluorescent properties of many plant tissues and the FPs themselves, red and orange FPs (RFPs, and OFPs, respectfully appear to be the colors with maximum utility in plant biotechnology. Within the color palette OFPs have emerged as the brightest FP markers in the visible spectra. This study compares several native, near-native and modified OFPs for their “brightness” and fluorescence, therefore, their usability as marker genes in transgenic plant tissues. Results The OFPs DsRed2, tdTomato, mOrange and pporRFP were all expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in agroinfiltration-mediated transient assays in Nicotiana benthamiana. Each of these, as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER-targeted versions, were stably expressed in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum and Arabidopsis thaliana. Congruent results were observed between transient and stable assays. Our results demonstrated that there are several adequate OFP genes available for plant transformation, including the new pporRFP, an unaltered tetramer from the hard coral Porites porites. When the tandem dimer tdTomato and the monomeric mOrange were targeted to the ER, dramatic, ca. 3-fold, increase in plant fluorescence was observed. Conclusions From our empirical data, and a search of the literature, it appears that tdTomato-ER and mOrange-ER are the two highest fluorescing FPs available as reporters for transgenic plants. The pporRFP is a brightly fluorescing tetramer, but all tetramer FPs are far less bright than the ER-targeted monomers we report here.

  10. Tissue engineering for lateral ridge augmentation with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 combination therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelaris, George A; Spagnoli, Daniel B; Rosenfeld, Alan L; McKee, James; Lu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes a tissue-engineered reconstruction with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2/acellular collagen sponge (rhBMP-2/ ACS) + cancellous allograft and space maintenance via Medpor Contain mesh in the treatment of a patient requiring maxillary and mandibular horizontal ridge augmentation to enable implant placement. The patient underwent a previously unsuccessful corticocancellous bone graft at these sites. Multiple and contiguous sites in the maxilla and in the mandibular anterior, demonstrating advanced lateral ridge deficiencies, were managed using a tissue engineering approach as an alternative to autogenous bone harvesting. Four maxillary and three mandibular implants were placed 9 and 10 months, respectively, after tissue engineering reconstruction, and all were functioning successfully after 24 months of follow-up. Histomorphometric analysis of a bone core obtained at the time of the maxillary implant placement demonstrated a mean of 76.1% new vital bone formation, 22.2% marrow/cells, and 1.7% residual graft tissue. Tissue engineering for lateral ridge augmentation with combination therapy requires further research to determine predictability and limitations.

  11. Complications Associated With the Use of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 in Ridge Augmentation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragonas, Panagiotis; Palin, Charles; Khan, Saba; Gajendrareddy, Praveen K; Weiner, Whitney D

    2017-10-01

    This case report aims to describe in detail a complication associated with resorption of regenerated bone following implant placement and ridge augmentation using recombinant human bone morphogenic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in combination with allograft and xenograft. Bilateral maxillary sinus and ridge augmentation procedures were completed using rhBMP-2 combined with allograft and xenograft. Five months later, significant bone augmentation was achieved, which allowed for the placement of 4 implants. Upon stage 2 surgery, significant dehiscence was noted in all implants. Treatment steps to address this complication included implant removal, guided bone regeneration with xenograft only, and placement of new implants followed by soft-tissue grafting. At the time of publication, this patient is status 1½ years post case completion with maintenance of therapy outcomes. Off-label use of rhBMP-2 has gained significant acceptance in implant dentistry. However, there is limited evidence regarding the bone maturation process when rhBMP-2 is combined with other biomaterials. More research may be needed regarding the timing and process of bone healing in the presence of rhBMP-2, in an effort to avoid surgical complications.

  12. Sensitive luminescent reporter viruses reveal appreciable release of hepatitis C virus NS5A protein into the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Nicholas S; Aloia, Amanda L; Joyce, Michael A; Chulanetra, Monrat; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Beard, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    The HCV NS5A protein is essential for viral RNA replication and virus particle assembly. To study the viral replication cycle and NS5A biology we generated an infectious HCV construct with a NanoLuciferase (NLuc) insertion within NS5A. Surprisingly, beyond its utility as a sensitive reporter of cytoplasmic viral RNA replication, we also observed strong luminescence in cell culture fluids. Further analysis using assembly-defective viruses and subgenomic replicons revealed that infectious virus production was not required for extracellular NS5A-NLuc activity but was associated with enrichment of extracellular NS5A-NLuc in intermediate-density fractions similar to those of exosomes and virus particles. Additionally, BRET analysis indicated that intracellular and extracellular forms of NS5A may adopt differing conformations. Importantly, infection studies using a human liver chimeric mouse model confirmed robust infection in vivo and ready detection of NLuc activity in serum. We hypothesise that the presence of NS5A in extracellular fluids contributes to HCV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. E. coli O124 K72 alters the intestinal barrier and the tight junctions proteins of guinea pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Yanyan; Gamallat, Yaser; Ma, Shenhao; Chiwala, Gift; Meyiah, Abdo; Xin, Yi

    2017-10-01

    Our research group previously isolated and identified a strain of pathogenic Escherichia coli from clinical samples called E. coli O124 K72. The present study was aimed at determining the potential effects of E. coli O124 K72 on intestinal barrier functions and structural proteins integrity in guinea pig. Guinea pigs were grouped into three groups; control (CG); E. coli O124 K72 (E. coli); and probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG). Initially, we create intestinal dysbiosis by giving all animals Levofloxacin for 10days, but the control group (CG) received the same volume of saline. Then, the animals received either E. coli O124 K72 (E. coli) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) according to their assigned group. E. coli O124 K72 treatment significantly affected colon morphology and distorted intestinal barrier function by up-regulating Claudin2 and down-regulating Occludin. In addition, E. coli upregulated the mRNA expression of MUC1, MUC2, MUC13 and MUC15. Furthermore, suspected tumor was found in the E. coli treated animals. Our results suggested that E. coli O124 K72 strain has adverse effects on intestinal barrier functions and is capable of altering integrity of structural proteins in guinea pig model while at same time it may have a role in colon carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  15. 2D DIGE Does Not Reveal all: A Scotopic Report Suggests Differential Expression of a Single "Calponin Family Member" Protein for Tetany of Sphincters!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Using 2D differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a recent report by Rattan and Ali (2015) compared proteome expression between tonically contracted sphincteric smooth muscles of the internal anal sphincter (IAS), in comparison to the adjacent rectum [rectal smooth muscles (RSM)] that contracts in a phasic fashion. The study showed the differential expression of a single 23 kDa protein SM22, which was 1.87 fold, overexpressed in RSM in comparison to IAS. Earlier studies have shown differences in expression of different proteins like Rho-associated protein kinase II, myosin light chain kinase, myosin phosphatase, and protein kinase C between IAS and RSM. The currently employed methods, despite its high-throughput potential, failed to identify these well-characterized differences between phasic and tonic muscles. This calls into question the fidelity and validatory potential of the otherwise powerful technology of 2D DIGE/MS. These discrepancies, when redressed in future studies, will evolve this recent report as an important baseline study of "sphincter proteome." Proteomics techniques are currently underutilized in examining pathophysiology of hypertensive/hypotensive disorders involving gastrointestinal sphincters, including achalasia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), spastic pylorus, seen during diabetes or chronic chemotherapy, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and recto-anal incontinence. Global proteome mapping may provide instant snapshot of the complete repertoire of differential proteins, thus expediting to identify the molecular pathology of gastrointestinal motility disorders currently labeled "idiopathic" and facilitating practice of precision medicine.

  16. Inherited protein S deficiency due to a novel nonsense mutation in the PROS1 gene in the patient with recurrent vascular access thrombosis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jin Cho

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Vascular access thrombosis is one of the major causes of morbidity in patients maintained on chronic hemodialysis. Thrombophilia has been recognized as a risk factor of vascular access thrombosis. The authors report a case of inherited protein S deficiency associated with vascular access thrombotic events. DNA sequence analysis of the PROS1 gene identified a novel heterozygous nonsense mutation in exon 10 by transition of AAG (lysine to TAG (stop codon at codon 473 (c.1417A>T, p.K473X. Results from the study suggest that the inherited protein S deficiency due to a PROS1 gene mutation may cause vascular access thrombosis in hemodialysis patients.

  17. The central domain of yeast transcription factor Rpn4 facilitates degradation of reporter protein in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A V; Spasskaya, D S; Karpov, D S; Karpov, V L

    2014-10-16

    Despite high interest in the cellular degradation machinery and protein degradation signals (degrons), few degrons with universal activity along species have been identified. It has been shown that fusion of a target protein with a degradation signal from mammalian ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) induces fast proteasomal degradation of the chimera in both mammalian and yeast cells. However, no degrons from yeast-encoded proteins capable to function in mammalian cells were identified so far. Here, we demonstrate that the yeast transcription factor Rpn4 undergoes fast proteasomal degradation and its central domain can destabilize green fluorescent protein and Alpha-fetoprotein in human HEK 293T cells. Furthermore, we confirm the activity of this degron in yeast. Thus, the Rpn4 central domain is an effective interspecies degradation signal. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Multidimensional protein fractionation using ProteomeLab PF 2D™ for profiling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis immunity: A preliminary report

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    Mosley R Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ProteomeLab™ PF 2D platform is a relatively new approach to global protein profiling. Herein, it was used for investigation of plasma proteome changes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS patients before and during immunization with glatiramer acetate (GA in a clinical trial. Results The experimental design included immunoaffinity depletion of 12 most abundant proteins from plasma samples with the ProteomeLab™ IgY-12 LC10 column kit as first dimension separation, also referred to as immuno-partitioning. Second and third dimension separations of the enriched proteome were performed on the PF 2D platform utilizing 2D isoelectric focusing and RP-HPLC with the resulting fractions collected for analysis. 1D gel electrophoresis was added as a fourth dimension when sufficient protein was available. Protein identification from collected fractions was performed using nano-LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis of differences in the resulting two-dimensional maps of fractions obtained from the PF 2D and the ability to identify proteins from these fractions allowed sensitivity threshold measurements. Masked proteins in the PF 2D fractions are discussed. Conclusion We offer some insight into the strengths and limitations of this emerging proteomic platform.

  19. FY 1999 report on the results on analysis of protein functions; 1999 nendo tanpakushitsu kino kaiseki seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This project is aimed at construction of the intellectual infrastructures for biotechnologies, in order to accelerate development of the Japanese technologies and activate their application to industries. Described herein are the FY 1999 results. These infrastructures are for functional analysis of protein which will be one of the key issues in genome analysis, and collection and analysis of biological information. This project includes a total of 9 research and development themes for four research categories: frequency analysis of gene expression (development of the gene expression profile database system for functional analysis of human genome, and analysis of the gene expression and protein functions by the ECA chip technology), function analysis by the biological model (high-performance analysis by the bio-project, database system for drug metabolizing enzymes, analysis of gene functions using mutant mice, and simple genome function analysis of murine individuals using the RNAi effect), protein expression (function validation of unknown human genes based on the useful biological model, and protein function analysis using multi-purpose destination vectors), and protein function prediction by the information science method. (NEDO)

  20. Protein synthesis and its regulation: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report, July 1, 1976--August 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, P.C.

    1977-06-01

    Results of studies are reported on delineation of the steps involved in protein synthesis and the role of transfer and messenger RNAs in the translation process. During the past year we have studied the mechanisms by which an oncogenic RNA virus modifies the growth process, and have begun to elucidate the role a novel dinucleotide, discovered in these laboratories, plays in rapidly growing cells in tissue culture

  1. Properties and regulation of biosynthesis of cottonseed storage proteins. Comprehensive progress report, December 1, 1976 to September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dure, III, L S

    1979-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in cotton seed embryogenesis was studied by attempting to define what gene products are likely to be highly regulated during this developmental progression. The flow of nitrogen into the free amino acids pools of the developing cotyledons, and into the principal nitrogen nutritional reserve of the seed, the storage proteins was measured. This was continued by following the flow of nitrogen from the storage proteins to the principal exported amino acid asparagine that occurs during the first several days of germination. In this fashion the rise and fall of certain enzymes of amino acid intermediary metabolism could be postulated, and in some cases, verified. The subsets of abundant mRNAs whose appearance and disappearance coincided with developmental events in cotyledon embryogenesis/germination with the short range goal of identifying proteins/enzyme activities were delineated as well as their mRNAs that represent specific developmental stages and the long range goal of using these representatives as probes for studying the mechanisms controlling the rise and fall of these mRNAs and their protein products.

  2. Quantitative measurement of cell membrane receptor internalization by the nanoluciferase reporter: Using the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3 as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-02-01

    Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) is a newly developed small luciferase reporter with the brightest bioluminescence to date. In the present work, we developed NanoLuc as a sensitive bioluminescent reporter to measure quantitatively the internalization of cell membrane receptors, based on the pH dependence of the reporter activity. The G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3, the cognate receptor of relaxin-3/INSL7, was used as a model receptor. We first generated stable HEK293T cells that inducibly coexpressed a C-terminally NanoLuc-tagged human RXFP3 and a C-terminally enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged human RXFP3. The C-terminal EGFP-tag and NanoLuc-tag had no detrimental effects on the ligand-binding potency and intracellular trafficking of RXFP3. Based on the fluorescence of the tagged EGFP reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was visualized directly under a fluorescence microscope. Based on the bioluminescence of the tagged NanoLuc reporter, the ligand-induced RXFP3 internalization was measured quantitatively by a convenient bioluminescent assay. Coexpression of an EGFP-tagged inactive [E141R]RXFP3 had no detrimental effect on the ligand-binding potency and ligand-induced internalization of the NanoLuc-tagged wild-type RXFP3, suggesting that the mutant RXFP3 and wild-type RXFP3 worked independently. The present bioluminescent internalization assay could be extended to other G protein-coupled receptors and other cell membrane receptors to study ligand-receptor and receptor-receptor interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) detected by Tc99m-labelled human serum albumin abdominal scintigraphy--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubalewska-Hoła, Alicja; Sowa-Staszczak, Anna; Szczerbiński, Tomasz; Lis, Grzegorz; Huszno, Bohdan; Szybiński, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) is a gastrointestinal disorder that is associated with excessive loss of plasma protein into the gut resulting from abnormal mucosal permeability. The disease is usually caused by inflammation. The loss of protein in PLE is a nonselective process affecting albumin, globulin and transferrin. Abdominal scintigraphy with human serum albumin marked by Tc99m seems to be an easy and sensitive method for diagnosing PLE. An 4-year-old girl was presented to an outside Pediatric Department due to hypoproteinemia and recurrent pneumonia which had caused several prior hospitalizations. The laboratory tests revealed hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, low level of IgG, sideropenia, and a decreased level of T lymphocytes. The loss of protein into the gut was confirmed by fecal clearance of alfa-1 antitrypsin. Only nonspecific inflammation was detected by biopsy of the small intestine. These clinical and laboratory findings, quickly decreasing IgG and albumin levels in spite of i.v. supplementation and the lack of proteinuria permitted PLE diagnosis. The abdominal scintigraphy was planned to assess and localise protein losing through GIT and for strategy of possible surgical treatment. Abdominal dynamic scintigraphy was performed immediately after the injection of 300 MBq Tc99m human albumin. 90 images were taken within 180 minutes. Delayed abdominal images were obtained 6 and 24 hours after the tracer injection. Anterior abdominal scintigraphy showed pathological activity of Tc99m-albumin in small bowel in the upper left segment of the abdomen in the 40th minute after injection. Extensive accumulation of albumin was seen in the 160th minute. Delayed images, after 3 and 6 hours, revealed translocation of the tracer into the lower right abdominal segment. The further passage and tracer concentration was detected in ascendant and transverse colon. Based on the laboratory tests and scintigraphic images the girl was suspected to have segmental

  4. Clinical presentation and endoscopic features of primary gastric Burkitt lymphoma in childhood, presenting as a protein-losing enteropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieng Jenny Hui Chia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Burkitt lymphoma and B cell lymphomas in childhood may arise in many atypical locations, which on rare occasions can include gastric mucosa. A case of primary gastric Burkitt lymphoma is described in a child presenting as a protein-losing enteropathy, including the direct monitoring of the disease response by sequential endoscopic biopsy and molecular analysis. Case presentation We report a 9-year-old boy who presented with gross oedema, ascites and respiratory distress caused by a protein-losing enteropathy. Initial imaging investigations were non-diagnostic but gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed massive involvement of the gastric mucosa with a primary Burkitt lymphoma. His subsequent clinical progress and disease response were monitored directly by endoscopy and he remains in clinical remission 4 years after initial diagnosis. Conclusions This is the first case report of primary Burkitt lymphoma presenting as a protein-losing enteropathy. The clinical course and progress of the patient were monitored by sequential endoscopic biopsy, histology and molecular analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridisation.

  5. BMI was found to be a consistent determinant related to misreporting of energy, protein and potassium intake using self-report and duplicate portion methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trijsburg, Laura; Geelen, Anouk; Hollman, Peter Ch; Hulshof, Paul Jm; Feskens, Edith Jm; Van't Veer, Pieter; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; de Vries, Jeanne Hm

    2017-03-01

    As misreporting, mostly under-reporting, of dietary intake is a generally known problem in nutritional research, we aimed to analyse the association between selected determinants and the extent of misreporting by the duplicate portion method (DP), 24 h recall (24hR) and FFQ by linear regression analysis using the biomarker values as unbiased estimates. For each individual, two DP, two 24hR, two FFQ and two 24 h urinary biomarkers were collected within 1·5 years. Also, for sixty-nine individuals one or two doubly labelled water measurements were obtained. The associations of basic determinants (BMI, gender, age and level of education) with misreporting of energy, protein and K intake of the DP, 24hR and FFQ were evaluated using linear regression analysis. Additionally, associations between other determinants, such as physical activity and smoking habits, and misreporting were investigated. The Netherlands. One hundred and ninety-seven individuals aged 20-70 years. Higher BMI was associated with under-reporting of dietary intake assessed by the different dietary assessment methods for energy, protein and K, except for K by DP. Men tended to under-report protein by the DP, FFQ and 24hR, and persons of older age under-reported K but only by the 24hR and FFQ. When adjusted for the basic determinants, the other determinants did not show a consistent association with misreporting of energy or nutrients and by the different dietary assessment methods. As BMI was the only consistent determinant of misreporting, we conclude that BMI should always be taken into account when assessing and correcting dietary intake.

  6. Combining short- and long-range fluorescence reporters with simulations to explore the intramolecular dynamics of an intrinsically disordered protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosel, Franziska; Haenni, Dominik; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Schuler, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are increasingly recognized as a class of molecules that can exert essential biological functions even in the absence of a well-defined three-dimensional structure. Understanding the conformational distributions and dynamics of these highly flexible proteins is thus essential for explaining the molecular mechanisms underlying their function. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful tool for probing intramolecular distances and the rapid long-range distance dynamics in IDPs. To complement the information from FRET, we combine it with photoinduced electron transfer (PET) quenching to monitor local loop-closure kinetics at the same time and in the same molecule. Here we employed this combination to investigate the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of HIV-1 integrase. The results show that both long-range dynamics and loop closure kinetics on the sub-microsecond time scale can be obtained reliably from a single set of measurements by the analysis with a comprehensive model of the underlying photon statistics including both FRET and PET. A more detailed molecular interpretation of the results is enabled by direct comparison with a recent extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulation of integrase. The simulations are in good agreement with experiment and can explain the deviation from simple models of chain dynamics by the formation of persistent local secondary structure. The results illustrate the power of a close combination of single-molecule spectroscopy and simulations for advancing our understanding of the dynamics and detailed mechanisms in unfolded and intrinsically disordered proteins.

  7. Oxidation reaction of ferrocytochrome C by ferricyanide as a probe to effects of alcohols on structure and reactivity of the protein. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilan, Y.; Shafferman, A.

    1977-05-01

    Results are reported on the effect of ethanol on the oxidation of ferrocytochrome c by ferricyanide and its cumulative effect with pH and temperature, on structure and spectra of cytochrome c. It is concluded that low concentrations of alcohols which do not change dramatically the structure and physical properties of cytochrome c, but produce changes in the structure of water, cause small changes in the structure of the protein. This is manifested by the shift in the pKa, and also in the retardation of the redox reactions. This indicates that water molecules participate in the reaction complex of cytochrome c with its redox substrates. (DLC)

  8. Novel C16orf57 mutations in patients with Poikiloderma with Neutropenia: bioinformatic analysis of the protein and predicted effects of all reported mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Elisa A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poikiloderma with Neutropenia (PN is a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis caused by C16orf57 mutations. To date 17 mutations have been identified in 31 PN patients. Results We characterize six PN patients expanding the clinical phenotype of the syndrome and the mutational repertoire of the gene. We detect the two novel C16orf57 mutations, c.232C>T and c.265+2T>G, as well as the already reported c.179delC, c.531delA and c.693+1G>T mutations. cDNA analysis evidences the presence of aberrant transcripts, and bioinformatic prediction of C16orf57 protein structure gauges the mutations effects on the folded protein chain. Computational analysis of the C16orf57 protein shows two conserved H-X-S/T-X tetrapeptide motifs marking the active site of a two-fold pseudosymmetric structure recalling the 2H phosphoesterase superfamily. Based on this model C16orf57 is likely a 2H-active site enzyme functioning in RNA processing, as a presumptive RNA ligase. According to bioinformatic prediction, all known C16orf57 mutations, including the novel mutations herein described, impair the protein structure by either removing one or both tetrapeptide motifs or by destroying the symmetry of the native folding. Finally, we analyse the geographical distribution of the recurrent mutations that depicts clusters featuring a founder effect. Conclusions In cohorts of patients clinically affected by genodermatoses with overlapping symptoms, the molecular screening of C16orf57 gene seems the proper way to address the correct diagnosis of PN, enabling the syndrome-specific oncosurveillance. The bioinformatic prediction of the C16orf57 protein structure denotes a very basic enzymatic function consistent with a housekeeping function. Detection of aberrant transcripts, also in cells from PN patients carrying early truncated mutations, suggests they might be translatable. Tissue-specific sensitivity to the lack of functionally correct protein accounts for the

  9. Pooled results from 5 validation studies of dietary self-report instruments using recovery biomarkers for energy and protein intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    We pooled data from 5 large validation studies of dietary self-report instruments that used recovery biomarkers as references to clarify the measurement properties of food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and 24-hour recalls. The studies were conducted in widely differing U.S. adult populations from...

  10. Case report: a novel KERA mutation associated with cornea plana and its predicted effect on protein function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Laura; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Harris, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    of the keratocan gene (KERA) on chromosome 12q22. To date, only nine different disease-associated KERA mutations, including four missense mutations, have been described. Case presentation: In this report, we present clinical data from a Turkish family with autosomal recessive cornea plana. In some of the affected...

  11. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-based fluorescent protein (FbFP) as reporter for gene expression in the anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Leandro A; Smith, Charles J; Rocha, Edson R

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we show the expression of flavin mononucleotide-based fluorescent protein (FbFP) BS2 as a marker for gene expression in the opportunistic human anaerobic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis. Bacteroides fragilis 638R strain carrying osu∷bs2 constructs showed inducible fluorescence following addition of maltose anaerobically compared with nonfluorescent cells under glucose-repressed conditions. Bacteria carrying ahpC∷bs2 or dps∷bs2 constructs were fluorescent following induction by oxygen compared with nonfluorescent cells from the anaerobic control cultures. In addition, when these transcriptional fusion constructs were mobilized into B. fragilis IB263, a constitutive peroxide response strain, fluorescent BS2, was detected in both anaerobic and aerobic cultures, confirming the unique properties of the FbFP BS2 to yield fluorescent signal in B. fragilis in the presence and in the absence of oxygen. Moreover, intracellular expression of BS2 was also detected when cell culture monolayers of J774.1 macrophages were incubated with B. fragilis ahpC∷bs2 or dps∷bs2 strains within an anaerobic chamber. This suggests that ahpC and dps are induced following internalization by macrophages. Thus, we show that BS2 is a suitable tool for the detection of gene expression in obligate anaerobic bacteria in in vivo studies. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improvement of the green fluorescent protein reporter system in Leishmania spp. for the in vitro and in vivo screening of antileishmanial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Sergio A; Muñoz, Diana L; Restrepo, Adriana M; Mesa, Carol V; Alzate, Juan F; Vélez, Iván D; Robledo, Sara M

    2012-04-01

    Development of new therapeutic approaches for leishmaniasis treatment requires new high throughput screening methodologies for the antileishmanial activity of the new compounds both in vitro and in vivo. Reporter genes as the GFP have become one of the most promissory and widely used tools for drug screening in several models, since it offers live imaging, high sensibility, specificity and flexibility; additionally, the use of GFP as a reporter gene in screening assays eliminates all the drawbacks presented in conventional assays and also those technical problems found using other reporter genes. The utility of the GFP as a reporter gene in drug screening assays with Leishmania parasites depends on the homogeneity and stability of the GFP transfected strains. Stable expression of the GFP in the Old World Leishmania species has been demonstrated using integration vectors; however, no reports exist yet about the success of this methodology in the New World species. Here we report the generation of New World Leishmania strains expressing the GFP protein from an integration vector, which replaces one copy of the 18S RNA in the chromosome with the GFP coding sequence by homologous recombination. We also prove that the expression of the integrated GFP is stable and homogeneous in the transfected parasites after months in culture without selective pressure or during its use in hamster infection assays. The fluorescent strains are useful for in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo drug screening assays since no considerable variations in virulence or infectivity where seen attributable to the genetic manipulation during both in vitro and in vivo infection experiments. The platform described here for drug testing assays based on the use of stable fluorescent Leishmania strains coupled to flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy is more sensitive, more specific and faster than conventional assays used normally for the evaluation of compounds with potential antileishmanial activity

  13. Search for mutations altering protein charge and/or function in children of atomic bomb survivors: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, C.; Goriki, K.; Asakawa, J.; Fujita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kageoka, T.; Hazama, R.

    1988-01-01

    A sample of (1) children whose parents had been proximally exposed (i.e., less than 2000 m from the hypocenter) at the time of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and (2) a suitable comparison group have been examined for the occurrence of mutations altering the electrophoretic mobility or activity of a series of 30 proteins. The examination of the equivalent of 667,404 locus products in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded three mutations altering electrophoretic mobility; the corresponding figure for the comparison group was three mutations in 466,881 tests. The examination of a subset of 60,529 locus products for loss of enzyme activity in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded one mutation; no mutations were encountered in 61,741 determinations on the children of the comparison group. When these two series are compared, the mutation rate observed in the children of proximally exposed persons is thus 0.60 x 10(-5)/locus/generation, with 95% confidence intervals between 0.2 and 1.5 x 10(-5), and that in the comparison children is 0.64 x 10(-5)/locus/generation, with 95% intervals between 0.1 and 1.9 x 10(-5). The average conjoint gonad doses for the proximally exposed parents are estimated to be 0.437 Gy of gamma radiation and 0.002 Gy of neutron radiation. If a relative biological effectiveness of 20 is assigned to the neutron radiation, the combined total gonad dose for the parents becomes 0.477 Sv. (Organ absorbed doses are expressed in gray [1 Gy = 100 rad]; where dose is a mixture of gamma and neutron radiation, it is necessary because of the differing relative biological effectiveness of gamma and neutron radiation to express the combined gamma-neutron gonad exposures in sieverts [1 Sv = 100 rem])

  14. Search for mutations altering protein charge and/or function in children of atomic bomb survivors: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.; Satoh, Chiyoko; Goriki, Kazuaki; Asakawa, Jun-ichi; Fujita, Mikio; Takahashi, Norio; Kageoka, Takeshi; Hazama, Ryuji.

    1990-04-01

    A sample of children whose parents were proximally exposed at the time of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (i.e., within 2,000 m of the hypocenter) and a suitable comparison group have been examined for the occurrence of mutations altering the electrophoretic mobility or activity of a series of 30 proteins. The examination of the equivalent of 667,404 locus products in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded three mutations altering electrophoretic mobility; the corresponding figure for the comparison group was three mutations in 466,881 tests. The examination of a subset of 60,529 locus products for loss of enzyme activity in the children of proximally exposed persons yielded one mutation; no mutations were encountered in 61,741 determinations on the children of the comparison group. Combining these two series, the mutation rate observed in the children of proximally exposed is thus 0.60 x 10 -5 /locus/generation, with 95 % confidence intervals between 0.2 and 1.5 x 10 -5 , and in the comparison children, 0.64 x 10 -5 /locus/generation, with 95 % intervals between 0.1 and 1.9 x 10 -5 . The average conjoint gonad doses of the proximally exposed parents are estimated to be 0.437 Gy of gamma radiation and 0.002 Gy of neutron radiation. Assigning a relative biological effectiveness of 20 to the neutron radiation, the combined total gonad dose of the parents becomes 0.477 Sv. (author)

  15. Clinicopathological report of retinitis pigmentosa with vitamin E deficiency caused by mutation of the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, J; Kiyosawa, M; Seko, Y; Yokota, T; Harino, S; Suzuki, J

    2001-01-01

    To discuss the clinicopathological findings in a patient with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) accompanied by a vitamin E deficiency caused by an H101Q mutation in the alpha-tocopherol transfer protein (alpha-TTP) gene. The clinical course of this patient was followed by conventional ophthalmological examinations over a 3-year period. After the patient died from pancreatic cancer, the eyes were obtained, and examined by light and electron microscopy. The patient complained of night blindness subsequent to adult-onset ataxia, although the ataxia was very mild. His visual acuity was 0.6 OU, and ophthalmoscopy revealed RP sine pigmento. Ring scotomas were detected, and the electroretinography, electro-oculography, and dark-adaptation were altered. Fluorescein angiography showed granular hyperfluorescence around the macula. No progression of the visual and neurological symptoms was observed during the 10 years he was taking oral vitamin E. Histopathological examination revealed the loss of the outer and inner segments of the photoreceptors in the area corresponding to the ring scotoma, as well as a disorganization and shortening of the outer segments in the peripheral retina. We conclude that the clinical and pathological findings in the eyes of this patient having RP with vitamin E deficiency caused by an H101Q mutation are similar to those of common autosomal recessive RP. However, special attention is required in making a diagnosis of RP with vitamin E deficiency because RP with vitamin E deficiency is medically treatable. The mild Friedreich-type ataxia accompanying the RP may be helpful in identifying this disease.

  16. Engineered CAR T Cells Targeting the Cancer-Associated Tn-Glycoform of the Membrane Mucin MUC1 Control Adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posey, Avery D; Schwab, Robert D; Boesteanu, Alina C

    2016-01-01

    with sufficient cancer-specific expression. The majority of CAR targets have been normal self-antigens on dispensable hematopoietic tissues or overexpressed shared antigens. Here, we established that abnormal self-antigens can serve as targets for tumor rejection. We developed a CAR that recognized cancer...

  17. Intratumoral delivery of CpG-conjugated anti-MUC1 antibody enhances NK cell anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettini, Jorge; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Besmer, Dahlia M; Tinder, Teresa L; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Lustgarten, Joseph; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against tumor-associated antigens are useful anticancer agents. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is one of the major mechanisms responsible for initiating natural killer cell (NK)-mediated killing of tumors. However, the regulation of ADCC via NK cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the cytolytic activity of NK cells against pancreatic cancer cells that were coated with an antibody directed against the human tumor antigen, Mucin-1 designated HMFG-2, either alone or conjugated to CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG ODN). Conjugated antibodies were tested for their ability to elicit ADCC in vitro and in vivo against pancreatic cancer cells. NK cells cultured in the presence of immobilized CpG ODN, HMFG-2 Ab, or CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 Ab were able to up-regulate perforin similarly. Interestingly, a significant higher ADCC was observed when CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2-coated tumor cells were co-cultured with NK cells compared to unconjugated HMFG-2 Ab or CpG ODN alone. Moreover, MyD88-deficient NK cells can perform ADCC in vitro. Furthermore, intratumoral injections of CpG ODN-conjugated HMFG-2 induced a significant reduction in tumor burden in vivo in an established model of pancreatic tumor in nude mice compared to CpG ODN or the HMFG-2 alone. Depletion of macrophages or NK cells before treatment confirmed that both cells were required for the anti-tumor response in vivo. Results also suggest that CpG ODN and HMFG-2 Ab could be sensed by NK cells on the mAb-coated tumor cells triggering enhanced ADCC in vitro and in vivo.

  18. 78 FR 11895 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of MUC-1 Tumor Associated Antigens as Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... recent approach where tumor associated antigens (TAAs), which are primarily expressed in human tumor cells, and not expressed or minimally expressed in normal tissues, are employed to generate a tumor... royalty bearing and will comply with the terms and conditions of 35 U.S.C. 209 and 37 CFR Part 404.7. The...

  19. Establishment of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes: sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Won Jung; Koo, Bon Chul; Kwon, Mo Sun

    2007-01-01

    Dual reporter gene imaging has several advantages for more sophisticated molecular imaging studies such as gene therapy monitoring. Herein, we have constructed hepatoma cell line expressing dual reporter genes of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and the functionalities of the genes were evaluated in vivo by nuclear and optical imaging. A pRetro-PN vector was constructed after separating NIS gene from pcDNA-NIS. RSV-EGFP-WPRE fragment separated from pLNRGW was cloned into pRetro-PN vector. The final vector expressing dual reporter genes was named pRetro-PNRGW. A human hepatoma (HepG2) cells were transfected by the retrovirus containing NIS and EGFP gene (HepG2-NE). Expression of NIS gene was confirmed by RT-PCR, radioiodine uptake and efflux studies. Expression of EGFP was confirmed by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscope. The HepG2 and HepG2-NE cells were implanted in shoulder and hindlimb of nude mice, then fluorescence image, gamma camera image and I-124 microPET image were undertaken. The HepG2-NE cell was successfully constructed. RT-PCR showed NIS and EGFP mRNA expression. About 50% of cells showed fluorescence. The iodine uptake of NIS-expressed cells was about 9 times higher than control. In efflux study, T 1/2 of HepG2-NE cells was 9 min. HepG2-NE xenograft showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots and higher iodine-uptake compared to those of HepG2 xenograft. A hepatoma cell line expressing NIS and EGFP dual reporter genes was successfully constructed and could be used as a potential either by therapeutic gene or imaging reporter gene

  20. Primary clear cell ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: A case report and clinicopathologic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal Modi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a very rare, interesting case of a carcinoma of the pancreas with predominantly abundant clear cell morphology. According to the WHO classification, primary clear cell carcinoma of the pancreas is classified as a rare "miscellaneous" carcinoma. The tumor was observed in the distal body and tail of the pancreas of a 74-year-old woman. The histopathology of tumor cells showed well-defined cell membranes, clear cytoplasm, and prominent cell boundaries. Immunohistochemical (IHC staining showed positive reactions to antibodies against vimentin, cytokeratin 7 (CK-7, mucicarmine (MUC-1, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS, periodic acid-Schiff with diastase (PASD, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, and Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9. On the other hand, IHC staining was negative for alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, cytokeratin 20 (CK-20, HMB45, chromogranin, and synaptophysin. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with a primary solid-type pancreatic clear cell carcinoma with hepatic metastasis. Herein, we report this rare case and include a review of the current literature of this tumor.

  1. Redox Specificity of 2-Hydroxyacid-Coupled NAD+/NADH Dehydrogenases: A Study Exploiting “Reactive” Arginine as a Reporter of Protein Electrostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durani, Susheel

    2013-01-01

    With “reactive” arginine as a kinetic reporter, 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases are assessed in basis of their specialization as NAD+-reducing or NADH-oxidizing enzymes. Specifically, M4 and H4 lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenases (MDHs) are compared to assess if their coenzyme specificity may involve electrostatics of cationic or neutral nicotinamide structure as the basis. The enzymes from diverse eukaryote and prokaryote sources thus are assessed in “reactivity” of functionally-critical arginine as a function of salt concentration and pH. Electrostatic calculations were performed on “reactive” arginines and found good correspondence with experiment. The reductive and oxidative LDHs and MDHs are assessed in their count over ionizable residues and in placement details of the residues in their structures as proteins. The variants found to be high or low in ΔpKa of “reactive” arginine are found to be also strong or weak cations that preferentially oxidize NADH (neutral nicotinamide structure) or reduce NAD+ (cationic nicotinamide structure). The ionized groups of protein structure may thus be important to redox specificity of the enzyme on basis of electrostatic preference for the oxidized (cationic nicotinamide) or reduced (neutral nicotinamide) coenzyme. Detailed comparisons of isozymes establish that the residues contributing in their redox specificity are scrambled in structure of the reductive enzyme. PMID:24391777

  2. Redox specificity of 2-hydroxyacid-coupled NAD(+/NADH dehydrogenases: a study exploiting "reactive" arginine as a reporter of protein electrostatics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Gupta

    Full Text Available With "reactive" arginine as a kinetic reporter, 2-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases are assessed in basis of their specialization as NAD(+-reducing or NADH-oxidizing enzymes. Specifically, M4 and H4 lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenases (MDHs are compared to assess if their coenzyme specificity may involve electrostatics of cationic or neutral nicotinamide structure as the basis. The enzymes from diverse eukaryote and prokaryote sources thus are assessed in "reactivity" of functionally-critical arginine as a function of salt concentration and pH. Electrostatic calculations were performed on "reactive" arginines and found good correspondence with experiment. The reductive and oxidative LDHs and MDHs are assessed in their count over ionizable residues and in placement details of the residues in their structures as proteins. The variants found to be high or low in ΔpKa of "reactive" arginine are found to be also strong or weak cations that preferentially oxidize NADH (neutral nicotinamide structure or reduce NAD(+ (cationic nicotinamide structure. The ionized groups of protein structure may thus be important to redox specificity of the enzyme on basis of electrostatic preference for the oxidized (cationic nicotinamide or reduced (neutral nicotinamide coenzyme. Detailed comparisons of isozymes establish that the residues contributing in their redox specificity are scrambled in structure of the reductive enzyme.

  3. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...... facilitates homophilic cell adhesion. Moreover, IGSF9 family proteins have been implicated in the outgrowth and branching of neurites, axon guidance, synapse maturation, self-avoidance, and tiling. However, despite the few published studies on IGSF9 family proteins, reports on the functions of both Turtle...

  4. In vitro translocation experiments with RxLR-reporter fusion proteins of Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae and AVR3a from Phytophthora infestans fail to demonstrate specific autonomous uptake in plant and animal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawra, Stephan; Djamei, Armin; Albert, Isabell; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Kahmann, Regine; van West, Pieter

    2013-05-01

    Plant-pathogenic oomycetes have a large set of secreted effectors that can be translocated into their host cells during infection. One group of these effectors are the RxLR effectors for which it has been shown, in a few cases, that the RxLR motif is important for their translocation. It has been suggested that the RxLR-leader sequences alone are enough to translocate the respective effectors into eukaryotic cells through binding to surface-exposed phosphoinositol-3-phosphate. These conclusions were primary based on translocation experiments conducted with recombinant fusion proteins whereby the RxLR leader of RxLR effectors (i.e., Avr1b from Phytophthora sojae) were fused to the green fluorescent protein reporter-protein. However, we failed to observe specific cellular uptake for a comparable fusion protein where the RxLR leader of the P. infestans AVR3a was fused to monomeric red fluorescent protein. Therefore, we reexamined the ability of the reported P. sojae AVR1b RxLR leader to enter eukaryotic cells. Different relevant experiments were performed in three independent laboratories, using fluorescent reporter fusion constructs of AVR3a and Avr1b proteins in a side-by-side comparative study on plant tissue and human and animal cells. We report that we were unable to obtain conclusive evidence for specific RxLR-mediated translocation.

  5. In vivo imaging of induction of heat-shock protein-70 gene expression with fluorescence reflectance imaging and intravital confocal microscopy following brain ischaemia in reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Xavier; Santalucía, Tomàs; Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Purroy, Jesús; Calvo, Maria; Salas-Perdomo, Angélica; Justicia, Carles; Couillaud, Franck; Planas, Anna M

    2013-02-01

    Stroke induces strong expression of the 72-kDa heat-shock protein (HSP-70) in the ischaemic brain, and neuronal expression of HSP-70 is associated with the ischaemic penumbra. The aim of this study was to image induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in vivo after brain ischaemia using reporter mice. A genomic DNA sequence of the Hspa1b promoter was used to generate an Hsp70-mPlum far-red fluorescence reporter vector. The construct was tested in cellular systems (NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line) by transient transfection and examining mPlum and Hsp-70 induction under a challenge. After construct validation, mPlum transgenic mice were generated. Focal brain ischaemia was induced by transient intraluminal occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and the mice were imaged in vivo with fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) with an intact skull, and with confocal microscopy after opening a cranial window. Cells transfected with the Hsp70-mPlum construct showed mPlum fluorescence after stimulation. One day after induction of ischaemia, reporter mice showed a FRI signal located in the HSP-70-positive zone within the ipsilateral hemisphere, as validated by immunohistochemistry. Live confocal microscopy allowed brain tissue to be visualized at the cellular level. mPlum fluorescence was observed in vivo in the ipsilateral cortex 1 day after induction of ischaemia in neurons, where it is compatible with penumbra and neuronal viability, and in blood vessels in the core of the infarction. This study showed in vivo induction of Hsp-70 gene expression in ischaemic brain using reporter mice. The fluorescence signal showed in vivo the induction of Hsp-70 in penumbra neurons and in the vasculature within the ischaemic core.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the buildup of this waste product can cause gout, which is a form of arthritis resulting from ... MCKD1 is caused by mutations in the MUC1 gene. This gene provides instructions for making a protein ...

  7. Functional fluorescent protein insertions in herpes simplex virus gB report on gB conformation before and after execution of membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R Gallagher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV into a target cell requires complex interactions and conformational changes by viral glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. During viral entry, gB transitions from a prefusion to a postfusion conformation, driving fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane. While the structure of postfusion gB is known, the prefusion conformation of gB remains elusive. As the prefusion conformation of gB is a critical target for neutralizing antibodies, we set out to describe its structure by making genetic insertions of fluorescent proteins (FP throughout the gB ectodomain. We created gB constructs with FP insertions in each of the three globular domains of gB. Among 21 FP insertion constructs, we found 8 that allowed gB to remain membrane fusion competent. Due to the size of an FP, regions in gB that tolerate FP insertion must be solvent exposed. Two FP insertion mutants were cell-surface expressed but non-functional, while FP insertions located in the crown were not surface expressed. This is the first report of placing a fluorescent protein insertion within a structural domain of a functional viral fusion protein, and our results are consistent with a model of prefusion HSV gB constructed from the prefusion VSV G crystal structure. Additionally, we found that functional FP insertions from two different structural domains could be combined to create a functional form of gB labeled with both CFP and YFP. FRET was measured with this construct, and we found that when co-expressed with gH/gL, the FRET signal from gB was significantly different from the construct containing CFP alone, as well as gB found in syncytia, indicating that this construct and others of similar design are likely to be powerful tools to monitor the conformation of gB in any model system accessible to light microscopy.

  8. Radiographic and Histologic Evaluation of a Bone Void that Formed After Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2-Mediated Sinus Graft Augmentation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Choong-Man; Yun, Jeong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    In the present case report, the authors describe radiographic and histologic observations of a bone void that formed after a sinus augmentation using a graft material that contained recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) and discuss clinical and histologic implications of their findings. Sinus augmentation was performed using a graft material comprising 1 g of hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate, which contained 1 mg of rhBMP-2. Radiographic evaluation was conducted with panoramic radiographs and computed tomography images of the augmented maxillary sinus, which were analyzed using a three-dimensional image-reconstruction program. Histologic evaluation was also performed on a biopsy specimen obtained 6 months after the sinus augmentation. The total augmented volume increased from 1,582.2 mm(3) immediately after the sinus augmentation to 3,344.9 mm3 at 6 months after the augmentation because of the formation of a bone void. Twenty-six months after the sinus augmentation, the bone void remained but had reduced in volume, with the total augmented volume reduced to 2,551.7 mm(3). Histologically, new bone was observed to be in contact with the grafted particles, and a fatty marrow-like tissue was present in the area of the bone void. This case report shows that the bone void that had formed after sinus augmentation resolved over time and seemed to be partially replaced with new bone. Furthermore, none of the implants failed, and clinical adverse events were not observed during the follow-up period.

  9. Blue Emission in Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sohini; Sengupta, Abhigyan; Hazra, Partha; Mandal, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Recent literatures reported blue-green emission from amyloid fibril as exclusive signature of fibril formation. This unusual visible luminescence is regularly used to monitor fibril growth. Blue-green emission has also been observed in crystalline protein and in solution. However, the origin of this emission is not known exactly. Our spectroscopic study of serum proteins reveals that the blue-green emission is a property of protein monomer. Evidences suggest that semiconductor-like band struc...

  10. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  11. Leading survey and research report for fiscal 1999. New technology based on functions involved in intracellular protein transport; 1999 nendo saibonai tanpakushitsu yuso kino riyo gijutsu kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    An intercellular transport technology (artificial manipulation of an intracellular protein transport system in eucaryotes) is studied for the accumulation of cytotoxic proteins, whose expression has so far been difficult, and activated proteins, which have avoided decomposition, in appropriate intracellular minute organs. The aim is to construct a system to allow foreign proteins high in productivity and quality to express themselves for production in eucaryotes. Basic surveys were conducted of the intracellular biological functions of single-membrane organelles (endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisome, vacuole/lysosome, and Golgi body), the molecular mechanism of protein transport to each organelle, and protein activation and quality control, and element technologies were extracted. For the development of novel pharmaceuticals making use of the intracellular protein transport technology, an activated protein production system was built and a search was made for transport activity impeding substances. Research tasks relative to the development of the new technologies were isolated, such as the visualization of intercellular transport. A survey was made of the market for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, enzymes, and visualizing equipment (fluorescence microscope provided with new functions), etc. (NEDO)

  12. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    'The overall goal of the research is to apply the methods of structural biology, which have been previously used primarily in biomedical applications, to bioremediation. The authors are doing this by using NMR spectroscopy to determine the structures of proteins involved in the bacterial mercury detoxification system. The research is based on the premise that the proteins encoded in the genes of the bacterial detoxification system are an untapped source of reagents and, more fundamentally, chemical strategies that can be used to remove heavy metal toxins from the environment. The initial goals are to determine the structures of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification systems responsible for the sequestration and transport of the Hg(II) ions in to the cell where reduction to Hg(O) occurs. These proteins are meP, which is water soluble and can be investigated with multidimensional solution NMR methods, and merT, the transport protein in the membrane that requires solid-state NMR methods. As of June 1998, this report summarizes work after about one and half years of the three-year award. The authors have made significant accomplishments in three aspects of the NMR studies of the proteins of the bacterial mercury detoxification system.'

  13. Green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene visualizes parvovirus B19 non-structural segment 1 (NS1 transfected endothelial modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wurster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human Parvovirus B19 (PVB19 has been associated with myocarditis putative due to endothelial infection. Whether PVB19 infects endothelial cells and causes a modification of endothelial function and inflammation and, thus, disturbance of microcirculation has not been elucidated and could not be visualized so far. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To examine the PVB19-induced endothelial modification, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP color reporter gene in the non-structural segment 1 (NS1 of PVB19. NS1-GFP-PVB19 or GFP plasmid as control were transfected in an endothelial-like cell line (ECV304. The endothelial surface expression of intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 (CD54/ICAM-1 and extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN/CD147 were evaluated by flow cytometry after NS-1-GFP or control-GFP transfection. To evaluate platelet adhesion on NS-1 transfected ECs, we performed a dynamic adhesion assay (flow chamber. NS-1 transfection causes endothelial activation and enhanced expression of ICAM-1 (CD54: mean ± standard deviation: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 85.3 ± 11.2 vs. 61.6 ± 8.1; P<0.05 and induces endothelial expression of EMMPRIN/CD147 (CD147: mean ± SEM: NS1-GFP vs. control-GFP: 114 ± 15.3 vs. 80 ± 0.91; P<0.05 compared to control-GFP transfected cells. Dynamic adhesion assays showed that adhesion of platelets is significantly enhanced on NS1 transfected ECs when compared to control-GFP (P<0.05. The transfection of ECs was verified simultaneously through flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis. CONCLUSIONS: GFP color reporter gene shows transfection of ECs and may help to visualize NS1-PVB19 induced endothelial activation and platelet adhesion as well as an enhanced monocyte adhesion directly, providing in vitro evidence of possible microcirculatory dysfunction in PVB19-induced myocarditis and, thus, myocardial tissue damage.

  14. Feasibility of dual reporter gene in rat myoblast cell line using human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, You La; Ahn, Sohn Joo; Choi, Chang Ik; Lee, Sang Woo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    To develop a non-invasive combined imaging method of gamma camera and optical imaging to assess rat myoblast cell line, H9c2, we constructed retrovirus containing hNIS and EGFP gene, and transfected to rat myoblast cell and monitored hNIS and EGFP expression. Rat myoblast cell line, H9C2, was transfected with hNIS and EGFP gene using retrovirus (H9C2-NG). The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was determined by RT-PCR and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The uptake and efflux of I-125 were measured in the transfected and wild type cell lines. Each cell line was injected to 4 flank sites (H9c2: 1X107 or 2X107, H9C2-NG: 1X107 or 2X107) in nude mouse. Scintigraphic image was performed at 3h, 1 day after H9C2 and H9C2-NG cell inoculation. We performed gamma camera and animal PET imaging to evaluate NIS expression. Also, GFP image obtained using optical imaging system. The expression of hNIS and EGFP gene was confirmed by RT-PCR. In iodide uptake, H9C2-NG cells accumulated 274.52.2 pmol/ mg protein at 30 min. But wild type cell line did not uptake iodide. In fluorescent microscopy, H9C2-NG cells were highly fluorescent than that of H9C2 cells. In iodide efflux study, 50% of radioactivity flowed out during the first 10min. Scintigraphy showed increased uptake of Tc-99m in H9c2-NG than in H9C2 for 1 day. Also, H9C2-NG cells showed high signal-to-background fluorescent spots in animal body. In this study, NIS and EGFP reporter gene were successfully transfected by a retrovirus in myoblast cell line, and the transfected cell can be easily visualized in vivo. These results suggest that NIS and EGFP gene has an excellent feasibility as a reporter gene, and it can be used to monitor cell trafficking for monitoring.

  15. Ability of self-reported estimates of dietary sodium, potassium and protein to detect an association with general and abdominal obesity: comparison with the estimates derived from 24 h urinary excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kentaro; Livingstone, M Barbara E; Sasaki, Satoshi; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-28

    As under-reporting of dietary intake, particularly by overweight and obese subjects, is common in dietary surveys, biases inherent in the use of self-reported dietary information may distort true diet-obesity relationships or even create spurious ones. However, empirical evidence of this possibility is limited. The present cross-sectional study compared the relationships of 24 h urine-derived and self-reported intakes of Na, K and protein with obesity. A total of 1043 Japanese women aged 18-22 years completed a 24 h urine collection and a self-administered diet history questionnaire. After adjustment for potential confounders, 24 h urine-derived Na intake was associated with a higher risk of general obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2) and abdominal obesity (waist circumference≥80 cm; both P for trend=0·04). For 24 h urine-derived protein intake, positive associations with general and abdominal obesity were observed (P for trend=0·02 and 0·053, respectively). For 24 h urine-derived K intake, there was an inverse association with abdominal obesity (P for trend=0·01). Conversely, when self-reported dietary information was used, only inverse associations between K intake and general and abdominal obesity were observed (P for trend=0·04 and 0·02, respectively), with no associations of Na or protein intake. In conclusion, we found positive associations of Na and protein intakes and inverse associations of K intake with obesity when using 24 h urinary excretion for estimating dietary intakes. However, no association was observed based on using self-reported dietary intakes, except for inverse association of K intake, suggesting that the ability of self-reported dietary information using the diet history questionnaire for investigating diet-obesity relationships is limited.

  16. Early steps in protein synthesis and their regulation: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The proposed program is an interwoven effort to study the details of the mechanism of protein synthesis in normal living systems and their alterations in the presence of oncogenic RNA viruses using the avian myeloblastosis virus as a model. Emphasis will be placed on determining the role of the primary structure of the viral RNA and of other factors required for the production of viral proteins in a cell-free system. Continued studies of the initial steps of protein synthesis where much specificity is determined by the tRNA: tRNA synthetase interactions will be carried out using biochemical and genetic techniques. (U.S.)

  17. Silencing of Anticoagulant Protein C Evokes Low-Incident but Spontaneous Atherothrombosis in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice-Brief Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweneel, Amber B.; Heestermans, Marco; Verwilligen, Robin A. F.; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Eck, Miranda; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Murine atherosclerosis models do not spontaneously develop atherothrombotic complications. We investigated whether disruption of natural anticoagulation allows preexisting atherosclerotic plaques to progress toward an atherothrombotic phenotype. On lowering of plasma protein C levels with small

  18. Early steps in protein synthesis and their regulation: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, P.C.

    1976-03-01

    This is a continuing study of protein synthesis, involving a search for the role of Ap/sub 4/A and other unusual nucleotides in growth regulation; studies of the mechanism of action of aminoacyl-tRNA ligases and the effect thereof on protein synthesis; a search for new regulators of the translation step, in cell-free systems; and an effort to improve the sensitivity and quantitation of chemical sequencing at the 3'-end of messenger RNA.

  19. Protein Correlation Profiles Identify Lipid Droplet Proteins with High Confidence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahmer, Natalie; Hilger, Maximiliane; Kory, Nora; Wilfling, Florian; Stoehr, Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Farese, Robert V.; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are important organelles in energy metabolism and lipid storage. Their cores are composed of neutral lipids that form a hydrophobic phase and are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer that harbors specific proteins. Most well-established LD proteins perform important functions, particularly in cellular lipid metabolism. Morphological studies show LDs in close proximity to and interacting with membrane-bound cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endosomes. Because of these close associations, it is difficult to purify LDs to homogeneity. Consequently, the confident identification of bona fide LD proteins via proteomics has been challenging. Here, we report a methodology for LD protein identification based on mass spectrometry and protein correlation profiles. Using LD purification and quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified LD proteins by correlating their purification profiles to those of known LD proteins. Application of the protein correlation profile strategy to LDs isolated from Drosophila S2 cells led to the identification of 111 LD proteins in a cellular LD fraction in which 1481 proteins were detected. LD localization was confirmed in a subset of identified proteins via microscopy of the expressed proteins, thereby validating the approach. Among the identified LD proteins were both well-characterized LD proteins and proteins not previously known to be localized to LDs. Our method provides a high-confidence LD proteome of Drosophila cells and a novel approach that can be applied to identify LD proteins of other cell types and tissues. PMID:23319140

  20. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  1. Proteins engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the - Departement d'Ingenierie et d'etudes de proteines (Deip) of the CEA more than seventy researchers are working hard to understand the function of proteins. For that they use the molecular labelling technique (F.M.)

  2. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reliable information about the safety of taking whey protein if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Milk allergy: If you are allergic to cow's milk, avoid using whey protein.

  3. Synergistic inhibition of the intrinsic factor X activation by protein S and C4b-binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The complement protein C4b-binding protein plays an important role in the regulation of the protein C anticoagulant pathway. C4b-binding protein can bind to protein S, thereby inhibiting the cofactor activity of protein S for activated protein C. In this report, we describe a new role for

  4. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL). By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1), shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL. PMID:24555083

  5. Full protein alimentation and nitrogen equilibrium in a renal failure patient treated with continuous hemodiafiltration: a case report of 67 days of continuous hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, H N; Borg, U; Frankenfield, D

    1992-01-01

    Standard care for patients with renal failure while in an intensive care unit involves traditional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis and protein restriction. We present a case of a patient with renal failure supported with continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration with dialysis (CAVH-D) who was given full protein alimentation. Total daily urea clearance was measured from the CAVH-D output. Protein load was 196 +/- 34 g/day while receiving total parenteral nutrition and 164 +/- 30 g/day while receiving enteral alimentation. Serum blood urea nitrogen was controlled between 40 and 75 mg/dL, except during septic episodes. Nitrogen balance was estimated based upon known alimentation protein load and measurable and estimated nitrogenous losses. The patient was potentially in nitrogen equilibrium during most of the dialysis period. The cumulative nitrogen balance was positive by 5.2 g after 67 days of dialysis. Volume of alimentation was 3.49 +/- 0.7 liters/day. With CAVH-D, the renal failure patient can receive full alimentation without volume or protein load limitations. Furthermore, nitrogen balances can be estimated easily while the patient is on CAVH-D.

  6. Two-dimensional analysis of human lymphocyte proteins. III. Preliminary report on a marker for the early detection and diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willard, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic patterns of human peripheral blood leukocytes from 12 patients with infectious mononucleosis were prepared by use of the ISO-DALT system. Before the two-dimensional separation, the leukocytes were purified by Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation and labeled overnight with [ 35 S] methionine. Quantitative increases in two proteins were detected in the patterns of infected leukocytes from the patients as compared with controls. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of leukocytes from normal human peripheral blood before subsequent two-dimensional gel analysis revealed that the dramatic increase in one of these proteins (Inmono:2) could be due to shifts in the population ratios of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes. In contrast, the appearance in the infected leukocytes of a second protein, Inmono:1, could not be accounted for by cell-population shifts. Increased amounts of these two proteins have been found in every patient studied who had clinically detectable infectious mononucleosis. In addition, a patient who displayed symptoms of infectious mononucleosis but who did not have a positive result in the MONOSPOT test (Ortho) until three weeks after our analysis also demonstrated increased relative amounts of these proteins in his leukocyte pattern

  7. Abnormal protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a submicroscopic X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, J E; Poglod, R; Murphy, D L; Sims, K B; de la Chapelle, A; Sankila, E M; Norio, R; Merril, C R

    1991-01-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness and, in many cases, mental retardation. Some Norrie disease cases have been shown to be associated with a submicroscopic deletion in chromosomal region Xp11.3. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from four male patients with an X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease. CSF proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then analyzed by computer using the Elsie V program. Our analysis revealed a protein that appears to be altered in patients with Norrie disease deletion.

  8. Protein restriction and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Huang, Xingguo; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-03-26

    Protein restriction without malnutrition is currently an effective nutritional intervention known to prevent diseases and promote health span from yeast to human. Recently, low protein diets are reported to be associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality risk of cancers in human. In murine models, protein restriction inhibits tumor growth via mTOR signaling pathway. IGF-1, amino acid metabolic programing, FGF21, and autophagy may also serve as potential mechanisms of protein restriction mediated cancer prevention. Together, dietary intervention aimed at reducing protein intake can be beneficial and has the potential to be widely adopted and effective in preventing and treating cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neuron adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, upstream kinase/phosphorylase protein expression, and receptivity to hormone and fuel reporters of short-term food deprivation are regulated by estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briski, Karen P; Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Shakya, Manita; Sylvester, Paul W

    2017-07-01

    Estradiol (E) mitigates acute and postacute adverse effects of 12 hr-food deprivation (FD) on energy balance. Hindbrain 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates hyperphagic and hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide and norepinephrine responses to FD in an E-dependent manner. Energy-state information from AMPK-expressing hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons shapes neural responses to metabolic imbalance. Here we investigate the hypothesis that FD causes divergent changes in A2 AMPK activity in E- vs. oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats, alongside dissimilar adjustments in circulating metabolic fuel (glucose, free fatty acids [FFA]) and energy deficit-sensitive hormone (corticosterone, glucagon, leptin) levels. FD decreased blood glucose in oil (O)- but not E-implanted ovariectomized female rats and elevated and reduced glucagon levels in O and E, respectively. FD decreased circulating leptin in O and E, but increased corticosterone and FFA concentrations in E only. Western blot analysis of laser-microdissected A2 neurons showed that glucocorticoid receptor type II and very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 protein profiles were amplified in FD/E vs. FD/O. A2 total AMPK protein was elevated without change in activity in FD/O, whereas FD/E exhibited increased AMPK activation along with decreased upstream phosphatase expression. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) was increased in FD/O but not FD/E A2 cells. The data show discordance between A2 AMPK activation and glycemic responses to FD; sensor activity was refractory to glucose decrements in FD/O but augmented in FD/E despite stabilized glucose and elevated FFA levels. E-dependent amplification of AMPK activity may reflect adaptive conversion to fatty acid oxidation and/or glucocorticoid stimulation. FD augmentation of A2 DβH protein profiles in FD/O but not FD/E animals suggests that FD may correspondingly regulate NE synthesis vs. metabolism/release in the

  10. Fiscal 1999 achievement report on research and development project on intellectual infrastructure creation and utilization technologies. Development of efficient protein expression system (Development of efficient protein expression system utilizing protein folding mechanism of hyperthermophilic bacteria); 1999 nendo kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chokonetsukin no tanpakushitsu oritatami kiko wo riyoshita kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Efforts were exerted to achieve efficient expression of proteins of hyperthermophilic bacteria, hyperthermophilic archaeabacteria in particular, using a heterogene expression system in which Escherichia coli was the host. In an effort to search for genes related to protein folding and to elucidate the mechanism of folding, chaperonin and prefoldin subunit genes, out of various factors participating in protein folding in hyperthermophilic archaeabacteria, were cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. As a system for analyzing protein folding reaction, an experimental system was established on a substrate comprising isopropyl malate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, glucose dehydrogenase, and a green fluorescent protein. Studies were further conducted to elucidate the mechanism of expression of enzyme genes in Escherichia coli for the establishment of a mass production method for useful enzymes. Also carried out was the research and development of an element technology evaluation system involving protein expression. (NEDO)

  11. Development and application of hepatitis C reporter viruses with genotype 1 to 7 core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) expressing fluorescent proteins or luciferase in modified JFH1 NS5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Tanja B; Mathiesen, Christian K

    2011-01-01

    to 2a(J6) tagged with EGFP, DsRed-Express2, mCherry, or Renilla luciferase (RLuc), yielding peak supernatant infectivity titers of 4 to 5 log(10) focus-forming units (FFU)/ml. 2a(J6) with ¿40 or ¿25 was fully viable in Huh7.5 cells. In human liver chimeric mice, 2a(J6)-EGFP¿40 acquired various...... deletions in EGFP, while 2a(J6)¿40 did not show an impaired viability. We further developed panels of JFH1-based genotype 1 to 7 core-NS2 recombinants expressing EGFP- or RLuc-NS5A¿40 fusion proteins. In cell culture, the different EGFP recombinants showed growth characteristics comparable to those...

  12. [Wheat anaphylaxis or wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by use of a soap product which contains hydrolyzed wheat proteins. -a report of 12 cases-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akiko; Kishikawa, Reiko; Nishie, Haruko; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Shimoda, Terufumi; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Nishima, Sankei; Furue, Masutaka

    2011-11-01

    Recently, it has become a social problem that hydrolyzed wheat protein in facial soap can induce wheat allergy including wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). We described the clinical characteristics of the patients related. We collected 12 cases who had had a medical examination from January to October in 2010. All the patients were female and mean age was 36.0± 9.9 years. All of them had had no prior symptoms history of wheat allergy, they gradually developed wheat anaphylaxis or WDEIA in an average of 2 years after they started to use a soap product in question which contains hydrolyzed wheat proteins. Most patients suffered immediate contact allergic reactions after or at the time of washing their face with the soap product. 10 of 12 patients showed a low level of IgE to CAP-recombinant ω-5-gliadin. Episodes of anaphylaxis were prevented by avoiding both intake of wheat-containing foods and usage of the soap product. We concluded that their wheat anaphylaxis is likely to be caused by epicutaneous sensitization of the hydrolyzed wheat proteins in the soap product. It was important that physicians should know the possibility of sensitization from non-dietary antigen.

  13. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    large molecular weight, net negative charge and hydrophilicity of synthetic small interfering RNAs makes it hard for the molecules to cross the plasma membrane and enter the cell cytoplasm. Immune responses can also diminish the effectiveness of this approach. In this issue, Shiri Weinstein and Dan Peer from Tel Aviv University provide an overview of the challenges and recent progress in the use of nanocarriers for delivering RNAi effector molecules into target tissues and cells more effectively [5]. Also in this issue, researchers in Korea report new results that demonstrate the potential of nanostructures in neural network engineering [6]. Min Jee Jang et al report directional growth of neurites along linear carbon nanotube patterns, demonstrating great progress in neural engineering and the scope for using nanotechnology to treat neural diseases. Modern medicine cannot claim to have abolished the pain and suffering that accompany disease. But a comparison between the ghastly and often ineffective iron implements of early medicine and the smart gadgets and treatments used in hospitals today speaks volumes for the extraordinary progress that has been made, and the motivation behind this research. References [1] Wallis F 2000 Signs and senses: diagnosis and prognosis in early medieval pulse and urine texts Soc. Hist. Med. 13 265-78 [2] Arntz Y, Seelig J D, Lang H P, Zhang J, Hunziker P, Ramseyer J P, Meyer E, Hegner M and Gerber Ch 2003 Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantiliever array Nanotechnology 14 86-90 [3] Gowtham S, Scheicher R H, Pandey R, Karna S P and Ahuja R 2008 First-principles study of physisorption of nucleic acid bases on small-diameter carbon nanotubes Nanotechnology 19 125701 [4] Wang H-N and Vo-Dinh T 2009 Multiplex detection of breast cancer biomarkers using plasmonic molecular sentinel nanoprobes Nanotechnology 20 065101 [5] Weinstein S and Peer D 2010 RNAi nanomedicines: challenges and opportunities within the immune system

  14. Scoring functions for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moal, Iain H; Moretti, Rocco; Baker, David; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The computational evaluation of protein-protein interactions will play an important role in organising the wealth of data being generated by high-throughput initiatives. Here we discuss future applications, report recent developments and identify areas requiring further investigation. Many functions have been developed to quantify the structural and energetic properties of interacting proteins, finding use in interrelated challenges revolving around the relationship between sequence, structure and binding free energy. These include loop modelling, side-chain refinement, docking, multimer assembly, affinity prediction, affinity change upon mutation, hotspots location and interface design. Information derived from models optimised for one of these challenges can be used to benefit the others, and can be unified within the theoretical frameworks of multi-task learning and Pareto-optimal multi-objective learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and

  16. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  17. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  18. Successful Treatment of Protein-Losing Enteropathy Induced by Intestinal Lymphangiectasia in a Liver Cirrhosis Patient with Octreotide: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hang Lak; Kim, Jin Bae; Jeon, Yong Chul; Sohn, Joo Hyun; Hahm, Joon Soo

    2004-01-01

    A 47-yr-old man with hepatitis B virus associated liver cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital with diarrhea and generalized edema and diagnosed as protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal lymphangiectasia by intestinal biopsy and 99mTc albumin scan. During hospitalization, he received subcutaneous octreotide therapy. After 2 weeks of octreotide therapy, follow-up albumin scan showed no albumin leakage, and the serum albumin level was sustained. We speculate that liver cirrhosis can be a cause of intestinal lymphangiectasia and administration of octreotide should be considered for patients with intestinal lymphangiectasia whose clinical and biochemical abnormalities do not respond to a low-fat diet. PMID:15201518

  19. Effects of whole-body γ-irradiation on the biosynthesis of certain serum proteins. Final report, November 29, 1967--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhaus, O.W.

    1976-01-01

    Whole-body exposure of rats to ionizing radiations yielded an increased incorporation of labeled amino acids into serum albumin in in vivo studies suggesting a stimulation of biosynthesis. Actually this may have been caused by an elevated hepatic transport of labeled amino acids (see below). A suppressed biosynthesis of albumin was observed when the experiments were performed in vitro using liver microsomes. Impaired biosynthesis appeared to be caused by a reduced mRNA production. Irradiation stimulated the biosynthesis of acute-phase plasma proteins (stress response) and inhibited the excretion of α/sub 2u/-globulin, the sex-dependent protein of the adult male rat. Exposure of rats to γ-rays stimulated amino acid transport into the liver. This process which is Na + and energy-dependent was studied with α-aminoisobutyric acid, cycloleucine, and L-methionine among others. After irradiation the serum glucagon and insulin, as well as hepatic cAMP levels, were elevated. Amino acid transport may be an important factor in controlling the increased gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis observed in rats following whole-body irradiation

  20. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Kim, Grace E.; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy; Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin; Yanik, Gregory A.; Kreissman, Susan G.; Hogarty, Michael; DuBois, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  1. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kim, Grace E. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy [UCSF School of Pharmacy, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, San Francisco, CA (United States); Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin [University of Florida, Children' s Oncology Group Statistics and Data Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yanik, Gregory A. [University of Michigan, CS Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kreissman, Susan G. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hogarty, Michael [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DuBois, Steven G. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  2. Binding of a fluorescence reporter and a ligand to an odorant-binding protein of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4yp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M. Leal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs, also named pheromone-binding proteins when the odorant is a pheromone, are essential for insect olfaction. They solubilize odorants that reach the port of entry of the olfactory system, the pore tubules in antennae and other olfactory appendages. Then, OBPs transport these hydrophobic compounds through an aqueous sensillar lymph to receptors embedded on dendritic membranes of olfactory receptor neurons. Structures of OBPs from mosquito species have shed new light on the mechanism of transport, although there is considerable debate on how they deliver odorant to receptors. An OBP from the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, binds the hydrophobic moiety of a mosquito oviposition pheromone (MOP on the edge of its binding cavity. Likewise, it has been demonstrated that the orthologous protein from the malaria mosquito binds the insect repellent DEET on a similar edge of its binding pocket. A high school research project was aimed at testing whether the orthologous protein from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, binds DEET and other insect repellents, and MOP was used as a positive control. Binding assays using the fluorescence reporter N-phenyl-1-naphtylamine (NPN were inconclusive. However, titration of NPN fluorescence emission in AaegOBP1 solution with MOP led to unexpected and intriguing results. Quenching was observed in the initial phase of titration, but addition of higher doses of MOP led to a stepwise increase in fluorescence emission coupled with a blue shift, which can be explained at least in part by formation of MOP micelles to house stray NPN molecules.

  3. Analysis of reporter proteins GUS and DsRed driven under the control of CaMV35S promoter in syncytia induced by beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amjad Ali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyst nematodes induce specialized feeding structures called syncytia in the plant roots. The expression of CaMV promoter in syncytia has remained topic of debate. The objective of this research was to study the activity of CaMV promoter by using reporter proteins like GUS and DsRed under the control of CaMV35S promoter in syncytia induced by H. schachtii in Arabidopsis roots. Methods: pMAA-Red and pPZP3425 plasmids were used to study expression of GUS and DsRed in syncytia. The plants were grown in 2% Knop medium under sterile conditions in growth chambers at 25°C in long day conditions. GUS activity in syncytia was studied through staining of syncytia using X-gluc solution. Ds-Red fluorescence in syncytia was detected by using an inverse microscope equipped with UV filter. Results: The expression analysis of DsRed protein driven by CaMV promoter demonstrated that this promoter is active in syncytia at all the time points. All the syncytia showed DsRed expression at 5 dpi. At 7 dpi, 10 dpi and 15 dpi over 90%, 80% and 50% of the syncytia showed DsRed fluorescence respectively. There was very high fluorescence in the syncytia as compared to the uninfected root segments due to high expression. CaMV::GUS lines showed GUS expression in 80% of 5dpi syncytia. However, unlike expression of DsRed, the number of GUS stained syncytia decreased quickly to around 50% at 7 dpi and to about 5% in the 15 dpi syncytia. Conclusions: The results conclude that CaMV promoter is more active in younger syncytia as compared to older syncytia but can be used for expression in syncytia. Moreover, DsRed protein could be used as better reporter for evaluation of gene expression in syncytia as compared to GUS.

  4. BMI was found to be a consistent determinant related to misreporting of energy, protein and potassium intake using self-report and duplicate portion methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijsburg, L.E.; Geelen, M.M.E.E.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Veer, van 't P.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.

    2017-01-01


    As misreporting, mostly under-reporting, of dietary intake is a generally known problem in nutritional research, we aimed to analyse the association between selected determinants and the extent of misreporting by the duplicate portion method (DP), 24 h recall (24hR) and FFQ by linear regression

  5. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  6. Detecting parathyroid adenoma using technetium-99m tetrofosmin: comparison with P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance related protein expression--a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiau, Y.C.; Tsai, S.C.; Wang, J.J.; Ho, S.T.; Kao, A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships among technetium-99m tetrofosmin (Tc-TF) accumulation in parathyroid adenoma and the expression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) or multidrug resistance related protein (MRP). Before operation, 33 patients with parathyroid adenomas (larger than 1.5 gm) were studied with parathyroid scintigraphy 10 minutes and 2 hours after intravenous injection of Tc-TF before operation. Immunohistochemical analyses (IHA) were performed on multiple nonconsecutive sections of operative parathyroid specimens to detect Pgp or MRP expression. According to the results of IHA, the 33 parathyroid adenomas were separated into four groups: (1) 2 adenomas with both positive Pgp and positive MRP expression, (2) 1 adenomas with positive Pgp but negative MRP expression, (3) 2 adenomas with negative Pgp but positive MRP expression, and (4) 28 adenomas with both negative Pgp and negative MRP expression. All of 28 adenomas in the group 4 could be detected by Tc-TF parathyroid imaging. All of 5 adenomas in the groups 1 to 3 could not be detected by TcTF parathyroid imaging (p < 0.05). Not only the size of parathyroid adenomas, but also significant Pgp or MRP expression limited the sensitivity of Tc-TF parathyroid imaging to localize parathyroid adenomas before operation

  7. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis in HIV-infected patients: report of 2 cases ... often affects young adults and children [1]. ... local trauma and infection, prothrombotic states like nephrotic ... head trauma. ... She denied any history of alcohol intake, cigarette smoking .... against protein S among HIV infected patients, leading to.

  8. FY 2000 report on the results of the regional consortium R and D project - Regional consortium field. First year report. R and D of highly integrated micro-protein reactor array system; 2000 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo - chiiki consortium bun'ya. Koshusekigata micro protein reactor array system no kenkyu kaihatsu (dai 1 nendo) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    By micro-processing, micro-protein reactor array is fabricated, and inside it a very trace of gene is amplified by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and then was amplified by adding the transcription/translation reaction mixture to it. By causing the protein synthesis reaction using the amplified gene, a highly integrated protein library is constructed. For it, the development of a new micro-protein reactor array system ({mu} PRAS) was proceeded with. Studies were made in the following 8 fields: 1) materials of micro reactor array and the manufacturing method; 2) development of the element unit of {mu} PRAS; 3) trial manufacture of micro reactor array chip and the evaluation; 4) trial manufacture of the micro-domain high-speed DNA manipulation system; 5) method to control non-specific DNA amplification in unimolecular PCR; 6) basic study of technology of molecular evolution of degrading enzymes of degradation-resistant substances such as dioxin; 7) method to construct the enzyme lipase library and computer simulation; 8) optimization of a system to synthesize optical activity useful compounds using enzyme lipase. (NEDO)

  9. Implication de la mucine membranaire MUC1 dans la progression tumorale rénale et identification de nouvelles cibles thérapeutiques

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillez , Audrey

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma corresponds to 5% of all adult malignancies and originates from renal tubules. The main histologic subtype is represented by clear renal cell carcinoma. Ninety percent of cRCC present a biallelic inactivation of the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene resulting in constitutive activation of hypoxia signaling pathway via the Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF) -1 transcription factor that contributes to the physiology of tumours. cRCC is typically highly resistant to ...

  10. Theranostic MUC-1 aptamer targeted gold coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy of colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Saei, Amir Ata

    2016-01-01

    Favorable physiochemical properties and the capability to accommodate targeting moieties make superparamegnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) popular theranostic agents. In this study, we engineered SPIONs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photothermal therapy of colon cancer cells...

  11. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  13. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mice lacking mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M; Curry, Jennifer M; Roy, Lopamudra D; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in more than 60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In this study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared with both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly less tumorigenic capacity compared with cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared with mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or matrix metalloproteinase 9. Further, significantly less KCKO cells entered the G(2)-M phase of the cell cycle compared with the KCM cells. Proteomics and Western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as well as a significant decrease in nestin and tubulin-α2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. ©2011 AACR

  14. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Years of meticulous curation of scientific literature and increasingly reliable computational predictions have resulted in creation of vast databases of protein interaction data. Over the years, these repositories have become a basic framework in which experiments are analyzed and new directions...

  15. Protein oxidation in muscle foods: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Marianne; Heinonen, Marina; Baron, Caroline P.

    2011-01-01

    insight into the reactions involved in the oxidative modifications undergone by muscle proteins. Moreover, a variety of products derived from oxidized muscle proteins, including cross-links and carbonyls, have been identified. The impact of oxidation on protein functionality and on specific meat quality...... and consequences of Pox in muscle foods. The efficiency of different anti-oxidant strategies against the oxidation of muscle proteins is also reported.......Protein oxidation in living tissues is known to play an essential role in the pathogenesis of relevant degenerative diseases, whereas the occurrence and impact of protein oxidation (Pox) in food systems have been ignored for decades. Currently, the increasing interest among food scientists...

  16. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  17. Chronological protein synthesis in regenerating rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinjun; Hao, Shuai; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Fuzheng; Huang, Lingyun; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng

    2015-07-01

    Liver regeneration has been studied for decades; however, its regulation remains unclear. In this study, we report a dynamic tracing of protein synthesis in rat regenerating liver with a new proteomic technique, (35) S in vivo labeling analysis for dynamic proteomics (SiLAD). Conventional proteomic techniques typically measure protein alteration in accumulated amounts. The SiLAD technique specifically detects protein synthesis velocity instead of accumulated amounts of protein through (35) S pulse labeling of newly synthesized proteins, providing a direct way for analyzing protein synthesis variations. Consequently, protein synthesis within short as 30 min was visualized and protein regulations in the first 8 h of regenerating liver were dynamically traced. Further, the 3.5-5 h post partial hepatectomy (PHx) was shown to be an important regulatory turning point by acute regulation of many proteins in the initiation of liver regeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Heterochiral Knottin Protein: Folding and Solution Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mong, Surin K; Cochran, Frank V; Yu, Hongtao; Graziano, Zachary; Lin, Yu-Shan; Cochran, Jennifer R; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2017-10-31

    Homochirality is a general feature of biological macromolecules, and Nature includes few examples of heterochiral proteins. Herein, we report on the design, chemical synthesis, and structural characterization of heterochiral proteins possessing loops of amino acids of chirality opposite to that of the rest of a protein scaffold. Using the protein Ecballium elaterium trypsin inhibitor II, we discover that selective β-alanine substitution favors the efficient folding of our heterochiral constructs. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of one such heterochiral protein reveals a homogeneous global fold. Additionally, steered molecular dynamics simulation indicate β-alanine reduces the free energy required to fold the protein. We also find these heterochiral proteins to be more resistant to proteolysis than homochiral l-proteins. This work informs the design of heterochiral protein architectures containing stretches of both d- and l-amino acids.

  19. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  20. Structures composing protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrycht, Jaroslav; Sigler, Karel; Souček, Pavel; Hudeček, Jiří

    2013-08-01

    This review summarizes available data concerning intradomain structures (IS) such as functionally important amino acid residues, short linear motifs, conserved or disordered regions, peptide repeats, broadly occurring secondary structures or folds, etc. IS form structural features (units or elements) necessary for interactions with proteins or non-peptidic ligands, enzyme reactions and some structural properties of proteins. These features have often been related to a single structural level (e.g. primary structure) mostly requiring certain structural context of other levels (e.g. secondary structures or supersecondary folds) as follows also from some examples reported or demonstrated here. In addition, we deal with some functionally important dynamic properties of IS (e.g. flexibility and different forms of accessibility), and more special dynamic changes of IS during enzyme reactions and allosteric regulation. Selected notes concern also some experimental methods, still more necessary tools of bioinformatic processing and clinically interesting relationships. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    This report summarizes our research activities. In the award period, we have made significant progress on the first aim, with new discoveries reported in one published paper (1) and in one submitted manuscript (2) currently under review. The published manuscript reports on our discovery of plant ribokinase and the metabolic pathway in which it functions; the submitted manuscript is identification and characterization of the plant fructokinase family of enzymes from expression studies, sequence comparisons, subcellular localizations and enzymatic activities of recombinant proteins. Our study of loss-of-function mutants in the fructokinase family members (2) revealed that there were no phenotypic differences observed for the five genes analyzed, so we have adopted the Crispr/Cas9 system to isolate mutants in the two genes for which there are no currently available insertion mutants, and we are generating higher order mutants (double, triples, etc) to discern the relative roles and significance for each fructokinase. These mutants will be an important resource to understand regulation of carbohydrate movement and catabolism in plants. As studies from others indicate, alteration of fructokinases results in changes in cell walls and vasculatures, which have importance relative to biofuel yield and quality. In the second aim, we have characterized the protein-protein interactions for the pkfB proteins FLN1 and FLN2 that are localized to chloroplast transcriptional complexes and have proposed a new model for how chloroplast transcription is regulated. This work has been submitted for publication, been revised and will be re-submitted in December 2016

  2. Application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report of an IAEA consultants' meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 14-16 December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A Consultants' Meeting convened by the IAEA in December 1992, made recommendations on the organization of a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) using stable isotopic techniques for international comparative studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in chronically undernourished people. The CRP will use recent developments in stable isotope tracer techniques ( 13 C and 15 N) to assess the impact of infection in undernourished people on the kinetics of protein breakdown, protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, and on the synthetic rates of selected plasma proteins. Studies will be conducted in developing countries, particularly in young children. The programme goals are to (i) elaborate methods and model protocols which can be implemented in developing countries to investigate the impact on protein metabolism of infection superimposed on chronic undernutrition; (ii) test they hypothesis that dietary requirements for protein and amino acids are related to the place of nutrition and are altered substantially when infection is superimposed on chronic undernutrition. When feasible, the primary focus on protein/amino acid metabolism will be extended to assessments of protein/energy interactions when H 2 18 O becomes more readily available and/or at research sites with indirect calorimetry equipment. The data generated should be appropriate as a basis for reevaluating amino acid/protein requirements in these populations. Refs

  3. Passive acquisition of leukocyte proteins is associated with changes in phosphorylation of cellular proteins and cell-cell adhesion properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabibzadeh, S. S.; Kong, Q. F.; Kapur, S.

    1994-01-01

    In this report, we show that interaction of neoplastic epithelial cells with vesicles derived from leukocytes results in passive acquisition by tumor cells of a diverse group of leukocyte proteins. Vesicles shed from leukocytes were heterogeneous and exhibited the specific proteins expressed on leukocyte subsets. Accordingly, epithelial cells differentially acquired leukocyte proteins associated with vesicles. Ultrastructural localization demonstrated that acquired proteins were associated wi...

  4. The E5 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    DiMaio, Daniel; Petti, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The E5 proteins are short transmembrane proteins encoded by many animal and human papillomaviruses. These proteins display transforming activity in cultured cells and animals, and they presumably also play a role in the productive virus life cycle. The E5 proteins are thought to act by modulating the activity of cellular proteins. Here, we describe the biological activities of the best-studied E5 proteins and discuss the evidence implicating specific protein targets and pathways in mediating ...

  5. Protein intake and ovulatory infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarro, Jorge E; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Rosner, Bernard A; Willett, Walter C

    2008-02-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate whether intake of protein from animal and vegetable origin is associated with ovulatory infertility. A total of 18,555 married women without a history of infertility were followed up as they attempted a pregnancy or became pregnant during an 8 year period. Dietary assessments were related to the incidence of ovulatory infertility. During follow-up, 438 women reported ovulatory infertility. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk (RR) (95% confidence interval [CI]; P for trend) of ovulatory infertility comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of animal protein intake was 1.39 (1.01 to 1.90; 0.03). The corresponding RR (95% CI; P for trend) for vegetable protein intake was 0.78 (0.54 to 1.12; 0.07). Furthermore, consuming 5% of total energy intake as vegetable protein rather than as animal protein was associated with a more than 50% lower risk of ovulatory infertility (P =.007). Replacing animal sources of protein with vegetable sources of protein may reduce ovulatory infertility risk.

  6. PHENIX reports. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The various tasks outlined in the Statement of Work for the PHENIX Program have been accomplished. Reports were generated which cover the work done. This report is a compilation of the following reports: Progress Report for May 1998; Progress Report for April 1998; PHENIX FEA Mount/Electron Shield Structural Analysis report; Progress Report for February 1998; Progress Report for March 1998; and Progress Report for December 1997 and January 1998

  7. Hot-spot analysis for drug discovery targeting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Mireia; Fernández-Recio, Juan

    2018-04-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important for biological processes and pathological situations, and are attractive targets for drug discovery. However, rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions is still highly challenging. Hot-spot residues are seen as the best option to target such interactions, but their identification requires detailed structural and energetic characterization, which is only available for a tiny fraction of protein interactions. Areas covered: In this review, the authors cover a variety of computational methods that have been reported for the energetic analysis of protein-protein interfaces in search of hot-spots, and the structural modeling of protein-protein complexes by docking. This can help to rationalize the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interfaces of therapeutic interest. Computational analysis and docking can help to locate the interface, molecular dynamics can be used to find suitable cavities, and hot-spot predictions can focus the search for inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Expert opinion: A major difficulty for applying rational drug design methods to protein-protein interactions is that in the majority of cases the complex structure is not available. Fortunately, computational docking can complement experimental data. An interesting aspect to explore in the future is the integration of these strategies for targeting PPIs with large-scale mutational analysis.

  8. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  9. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-10

    Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm), is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  10. Introduction to protein blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Protein blotting is a powerful and important procedure for the immunodetection of proteins following electrophoresis, particularly proteins that are of low abundance. Since the inception of the protocol for protein transfer from an electrophoresed gel to a membrane in 1979, protein blotting has evolved greatly. The scientific community is now confronted with a variety of ways and means to carry out this transfer.

  11. Molecular signatures distinguishing active from latent tuberculosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, after in vitro antigenic stimulation with purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) or Candida: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Joel N H; Keskin, Derin B; Romero, Viviana; Zuniga, Joaquin; Encinales, Liliana; Li, Changlin; Awad, Carlos; Yunis, Edmond J

    2009-01-01

    Purified protein derivative (PPD) or tuberculin skin testing is used to identify infected individuals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and to assess cell-mediated immunity to Mtb. In the present study, we compared PBMC cultures in the presence of tuberculin or Candida antigens using cytokine bead arrays and RNA microarrays. Measurements of different cytokines and chemokines in supernatants of PMBC cultures in the presence of PPD showed increased levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma in active tuberculosis infection (ATBI) and latent TB infected (LTBI) compared to controls, and increased levels of TNF-alpha in ATBI compared with LTBI. Also, we found increase of IL-6 in cultures of PPD positive and controls but not in the cultures with Candida. We also report the molecular signature of tuberculosis infection, in ATBI patients, the following genes were found to be up-regulated and absent in LTBI individuals: two kinases (JAK3 and p38MAPK), four interleukins (IL-7, IL-2, IL-6, and IFNbeta1), a chemokine (HCC-4) a chemokine receptor (CxCR5), two interleukin receptors (IL-1R2 and IL-18R1), and three additional ones (TRAF5, Smad2, CIITA, and NOS2A). By contrast, IL-17 and IGFBP3 were significantly up-regulated in LTBI. And, STAT4, GATA3, Fra-1, and ICOS were down-regulated in ATBI but absent in LTBI. Conversely, TLR-10, IL-15, DORA, and IKK-beta were down-regulated in LTBI but not in ATBI. Interestingly, the majority of the up-regulated genes found in ATBI were found in cultures stimulated with tuberculin (PPD) or Candida antigens, suggesting that these pathogens stimulate similar immunological pathways. We believe that the molecular signature distinguishing active from latent tuberculosis infection may require using cytokine bead arrays along with RNA microarrays testing cell cultures at different times following in vitro proliferation assays using several bacterial antigens and PPD.

  12. A three-protein biomarker panel assessed in diagnostic tissue predicts death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severi, Gianluca; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Muller, David C; Pedersen, John; Longano, Anthony; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Mills, John

    2014-01-01

    Only a minority of prostate cancers lead to death. Because no tissue biomarkers of aggressiveness other than Gleason score are available at diagnosis, many nonlethal cancers are treated aggressively. We evaluated whether a panel of biomarkers, associated with a range of disease outcomes in previous studies, could predict death from prostate cancer for men with localized disease. Using a case-only design, subjects were identified from three Australian epidemiological studies. Men who had died of their disease, “cases” (N = 83), were matched to “referents” (N = 232), those who had not died of prostate cancer, using incidence density sampling. Diagnostic tissue was retrieved to assess expression of AZGP1, MUC1, NKX3.1, p53, and PTEN by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC). Poisson regression was used to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) adjusted for age, Gleason score, and stage and to estimate survival probabilities. Expression of MUC1 and p53 was associated with increased mortality (MRR 2.51, 95% CI 1.14–5.54, P = 0.02 and 3.08, 95% CI 1.41–6.95, P = 0.005, respectively), whereas AZGP1 expression was associated with decreased mortality (MRR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20–0.96, P = 0.04). Analyzing all markers under a combined model indicated that the three markers were independent predictors of prostate cancer death and survival. For men with localized disease at diagnosis, assessment of AZGP1, MUC1, and p53 expression in diagnostic tissue by IHC could potentially improve estimates of risk of dying from prostate cancer based only on Gleason score and clinical stage

  13. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  14. In cellulo examination of a beta-alpha hybrid construct of beta-hexosaminidase A subunits, reported to interact with the GM2 activator protein and hydrolyze GM2 ganglioside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incilay Sinici

    Full Text Available The hydrolysis in lysosomes of GM2 ganglioside to GM3 ganglioside requires the correct synthesis, intracellular assembly and transport of three separate gene products; i.e., the alpha and beta subunits of heterodimeric beta-hexosaminidase A, E.C. # 3.2.1.52 (encoded by the HEXA and HEXB genes, respectively, and the GM2-activator protein (GM2AP, encoded by the GM2A gene. Mutations in any one of these genes can result in one of three neurodegenerative diseases collectively known as GM2 gangliosidosis (HEXA, Tay-Sachs disease, MIM # 272800; HEXB, Sandhoff disease, MIM # 268800; and GM2A, AB-variant form, MIM # 272750. Elements of both of the hexosaminidase A subunits are needed to productively interact with the GM2 ganglioside-GM2AP complex in the lysosome. Some of these elements have been predicted from the crystal structures of hexosaminidase and the activator. Recently a hybrid of the two subunits has been constructed and reported to be capable of forming homodimers that can perform this reaction in vivo, which could greatly simplify vector-mediated gene transfer approaches for Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff diseases. A cDNA encoding a hybrid hexosaminidase subunit capable of dimerizing and hydrolyzing GM2 ganglioside could be incorporated into a single vector, whereas packaging both subunits of hexosaminidase A into vectors, such as adeno-associated virus, would be impractical due to size constraints. In this report we examine the previously published hybrid construct (H1 and a new more extensive hybrid (H2, with our documented in cellulo (live cell- based assay utilizing a fluorescent GM2 ganglioside derivative. Unfortunately when Tay-Sachs cells were transfected with either the H1 or H2 hybrid construct and then were fed the GM2 derivative, no significant increase in its turnover was detected. In vitro assays with the isolated H1 or H2 homodimers confirmed that neither was capable of human GM2AP-dependent hydrolysis of GM2 ganglioside.

  15. Evolution of protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution of protein-protein interactions · Our interests in protein-protein interactions · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20.

  16. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. → Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. → Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of protein-protein interactions and involvement of viral proteins in SARS-CoV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Pan

    Full Text Available Analyses of viral protein-protein interactions are an important step to understand viral protein functions and their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we adopted a mammalian two-hybrid system to screen the genome-wide intraviral protein-protein interactions of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV and therefrom revealed a number of novel interactions which could be partly confirmed by in vitro biochemical assays. Three pairs of the interactions identified were detected in both directions: non-structural protein (nsp 10 and nsp14, nsp10 and nsp16, and nsp7 and nsp8. The interactions between the multifunctional nsp10 and nsp14 or nsp16, which are the unique proteins found in the members of Nidovirales with large RNA genomes including coronaviruses and toroviruses, may have important implication for the mechanisms of replication/transcription complex assembly and functions of these viruses. Using a SARS-CoV replicon expressing a luciferase reporter under the control of a transcription regulating sequence, it has been shown that several viral proteins (N, X and SUD domains of nsp3, and nsp12 provided in trans stimulated the replicon reporter activity, indicating that these proteins may regulate coronavirus replication and transcription. Collectively, our findings provide a basis and platform for further characterization of the functions and mechanisms of coronavirus proteins.

  18. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sungsoo S.; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S.; Weiner, Joseph A.; Cook, Ralph W.; Freshman, Ryan D.; Schallmo, Michael S.; Katchko, Karina M.; Schneider, Andrew D.; Smith, Justin T.; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z.; McClendon, Mark T.; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Hsu, Erin L.; Stupp , Samuel I. (NWU)

    2017-06-19

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  19. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  20. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xueping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83% of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134% than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109% or occurrence ranking (~46%. Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high

  1. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - protein ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a ... to eat animal products to get all the protein you need in your diet. Amino acids are ...

  2. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  3. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  4. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.; Hota, Mrinal Kanti; Mallik, Sandipan B.; Maì ti, Chinmay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  5. Bipolar resistive switching in different plant and animal proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Bag, A.

    2014-06-01

    We report bipolar resistive switching phenomena observed in different types of plant and animal proteins. Using protein as the switching medium, resistive switching devices have been fabricated with conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) and Al as bottom and top electrodes, respectively. A clockwise bipolar resistive switching phenomenon is observed in all proteins. It is shown that the resistive switching phenomena originate from the local redox process in the protein and the ion exchange from the top electrode/protein interface.

  6. Scaffolding proteins: not such innocent bystanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, F Donelson; Scott, John D

    2013-06-17

    Sequential transfer of information from one enzyme to the next within the confines of a protein kinase scaffold enhances signal transduction. Though frequently considered to be inert organizational elements, two recent reports implicate kinase-scaffolding proteins as active participants in signal relay. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scaffolding Proteins: Not Such Innocent Bystanders

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, F. Donelson; Scott, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential transfer of information from one enzyme to the next within the confines of a protein kinase scaffold enhances signal transduction. Though frequently considered to be inert organizational elements, two recent reports implicate kinase-scaffolding proteins as active participants in signal relay.

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for ... receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. ... surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, ... Abbreviations used: Abs, antibodies; ANOVA, analysis of variance; AP-1, activator protein -1; BCG, ...

  9. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  10. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, John W.; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between β-casein and κ-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a β-casein monolayer is attacked by a κ-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a β-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle 'corona' thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  11. Protein interfacial structure and nanotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, John W. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)], E-mail: jww@rsc.anu.edu.au; Perriman, Adam W.; McGillivray, Duncan J.; Lin, J.-M. [Research School of Chemistry, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2009-02-21

    Here we briefly recapitulate the use of X-ray and neutron reflectometry at the air-water interface to find protein structures and thermodynamics at interfaces and test a possibility for understanding those interactions between nanoparticles and proteins which lead to nanoparticle toxicology through entry into living cells. Stable monomolecular protein films have been made at the air-water interface and, with a specially designed vessel, the substrate changed from that which the air-water interfacial film was deposited. This procedure allows interactions, both chemical and physical, between introduced species and the monomolecular film to be studied by reflectometry. The method is briefly illustrated here with some new results on protein-protein interaction between {beta}-casein and {kappa}-casein at the air-water interface using X-rays. These two proteins are an essential component of the structure of milk. In the experiments reported, specific and directional interactions appear to cause different interfacial structures if first, a {beta}-casein monolayer is attacked by a {kappa}-casein solution compared to the reverse. The additional contrast associated with neutrons will be an advantage here. We then show the first results of experiments on the interaction of a {beta}-casein monolayer with a nanoparticle titanium oxide sol, foreshadowing the study of the nanoparticle 'corona' thought to be important for nanoparticle-cell wall penetration.

  12. Co-ordinated research programme on application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report of the first research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The report is divided into 5 parts: Summary report, Progress reports (2 papers), Working papers (7 papers), Theoretical background (3 papers) and Part V containing general matters. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Observing Protein & Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition (OPEN) Study was designed to assess dietary measurement error by comparing results from self-reported dietary intake data with four dietary biomarkers: doubly labeled water and urinary nitrogen, sodium, and potassium.

  14. In vivo and in vitro protein imaging in thermophilic archaea by exploiting a novel protein tag

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visone, Valeria; Han, Wenyuan; Perugino, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Protein imaging, allowing a wide variety of biological studies both in vitro and in vivo, is of great importance in modern biology. Protein and peptide tags fused to proteins of interest provide the opportunity to elucidate protein location and functions, detect protein-protein interactions, and ......, and allowed visualization of the enzyme in living cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo imaging of any protein of a thermophilic archaeon, filling an important gap in available tools for cell biology studies in these organisms....... to production of a functional H5 protein, which was successfully labeled with appropriate fluorescent molecules and visualized in cell extracts as well as in Δogt live cells. H5 was fused to reverse gyrase, a peculiar thermophile-specific DNA topoisomerase endowed with positive supercoiling activity...

  15. Strategies for the photo-control of endogenous protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechun, Katherine E; Arndt, Katja M; Woolley, G Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Photo-controlled or 'optogenetic' effectors interfacing with endogenous protein machinery allow the roles of endogenous proteins to be probed. There are two main approaches being used to develop optogenetic effectors: (i) caging strategies using photo-controlled conformational changes, and (ii) protein relocalization strategies using photo-controlled protein-protein interactions. Numerous specific examples of these approaches have been reported and efforts to develop general methods for photo-control of endogenous proteins are a current focus. The development of improved screening and selection methods for photo-switchable proteins would advance the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  17. Protein Structure Prediction by Protein Threading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhijie; Cai, Liming; Xu, Dong

    The seminal work of Bowie, Lüthy, and Eisenberg (Bowie et al., 1991) on "the inverse protein folding problem" laid the foundation of protein structure prediction by protein threading. By using simple measures for fitness of different amino acid types to local structural environments defined in terms of solvent accessibility and protein secondary structure, the authors derived a simple and yet profoundly novel approach to assessing if a protein sequence fits well with a given protein structural fold. Their follow-up work (Elofsson et al., 1996; Fischer and Eisenberg, 1996; Fischer et al., 1996a,b) and the work by Jones, Taylor, and Thornton (Jones et al., 1992) on protein fold recognition led to the development of a new brand of powerful tools for protein structure prediction, which we now term "protein threading." These computational tools have played a key role in extending the utility of all the experimentally solved structures by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), providing structural models and functional predictions for many of the proteins encoded in the hundreds of genomes that have been sequenced up to now.

  18. Usefulness of technetium-99m tetrofosmin liver imaging to detect hepatocellular carcinoma and related to expression of P-glycoprotein or multidrug resistance associated protein-a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, H.J.; Huang, W.T.; Tsai, C.S.; Chang, C.S.; Kao, A.

    2003-01-01

    Technetium-99m Tetrofsomin (Tc-TF) has been shown to be useful in identifying several types of tumors, such as breast, lung, and thyroid cancers. There was no report in the literature for Tc-TF uptake in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Tc-TF liver imaging to detect HCC and investigate the relationship between Tc-TF liver imaging findings and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) expression. Before any therapy, 22 patients with HCC were enrolled in this study. Tc-TF liver images were performed l0 minutes after intravenous injection of 20mCi Tc-TF. All patients had liver biopsy or surgery within l week after Tc-TF liver imaging. Immunohistochemical study of the biopsy or resected HCC specimens was performed using anti-human Pgp and MRP antibodies. Twenty of the 22 (90.9%) patients showed negative Tc-TF liver imaging results without significant Tc-TF uptake in HCC, whereas only the remaining 2 (9.1%) patients showed positive Tc-TF liver imaging results with significant Tc-TF uptake in HCC. Positive Pgp expression was observed in 13 of 20 patients with negative Tc-TF liver imaging results, whereas positive MRP expression was observed in 6 of the remaining 7 patients with negative both Tc-TF liver imaging results and Pgp expression. However, negative Pgp expression but positive MRP expression was observed in all of the remaining 2 patients with positive Tc-TF liver imaging results. The correlation between Tc-TF liver imaging findings and Pgp expression was significant and better than between Tc-TF liver imaging findings and MRP expression. Pgp or MRP expression in HCC may induce no significant Tc-TF uptake in HCC resulting in negative Tc-TF liver imaging findings. Therefore, Tc-TF liver imaging is potential to be a non-invasive method to predict Pgp or MRP expression in HCC. However, further studies with a larger series of patients and longer follow-up time are necessary to confirm

  19. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we evalua...

  20. Defective Proteasome Delivery of Polyubiquitinated Proteins by Ubiquilin-2 Proteins Containing ALS Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Chang

    Full Text Available Ubiquilin proteins facilitate delivery of ubiquitinated proteins to the proteasome for degradation. Interest in the proteins has been heightened by the discovery that gene mutations in UBQLN2 cause dominant inheritance of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. However, the mechanisms by which the mutations cause ALS are not known. Here we report on the underlying defect of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing ALS-linked mutations in affecting proteasome-mediated degradation. We found that overexpression of ubiquilin-2 proteins containing any one of five different ALS mutations slow degradation of Myc, a prototypic proteasome substrate. Examination of coprecipitating proteins indicated that the mutant proteins are generally capable of binding polyubiquitinated proteins, but defective in binding the proteasome. GST-pulldown studies revealed that many of the mutants bind weaker to the S5a subunit of the proteasome, compared with wild type (WT ubiquilin-2 protein. The results suggest the mutant proteins are unable to deliver their captured cargo to the proteasome for degradation, which presumably leads to toxicity. Quantification of cell death is consistent with this idea. Measurement of protein turnover further indicated the mutant proteins have longer half-lives than WT ubiquilin-2. Our studies provide novel insight into the mechanism by which ALS-linked mutations in UBQLN2 interfere with protein degradation.

  1. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  2. Amino acids and proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A balanced, safe diet with proteins is important to meet nutritional requirements. Proteins occur in animal as well as vegetable products in important quantities. In some countries, many people obtain much of their protein from animal products. In other regions, the major portion of dietary protein ...

  3. Isotopic Changes During Digestion: Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuross, N.

    2013-12-01

    Nutrient and hydrological inputs traverse a complicated route of pH, enzymatic and cellular processes in digestion in higher animals. The end products of digestion are the starting products for biosynthesis that are often used to interpret past life-ways. Using an artificial gut system, the isotopic changes (dD, d18O, d13C and d15N) of protein are documented. Three separate protein sources are subjected to the conditions, chemical and enzymatic, found in the stomach and upper small intestine with only a small shift in the oxygen isotopic composition of the proteins observed. Middle to lower small intestine parameters produced both greater isotopic effects and significantly lower molecular weight products. The role of the gastric enterocyte and the likely involvement of the internal milieu of this cell in the isotopic composition of amino acids that are transported to the liver are reported.

  4. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  5. FY 1998 annual report on the exploration and production of functional peptide from unutilized protein resources; 1998 nendo miriyo tanpakushitsugen kara no kinosei pepuchido no tansaku to seisan ni kansuru kenkyu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This project is aimed at promotion of effective utilization of unutilized resources by transforming histidine-containing peptide (anserine), enzymatically hydrolyzed muscle protein present in lean salmon swimming off the Sanriku District in the spawning season, into functional peptide. A reactor system, comprising an enzyme-immobilized column and rotary bioreactor, is investigated to efficiently produce peptide by enzymatically hydrolyzing the water-insoluble muscle protein. Anserine is isolated by ethanol extraction, ion-exchanging and partition chromatography. The TPTZ and ABTS methods are developed for speeding up measurement of the antioxidant activity. The salmon muscle protein is hydrolyzed by 3 types of enzymes, to measure the free radical erasing activity by the ABTS method. The enzymatically hydrolyzed protein is fractionated by gel permeation chromatography. The fractions having a molecular weight of 10,000 or less show strong antioxidant activity. The hydrolyzed protein shows improved activity by the iron rhodanide method when it has histidine at the center of tripeptide, and strong radical erasing function when it has thyrosine or tryptophan at the carboxyl terminal. (NEDO)

  6. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/yx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hartmann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL. By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1, shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL.

  7. The Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, J?rgen; Battey, James N. D.; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D.; Berman, Helen M.; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploratio...

  8. PDBTM: Protein Data Bank of transmembrane proteins after 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Dániel; Simon, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2013-01-01

    The PDBTM database (available at http://pdbtm.enzim.hu), the first comprehensive and up-to-date transmembrane protein selection of the Protein Data Bank, was launched in 2004. The database was created and has been continuously updated by the TMDET algorithm that is able to distinguish between transmembrane and non-transmembrane proteins using their 3D atomic coordinates only. The TMDET algorithm can locate the spatial positions of transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayer as well. During the last 8 years not only the size of the PDBTM database has been steadily growing from ∼400 to 1700 entries but also new structural elements have been identified, in addition to the well-known α-helical bundle and β-barrel structures. Numerous 'exotic' transmembrane protein structures have been solved since the first release, which has made it necessary to define these new structural elements, such as membrane loops or interfacial helices in the database. This article reports the new features of the PDBTM database that have been added since its first release, and our current efforts to keep the database up-to-date and easy to use so that it may continue to serve as a fundamental resource for the scientific community.

  9. Ultratight crystal packing of a 10 kDa protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trillo-Muyo, Sergio [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jasilionis, Andrius [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Domagalski, Marcin J. [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Chruszcz, Maksymilian [University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Minor, Wladek [University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Kuisiene, Nomeda [Vilnius University, M. K. Čiurlionio 21/27, 03101 Vilnius (Lithuania); Arolas, Joan L.; Solà, Maria; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier, E-mail: xgrcri@ibmb.csic.es [Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, Spanish Research Council CSIC, Barcelona Science Park, c/Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-03-01

    The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase from G. thermoleovorans is reported; it is one of the most tightly packed protein structures reported to date. While small organic molecules generally crystallize forming tightly packed lattices with little solvent content, proteins form air-sensitive high-solvent-content crystals. Here, the crystallization and full structure analysis of a novel recombinant 10 kDa protein corresponding to the C-terminal domain of a putative U32 peptidase are reported. The orthorhombic crystal contained only 24.5% solvent and is therefore among the most tightly packed protein lattices ever reported.

  10. Biospecific protein immobilization for rapid analysis of weak protein interactions using self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengali, Aditya N; Tessier, Peter M

    2009-10-01

    "Reversible" protein interactions govern diverse biological behavior ranging from intracellular transport and toxic protein aggregation to protein crystallization and inactivation of protein therapeutics. Much less is known about weak protein interactions than their stronger counterparts since they are difficult to characterize, especially in a parallel format (in contrast to a sequential format) necessary for high-throughput screening. We have recently introduced a highly efficient approach of characterizing protein self-association, namely self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy (SINS; Tessier et al., 2008; J Am Chem Soc 130:3106-3112). This approach exploits the separation-dependent optical properties of gold nanoparticles to detect weak self-interactions between proteins immobilized on nanoparticles. A limitation of our previous work is that differences in the sequence and structure of proteins can lead to significant differences in their affinity to adsorb to nanoparticle surfaces, which complicates analysis of the corresponding protein self-association behavior. In this work we demonstrate a highly specific approach for coating nanoparticles with proteins using biotin-avidin interactions to generate protein-nanoparticle conjugates that report protein self-interactions through changes in their optical properties. Using lysozyme as a model protein that is refractory to characterization by conventional SINS, we demonstrate that surface Plasmon wavelengths for gold-avidin-lysozyme conjugates over a range of solution conditions (i.e., pH and ionic strength) are well correlated with lysozyme osmotic second virial coefficient measurements. Since SINS requires orders of magnitude less protein and time than conventional methods (e.g., static light scattering), we envision this approach will find application in large screens of protein self-association aimed at either preventing (e.g., protein aggregation) or promoting (e.g., protein crystallization) these

  11. A credit-card library approach for disrupting protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Shi, Jin; Yamamoto, Noboru; Moss, Jason A; Vogt, Peter K; Janda, Kim D

    2006-04-15

    Protein-protein interfaces are prominent in many therapeutically important targets. Using small organic molecules to disrupt protein-protein interactions is a current challenge in chemical biology. An important example of protein-protein interactions is provided by the Myc protein, which is frequently deregulated in human cancers. Myc belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) transcription factors. It is biologically active only as heterodimer with the bHLH-ZIP protein Max. Herein, we report a new strategy for the disruption of protein-protein interactions that has been corroborated through the design and synthesis of a small parallel library composed of 'credit-card' compounds. These compounds are derived from a planar, aromatic scaffold and functionalized with four points of diversity. From a 285 membered library, several hits were obtained that disrupted the c-Myc-Max interaction and cellular functions of c-Myc. The IC50 values determined for this small focused library for the disruption of Myc-Max dimerization are quite potent, especially since small molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions are notoriously difficult to find. Furthermore, several of the compounds were active at the cellular level as shown by their biological effects on Myc action in chicken embryo fibroblast assays. In light of our findings, this approach is considered a valuable addition to the armamentarium of new molecules being developed to interact with protein-protein interfaces. Finally, this strategy for disrupting protein-protein interactions should prove applicable to other families of proteins.

  12. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  13. Mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Thomas J. D.; Roepstorff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for identification of interaction partners and structural characterization of protein interactions because of its high sensitivity, mass accuracy and tolerance towards sample heterogeneity. Several tools that allow studies of protein interaction are now...... available and recent developments that increase the confidence of studies of protein interaction by mass spectrometry include quantification of affinity-purified proteins by stable isotope labeling and reagents for surface topology studies that can be identified by mass-contributing reporters (e.g. isotope...... labels, cleavable cross-linkers or fragment ions. The use of mass spectrometers to study protein interactions using deuterium exchange and for analysis of intact protein complexes recently has progressed considerably....

  14. Protein engineering and its applications in food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Swati; Rafiq, Aasima; Sharma, Savita

    2017-07-24

    Protein engineering is a young discipline that has been branched out from the field of genetic engineering. Protein engineering is based on the available knowledge about the proteins structure/function(s), tools/instruments, software, bioinformatics database, available cloned gene, knowledge about available protein, vectors, recombinant strains and other materials that could lead to change in the protein backbone. Protein produced properly from genetic engineering process means a protein that is able to fold correctly and to do particular function(s) efficiently even after being subjected to engineering practices. Protein is modified through its gene or chemically. However, modification of protein through gene is easier. There is no specific limitation of Protein Engineering tools; any technique that can lead to change the protein constituent of amino acid and result in the modification of protein structure/function is in the frame of Protein Engineering. Meanwhile, there are some common tools used to reach a specific target. More active industrial and pharmaceutical based proteins have been invented by the field of Protein Engineering to introduce new function as well as to change its interaction with surrounding environment. A variety of protein engineering applications have been reported in the literature. These applications range from biocatalysis for food and industry to environmental, medical and nanobiotechnology applications. Successful combinations of various protein engineering methods had led to successful results in food industries and have created a scope to maintain the quality of finished product after processing.

  15. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Protein synthesis controls phosphate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2018-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element assimilated largely as orthophosphate (Pi). Cells respond to Pi starvation by importing Pi from their surroundings. We now report that impaired protein synthesis alone triggers a Pi starvation response even when Pi is plentiful in the extracellular milieu. In the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium , this response entails phosphorylation of the regulatory protein PhoB and transcription of PhoB-dependent Pi transporter genes and is eliminated upon stimulation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. When protein synthesis is impaired due to low cytoplasmic magnesium (Mg 2+ ), Salmonella triggers the Pi starvation response because ribosomes are destabilized, which reduces ATP consumption and thus free cytoplasmic Pi. This response is transient because low cytoplasmic Mg 2+ promotes an uptake in Mg 2+ and a decrease in ATP levels, which stabilizes ribosomes, resulting in ATP consumption and Pi increase, thus ending the response. Notably, pharmacological inhibition of protein synthesis also elicited a Pi starvation response in the bacterium Escherichia coli and the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Our findings identify a regulatory connection between protein synthesis and Pi homeostasis that is widespread in nature. © 2018 Pontes and Groisman; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Personalizing Protein Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS, DAVID C.; SANCTUARY, MEGAN R.; QU, YUNYAO; KHAJAVI, SHABNAM HAGHIGHAT; VAN ZANDT, ALEXANDRIA E.; DYANDRA, MELISSA; FRESE, STEVEN A.; BARILE, DANIELA; GERMAN, J. BRUCE

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are not equally digestible—their proteolytic susceptibility varies by their source and processing method. Incomplete digestion increases colonic microbial protein fermentation (putrefaction), which produces toxic metabolites that can induce inflammation in vitro and have been associated with inflammation in vivo. Individual humans differ in protein digestive capacity based on phenotypes, particularly disease states. To avoid putrefaction-induced intestinal inflammation, protein sources and processing methods must be tailored to the consumer’s digestive capacity. This review explores how food processing techniques alter protein digestibility and examines how physiological conditions alter digestive capacity. Possible solutions to improving digestive function or matching low digestive capacity with more digestible protein sources are explored. Beyond the ileal digestibility measurements of protein digestibility, less invasive, quicker and cheaper techniques for monitoring the extent of protein digestion and fermentation are needed to personalize protein nourishment. Biomarkers of protein digestive capacity and efficiency can be identified with the toolsets of peptidomics, metabolomics, microbial sequencing and multiplexed protein analysis of fecal and urine samples. By monitoring individual protein digestive function, the protein component of diets can be tailored via protein source and processing selection to match individual needs to minimize colonic putrefaction and, thus, optimize gut health. PMID:26713355

  18. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction network. Based on different complex sets detected by various algorithms, we can obtain different prediction sets of protein-protein interactions. The reliability of the predicted interaction sets is proved by using estimations with statistical tests and direct confirmation of the biological data. In comparison with the approaches which predict the interactions based on the cliques, the overlap of the predictions is small. Similarly, the overlaps among the predicted sets of interactions derived from various complex sets are also small. Thus, every predicted set of interactions may complement and improve the quality of the original network data. Meanwhile, the predictions from the proposed method replenish protein-protein interactions associated with protein complexes using only the network topology.

  19. Alignment of non-covalent interactions at protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study and comparison of protein-protein interfaces is essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of interaction between proteins. While there are many methods for comparing protein structures and protein binding sites, so far no methods have been reported for comparing the geometry of non-covalent interactions occurring at protein-protein interfaces. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a method for aligning non-covalent interactions between different protein-protein interfaces. The method aligns the vector representations of van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds based on their geometry. The method has been applied to a dataset which comprises a variety of protein-protein interfaces. The alignments are consistent to a large extent with the results obtained using two other complementary approaches. In addition, we apply the method to three examples of protein mimicry. The method successfully aligns respective interfaces and allows for recognizing conserved interface regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The Galinter method has been validated in the comparison of interfaces in which homologous subunits are involved, including cases of mimicry. The method is also applicable to comparing interfaces involving non-peptidic compounds. Galinter assists users in identifying local interface regions with similar patterns of non-covalent interactions. This is particularly relevant to the investigation of the molecular basis of interaction mimicry.

  20. Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein energy malnutrition. MH Etukudo, EO Agbedana, OO Akinyinka, BOA Osifo. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 5(1) 2006: 7-11. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  1. Lupine protein enrichment by milling and electrostatic separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Jue; Zhao, Jun; Wit, De Martin; Boom, Remko M.; Schutyser, Maarten A.I.

    2016-01-01

    Lupine seeds are excellent source of plant protein. We here report on dry fractionation by combining milling and electrostatic separation providing an alternative to wet extraction of protein from lupine seeds. Relatively coarse milling was preferred as this provides sufficient detached protein

  2. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  3. Roles of Apicomplexan protein kinases at each life cycle stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Iwanaga, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Inhibitors of cellular protein kinases have been reported to inhibit the development of Apicomplexan parasites, suggesting that the functions of protozoan protein kinases are critical for their life cycle. However, the specific roles of these protein kinases cannot be determined using only these inhibitors without molecular analysis, including gene disruption. In this report, we describe the functions of Apicomplexan protein kinases in each parasite life stage and the potential of pre-existing protein kinase inhibitors as Apicomplexan drugs against, mainly, Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research reports (Annual reports)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    This compilation of research reports is the third one to be published once a year in the frame of a comprehensive reporting on current investigations with regard to reactor safety. There are three types of reports: RS Research Reports, LRA Research Reports, GFK Research Reports. The RS Research Reports and the LRA Research Reports give information on the investigations sponsored by the Bundesminister fuer Forschung und Technologie (BMFT) and partly by the Bundesminister des Innern (BMI [SR 100, At T 85 a]) as individual reactor safety research projects. The GFK Research Reports inform about theoretical and experimental investigations on reactor safety conducted by the Gesellschaft fuer Kernforschung mbH (GFK), Karlsruhe. The Laboratorium fuer Reaktorregelung und Anlagensicherung (LRA), Muenchen-Garching, executes nine individual research projects comprehended under number At T 85 a. The work carried out by the GFK is included in the main project 'Nuclear Safety' (PNS). The single reports are attached to the main parts and focal points of the Research Program Reactor Safety. Therefore, at the head of the reports, under 'Project Number', not only the RS-, LRA- or GFK-Number but also the number of the main part of the Research Program which the reported investigation contributes to is noted. (orig.) [de

  5. Protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Luc J C; Kies, Arie K; Saris, Wim H M

    2007-08-01

    With the increasing knowledge about the role of nutrition in increasing exercise performance, it has become clear over the last 2 decades that amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates can play an important role. Most of the attention has been focused on their effects at a muscular level. As these nutrients are ingested, however, it also means that gastrointestinal digestibility and absorption can modulate their efficacy significantly. Therefore, discussing the role of amino acids, protein, and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition entails holding a discussion on all levels of the metabolic route. On May 28-29, 2007, a small group of researchers active in the field of exercise science and protein metabolism presented an overview of the different aspects of the application of protein and protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition. In addition, they were asked to share their opinions on the future progress in their fields of research. In this overview, an introduction to the workshop and a short summary of its outcome is provided.

  6. DNA mimic proteins: functions, structures, and bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao-Ching; Ho, Chun-Han; Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2014-05-13

    DNA mimic proteins have DNA-like negative surface charge distributions, and they function by occupying the DNA binding sites of DNA binding proteins to prevent these sites from being accessed by DNA. DNA mimic proteins control the activities of a variety of DNA binding proteins and are involved in a wide range of cellular mechanisms such as chromatin assembly, DNA repair, transcription regulation, and gene recombination. However, the sequences and structures of DNA mimic proteins are diverse, making them difficult to predict by bioinformatic search. To date, only a few DNA mimic proteins have been reported. These DNA mimics were not found by searching for functional motifs in their sequences but were revealed only by structural analysis of their charge distribution. This review highlights the biological roles and structures of 16 reported DNA mimic proteins. We also discuss approaches that might be used to discover new DNA mimic proteins.

  7. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  8. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ...

  9. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  10. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.; Snow, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full

  11. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  12. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions with other proteins, or binding of small molecules. Covalent .... vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms .... stance, molecular dynamic simulation of glutamine binding pro- tein shows that ...

  13. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... covering all the systems, so far discovered.5,7,8,12. With the increasing ... Structural investigations on proteins by NMR are, currently ... rapid analysis of unfolded proteins. ...... and hence help in design of drugs against them.

  14. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiji; Song, Minxun; Demers, Andrew; Weng, Yuejin; Lu, Wuxun; Wang, Dan; Kaushik, Radhey S; Yu, Qingzhong; Li, Feng

    2012-08-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane proteins (G, F, and SH). Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses. In the present study, we show that the AMPV SH protein is modified by N-linked glycans and can be released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glycosylated AMPV SH proteins form homodimers through cysteine-mediated disulfide bonds, which has not been reported previously for SH proteins of paramyxoviruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Imaging with Activatable Reporter Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging is a newly emerged multiple disciplinary field that aims to visualize, characterize and quantitatively measure biological processes at cellular and molecular levels in humans and other living systems. A reporter gene is a piece of DNA encoding reporter protein, which presents as a readily measurable phenotype that can be distinguished easily from the background of endogenous protein. After being transferred into cells of organ systems (transgenes, the reporter gene can be utilized to visualize transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, or trafficking of proteins or cells in living subjects. Herein, we review previous classification of reporter genes and regroup the reporter gene based imaging as basic, inducible and activatable, based on the regulation of reporter gene transcription and post-translational modification of reporter proteins. We then focus on activatable reporters, in which the signal can be activated at the posttranslational level for visualizing protein-protein interactions, protein phosphorylation or tertiary structure changes. The applications of several types of activatable reporters will also be summarized. We conclude that activatable reporter imaging can benefit both basic biomedical research and drug development.

  16. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  17. [Non-enzymatic glycosylation of dietary protein in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednykh, B S; Evdokimov, I A; Sokolov, A I

    2015-01-01

    Non-enzymatic glycosylation of proteins, based on discovered by Mayarn reaction of carbohydrate aldehyde group with a free amino group of a protein molecule, is well known to experts in biochemistry of food industry. Generated brown solid in some cases give the product marketable qualities--crackling bread--in others conversely, worsen the product. The biological effects of far-advanced products of non-enzymatic protein glycosylation reaction have not been studied enough, although it was reported previously that they are not split by digestive enzymes and couldn't be absorbed by animals. The objective of this work was to compare the depth of glycosylation of different food proteins of animal and vegetable origin. The objects of the study were proteins of animal (casein, lactoglobulin, albumin) and vegetable (soy isolate, proteins of rice flour, buckwheat, oatmeal) origin, glucose and fructose were selected as glycosylation agents, exposure 15 days at 37 degrees C. Lactoglobulin was glycosylated to a lesser extent among the proteins of animal origin while protein of oatmeal was glycosylated in the least degree among vegetable proteins. Conversely, such proteins as casein and soya isolate protein bound rather large amounts of carbohydrates. Fructose binding with protein was generally higher than the binding of glucose. The only exception was a protein of oatmeal. When of glucose and fructose simultaneously presented in the incubation medium, glucose binding usually increased while binding of fructose, in contrast, reduced. According to the total amount of carbohydrate (mcg), which is able to attach a protein (mg) the studied food proteins located in the following order: albumin (38) > soy protein isolate (23) > casein (15,) > whey protein rice flour protein (6) > protein from buckwheat flour (3) > globulin (2) > protein of oatmeal (0.3). The results obtained are to be used to select the optimal combination of proteins and carbohydrates, in which the glycosylation

  18. Structural analysis of recombinant human protein QM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualberto, D.C.H.; Fernandes, J.L.; Silva, F.S.; Saraiva, K.W.; Affonso, R.; Pereira, L.M.; Silva, I.D.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The ribosomal protein QM belongs to a family of ribosomal proteins, which is highly conserved from yeast to humans. The presence of the QM protein is necessary for joining the 60S and 40S subunits in a late step of the initiation of mRNA translation. Although the exact extra-ribosomal functions of QM are not yet fully understood, it has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor. This protein was reported to interact with the transcription factor c-Jun and thereby prevent c-Jun actives genes of the cellular growth. In this study, the human QM protein was expressed in bacterial system, in the soluble form and this structure was analyzed by Circular Dichroism and Fluorescence. The results of Circular Dichroism showed that this protein has less alpha helix than beta sheet, as described in the literature. QM protein does not contain a leucine zipper region; however the ion zinc is necessary for binding of QM to c-Jun. Then we analyzed the relationship between the removal of zinc ions and folding of protein. Preliminary results obtained by the technique Fluorescence showed a gradual increase in fluorescence with the addition of increasing concentration of EDTA. This suggests that the zinc is important in the tertiary structure of the protein. More studies are being made for better understand these results. (author)

  19. Improved segmental isotope labeling of proteins and application to a larger protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomo, Takanori; Teruya, Kenta; Uegaki, Koichi; Yamazaki, Toshio; Kyogoku, Yoshimasa

    1999-01-01

    A new isotope labeling technique for peptide segments in a protein sample was recently established using the protein splicing element intein [Yamazaki et al. (1998) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 120, 5591-5592]. This method makes it possible to observe signals of a selected amino (N-) or carboxyl (C-) terminal region along a peptide chain. However, there is a problem with the yield of the segmentally labeled protein. In this paper, we report an increase in the yield of the protein that enables the production of sufficient amounts of segmentally 13 C/ 15 N-labeled protein samples. This was achieved by improvement of the expression level of the N-terminal fragment in cells and the efficiency of refolding into the active splicing conformation. The N-terminal fragment was expressed as a fused protein with the cellulose binding domain at its N-terminus, which was expressed as an insoluble peptide in cells and the expression level was increased. Incubation with 2.5 M urea and 50% glycerol increased the efficiency of the refolding greatly, thereby raising the final yields of the ligated proteins. The feasibility of application of the method to a high-molecular-weight protein was demonstrated by the results for a maltose binding protein consisting of 370 amino acids. All four examined joints in the maltose binding protein were successfully ligated to produce segmentally labeled protein samples

  20. Protein - Which is Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jay R; Falvo, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids), whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function) are also reviewed. Key PointsHigher protein needs are seen in athletic populations.Animal proteins is an important source of protein, however potential health concerns do exist from a diet of protein

  1. Gα and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein pairs maintain functional compatibility and conserved interaction interfaces throughout evolution despite frequent loss of RGS proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackenberg, Dieter; McKain, Michael R; Lee, Soon Goo; Roy Choudhury, Swarup; McCann, Tyler; Schreier, Spencer; Harkess, Alex; Pires, J Chris; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Jez, Joseph M; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Pandey, Sona

    2017-10-01

    Signaling pathways regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins exist in all eukaryotes. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are key interactors and critical modulators of the Gα protein of the heterotrimer. However, while G-proteins are widespread in plants, RGS proteins have been reported to be missing from the entire monocot lineage, with two exceptions. A single amino acid substitution-based adaptive coevolution of the Gα:RGS proteins was proposed to enable the loss of RGS in monocots. We used a combination of evolutionary and biochemical analyses and homology modeling of the Gα and RGS proteins to address their expansion and its potential effects on the G-protein cycle in plants. Our results show that RGS proteins are widely distributed in the monocot lineage, despite their frequent loss. There is no support for the adaptive coevolution of the Gα:RGS protein pair based on single amino acid substitutions. RGS proteins interact with, and affect the activity of, Gα proteins from species with or without endogenous RGS. This cross-functional compatibility expands between the metazoan and plant kingdoms, illustrating striking conservation of their interaction interface. We propose that additional proteins or alternative mechanisms may exist which compensate for the loss of RGS in certain plant species. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Caged Protein Prenyltransferase Substrates: Tools for Understanding Protein Prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Hast, Michael A.; Xu, Juhua; Mullen, Daniel; Beese, Lorena S.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D. (Duke); (UMM)

    2010-11-15

    Originally designed to block the prenylation of oncogenic Ras, inhibitors of protein farnesyltransferase currently in preclinical and clinical trials are showing efficacy in cancers with normal Ras. Blocking protein prenylation has also shown promise in the treatment of malaria, Chagas disease and progeria syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanism, targets and in vivo consequences of protein prenylation are needed to elucidate the mode of action of current PFTase (Protein Farnesyltransferase) inhibitors and to create more potent and selective compounds. Caged enzyme substrates are useful tools for understanding enzyme mechanism and biological function. Reported here is the synthesis and characterization of caged substrates of PFTase. The caged isoprenoid diphosphates are poor substrates prior to photolysis. The caged CAAX peptide is a true catalytically caged substrate of PFTase in that it is to not a substrate, yet is able to bind to the enzyme as established by inhibition studies and X-ray crystallography. Irradiation of the caged molecules with 350 nm light readily releases their cognate substrate and their photolysis products are benign. These properties highlight the utility of those analogs towards a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  3. Peptide segments in protein-protein interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-06

    Sep 6, 2006 ... contact surface from the rest of the protein surface have been used to identify ..... interfaces the contribution of the charged residues, such as. Lys, Asp and ..... Lawrence M C and Colman P M 1993 Shape complementarity at.

  4. SynechoNET: integrated protein-protein interaction database of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woo-Yeon; Kang, Sungsoo; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Oh, Jeehyun; Cho, Seongwoong; Bhak, Jong; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are model organisms for studying photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation, evolution of plant plastids, and adaptability to environmental stresses. Despite many studies on cyanobacteria, there is no web-based database of their regulatory and signaling protein-protein interaction networks to date. Description We report a database and website SynechoNET that provides predicted protein-protein interactions. SynechoNET shows cyanobacterial domain-domain interactio...

  5. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  6. Glucose-neopentyl glycol (GNG) amphiphiles for membrane protein study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rana, Rohini R; Gotfryd, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new class of surfactants for membrane protein manipulation, "GNG amphiphiles", is reported. These amphiphiles display promising behavior for membrane proteins, as demonstrated recently by the high resolution structure of a sodium-pumping pyrophosphatase reported by Kellosalo ...

  7. Glucose-neopentyl glycol (GNG) amphiphiles for membrane protein study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rana, Rohini R; Gotfryd, Kamil; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Kruse, Andrew C; Cho, Kyung Ho; Capaldi, Stefano; Carlsson, Emil; Kobilka, Brian; Loland, Claus J; Gether, Ulrik; Banerjee, Surajit; Byrne, Bernadette; Lee, John K; Gellman, Samuel H

    2013-03-21

    The development of a new class of surfactants for membrane protein manipulation, "GNG amphiphiles", is reported. These amphiphiles display promising behavior for membrane proteins, as demonstrated recently by the high resolution structure of a sodium-pumping pyrophosphatase reported by Kellosalo et al. (Science, 2012, 337, 473).

  8. Biases in Drosophila melanogaster protein trap screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Ilka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to localise or follow endogenous proteins in real time in vivo is of tremendous utility for cell biology or systems biology studies. Protein trap screens utilise the random genomic insertion of a transposon-borne artificial reporter exon (e.g. encoding the green fluorescent protein, GFP into an intron of an endogenous gene to generate a fluorescent fusion protein. Despite recent efforts aimed at achieving comprehensive coverage of the genes encoded in the Drosophila genome, the repertoire of genes that yield protein traps is still small. Results We analysed the collection of available protein trap lines in Drosophila melanogaster and identified potential biases that are likely to restrict genome coverage in protein trap screens. The protein trap screens investigated here primarily used P-element vectors and thus exhibit some of the same positional biases associated with this transposon that are evident from the comprehensive Drosophila Gene Disruption Project. We further found that protein trap target genes usually exhibit broad and persistent expression during embryonic development, which is likely to facilitate better detection. In addition, we investigated the likely influence of the GFP exon on host protein structure and found that protein trap insertions have a significant bias for exon-exon boundaries that encode disordered protein regions. 38.8% of GFP insertions land in disordered protein regions compared with only 23.4% in the case of non-trapping P-element insertions landing in coding sequence introns (p -4. Interestingly, even in cases where protein domains are predicted, protein trap insertions frequently occur in regions encoding surface exposed areas that are likely to be functionally neutral. Considering the various biases observed, we predict that less than one third of intron-containing genes are likely to be amenable to trapping by the existing methods. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that the

  9. Isomeric Detergent Comparison for Membrane Protein Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Kyung Ho; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Mortensen, Jonas S.

    2016-01-01

    and utility, particularly for eukaryotic membrane proteins and membrane protein complexes. Thus, a number of new agents have been devised; some have made significant contributions to membrane protein structural studies. However, few detergent design principles are available. In this study, we prepared meta...... and ortho isomers of the previously reported para-substituted xylene-linked maltoside amphiphiles (XMAs), along with alkyl chain-length variation. The isomeric XMAs were assessed with three membrane proteins, and the meta isomer with a C12 alkyl chain was most effective at maintaining solubility....../stability of the membrane proteins. We propose that interplay between the hydrophile–lipophile balance (HLB) and alkyl chain length is of central importance for high detergent efficacy. In addition, differences in inter-alkyl-chain distance between the isomers influence the ability of the detergents to stabilise membrane...

  10. Discrimination of thermophilic and mesophilic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaisman Iosif I

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a considerable literature on the source of the thermostability of proteins from thermophilic organisms. Understanding the mechanisms for this thermostability would provide insights into proteins generally and permit the design of synthetic hyperstable biocatalysts. Results We have systematically tested a large number of sequence and structure derived quantities for their ability to discriminate thermostable proteins from their non-thermostable orthologs using sets of mesophile-thermophile ortholog pairs. Most of the quantities tested correspond to properties previously reported to be associated with thermostability. Many of the structure related properties were derived from the Delaunay tessellation of protein structures. Conclusions Carefully selected sequence based indices discriminate better than purely structure based indices. Combined sequence and structure based indices improve performance somewhat further. Based on our analysis, the strongest contributors to thermostability are an increase in ion pairs on the protein surface and a more strongly hydrophobic interior.

  11. Tubulinlike protein from Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudes, D.; Fracek, S. P. Jr; Laursen, R. A.; Margulis, L.; Obar, R.; Tzertzinis, G.

    1987-01-01

    Tubulin proteins are the fundamental subunits of all polymeric microtubule-based eukaryotic structures. Long, hollow structures each composed of 13 protofilaments as revealed by electron microscopy, microtubules (240 angstroms in diameter) are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotes. These proteins have been the subject of intense biochemical and biophyiscal interest since the early 1970s and are of evolutionary interest as well. If tubulin-based structures (i.e., neurotubules, mitotic spindle tubules, centrioles, kinetosomes, axonemes, etc.) evolved from spirochetes by way of motility symbioses, tubulin homologies with spirochete proteins should be detectable. Tubulin proteins are widely thought to be limited to eukaryotes. Yet both azotobacters and spirochetes have shown immunological cross-reactivity with antitubulin antibodies. In neither of these studies was tubulin isolated nor any specific antigen identified as responsible for the immunoreactivity. Furthermore, although far less uniform in structure than eukaryotic microtubules, various cytoplasmic fibers and tubules (as seen by electron microscopy) have been reported in several types of prokaryotes (e.g., Spirochaeta; large termite spirochetes; treponemes; cyanobacteria; and Azotobacter. This work forms a part of our long-range study of the possible prokaryotic origin of tubulin and microtubules. Spirochetes are helically shaped gram-negative motile prokaryotes. They differ from all other bacterial in that the position of their flagella is periplasmic: their flagella lie between the inner and outer membranes of the gram-negative cell wall. Some of the largest spirochetes have longitudinally aligned 240 angstrom microtubules. Unfortunately, in spite of many attempts, all of the larger spirochetes (family Pillotaceae) with well-defined cytoplasmic tubules and antitubulin immunoreactivity are not cultivable. However, a newly described spirochete species (Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis) possessing cytoplasmic fibers

  12. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  13. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...... specific carbonylated proteins have been identified. Protein carbonylation appears to accumulate at all stages of seed development and germination investigated to date. In some cases, such as seed aging, it is probably simply an accumulation of oxidative damage. However, in other cases protein...

  14. Racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  15. HIV-1 Tat protein induces glial cell autophagy through enhancement of BAG3 protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Anna Paola; De Simone, Francesca Isabella; Iorio, Vittoria; De Marco, Margot; Khalili, Kamel; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Capunzo, Mario; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Rosati, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    BAG3 protein has been described as an anti-apoptotic and pro-autophagic factor in several neoplastic and normal cells. We previously demonstrated that BAG3 expression is elevated upon HIV-1 infection of glial and T lymphocyte cells. Among HIV-1 proteins, Tat is highly involved in regulating host cell response to viral infection. Therefore, we investigated the possible role of Tat protein in modulating BAG3 protein levels and the autophagic process itself. In this report, we show that transfection with Tat raises BAG3 levels in glioblastoma cells. Moreover, BAG3 silencing results in highly reducing Tat- induced levels of LC3-II and increasing the appearance of sub G0/G1 apoptotic cells, in keeping with the reported role of BAG3 in modulating the autophagy/apoptosis balance. These results demonstrate for the first time that Tat protein is able to stimulate autophagy through increasing BAG3 levels in human glial cells.

  16. Texturized dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwulata, Charles I; Phillips, John G; Tunick, Michael H; Qi, Phoebi X; Cooke, Peter H

    2010-03-01

    Dairy proteins are amenable to structural modifications induced by high temperature, shear, and moisture; in particular, whey proteins can change conformation to new unfolded states. The change in protein state is a basis for creating new foods. The dairy products, nonfat dried milk (NDM), whey protein concentrate (WPC), and whey protein isolate (WPI) were modified using a twin-screw extruder at melt temperatures of 50, 75, and 100 degrees C, and moistures ranging from 20 to 70 wt%. Viscoelasticity and solubility measurements showed that extrusion temperature was a more significant (P extruded dairy protein ranged from rigid (2500 N) to soft (2.7 N). Extruding at or above 75 degrees C resulted in increased peak force for WPC (138 to 2500 N) and WPI (2.7 to 147.1 N). NDM was marginally texturized; the presence of lactose interfered with its texturization. WPI products extruded at 50 degrees C were not texturized; their solubility values ranged from 71.8% to 92.6%. A wide possibility exists for creating new foods with texturized dairy proteins due to the extensive range of states achievable. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, WPI, or WPC, or NDM were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion temperature conditions were adjusted to 50, 75, or 100 degrees C, sufficient to change the structure of the dairy proteins, but not destroy them. Extrusion modified the structures of these dairy proteins for ease of use in starchy foods to boost nutrient levels. Dairy proteins can be used to boost the protein content in puffed snacks made from corn meal, but unmodified, they bind water and form doughy pastes with starch. To minimize the water binding property of dairy proteins, whey protein isolate, whey protein concentrate, or nonfat dried milk were modified by extrusion processing. Extrusion

  17. Pyroelectricity in globular protein lysozyme films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, A.; Noor, M. R.; Haq, E. U.; Silien, C.; Soulimane, T.; Tofail, S. A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Pyroelectricity is the ability of certain non-centrosymmetric materials to generate an electric charge in response to a change in temperature and finds use in a range of applications from burglar alarms to thermal imaging. Some biological materials also exhibit pyroelectricity but the examples of the effect are limited to fibrous proteins, polypeptides, and tissues and organs of animals and plants. Here, we report pyroelectricity in polycrystalline aggregate films of lysozyme, a globular protein.

  18. Rationalizing the chemical space of protein-protein interaction inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Olivier; Reynès, Christelle H; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2010-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are one of the next major classes of therapeutic targets, although they are too intricate to tackle with standard approaches. This is due, in part, to the inadequacy of today's chemical libraries. However, the emergence of a growing number of experimentally validated inhibitors of PPIs (i-PPIs) allows drug designers to use chemoinformatics and machine learning technologies to unravel the nature of the chemical space covered by the reported compounds. Key characteristics of i-PPIs can then be revealed and highlight the importance of specific shapes and/or aromatic bonds, enabling the design of i-PPI-enriched focused libraries and, therefore, of cost-effective screening strategies. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  20. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  1. Protein chimerism: novel source of protein diversity in humans adds complexity to bottom-up proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Lacal, Juan Carlos; Elortza, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Three main molecular mechanisms are considered to contribute expanding the repertoire and diversity of proteins present in living organisms: first, at DNA level (gene polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms); second, at messenger RNA (pre-mRNA and mRNA) level including alternative splicing (also termed differential splicing or cis-splicing); finally, at the protein level mainly driven through PTM and specific proteolytic cleavages. Chimeric mRNAs constitute an alternative source of protein diversity, which can be generated either by chromosomal translocations or by trans-splicing events. The occurrence of chimeric mRNAs and proteins is a frequent event in cells from the immune system and cancer cells, mainly as a consequence of gene rearrangements. Recent reports support that chimeric proteins may also be expressed at low levels under normal physiological circumstances, thus, representing a novel source of protein diversity. Notably, recent publications demonstrate that chimeric protein products can be successfully identified through bottom-up proteomic analyses. Several questions remain unsolved, such as the physiological role and impact of such chimeric proteins or the potential occurrence of chimeric proteins in higher eukaryotic organisms different from humans. The occurrence of chimeric proteins certainly seems to be another unforeseen source of complexity for the proteome. It may be a process to take in mind not only when performing bottom-up proteomic analyses in cancer studies but also in general bottom-up proteomics experiments. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Protein-protein interactions in the regulation of WRKY transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yingjun; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2013-03-01

    It has been almost 20 years since the first report of a WRKY transcription factor, SPF1, from sweet potato. Great progress has been made since then in establishing the diverse biological roles of WRKY transcription factors in plant growth, development, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Despite the functional diversity, almost all analyzed WRKY proteins recognize the TTGACC/T W-box sequences and, therefore, mechanisms other than mere recognition of the core W-box promoter elements are necessary to achieve the regulatory specificity of WRKY transcription factors. Research over the past several years has revealed that WRKY transcription factors physically interact with a wide range of proteins with roles in signaling, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. Studies of WRKY-interacting proteins have provided important insights into the regulation and mode of action of members of the important family of transcription factors. It has also emerged that the slightly varied WRKY domains and other protein motifs conserved within each of the seven WRKY subfamilies participate in protein-protein interactions and mediate complex functional interactions between WRKY proteins and between WRKY and other regulatory proteins in the modulation of important biological processes. In this review, we summarize studies of protein-protein interactions for WRKY transcription factors and discuss how the interacting partners contribute, at different levels, to the establishment of the complex regulatory and functional network of WRKY transcription factors.

  3. Inferring domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions with formal concept analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Khor

    Full Text Available Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains.

  4. Inferring Domain-Domain Interactions from Protein-Protein Interactions with Formal Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains. PMID:24586450

  5. Thesis Report:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esayas G

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... localization as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion in caco-2 cell line ... Basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis showed ... surface, in intracellular components, or secreted into the ... Dectin-1is the main receptor on leukocytes ... presence and level of protein-protein interactions with.

  6. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Pei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Chueh-Lien; Tsao, Ya-Tzu; Chang, Wen; Hsieh, I-Shan; Chern, Yijuang; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT) gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT) exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17%) restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories) than in mice (~22%). We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein) for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein) for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS). The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378) in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression. PMID:25992839

  7. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17% restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories than in mice (~22%. We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS. The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378 in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression.

  8. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateu, Batirtze Prats; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L; Kainz, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  9. Protein metabolism in marine animals: the underlying mechanism of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Keiron P P; Rogers, Alex D

    2007-01-01

    comprise a significant proportion of overall metabolic costs in marine organisms, accurate estimates of the energetic cost per unit of synthesised protein are important. Measured costs of protein metabolism are reviewed, and the very high variability in reported costs highlighted. Two major determinants of protein synthesis rates are the tissue concentration of RNA, often expressed as the RNA to protein ratio, and the RNA activity (k(RNA)). The effects of temperature, nutrition and developmental stage on RNA concentration and activity are considered. This chapter highlights our complete lack of knowledge of protein metabolism in many groups of marine organisms, and the fact we currently have only limited data for animals held under a narrow range of experimental conditions. The potential assistance that genomic methods may provide in increasing our understanding of protein metabolism is described.

  10. Co-ordinated research programme on application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The use of isotopes has revolutionized the field of human nutrition research, but has been of greatest benefit to industrialized countries. The International Atomic Energy Agency is sponsoring programmes using isotopic and related technologies in human nutrition research to address issues that are of priority to developing countries. Scientists participating in the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Malnourished Populations of Developing Countries'' are conducting research on the interaction between infection and amino acid metabolism, particularly the potential diversion of substrates from anabolic pathways to fight infection in marginally nourished children during periods of infections. This topic is of great importance to the nutritional status of children in developing countries, who frequently or chronically have infections and who, as a consequence, may have alterations in nutrient requirements. The CRP has developed and implemented a standardized protocol for measuring leucine oxidation during infection in 8 different countries. The CRP is expected to contribute important new knowledge about interactions between protein utilization, the stresses of unhygienic environments, and infections in marginally nourished people. This information is expected to be applicable to efforts to increase efficient utilization of limited food resources in developing countries. Another highlight of the CRP is that it represents an international team of nutrition scientists who together are building nutritional biology research capabilities in developing countries. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Successful medical management of acute mesenteric ischemia due to superior mesenteric and portal vein thrombosis in a 27-year-old man with protein S deficiency: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, N P; Sah, D N; Bhandari, R S

    2017-11-09

    Acute mesenteric ischemia poses a diagnostic challenge due to nonspecific clinical clues and lack of awareness owing to its rarity. Ischemia due to mesenteric venous thrombosis has a good prognosis compared to arterial cause and can be managed conservatively with early diagnosis. The portomesenteric venous system is an unusual site of thrombosis in patients with protein S deficiency, and its thrombosis is an uncommon cause of acute mesenteric ischemia. We present a case of a 27-year-old Mongolian man who presented with acute abdominal pain increasing in severity, and refractory to repeated attempts at treatment with a misdiagnosis of acute peptic ulcer disease. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of his abdomen detected complete occlusion of the superior mesenteric vein, an extension of acute thrombus into the portal vein, and ischemic mid-jejunal loops. Early diagnosis and immediate anticoagulation with continuous intravenous infusion of unfractionated heparin prevented subsequent consequences. On further workup, our patient was diagnosed with isolated protein S deficiency. We started lifelong thromboprophylaxis with warfarin to prevent recurrence and our patient was asymptomatic on the latest follow-up 5 months after discharge. Despite accurate detection of acute mesenteric ischemia by contrast-enhanced computed tomography, high index of suspicion is indispensable for its early diagnosis. Early diagnosis and immediate anticoagulation will prevent subsequent complications and need for surgical intervention. Young patients without known risk factors presenting with venous thrombosis in atypical sites should be investigated for prothrombotic diseases.

  12. Structural biology of the sequestration and transport of heavy metal toxins: NMR structure determination of proteins containing the -Cys-X-Y-Cys-metal binding motifs. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opella, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    'There are enormous amounts of heavy metals in the environment, much of it in the form of organometallic compounds resulting from various types of industrial and military waste. Nearly all of these metals and compounds are highly toxic to biological organisms including humans. However, some bacteria thrive in the presence of high concentrations of heavy metal toxins because they possess efficient mechanisms for the detoxification of these metals and compounds. Heavy metals appear to be universally toxic because of their non-selective chemistry, for example Hg(II) reacts with essentially all exposed sulfhydryl groups on proteins, thus, it may seem surprising that any organism at all can survive these chemical insults much less those that grow in a toxic milieu. However, the prebiotic environment was undoubtedly heavily polluted with heavy metals from geological processes, and the most primitive organisms simply had to evolve mechanisms for dealing with them if they were going to be able to utilize Cys, His, and the other amino acids that contribute to metal binding sites in their proteins. Genes associated with bacterial resistance to Ag, AsO 2 , AsO 4 , Bi, Cd, Co, CrO 4 , Cu, Hg, iNi, TeO 3 , TI, Pb, Zn, and other metals of environmental concern have been described (Silver, 1992; Silver and Walderhaug, 1995).'

  13. Co-ordinated research programme on application of stable isotope tracer methods to studies of amino acid, protein, and energy metabolism in malnourished populations of developing countries. Report on the second research co-ordination meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The use of isotopes has revolutionized the field of human nutrition research, but has been of greatest benefit to industrialized countries. The International Atomic Energy Agency is sponsoring programmes using isotopic and related technologies in human nutrition research to address issues that are of priority to developing countries. Scientists participating in the Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ``Amino Acid and Protein Metabolism in Malnourished Populations of Developing Countries`` are conducting research on the interaction between infection and amino acid metabolism, particularly the potential diversion of substrates from anabolic pathways to fight infection in marginally nourished children during periods of infections. This topic is of great importance to the nutritional status of children in developing countries, who frequently or chronically have infections and who, as a consequence, may have alterations in nutrient requirements. The CRP has developed and implemented a standardized protocol for measuring leucine oxidation during infection in 8 different countries. The CRP is expected to contribute important new knowledge about interactions between protein utilization, the stresses of unhygienic environments, and infections in marginally nourished people. This information is expected to be applicable to efforts to increase efficient utilization of limited food resources in developing countries. Another highlight of the CRP is that it represents an international team of nutrition scientists who together are building nutritional biology research capabilities in developing countries. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. Monitoring and control of protein production in fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin

    : • How is protein production affected on a single cell level due to environmental stress factors? • How can we improve heterologous protein production in filamentous fungi, and how does production in Aspergillus nidulans compare to protein production in the industrially exploited Aspergillus niger...... stress elements on the production of heterologous proteins in S. cerevisiae is investigated. A fluorescent reporter strain, producing an intracellular protein linked to tagRFP from the glycolytic PGK1 promoter is constructed. This strain is used to monitor the level of production in each cell when...... exposed to environmental stress. The cells are grown in shake flasks as well as bioreactors and protein levels are analyzed by flow cytometry. It is demonstrated that the fluorescent reporter can be used to study the effects on stress elements on a population basis. Production of the protein was affected...

  15. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  16. Unraveling the meaning of chemical shifts in protein NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berjanskii, Mark V; Wishart, David S

    2017-11-01

    Chemical shifts are among the most informative parameters in protein NMR. They provide wealth of information about protein secondary and tertiary structure, protein flexibility, and protein-ligand binding. In this report, we review the progress in interpreting and utilizing protein chemical shifts that has occurred over the past 25years, with a particular focus on the large body of work arising from our group and other Canadian NMR laboratories. More specifically, this review focuses on describing, assessing, and providing some historical context for various chemical shift-based methods to: (1) determine protein secondary and super-secondary structure; (2) derive protein torsion angles; (3) assess protein flexibility; (4) predict residue accessible surface area; (5) refine 3D protein structures; (6) determine 3D protein structures and (7) characterize intrinsically disordered proteins. This review also briefly covers some of the methods that we previously developed to predict chemical shifts from 3D protein structures and/or protein sequence data. It is hoped that this review will help to increase awareness of the considerable utility of NMR chemical shifts in structural biology and facilitate more widespread adoption of chemical-shift based methods by the NMR spectroscopists, structural biologists, protein biophysicists, and biochemists worldwide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biophysics in Canada, edited by Lewis Kay, John Baenziger, Albert Berghuis and Peter Tieleman. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. General protein-protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria-Schaffer, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a general protein-to-protein cross-linking procedure using the water-soluble amine-reactive homobifunctional BS(3) (bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate); however, the protocol can be easily adapted using other cross-linkers of similar properties. BS(3) is composed of two sulfo-NHS ester groups and an 11.4 Å linker. Sulfo-NHS ester groups react with primary amines in slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7.2-8.5) and yield stable amide bonds. The reaction releases N-hydroxysuccinimide (see an application of NHS esters on Labeling a protein with fluorophores using NHS ester derivitization). © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  19. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedelacq, J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP

  20. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  1. Yeast ribosomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otaka, E.; Kobata, K.

    1978-01-01

    The cytoplasmic 80s ribosomal proteins from the cells of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were analyzed by SDS two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Seventyfour proteins were identified and consecutively numbered from 1 to 74. Upon oxidation of the 80s proteins with performic acid, ten proteins (no. 15, 20, 35, 40, 44, 46, 49, 51, 54 and 55) were dislocated on the gel without change of the total number of protein spots. Five proteins (no. 8, 14, 16, 36 and 74) were phosphorylated in vivo as seen in 32 P-labelling experiments. The large and small subunits separated in low magnesium medium were analyzed by the above gel electrophoresis. At least forty-five and twenty-eight proteins were assumed to be in the large and small subunits, respectively. All proteins found in the 80s ribosomes, except for no. 3, were detected in either subunit without appearance of new spots. The acidic protein no. 3 seems to be lost during subunit dissociation. (orig.) [de

  2. Physics of protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, A. V.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2004-04-01

    Protein physics is grounded on three fundamental experimental facts: protein, this long heteropolymer, has a well defined compact three-dimensional structure; this structure can spontaneously arise from the unfolded protein chain in appropriate environment; and this structure is separated from the unfolded state of the chain by the “all-or-none” phase transition, which ensures robustness of protein structure and therefore of its action. The aim of this review is to consider modern understanding of physical principles of self-organization of protein structures and to overview such important features of this process, as finding out the unique protein structure among zillions alternatives, nucleation of the folding process and metastable folding intermediates. Towards this end we will consider the main experimental facts and simple, mostly phenomenological theoretical models. We will concentrate on relatively small (single-domain) water-soluble globular proteins (whose structure and especially folding are much better studied and understood than those of large or membrane and fibrous proteins) and consider kinetic and structural aspects of transition of initially unfolded protein chains into their final solid (“native”) 3D structures.

  3. Ultrafiltration of pegylated proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Jessica R.

    There is considerable clinical interest in the use of "second-generation" therapeutics produced by conjugation of a native protein with various polymers including polyethylene glycol (PEG). PEG--protein conjugates, so-called PEGylated proteins, can exhibit enhanced stability, half-life, and bioavailability. One of the challenges in the commercial production of PEGylated proteins is the purification required to remove unreacted polymer, native protein, and in many cases PEGylated proteins with nonoptimal degrees of conjugation. The overall objective of this thesis was to examine the use of ultrafiltration for the purification of PEGylated proteins. This included: (1) analysis of size-based separation of PEGylated proteins using conventional ultrafiltration membranes, (2) use of electrically-charged membranes to exploit differences in electrostatic interactions, and (3) examination of the effects of PEGylation on protein fouling. The experimental results were analyzed using appropriate theoretical models, with the underlying physical properties of the PEGylated proteins evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, dynamic light scattering, and reverse phase chromatography. PEGylated proteins were produced by covalent attachment of activated PEG to a protein via primary amines on the lysine residues. A simple model was developed for the reaction kinetics, which was used to explore the effect of reaction conditions and mode of operation on the distribution of PEGylated products. The effective size of the PEGylated proteins was evaluated using size exclusion chromatography, with appropriate correlations developed for the size in terms of the molecular weight of the native protein and attached PEG. The electrophoretic mobility of the PEGylated proteins were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis with the data in good agreement with a simple model accounting for the increase in protein size and the reduction in the number of protonated amine

  4. Salvage of failed protein targets by reductive alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Kim, Youngchang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Chhor, Gekleng; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw; An, Hao; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bigelow, Lance; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Li, Hui; Mack, Jamey; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Tesar, Christine; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The growth of diffraction-quality single crystals is of primary importance in protein X-ray crystallography. Chemical modification of proteins can alter their surface properties and crystallization behavior. The Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) has previously reported how reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins can improve crystallization of unique proteins that initially failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals. Recently, this approach has been expanded to include ethylation and isopropylation in the MCSG protein crystallization pipeline. Applying standard methods, 180 unique proteins were alkylated and screened using standard crystallization procedures. Crystal structures of 12 new proteins were determined, including the first ethylated and the first isopropylated protein structures. In a few cases, the structures of native and methylated or ethylated states were obtained and the impact of reductive alkylation of lysine residues was assessed. Reductive methylation tends to be more efficient and produces the most alkylated protein structures. Structures of methylated proteins typically have higher resolution limits. A number of well-ordered alkylated lysine residues have been identified, which make both intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The previous report is updated and complemented with the following new data; a description of a detailed alkylation protocol with results, structural features, and roles of alkylated lysine residues in protein crystals. These contribute to improved crystallization properties of some proteins.

  5. Salvage of Failed Protein Targets by Reductive Alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Kim, Youngchang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Chhor, Gekleng; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw; An, Hao; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bigelow, Lance; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Li, Hui; Mack, Jamey; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Tesar, Christine; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The growth of diffraction-quality single crystals is of primary importance in protein X-ray crystallography. Chemical modification of proteins can alter their surface properties and crystallization behavior. The Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) has previously reported how reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins can improve crystallization of unique proteins that initially failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals. Recently, this approach has been expanded to include ethylation and isopropylation in the MCSG protein crystallization pipeline. Applying standard methods, 180 unique proteins were alkylated and screened using standard crystallization procedures. Crystal structures of 12 new proteins were determined, including the first ethylated and the first isopropylated protein structures. In a few cases, the structures of native and methylated or ethylated states were obtained and the impact of reductive alkylation of lysine residues was assessed. Reductive methylation tends to be more efficient and produces the most alkylated protein structures. Structures of methylated proteins typically have higher resolution limits. A number of well-ordered alkylated lysine residues have been identified, which make both intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The previous report is updated and complemented with the following new data; a description of a detailed alkylation protocol with results, structural features, and roles of alkylated lysine residues in protein crystals. These contribute to improved crystallization properties of some proteins. PMID:24590719

  6. Case Report Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2013-03-26

    Mar 26, 2013 ... c Medicine and Palliative Cancer Care: A Case Report. Sanjoy Kumar Pal ... us complementary and alternative therapies for treatment about the .... controlled trials that homeopathy may be effective for the treatment of ...

  7. In vivo and in vitro protein imaging in thermophilic archaea by exploiting a novel protein tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Han, Wenyuan; Perugino, Giuseppe; Del Monaco, Giovanni; She, Qunxin; Rossi, Mosè; Valenti, Anna; Ciaramella, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Protein imaging, allowing a wide variety of biological studies both in vitro and in vivo, is of great importance in modern biology. Protein and peptide tags fused to proteins of interest provide the opportunity to elucidate protein location and functions, detect protein-protein interactions, and measure protein activity and kinetics in living cells. Whereas several tags are suitable for protein imaging in mesophilic organisms, the application of this approach to microorganisms living at high temperature has lagged behind. Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding basic cell biology mechanisms. Here, we present the development of a toolkit for protein imaging in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The system relies on a thermostable protein tag (H5) constructed by engineering the alkylguanine-DNA-alkyl-transferase protein of Sulfolobus solfataricus, which can be covalently labeled using a wide range of small molecules. As a suitable host, we constructed, by CRISPR-based genome-editing technology, a S. islandicus mutant strain deleted for the alkylguanine-DNA-alkyl-transferase gene (Δogt). Introduction of a plasmid-borne H5 gene in this strain led to production of a functional H5 protein, which was successfully labeled with appropriate fluorescent molecules and visualized in cell extracts as well as in Δogt live cells. H5 was fused to reverse gyrase, a peculiar thermophile-specific DNA topoisomerase endowed with positive supercoiling activity, and allowed visualization of the enzyme in living cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of in vivo imaging of any protein of a thermophilic archaeon, filling an important gap in available tools for cell biology studies in these organisms.

  8. Study on the plasma proteins of A-bomb survived patients including those suffered by the remained radioactivities. Report 2. Quantitative observation of the plasma protein fractions by electrophoretic test and to solve the problems for physiological clinical significance of its patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makidono, J; Takanashi, S; Yoshimoto, T; Kai, T; Yoshimoto, K; Matsutani, M; Miura, M

    1963-10-01

    The plasma proteins of A-bombed survivors, healthy persons, long term x-ray equipment handling people (for instance the radiologists and x-ray technicians), cancer patients, and tumor irradiated cancer patients were examined by the electrophoretic test. It was found that the electrophoretic patterns of plasma proteins could be divided into normal (N-pattern) and abnormal (..beta.. and ..gamma.. patterns) patterns, when they were classified according to the accents of each fraction. The patterns of the healthy persons and the long term x-ray handling people showed normal (N) pattern, however, it showed 43% abnormal patterns in A-bombed survivors and 48% in cancer patients. Furthermore, the patterns could be changed by radiotherapy to cancer, ie., from N to ..beta.. or vice versa. As a result of the quantitative observation about individual pattern, the accents of ..beta..-globulins in ..beta..-patterns and ..gamma..-globulins in ..gamma..-patterns were found. The globulins increased in the A bomb survivors and the long term x-ray handling people, and this increase was also seen in the cases of cancer patients which showed 85% of them were effected with uclers (self disintegrated) by clinical examinations. A physiological clinical significance of these abnormal patterns (..beta.. and ..gamma..) in the plasma proteins indicates the disorders in its body and an important immunological meaning. Abnormal patterns in those who suffered by the remained radioactivities caused by the A-bomb showed 70%, whose average was much higher than those of direct A-bombed survivors. It is pointed out that, in recent days, there is a trend of more and gradual increase in the malignant neoplamsm than the disorders of direct A-bombed survivors.

  9. Extractable protein of radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soebianto, Y.S.; Upul, R.M.; Makuuchi, K.; Yoshii, F.; Kume, T.

    2000-01-01

    A new method to reduce the protein level in the latex products by irradiation is reported. Water soluble protein (WSP) solution (10%) was added into radiation vulcanized NR latex (RVNRL) as much as 3 phr in three different processes: added to RVNRL, added to re-centrifuged RVNRL, and added to RVNRL followed by centrifugation. The protein content was determined by enhanced BCA method, and identified by SDS-PAGE analysis. Addition of WSP followed by centrifugation reduces EP up to the minimum protein detection, and shortens the leaching time to 20-30 min. SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the reduction of soluble protein in the serum phase, and disappearance of protein bands in the rubber extract. Protein-WSP interaction produces water soluble complex, and removed by centrifugation. The molecular weight of WSP dictates the efficiency of protein removal. (author)

  10. Extractable protein of radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soebianto, Y.S. [Center for Research and Development of Isotopes and Radiation Technology, BATAN, Jakarta (Indonesia); Upul, R.M. [Rubber Research Institute of Sri Lanka, Ratmalana (Sri Lanka); Makuuchi, K.; Yoshii, F.; Kume, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    A new method to reduce the protein level in the latex products by irradiation is reported. Water soluble protein (WSP) solution (10%) was added into radiation vulcanized NR latex (RVNRL) as much as 3 phr in three different processes: added to RVNRL, added to re-centrifuged RVNRL, and added to RVNRL followed by centrifugation. The protein content was determined by enhanced BCA method, and identified by SDS-PAGE analysis. Addition of WSP followed by centrifugation reduces EP up to the minimum protein detection, and shortens the leaching time to 20-30 min. SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the reduction of soluble protein in the serum phase, and disappearance of protein bands in the rubber extract. Protein-WSP interaction produces water soluble complex, and removed by centrifugation. The molecular weight of WSP dictates the efficiency of protein removal. (author)

  11. International consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: Executive summary-Workgroup Report of the Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna; Chehade, Mirna; Groetch, Marion E; Spergel, Jonathan M; Wood, Robert A; Allen, Katrina; Atkins, Dan; Bahna, Sami; Barad, Ashis V; Berin, Cecilia; Brown Whitehorn, Terri; Burks, A Wesley; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Cianferoni, Antonella; Conte, Marisa; Davis, Carla; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Grimshaw, Kate; Gupta, Ruchi; Hofmeister, Brittany; Hwang, J B; Katz, Yitzhak; Konstantinou, George N; Leonard, Stephanie A; Lightdale, Jennifer; McGhee, Sean; Mehr, Sami; Sopo, Stefano Miceli; Monti, Giovanno; Muraro, Antonella; Noel, Stacey Katherine; Nomura, Ichiro; Noone, Sally; Sampson, Hugh A; Schultz, Fallon; Sicherer, Scott H; Thompson, Cecilia C; Turner, Paul J; Venter, Carina; Westcott-Chavez, A Amity; Greenhawt, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Food protein-induced enterocolitis (FPIES) is a non-IgE cell- mediated food allergy that can be severe and lead to shock. Despite the potential seriousness of reactions, awareness of FPIES is low; high-quality studies providing insight into the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management are lacking; and clinical outcomes are poorly established. This consensus document is the result of work done by an international workgroup convened through the Adverse Reactions to Foods Committee of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the International FPIES Association advocacy group. These are the first international evidence-based guidelines to improve the diagnosis and management of patients with FPIES. Research on prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnostic markers, and future treatments is necessary to improve the care of patients with FPIES. These guidelines will be updated periodically as more evidence becomes available. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subarachnoidal-pleural fistula (SAPF) as an unusual cause of persistent pleural effusion. Beta-trace protein as a marker for SAPF. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deseyne, S; Vanhouteghem, K; Hallaert, G; Delanghe, J; Malfait, T

    2015-02-01

    We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a recurrent pleural effusion after a thoracoscopic resection of an anterior bulging thoracic disc hernia (level D9-D10). Despite several evacuating pleural punctions, dyspnea reoccurred due to recurrent pleural effusion, the same side as the disc resection. Because of increasing headache after each punction, a subarachnoidal pleural fistula (SAPF) was suspected. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of SAPF, there was not enough evidence to justify a new thorascopy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavity has been described as a result of trauma or surgery. Detection of beta-trace protein (BTP, a brain-specific protein) has been described to detect CSF fistulae causing rhino- and otoliquorrhea. Similarly, BTP determination could be used to identify the presence of CSF at other anatomical sites such as the thoracic cavity. Therefore, we decided to determine the concentration of BTP in the pleural effusion of this patient. BTP was assayed using immunonephelometry. The patient's BTP pleural fluid concentration was 14·0 mg/l, which was a 25-fold increase compared with the BTP serum concentration. After insertion of a subarachnoidal lumbal catheter, a video-assisted thorascopy was performed. Leakage of liquor through the parietal pleura into the thoracic cavity was observed. The SAPF was closed using a durasis patch and DuraSeal®. Postoperatively, there was no reoccurrence of pleural fluid. SAPF has to be included to the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pleural effusion after spinal surgery. This case illustrates the importance of BTP in diagnosing SAPF, especially in cases where major therapeutic consequences may need to be drawn.

  13. MAVS protein is attenuated by rotavirus nonstructural protein 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satabdi Nandi

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the single, most important agent of infantile gastroenteritis in many animal species, including humans. In developing countries, rotavirus infection attributes approximately 500,000 deaths annually. Like other viruses it establishes an intimate and complex interaction with the host cell to counteract the antiviral responses elicited by the cell. Among various pattern recognition receptors (PAMPs of the host, the cytosolic RNA helicases interact with viral RNA to activate the Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling protein (MAVS, which regulates cellular interferon response. With an aim to identify the role of different PAMPs in rotavirus infected cell, MAVS was found to degrade in a time dependent and strain independent manner. Rotavirus non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 which is a known IFN antagonist, interacted with MAVS and degraded it in a strain independent manner, resulting in a complete loss of RNA sensing machinery in the infected cell. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report on NSP1 functionality where a signaling protein is targeted unanimously in all strains. In addition NSP1 inhibited the formation of detergent resistant MAVS aggregates, thereby averting the antiviral signaling cascade. The present study highlights the multifunctional role of rotavirus NSP1 and reinforces the fact that the virus orchestrates the cellular antiviral response to its own benefit by various back up strategies.

  14. Fiscal 1999 R and D project report on intellectual base creation and use technology. Development of the efficient expression system of proteins. Part 1 (Development of the system for hyperthermophilic proteins); 1999 nendo kokoritsu tanpakushitsu hatsugen system no kaihatsu gyomu seika hokokusho. 1. Chokonetsukin yurai tanpakushitsu wo kokoritsu ni hatsugensuru system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    R and D were made on the efficient expression system of hyperthermophilic proteins. Hyperthermophilic strains living in the limited tropical zone of the earth can produce heat- resistant enzyme group with activity even at more than 90 degrees C. To utilize the effective information obtained from analysis of these genomes for industries, the base arrangement of all genomes of P.horikoshii OT3 has been opened. For the efficient expression of hyperthermophilic proteins in Escherichia coli, enzyme PhFEN was improved. For Bacillus strains, new host strains were screened. Expression of several genes from hyperthermophile, P.horikoshii OT3 was tried to be expressed in T.thermophilus using expression vector pTEV131. 8 genes were selected to be expressed using T.thermophilus as a host for independent insertion of every gene. 7 genes except the gene encoding DNA polymerase I were introduced into T.thermophilus as expression plasmid, and 5 genes were also expressed active oxygen. This R and D can largely contribute to development of genome informatics technology based on DNA analysis data. (NEDO)

  15. Novel fusion protein approach for efficient high-throughput screening of small molecule-mediating protein-protein interactions in cells and living animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2005-08-15

    Networks of protein interactions execute many different intracellular pathways. Small molecules either synthesized within the cell or obtained from the external environment mediate many of these protein-protein interactions. The study of these small molecule-mediated protein-protein interactions is important in understanding abnormal signal transduction pathways in a variety of disorders, as well as in optimizing the process of drug development and validation. In this study, we evaluated the rapamycin-mediated interaction of the human proteins FK506-binding protein (FKBP12) rapamycin-binding domain (FRB) and FKBP12 by constructing a fusion of these proteins with a split-Renilla luciferase or a split enhanced green fluorescent protein (split-EGFP) such that complementation of the reporter fragments occurs in the presence of rapamycin. Different linker peptides in the fusion protein were evaluated for the efficient maintenance of complemented reporter activity. This system was studied in both cell culture and xenografts in living animals. We found that peptide linkers with two or four EAAAR repeat showed higher protein-protein interaction-mediated signal with lower background signal compared with having no linker or linkers with amino acid sequences GGGGSGGGGS, ACGSLSCGSF, and ACGSLSCGSFACGSLSCGSF. A 9 +/- 2-fold increase in signal intensity both in cell culture and in living mice was seen compared with a system that expresses both reporter fragments and the interacting proteins separately. In this fusion system, rapamycin induced heterodimerization of the FRB and FKBP12 moieties occurred rapidly even at very lower concentrations (0.00001 nmol/L) of rapamycin. For a similar fusion system employing split-EGFP, flow cytometry analysis showed significant level of rapamycin-induced complementation.

  16. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  17. Synthesis of Lipidated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-08-17

    Protein lipidation is one of the major post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. The attachment of the lipid moiety frequently determines the localization and the function of the lipoproteins. Lipidated proteins participate in many essential biological processes in eukaryotic cells, including vesicular trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the immune response. Malfunction of these cellular processes usually leads to various diseases such as cancer. Understanding the mechanism of cellular signaling and identifying the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in which the lipoproteins are involved is a crucial task. To achieve these goals, fully functional lipidated proteins are required. However, access to lipoproteins by means of standard expression is often rather limited. Therefore, semisynthetic methods, involving the synthesis of lipidated peptides and their subsequent chemoselective ligation to yield full-length lipoproteins, were developed. In this Review we summarize the commonly used methods for lipoprotein synthesis and the development of the corresponding chemoselective ligation techniques. Several key studies involving full-length semisynthetic lipidated Ras, Rheb, and LC3 proteins are presented.

  18. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  19. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  20. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  1. RFP tags for labeling secretory pathway proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Liyang; Zhao, Yanhua [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Xi; Peng, Jianxin [College of Life Sciences, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Xu, Pingyong, E-mail: pyxu@ibp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Research, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Huan, Shuangyan, E-mail: shuangyanhuan@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Mingshu, E-mail: mingshu1984@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Research, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Membrane protein Orai1 can be used to report the fusion properties of RFPs. • Artificial puncta are affected by dissociation constant as well as pKa of RFPs. • Among tested RFPs mOrange2 is the best choice for secretory protein labeling. - Abstract: Red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) are useful tools for live cell and multi-color imaging in biological studies. However, when labeling proteins in secretory pathway, many RFPs are prone to form artificial puncta, which may severely impede their further uses. Here we report a fast and easy method to evaluate RFPs fusion properties by attaching RFPs to an environment sensitive membrane protein Orai1. In addition, we revealed that intracellular artificial puncta are actually colocalized with lysosome, thus besides monomeric properties, pKa value of RFPs is also a key factor for forming intracellular artificial puncta. In summary, our current study provides a useful guide for choosing appropriate RFP for labeling secretory membrane proteins. Among RFPs tested, mOrange2 is highly recommended based on excellent monomeric property, appropriate pKa and high brightness.

  2. Molecular imaging of drug-modulated protein-protein interactions in living subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Massoud, Tarik F; Huang, Jing; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2004-03-15

    Networks of protein interactions mediate cellular responses to environmental stimuli and direct the execution of many different cellular functional pathways. Small molecules synthesized within cells or recruited from the external environment mediate many protein interactions. The study of small molecule-mediated interactions of proteins is important to understand abnormal signal transduction pathways in cancer and in drug development and validation. In this study, we used split synthetic renilla luciferase (hRLUC) protein fragment-assisted complementation to evaluate heterodimerization of the human proteins FRB and FKBP12 mediated by the small molecule rapamycin. The concentration of rapamycin required for efficient dimerization and that of its competitive binder ascomycin required for dimerization inhibition were studied in cell lines. The system was dually modulated in cell culture at the transcription level, by controlling nuclear factor kappaB promoter/enhancer elements using tumor necrosis factor alpha, and at the interaction level, by controlling the concentration of the dimerizer rapamycin. The rapamycin-mediated dimerization of FRB and FKBP12 also was studied in living mice by locating, quantifying, and timing the hRLUC complementation-based bioluminescence imaging signal using a cooled charged coupled device camera. This split reporter system can be used to efficiently screen small molecule drugs that modulate protein-protein interactions and also to assess drugs in living animals. Both are essential steps in the preclinical evaluation of candidate pharmaceutical agents targeting protein-protein interactions, including signaling pathways in cancer cells.

  3. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walchli John

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. Results In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38α, viral polymerase (HCV NS5B, and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. Conclusion The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  4. Nanodisc-solubilized membrane protein library reflects the membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Michael T; Wilcox, Kyle C; Klein, William L; Sligar, Stephen G

    2013-05-01

    The isolation and identification of unknown membrane proteins offers the prospect of discovering new pharmaceutical targets and identifying key biochemical receptors. However, interactions between membrane protein targets and soluble ligands are difficult to study in vitro due to the insolubility of membrane proteins in non-detergent systems. Nanodiscs, nanoscale discoidal lipid bilayers encircled by a membrane scaffold protein belt, have proven to be an effective platform to solubilize membrane proteins and have been used to study a wide variety of purified membrane proteins. This report details the incorporation of an unbiased population of membrane proteins from Escherichia coli membranes into Nanodiscs. This solubilized membrane protein library (SMPL) forms a soluble in vitro model of the membrane proteome. Since Nanodiscs contain isolated proteins or small complexes, the SMPL is an ideal platform for interactomics studies and pull-down assays of membrane proteins. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the protein population before and after formation of the Nanodisc library indicates that a large percentage of the proteins are incorporated into the library. Proteomic identification of several prominent bands demonstrates the successful incorporation of outer and inner membrane proteins into the Nanodisc library.

  5. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  6. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  7. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  8. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Jouhten, Paula; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    proteins. Despite the value of BioGRID for studying protein-protein interactions, there is a need for manual curation of these interactions in order to remove false positives. RESULTS: Here we describe an annotated reconstruction of the protein-protein interactions around four key nutrient......) and for all the interactions between them (edges). The annotated information is readily available utilizing the functionalities of network modelling tools such as Cytoscape and CellDesigner. CONCLUSIONS: The reported fully annotated interaction model serves as a platform for integrated systems biology studies...

  9. The Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, Jürgen; Battey, James N D; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D; Berman, Helen M; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploration of the protein structure space. One of the challenges in using model information effectively has been to access all models available for a specific protein in heterogeneous formats at different sites using various incompatible accession code systems. Often, structure models for hundreds of proteins can be derived from a given experimentally determined structure, using a variety of established methods. This has been done by all of the PSI centers, and by various independent modeling groups. The goal of the Protein Model Portal (PMP) is to provide a single portal which gives access to the various models that can be leveraged from PSI targets and other experimental protein structures. A single interface allows all existing pre-computed models across these various sites to be queried simultaneously, and provides links to interactive services for template selection, target-template alignment, model building, and quality assessment. The current release of the portal consists of 7.6 million model structures provided by different partner resources (CSMP, JCSG, MCSG, NESG, NYSGXRC, JCMM, ModBase, SWISS-MODEL Repository). The PMP is available at http://www.proteinmodelportal.org and from the PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase.

  10. Coarse-grain modelling of protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaden, Marc; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review recent advances towards the modelling of protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the coarse-grained (CG) level, a technique that is now widely used to understand protein affinity, aggregation and self-assembly behaviour. PPI models of soluble proteins and membrane proteins are

  11. Protein-Protein Docking in Drug Design and Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Bartuzi, Damian; Stępniewski, Tomasz Maciej; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Selent, Jana

    2018-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are responsible for a number of key physiological processes in the living cells and underlie the pathomechanism of many diseases. Nowadays, along with the concept of so-called "hot spots" in protein-protein interactions, which are well-defined interface regions responsible for most of the binding energy, these interfaces can be targeted with modulators. In order to apply structure-based design techniques to design PPIs modulators, a three-dimensional structure of protein complex has to be available. In this context in silico approaches, in particular protein-protein docking, are a valuable complement to experimental methods for elucidating 3D structure of protein complexes. Protein-protein docking is easy to use and does not require significant computer resources and time (in contrast to molecular dynamics) and it results in 3D structure of a protein complex (in contrast to sequence-based methods of predicting binding interfaces). However, protein-protein docking cannot address all the aspects of protein dynamics, in particular the global conformational changes during protein complex formation. In spite of this fact, protein-protein docking is widely used to model complexes of water-soluble proteins and less commonly to predict structures of transmembrane protein assemblies, including dimers and oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this chapter we review the principles of protein-protein docking, available algorithms and software and discuss the recent examples, benefits, and drawbacks of protein-protein docking application to water-soluble proteins, membrane anchoring and transmembrane proteins, including GPCRs.

  12. Random close packing in protein cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Jennifer C; Smith, W Wendell; Regan, Lynne; O'Hern, Corey S

    2016-03-01

    Shortly after the determination of the first protein x-ray crystal structures, researchers analyzed their cores and reported packing fractions ϕ ≈ 0.75, a value that is similar to close packing of equal-sized spheres. A limitation of these analyses was the use of extended atom models, rather than the more physically accurate explicit hydrogen model. The validity of the explicit hydrogen model was proved in our previous studies by its ability to predict the side chain dihedral angle distributions observed in proteins. In contrast, the extended atom model is not able to recapitulate the side chain dihedral angle distributions, and gives rise to large atomic clashes at side chain dihedral angle combinations that are highly probable in protein crystal structures. Here, we employ the explicit hydrogen model to calculate the packing fraction of the cores of over 200 high-resolution protein structures. We find that these protein cores have ϕ ≈ 0.56, which is similar to results obtained from simulations of random packings of individual amino acids. This result provides a deeper understanding of the physical basis of protein structure that will enable predictions of the effects of amino acid mutations to protein cores and interfaces of known structure.

  13. Protein unfolding with a steric trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Tracy M; Hong, Heedeok; Kim, Tae H; Bowie, James U

    2009-10-07

    The study of protein folding requires a method to drive unfolding, which is typically accomplished by altering solution conditions to favor the denatured state. This has the undesirable consequence that the molecular forces responsible for configuring the polypeptide chain are also changed. It would therefore be useful to develop methods that can drive unfolding without the need for destabilizing solvent conditions. Here we introduce a new method to accomplish this goal, which we call steric trapping. In the steric trap method, the target protein is labeled with two biotin tags placed close in space so that both biotin tags can only be bound by streptavidin when the protein unfolds. Thus, binding of the second streptavidin is energetically coupled to unfolding of the target protein. Testing the method on a model protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), we find that streptavidin binding can drive unfolding and that the apparent binding affinity reports on changes in DHFR stability. Finally, by employing the slow off-rate of wild-type streptavidin, we find that DHFR can be locked in the unfolded state. The steric trap method provides a simple method for studying aspects of protein folding and stability in native solvent conditions, could be used to specifically unfold selected domains, and could be applicable to membrane proteins.

  14. Al cation induces aggregation of serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-07-15

    Al cation is known to induce protein fibrillation and causes several neurodegenerative disorders. We report the spectroscopic, thermodynamic analysis and AFM imaging for the Al cation binding process with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Hydrophobicity played a major role in Al-protein interactions with more hydrophobic b-LG forming stronger Al-protein complexes. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG showed Al-protein bindings occur via hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts for b-LG, while van der Waals and H-bonding interactions prevail in HSA and BSA adducts. AFM clearly indicated that aluminum cations are able to force BSA and b-LG into larger or more robust aggregates than HSA, with HSA 4±0.2 (SE, n=801) proteins per aggregate, for BSA 17±2 (SE, n=148), and for b-LG 12±3 (SE, n=151). Thioflavin T test showed no major protein fibrillation in the presence of Al cation. Al complexation induced major alterations of protein conformations with the order of perturbations b-LG>BSA>HSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein Translation and Signaling in Human Eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Esnault

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that, unlike IL-5 and GM-CSF, IL-3 induces increased translation of a subset of mRNAs. In addition, we have demonstrated that Pin1 controls the activity of mRNA binding proteins, leading to enhanced mRNA stability, GM-CSF protein production and prolonged eosinophil (EOS survival. In this review, discussion will include an overview of cap-dependent protein translation and its regulation by intracellular signaling pathways. We will address the more general process of mRNA post-transcriptional regulation, especially regarding mRNA binding proteins, which are critical effectors of protein translation. Furthermore, we will focus on (1 the roles of IL-3-driven sustained signaling on enhanced protein translation in EOS, (2 the mechanisms regulating mRNA binding proteins activity in EOS, and (3 the potential targeting of IL-3 signaling and the signaling leading to mRNA binding activity changes to identify therapeutic targets to treat EOS-associated diseases.

  16. Biomimetic devices functionalized by membrane channel proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jacob

    2004-03-01

    We are developing a new family of active materials which derive their functional properties from membrane proteins. These materials have two primary components: the proteins and the membranes themselves. I will discuss our recent work directed toward development of a generic platform for a "plug-and-play" philosophy of membrane protein engineering. By creating a stable biomimetic polymer membrane a single molecular monolayer thick, we will enable the exploitation of the function of any membrane protein, from pores and pumps to sensors and energy transducers. Our initial work has centered on the creation, study, and characterization of the biomimetic membranes. We are attempting to make large areas of membrane monolayers using Langmuir-Blodgett film formation as well as through arrays of microfabricated black lipid membrane-type septa. A number of techniques allow the insertion of protein into the membranes. As a benchmark, we have been employing a model system of voltage-gated pore proteins, which have electrically controllable porosities. I will report on the progress of this work, the characterization of the membranes, protein insertion processes, and the yield and functionality of the composite.

  17. Tools for controlling protein interactions with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Chandra L.; Vrana, Justin D.; Kennedy, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-encoded actuators that allow control of protein-protein interactions with light, termed ‘optical dimerizers’, are emerging as new tools for experimental biology. In recent years, numerous new and versatile dimerizer systems have been developed. Here we discuss the design of optical dimerizer experiments, including choice of a dimerizer system, photoexcitation sources, and coordinate use of imaging reporters. We provide detailed protocols for experiments using two dimerization systems we previously developed, CRY2/CIB and UVR8/UVR8, for use controlling transcription, protein localization, and protein secretion with light. Additionally, we provide instructions and software for constructing a pulse-controlled LED light device for use in experiments requiring extended light treatments. PMID:25181301

  18. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations...... of paired strands) of a given protein. We show that the beta-topology corresponding to the native structure is, with high probability, among the top-ranked. Since full enumeration is very time-consuming, we also suggest a method to deal with proteins with many beta-strands. The results reported...... in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. The top-ranked beta-topologies can be used to find initial conformations from which conformational searches can be started. They can also be used to filter decoys by removing those with poorly...

  19. Predicting membrane protein types by fusing composite protein sequence features into pseudo amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Maqsood; Khan, Asifullah

    2011-02-21

    Membrane proteins are vital type of proteins that serve as channels, receptors, and energy transducers in a cell. Prediction of membrane protein types is an important research area in bioinformatics. Knowledge of membrane protein types provides some valuable information for predicting novel example of the membrane protein types. However, classification of membrane protein types can be both time consuming and susceptible to errors due to the inherent similarity of membrane protein types. In this paper, neural networks based membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Composite protein sequence representation (CPSR) is used to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid composition, sequence length, 2 gram exchange group frequency, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, and R-group. Principal component analysis is then employed to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector. The probabilistic neural network (PNN), generalized regression neural network, and support vector machine (SVM) are used as classifiers. A high success rate of 86.01% is obtained using SVM for the jackknife test. In case of independent dataset test, PNN yields the highest accuracy of 95.73%. These classifiers exhibit improved performance using other performance measures such as sensitivity, specificity, Mathew's correlation coefficient, and F-measure. The experimental results show that the prediction performance of the proposed scheme for classifying membrane protein types is the best reported, so far. This performance improvement may largely be credited to the learning capabilities of neural networks and the composite feature extraction strategy, which exploits seven different properties of protein sequences. The proposed Mem-Predictor can be accessed at http://111.68.99.218/Mem-Predictor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloud prediction of protein structure and function with PredictProtein for Debian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaján, László; Yachdav, Guy; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Steinegger, Martin; Mirdita, Milot; Angermüller, Christof; Böhm, Ariane; Domke, Simon; Ertl, Julia; Mertes, Christian; Reisinger, Eva; Staniewski, Cedric; Rost, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    We report the release of PredictProtein for the Debian operating system and derivatives, such as Ubuntu, Bio-Linux, and Cloud BioLinux. The PredictProtein suite is available as a standard set of open source Debian packages. The release covers the most popular prediction methods from the Rost Lab, including methods for the prediction of secondary structure and solvent accessibility (profphd), nuclear localization signals (predictnls), and intrinsically disordered regions (norsnet). We also present two case studies that successfully utilize PredictProtein packages for high performance computing in the cloud: the first analyzes protein disorder for whole organisms, and the second analyzes the effect of all possible single sequence variants in protein coding regions of the human genome.

  1. Structural basis for target protein recognition by the protein disulfide reductase thioredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin is ubiquitous and regulates various target proteins through disulfide bond reduction. We report the structure of thioredoxin (HvTrxh2 from barley) in a reaction intermediate complex with a protein substrate, barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI). The crystal structure...... of this mixed disulfide shows a conserved hydrophobic motif in thioredoxin interacting with a sequence of residues from BASI through van der Waals contacts and backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds. The observed structural complementarity suggests that the recognition of features around protein disulfides plays...... a major role in the specificity and protein disulfide reductase activity of thioredoxin. This novel insight into the function of thioredoxin constitutes a basis for comprehensive understanding of its biological role. Moreover, comparison with structurally related proteins shows that thioredoxin shares...

  2. P2X7 Receptor Expression in Peripheral Blood Monocytes Is Correlated With Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Cytokine Levels in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: a Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Nie, Yijun; Xiong, Huangui; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Guo, Lili; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-12-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a major role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). C-reactive protein (CRP) and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) are directly involved in the occurrence of insulin resistance. Increased extracellular ATP levels can amplify the inflammatory response in vivo via the P2X7 receptor. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between P2X7 receptor expression in human peripheral blood monocytes and plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and CRP in T2DM patients. The results showed the association of increased P2X7 receptor expression of monocytes with high serum CRP, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were lowest in healthy subjects; in T2DM patients, these inflammatory markers were less abundant in individuals with normal CRP levels compared to those with high CRP contents. In contrast, IL-10 levels in T2DM patients with high CRP levels were dramatically decreased. P2X7 receptor expression in monocytes from T2DM patients with high CRP levels was significantly increased in comparison with healthy individuals and T2DM patients with normal CRP levels. These findings indicated that P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood monocytes may be involved in the pathological changes of T2DM, particularly affecting patients with high CRP levels.

  3. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  4. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  5. Endometrial proteins: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, M; Julkunen, M; Riittinen, L; Koistinen, R

    1992-06-01

    Uterine factors influence reproduction at the macro-anatomy level, and the effects of hormonal steroids on endometrial morphology are well recognized in the histopathological diagnosis of dysfunctional bleeding and infertility. During the past decade, attention has been paid to endometrial protein synthesis and secretion with respect to endocrine stimuli and implantation, and to the paracrine/autocrine effects of endometrial peptide growth factors, their binding proteins and other factors. The emphasis of this presentation is on protein secretion of the secretory endometrium, in which progesterone plays a pivotal role. Insulin-like growth factors have receptors on the endometrium, and IGF-binding proteins, stimulated by progesterone, modulate the effects of IGFs locally. Also other protein products of the secretory endometrium have been reviewed in this communication, with special emphasis on studies of a progesterone-associated endometrial protein which has many names in the literature, such as PEP, PP14, alpha 2-PEG and AUP. Extensive studies are ongoing in many laboratories to elucidate the regulation, function, interplay at tissue and cellular levels, and clinical significance of these proteins.

  6. Protein trapping of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Joo C.; Lin, Jack M.; Yaron, Peter N.; White, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We have observed the formation of protein-nanoparticle complexes at the air-water interfaces from three different methods of presenting the nanoparticles to proteins. The structures formed resemble the 'protein-nanoparticle corona' proposed by Lynch et al. [1-3) in relation to a possible route for nanoparticle entry into living cells. To do this, the methods of x-ray and neutron reflectivity (with isotopic contrast variation between the protein and nanoparticles) have been used to study the structures formed at the air-water interface of l 3 - casein presented to silica nanoparticle dispersions. Whilst the silica dispersions showed no observable reflectivity, strong signals appear in the reflectivity when protein is present. Drop-wise spreading of a small amount of protein at the air-silica sol interface and presentation of the silica sol to an isolated monomolecular protein film (made by the 'flow-trough' method [4]) gave an immediate signal. Mixing the components in solution only produces a slow response but in all cases a similar structure is formed. The different responses are interpreted in structural and stoichiometric ways.

  7. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  8. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions...

  9. Turnover of whole body proteins and myofibrillar proteins in middle-aged active men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zackin, M.; Meredith, C.; Frontera, W.; Evans, W.

    1986-01-01

    Endurance-trained older men have a higher proportion of lean tissue and greater muscle cell oxidative capacity, reversing age-related trends and suggesting major changes in protein metabolism. In this study, protein turnover was determined in 6 middle-aged (52+/-1 yr) men who were well trained (VO 2 max 55.2+/-5.0 ml O 2 /kg.min) and lean (body fat 18.9+/-2.8%, muscle mass 36.6+/-0.6%). The maintained habitual exercise while consuming 0.6, 0.9 or 1.2 g protein/kg.day for 10-day periods. N flux was measured from 15 N in urea after oral 15 N-glycine administration. Myofibrillar protein breakdown was estimated from urinary 3-methyl-histidine. Dietary protein had no effect on turnover rates, even when N balance was negative. Whole body protein synthesis was 3.60+/-0.12 g/kg.day and breakdown was 3.40+/-0.14 g/kg.day for all N intakes. Whole body protein flux, synthesis and breakdown were similar to values reported for sedentary young (SY) or sedentary old (SO) men on comparable diets. 3-me-his (3.67+/-0.14 μmol/kg.day) was similar to values reported for SY but higher (p<0.01) than for SO. Myofibrillar protein breakdown per unit muscle mass (185+/-7 μmol 3-me-his/g creatinine) was higher (p<0.01) than for SY or SO. In active middle-aged men, myofibrillar proteins may account for a greater proportion of whole body protein turnover, despite an age-related reduction in muscle mass

  10. Critical roles of mucin-1 in sensitivity of lung cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Menglin; Wang, Xiangdong

    2017-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer. Mucins are glycoproteins with high molecular weight, responsible for cell growth, differentiation, and signaling, and were proposed to be correlated with gene heterogeneity of lung cancer. Here, we report aberrant expression of mucin genes and tumor necrosis factor receptors in lung adenocarcinoma tissues compared with normal tissues in GEO datasets. Mucin-1 (MUC1) gene was selected and considered as the target gene; furthermore, the expression pattern of adenocarcinomic cells (A549, H1650, or H1299 cells) was validated under the stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) or dexamethasone (DEX), separately. MUC1 gene interference was done to A549 cells to show its role in sensitivity of lung cancer cells to TNFα and DEX. Results of our experiments indicate that MUC1 may regulate the influence of inflammatory mediators in effects of glucocorticoids (GCs), as a regulatory target to improve therapeutics. It shows the potential effect of MUC1 and GCs in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC), which may help in LADC treatment in the future.

  11. ProDis-ContSHC: learning protein dissimilarity measures and hierarchical context coherently for protein-protein comparison in protein database retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyan; Gao, Xin; Wang, Quanquan; Li, Yongping

    2012-05-08

    Context Coherently in an iterative algorithm--ProDis-ContSHC.We test the performance of ProDis-ContSHC on two benchmark sets, i.e., the ASTRAL 1.73 database and the FSSP/DALI database. Experimental results demonstrate that plugging our supervised contextual dissimilarity measures into the retrieval systems significantly outperforms the context-free dissimilarity/similarity measures and other unsupervised contextual dissimilarity measures that do not use the class label information. Using the contextual proteins with their class labels in the database, we can improve the accuracy of the pairwise dissimilarity/similarity measures dramatically for the protein retrieval tasks. In this work, for the first time, we propose the idea of supervised contextual dissimilarity learning, resulting in the ProDis-ContSHC algorithm. Among different contextual dissimilarity learning approaches that can be used to compare a pair of proteins, ProDis-ContSHC provides the highest accuracy. Finally, ProDis-ContSHC compares favorably with other methods reported in the recent literature.

  12. ProDis-ContSHC: Learning protein dissimilarity measures and hierarchical context coherently for protein-protein comparison in protein database retrieval

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2012-05-08

    the Protein Hierarchial Context Coherently in an iterative algorithm--ProDis-ContSHC.We test the performance of ProDis-ContSHC on two benchmark sets, i.e., the ASTRAL 1.73 database and the FSSP/DALI database. Experimental results demonstrate that plugging our supervised contextual dissimilarity measures into the retrieval systems significantly outperforms the context-free dissimilarity/similarity measures and other unsupervised contextual dissimilarity measures that do not use the class label information.Conclusions: Using the contextual proteins with their class labels in the database, we can improve the accuracy of the pairwise dissimilarity/similarity measures dramatically for the protein retrieval tasks. In this work, for the first time, we propose the idea of supervised contextual dissimilarity learning, resulting in the ProDis-ContSHC algorithm. Among different contextual dissimilarity learning approaches that can be used to compare a pair of proteins, ProDis-ContSHC provides the highest accuracy. Finally, ProDis-ContSHC compares favorably with other methods reported in the recent literature. 2012 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  14. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Vetting, Matthew W.; Hegde, Subray S.; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Fiser, Andras; Roderick, Steven L.; Takiff, Howard E.; Blanchard, John S.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S,T,A,V][D,N][L,F]-[S,T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Myc...

  15. Leptin (Obesity Protein) and Breast Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Surmacz, Eva

    2002-01-01

    ...). Leptin, a 16 kDa protein product of the OB (obesity) gene is a cytokine reported to be secreted mainly from adipocytes and has been shown to control body fat mass and food intake by providing information to the central nervous system (2...

  16. SAS-Based Studies of Protein Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marasini, Carlotta; Vestergaard, Bente

    2017-01-01

    Protein fibrillation is associated with a number of fatal amyloid diseases (e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). From a structural point of view, the aggregation process starts from an ensemble of native states that convert into transiently formed oligomers, higher order assemblies and pro...... and highlight existing reports, exemplifying the wealth of information that can be derived from the method....

  17. Pierced Lasso Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Patricia

    Entanglement and knots are naturally occurring, where, in the microscopic world, knots in DNA and homopolymers are well characterized. The most complex knots are observed in proteins which are harder to investigate, as proteins are heteropolymers composed of a combination of 20 different amino acids with different individual biophysical properties. As new-knotted topologies and new proteins containing knots continue to be discovered and characterized, the investigation of knots in proteins has gained intense interest. Thus far, the principle focus has been on the evolutionary origin of tying a knot, with questions of how a protein chain `self-ties' into a knot, what the mechanism(s) are that contribute to threading, and the biological relevance and functional implication of a knotted topology in vivo gaining the most insight. Efforts to study the fully untied and unfolded chain indicate that the knot is highly stable, remaining intact in the unfolded state orders of magnitude longer than first anticipated. The persistence of ``stable'' knots in the unfolded state, together with the challenge of defining an unfolded and untied chain from an unfolded and knotted chain, complicates the study of fully untied protein in vitro. Our discovery of a new class of knotted proteins, the Pierced Lassos (PL) loop topology, simplifies the knotting approach. While PLs are not easily recognizable by the naked eye, they have now been identified in many proteins in the PDB through the use of computation tools. PL topologies are diverse proteins found in all kingdoms of life, performing a large variety of biological responses such as cell signaling, immune responses, transporters and inhibitors (http://lassoprot.cent.uw.edu.pl/). Many of these PL topologies are secreted proteins, extracellular proteins, as well as, redox sensors, enzymes and metal and co-factor binding proteins; all of which provide a favorable environment for the formation of the disulphide bridge. In the PL

  18. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  19. Computational Studies of Protein Hydration Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozenko, Aleksandr

    It is widely appreciated that water plays a vital role in proteins' functions. The long-range proton transfer inside proteins is usually carried out by the Grotthuss mechanism and requires a chain of hydrogen bonds that is composed of internal water molecules and amino acid residues of the protein. In other cases, water molecules can facilitate the enzymes catalytic reactions by becoming a temporary proton donor/acceptor. Yet a reliable way of predicting water protein interior is still not available to the biophysics community. This thesis presents computational studies that have been performed to gain insights into the problems of fast and accurate prediction of potential water sites inside internal cavities of protein. Specifically, we focus on the task of attainment of correspondence between results obtained from computational experiments and experimental data available from X-ray structures. An overview of existing methods of predicting water molecules in the interior of a protein along with a discussion of the trustworthiness of these predictions is a second major subject of this thesis. A description of differences of water molecules in various media, particularly, gas, liquid and protein interior, and theoretical aspects of designing an adequate model of water for the protein environment are widely discussed in chapters 3 and 4. In chapter 5, we discuss recently developed methods of placement of water molecules into internal cavities of a protein. We propose a new methodology based on the principle of docking water molecules to a protein body which allows to achieve a higher degree of matching experimental data reported in protein crystal structures than other techniques available in the world of biophysical software. The new methodology is tested on a set of high-resolution crystal structures of oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) containing a large number of resolved internal water molecules and applied to bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase in the fully

  20. Thermal precipitation fluorescence assay for protein stability screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junping; Huang, Bo; Wang, Xianping; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2011-09-01

    A simple and reliable method of protein stability assessment is desirable for high throughput expression screening of recombinant proteins. Here we described an assay termed thermal precipitation fluorescence (TPF) which can be used to compare thermal stabilities of recombinant protein samples directly from cell lysate supernatants. In this assay, target membrane proteins are expressed as recombinant fusions with a green fluorescence protein tag and solubilized with detergent, and the fluorescence signals are used to report the quantity of the fusion proteins in the soluble fraction of the cell lysate. After applying a heat shock, insoluble protein aggregates are removed by centrifugation. Subsequently, the amount of remaining protein in the supernatant is quantified by in-gel fluorescence analysis and compared to samples without a heat shock treatment. Over 60 recombinant membrane proteins from Escherichia coli were subject to this screening in the presence and absence of a few commonly used detergents, and the results were analyzed. Because no sophisticated protein purification is required, this TPF technique is suitable to high throughput expression screening of recombinant membrane proteins as well as soluble ones and can be used to prioritize target proteins based on their thermal stabilities for subsequent large scale expression and structural studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E.; Korgsdam, A.-M.; Jørgensen, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...... was validated by the identification of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins, and its use provided evidence that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase exhibits DNA sequence-specific binding to DNA....

  2. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a balance between synthesis and hydrolysis. Aside from .... be used to follow the synthesis of this protein fraction. (Clarke, 1977a) .... form of digestive enzymes, urea and ammonia (Egan, ..... decreasing urine-nitrogen excretion (Thornton, Bird,.

  3. Dietary Proteins and Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  4. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  5. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... of this process depends on the extent of oxidation at C-3 compared with other sites. HO*, generated by gamma radiolysis, gave the highest total carbonyl yield, with protein-bound carbonyls predominating over released. In contrast, metal ion/H2O2 systems, gave more released than bound carbonyls, with this ratio...... modulated by EDTA. This is ascribed to metal ion-protein interactions affecting the sites of initial oxidation. Hypochlorous acid gave low concentrations of released carbonyls, but high yields of protein-bound material. The peroxyl radical generator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride...

  6. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  7. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  8. Protein turnover in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in the knowledge of the mechanisms and control of synthesis and degradation of proteins in animal tissues during the last decade. Most of the work on the measurement of synthetic and degradative rates of the mixed protein fraction from tissues has been conducted in the rat. There have, unfortunately, been few publications describing results of protein turnover studies with ruminants. Consideration is given here to the techniques used to measure protein turnover, and some of the results obtained, particularly with sheep, are summarized. No attempt has been made to discuss directly the situation in parasitized animals; rather the aim is to provide background information which complements other work dealing with the effects of parasites on the nitrogen metabolism of ruminants. (author)

  9. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...... characteristics of a miP. In this opinion article, we clearly state the characteristics of a miP as evidenced by known proteins that fit the definition; we explain why modulatory proteins misrepresented as miPs do not qualify as true miPs. We also discuss the evolutionary history of miPs, and how the miP concept...

  10. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  11. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  12. The protein protocols handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, John M

    2002-01-01

    .... The new chapters cover with many rapidly developing areas, particularly the application of mass spectrometry in protein characterization, as well as the now well-established 2-D PAGE technique in proteomics...

  13. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  14. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, Jobie; Hargreaves, David; O’Keefe, Simon; Wilson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored

  15. Analysis of crystallization data in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkwood, Jobie [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hargreaves, David [AstraZeneca, Darwin Building, Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); O’Keefe, Simon [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Julie, E-mail: julie.wilson@york.ac.uk [University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-23

    In a large-scale study using data from the Protein Data Bank, some of the many reported findings regarding the crystallization of proteins were investigated. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the largest available repository of solved protein structures and contains a wealth of information on successful crystallization. Many centres have used their own experimental data to draw conclusions about proteins and the conditions in which they crystallize. Here, data from the PDB were used to reanalyse some of these results. The most successful crystallization reagents were identified, the link between solution pH and the isoelectric point of the protein was investigated and the possibility of predicting whether a protein will crystallize was explored.

  16. Neuronal Functions of Activators of G Protein Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man K. Tse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are one of the most important gateways for signal transduction across the plasma membrane. Over the past decade, several classes of alternative regulators of G protein signaling have been identified and reported to activate the G proteins independent of the GPCRs. One group of such regulators is the activator of G protein signaling (AGS family which comprises of AGS1-10. They have entirely different activation mechanisms for G proteins as compared to the classic model of GPCR-mediated signaling and confer upon cells new avenues of signal transduction. As GPCRs are widely expressed in our nervous system, it is believed that the AGS family plays a major role in modulating the G protein signaling in neurons. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on AGS proteins in relation to their potential roles in neuronal regulations.

  17. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  18. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  19. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  20. Proteins and their crystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Hogg, T.; Hilgenfeld, R.; Grandori, R.; Carey, J.; Vácha, František; Štys, Dalibor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2003), s. 31-32 ISSN 1211-5894 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GA206/00/D007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902; CEZ:MSM 123100001 Keywords : pokeweed antiviral protein * flavodoxin-like protein * PSII Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. The tubby family proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Jackson, Peter K

    2011-01-01

    The tubby mouse shows a tripartite syndrome characterized by maturity-onset obesity, blindness and deafness. The causative gene Tub is the founding member of a family of related proteins present throughout the animal and plant kingdoms, each characterized by a signature carboxy-terminal tubby domain. This domain consists of a β barrel enclosing a central α helix and binds selectively to specific membrane phosphoinositides. The vertebrate family of tubby-like proteins (TULPs) includes the foun...

  2. The caveolin proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Terence M; Lisanti, Michael P

    2004-01-01

    The caveolin gene family has three members in vertebrates: caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3. So far, most caveolin-related research has been conducted in mammals, but the proteins have also been found in other animals, including Xenopus laevis, Fugu rubripes, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Caveolins can serve as protein markers of caveolae ('little caves'), invaginations in the plasma membrane 50-100 nanometers in diameter. Caveolins are found predominantly at the plasma membrane but also ...

  3. Engineering a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein tag for a wide variety of protein research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetically encoded tag is a powerful tool for protein research. Various kinds of tags have been developed: fluorescent proteins for live-cell imaging, affinity tags for protein isolation, and epitope tags for immunological detections. One of the major problems concerning the protein tagging is that many constructs with different tags have to be made for different applications, which is time- and resource-consuming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP tag which was engineered by inserting multiple peptide tags, i.e., octa-histidine (8xHis, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP, and c-Myc tag, in tandem into a loop of GFP. When fused to various proteins, mfGFP monitored their localization in living cells. Streptavidin agarose column chromatography with the SBP tag successfully isolated the protein complexes in a native form with a high purity. Tandem affinity purification (TAP with 8xHis and SBP tags in mfGFP further purified the protein complexes. mfGFP was clearly detected by c-Myc-specific antibody both in immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy (EM. These findings indicate that mfGFP works well as a multifunctional tag in mammalian cells. The tag insertion was also successful in other fluorescent protein, mCherry. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The multifunctional fluorescent protein tag is a useful tool for a wide variety of protein research, and may have the advantage over other multiple tag systems in its higher expandability and compatibility with existing and future tag technologies.

  4. A membrane protein / signaling protein interaction network for Arabidopsis version AMPv2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Lalonde

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between membrane proteins and the soluble fraction are essential for signal transduction and for regulating nutrient transport. To gain insights into the membrane-based interactome, 3,852 open reading frames (ORFs out of a target list of 8,383 representing membrane and signaling proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into a Gateway compatible vector. The mating-based split-ubiquitin system was used to screen for potential protein-protein interactions (pPPIs among 490 Arabidopsis ORFs. A binary robotic screen between 142 receptor-like kinases, 72 transporters, 57 soluble protein kinases and phosphatases, 40 glycosyltransferases, 95 proteins of various functions and 89 proteins with unknown function detected 387 out of 90,370 possible PPIs. A secondary screen confirmed 343 (of 387 pPPIs between 179 proteins, yielding a scale-free network (r2=0.863. Eighty of 142 transmembrane receptor-like kinases (RLK tested positive, identifying three homomers, 63 heteromers and 80 pPPIs with other proteins. Thirty-one out of 142 RLK interactors (including RLKs had previously been found to be phosphorylated; thus interactors may be substrates for respective RLKs. None of the pPPIs described here had been reported in the major interactome databases, including potential interactors of G protein-coupled receptors, phospholipase C, and AMT ammonium transporters. Two RLKs found as putative interactors of AMT1;1 were independently confirmed using a split luciferase assay in Arabidopsis protoplasts. These RLKs may be involved in ammonium-dependent phosphorylation of the C-terminus and regulation of ammonium uptake activity. The robotic screening method established here will enable a systematic analysis of membrane protein interactions in fungi, plants and metazoa.

  5. Dietary protein restriction for renal patients: don't forget protein-free foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Rossi, Andrea; Innocenti, Maurizio; Ricchiuti, Guido; Bozzoli, Laura; Sbragia, Giulietta; Meola, Mario; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) consists of pharmacological, nutritional, and psychological-social approaches. The dietary therapy of CKD, namely a low-protein low-phosphorus diet, plays a crucial role in contributing to delay the onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to protect cardiovascular and nutritional status. The protein-free food products represent a very important tool for the implementation of a low-protein diet to ensure adequate energy supply, reducing the production of nitrogenous waste products. This survey included 100 consecutive CKD patients who were asked their opinion about the use of protein-free foods. Ninety-eight patients (98%) reported a regular daily intake of protein-free pasta (as macaroni, spaghetti, etc.), which was the preferred product consumed. Actually, the taste and texture of protein-free pasta were considered as "good" or "very good" by 70% of patients. Conversely, 43% of CKD patients perceived the taste and texture of protein-free bread as "bad" or "very bad", and 30% found it "acceptable". Therefore, the main concern for the implementation of low-protein diets is the use and palatability of the protein-free products, bread in particular. The use of these products may help in reducing protein, phosphorus, and sodium intake while supplying an adequate energy intake, which represents the basis for a nutritionally safe and successful dietary treatment of advanced CKD patients. Manufacturers and food technology should make more efforts to finding new solutions to improve the taste and texture of protein-free products. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rebelato, E. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C. [Centro de Terapia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-02-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations.

  7. VP22 herpes simplex virus protein can transduce proteins into stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabanyi, I.; Lojudice, F.H.; Kossugue, P.M.; Rebelato, E.; Demasi, M.A.; Sogayar, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    The type I herpes simplex virus VP22 tegument protein is abundant and well known for its ability to translocate proteins from one cell to the other. In spite of some reports questioning its ability to translocate proteins by attributing the results observed to fixation artifacts or simple attachment to the cell membrane, VP22 has been used to deliver several proteins into different cell types, triggering the expected cell response. However, the question of the ability of VP22 to enter stem cells has not been addressed. We investigated whether VP22 could be used as a tool to be applied in stem cell research and differentiation due to its capacity to internalize other proteins without altering the cell genome. We generated a VP22.eGFP construct to evaluate whether VP22 could be internalized and carry another protein with it into two different types of stem cells, namely adult human dental pulp stem cells and mouse embryonic stem cells. We generated a VP22.eGFP fusion protein and demonstrated that, in fact, it enters stem cells. Therefore, this system may be used as a tool to deliver various proteins into stem cells, allowing stem cell research, differentiation and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells in the absence of genome alterations

  8. Toxicological relationships between proteins obtained from protein target predictions of large toxicity databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigsch, Florian; Mitchell, John B.O.

    2008-01-01

    The combination of models for protein target prediction with large databases containing toxicological information for individual molecules allows the derivation of 'toxiclogical' profiles, i.e., to what extent are molecules of known toxicity predicted to interact with a set of protein targets. To predict protein targets of drug-like and toxic molecules, we built a computational multiclass model using the Winnow algorithm based on a dataset of protein targets derived from the MDL Drug Data Report. A 15-fold Monte Carlo cross-validation using 50% of each class for training, and the remaining 50% for testing, provided an assessment of the accuracy of that model. We retained the 3 top-ranking predictions and found that in 82% of all cases the correct target was predicted within these three predictions. The first prediction was the correct one in almost 70% of cases. A model built on the whole protein target dataset was then used to predict the protein targets for 150 000 molecules from the MDL Toxicity Database. We analysed the frequency of the predictions across the panel of protein targets for experimentally determined toxicity classes of all molecules. This allowed us to identify clusters of proteins related by their toxicological profiles, as well as toxicities that are related. Literature-based evidence is provided for some specific clusters to show the relevance of the relationships identified

  9. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  10. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. More protein in cereals?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-07-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  12. Competitive protein binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  13. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  14. Targeted amino-terminal acetylation of recombinant proteins in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Johnson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One major limitation in the expression of eukaryotic proteins in bacteria is an inability to post-translationally modify the expressed protein. Amino-terminal acetylation is one such modification that can be essential for protein function. By co-expressing the fission yeast NatB complex with the target protein in E.coli, we report a simple and widely applicable method for the expression and purification of functional N-terminally acetylated eukaryotic proteins.

  15. Optimised 'on demand' protein arraying from DNA by cell free expression with the 'DNA to Protein Array' (DAPA) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ronny; Cook, Elizabeth A; Kastelic, Damjana; Taussig, Michael J; Stoevesandt, Oda

    2013-08-02

    We have previously described a protein arraying process based on cell free expression from DNA template arrays (DNA Array to Protein Array, DAPA). Here, we have investigated the influence of different array support coatings (Ni-NTA, Epoxy, 3D-Epoxy and Polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA)). Their optimal combination yields an increased amount of detected protein and an optimised spot morphology on the resulting protein array compared to the previously published protocol. The specificity of protein capture was improved using a tag-specific capture antibody on a protein repellent surface coating. The conditions for protein expression were optimised to yield the maximum amount of protein or the best detection results using specific monoclonal antibodies or a scaffold binder against the expressed targets. The optimised DAPA system was able to increase by threefold the expression of a representative model protein while conserving recognition by a specific antibody. The amount of expressed protein in DAPA was comparable to those of classically spotted protein arrays. Reaction conditions can be tailored to suit the application of interest. DAPA represents a cost effective, easy and convenient way of producing protein arrays on demand. The reported work is expected to facilitate the application of DAPA for personalized medicine and screening purposes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Do vulnerable populations consume adequate amounts of dietary protein?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the previous year there has been a renewed interest in the adequacy of protein intake to maintain optimal health and to promote normal growth and development (1, 2). In this issue of the Journal there is an excellent report on protein consumption among children aged 6–36 mo from low-income countr...

  17. Model systems for understanding absorption tuning by opsin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens Brøndsted

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review reports on model systems that have been synthesised and investigated for elucidating how opsin proteins tune the absorption of the protonated retinal Schiff base chromophore. In particular, the importance of the counteranion is highlighted. In addition, the review advocates...... is avoided, and it becomes clear that opsin proteins induce blueshifts in the chromophore absorption rather than redshifts....

  18. Animal proteins in feed : IAG ring rest 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Vliege, J.J.M.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, section Feeding stuff Microscopy, organises annually a ring test for animal proteins for all their members. In this report the ring test for animal proteins is presented, which was organised by RIKILT in 2011 on behalf of the IAG section

  19. Small angle X-ray scattering from protein in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, C.F. de; Torriani, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    In this work we report experiments performed with giant respiratory proteins from annelids. X-ray scattering data were obtained both by the use of conventional rotating anod source and synchotron radiation. Data from solutions with several protein concentrations were analyzed. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  20. Collagen targeting using multivalent protein-functionalized dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breurken, M.; Lempens, E.H.M.; Temming, R.P.; Helms, B.A.; Meijer, E.W.; Merkx, M.

    2011-01-01

    Collagen is an attractive marker for tissue remodeling in a variety of common disease processes. Here we report the preparation of protein dendrimers as multivalent collagen targeting ligands by native chemical ligation of the collagen binding protein CNA35 to cysteine-functionalized dendritic

  1. Protein substitution to produce a processed cheese with high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple studies report the beneficial effects of BCAAs supplementation to improve plasma amino acids imbalance, several neurologic diseases, protein energy malnutrition, and subsequently the survival rate of cirrhotic patients. Methods: In the present study we used a protein substitution technique to synthesize a new ...

  2. Nicotine affects protein complex rearrangement in Caenorhabditis elegans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobkowiak, Robert; Zielezinski, Andrzej; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Lesicki, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Nicotine may affect cell function by rearranging protein complexes. We aimed to determine nicotine-induced alterations of protein complexes in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) cells, thereby revealing links between nicotine exposure and protein complex modulation. We compared the proteomic alterations induced by low and high nicotine concentrations (0.01 mM and 1 mM) with the control (no nicotine) in vivo by using mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques, specifically the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) discontinuous gel electrophoresis coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS and spectral counting. As a result, we identified dozens of C. elegans proteins that are present exclusively or in higher abundance in either nicotine-treated or untreated worms. Based on these results, we report a possible network that captures the key protein components of nicotine-induced protein complexes and speculate how the different protein modules relate to their distinct physiological roles. Using functional annotation of detected proteins, we hypothesize that the identified complexes can modulate the energy metabolism and level of oxidative stress. These proteins can also be involved in modulation of gene expression and may be crucial in Alzheimer's disease. The findings reported in our study reveal putative intracellular interactions of many proteins with the cytoskeleton and may contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) signaling and trafficking in cells.

  3. Extractable protein of radiation vulcanized natural rubber latex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soebianto, Y.S.; Ratnayake, U.M.; Makuuchi, Keizo; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Protein remained in the latex products are reported to cause serious allergy. A new method to reduce the protein level in the latex products by irradiation is reported. Water soluble protein (WSP) solution (10%) was added into radiation vulcanized NR latex (RVNRL) in three different processes. The amount of WSP was 3 phr. It was only added to RVNRL (standard), added to re-centrifuged RVNRL (pre-centrifugation), and added to RVNRL followed by centrifugation (post-centrifugation). The protein content was determined by enhanced BCA method, and identified by SDS-PAGE. Extractable protein (EP) from the rubber has been reduced up to the minimum protein detection by combining WSP addition and centrifugation. Short leaching time (20-30 min.) can be achieved after the combine treatment, and SDS-PAGE confirms the reduction of soluble protein in the serum phase, and disappearance of protein bands in the rubber extract. Protein-WSP interaction produces water soluble complex, and removed by centrifugation. The efficiency of protein removal by WSP depends on its molecular weight of WSP which relates to its water solubility. (author)

  4. Unique Features of Halophilic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Proteins from moderate and extreme halophiles have unique characteristics. They are highly acidic and hydrophilic, similar to intrinsically disordered proteins. These characteristics make the halophilic proteins soluble in water and fold reversibly. In addition to reversible folding, the rate of refolding of halophilic proteins from denatured structure is generally slow, often taking several days, for example, for extremely halophilic proteins. This slow folding rate makes the halophilic proteins a novel model system for folding mechanism analysis. High solubility and reversible folding also make the halophilic proteins excellent fusion partners for soluble expression of recombinant proteins.

  5. Finding protein sites using machine learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Leonardo Bobadilla Molina

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing amount of protein three-dimensional (3D structures determined by x-ray and NMR technologies as well as structures predicted by computational methods results in the need for automated methods to provide inital annotations. We have developed a new method for recognizing sites in three-dimensional protein structures. Our method is based on a previosly reported algorithm for creating descriptions of protein microenviroments using physical and chemical properties at multiple levels of detail. The recognition method takes three inputs: 1. A set of control nonsites that share some structural or functional role. 2. A set of control nonsites that lack this role. 3. A single query site. A support vector machine classifier is built using feature vectors where each component represents a property in a given volume. Validation against an independent test set shows that this recognition approach has high sensitivity and specificity. We also describe the results of scanning four calcium binding proteins (with the calcium removed using a three dimensional grid of probe points at 1.25 angstrom spacing. The system finds the sites in the proteins giving points at or near the blinding sites. Our results show that property based descriptions along with support vector machines can be used for recognizing protein sites in unannotated structures.

  6. Cellular Reprogramming Employing Recombinant Sox2 Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Thier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells represent an attractive option for the derivation of patient-specific pluripotent cells for cell replacement therapies as well as disease modeling. To become clinically meaningful, safe iPS cells need to be generated exhibiting no permanent genetic modifications that are caused by viral integrations of the reprogramming transgenes. Recently, various experimental strategies have been applied to accomplish transgene-free derivation of iPS cells, including the use of nonintegrating viruses, episomal expression, or excision of transgenes after reprogramming by site-specific recombinases or transposases. A straightforward approach to induce reprogramming factors is the direct delivery of either synthetic mRNA or biologically active proteins. We previously reported the generation of cell-permeant versions of Oct4 (Oct4-TAT and Sox2 (Sox2-TAT proteins and showed that Oct4-TAT is reprogramming-competent, that is, it can substitute for Oct4-encoding virus. Here, we explore conditions for enhanced Sox2-TAT protein stabilization and functional delivery into somatic cells. We show that cell-permeant Sox2 protein can be stabilized by lipid-rich albumin supplements in serum replacement or low-serum-supplemented media. Employing optimized conditions for protein delivery, we demonstrate that Sox2-TAT protein is able to substitute for viral Sox2. Sox2-piPS cells express pluripotency-associated markers and differentiate into all three germ layers.

  7. Protein signature of lung cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Mehan

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related mortality. We applied a highly multiplexed proteomic technology (SOMAscan to compare protein expression signatures of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC tissues with healthy adjacent and distant tissues from surgical resections. In this first report of SOMAscan applied to tissues, we highlight 36 proteins that exhibit the largest expression differences between matched tumor and non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of twenty proteins increased and sixteen decreased in tumor tissue, thirteen of which are novel for NSCLC. NSCLC tissue biomarkers identified here overlap with a core set identified in a large serum-based NSCLC study with SOMAscan. We show that large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression can be used to develop novel histochemical probes. As expected, relative differences in protein expression are greater in tissues than in serum. The combined results from tissue and serum present the most extensive view to date of the complex changes in NSCLC protein expression and provide important implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  8. urban dietary heavy metal intake from protein foods and vegetables

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Contamination of food and food products by heavy metals has made dietary intake as one of the ... metals cadmium, copper, lead and zinc from protein-foods (beans, meat, fish, milk) and green ..... on food additives Technical report series. No.

  9. Protein Sparing Effects of Lipids in The Practical Diets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: A feeding trial was conducted to establish the protein sparing effects of various lipid sources in ... reported to utilize vegetable oil that is high in omega 6 .... origin up to 15 % without any negative effects on ..... Committee on Animal.

  10. Using Gel Electrophoresis To Illustrate Protein Diversity and Isoelectric Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Mark; Vanable, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the differences in protein structures by focusing on isoelectric point with an experiment that is observable under certain pH levels in gel electrophoresis. Explains the electrophoresis procedure and reports results of the experiments. (YDS)

  11. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  12. Bioinformatics and moonlighting proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eHernández

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multitasking or moonlighting is the capability of some proteins to execute two or more biochemical functions. Usually, moonlighting proteins are experimentally revealed by serendipity. For this reason, it would be helpful that Bioinformatics could predict this multifunctionality, especially because of the large amounts of sequences from genome projects. In the present work, we analyse and describe several approaches that use sequences, structures, interactomics and current bioinformatics algorithms and programs to try to overcome this problem. Among these approaches are: a remote homology searches using Psi-Blast, b detection of functional motifs and domains, c analysis of data from protein-protein interaction databases (PPIs, d match the query protein sequence to 3D databases (i.e., algorithms as PISITE, e mutation correlation analysis between amino acids by algorithms as MISTIC. Programs designed to identify functional motif/domains detect mainly the canonical function but usually fail in the detection of the moonlighting one, Pfam and ProDom being the best methods. Remote homology search by Psi-Blast combined with data from interactomics databases (PPIs have the best performance. Structural information and mutation correlation analysis can help us to map the functional sites. Mutation correlation analysis can only be used in very specific situations –it requires the existence of multialigned family protein sequences - but can suggest how the evolutionary process of second function acquisition took place. The multitasking protein database MultitaskProtDB (http://wallace.uab.es/multitask/, previously published by our group, has been used as a benchmark for the all of the analyses.

  13. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  14. Refolding techniques for recovering biologically active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2014-02-20

    Biologically active proteins are useful for studying the biological functions of genes and for the development of therapeutic drugs and biomaterials in a biotechnology industry. Overexpression of recombinant proteins in bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, often results in the formation of inclusion bodies, which are protein aggregates with non-native conformations. As inclusion bodies contain relatively pure and intact proteins, protein refolding is an important process to obtain active recombinant proteins from inclusion bodies. However, conventional refolding methods, such as dialysis and dilution, are time consuming and, often, recovered yields of active proteins are low, and a trial-and-error process is required to achieve success. Recently, several approaches have been reported to refold these aggregated proteins into an active form. The strategies largely aim at reducing protein aggregation during the refolding procedure. This review focuses on protein refolding techniques using chemical additives and laminar flow in microfluidic chips for the efficient recovery of active proteins from inclusion bodies.

  15. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 654346314 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein Mastigocoleus testarum MLEQIELKPNWERNQVAFLDFIVNGTSLHDQFDHPQVRDLCTVFTSDQYEFDGKSSAAIHASWFLGYGETPFPDDRIPVYICSSGDFDCGTVTAYLTVNDGTIKWSEFRIERLTEELQDQPIELTSVKQCVFERNAYEKLFQPFLRKVID

  17. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact...

  18. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  19. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  20. Electrophoretic studies on rape seed proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, M.A.; Starr, A.; Bibi, N.

    1992-07-01

    Electrophoresis is a technique which separates biological molecules on the basis of charge and mass properties. The technique is used for separation, purification, characterization and identification of molecules/ compounds. Two major objectives for applications of electrophoresis have been studied in this report i.e. characterization of rape seed proteins and enzymes and identification of rape seed cultivars by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Gamma irradiation is being successfully used to create genetic variability and germination which brought about definite changes in the rape seed proteins reflected in different bands. These dif