WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported medical conditions

  1. CHRONIC MEDICAL CONDITIONS AND REPRODUCIBILITY OF SELF-REPORTED AGE AT MENOPAUSE AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING WOMEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Heather F.; Northington, Gina M.; Kaye, Elise M.; Bogner, Hillary R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between chronic medical conditions and reproducibility of self-reported age at menopause among community-dwelling women. METHOD Age at menopause was assessed in a population-based longitudinal survey of 240 women twice, in 1993 and 2004. Women who recalled age at menopause in 2004 within one year or less of the age at menopause recalled in 1993 (concordant) were compared with women who did not recall of age at menopause in 2004 within 1 year of age at menopause recalled in 1993 (discordant). Type of menopause (surgical or natural) and chronic medical conditions were assessed by self-report. RESULTS One hundred and forty three women (59.6%) reported surgical menopause and 97 (40.4%) reported natural menopause. In all, 130 (54.2%) of women recalled age at menopause in 2004 within one year or less of recalled age at menopause in 1994 while 110 (45.8%) women did not recall age at menopause in 2004 within one year or less of recalled age at menopause in 1994. Among women with surgical menopause, women with three or more medical conditions were less likely to have concordant recall of age at menopause than women with less than three chronic medical conditions (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.15, 0.91]) in multivariate models controlling for potentially influential characteristics including cognition and years from menopause. CONCLUSIONS Among women who underwent surgical menopause, the presence of three or more medical conditions is associated with decreased reproducibility of self-reported age at menopause. PMID:21971208

  2. Medication understanding among patients living with multiple chronic conditions: Implications for patient-reported measures of adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericksen, R J; Gibbons, L; Brown, S; Edwards, T C; Yang, F M; Fitzsimmons, E; Alperovitz-Bichell, K; Godfrey, M; Wang, A; Church, A; Gutierrez, C; Paez, E; Dant, L; Loo, S; Walcott, M; Mugavero, M J; Mayer, K; Mathews, W C; Patrick, D L; Crane, P K; Crane, H M

    2017-06-20

    Low health literacy is associated with poor medication adherence and poor health outcomes. Limited understanding of prescribed medications may decrease validity of patient-reported adherence measures. To assess knowledge of names and purposes of prescribed medications among patients with multiple chronic conditions. Individual interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of patients from six U.S. primary care clinics. Participants (n = 57) were English and/or Spanish-speaking patients prescribed 3+ medications for chronic conditions, for which non-adherence may lead to disability or death. In individual interviews, patients were asked to name their medications, explain the purpose of each, and to explain how they distinguish them from one another. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded; coded content was quantified by 1) whether or not the patient could name medications; 2) method of categorizing medications; 3) whether or not the purpose of the medication was understood. Descriptive statistics were compiled using Fisher's exact test to determine the relationship between patient knowledge and medication characteristics. Thirty percent of patients could not name at least one of their medications; 19% did not know their purpose; 30% held misconceptions about the purpose of one or more medications. There was no significant difference in ability to name medications or state their medication's purpose between patients using medi-sets, pre-packaged rolls, or blister packs, and patients who stored pills in their original containers (p = 0.56 and p = 0.73, respectively), or across demographic groups (p = 0.085 to 0.767). Many patients demonstrated difficulty identifying the name and purpose of prescribed medications; this did not differ by demographic group or medication storage type. Patients may benefit from routine review of medications with their provider in order to improve health literacy, outcomes, and patient-reported adherence

  3. Chronic medical conditions and reproducibility of self-reported age at menopause among community-dwelling women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Heather F; Northington, Gina M; Kaye, Elise M; Bogner, Hillary R

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between chronic medical conditions and reproducibility of self-reported age at menopause among community-dwelling women. Age at menopause was assessed in a population-based longitudinal survey of 240 women twice, in 1993 and 2004. Women who recalled age at menopause in 2004 within 1 year or less of age at menopause recalled in 1993 (concordant) were compared with women who did not recall age at menopause in 2004 within 1 year of age at menopause recalled in 1993 (discordant). Type of menopause (surgical or natural) and chronic medical conditions were assessed by self-report. One hundred forty-three women (59.6%) reported surgical menopause, and 97 (40.4%) reported natural menopause. In all, 130 (54.2%) women recalled age at menopause in 2004 within 1 year or less of recalled age at menopause in 1994, whereas 110 (45.8%) women did not recall age at menopause in 2004 within 1 year or less of recalled age at menopause in 1994. Among the women with surgical menopause, the women with three or more medical conditions were less likely to have concordant recall of age at menopause than the women with less than three chronic medical conditions (adjusted odds ratio, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.15-0.91) in multivariate models controlling for potentially influential characteristics including cognition and years since menopause. Among women who underwent surgical menopause, the presence of three or more medical conditions is associated with decreased reproducibility of self-reported age at menopause.

  4. Physical Health Conditions Among a Population-Based Cohort of Vietnam-Era Women Veterans: Agreement Between Self-Report and Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Schumacher, Karen; Frayne, Susan M; Cypel, Yasmin; Barbaresso, Michelle M; Nord, Kristina M; Perzhinsky, Juliette; Lai, Zongshan; Prenovost, Katherine; Spiro, Avron; Gleason, Theresa C; Kimerling, Rachel; Huang, Grant D; Serpi, Tracey B; Magruder, Kathryn M

    2017-08-07

    Little is known about medical morbidity among women Vietnam-era veterans, or the long-term physical health problems associated with their service. This study assessed agreement comparing data on physical health conditions from self-report and medical records from a population-based cohort of women Vietnam-era Veterans from the Health of Vietnam Era Women's Study (HealthViEWS). Women Vietnam-era veterans (n = 4219) self-completed a survey and interview on common medical conditions. A subsample (n = 900) were contacted to provide permission to obtain medical records from as many as three of their providers. Medical record reviews were conducted using a standardized checklist. Agreement and kappa (agreement beyond chance) were calculated for physical health condition groups. Of the 900, 449 had medical records returned, and of those, 412 had complete surveys/interviews. The most commonly reported conditions based on self-report or medical record review included hypertension, hyperlipidemia, or arthritis. Kappa scores between self-reported conditions and medical record documentation were 0.75-0.91 for hypertension, diabetes, most cancers, and neurological conditions, but lower (k = 0.29-0.55) for cardiovascular diseases, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal conditions. Generally, agreement did not significantly vary by different sociodemographic groups. There was relatively high agreement for physical health conditions when self-report was compared with medical record review. As more women are increasingly represented in the military and more veterans in general seek care outside the Veterans Health Administration, accurate measurement of physical health conditions among population-based samples is crucial.

  5. STS-3 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The medical operations report for STS-3, which includes a review of the health of the crew before, during, and immediately after the third Shuttle orbital flight is presented. Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical 'kit' carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustic noise. Environmental effects of shuttle launch and landing medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are also dicussed.

  6. STS-1 medical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The report includes a review of the health of the crew before, during and immediately after the first Shuttle orbital flight (April 12-14, 1981). Areas reviewed include: health evaluation, medical debriefing of crewmembers, health stabilization program, medical training, medical kit carried inflight; tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular profile, biochemistry and endocrinology results; hematology and immunology analyses; medical microbiology; food and nutrition; potable water; shuttle toxicology; radiological health; cabin acoustical noise. Also included is information on: environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management; and management, planning and implementation of the medical program.

  7. Predictors of psychopathology among Nigerian adolescents: the role of psychosocial, demographics, personality and medical condition reports domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, A O

    2011-06-01

    Psychopathology among adolescents has become a global concern in the last decade. The aim of this study was to identify the predictors of psychopathology among adolescents in Ibadan region using a multi-theoretical approach. Eight hundred and eighty-nine (889) male and female adolescents drawn from different parts of Ibadan region of the South-West Nigeria, participated in the study. The study is a cross-sectional survey and adopted an ex-post facto design. A questionnaire divided into six sections, with two versions was used for data collection. Analysis of data involved multiple/stepwise regressions, F-test & T-test. SPSS 10.0 computer programme was utilized for all analyses. Data showed that all the predictors jointly contributed 37% (Ppsychopathology. The domains of psychosocial, personality, demographic and medical condition reports all independently and significantly predicted psychopathology among the adolescents but psychosocial domain had the highest contribution of 16% (Ppsychopathology among the sampled adolescents was 0.152 (15.2%) at the criteria of one standard deviation above the mean. It is concluded that a multi-theoretical approach to the understanding of psychopathology among adolescents will be more appropriate in the Nigerian community. Results have implication for further assessment and treatments. Parents are advised to report any behavioural dysfunction observed in their wards to experts early enough to avoid degeneration to greater psychopathology in the later years.

  8. The Near Earth Asteroid Medical Conditions List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Yael R.; Watkins, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element is one of six elements within NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) and is responsible for addressing the risk of "the inability to adequately recognize or treat an ill or injured crewmember" for exploration-class missions. The Near Earth Asteroid (NEA) Medical Conditions List, constructed by ExMC, is the first step in addressing the above-mentioned risk for the 13-month long NEA mission. The NEA mission is being designed by NASA's Human Space Flight Architecture Team (HAT). The purpose of the conditions list is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for determining which medical conditions could affect a crewmember during the NEA mission, which of those conditions would be of concern and require treatment, and for which conditions a gap in knowledge or technology development exists. This information is used to focus research efforts and technology development to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration-class missions. Scope and Approach: The NEA Medical Conditions List is part of a broader Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), which incorporates various exploration-class design reference missions (DRMs). The conditions list contains 85 medical conditions which could occur during space flight and which are derived from several sources: Long-Term Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) in-flight occurrence data, The Space Shuttle (STS) Medical Checklist, The International Space Station (ISS) Medical Checklist, and subject matter expert opinion. Each medical condition listed has been assigned a clinical priority and a clinical priority rationale based on incidence, consequence, and mitigation capability. Implementation: The conditions list is a "living document" and as such, new conditions can be added to the list, and the priority of conditions on the list can be adjusted as the DRM changes, and as screening, diagnosis, or treatment capabilities

  9. MDR (Medical Device Reporting)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database allows you to search the CDRH's database information on medical devices which may have malfunctioned or caused a death or serious injury during the...

  10. Medical confidentiality and patient safety: reporting procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbing, Henriette Roscam

    2014-06-01

    Medical confidentiality is of individual and of general interest. Medical confidentiality is not absolute. European countries differ in their legislative approaches of consent for data-sharing and lawful breaches of medical confidentiality. An increase of interference by the legislator with medical confidentiality is noticeable. In The Netherlands for instance this takes the form of new mandatory duties to report resp. of legislation providing for a release of medical confidentiality in specific situations, often under the condition that reporting takes place on the basis of a professional code that includes elements imposed by the legislator (e.g. (suspicion of) child abuse, domestic violence). Legislative interference must not result in the patient loosing trust in healthcare. To avoid erosion of medical confidentiality, (comparative) effectiveness studies and privacy impact assessments are necessary (European and national level). Medical confidentiality should be a subject of permanent education of health personnel.

  11. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    As a response to a low quality of reporting of medical research, guidelines for several different types of study design have been developed to secure accurate reporting and transparency for reviewers and readers from the scientific community. Herein, we review and discuss the six most widely...... accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent...... reporting of medical research findings....

  12. Medical Conditions Differentially Affect the Development of IADL Disability: Implications for Medical Care and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Sylvia E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Determined independent effects of nine self-reported medical conditions on the likelihood of developing specific instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disabilities at three points in time. Various medical conditions differentially affect each specific IADL disability, and each IADL disability has its own set of predictors, which, in…

  13. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  14. Analyzing voluntary medical incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yang; Richardson, James; Zhijian, Luan; Alafaireet, Patricia; Yoo, Illhoi

    2008-11-06

    Voluntary medical incident reports lacking consistency and accuracy impede the ultimate use of the reports for patient safety research. To improve this, two coders examined harm score usage in a voluntary medical incident reporting system where the harm scores were selected from a predefined list by different reporters. The two coders inter-rater agreement percent was 82%. The major categories and reviewed harm score jointly demonstrate that this process is critical and necessary in preparing the voluntary reports for further content and semantics analysis.

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    personal performance, as members may suffer from cognitive impairment, chronic fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other chronic...an underesti- mation of the incidence or prevalence of the condition. Finally, findings related to temporal trends need to also take into account...performance while in service. Acknowledgments: The authors thank Ter- rence Lee, PhD, MPH, for assisting with original protocol guidance. Disclaimer

  16. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Sharmi; Barr, Yael; Kerstman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA s Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the "Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember." This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this risk. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to define the set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur during exploration space flight missions. The list was derived from the International Space Station Medical Checklist, the Shuttle Medical Checklist, in-flight occurrence data from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health, and NASA subject matter experts. The list of conditions was further prioritized for eight specific design reference missions with the assistance of the ExMC Advisory Group. The purpose of the SMEMCL is to serve as an evidence-based foundation for the conditions that could affect a crewmember during flight. This information is used to ensure that the appropriate medical capabilities are available for exploration missions.

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    albopictus); however, sexual transmis- sion and transmission through other bodily fluids have been confirmed. Approximately one out of five individuals...to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), research suggests a strong association between Zika and GBS, but the link continues...all countries and territories traveled to with ongoing ZIKV transmis- sion or possible endemic transmission that were reported by the infected person

  18. Guidelines for Reporting Medical Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mathilde; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2016-01-01

    accepted and used guidelines: PRISMA, CONSORT, STROBE, MOOSE, STARD, and SPIRIT. It is concluded that the implementation of these guidelines has led to only a moderate improvement in the quality of the reporting of medical research. There is still much work to be done to achieve accurate and transparent...

  19. Psychiatric disorders and general medical conditions: implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    happening, medical practice is running the risk of becoming so compartmentalized that ... medical disorders also increase the risk of developing mental disorders. Mental illness and .... dysregulation, reduced heart rate variability, altered blood.

  20. Report of VA Medical Training Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Report of VA Medical Training Programs Database is used to track medical center health services trainees and VA physicians serving as faculty. The database also...

  1. [Ways to optimize working conditions of medical personnel servicing modern hi-tech medical equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, O K

    2007-01-01

    The author analyzed health state of medical personnel through various parameters. Hygienic characteristics of work conditions for medical personnel subjected to physical factors when servicing modern hi-tech medical equipment are presented. Occupational groups at high risk are defined. The article covers main directions in improving work conditions and preserving health for medical personnel in these groups.

  2. Constipation - prevalence and incidence among medical patients acutely admitted to hospital with a medical condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noiesen, Eline; Trosborg, Ingelise; Bager, Louise;

    2014-01-01

    To examine the prevalence and incidence of patient-reported symptoms of constipation in acutely hospitalised medical patients.......To examine the prevalence and incidence of patient-reported symptoms of constipation in acutely hospitalised medical patients....

  3. Medication incidents reported to an online incident reporting system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alrwisan, Adel

    2011-01-15

    AIMS: Approximately 20% of deaths from adverse events are related to medication incidents, costing the NHS an additional £500 million annually. Less than 5% of adverse events are reported. This study aims to assess the reporting rate of medication incidents in NHS facilities in the north east of Scotland, and to describe the types and outcomes of reported incidents among different services. Furthermore, we wished to quantify the proportion of reported incidents according to the reporters\\' profession. METHODS: A retrospective description was made of medication incidents reported to an online reporting system (DATIX) over a 46-month-period (July 2005 to April 2009). Reports originated from acute and community hospitals, mental health, and primary care facilities. RESULTS: Over the study period there were 2,666 incidents reported with a mean monthly reporting rate of 78.2\\/month (SD±16.9). 6.1% of all incidents resulted in harm, with insulin being the most commonly implicated medication. Nearly three-quarters (74.2%, n=1,978) of total incidents originated from acute hospitals. Administration incidents were implicated in the majority of the reported medication incidents (59%), followed by prescribing (10.8%) and dispensing (9.9%), while the nondescript "other medication incidents" accounted for 20.3% of total incidents. The majority of reports were made by nursing and midwifery staff (80%), with medical and dental professionals reporting the lowest number of incidents (n=56, 2%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medication incidents in this study were reported by nursing and midwifery staff, and were due to administration incidents. There is a clear need to elucidate the reasons for the limited contribution of the medical and dental professionals to reporting medication incidents.

  4. 28 CFR 79.16 - Proof of medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cancer Institute can make a diagnosis of leukemia to a reasonable degree of medical certainty: (i) Bone... COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.16 Proof of medical condition. (a... leukemia. Proof that the claimant contracted leukemia must be made either by using the procedure outlined...

  5. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, R. G.; Neary, V. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Yu, Y.; Weber, J.

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, NM on May 13th-14th, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. hurricanes and other large storms) and to suggest how U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry.

  6. How commonly are known medical conditions associated with autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, M; Volkmar, F

    1998-08-01

    Recent research has yielded increasing support for neurobiologic theories of autism. A number of family and twin studies support the role of genetics and have led to wide acceptance of autism as an organically based disorder. Controversy persists, however, over the role of congenital medical conditions in the etiology of autism. Two rather divergent views have emerged. One, advocated by Gillberg and colleagues, proposes that up to 30% of cases of autism are associated with a known medical condition. On the other hand, research by Rutter and colleagues suggests the incidence may be closer to 10%. In this retrospective study records on 211 subjects with autism and other developmental disorders are reviewed to determine the prevalence of associated medical conditions and its variability related to the system used to diagnose autism. Results suggest the prevalence of medical conditions with suspected etiologic relationship with autism varies between 10 and 15%, depending on the diagnostic system employed. Further variability in prevalence rates results from a less strict definition of "medical condition" and yields rates between 25 and 37%. Disparate findings in previous research may stem from variability in both diagnostic system employed and which medical conditions are considered significant in the etiology of autism.

  7. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Extreme Conditions Modeling Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lawon, Michael J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weber, Jochem [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted the Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Extreme Conditions Modeling (ECM) Workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico on May 13–14, 2014. The objective of the workshop was to review the current state of knowledge on how to numerically and experimentally model WECs in extreme conditions (e.g. large ocean storms) and to suggest how national laboratory resources could be used to improve ECM methods for the benefit of the wave energy industry. More than 30 U.S. and European WEC experts from industry, academia, and national research institutes attended the workshop, which consisted of presentations from W EC developers, invited keynote presentations from subject matter experts, breakout sessions, and a final plenary session .

  9. New journals for publishing medical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Katherine G

    2016-04-01

    Because they do not rank highly in the hierarchy of evidence and are not frequently cited, case reports describing the clinical circumstances of single patients are seldom published by medical journals. However, many clinicians argue that case reports have significant educational value, advance medical knowledge, and complement evidence-based medicine. Over the last several years, a vast number (∼160) of new peer-reviewed journals have emerged that focus on publishing case reports. These journals are typically open access and have relatively high acceptance rates. However, approximately half of the publishers of case reports journals engage in questionable or "predatory" publishing practices. Authors of case reports may benefit from greater awareness of these new publication venues as well as an ability to discriminate between reputable and non-reputable journal publishers.

  10. Sexual dysfunction among Ghanaian men presenting with various medical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaye Lawrence

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several medical conditions can affect and disrupt human sexuality. The alteration of sexuality in these medical conditions often hinder effective communication and empathy between the patients and their sexual partners because of cultural attitudes, social norms and negative feelings such as anxiety and guilt. Validated and standardized sexual inventories might therefore help resolve this problem. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to obtain data on the prevalence of male sexual dysfunction (SD among Ghanaians with various medical conditions residing in Kumasi. Methods The Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS was administered to 150 Ghanaian men with various medical conditions between 19 and 66 years old (mean ± standard deviation: 40.01 ± 12.32 years domiciled in the Kumasi metropolis. Results Out of the total 150 questionnaires administered, 105 (70.0% men returned the questionnaires. Questionnaires from 3 men were incomplete, leaving 102 complete and evaluable questionnaires, indicating a 68.0% response rate. Of the remaining 102 men, 88.2% were married, 70.6% had attained higher education, 88.2% were non-smokers. Whereas 54.9% were engaged in exercise, 61.8% indulged in alcoholic beverages. The prevalence of the various medical conditions include: diabetes (18%, hypertension (24.5%, migraine (11.8%, ulcer (7.8%, surgery (6.9%, STD (3.9 and others (26.5%. The prevalence of SD among the respondents in the study was 59.8%. The highest prevalence of SD was seen among ulcer patients (100%, followed by patients who have undergone surgery (75%, diabetes (70%, hypertension (50%, STD (50% and the lowest was seen among migraine patients (41.7%. Conclusions SD rate is high among Ghanaian men with medical conditions (about 60% and vary according to the condition and age.

  11. Crash Rates of Quebec Drivers with Medical Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Dow, Jamie; Gaudet, Michel; Turmel, Émilie

    2013-01-01

    Using a databank that combines comprehensive medical data with the driving records of 96% of the drivers in Quebec, odds ratios were calculated for crash risk involving death or serious injury according to the diagnosis of medical conditions traditionally associated with increased crash risk. Results were controlled for age, sex, residence (rural/urban), possession of a professional licence (classes 1 – 4), previous involvement in a crash with injury or death and for the presence of other med...

  12. Chronic medical conditions among jail detainees in residential psychiatric treatment: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, James A

    2011-08-01

    Studies of incarcerates with serious mental illnesses have found elevated rates of chronic medical conditions such as asthma and diabetes, and of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis compared with general population rates. This study explored the pattern of chronic medical conditions in a sample of adult detainees in psychiatric treatment in a large urban jail to develop a clinical profile encompassing the full range of medical conditions. A total of 431 male and female detainees were sampled with certainty from admissions to a residential psychiatric treatment program (overall recruitment rate = 67%). Interviews used the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to assess psychiatric and substance use disorders per DSM-IV criteria and chronic medical conditions. Latent class analysis was conducted using 17 medical conditions as class indicators, yielding a 3-class model composed of: a latent class with a high to intermediate probability of multiple medical conditions (HMC; 12.5% of the sample); an intermediate class with a lower probability of having a smaller number of medical conditions (MMC; 43.2%); and a class with a low probability of any medical condition (44.3%). Those in the HMC class were more likely to report respiratory problems, severe headaches, musculoskeletal pain, hypertension, and arthritis, have greater functional impairment, and have a higher number of co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Being older (50+ years) and female were associated with higher odds of being in the HMC or MMC classes. The policy implications for providing medical care to incarcerates with complex mixtures of medical conditions and psychiatric disorders are considered.

  13. Risk of endometrial cancer in relation to medical conditions and medication use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, Joan; Sima, Camelia; Bayuga, Sharon; Wilcox, Homer; Pulick, Katherine; Faulkner, Shameka; Zauber, Ann G.; Olson, Sara H.

    2009-01-01

    We studied the relation of medical conditions related to obesity and medications used for these conditions with endometrial cancer. We also investigated the association of other medical conditions and medications with risk. This US population-based case-control study included 469 endometrial cancer cases and 467 controls. Information on putative risk factors for endometrial cancer was collected through personal interviews. We asked women about their medical history and medications used for six months or longer and the number of years each medication was taken. Risk was strongly associated with increasing obesity (p for trend <0.001). Among conditions related to obesity, and after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), and other risk factors and conditions, uterine fibroids were independently related to an increased cancer risk (adjusted OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.2–2.5). Although hypertension was not significantly related to endometrial cancer after adjustment for age and BMI, use of thiazide diuretics was independently associated with an increased risk (OR= 1.8, 95%CI= 1.1–3.0). Anemia was associated with decreased risk (OR= 0.6, 95%CI= 0.5–0.9). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was related to a decreased risk (OR= 0.7, 95%CI= 0.5–0.97). To our knowledge, the observation about thiazide diuretics is novel and requires confirmation in other studies and populations. PMID:19383893

  14. Dementia and serious coexisting medical conditions: a double whammy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Katie

    2004-09-01

    Research-based information about the prevalence of other serious medical conditions in people with dementia has become available only recently, and the true prevalence is not known, primarily because many people with dementia do not have a diagnosis. The existing information is sufficient, however, to show that these other conditions are common in people with dementia. It is also clear that coexisting medical conditions increase the use and cost of health care services for people with dementia, and conversely, dementia increases the use and cost of health care services for people with other serious medical conditions. Nurses and other healthcare professionals should expect to see these relationships in their elderly patients. They should know how to recognize possible dementia and assess, or obtain an assessment of, the patient's cognitive status. They should expect the worsening of cognitive and related symptoms in acutely ill people with dementia and try to eliminate factors that cause this worsening, to the extent possible, while assuring the family that the symptoms are likely to improve once the acute phase of illness or treatment is over. Families, nurses, and other health care professionals are challenged by the complex issues involved in caring for a person with both dementia and other serious medical conditions. Greater attention to these issues by informed and thoughtful clinicians will improve outcomes for the people and their family and professional caregivers.

  15. Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 15, Number 6, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    laboratory specialist; cytology specialist; hemodialysis technician; medical, histopathology, cytotechnology apprentice, journeyman, or craftsman; iv...reported by August 7, 2007 and 2008 †Seventy medical events/conditions specified by Tri-Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May...Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May 2004. Note: Completeness and timeliness of reporting vary by facility. JULY – AUGUST

  17. Legal framework conditions for the reprocessing of medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großkopf, Volker; Jäkel, Christian

    2008-09-03

    The processing of single-use products is permissible pursuant to medical device law. This is apparent both from the wording of the German Law on Medical Devices and from the purpose and the objectives underpinning the legislative materials. The prerequisite for processing is, however, compliance with the the Joint Recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Products (BfArM).For medical devices in the category "critical C", the RKI/BfArM-recommendation provides that the processor's quality management system must be certified by a body accredited by the Central Authority of the Federal States for Health Protection with regard to Medicinal Products and Medical Devices (Zentralstelle der Länder für Gesundheitsschutz bei Arzneimitteln und Medizinprodukten, ZLG). The certification must be carried out in accordance with EN ISO 13485:2003+AC:2007.On April 4, 2008 the Federal Health Ministry (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) presented a progress report on the processing of medical devices. The BMG concludes that the legal framework for the processing of medical devices is sufficient, and that a prohibition on the processing of single-use products is inappropriate.

  18. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. Oral health and medical conditions among Amish children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Marc-Allen; Milgrom, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Amish are a growing population who live a traditional, rural way of life, which makes them less accepting of modernism. Most Amish live in poverty and are detached from modern health care. In addition, the recent change of their lifestyle has been reported, such as consuming a nontraditional diet and the usage of electronic devices. As a result, their lifestyle change may have impacted their oral health. However, since only a single report about oral health among Amish children has been published approximately three decades ago it has not yet been updated. This study describes oral health among Amish children and their medical conditions during visits to a mobile dental unit (MDU). Material and Methods: The dental records of all patients (N=216) who visited a mobile dental unit were reviewed, which covers 1 year from May 20, 2011, the first date of service. The following factors were taken into consideration during the review process: parental perceptions of their children’s oral health care, dental care experiences, and general health information. Results: Fifty-four (27.8%) children, ages 3 to 17, have never received dental treatment before visiting the MDU; the average number of untreated decayed teeth was 6.8. In spite of this, most parents rated their children’s oral health as good or very good (87.7%). The high cost and long distance travel associated with routine, professional dental care makes it difficult for children to maintain good oral hygiene. Our analysis revealed that bleeding disorders were more prevalent among this gene pool compared to the nation at large; however, asthma was less common. Conclusions: There are oral and general health disparities among Amish children. There is a lack of awareness among Amish parents with regard to their children’s oral health. Key words:Amish, child, dental caries, mobile health units. PMID:28298971

  20. Association between adherence to medications for COPD and medications for other chronic conditions in COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamane, Amol D; Schwab, Phil; Hopson, Sari; Moretz, Chad; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Burslem, Kate; Renda, Andrew; Kaila, Shuchita

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with COPD often have multiple comorbidities requiring use of multiple medications, and adherence rates for maintenance COPD (mCOPD) medications are already known to be suboptimal. Presence of comorbidities in COPD patients, and use of medications used to treat those comorbidities (non-COPD medications), may have an adverse impact on adherence to mCOPD medications. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between non-adherence to mCOPD medications and non-COPD medications in COPD patients. Methods COPD patients were identified using a large administrative claims database. Selected patients were 40–89 years old and continuously enrolled for 12 months prior to and 24 months after the first identified COPD diagnosis (index date) during January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. Patients were required to have ≥1 prescription for a mCOPD medication within 365 days of the index date and ≥1 prescription for one of 12 non-COPD medication classes within ±30 days of the first COPD prescription. Adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) was measured during 365 days following the first COPD prescription. The association between non-adherence (PDC <0.8) to mCOPD and non-adherence to non-COPD medications was determined using logistic regression, controlling for baseline patient characteristics. Results A total of 14,117 patients, with a mean age of 69.9 years, met study criteria. Of these, 40.9% were males and 79.2% were non-adherent to mCOPD medications with a mean PDC of 0.47. Non-adherence to mCOPD medications was associated with non-adherence to 10 of 12 non-COPD medication classes (odds ratio 1.38–1.78, all P<0.01). Conclusion Adherence to mCOPD medications is low. Non-adherence (or adherence) to mCOPD medications is positively related to non-adherence (or adherence) to non-COPD medications, implying that the need to take medications prescribed for comorbid conditions does not adversely impact adherence to m

  1. Association between adherence to medications for COPD and medications for other chronic conditions in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamane, Amol D; Schwab, Phil; Hopson, Sari; Moretz, Chad; Annavarapu, Srinivas; Burslem, Kate; Renda, Andrew; Kaila, Shuchita

    2017-01-01

    Patients with COPD often have multiple comorbidities requiring use of multiple medications, and adherence rates for maintenance COPD (mCOPD) medications are already known to be suboptimal. Presence of comorbidities in COPD patients, and use of medications used to treat those comorbidities (non-COPD medications), may have an adverse impact on adherence to mCOPD medications. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between non-adherence to mCOPD medications and non-COPD medications in COPD patients. COPD patients were identified using a large administrative claims database. Selected patients were 40-89 years old and continuously enrolled for 12 months prior to and 24 months after the first identified COPD diagnosis (index date) during January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010. Patients were required to have ≥1 prescription for a mCOPD medication within 365 days of the index date and ≥1 prescription for one of 12 non-COPD medication classes within ±30 days of the first COPD prescription. Adherence (proportion of days covered [PDC]) was measured during 365 days following the first COPD prescription. The association between non-adherence (PDC non-adherence to non-COPD medications was determined using logistic regression, controlling for baseline patient characteristics. A total of 14,117 patients, with a mean age of 69.9 years, met study criteria. Of these, 40.9% were males and 79.2% were non-adherent to mCOPD medications with a mean PDC of 0.47. Non-adherence to mCOPD medications was associated with non-adherence to 10 of 12 non-COPD medication classes (odds ratio 1.38-1.78, all PAdherence to mCOPD medications is low. Non-adherence (or adherence) to mCOPD medications is positively related to non-adherence (or adherence) to non-COPD medications, implying that the need to take medications prescribed for comorbid conditions does not adversely impact adherence to mCOPD medications.

  2. Liposuction for chronic medical diseases and noncosmetic conditions: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy Abuelhassan El-Khatib

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the safety of liposuction techniques and to identify the cosmetic and noncosmetic application of liposuction. Liposuction can be used to improve the quality-of-life in patients with disabling medical conditions in addition to its use for cosmetic rejuvenation. An online search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, and SciELO were conducted. Forty-seven original articles reported from 1982 to February 2014 were included in this review. The articles reported on the use as well as the limitations of liposuction for treatment of noncosmetic and disabling medical conditions. The criteria used for selection of articles were: large sample size and originality. The case reports were excluded. There was a broad agreement about the applicability and the efficacy of the liposuction for treatment of these chronic medical conditions, such as multiple systemic lipomatosis, dercum's disease, chronic lymphedema, and axillary hyperhidrosis. Literatures review confirmed that Liposuction technique has provided significant and stable cure for these chronic medical conditions. Liposuction is the most frequent esthetic procedure for adipose tissue reduction and treatment of lipedema worldwide. Apart from esthetic indications, liposuction can also be used to treat chronic medical diseases and noncosmetic conditions.

  3. Clinical studies on health conditions of medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Liqun

    1984-10-01

    The results of investigations on general health conditions of 2484 medical X-ray workers and 1718 controls were reported. It was shown that the incidences of neurasthenic syndrome, loss of appetite, baldness etc. in X-ray workers were statistically higher than those in controls. Chronic rhinitis, pharyngitis, and paranasal sinusitis also occurred more frequently in the former group. The blood pressure, pulse rate, capillary resistance and past medical history showed no significant difference between these two groups. (Author).

  4. The Annual Condition of Education Report 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Annual Condition of Education Report provides a wide range of state-level data, including shifts in student populations and demographics, teacher salaries and characteristics, student achievement results, and school financial information. The report provides important metrics to the education community about the status of the education system.…

  5. Medical Transport of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most notable trends in child health has been the increase in the number of children with special health care needs, including those with complex chronic conditions. Care of these children accounts for a growing fraction of health care resources. We examine recent developments in health care, especially with regard to medical transport and prehospital care, that have emerged to adapt to this remarkable demographic trend. One such development is the focus on care coordination, including the dissemination of the patient-centered medical home concept. In the prehospital setting, the need for greater coordination has catalyzed the development of the emergency information form. Training programs for prehospital providers now incorporate specific modules for children with complex conditions. Another notable trend is the shift to a family-centered model of care. We explore efforts toward regionalization of care, including the development of specialized pediatric transport teams, and conclude with recommendations for a research agenda.

  6. Parametric estimation of medical care costs under conditions of censoring

    OpenAIRE

    Raikou, Maria; McGuire, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a set of parametric estimators that attempt to provide consistent estimates of average medical care costs under conditions of censoring. The main finding is that incorporation of the inverse of the probability of an individual not being censored in the estimating equations is instrumental in deriving unbiased cost estimates. The success of the approach is dependent on the amount of available information on the cost history process. The value of this information in...

  7. Medical conditions affect the outcome of early intervention in preschool children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mats Anders; Westerlund, Joakim; Hedvall, Åsa; Åmark, Per; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to explore the frequency of genetic and other medical conditions, including epilepsy, in a population-based group of 208 preschool children with early diagnosis of Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and to relate outcome at a 2-year follow-up to the co-existing medical findings. They had all received early intervention. The Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS-II) composite score served as the primary outcome measure. In the total group, 38/208 children (18 %) had a significant medical or genetic condition. Epilepsy was present in 6.3 % at the first assessment and in 8.6 % at follow-up and was associated with more severe intellectual impairment. A history of regression was reported in 22 %. Children with any medical/genetic condition, including epilepsy, as well as children with a history of regression had significantly lower VABS-II scores at the 2-year follow-up. Children with a medical/genetic condition, including epilepsy, had been diagnosed with ASD at an earlier age than those without such conditions, and early age at diagnosis also correlated negatively with adaptive functioning outcome. The results underscore the importance of considering medical/genetic aspects in all young children with ASD and the requirement to individualize and tailor interventions according to their specific needs.

  8. Review of medical reports on pedophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, John R

    2007-10-01

    The present report is a review of all 554 papers published on Medline on pedophilia. The first discussion is the history of the disorder from ancient Greece to the present time, especially the influence of the liberal country of the Netherlands, the North American Man-Boy Love Association, and the sexual crisis in the Catholic Church. One important question is the relationship between homosexual pedophilia and adult homosexuality. Evidence for and against this relationship is presented. Next discussed are the characteristics of the victim and the long lasting serious effects of sexual abuse. Laboratory correlations are included, especially phallometric tests in order to objectively measure the physical responses to sexual stimuli. Electrophysiological and radiographic tests are also mentioned, including electroencephalography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography scans. An important section is the characterization of pedophiles with emphasis on their frequent previous sexual abuse, their past, their present, and their anticipated future. The final topic is treatment of this disorder with surgery, medication, behavioral therapy and the combination of medication and behavioral therapy.

  9. Parent-Reported Medication Use in a Head Start Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Tara M.; Carlson, John S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of medication use within a Head Start population. Parent-reported data (N = 1,397) from initial enrollment information indicated 6.8% of children were taking 34 different types of medication. More than two thirds (69%) of those on medication were prescribed more than one medication, and more than one third…

  10. Learning from medication errors through a nationwide reporting programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, K.C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the strategies to enhance patient safety is the spontaneous reporting and analysis of medication errors. Sharing this information with other healthcare providers will help to prevent the reoccurrence of similar medication errors. In The Netherlands medication errors can be reported to a natio

  11. Pharmacist self-reported antidepressant medication counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon-Breland, Michelle L; Westrick, Salisa C; Kavookjian, Jan; Berger, Bruce A; Shannon, David M; Lorenz, Raymond A

    2013-01-01

    To identify the extent of pharmacists' self-reported antidepressant counseling (SRAC) and to identify factors that may affect pharmacists' decisions to provide antidepressant counseling. Cross-sectional study. Alabama community pharmacies in 2011. Full-time pharmacists from 600 community pharmacies. Self-administered survey; three mail contacts with alternate electronic surveys were used. Pharmacists' SRAC behavior and its relationship with pharmacists' illness perceptions of depression, self-efficacy, and organizational and environmental influences. 600 surveys were sent; 22 were undeliverable, 1 was partially completed (understanding of depression, and 36% discussed options for managing adverse effects with no more than a few patients. More than one-quarter (28.6%) never asked patients whether they had barriers to taking antidepressants. Pharmacists' perceptions regarding consequences, control/cure, and the episodic nature of depression, as well as their self-efficacy, had significant relationships ( P < 0.05) with pharmacists' involvement in antidepressant counseling. Low rates of pharmacists' involvement in antidepressant counseling were reported. Pharmacists must become more involved in counseling patients about their antidepressant medications and overcoming barriers preventing greater involvement.

  12. Medical conditions associated with out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Balasubramani, G K; Cook, Lawrence J; Yealy, Donald M; Lave, Judith R

    2011-01-01

    While prior studies describe the clinical presentation of patients requiring paramedic out-of-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI), limited data characterize the underlying medical conditions or comorbidities. To characterize the medical conditions and comorbidities of patients receiving successful paramedic out-of-hospital ETI. We used Pennsylvania statewide emergency medical services (EMS) clinical data, including all successful ETIs performed during 2003-2005. Using multiple imputation triple-match algorithms, we probabilistically linked EMS ETI to statewide death and hospital admission data. Each hospitalization record contained one primary and up to eight secondary diagnoses, classified according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). We determined the proportion of patients in each major ICD-9-CM diagnostic group and subgroup. We calculated the Charlson Comorbidity Index score for each patient. Using binomial proportions with confidence intervals (CIs), we analyzed the data and combined imputed results using Rubin's method. Across the imputed sets, we linked 25,733 (77.7% linkage) successful ETIs to death or hospital records; 56.3% patients died before and 43.7% survived to hospital admission. Of the 14,478 patients who died before hospital admission, most (92.7%; 95% CI: 92.5-93.3%) had presented to EMS in cardiac arrest. Of the 11,255 hospitalized patents, the leading primary diagnoses were circulatory diseases (32.0%; 95% CI: 30.2-33.7%), respiratory diseases (22.8%; 95% CI: 21.9-23.7%), and injury or poisoning (25.2%; 95% CI: 22.7-27.8%). Prominent primary diagnosis subgroups included asphyxia and respiratory failure (15.2%), traumatic brain injury and skull fractures (11.3%), acute myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease (10.9%), poisonings and drug and alcohol disorders (6.7%), dysrhythmias (6.7%), hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic stroke (5.9%), acute heart failure and cardiomyopathies

  13. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnaemeka G. Okafor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods: A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results: The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion: Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, userfriendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system.

  14. Perspectives on medical malpractice self-insurance financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Richard C; Kitchen, Patrick J

    2012-11-01

    Financial reporting of medical malpractice self-insurance is evolving. The Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification Section 954-450-25 provides guidance for accounting and financial reporting for medical malpractice. Discounting of medical malpractice liabilities has been reassessed in recent years. Malpractice litigation reform efforts continue in several states. Accountable care organizations could increase the frequency of medical malpractice claims because of patients' heightened expectations regarding quality of care.

  15. Guideline-Recommended Medications and Physical Function in Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvay, Gail; Allore, Heather G; Cohen, Andrew B; Gnjidic, Danijela; Murphy, Terrence E; Tinetti, Mary E

    2017-09-14

    The benefit or harm of a single medication recommended for one specific condition can be difficult to determine in individuals with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. There is limited information on the associations between guideline-recommended medications and physical function in older adults with multiple chronic conditions. The objective of this study was to estimate the beneficial or harmful associations between guideline-recommended medications and decline in physical function in older adults with multiple chronic conditions. Prospective observational cohort. National. Community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey study (N = 3,273). Participants with atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, or heart failure were included. Self-reported decline in physical function; guideline-recommended medications; polypharmacy (taking <7 vs ≥7 concomitant medications); chronic conditions; and sociodemographic, behavioral, and health risk factors. The risk of decline in function in the overall sample was highest in participants with heart failure (35.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 26.3-44.5) and lowest for those with atrial fibrillation (20.6%, 95% CI = 14.9-26.2). In the overall sample, none of the six guideline-recommended medications was associated with decline in physical function across the five study conditions, although in the group with low polypharmacy exposure, there was lower risk of decline in those with heart failure taking renin angiotensin system blockers (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.16-0.99) and greater risk of decline in physical function for participants with diabetes mellitus taking statins (HR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.39-3.69). In older adults with multiple chronic conditions, guideline-recommended medications for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, and heart failure were largely not associated with self-reported

  16. Medical Signal-Conditioning and Data-Interface System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jeffrey; Jacobus, charles; Booth, Scott; Suarez, Michael; Smith, Derek; Hartnagle, Jeffrey; LePrell, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    A general-purpose portable, wearable electronic signal-conditioning and data-interface system is being developed for medical applications. The system can acquire multiple physiological signals (e.g., electrocardiographic, electroencephalographic, and electromyographic signals) from sensors on the wearer s body, digitize those signals that are received in analog form, preprocess the resulting data, and transmit the data to one or more remote location(s) via a radiocommunication link and/or the Internet. The system includes a computer running data-object-oriented software that can be programmed to configure the system to accept almost any analog or digital input signals from medical devices. The computing hardware and software implement a general-purpose data-routing-and-encapsulation architecture that supports tagging of input data and routing the data in a standardized way through the Internet and other modern packet-switching networks to one or more computer(s) for review by physicians. The architecture supports multiple-site buffering of data for redundancy and reliability, and supports both real-time and slower-than-real-time collection, routing, and viewing of signal data. Routing and viewing stations support insertion of automated analysis routines to aid in encoding, analysis, viewing, and diagnosis.

  17. Dioxins from medical waste incineration: Normal operation and transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Zhan, Ming-xiu; Yan, Mi; Fu, Jian-ying; Lu, Sheng-yong; Li, Xiao-dong; Yan, Jian-hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2015-07-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) are key pollutants in waste incineration. At present, incinerator managers and official supervisors focus only on emissions evolving during steady-state operation. Yet, these emissions may considerably be raised during periods of poor combustion, plant shutdown, and especially when starting-up from cold. Until now there were no data on transient emissions from medical (or hospital) waste incineration (MWI). However, MWI is reputed to engender higher emissions than those from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI). The emission levels in this study recorded for shutdown and start-up, however, were significantly higher: 483 ± 184 ng Nm(-3) (1.47 ± 0.17 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for shutdown and 735 ng Nm(-3) (7.73 ng I-TEQ Nm(-3)) for start-up conditions, respectively. Thus, the average (I-TEQ) concentration during shutdown is 2.6 (3.8) times higher than the average concentration during normal operation, and the average (I-TEQ) concentration during start-up is 4.0 (almost 20) times higher. So monitoring should cover the entire incineration cycle, including start-up, operation and shutdown, rather than optimised operation only. This suggestion is important for medical waste incinerators, as these facilities frequently start up and shut down, because of their small size, or of lacking waste supply. Forthcoming operation should shift towards much longer operating cycles, i.e., a single weekly start-up and shutdown.

  18. Twenty-five additional cases of trisomy 9 mosaic: Birth information, medical conditions, and developmental status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2015-05-01

    Limited literature exists on children and adults diagnosed with the mosaic form of trisomy 9. Data from the Tracking Rare Incidence Syndromes (TRIS) project has provided physical characteristics and medical conditions for 14 individuals. This article provides TRIS Survey results of 25 additional cases at two data points (birth and survey completion) as well as developmental status. Results confirmed a number of phenotypic features and medical conditions. In addition, a number of cardiac anomalies were reported along with feeding and respiratory difficulties in the immediate postnatal period. In addition, developmental status data indicated a range in functioning level up to skills in the 36 and 48-month range. Strengths were also noted across the sample in language and communication, fine motor and social-emotional development. Implications for professionals caring for children with this genetic condition are offered.

  19. Real time video analysis to monitor neonatal medical condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvaikar, Mukul; Paydarfar, David; Indic, Premananda

    2017-05-01

    One in eight live births in the United States is premature and these infants have complications leading to life threatening events such as apnea (pauses in breathing), bradycardia (slowness of heart) and hypoxia (oxygen desaturation). Infant movement pattern has been hypothesized as an important predictive marker for these life threatening events. Thus estimation of movement along with behavioral states, as a precursor of life threatening events, can be useful for risk stratification of infants as well as for effective management of disease state. However, more important and challenging is the determination of the behavioral state of the infant. This information includes important cues such as sleep position and the status of the eyes, which are important markers for neonatal neurodevelopment state. This paper explores the feasibility of using real time video analysis to monitor the condition of premature infants. The image of the infant can be segmented into regions to localize and focus on specific areas of interest. Analysis of the segmented regions can be performed to identify different parts of the body including the face, arms, legs and torso. This is necessary due to real-time processing speed considerations. Such a monitoring system would be of great benefit as an aide to medical staff in neonatal hospital settings requiring constant surveillance. Any such system would have to satisfy extremely stringent reliability and accuracy requirements, before it can be deployed in a hospital care unit, due to obvious reasons. The effect of lighting conditions and interference will have to be mitigated to achieve such performance.

  20. 14 CFR 67.113 - General medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment...

  1. 14 CFR 67.213 - General medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment...

  2. 14 CFR 67.313 - General medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus that requires insulin or any other... that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment... the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified medical judgment...

  3. 42 CFR 418.102 - Condition of participation: Medical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... medical director or physician designee reviews the clinical information for each hospice patient and... objective medical findings; (4) Current medication and treatment orders; and (5) Information about the....102 Section 418.102 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  4. Attitudes to reporting medication error among differing healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvadikar, Ajit; Prescott, Gordon; Williams, David

    2010-08-01

    Medication error reporting is an important measure to prevent medication error incidents in a healthcare system and can serve as an important tool for improving patient safety. This study aimed to investigate attitudes of healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses, and pharmacists) in reporting medication errors. Fifty-six healthcare professionals working at a 900-bed tertiary referral hospital were surveyed. A questionnaire using two different clinical scenarios (involving oral and intravenous administration of a drug) and four questions with an ascending order of worsening patient outcome was used. A Likert scale ranging from 1 (unlikely) to 5 (likely) was used to describe the likelihood of reporting a medication error. The overall response rate was 57% (43% for doctors, 68% for nurses, and 64% for pharmacists). Results showed that doctors were unlikely to report less-serious medication errors (median value of 2 on the Likert scale). Nurses and pharmacists (median value of 5) were likely to report less-serious as well as serious medication errors despite their fears of receiving disciplinary action. All healthcare professionals were more likely to report an error as the clinical scenarios had a progressively worsening outcome for the patient. These results suggest that among healthcare professionals, there are differing attitudes to reporting medication errors. Differing approaches are therefore required to encourage medication error reporting among different healthcare professionals. Future study is required to further investigate these findings and improve reporting rates.

  5. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Methods Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Results Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude, potential benefits, and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction, but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making. Conclusions We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management. PMID:28523207

  6. Effects and Satisfaction of Medical Device Safety Information Reporting System Using Electronic Medical Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hye Jung; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Nam Hyun

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes an evaluation study on the effectiveness of developing an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system for managing safety information, including adverse incident data related to medical devices, following the enactment of the Medical Device Act in Korea. Medical device safety information reports were analyzed for 190 cases that took place prior to the application of a medical device safety information reporting system and during a period when the reporting system was used. Also, questionnaires were used to measure the effectiveness of the medical device safety information reporting system. The analysis was based on the questionnaire responses of 15 reporters who submitted reports in both the pre- and post-reporting system periods. Sixty-two reports were submitted in paper form, but after the system was set up, this number more than doubled to 128 reports in electronic form. In terms of itemized reporting, a total of 45 items were reported. Before the system was used, 23 items had been reported, but this increased to 32 items after the system was put to use. All survey variables of satisfaction received a mean of over 3 points, while positive attitude, potential benefits, and positive benefits all exceeded 4 points, each receiving 4.20, 4.20, and 4.13, respectively. Among the variables, time-consuming and decision-making had the lowest mean values, each receiving 3.53. Satisfaction was found to be high for system quality and user satisfaction, but relatively low for time-consuming and decision-making. We were able to verify that effective reporting and monitoring of adverse incidents and the safety of medical devices can be implemented through the establishment of an in-hospital medical device safety information reporting system that can enhance patient safety and medical device risk management.

  7. The effect of medical conditions on the functional limitations of Mexican-American elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markides, K S; Stroup-Benham, C A; Goodwin, J S; Perkowski, L C; Lichtenstein, M; Ray, L A

    1996-09-01

    We examined the relationship of self-reported functional status to common medical conditions using a probability sample of 3050 noninstitutionalized Mexican-American men and women aged 65 or older and residing in the Southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas). All subjects were interviewed in person (n = 2,873) or by proxy (n = 177) in their homes during late 1993 and early 1994. The questionnaire obtained information on self-reported functional status and prevalence of arthritis, cancer, diabetes, stroke, heart attack, and hip fracture. The prevalence of medical conditions ranged from 4.1% for hip fracture to 40.8% for arthritis. Prevalence of impairments in seven activities of daily living ranged from 5.4% for eating to 11.7% for bathing, while 25.1% could not walk up and down stairs, and 28.9% could not walk a half mile without help. In multiple logistic regression analyses, previous diagnoses of stroke and hip fracture were most predictive of functional limitations, though all conditions examined (arthritis, cancer, diabetes, stroke, heart attack, and hip fracture) were independently associated with increased odds of impairment in some activities of daily living. In general, the odds for functional impairment associated with specific medical conditions were higher than those previously published for non-Hispanic white populations. The fact that Mexican-American elderly who live in the community and who have medical conditions, especially stroke and hip fracture, are at high risk for functional impairment probably reflects the low rate of institutionalization in this population and has implications for the provision of community-based long-term care services for Mexican-American elderly.

  8. MEDICAL MYSTERY: ECTRODACTYLY A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhra Mandal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of all or part of one or more fingers or toes is defined as Ectrodactyly. It is the word derived from Greek ektroma meaning “abortion” and dactyly meaning digits. Also called split hand or foot malformation (SHFM, Ectrodactyly is a rare limb malformation with median cleft of hand and foot and aplasia or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals and metatarsals. Irregular pattern of inheritance exists for ectrodactyly; may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X linked. In this condition, the median cleft of the hand gives the hand, the appearance of lobster claws- so also called ‘Lobster Claw Hand”. Ectrodactyly may be very commonly associated with other anomalies of face, eyes and skeletal system. We report a rare case of unilateral ectrodactyly of right hand .The present case is not associated with any other anomaly as described in various textbooks and reference articles. The details of etiology, diagnosis, genetic causes, association with other anomalies and treatment will be discussed.

  9. Medical Services: Nursing Records and Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    11) Item 11. Self–explanatory. (12) Item 12. Record if electrosurgical unit (ESU) was used by “X” in the YES or NO block. Enter medical maintenance...Guard cc cubic centimeter CNS clinical nurse specialist ESU electrosurgical unit expir expiration HR health record (records filed in DA Form 3444

  10. Wikipedia vs peer-reviewed medical literature for information about the 10 most costly medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasty, Robert T; Garbalosa, Ryan C; Barbato, Vincenzo A; Valdes, Pedro J; Powers, David W; Hernandez, Emmanuel; John, Jones S; Suciu, Gabriel; Qureshi, Farheen; Popa-Radu, Matei; San Jose, Sergio; Drexler, Nathaniel; Patankar, Rohan; Paz, Jose R; King, Christopher W; Gerber, Hilary N; Valladares, Michael G; Somji, Alyaz A

    2014-05-01

    Since its launch in 2001, Wikipedia has become the most popular general reference site on the Internet and a popular source of health care information. To evaluate the accuracy of this resource, the authors compared Wikipedia articles on the most costly medical conditions with standard, evidence-based, peer-reviewed sources. The top 10 most costly conditions in terms of public and private expenditure in the United States were identified, and a Wikipedia article corresponding to each topic was chosen. In a blinded process, 2 randomly assigned investigators independently reviewed each article and identified all assertions (ie, implication or statement of fact) made in it. The reviewer then conducted a literature search to determine whether each assertion was supported by evidence. The assertions found by each reviewer were compared and analyzed to determine whether assertions made by Wikipedia for these conditions were supported by peer-reviewed sources. For commonly identified assertions, there was statistically significant discordance between 9 of the 10 selected Wikipedia articles (coronary artery disease, lung cancer, major depressive disorder, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, back pain, and hyperlipidemia) and their corresponding peer-reviewed sources (Ppeer-reviewed sources. Caution should be used when using Wikipedia to answer questions regarding patient care.

  11. Reporting bias in medical research - a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kölsch Heike

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reporting bias represents a major problem in the assessment of health care interventions. Several prominent cases have been described in the literature, for example, in the reporting of trials of antidepressants, Class I anti-arrhythmic drugs, and selective COX-2 inhibitors. The aim of this narrative review is to gain an overview of reporting bias in the medical literature, focussing on publication bias and selective outcome reporting. We explore whether these types of bias have been shown in areas beyond the well-known cases noted above, in order to gain an impression of how widespread the problem is. For this purpose, we screened relevant articles on reporting bias that had previously been obtained by the German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care in the context of its health technology assessment reports and other research work, together with the reference lists of these articles. We identified reporting bias in 40 indications comprising around 50 different pharmacological, surgical (e.g. vacuum-assisted closure therapy, diagnostic (e.g. ultrasound, and preventive (e.g. cancer vaccines interventions. Regarding pharmacological interventions, cases of reporting bias were, for example, identified in the treatment of the following conditions: depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Alzheimer's disease, pain, migraine, cardiovascular disease, gastric ulcers, irritable bowel syndrome, urinary incontinence, atopic dermatitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypercholesterolaemia, thyroid disorders, menopausal symptoms, various types of cancer (e.g. ovarian cancer and melanoma, various types of infections (e.g. HIV, influenza and Hepatitis B, and acute trauma. Many cases involved the withholding of study data by manufacturers and regulatory agencies or the active attempt by manufacturers to suppress publication. The ascertained effects of reporting bias included the

  12. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy or, when permitted by State law of...

  13. CHARGE syndrome: Relations between behavioral characteristics and medical conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloed, M.P.J.; Boom, M.A.A. van den; Knoors, H.E.T.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Admiraal, R.J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviors and medical problems in 27 persons with CHARGE syndrome were studied, because it was hypothesized that their behavior might be partly dependent on the heterogeneous medical status. With the exception of more tics, cardiac surgery was associated with positive behaviors: less withdrawn

  14. 45 CFR 60.7 - Reporting medical malpractice payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Information § 60.7 Reporting medical malpractice payments. (a) Who must report. Each entity, including an... to the reporting entity— (i) Name and address of the entity making the payment, (ii) Name, title, and...) Relationship of the reporting entity to the physician, dentist, or other health care practitioner for...

  15. 28 CFR 79.26 - Proof of medical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cytology; (E) Fine needle aspirate; (F) Pleural biopsy; or (G) Sputum cytology; (ii) Autopsy report; (iii... surgical resection; (ii) Autopsy report; (iii) Report of otolaryngology or oral maxillofacial...

  16. Developing a user-centered voluntary medical incident reporting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lei; Gong, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors are one of leading causes of death among adults in the United States. According to the Institute of Medicine, reporting of medical incidents could be a cornerstone to learn from errors and to improve patient safety, if incident data are collected in a properly structured format which is useful for the detection of patterns, discovery of underlying factors, and generation of solutions. Globally, a number of medical incident reporting systems were deployed for collecting observable incident data in care delivery organizations (CDO) over the past several years. However, few researches delved into design of user-centered reporting system for improving completeness and accuracy of medical incident collection, let alone design models created for other institutes to follow. In this paper, we introduce the problems identified in a current using voluntary reporting system and our effort is being made towards complete, accurate and useful user-centered new reporting system through a usability engineering process.

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 4, April 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Epidemiology of Injuries Associated with Physical Training Among Young Men in the Army. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 25:197-203, 1993...available to the Medical Surveillance Activity . Notifiable conditions are reported by date of onset (or date of notification when date of onset is absent...Selected notifiable conditions ....................................... 4 Notifiable sexually transmitted diseases ....................... 6 Injuries

  18. Medical Conditions in the First Years of Life Associated with Future Diagnosis of ASD in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, Stacey E.; Yau, Vincent; Qian, Yinge; Davignon, Meghan; Lynch, Frances; Crawford, Phillip; Davis, Robert; Croen, Lisa A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines medical conditions diagnosed prior to the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Using a matched case control design with 3911 ASD cases and 38,609 controls, we found that 38 out of 79 medical conditions were associated with increased ASD risk. Developmental delay, mental health, and neurology conditions had the strongest…

  19. Medical marijuana: CAS releases report, government cuts research funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betteridge, Glenn

    2006-12-01

    In June 2006, the Canadian AIDS Society (CAS) released a comprehensive report with recommendations to overcome barriers to the use of cannabis for medical purposes faced by people living with HIV/AIDS in Canada. On 25 September 2006, as part of package of spending cuts, the federal government announced plans to eliminate its marijuana medical research program.

  20. Case report medical eponyms: an applied clinical informatics opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, L N Guptha Munugoor; Greco, P J; Kaelber, D C

    2012-01-01

    Medical eponyms are medical words derived from people's names. Eponyms, especially similar sounding eponyms, may be confusing to people trying to use them because the terms themselves do not contain physiologically descriptive words about the condition they refer to. Through the use of electronic health records (EHRs), embedded applied clinical informatics tools including synonyms and pick lists that include physiologically descriptive terms associated with any eponym appearing in the EHR can significantly enhance the correct use of medical eponyms. Here we describe a case example of two similar sounding medical eponyms--Wegener's disease and Wegner's disease-- which were confused in our EHR. We describe our solution to address this specific example and our suggestions and accomplishments developing more generalized approaches to dealing with medical eponyms in EHRs. Integrating brief physiologically descriptive terms with medical eponyms provides an applied clinical informatics opportunity to improve patient care.

  1. #DDOD Use Case: Consolidated reporting of medical device recalls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — SUMMARY DDOD use case request for consolidated, consistent reporting of medical device recalls. WHAT IS A USE CASE? A “Use Case” is a request that was made by the...

  2. Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    sporozoite neutralizing activity (SNA), destroying sporozoite infectivity and produce a circumsporozoite precipitate (CSP) reaction. Passive transfer...fact that passive transfer of immune serum does not protect recipient animals and that, under certain experimental conditions, mice are protected in...non-immune control, immune unfractionated, inmune -T cells or immune-B cells, and in varying quantities were transferred to recipient mice

  3. PERSONAL ATTITUDES, PERCEIVED SOCIAL NORMS, AND HEALTH RISK BEHAVIOR AMONG FEMALE ADOLESCENTS WITH CHRONIC MEDICAL CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Jennifer Hauser; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Mussatto, Kathleen A.; Roth-Wojcicki, Betsy; Miller, Tami; Freeman, Mary Ellen; Lerand, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether perceived peer/parent norms or personal beliefs about adolescent substance use influence substance use among female adolescents with chronic medical conditions. Methods 68 females reported on substance use, personal beliefs, and perceived peer/parent norms. Results Personal beliefs and perceived peer/parent norms were associated with adolescent’s current and future substance use. Although perceived peer norms accounted for variance in current substance use, only personal beliefs accounted for variance in future alcohol use. Conclusions Targeting perceived peer norms may be effective for intervention efforts among adolescents endorsing current substance use, whereas alcohol use prevention efforts should target personal beliefs. PMID:23524992

  4. Medical errors in hospitalized pediatric trauma patients with chronic health conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study compares medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with and without chronic conditions. Methods: The 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database, which included 123,303 trauma discharges, was analyzed. Medical errors were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. The medical error rates per 100 discharges and per 1000 hospital days were calculated and compared between inpatients with and without chronic conditions. Results: Pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions experienced a higher medical error rate compared with patients without chronic conditions: 4.04 (95% confidence interval: 3.75–4.33 versus 1.07 (95% confidence interval: 0.98–1.16 per 100 discharges. The rate of medical error differed by type of chronic condition. After controlling for confounding factors, the presence of a chronic condition increased the adjusted odds ratio of medical error by 37% if one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.37, 95% confidence interval: 1.21–1.5, and 69% if more than one chronic condition existed (adjusted odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.48–1.53. In the adjusted model, length of stay had the strongest association with medical error, but the adjusted odds ratio for chronic conditions and medical error remained significantly elevated even when accounting for the length of stay, suggesting that medical complexity has a role in medical error. Higher adjusted odds ratios were seen in other subgroups. Conclusion: Chronic conditions are associated with significantly higher rate of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients. Future research should evaluate interventions or guidelines for reducing the risk of medical errors in pediatric trauma patients with chronic conditions.

  5. Effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team on medication-error reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Jennifer L; Torowicz, Deborah Lloyd; Yeh, Timothy S

    2007-07-01

    The effects of a pharmacist-led pediatrics medication safety team (PMST) on the frequency and severity of medication errors reported were studied. This study was conducted in a pediatric critical care center (PCCC) in three phases. Phase 1 consisted of retrospective collection of medication-error reports before any interventions were made. Phases 2 and 3 included prospective collection of medication-error reports after several interventions. Phase 2 introduced a pediatrics clinical pharmacist to the PCCC. A pediatrics clinical pharmacist-led PMST (including a pediatrics critical care nurse and pediatrics intensivist), a new reporting form, and educational forums were added during phase 3 of the study. In addition, education focus groups were held for all intensive care unit staff. Outcomes for all phases were measured by the number of medication-error reports processed, the number of incidents, error severity, and the specialty of the reporter. Medication-error reporting increased twofold, threefold, and sixfold between phases 1 and 2, phases 2 and 3, and phases 1 and 3, respectively. Error severity decreased over the three time periods. In phases 1, 2, and 3, 46%, 8%, and 0% of the errors were classified as category D or E, respectively. Conversely, the reporting of near-miss errors increased from 9% in phase 1 to 38% in phase 2 and to 51% in phase 3. An increase in the number of medication errors reported and a decrease in the severity of errors reported were observed in a PCCC after implementation of a PMST, provision of education to health care providers, and addition of a clinical pharmacist.

  6. Health Conditions at Periodic Medical Surveillance in Romanian Offshore Workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liga, Percsi Letitia; Jensen, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Drilling activities in Romania have been running for over 150 years. The objective was to estimate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and the routine laboratory values in Romanian oil- and gas platform workers. Methods Data from 201 medical examinations in a 3-month period was collected and...

  7. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents...characteristics. ACHIEVEMENTS: A commercial dental X-ray film processor unit devel- oped and marketed by the Air Techniques Inc. Company of New Hyde Park, NY, was...has been designed which will increase the usefulness of the standard r. ubered containers. Prototypes will be procured during 2nd Quarter FY80. 83 D

  8. Gender-sensitive reporting in medical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidari Shirin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sex and gender differences influence the health and wellbeing of men and women. Although studies have drawn attention to observed differences between women and men across diseases, remarkably little research has been pursued to systematically investigate these underlying sex differences. Women continue to be underrepresented in clinical trials, and even in studies in which both men and women participate, systematic analysis of data to identify potential sex-based differences is lacking. Standards for reporting of clinical trials have been established to ensure provision of complete, transparent and critical information. An important step in addressing the gender imbalance would be inclusion of a gender perspective in the next Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT guideline revision. Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals, as a set of well-recognized and widely used guidelines for authors and biomedical journals, should similarly emphasize the ethical obligation of authors to present data analyzed by gender as a matter of routine. Journal editors are also promoters of ethical research and adequate standards of reporting, and requirements for inclusion of gender analyses should be integrated into editorial policies as a matter of urgency.

  9. 76 FR 15798 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Medical Lift AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final special conditions. SUMMARY... Aviation, will have a novel or unusual design feature associated with the installation of a medical lift... configuration. This modification includes the installation of a medical lift between the main deck and upper...

  10. Improving Patients\\\\\\' Care through Electronic Medical Error Reporting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rangraz Jeddi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical errors are unintentional acts that take place due to the negligence or lead to undesirable consequences in medical practice. The purpose of this study was to design a conceptual model for medical error reporting system. This applied descriptive cross-sectional research employed Delphi method carried out from 2012 to 2013. The study population was medical and paramedical personnel of health workers and paramedical personnel of hospitals, deputy of treatment, faculty members of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in addition to the internet and library resources. Sample size included 30 expert individuals in the field of medical errors. The one-stage stratified sampling procedure was used. The items with opposition ranging 0 to 25 were confirmed and those exceeding 50 were rejected whereas the items with the opposition 25 to 50 were reevaluated in the second session. This process continued for three times and the items that failed to be approved were eliminated in the model. Based on the results of this research, repeated informing about and reporting operation at on-line bases that have access to the incidence of error detected on time, identifying cause and damage due to the incidence reported confidential and anonymously immediately after the occurrence is necessary. Analysis of data quantitatively and qualitatively by using computer software is needed. Classifying the errors reports based on feedback provision according to the cause of error is needed. In addition, confidential report and possible manual retrieval were suggested It is essential to determine the means of reporting and items in the reporting form including time, cause and damage of medical error, media of reporting and method of recording and analysis.

  11. Hearing loss and associated medical conditions among individuals 65 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Stransky, Michelle L; Reichard, Amanda

    2017-06-01

    Hearing loss is prevalent, but few studies have investigated its associations with common medical conditions. The objective was to assess the prevalence of medical conditions among individuals with hearing loss, compared to those without hearing loss, in people aged 65 years and older. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) collects data on a variety of health-related topics, including disability. Three years of NHIS data (2011-2013; unweighted n = 53,111) were pooled to examine subpopulations of individuals with hearing loss. Comparisons were made between adults aged 65 and older with, and without, self-reported hearing loss. Statistical analysis included descriptive frequencies, Chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regressions. The outcomes of interest included self-reported diagnosis of arthritis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, emphysema, stroke, cancer, asthma, multiple chronic conditions, health status, and obesity. Hearing loss prevalence was nearly 37%. After adjusting for sociodemographics, smoking status, and disability, hearing loss was independently associated with the following conditions: arthritis (OR 1.41; 1.27-1.57), cancer (OR 1.35; 1.21-1.5), cardiovascular disease (OR 1.48; 1.33-1.66), diabetes (OR 1.16; 1.03-1.31), emphysema (OR 1.41; 1.14-1.74), high blood pressure (OR 1.29; 1.17-1.43), and stroke (OR 1.39; 1.12-1.66). There was an association with worse health status over the past year (OR 1.5 (1.3-1.73). Hearing loss among older individuals is independently associated with increased disease burden and poorer self-reported health. Future studies are needed to investigate the mechanistic nature of these associations, and whether improved access to hearing healthcare surveillance can reduce the overall health burden among these individuals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Cannabis as a Substitute for Opioid-Based Pain Medication: Patient Self-Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Amanda; Welty, Mark; Solomon, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Prescription drug overdoses are the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Alternatives to opioids for the treatment of pain are necessary to address this issue. Cannabis can be an effective treatment for pain, greatly reduces the chance of dependence, and eliminates the risk of fatal overdose compared to opioid-based medications. Medical cannabis patients report that cannabis is just as effective, if not more, than opioid-based medications for pain. Materials and Methods: The current study examined the use of cannabis as a substitute for opioid-based pain medication by collecting survey data from 2897 medical cannabis patients. Discussion: Thirty-four percent of the sample reported using opioid-based pain medication in the past 6 months. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that cannabis provided relief on par with their other medications, but without the unwanted side effects. Ninety-seven percent of the sample "strongly agreed/agreed" that they are able to decrease the amount of opiates they consume when they also use cannabis, and 81% "strongly agreed/agreed" that taking cannabis by itself was more effective at treating their condition than taking cannabis with opioids. Results were similar for those using cannabis with nonopioid-based pain medications. Conclusion: Future research should track clinical outcomes where cannabis is offered as a viable substitute for pain treatment and examine the outcomes of using cannabis as a medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence.

  13. An overview of intravenous-related medication administration errors as reported to MEDMARX, a national medication error-reporting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney W; Becker, Shawn C

    2006-01-01

    Medication errors can be harmful, especially if they involve the intravenous (IV) route of administration. A mixed-methodology study using a 5-year review of 73,769 IV-related medication errors from a national medication error reporting program indicates that between 3% and 5% of these errors were harmful. The leading type of error was omission, and the leading cause of error involved clinician performance deficit. Using content analysis, three themes-product shortage, calculation errors, and tubing interconnectivity-emerge and appear to predispose patients to harm. Nurses often participate in IV therapy, and these findings have implications for practice and patient safety. Voluntary medication error-reporting programs afford an opportunity to improve patient care and to further understanding about the nature of IV-related medication errors.

  14. Reporting Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in Major Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattah, Sabina; Johnsen, Anne Siri; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in major incidents is predominately based on case descriptions reported in a heterogeneous fashion. Uniform data reported with a consensus-based template could facilitate the collection, analysis, and exchange of experiences...... interacted through e-mail. We asked these experts to define data variables and rank which were most important to report during an immediate prehospital medical response to a major incident. Five rounds were conducted. RESULTS: In the first round, the experts suggested 98 variables. After 5 rounds, 21...

  15. Quarterly report of Biological and Medical Research Division, April 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brues, A.M.

    1955-04-01

    This report is a compilation of 48 investigator prepared summaries of recent progress in individual research programs of the Biology and Medical Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for the quarterly period ending April,1955. Individual reports are about 3-6 pages in length and often contain research data.

  16. Business continuity after catastrophic medical events: the Joplin medical business continuity report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Paul K; Bringle, Dottie

    2012-01-01

    On May 22, 2011, The St Johns Mercy Medical Center in Joplin, MO, was destroyed by an F-5 tornado. There were 183 patients in the building at that time in this 367-bed Medical Center. The preparation and response were superbly done and resulted in many lives saved. This report is focused on the reconstitution phase of this disaster response, which includes how to restore business continuity. As 95 percent of our medical capacity resides in the private sector in the United States, we must have a proper plan for how to restore business continuity or face the reality of the medical business failing and not providing critical medical services to the community. A tornado in 2007 destroyed a medical center in Sumter County, GA, and it took more than 365 days to restore business continuity at a cost of $18M. The plan executed by the Mercy Medical System after the disaster in Joplin restored business continuity in 88 days and cost a total of $6.6M, with all assets being reusable. The recommendation from these lessons learned is that every county, state, and Federal Emergency Management Agency region has a plan on the shelf to restore business continuity and the means to be able to do so. The hard work that the State of Missouri and the Mercy Medical System did after this disaster can serve as a model for the nation in how to quickly recover from any loss of medical capability.

  17. Safety analysis report for medical radioisotope transport cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, K. S.; Ku, J. H.; Lee, J. C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    KAERI has been producing radioisotopes for medical and industrial use and supplying them to radioisotope-using hospitals and industries. RI transport cask of A type package has been developed to transport medical radioisotopes from the HANARO to the hospitals. The safety analyses were performed under normal transport conditions in accordance with standards of transport regulations. As a results, it should be verified that the cask maintains the shielding and structural integrities under prescribed condition by the regulations. 8 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  18. Psychological Stressors and Burden of Medical Conditions in Older Adults: A Psychosomatic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "n  "nObjective: "nIn geriatric practice, the impact of psychological distress on health status has been undermined due to ageism, atypical presentation and less tendency to report negative affect among elderly people. Few studies have examined the impact of psychological stressors on medical burden in older adults. The current study has investigated the correlation of psychological distress and burden of medical conditions in a sample of older people .     "n  "n  "nMethod: A convenient study sample of 120 elderly subjects was recruited from the places where there was greater chance for the elderly people to attend. Data were collected by a trained research assistant using perceived stress scale, cumulative illness rating scale, geriatric depressive scale and a demographic questionnaire.     "n  "n  "nResults: "nOur participants perceived more level of stress than the average for their age. In the current study, the burden of medical condition was significantly correlated with the level of perceived stress(r = .197, p = .044. Moreover, in regression analysis, perceived stress was the strongest predictor for physical health morbidity (R2 =.049, significant f= .03.     "n  "n  "nConclusions: "nThe result of this study suggested that the psychological stressors contribute to poor health outcome in older adults ; the area that is usually overlooked due to ageism and its physiological related changes. The medical practitioners should consider the psychological distress as a part of etiological factors implicating in health morbidity among their aged patients.

  19. Perception of Nigerian medical students on adverse drug reaction reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Chedi, Bashir A Z; Mohammed, Khalid Garba; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous reporting (SPR) and intensive monitoring are the conventional systems used for detecting, recording, and reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Using spontaneous reporting a lot of successes has been made as existing ADRs were identified and new ones prevented through this methods. The aim of this appraisal was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and the practice of medical students with regards to ADRs reporting and to see if differences exist between the level of study and genders. The questionnaire was adopted, modified, and validated from previous studies. It comprised of 25 questions. It was administered year-IV and V medical students of Bayero University Kano, Nigeria. The data collected were coded and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20, currently known as IBM SPSS Statistics. The response rate was 74%. Among the 108 participants, 80% got the definition of ADRs correct; 63% of them knew the precise functions of pharmacovigilance (PV). In addition, 82% strongly agreed that ADR reporting is health care workers responsibility; 82% also said PV should be taught in detail. Meanwhile, 99% have noticed patient experiencing ADRs; 67% said even mild ADRs should be reported. The outcome of this study showed good knowledge and attitude with respect to ADRs and PV among the medical students surveyed. Unfortunately, the practice of medical students was found to be unsatisfactory. There is a need to upgrade the students teaching the curriculum with respect to ADRs monitoring.

  20. Perception of Nigerian medical students on adverse drug reaction reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Rabiu Abubakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous reporting (SPR and intensive monitoring are the conventional systems used for detecting, recording, and reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs. Using spontaneous reporting a lot of successes has been made as existing ADRs were identified and new ones prevented through this methods. The aim of this appraisal was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude, and the practice of medical students with regards to ADRs reporting and to see if differences exist between the level of study and genders. The questionnaire was adopted, modified, and validated from previous studies. It comprised of 25 questions. It was administered year-IV and V medical students of Bayero University Kano, Nigeria. The data collected were coded and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20, currently known as IBM SPSS Statistics. The response rate was 74%. Among the 108 participants, 80% got the definition of ADRs correct; 63% of them knew the precise functions of pharmacovigilance (PV. In addition, 82% strongly agreed that ADR reporting is health care workers responsibility; 82% also said PV should be taught in detail. Meanwhile, 99% have noticed patient experiencing ADRs; 67% said even mild ADRs should be reported. The outcome of this study showed good knowledge and attitude with respect to ADRs and PV among the medical students surveyed. Unfortunately, the practice of medical students was found to be unsatisfactory. There is a need to upgrade the students teaching the curriculum with respect to ADRs monitoring.

  1. Organizational safety culture and medical error reporting by Israeli nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Barnoy, Sivia

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the association between patient safety culture (PSC) and the incidence and reporting rate of medical errors by Israeli nurses. Self-administered structured questionnaires were distributed to a convenience sample of 247 registered nurses enrolled in training programs at Tel Aviv University (response rate = 91%). The questionnaire's three sections examined the incidence of medication mistakes in clinical practice, the reporting rate for these errors, and the participants' views and perceptions of the safety culture in their workplace at three levels (organizational, departmental, and individual performance). Pearson correlation coefficients, t tests, and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Most nurses encountered medical errors from a daily to a weekly basis. Six percent of the sample never reported their own errors, while half reported their own errors "rarely or sometimes." The level of PSC was positively and significantly correlated with the error reporting rate. PSC, place of birth, error incidence, and not having an academic nursing degree were significant predictors of error reporting, together explaining 28% of variance. This study confirms the influence of an organizational safety climate on readiness to report errors. Senior healthcare executives and managers can make a major impact on safety culture development by creating and promoting a vision and strategy for quality and safety and fostering their employees' motivation to implement improvement programs at the departmental and individual level. A positive, carefully designed organizational safety culture can encourage error reporting by staff and so improve patient safety. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Development of an electronic medical report delivery system to 3G GSM mobile (cellular) phones for a medical imaging department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Eugene Y; Lee, Chiang; Cai, Weidong; Feng, Dagan; Fulham, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Medical practice is characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity in collaborative and cooperative patient care. Fast and effective communication between medical practitioners can improve patient care. In medical imaging, the fast delivery of medical reports to referring medical practitioners is a major component of cooperative patient care. Recently, mobile phones have been actively deployed in telemedicine applications. The mobile phone is an ideal medium to achieve faster delivery of reports to the referring medical practitioners. In this study, we developed an electronic medical report delivery system from a medical imaging department to the mobile phones of the referring doctors. The system extracts a text summary of medical report and a screen capture of diagnostic medical image in JPEG format, which are transmitted to 3G GSM mobile phones.

  3. Are Persons Reporting "Near-Death Experiences" Really Near Death? A Study of Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Ian; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examination of medical records from 40 patients who reported unusual experiences during an illness or injury revealed that only 18 patients were judged to have had serious, life-threatening conditions, while 33 believed they had been dead or near death. Findings suggest that an important precipitator of so-called near-death experience is belief…

  4. Medical Clowning and Psychosis: A Case Report and Theoretical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Alex; Levin, Raz; Lichtenberg, Pesach

    2015-01-01

    The medical clown has become an accepted therapeutic figure in non-psychiatric hospital departments in recent years. However, the potential role of the clown in psychiatry, especially for the treatment of psychosis, has not been investigated. We report here on the functioning of a medical clown in an inpatient psychiatric department. A program using psychodramatic group therapy techniques with the clown serving as moderator was developed. We describe the case of one individual diagnosed with schizophrenia who in the course of four and a half months of group therapy led by the medical clown was able to adopt a succession of surprising roles. This process may have contributed to the patient's remission. We discuss the special capacity of medical clowns to encourage communication and indulge in fantasy while returning to consensual reality. We suggest that this may have particular relevance in work with psychotic individuals.

  5. [Medical activities under adverse conditions. Memisa Medicus Mundi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjer, J M

    1992-05-01

    The largest medical missionary organization in the Netherlands is Memisa Medicus Mundi. It has been in operation since 1984 when the organization Memisa, founded in 1925 by 2 doctors from Rotterdam and a priest, merged with Medicus Mundi Nederland. 130 of its doctors work in 80 programs mostly in English-speaking Third World countries. The regional representative for East Africa, worst affected by AIDS, related that a number of doctors work in hospitals where more than 1/2 of patients suffer from AIDS. Many doctors do not want to go to Africa because of the AIDS stigma and the lack of professional challenge of caring mainly for victims of 1 disease. Yet increasingly more foreign doctors are needed, as native doctors are often infected themselves. 1992 World Health Organizations data indicate that 1 out of 40 adult Africans is infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In major East African cities the proportion reaches 30% of the adult population. A 1991 visit to Uganda, Tanzania, and Malawi revealed the spectacle of empty villages or inhabited only by children and old people. In Malawi there is 1 doctor for 40,000 people and 1 bed for 600 inhabitants whose average age is 49.3 years for men and 57.2 years for women. The doctors working there stressed prevention, and 1 of them got embroiled in a conflict with the Catholic archbishop because of handing out condoms. Nonetheless, sensitive topics such as sterilization, caesarean section, abortion, euthanasia, and contraception have been addressed to educate the people, since prevention takes precedence over treatment.

  6. [A mourning case that referred with sexual identity disorder secondary to a general medical condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ayşegül; Ceri, Ozge; Tatlidil, Elif; Koçak, Orhan Murat; Soykan, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    D.G. was a 59-year-old male patient who was retired and married, and had 3 children. He reported no psychopathology prior to a myocardial infarction he had in 1996. Following bypass surgery he had erectile dysfunction. Subsequently, gynecomastia developed as a side effect of spironolactone and digoxin treatment. After a long period of depression he claimed was caused by non-adaptation to the changes in his body, he realized differences about himself; he began to feel like a woman. Upon referral to our clinic, he said that he had decided to continue his life as a woman and wished to get pink colored (as opposed to blue for male) identity card issued by the Turkish Government for female Turkish citizens. He reported that his wish was to learn how to become a woman. This is the first case in the medical literature defined as sexual identity disorder secondary to a general medical condition. The case is discussed in terms of pathological grief reaction.

  7. Medication error report: Intrathecal administration of labetalol during obstetric anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baisakhi Laha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Labetalol, a combined alfa and beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, is used as an antihypertensive drug. We report a case of an acute rise in blood pressure and lower limb pain due to the inadvertent intrathecal administration of labetalol, mistaking it for bupivacaine, during obstetric anesthesia. The situation was rescued by converting to general anesthesia. The cesarean delivery was uneventful, and mother as well as newborn child showed no ill-effect. This particular medication error was attributable to a failure on the part of the doctors administering the injection to read and cross-check medication labels and the practice of keeping multiple injections together. In the absence of an organized medication error reporting system and action on that basis, such events may recur in future.

  8. Advancing medical-surgical nursing practice: improving management of the changing patient condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Heidi; Plylar, Peggy; Krugman, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Higher patient acuities and more novice nurses on medical-surgical units have Educators focused on achieving positive outcomes with changes in patient condition. An educational program was developed to enhance nurses' knowledge, skill, and confidence in assessing hemodynamics, recognizing early signs of instability, and administering vasoactive medications. The program was successful with significant knowledge improvement as well as an increased use of the Medical Emergency Team while maintaining a low number of code calls.

  9. Management of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity: research and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erugina M.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Objective: research of regularities of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity and justification of the directions of optimization of management by this process. Material and Methods. Object of research included functioning of system of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity. Are carried out: The study of reports of the Saratov region for 2006-2012, documentation of 16 treatment-and-prophylactic medical organizations and 84 responses on graduates of Saratov State Medical University n.a. V. I. Razumovsky; anonymous retrospective questioning of 164 doctors after professional retraining at the faculty of professional development; expert questionnaire of 15 persons of the faculty of organizational chairs have been carried out. Results. In the work "complex adaptation factor"; dynamics of level of social and psychological, psychophysiological, organizational and professional indicators of adaptation of graduates to conditions of independent professional activity; the characteristic of "lagging behind" doctors; purposes of management of adaptation, importance of stages of its organizational support have been established. The ways to evaluate the success of individual adaptation and management of this process have been worked out, which are designed on the basis of the corresponding authorized optimization technology. Conclusion. Results of the conducted research allowed to expand idea of adaptation of graduates of medical schools to conditions of independent professional activity and to solve a number of applied problems of its optimization.

  10. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity Annual Report 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    The Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity annual Report 2001 summarizes work done to support the development of evidence-based...Hepatitis, Temporomandibular Disorders, Thyroid Disorders, Diabetes Mellitus, Abnormal Pap Smear, Enuresis, and Varicocele. Over 1,575,000 enlisted

  11. Nine children over the age of one year with full trisomy 13: a case series describing medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Deborah A; Campbell, Emily

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), identified by Patau and colleagues [1960; Lancet 1: 790-793] is the third most common autosomal condition. Population studies indicate less than one in 10 children reaches their first birthday. In the face of mixed findings and recommendations for treatment, additional research is needed to further determine what contributes to longevity and implications for treatment for presenting medical conditions. The purpose of the present study is to report on presenting medical conditions and the presence or absence of the specific conditions (age at survey completion). Data on nine survivors (seven female, two male) with trisomy 13 indicated mean gestational age of approximately 36 weeks, birth weight ranging from 1100 to 3290 g and mean length of 45.3 cm. Length of hospital stay after birth varied. The majority of infants presented with well-known physical characteristics. Medical conditions and their treatment varied at birth and at survey completion. Notably, several infants' cardiac anomalies resolved without surgical intervention. Surgeries were provided for a range of conditions including gastrostomy tube placement to address feeding issues and removal of intestinal blockage. There were no reports of holoprosencephaly. Implications and recommendations are provided.

  12. Returning persons with a medical condition to their home country : still a contentious issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flegar, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Deportation of persons with a medical condition: the Dutch National ombudsman criticizes the immigration authorities of the Netherlands for an insufficiently clear evaluation of the medical resources available in the country of origin. At the same time, Judge Pinto de Albuquerque points to the meage

  13. Adherence to Medication Regimens among Low-Income Patients with Multiple Comorbid Chronic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shiraz I.; Gioia, Deborah; Childress, Saltanat; Barnet, Beth; Webster, Ramothea L.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to explore facilitators and barriers to adherence to multiple medications among low-income patients with comorbid chronic physical and mental health conditions. The 50 focus group participants identified personal/contextual and health system factors as major impediments to adherence to multiple medications. These…

  14. Systematic screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions: Still debatable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagarde Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assessing people's ability to drive has become a public health concern in most industrialized countries. Although age itself is not a predictive factor of an increased risk for dangerous driving, the prevalence of medical conditions that may impair driving increases with age. Because the implementation of a screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions is a public health issue, its usefulness should be judged using standardised criteria already proposed for screening for chronic disease. The aim of this paper is to propose standardised criteria suitable to assess the scientific validity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions, and identify potential issues to be clarified before screening can be implemented and effective. Discussion Using criteria developed for screening for chronic diseases and published studies on driving with medical conditions, we specify six criteria to judge the opportunity of screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. This adaptation was needed because of the complexity of the natural history of medical conditions and their potential consequences on driving and road safety. We then illustrate that published studies pleading for or against screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions fail to provide the needed documentation. Individual criteria were mentioned in 3 to 72% of 36 papers pleading for or against screening. Quantitative estimates of relevant indicators were provided in at most 42% of papers, and some data, such as the definition of an appropriate unsafe driving period were never provided. Summary The standardised framework described in this paper provides a template for assessing the effectiveness (or lack of effectiveness of proposed measures for screening for unsafe driving due to medical conditions. Even if most criteria were mentioned in the published literature pleading for or against such a screening, the failure to find quantitative and

  15. Modelling Estimates of Norovirus Disease in Patients with Chronic Medical Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Verstraeten; Baoguo Jiang; John G Weil; Lin, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The burden of disease due to norovirus infection has been well described in the general United States population, but studies of norovirus occurrence among persons with chronic medical conditions have been limited mostly to the immunocompromised. We assessed the impact of norovirus gastroenteritis on health care utilization in US subjects with a range of chronic medical conditions. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study using MarketScan data from July 2002 to December 20...

  16. 33 CFR 142.7 - Reports of unsafe working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... working conditions. (a) Any person may report a possible violation of any regulation in this subchapter or any other hazardous or unsafe working condition on any unit engaged in OCS activities to an Officer in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports of unsafe...

  17. Potential therapeutic competition in community-living older adults in the U.S.: use of medications that may adversely affect a coexisting condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songprod Jonathan Lorgunpai

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 75% of older adults with multiple chronic conditions are at risk of therapeutic competition (i.e. treatment for one condition may adversely affect a coexisting condition. The objective was to determine the prevalence of potential therapeutic competition in community-living older adults. METHODS: Cross-sectional descriptive study of a representative sample of 5,815 community-living adults 65 and older in the U.S, enrolled 2007-2009. The 14 most common chronic conditions treated with at least one medication were ascertained from Medicare claims. Medication classes recommended in national disease guidelines for these conditions and used by ≥ 2% of participants were identified from in-person interviews conducted 2008-2010. Criteria for potential therapeutic competition included: 1, well-acknowledged adverse medication effect; 2 mention in disease guidelines; or 3 report in a systematic review or two studies published since 2000. Outcomes included prevalence of situations of potential therapeutic competition and frequency of use of the medication in individuals with and without the competing condition. RESULTS: Of 27 medication classes, 15 (55.5% recommended for one study condition may adversely affect other study conditions. Among 91 possible pairs of study chronic conditions, 25 (27.5% have at least one potential therapeutic competition. Among participants, 1,313 (22.6% received at least one medication that may worsen a coexisting condition; 753 (13% had multiple pairs of such competing conditions. For example, among 846 participants with hypertension and COPD, 16.2% used a nonselective beta-blocker. In only 6 of 37 cases (16.2% of potential therapeutic competition were those with the competing condition less likely to receive the medication than those without the competing condition. CONCLUSIONS: One fifth of older Americans receive medications that may adversely affect coexisting conditions. Determining clinical outcomes in these

  18. Potential therapeutic competition in community-living older adults in the U.S.: use of medications that may adversely affect a coexisting condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorgunpai, Songprod Jonathan; Grammas, Marianthe; Lee, David S H; McAvay, Gail; Charpentier, Peter; Tinetti, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    The 75% of older adults with multiple chronic conditions are at risk of therapeutic competition (i.e. treatment for one condition may adversely affect a coexisting condition). The objective was to determine the prevalence of potential therapeutic competition in community-living older adults. Cross-sectional descriptive study of a representative sample of 5,815 community-living adults 65 and older in the U.S, enrolled 2007-2009. The 14 most common chronic conditions treated with at least one medication were ascertained from Medicare claims. Medication classes recommended in national disease guidelines for these conditions and used by ≥ 2% of participants were identified from in-person interviews conducted 2008-2010. Criteria for potential therapeutic competition included: 1), well-acknowledged adverse medication effect; 2) mention in disease guidelines; or 3) report in a systematic review or two studies published since 2000. Outcomes included prevalence of situations of potential therapeutic competition and frequency of use of the medication in individuals with and without the competing condition. Of 27 medication classes, 15 (55.5%) recommended for one study condition may adversely affect other study conditions. Among 91 possible pairs of study chronic conditions, 25 (27.5%) have at least one potential therapeutic competition. Among participants, 1,313 (22.6%) received at least one medication that may worsen a coexisting condition; 753 (13%) had multiple pairs of such competing conditions. For example, among 846 participants with hypertension and COPD, 16.2% used a nonselective beta-blocker. In only 6 of 37 cases (16.2%) of potential therapeutic competition were those with the competing condition less likely to receive the medication than those without the competing condition. One fifth of older Americans receive medications that may adversely affect coexisting conditions. Determining clinical outcomes in these situations is a research and clinical priority

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia Comorbid With Psychiatric and Medical Conditions: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jade Q; Appleman, Erica R; Salazar, Robert D; Ong, Jason C

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the most prominent nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorders. Although meta-analyses have examined primary insomnia, less is known about the comparative efficacy of CBT-I on comorbid insomnia. To examine the efficacy of CBT-I for insomnia comorbid with psychiatric and/or medical conditions for (1) remission from insomnia; (2) self-reported sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and subjective sleep quality; and (3) comorbid symptoms. A systematic search was conducted on June 2, 2014, through PubMed, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and manual searches. Search terms included (1) CBT-I or CBT or cognitive behavioral [and its variations] or behavioral therapy [and its variations] or behavioral sleep medicine or stimulus control or sleep restriction or relaxation therapy or relaxation training or progressive muscle relaxation or paradoxical intention; and (2) insomnia or sleep disturbance. Studies were included if they were randomized clinical trials with at least one CBT-I arm and had an adult population meeting diagnostic criteria for insomnia as well as a concomitant condition. Inclusion in final analyses (37 studies) was based on consensus between 3 authors' independent screenings. Data were independently extracted by 2 authors and pooled using a random-effects model. Study quality was independently evaluated by 2 authors using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. A priori main outcomes (ie, clinical sleep and comorbid outcomes) were derived from sleep diary and other self-report measures. At posttreatment evaluation, 36.0% of patients who received CBT-I were in remission from insomnia compared with 16.9% of those in control or comparison conditions (pooled odds ratio, 3.28; 95% CI, 2.30-4.68; P sleep parameters (sleep efficiency: Hedges g = 0.91 [95% CI, 0.74 to 1.08]; sleep onset latency: Hedges g = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.60 to 1.00]; wake after sleep

  20. Pediatric glaucoma medical therapy: who more accurately reports medication adherence, the caregiver or the child?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore DB

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Daniel B Moore,1 Rebecca F Neustein,2 Sarah K Jones,1 Alan L Robin,3 Kelly W Muir1,4 1Duke Eye Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Emory School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 4Health Services Research & Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: As they grow older, most children with glaucoma must eventually face the transition to self-administering medications. We previously reported factors associated with better or worse medication adherence in children with glaucoma, using an objective, electronic monitor. Utilizing the same data set, the purpose of the current study was to determine whose report (the caregiver’s or the child’s corresponded better with electronically monitored adherence. Of the 46 participants (22 girls, the mean age of children primarily responsible, and caregiver primarily responsible for medication administration was 15±2 and 10±2 years, respectively. For the children whose caregiver regularly administered the eyedrops, the caregiver’s assessment of drop adherence was associated with measured adherence (P=0.012, but the child’s was not (P=0.476. For the children who self-administered eyedrops, neither the child’s (P=0.218 nor the caregiver’s (P=0.395 assessment was associated with measured percent adherence. This study highlights potential errors when relying on self-reporting of compliance in patients and caregivers with pediatric glaucoma, particularly when the child is responsible for administering their own eyedrops. Frank discussions about the importance of medication adherence and how to improve compliance may help both the child and caregiver better communicate with the treating provider. Keywords: glaucoma, children, adherence

  1. Organizational culture, continuous quality improvement, and medication administration error reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, B J; Blegen, M A; Uden-Holman, T; Vaughn, T; Chrischilles, E; Wakefield, D S

    2001-01-01

    This study explores the relationships among measures of nurses' perceptions of organizational culture, continuous quality improvement (CQI) implementation, and medication administration error (MAE) reporting. Hospital-based nurses were surveyed using measures of organizational culture and CQI implementation. These data were combined with previously collected data on perceptions of MAE reporting. A group-oriented culture had a significant positive correlation with CQI implementation, whereas hierarchical and rational culture types were negatively correlated with CQI implementation. Higher barriers to reporting MAE were associated with lower perceived reporting rates. A group-oriented culture and a greater extent of CQI implementation were positively (but not significantly) associated with the estimated overall percentage of MAEs reported. We conclude that health care organizations have implemented CQI programs, yet barriers remain relative to MAE reporting. There is a need to assess the reliability, validity, and completeness of key quality assessment and risk management data.

  2. A report on student abuse during medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maida, Ana Margarita; Vásquez, Alicia; Herskovic, Viviana; Calderón, José Luis; Jacard, Marcela; Pereira, Ana; Widdel, Lars

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence, and the consequences, of abusive situations as perceived by students during the course of their medical training. A descriptive study was carried out surveying the entire 2000 fifth-year class of 181 in the Medical School of the University of Chile. The questionnaire was answered by 144 students. Results showed that 91.7% of the students who responded had suffered at least one episode of abuse while enrolled in medical school. The main offenders were teachers and peers. Verbal abuse was the most common (85.4%), followed by psychological (79.9%), sexual(26.4%) and physical (23.6%) abuse. Students reported that abuse had effects on their mental health, social life and the image they had of physicians; 17% considered dropping out of school as a consequence of this experience. Efforts should be addressed to prompt educators to reflect on their role.

  3. A Comparison of Management Conditions in Japan's Dental Clinics and Medical Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kawabuchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, national medical expenditures have continued to increase in Japan, and have now reached 39 trillion yen. In contrast, dental clinic expenditures have been slow to grow over the past few years, totaling 2.7132 trillion yen. At the same time, the number of dentists continues to increase, with a total of 102,551 dentists in 2012, surpassing the 100,544 physicians at medical clinics. Objective: Given this, we compared management conditions at dental clinics and medical clinics over time to determine whether management conditions of dental clinics are really as harsh as often claimed. Methods: we used the relevant data provided in the Central Social Insurance Medical Council's Survey on Economic Conditions in Health Care for statistics, which depicts management conditions at clinics, and analyzed the causes. Results: Annual fluctuations in the revenue/expense gap (revenue less expense show that the gap for dentists far undercut that for physicians at medical clinics. The main reason for this decline in revenue is that the number of dental patients declined more that the unit price rose compared to the medical clinic. Conclusion: We determined that management conditions are harsh for dental clinics.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.507

  4. Academic genres in EFL medical educational contexts: The medical case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Cianflone

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In genre analysis literature medical case-reports can be said to be almost underrepresented when compared to other scholarly specimens that have been thoroughly researched, like the research article, the master’s thesis or the doctoral dissertation. As a written academic variety little is known to English as a foreign language practitioners about the medical case report’s format and about its use in language for specific purposes classes. The aim of this note is to offer a preliminary description of the case-report’s main sections and to suggest some activities to be exploited in English as a foreign language classes. The hope is that these insights can call genre analysts’ attention on this medical genre to develop appropriate research that will result in new educational texts.

  5. Price elasticity and medication use: cost sharing across multiple clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatwood, Justin; Gibson, Teresa B; Chernew, Michael E; Farr, Amanda M; Vogtmann, Emily; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-11-01

    To address the impact that out-of-pocket prices may have on medication use, it is vital to understand how the demand for medications may be affected when patients are faced with changes in the price to acquire treatment and how price responsiveness differs across medication classes.  To examine the impact of cost-sharing changes on the demand for 8 classes of prescription medications. This was a retrospective database analysis of 11,550,363 commercially insured enrollees within the 2005-2009 MarketScan Database. Patient cost sharing, expressed as a price index for each medication class, was the main explanatory variable to examine the price elasticity of demand. Negative binomial fixed effect models were estimated to examine medication fills. The elasticity estimates reflect how use changes over time as a function of changes in copayments. Model estimates revealed that price elasticity of demand ranged from -0.015 to -0.157 within the 8 categories of medications (P  less than  0.01 for 7 of 8 categories). The price elasticity of demand for smoking deterrents was largest (-0.157, P  less than  0.0001), while demand for antiplatelet agents was not responsive to price (P  greater than 0.05). The price elasticity of demand varied considerably by medication class, suggesting that the influence of cost sharing on medication use may be related to characteristics inherent to each medication class or underlying condition.

  6. Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Inflight Medical Conditions: ExMC Pharmacy Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program is charged with identifying medical capabilities that can address the challenges of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and injuries that could occur during exploration missions beyond Earth's orbit. Faced with the obstacle of access to in-flight medical care, and limitations of vehicle space, time, and communications; it is necessary to prioritize what medical consumables are manifested for the flight, and which medical conditions are addressed. Studies of astronaut health establish the incidence of common and high risk medical conditions that require medical intervention during long-duration exploration missions. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a committee of experts, Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel beyond Earth Orbit, to examine the issues surrounding astronaut health and safety for long duration space missions. Two themes run throughout the committee's final report: (1) that not enough is known about the risks to human health during long-duration missions beyond Earth's orbit or about what can effectively mitigate those risks to enable humans to travel and work safely in the environment of deep space and (2) that everything reasonable should be done to gain the necessary information before humans are sent on missions of space exploration (IOM, 2001). Although several spaceflight focused pharmaceutical research studies have been conducted, few have provided sufficient data regarding medication usage or potency changes during spaceflight. The Du pharmaceutical stability study assessed medications flown on space shuttles to and from the International Space Station (ISS) from 2006 until 2008; of which some medications were still viable beyond their expiration dates (Du et al, 2011). However, as with many spaceflight studies, the small 'n' associated with this study limits the ability to draw strong conclusions from it

  7. British Coal Corporation Medical Service annual report 1988-89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    This annual report reviews the work of British Coal's Medical Service over the period 1988-89. Recruitment was at a lower level resulting in a reduction in the number of pre-employment medical examinations. Statistics are given for these, and for consultations during the year. The work of the rescue service is described. Results of surveys on the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in coal miners from 1961 to 1988 are presented in detail. The fall in prevalence continued. Continued attention has been paid to compliance with COSHH regulations, to encouraging the use of physiotherapy and to educating workers in lifting and handling methods. Following an incidence of Legionnaires Disease an investigation was carried out to identify the source of infection in an underground refrigeration plant. Studies on the mortality of coke workers have progressed. Reports are given on first aid and nursing services and on the administration of pethridine to injured miners.

  8. Self-reported study habits for enhancing medical students’ performance in the National Medical Unified Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Amr; Al Saadi, Tareq; Edris, Basel; Sawaf, Bisher; Zakaria, Mhd. Ismael; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The National Medical Unified Examination (NMUE) is currently required for graduation, joining postgraduate medical training, and practicing medicine in Syria. Objective: To investigate self-reported study habits that correlate with high performance on the NMUE. Methods: First through 3rd year residents at the three main hospitals in Damascus, Syria, were asked to complete a retrospective cross-sectional survey investigating their study habits and previous scores. Results: Significantly higher score was associated with >15 study h/day and allocating 1–40% of study time for practicing questions. Mean NMUE score was not significantly different in relation to preparation months for examination or for those who reported spending all their time studying alone compared with spending any amount of time in a group setting. Scores of 231–240 on the Syrian scientific high school exam correlated with significantly higher NMUE performance compared with fewer scores, except scores of 221–230. For every 10 point increase in medical school cumulative grades, the NMUE score increased 3.6 (95% confidence interval 2.5–4.8). Conclusion: The NMUE score was significantly affected by hours spent studying per day, number of practice questions completed, percentage of study time allocated for doing questions, Syrian scientific high school exam scores, and the cumulative medical school class grades. It was not significantly affected by preparation months or studying in a group setting. More studies are needed to further describe and investigate the factors that might affect performance in the NMUE. PMID:27144140

  9. 42 CFR 482.61 - Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Special medical record requirements for psychiatric hospitals. 482.61 Section 482.61 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR...

  10. National Coal Board Medical Service annual report 1981-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Sections report on: medical examinations and consultations; protection from health hazards, such as pneumoconiosis and other prescribed diseases; problems such as vitamin D in miners' blood, Legionnaires' disease, rehabilitation and physiotherapy, high pressure injection injuries, pump packing; National Coal Board (Coal Products) Ltd.; injuries and treatment; and nursing service. A list of staff and their publications and a supplement on occupational toxicology are included.

  11. Medication errors reported to the National Medication Error Reporting System in Malaysia: a 4-year retrospective review (2009 to 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsiah, A; Othman, Noordin; Jamshed, Shazia; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Wan-Mohaina, W M

    2016-12-01

    Reporting and analysing the data on medication errors (MEs) is important and contributes to a better understanding of the error-prone environment. This study aims to examine the characteristics of errors submitted to the National Medication Error Reporting System (MERS) in Malaysia. A retrospective review of reports received from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 was undertaken. Descriptive statistics method was applied. A total of 17,357 MEs reported were reviewed. The majority of errors were from public-funded hospitals. Near misses were classified in 86.3 % of the errors. The majority of errors (98.1 %) had no harmful effects on the patients. Prescribing contributed to more than three-quarters of the overall errors (76.1 %). Pharmacists detected and reported the majority of errors (92.1 %). Cases of erroneous dosage or strength of medicine (30.75 %) were the leading type of error, whilst cardiovascular (25.4 %) was the most common category of drug found. MERS provides rich information on the characteristics of reported MEs. Low contribution to reporting from healthcare facilities other than government hospitals and non-pharmacists requires further investigation. Thus, a feasible approach to promote MERS among healthcare providers in both public and private sectors needs to be formulated and strengthened. Preventive measures to minimise MEs should be directed to improve prescribing competency among the fallible prescribers identified.

  12. Future Supply of Medical Radioisotopes for the UK Report 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Neilly, Brian; Ballinger, Jim; Buscombe, John; Clarke, Rob; Ellis, Beverley; Flux, Glenn; Fraser, Louise; Hall, Adrian; Owen, Hywel; Paterson, Audrey; Perkins, Alan; Scarsbrook, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The UK has no research nuclear reactors and relies on the importation of 99Mo and other medical radioisotopes (e.g. Iodine-131) from overseas (excluding PET radioisotopes). The UK is therefore vulnerable not only to global shortages, but to problems with shipping and importation of the products. In this context Professor Erika Denton UK national Clinical Director for Diagnostics requested that the British Nuclear Medicine Society lead a working group with stakeholders including representatives from the Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) to prepare a report. The group had a first meeting on 10 April 2013 followed by a working group meeting with presentations on 9th September 2013 where the scope of the work required to produce a report was agreed. The objectives of the report are: to describe the status of the use of medical radioisotopes in the UK; to anticipate the potential impact of shortages for the UK; to assess potential alternative avenues of medical radioisotope production for the UK m...

  13. Consistency in performance evaluation reports and medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingshan; Ma, Ching-to Albert

    2002-12-01

    In the health care market managed care has become the latest innovation for the delivery of services. For efficient implementation, the managed care organization relies on accurate information. So clinicians are often asked to report on patients before referrals are approved, treatments authorized, or insurance claims processed. What are clinicians responses to solicitation for information by managed care organizations? The existing health literature has already pointed out the importance of provider gaming, sincere reporting, nudging, and dodging the rules. We assess the consistency of clinicians reports on clients across administrative data and clinical records. For about 1,000 alcohol abuse treatment episodes, we compare clinicians reports across two data sets. The first one, the Maine Addiction Treatment System (MATS), was an administrative data set; the state government used it for program performance monitoring and evaluation. The second was a set of medical record abstracts, taken directly from the clinical records of treatment episodes. A clinician s reporting practice exhibits an inconsistency if the information reported in MATS differs from the information reported in the medical record in a statistically significant way. We look for evidence of inconsistencies in five categories: admission alcohol use frequency, discharge alcohol use frequency, termination status, admission employment status, and discharge employment status. Chi-square tests, Kappa statistics, and sensitivity and specificity tests are used for hypothesis testing. Multiple imputation methods are employed to address the problem of missing values in the record abstract data set. For admission and discharge alcohol use frequency measures, we find, respectively, strong and supporting evidence for inconsistencies. We find equally strong evidence for consistency in reports of admission and discharge employment status, and mixed evidence on report consistency on termination status. Patterns of

  14. Discovering medical conditions associated with periodontitis using linked electronic health records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Mary Regina; Hripcsak, George; Albers, David J.; Wei, Ying; Wilcox, Adam B.; Wei, Jin; Li, Jianhua; Lin, Steven; Breene, Michael; Myers, Ronnie; Zimmerman, John; Papapanou, Panos N.; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Aim To use linked electronic medical and dental records to discover associations between periodontitis and medical conditions independent of a priori hypotheses. Materials and Methods This case-control study included 2475 patients who underwent dental treatment at the College of Dental Medicine at Columbia University and medical treatment at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Our cases are patients who received periodontal treatment and our controls are patients who received dental maintenance but no periodontal treatment. Chi-square analysis was performed for medical treatment codes and logistic regression was used to adjust for confounders. Results Our method replicated several important periodontitis associations in a largely Hispanic population, including diabetes mellitus type I (OR = 1.6, 95% CI 1.30–1.99, p diabetes, obesity, lipid and circulatory system conditions, alcohol and tobacco abuse. Conclusions This study contributes a high-throughput method for associating periodontitis with systemic diseases using linked electronic records. PMID:23495669

  15. Accurate Completion of Medical Report on Diagnosing Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Slobodan; Alempijević, Djordje; Andjelić, Sladjana

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing death and issuing a Death Diagnosing Form (DDF) represents an activity that carries a great deal of public responsibility for medical professionals of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and is perpetually exposed to the control of the general public. Diagnosing death is necessary so as to confirm true, to exclude apparent death and consequentially to avoid burying a person alive, i.e. apparently dead. These expert-methodological guidelines based on the most up-to-date and medically based evidence have the goal of helping the physicians of the EMS in accurately filling out a medical report on diagnosing death. If the outcome of applied cardiopulmonary resuscitation measures is negative or when the person is found dead, the physician is under obligation to diagnose death and correctly fill out the DDF. It is also recommended to perform electrocardiography (EKG) and record asystole in at least two leads. In the process of diagnostics and treatment, it is a moral obligation of each Belgrade EMS physician to apply all available achievements and knowledge of modern medicine acquired from extensive international studies, which have been indeed the major theoretical basis for the creation of these expert-methodological guidelines. Those acting differently do so in accordance with their conscience and risk professional, and even criminal sanctions.

  16. Descriptive analysis of medication errors reported to the Egyptian national online reporting system during six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Zahraa Hassan Abdelrahman; Sabri, Nagwa Ali; Elmelegy, Ahmed Abdelsalam

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes reports to the Egyptian medication error (ME) reporting system from June to December 2014. Fifty hospital pharmacists received training on ME reporting using the national reporting system. All received reports were reviewed and analyzed. The pieces of data analyzed were patient age, gender, clinical setting, stage, type, medication(s), outcome, cause(s), and recommendation(s). Over the course of 6 months, 12,000 valid reports were gathered and included in this analysis. The majority (66%) came from inpatient settings, while 23% came from intensive care units, and 11% came from outpatient departments. Prescribing errors were the most common type of MEs (54%), followed by monitoring (25%) and administration errors (16%). The most frequent error was incorrect dose (20%) followed by drug interactions, incorrect drug, and incorrect frequency. Most reports were potential (25%), prevented (11%), or harmless (51%) errors; only 13% of reported errors lead to patient harm. The top three medication classes involved in reported MEs were antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Causes of MEs were mostly lack of knowledge, environmental factors, lack of drug information sources, and incomplete prescribing. Recommendations for addressing MEs were mainly staff training, local ME reporting, and improving work environment. There are common problems among different healthcare systems, so that sharing experiences on the national level is essential to enable learning from MEs. Internationally, there is a great need for standardizing ME terminology, to facilitate knowledge transfer. Underreporting, inaccurate reporting, and a lack of reporter diversity are some limitations of this study. Egypt now has a national database of MEs that allows researchers and decision makers to assess the problem, identify its root causes, and develop preventive strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  17. Pain Report and Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Operantly Conditioned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, Richel; Vuurman, Eric; Lamers, Theo; Breukelen, van Gerard; Jongen, Ellen; Rijnen, Heidi; Maessen, Christa; Hermens, Hermie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to answer the ques- tion whether pain report can be increased and decreased by operant conditioning. We predicted that the conditioned pain effects would remain significant after correction for social desirability and fantasy proneness. Furthermore, we

  18. Pain Report and Pain-Related Evoked Potentials Operantly Conditioned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, Richel; Vuurman, Eric; Lamers, Theo; van Breukelen, Gerard; Jongen, Ellen; Rijnen, Heidi; Maessen, Christa; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to answer the ques- tion whether pain report can be increased and decreased by operant conditioning. We predicted that the conditioned pain effects would remain significant after correction for social desirability and fantasy proneness. Furthermore, we

  19. Conditions for successful reflective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Driessen, Erik W; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Overeem, Karlijn; Vermunt, Jan D; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Portfolios are often used as an instrument with which to stimulate students to reflect on their experiences. Research has shown that working with portfolios does not automatically stimulate reflection. In this study we addressed the question: What are the conditions for successful reflective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education? METHODOLOGY/RESEARCH DESIGN: We designed a portfolio that was aimed at stimulating reflection in early undergraduate medical education, using exp...

  20. Medication error reporting by community pharmacists in Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Amanda G; Littenberg, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    To document community pharmacists' awareness and use of the United States Pharmacopeia Medication Errors Reporting (USP MER) program. Telephone survey. Community pharmacies in Vermont. One self-identified community pharmacist from each community pharmacy. Each operating community pharmacy in Vermont was contacted by telephone between June 2002 and February 2003. The first individual to self-identify himself or herself as a pharmacist was asked to participate. The telephone surveys were conducted using a standard script. Survey responses to questions about awareness and use of USP MER. A pharmacist was contacted in 98% (122/124) of all operating community pharmacies in Vermont. Nine (7%) pharmacists refused to participate, leaving 113 pharmacists who responded to the survey. Although more than one half of all respondents (70/113; 62%) had heard of USP MER, less than one quarter (24/113; 21%) had ever submitted a report. Significantly more pharmacists employed by independent pharmacies had submitted a report, compared with pharmacists from other pharmacy types (chain, supermarket, mass merchandiser; P = .03). Submitting reports through a corporate hierarchy or to a corporate program was the reason most frequently cited by pharmacists for not submitting reports directly to USP MER (37%). Whether corporate reports were forwarded to USP MER is unknown. The majority of Vermont community pharmacists were aware of USP MER. However, use was low. Barriers to reporting to a common system such as USP MER may differ depending on pharmacy type. Further research to document the barriers to submitting reports is warranted.

  1. Contemporary Issues in Medicine--Medical Informatics and Population Health: Report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academic Medicine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The report of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program presents the work of two expert panels. One, on medical informatics, identified five important physician roles: lifelong learner, clinician, educator, researcher, and manager. Another panel established a definition for "population health perspective"…

  2. How experiences become data: the process of eliciting adverse event, medical history and concomitant medication reports in antimalarial and antiretroviral interaction trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elizabeth N; Mushi, Adiel K; Massawe, Isolide S; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Lemnge, Martha; Staedke, Sarah G; Mehta, Ushma; Barnes, Karen I; Chandler, Clare I R

    2013-11-14

    Accurately characterizing a drug's safety profile is essential. Trial harm and tolerability assessments rely, in part, on participants' reports of medical histories, adverse events (AEs), and concomitant medications. Optimal methods for questioning participants are unclear, but different methods giving different results can undermine meta-analyses. This study compared methods for eliciting such data and explored reasons for dissimilar participant responses. Participants from open-label antimalarial and antiretroviral interaction trials in two distinct sites (South Africa, n = 18 [all HIV positive]; Tanzania, n = 80 [86% HIV positive]) were asked about ill health and treatment use by sequential use of (1) general enquiries without reference to particular conditions, body systems or treatments, (2) checklists of potential health issues and treatments, (3) in-depth interviews. Participants' experiences of illness and treatment and their reporting behaviour were explored qualitatively, as were trial clinicians' experiences with obtaining participant reports. Outcomes were the number and nature of data by questioning method, themes from qualitative analyses and a theoretical interpretation of participants' experiences. There was an overall cumulative increase in the number of reports from general enquiry through checklists to in-depth interview; in South Africa, an additional 12 medical histories, 21 AEs and 27 medications; in Tanzania an additional 260 medical histories, 1 AE and 11 medications. Checklists and interviews facilitated recognition of health issues and treatments, and consideration of what to report. Information was sometimes not reported because participants forgot, it was considered irrelevant or insignificant, or they feared reporting. Some medicine names were not known and answers to questions were considered inferior to blood tests for detecting ill health. South African inpatient volunteers exhibited a "trial citizenship", working to achieve

  3. Shuttle OFT medical report: Summary of medical results from STS-1, STS-2, STS-3, and STS-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L. (Editor); Johnson, P. C., Jr. (Editor); Mason, J. A. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The medical operations for the orbital test flights which includes a review of the health of the crews before, during, and immediately after the four shuttle orbital flights are reported. Health evaluation, health stabilization program, medical training, medical "kit" carried in flight, tests and countermeasures for space motion sickness, cardiovascular, biochemistry and endocrinology results, hematology and immunology analyses, medical microbiology, food and nutrition, potable water, Shuttle toxicology, radiological health, and cabin acoustical noise are reviewed. Information on environmental effects of Shuttle launch and landing, medical information management, and management, planning, and implementation of the medical program are included.

  4. The Accuracy of Market Reporters under Liveweight Selling Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Naughtin, John C.; Holland, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A series of trials was conducted to test the accuracy of livestock market reporters under liveweight selling conditions in Victoria using a range of cattle types. The performance of the market reporters in carcass weight and fat cover estimation was poorer for cows than for bullocks, while the accuracy of the estimates for bullocks sold under liveweight was similar to that reported earlier for young cattle sold on a per head basis.

  5. Recurrent hypersomnia: Report of medication-responsive cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Bruna V.; Rodrigues, Iorrana; Giasson, Franciele T.B.; Balen, Matheus; Posenato, Naiana; Forcelini, Cassiano M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recurrent hypersomnia (RH) is a rare disorder without established treatment. Methods We report 2 RH medication-responsive cases with typical characteristics of Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS). Case-reports A 10 y.o. girl and a 14 y.o. boy presented with sudden sleepiness for 3–9 days (every 2–3 weeks). Physical examination, brain images and blood tests were normal. Polysomnographic findings were heterogenous, including disrupted sleep architecture. MSLTs revealed 2–3 SOREMPs and short sleep latency. Carbamazepine rendered girl׳s sleep normalization, while risperidone normalized boy׳s sleep cycles. Conclusions Facing the absence of clinical trials in RH, reports of responsive cases are the available therapeutic evidence. PMID:26483951

  6. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Davis, Scott A; Hickson, Ryan P; Lee, Charles; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Scott, Jennifer E; Rodebaugh, Lisa B; Cummings, Doyle M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient's self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1) develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2) examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach's alpha =0.86). Among a sample (N=51) of mostly African-American female patients, diabetes medication problems were common (6.1±3.1) and a greater number of diabetes medications were associated with lower medication adherence (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.89). Higher medication self-efficacy was significantly related to medication adherence (odds ratio: 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.30) and inversely related to the number of self-reported medication problems (β=-0.13; P=0.006). Higher diabetes medication self-efficacy was associated with fewer patient-reported medication problems and better medication adherence. Assessing medication-specific self-efficacy may help to identify medication-related problems that providers can help the patients address, potentially improving adherence and patient outcomes.

  7. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M; Blalock, Susan J; Davis, Scott A; Hickson, Ryan P; Lee, Charles; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Scott, Jennifer E; Rodebaugh, Lisa B; Cummings, Doyle M

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient’s self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1) develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2) examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Patients and methods Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. Results The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach’s alpha =0.86). Among a sample (N=51) of mostly African-American female patients, diabetes medication problems were common (6.1±3.1) and a greater number of diabetes medications were associated with lower medication adherence (odds ratio: 0.35; 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.89). Higher medication self-efficacy was significantly related to medication adherence (odds ratio: 1.17; 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.30) and inversely related to the number of self-reported medication problems (β=−0.13; P=0.006). Conclusion Higher diabetes medication self-efficacy was associated with fewer patient-reported medication problems and better medication adherence. Assessing medication-specific self-efficacy may help to identify medication-related problems that providers can help the patients address, potentially improving adherence and patient outcomes. PMID:27354769

  8. National Coal Board Medical Service annual report 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Sections report on: medical examinations and consultations; protection from health hazards such as pneumoconiosis and other prescribed diseases; problems such as vitamin D in the blood of miners, Legionaires' disease, Perthe's disease, rehabilitation and physiotherapy, chemical hazards, public health and hygiene, noise, and the use of visual display units; diseases from coal products such as in coke and tar manufacture; first aid services, morphia, and nursing service; and back pain in the mining industry. A list of staff and their publications is also included.

  9. A Research of Stress over Medical Employees which is Caused by Job Conditions in Sivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt Tokmak

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress that almost everybody can experience in their lifetime is a state of discomfort which is caused by several components and which can influence the quality of life in a negative way. Especially the complications in the job conditions that are faced by the employees can be sources of stress. In this study, it is aimed to reveal whether the job conditions cause stress over health employees or not. It is also aimed to discover whether the effect of job conditions on employees alter depending on diverse criteria (gender, age, organization, income level, marital status. In this study, field survey method is used and a questionnaire is applied over a total of 456 people who work for private and public medical establishments in Sivas. As a result, it is revealed that job conditions cause a medium level stress and employees working for private medical establishments face less stress in comparison to the employees working for public establishments.

  10. 76 FR 44086 - Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation) Activity.... 2900-0052.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation... submit the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB)...

  11. Mediators for internalizing problems in adolescents of parents with chronic medical condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.; Oort, F.J.; Visser-Meily, J.M.A.; Meijer, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Parents’ chronic medical condition (CMC) is related to internalizing problem behavior in adolescents. Following the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model of Hocking and Lochman, our study examines whether the effect of illness and demographic parameters on the child’s internalizing problems is

  12. Mediators for internalizing problems in adolescents of parents with chronic medical condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S. Sieh; F.J. Oort; J.M.A. Visser-Meily; A.M. Meijer

    2014-01-01

    Parents’ chronic medical condition (CMC) is related to internalizing problem behavior in adolescents. Following the transactional stress and coping (TSC) model of Hocking and Lochman, our study examines whether the effect of illness and demographic parameters on the child’s internalizing problems is

  13. Academic and Family Conditions Associated with Intrinsic Academic Motivation in Japanese Medical Students: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabea, Yasuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Intrinsic academic motivation is one of the most important psychological concepts in education, and it is related to academic outcomes in medical students. This study examined the relationships between academic and family conditions and intrinsic academic motivation. Design: Cross-sectional design. Setting: The study group consisted of…

  14. Epidemiology of Autism Spectrum Disorder in Portugal: Prevalence, Clinical Characterization, and Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Guiomar; Ataide, Assuncao; Marques, Carla; Miguel, Teresa S.; Coutinho, Ana Margarida; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Goncalves, Esmeralda; Lopes, Nazare Mendes; Rodrigues, Vitor; Carmona da Mota, Henrique; Vicente, Astrid Moura

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and identify its clinical characterization, and medical conditions in a paediatric population in Portugal. A school survey was conducted in elementary schools, targeting 332 808 school-aged children in the mainland and 10 910 in the Azores islands.…

  15. Air conditioning a vaccine laboratory. [Connaught Medical Research Laboratory, Toronto, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross J.

    1976-05-01

    In 1974, the new Bacterial Vaccine Building of Connaught Medical Research Laboratories, Toronto, Canada, was opened to produce such vaccines as pertussis, typhoid, paratyphoids, and cholera and such toxoids as staphylococcus, diphtheria, and tetanus. It also produces other medicinal products. The layout of the complex and the air conditioning system necessary in all zones are described and schematically shown. (MCW)

  16. Triggered by Medication Used in Dental Procedures: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced intestinal permeability and food sensitivity are two of the many proven causes of gastrointestinal disorders. This present report describes a woman with no previous gastrointestinal (GI complaints, who underwent dental root canal, bone graft, and implant procedures. Postsurgery she experienced an allergic reaction to the combined medications. In the weeks that followed, she presented with multiple food intolerances. Four weeks after the final dental procedure, she was assessed serologically for mucosal immune function, salivary, and blood-gluten reactivity, intestinal permeability, and other food sensitivities. Compared to her test reports from two months prior to her first dental procedure, the patient’s results showed high total secretory IgA (SIgA and elevated salivary antibodies to alpha-gliadin, indicating abnormal mucosal immunity and loss of tolerance to gluten. Her serologic assessments revealed immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgA antibodies to a range of wheat/gluten proteins and peptides, gut bacterial endotoxins and tight junction proteins. These test results indicate gut dysbiosis, enhanced intestinal permeability, systemic gluten-reactivity, and immune response to other dietary macromolecules. The present case suggests that patients who experience severe allergic or pseudoallergic reactions to medication should be assessed and monitored for gut dysfunction. If left untreated this could lead to autoimmune reactions to self tissues.

  17. Medication therapy management and condition care services in a community-based employer setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannigman, Mark J; Leifheit, Michael; Bellman, Nick; Pierce, Tracey; Marriott, Angela; Bishop, Cheryl

    2010-08-15

    A program in which health-system pharmacists and pharmacy technicians provide medication therapy management (MTM), wellness, and condition care (disease management) services under contract with local businesses is described. The health-system pharmacy department's Center for Medication Management contracts directly with company benefits departments for defined services to participating employees. The services include an initial wellness and MTM session and, for certain patients identified during the initial session, ongoing condition care. The initial appointment includes a medication history, point-of-care testing for serum lipids and glucose, body composition analysis, and completion of a health risk assessment. The pharmacist conducts a structured MTM session, reviews the patient's test results and risk factors, provides health education, discusses opportunities for cost savings, and documents all activities on the patient's medication action plan. Eligibility for the condition care program is based on a diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, asthma, heart failure, or hyperlipidemia or elevation of lipid or glucose levels. Findings are summarized for employers after the initial wellness screening and at six-month intervals. Patients receiving condition care sign a customized contract, establish goals, attend up to four MTM sessions per year, and track their information on a website; employers may offer incentives for participation. When pharmacists recommend adjustments to therapy or cost-saving changes, it is up to patients to discuss these with their physician. A survey completed by each patient after the initial wellness session has indicated high satisfaction. Direct cost savings related to medication changes have averaged $253 per patient per year. Total cost savings to companies in the first year of the program averaged $1011 per patient. For the health system, the program has been financially sustainable. Key laboratory values indicate positive clinical

  18. Condition Monitoring of Cables Task 3 Report: Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaran, M.; Lofaro, R.; na

    2009-11-30

    For more than 20 years the NRC has sponsored research studying electric cable aging degradation, condition monitoring, and environmental qualification testing practices for electric cables used in nuclear power plants. This report summarizes several of the most effective and commonly used condition monitoring techniques available to detect damage and measure the extent of degradation in electric cable insulation. The technical basis for each technique is summarized, along with its application, trendability of test data, ease of performing the technique, advantages and limitations, and the usefulness of the test results to characterize and assess the condition of electric cables.

  19. Systematic Analysis of Self-Reported Comorbidities in Large Cohort Studies – A Novel Stepwise Approach by Evaluation of Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Margarethe; Holle, Rolf; Biertz, Frank; Nowak, Dennis; Huber, Rudolf M.; Söhler, Sandra; Vogelmeier, Claus; Ficker, Joachim H.; Mückter, Harald; Jörres, Rudolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In large cohort studies comorbidities are usually self-reported by the patients. This way to collect health information only represents conditions known, memorized and openly reported by the patients. Several studies addressed the relationship between self-reported comorbidities and medical records or pharmacy data, but none of them provided a structured, documented method of evaluation. We thus developed a detailed procedure to compare self-reported comorbidities with information on comorbidities derived from medication inspection. This was applied to the data of the German COPD cohort COSYCONET. Methods Approach I was based solely on ICD10-Codes for the diseases and the indications of medications. To overcome the limitations due to potential non-specificity of medications, Approach II was developed using more detailed information, such as ATC-Codes specific for one disease. The relationship between reported comorbidities and medication was expressed by a four-level concordance score. Results Approaches I and II demonstrated that the patterns of concordance scores markedly differed between comorbidities in the COSYCONET data. On average, Approach I resulted in more than 50% concordance of all reported diseases to at least one medication. The more specific Approach II showed larger differences in the matching with medications, due to large differences in the disease-specificity of drugs. The highest concordance was achieved for diabetes and three combined cardiovascular disorders, while it was substantial for dyslipidemia and hyperuricemia, and low for asthma. Conclusion Both approaches represent feasible strategies to confirm self-reported diagnoses via medication. Approach I covers a broad spectrum of diseases and medications but is limited regarding disease-specificity. Approach II uses the information from medications specific for a single disease and therefore can reach higher concordance scores. The strategies described in a detailed and

  20. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    The research during 1978 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory, is summarized. Studies related to nuclear energy include responses of beagles to continuous low-level /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and development of leukemic indicators; comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low-level neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma radiation; genetic effects of high LET radiations; and metabolic and therapeutic studies of heavy metals. Studies of nonnuclear energy sources deal with characterization and toxicological evaluation of effluents of fluidized bed combustion and coal gasification; electrical storage systems; electric fields associated with energy transmission; and development of population projection models and assessment of human risk. Basic research studies include fundamental structural and biophysical investigations; circadian rhythms; mutagenesis in bacteria and mammalian cells; cell killing, damage, and repair in mammalian cells; carcinogenesis and cocarcinogenesis; the use of liposomes as biological carriers; and studies of environmental influences on life-span, physiological performance, and circadian cycles. In the area of medical development, proteins in urine and tissues of normal and diseased humans are analyzed, and advanced analytical procedures for use of stable isotopes in clinical research and diagnosis are developed and applied. The final sections of the report cover support facilities, educational activities, the seminar program, staff talks, and staff publications.

  1. Personal attitudes, perceived social norms, and health-risk behavior among female adolescents with chronic medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Jennifer H; Greenley, Rachel N; Mussatto, Kathleen A; Roth-Wojcicki, Betsy; Miller, Tami; Freeman, Mary E; Lerand, Sarah

    2014-07-01

    To examine whether perceived peer/parent norms or personal beliefs about adolescent substance use influence substance use among female adolescents with chronic medical conditions. Sixty-eight females reported on substance use, personal beliefs, and perceived peer/parent norms. Personal beliefs and perceived peer/parent norms were associated with adolescent's current and future substance use. Although perceived peer norms accounted for variance in current substance use, only personal beliefs accounted for variance in future alcohol use. Targeting perceived peer norms may be effective for intervention efforts among adolescents endorsing current substance use, whereas alcohol use prevention efforts should target personal beliefs.

  2. Living Conditions, Ability to Seek Medical Treatment, and Awareness of Health Conditions and Healthcare Options among Homeless Persons in Tokyo, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohtsu,Tadahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Empirical data indicative of the health conditions and medical needs of homeless persons are scarce in Japan. In this study, with the aim of contributing to the formulation of future healthcare strategies for the homeless, we conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey and interviews at a park in Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo, to clarify the living conditions of homeless persons and their health conditions and awareness about the availability of medical treatment. Responses from 55 homeless men were recorded (response rate:36.7%. With the exception of one person, none of them possessed a health insurance certificate. Half of the respondents reported having a current income source, although their modal monthly income was 30,000 yen($1 was approximately 90 yen. The number of individuals who responded "yes" to the questions regarding "Consulting a doctor on the basis of someone's recommendation" and "Being aware of the location of the nearest hospital or clinic" was significantly higher among those who had someone to consult when they were ill than among those who did not (the odds ratios [95% confidence intervals] were 15.00 [3.05-93.57] and 11.45 [1.42-510.68], respectively. This showed that whether or not a homeless person had a person to consult might influence his healthcare-seeking behavior. When queried about the entity they consulted (multiple responses acceptable, respondents mentioned "life support organizations" (61.1% and "public offices" (33.3%. Overall, 94.5% of the respondents were aware of swine flu (novel influenza A (H1N1. Their main sources of information were newspapers and magazines. On the basis of these findings, with regard to the aim of formulating healthcare strategies for homeless persons, while life support organizations and public offices play significant roles as conduits to medical institutions, print media should be considered useful for communicating messages to homeless persons.

  3. Medical neglect death due to acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an autopsy case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usumoto, Yosuke; Sameshima, Naomi; Tsuji, Akiko; Kudo, Keiko; Nishida, Naoki; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of 2-year-old girl who died of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common cancer in children. She had no remarkable medical history. She was transferred to a hospital because of respiratory distress and died 4 hours after arrival. Two weeks before death, she had a fever of 39 degrees C, which subsided after the administration of a naturopathic herbal remedy. She developed jaundice 1 week before death, and her condition worsened on the day of death. Laboratory test results on admission showed a markedly elevated white blood cell count. Accordingly, the cause of death was suspected to be acute leukaemia. Forensic autopsy revealed the cause of death to be precursor B-cell ALL. With advancements in medical technology, the 5-year survival rate of children with ALL is nearly 90%. However, in this case, the deceased's parents preferred complementary and alternative medicine (i.e., naturopathy) to evidence-based medicine and had not taken her to a hospital for a medical check-up or immunisation since she was an infant. Thus, if she had received routine medical care, she would have a more than 60% chance of being alive 5 years after diagnosis. Therefore, we conclude that the parents should be accused of medical neglect regardless of their motives.

  4. New strategies in the assessment of psychological factors affecting medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirri, Laura; Fabbri, Stefania; Fava, Giovanni A; Sonino, Nicoletta

    2007-12-01

    In this article, we examine research that may lead to a better assessment of psychological factors affecting medical conditions. We performed a review of the psychosomatic literature using both Medline and manual searches. We selected papers that were judged to be relevant to new strategies of assessment, with particular reference to the use of the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research. We assessed 8 areas concerned with the assessment of psychological factors in the setting of medical disease: hypochondriasis, disease phobia, persistent somatization, conversion symptoms, illness denial, demoralization, irritable mood, and Type A behavior. A new subclassification of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-V]; not yet published) category of psychological factors affecting physical conditions appears to be feasible and may provide the clinician with better tools for identifying psychological distress.

  5. Case reports in medical education: a platform for training medical students, residents, and fellows in scientific writing and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Aleksandra G; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-04-06

    A case report is a detailed narrative that usually illustrates a diagnostic or therapeutic problem experienced by one or several patients. Case reports commonly serve as the first line of evidence for new interventions or they function as alarms that an issue exists with an already established therapy. Case reports are of minor importance in evidence-based medicine; however, they make meaningful contributions to both the knowledge and education of medical students, residents, and fellows. Case reports are written with the goal of sharing information for medical, scientific, or educational purposes. They often serve as medical or even undergraduate students' first experience with medical writing and they provide a solid foundation for manuscript preparation and publication. In the last few decades, there has been an exponential increase in medical student research, specifically in the number of manuscripts published by medical students. It is important to foster this academic spirit among students by encouraging them to become involved in research. This editorial will focus on the value and educational benefits of writing case reports for medical students, university students, residents, and fellows.

  6. Working with Students in the Medication Era: Do We All Have to Know How to Diagnose and Treat Mental Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishio, Kip

    2005-01-01

    A marked increase in the number of college students on medications for depression, attention deficit disorder, and other conditions may have intimidated counselors and educators into believing that they all need to be medical experts. The widespread practice of medicalizing behavior and experience contrasts dramatically with the approach in which…

  7. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, A; Neri, L; Aguglia, E; Bellomo, A; Bisogno, A; Camerino, D; Carpiniello, B; Cassin, A; Costa, G; De Fazio, P; Di Sciascio, G; Favaretto, G; Fraticelli, C; Giannelli, R; Leone, S; Maniscalco, T; Marchesi, C; Mauri, M; Mencacci, C; Polselli, G; Quartesan, R; Risso, F; Sciaretta, A; Vaggi, M; Vender, S; Viora, U

    2015-01-01

    Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182-5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions.

  8. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattori, A.; Neri, L.; Aguglia, E.; Bellomo, A.; Bisogno, A.; Camerino, D.; Carpiniello, B.; Cassin, A.; Costa, G.; De Fazio, P.; Di Sciascio, G.; Favaretto, G.; Fraticelli, C.; Giannelli, R.; Leone, S.; Maniscalco, T.; Marchesi, C.; Mauri, M.; Mencacci, C.; Polselli, G.; Quartesan, R.; Risso, F.; Sciaretta, A.; Vaggi, M.; Vender, S.; Viora, U.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N = 1717) with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p < 0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p < 0.01). The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP) 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers' quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions. PMID:26557692

  9. Estimating the Impact of Workplace Bullying: Humanistic and Economic Burden among Workers with Chronic Medical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattori

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the prevalence of work-limiting diseases is increasing, the interplay between occupational exposures and chronic medical conditions remains largely uncharacterized. Research has shown the detrimental effects of workplace bullying but very little is known about the humanistic and productivity cost in victims with chronic illnesses. We sought to assess work productivity losses and health disutility associated with bullying among subjects with chronic medical conditions. Methods. Participants (N=1717 with chronic diseases answered a self-administered survey including sociodemographic and clinical data, workplace bullying experience, the SF-12 questionnaire, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment questionnaire. Results. The prevalence of significant impairment was higher among victims of workplace bullying as compared to nonvictims (SF-12 PCS: 55.5% versus 67.9%, p<0.01; SF-12 MCS: 59.4% versus 74.3%, p<0.01. The adjusted marginal overall productivity cost of workplace bullying ranged from 13.9% to 17.4%, corresponding to Italian Purchase Power Parity (PPP 2010 US$ 4182–5236 yearly. Association estimates were independent and not moderated by concurrent medical conditions. Conclusions. Our findings demonstrate that the burden on workers’ quality of life and productivity associated with workplace bullying is substantial. This study provides key data to inform policy-making and prioritize occupational health interventions.

  10. British Coal Medical Service annual report 1989-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The report contains detailed results of surveys on the prevalence of pneumoconiosis in coal miners of various age groups from 1962 to 1989. Only 0.6% of 14,300 men X-rayed in 1989 showed any sign of the disease and the overall figure for the 112 collieries surveyed after the completed seventh round of surveys was 0.7%. Emphasis has continued on dust control measures on coal faces and in drivages - dust concentration of 3.1 mg/m {sup 3} in 1989-90 was in keeping with the trend since 1970. A 'cohort' of young miners is being monitored to develop an early warning system to identify changes in the incidence of pneumoconiosis. The role of Medical Service in treating injuries, skin diseases, back pain etc. and problems caused by noise and chemicals is explained. Continued attention has been paid to implication of the COSHH regulations and audiometry has been introduced to all British Coal's employees. Services are now provided to workers of Coal Products Ltd. Reports of first aid and nursing services are included. Use of pethidine for relieving pain is now being advocated. 6 figs., 20 tabs.

  11. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  12. 10 CFR 35.3045 - Report and notification of a medical event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Report and notification of a medical event. 35.3045... Report and notification of a medical event. (a) A licensee shall report any event, except for an event... migrated outside the treatment site). (b) A licensee shall report any event resulting from intervention of...

  13. Identifying medication error chains from critical incident reports: a new analytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckels-Baumgart, Saskia; Manser, Tanja

    2014-10-01

    Research into the distribution of medication errors usually focuses on isolated stages within the medication use process. Our study aimed to provide a novel process-oriented approach to medication incident analysis focusing on medication error chains. Our study was conducted across a 900-bed teaching hospital in Switzerland. All reported 1,591 medication errors 2009-2012 were categorized using the Medication Error Index NCC MERP and the WHO Classification for Patient Safety Methodology. In order to identify medication error chains, each reported medication incident was allocated to the relevant stage of the hospital medication use process. Only 25.8% of the reported medication errors were detected before they propagated through the medication use process. The majority of medication errors (74.2%) formed an error chain encompassing two or more stages. The most frequent error chain comprised preparation up to and including medication administration (45.2%). "Non-consideration of documentation/prescribing" during the drug preparation was the most frequent contributor for "wrong dose" during the administration of medication. Medication error chains provide important insights for detecting and stopping medication errors before they reach the patient. Existing and new safety barriers need to be extended to interrupt error chains and to improve patient safety.

  14. Facilitated Nurse Medication-Related Event Reporting to Improve Medication Management Quality and Safety in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Reale, Carrie; Slagle, Jason M; Anders, Shilo; Shotwell, Matthew S; Dresselhaus, Timothy; Weinger, Matthew B

    Medication safety presents an ongoing challenge for nurses working in complex, fast-paced, intensive care unit (ICU) environments. Studying ICU nurse's medication management-especially medication-related events (MREs)-provides an approach to analyze and improve medication safety and quality. The goal of this study was to explore the utility of facilitated MRE reporting in identifying system deficiencies and the relationship between MREs and nurses' work in the ICUs. We conducted 124 structured 4-hour observations of nurses in three different ICUs. Each observation included measurement of nurse's moment-to-moment activity and self-reports of workload and negative mood. The observer then obtained MRE reports from the nurse using a structured tool. The MREs were analyzed by three experts. MREs were reported in 35% of observations. The 60 total MREs included four medication errors and seven adverse drug events. Of the 49 remaining MREs, 65% were associated with negative patient impact. Task/process deficiencies were the most common contributory factor for MREs. MRE occurrence was correlated with increased total task volume. MREs also correlated with increased workload, especially during night shifts. Most of these MREs would not be captured by traditional event reporting systems. Facilitated MRE reporting provides a robust information source about potential breakdowns in medication management safety and opportunities for system improvement.

  15. Measuring diversity in medical reports based on categorized attributes and international classification systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Přečková Petra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Narrative medical reports do not use standardized terminology and often bring insufficient information for statistical processing and medical decision making. Objectives of the paper are to propose a method for measuring diversity in medical reports written in any language, to compare diversities in narrative and structured medical reports and to map attributes and terms to selected classification systems. Methods A new method based on a general concept of f-diversity is proposed for measuring diversity of medical reports in any language. The method is based on categorized attributes recorded in narrative or structured medical reports and on international classification systems. Values of categories are expressed by terms. Using SNOMED CT and ICD 10 we are mapping attributes and terms to predefined codes. We use f-diversities of Gini-Simpson and Number of Categories types to compare diversities of narrative and structured medical reports. The comparison is based on attributes selected from the Minimal Data Model for Cardiology (MDMC. Results We compared diversities of 110 Czech narrative medical reports and 1119 Czech structured medical reports. Selected categorized attributes of MDMC had mostly different numbers of categories and used different terms in narrative and structured reports. We found more than 60% of MDMC attributes in SNOMED CT. We showed that attributes in narrative medical reports had greater diversity than the same attributes in structured medical reports. Further, we replaced each value of category (term used for attributes in narrative medical reports by the closest term and the category used in MDMC for structured medical reports. We found that relative Gini-Simpson diversities in structured medical reports were significantly smaller than those in narrative medical reports except the "Allergy" attribute. Conclusions Terminology in narrative medical reports is not standardized. Therefore it is nearly

  16. Medical condition and care of undocumented migrants in ambulatory clinics in Tel Aviv, Israel: assessing unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Zohar; Raveh, Yuval; Lurie, Ido; Leventhal, Alex; Gamzu, Roni; Davidovitch, Nadav; Benari, Orel; Grotto, Itamar

    2017-07-14

    Approximately 150,000 undocumented migrants (UM) who are medically uninsured reside in Israel, including ~50,000 originating from the horn of Africa (MHA). Free medical-care is provided by two walk-in clinics in Tel-Aviv. This study aims to compare the medical complaints of UM from different origins, define their community health needs and assess gaps between medical needs and available services. This cross-sectional study included a random sample of 610 UM aged 18-64 years, who were treated in these community clinics between 2008 and 2011. The study compared UM who had complex medical conditions which necessitated referral to more equipped medical settings with UM having mild/simple medical conditions, who were treated at the clinics. MHA were younger, unemployed and more commonly males compared with UM originating from other countries. MHA also had longer referral-delays and visited the clinics less frequently. UM with complex medical conditions were more commonly females, had chronic diseases and demonstrated longer referral-delays than those who had mild/simple medical conditions. The latter more commonly presented with complained of respiratory, muscular and skeletal discomfort. In multivariate analysis, the variables which predicted complex medical conditions included female gender, chronic illnes and self-referral to the clinics. The ambulatory clinics were capable of responding to mild/simple medical conditions. Yet, the health needs of women and migrants suffering from complex medical conditions and chronic diseases necessitated referrals to secondary/tertiary medical settings, while jeopardizing the continuity of care. The health gaps can be addressed by a more holistic social approach, which includes integration of UM in universal health insurance.

  17. 77 FR 55221 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... Medical Examination and Vaccination Record, Form I-693; Revision of a Currently Approved Collection ACTION...: Report of Medical Examination and Vaccination Record. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the...

  18. Maternal medical conditions during pregnancy and gross motor development up to age 24 months in the Upstate KIDS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabian, Akhgar; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Wylie, Amanda; Bell, Erin; Bello, Scott C; Yeung, Edwina

    2016-07-01

    We examined whether children of mothers with a medical condition diagnosed before or during pregnancy took longer to achieve gross motor milestones up to age 24 months. We obtained information on medical conditions using self-reports, birth certificates, and hospital records in 4909 mothers participating in Upstate KIDS, a population-based birth cohort. Mothers reported on their children's motor milestone achievement at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. After adjustment for covariates (including pre-pregnancy body mass index), children of mothers with gestational diabetes took longer to achieve sitting without support (hazard ratio [HR]=0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-0.93), walking with assistance (HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.98), and walking alone (HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.99) than children of females with no gestational diabetes. Similar findings emerged for maternal diabetes. Gestational hypertension was associated with a longer time to achieve walking with assistance. These associations did not change after adjustment for gestational age or birthweight. Severe hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were related to a longer time to achieve milestones, but not after adjustment for perinatal factors. Children exposed to maternal diabetes, gestational or pre-gestational, may take longer to achieve motor milestones than non-exposed children, independent of maternal obesity. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Motor-vehicle crash history and licensing outcomes for older drivers reported as medically impaired in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuser, Thomas M; Carr, David B; Ulfarsson, Gudmundur F

    2009-03-01

    The identification and evaluation of medically impaired drivers is an important safety issue. Medical fitness to drive is applicable to all ages but is particularly salient for older adults. Voluntary procedures, whereby various professionals and family members may report medical fitness concerns to State driver license bureaus, are common in the United States. This paper examines traffic crashes of drivers reported during 2001-2005 under the State of Missouri's voluntary reporting law (House Bill HB-1536) and the resulting licensing outcomes. Missouri's law is non-specific as to age, but the mean age of reported drivers was 80. Reports were submitted by police officers (30%), license office staff (27%), physicians (20%), family members (16%), and others (7%). The most common medical condition was dementia/cognitive (45%). Crash history for reported drivers was higher than that of controls, dating back to 1993, reaching a peak in 2001 when the crash involvement of reported drivers was 9.3% vs. 2.2% for controls--a fourfold difference. The crash involvement of reported drivers decreased rapidly after, indicating the impact of HB-1536 reporting with subsequent license revocation and to a lesser degree, mortality. Of the 4,100 reported individuals, 144 (3.5%) retained a driver's license after the process.

  20. The analysis of the medical university students’ health condition and lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLGA KHURS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Significant psychophysiological burdens and unhealthy lifestyle constitute the risk factors leading to students’ health deterioration. Purpose: The purpose of the research was the analysis of students’ health condition and lifestyle in medical university. Material and methods: The objects of the research were 100 third year students of the Faculties of General Medicine and Pediatrics of Grodno State Medical University. For the study of students’ orientation on healthy lifestyle, a special scale-type questionnaire was developed and used. Results: According to the respondents’ opinions it has been detected that the basic factors influencing the state of health are the lifestyle and the living conditions. The students activity is evaluated as very low as well as their rational nutrition. The majority of them smoke and drink alcohol. Conclusions: The peculiarities of studying at a medical university accompanied by imbalanced nutrition might lead to the deterioration of health in the students which are doctors to be. The results ought to lead to the optimization of prophylaxis programs and entire alteration of the students’ lifestyles.

  1. Leisure Engagement: Medical Conditions, Mobility Difficulties, and Activity Limitations—A Later Life Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Nilsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study aims to investigate the impact of medical conditions, mobility difficulties, and activity limitations on older people’s engagement in leisure activities. Methods. The analyses are based on a cross regional survey carried out in 2010 in the Bothnia region (Northern Sweden and Western Finland. A posted questionnaire, which included questions on different aspects of leisure engagement, medical history, and health, was sent out to older persons in the region. The final sample consisted of 5435 persons aged 65, 70, 75, and 80 years. The data was analyzed by using ordinary least squares (OLS multivariate regression. Results. The most important predictor of leisure engagement abstention among older people is the prevalence of activity limitations, whereas mobility difficulties and medical conditions play less important roles. The strong negative association between activity limitations and leisure engagement remains significant even after we control for individual, sociodemographic characteristics, and country. Discussion. This study provides a window into leisure engagement in later life and factors influencing the magnitude of engagement in leisure activities.

  2. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome--a medical condition requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwilsza, Małgorzata; Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna

    2012-09-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare genetic condition showing a variable expressiveness. It is inherited in a dominant autosomal way. The strongest characteristic of the disease includes multiple basal cell carcinomas, jaw cysts, palmar and plantar pits, skeletal abnormalities and other developmental defects. Owing to the fact that the condition tends to be a multisystemic disorder, familiarity of various medical specialists with its manifestations may reduce the time necessary for providing a diagnosis. It will also enable them to apply adequate methods of treatment and secondary prevention. In this study, we present symptoms of the disease, its diagnostic methods and currently used treatments. We searched 2 scientific databases: Medline (EBSCO) and Science Direct, for the years 1996 to 2011. In our search of abstracts, key words included nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. We examined 287 studies from Medline and 80 from Science Direct, all published in English. Finally, we decided to use 60 papers, including clinical cases and literature reviews. Patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome need particular multidisciplinary medical care. Knowledge of multiple and difficult to diagnose symptoms of the syndrome among professionals of various medical specialties is crucial. The consequences of the disease pose a threat to the health and life of patients. Therefore, an early diagnosis creates an opportunity for effective prevention and treatment of the disorder. Prevention is better than cure.

  3. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  4. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  5. PIGMI: a design report for Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansborough, L.D. (comp.)

    1981-09-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is an integrated linear accelerator (linac) system developed under the auspices of the National Cancer Institute for specific application to cancer treatment in a hospital environment. In its full configuration, PIGMI is a proton linac that is far smaller, less expensive, and more reliable than previous machines that produce pions. Subsets of PIGMI technology can be used with equal advantage to generate beams of other particles (such as neutrons, protons, or heavy ions) that may be of interest for radiotherapy, radioisotope production, or other applications. The dramatic performance and cost advantages of this new breed of acceleraor result from a number of improvements. In the low-energy portion of the machine, a new type of low-energy linac (the radio-frequency quadrupole(RFQ)) produces an exceptionally good quality beam, and uses a very simple 30-kV injector. In the second part of the machine (the drift-tube linac (DTL)), high accelerating gradients are now achievable with consequent reductions in machine length. Another new structure (the disk and washer (DAW)) will be used in the third and final section of the accelerator; this portion will also be relatively short and require few power amplifiers. The entire machine is designed for ease of operation and high reliability. The pion-production machine, discussed in this report, accelerates a 100-..mu..A average proton-beam current to 650 MeV; use of an efficient pion-collection channel would result in an average pion flux of over 100 rad/min in a volume of about 1 l. Pion-channel design is not treated in this report. Accelerator construction cost is estimated at $10 million (1980 dollars); site preparation and treatment facility costs would bring the cost of a complete facility to an estimated $25 million.

  6. Medication Error Reporting Rate and its Barriers and Facilitators among Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snor Bayazidi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication errors are among the most prevalent medical errors leading to morbidity and mortality. Effective prevention of this type of errors depends on the presence of a well-organized reporting system. The purpose of this study was to explore medication error reporting rate and its barriers and facilitators among nurses in teaching hospitals of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran.Methods: In a descriptive study in 2011, 733 nurses working in Urmia teaching hospitals were included. Data was collected using a questionnaire based on Haddon matrix. The questionnaire consisted of three items about medication error reporting rate, eight items on barriers of reporting, and seven items on facilitators of reporting. The collected data was analyzed by descriptive statistics in SPSS14.Results:The rate of reporting medication errors among nurses was far less than medication errors they had made. Nurses perceived that the most important barriers of reporting medication errors were blaming individuals instead of the system, consequences of reporting errors, and fear of reprimand and punishment. Some facilitating factors were also determined. Conclusion: Overall, the rate of medication errors was found to be much more than what had been reported by nurses. Therefore, it is suggested to train nurses and hospital administrators on facilitators and barriers of error reporting in order to enhance patient safety.

  7. Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes and Decrements in Performance Due to In-flight Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen,Erik

    2017-01-01

    The drive to undertake long-duration space exploration missions at greater distances from Earth gives rise to many challenges concerning human performance under extreme conditions. At NASA, the Human Research Program (HRP) has been established to investigate the specific risks to astronaut health and performance presented by space exploration, in addition to developing necessary countermeasures and technology to reduce risk and facilitate safer, more productive missions in space (NASA Human Research Program 2009). The HRP is divided into five subsections, covering behavioral health, space radiation, habitability, and other areas of interest. Within this structure is the ExMC Element, whose research contributes to the overall development of new technologies to overcome the challenges of expanding human exploration and habitation of space. The risk statement provided by the HRP to the ExMC Element states: "Given that medical conditions/events will occur during human spaceflight missions, there is a possibility of adverse health outcomes and decrements in performance in mission and for long term health" (NASA Human Research Program 2016). Within this risk context, the Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element is specifically concerned with establishing evidenced-based methods of monitoring and maintaining astronaut health. Essential to completing this task is the advancement in techniques that identify, prevent, and treat any health threats that may occur during space missions. The ultimate goal of the ExMC Element is to develop and demonstrate a pathway for medical system integration into vehicle and mission design to mitigate the risk of medical issues. Integral to this effort is inclusion of an evidence-based medical and data handling system appropriate for long-duration, exploration-class missions. This requires a clear Concept of Operations, quantitative risk metrics or other tools to address changing risk throughout a mission, and system scoping and system

  8. Notifiable condition reporting practices: implications for public health agency participation in a health information exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revere, Debra; Hills, Rebecca H; Dixon, Brian E; Gibson, P Joseph; Grannis, Shaun J

    2017-03-11

    The future of notifiable condition reporting in the United States is undergoing a transformation with the increasing development of Health Information Exchanges which support electronic data-sharing and -transfer networks and the wider adoption of electronic laboratory reporting. Communicable disease report forms originating in clinics are an important source of surveillance data for public health agencies. However, problems of poor data quality and delayed submission of reports to public health agencies are common. In addition, studies of barriers and facilitators to reporting have assumed that the primary reporter is the treating physician, although the extent to which a provider is involved in the reporting workflow is unclear. We sought to better understand the barriers to and burden of notifiable condition reporting from the perspectives of the three primary groups involved in reporting workflow: providers, clinic staff who bear the principal responsibility for reporting, and the public health workers who receive and process reports from clinics. In addition, we sought to situate these findings within the context of the future of notifiable disease reporting and the potential impacts of electronic lab and medical records on the surveillance system. Seven ambulatory care clinics and 3 public health agencies that are part of a Health Information Exchange in the state of Indiana, USA, participated in the study. Data were obtained from a survey of clinic physicians (N = 29), interviews with clinic reporters (N = 11), and interviews with public health workers (N = 9). Survey data were summarized descriptively and interview transcripts underwent qualitative analysis. In both clinics and public health agencies, the laboratory report initiates reporting workflow. Provider involvement with reporting primarily revolves around ordering medications to treat a condition confirmed by the lab result. In clinics, reporting is typically the responsibility of clinic

  9. Steatocystoma multiplex suppurativa: case report of a rare condition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Cândida Naira Lima e Lima; Pereira, Daniele do Nascimento; Lisboa, Alice Paixão; Leal, Juliana Martins; Obadia, Daniel Lago; da Silva, Roberto Souto

    2016-01-01

    Steatocystoma multiplex is a rare genetic disorder characterized by the presence of hamartomatous malformations at the junction of the pilosebaceous duct. It consists of encapsulated cystic lesions in the dermis, with adjacent sebaceous gland. When associated with inflammation, resembling hidradenitis, it is called steatocystoma multiplex suppurativa, a condition rarely reported. This is the first case of steatocystoma multiplex suppurativa reported in the Brazilian literature. Female patient, 23 years old, with papular and nodular cystic lesions that started in the armpits and groin, later spreading to the trunk, lower limbs, anticubital fossa, face and scalp. The presence of papular-nodular lesions associated with disseminated hidradenitis-like lesions in flexural areas and the histopathological diagnosis of steatocystoma defined the diagnosis of steatocystoma multiplex suppurativa.

  10. Medication Exposures and Subsequent Development of Ewing Sarcoma: A Review of FDA Adverse Event Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith U. Cope

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT are rare but deadly cancers of unknown etiology. Few risk factors have been identified. This study was undertaken to ascertain any possible association between exposure to therapeutic drugs and ESFT. Methods. This is a retrospective, descriptive study. A query of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS was conducted for all reports of ESFT, January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2013. Report narratives were individually reviewed for patient characteristics, underlying conditions and drug exposures. Results. Over 16 years, 134 ESFT reports were identified, including 25 cases of ESFT following therapeutic drugs and biologics including immunosuppressive agents and hormones. Many cases were confounded by concomitant medications and other therapies. Conclusions. This study provides a closer look at medication use and underlying disorders in patients who later developed ESFT. While this study was not designed to demonstrate any clear causative association between ESFT and prior use of a single product or drug class, many drugs were used to treat immune-related disease and growth or hormonal disturbances. Further studies may be warranted to better understand possible immune or neuroendocrine abnormalities or exposure to specific classes of drugs that may predispose to the later development of ESFT.

  11. Effects of common chronic medical conditions on psychometric tests used to diagnose minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Poulsen, L; Rasmussen, C K

    2016-01-01

    Many chronic medical conditions are accompanied by cognitive disturbances but these have only to a very limited extent been psychometrically quantified. An exception is liver cirrhosis where hepatic encephalopathy is an inherent risk and mild forms are diagnosed by psychometric tests. The preferred....../15, p psychometrically measurable cognitive deficits, whereas those with ESRF or DMII had not. This adds to the understanding of the clinical consequences of chronic heart- and lung disease, and implies...... that the psychometric tests should be interpreted with great caution in cirrhosis patients with heart- or lung comorbidity....

  12. Health Maintenance in Very Old Age : Medical Conditions, Functional Outcome and Nutritional Status

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Huan-Ji

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to provide better understanding of the underlying factors related to health maintenance in very old people, with a focus on medical conditions, functional outcome and nutritional status. Data were gathered from the ELSA 85 project (Elderly in Linköping Screening Assessment). The ELSA 85 project was started in 2007 with a population-based survey of 85-year-old individuals (n = 650) residing in Linköping municipality, Sweden. During the study period from 2007 ...

  13. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  14. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, S.L. (Oregon Medical Laser Center, Portland, OR (United States))

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  15. Motivation in medical students: a PhD thesis report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi

    2012-08-01

    The aims of this thesis were to gather insights and investigate the factors influencing, outcomes and applications of medical students' motivation. This thesis consists of three literature reviews, four research papers and two application papers. Two research studies investigated the relationships of student motivation with study strategy, effort and academic performance through structural equation modelling and cluster analysis. The relationships of age, maturity, gender and educational background with motivation were investigated through multiple regression analysis. The results of this thesis were 1. Developments in medical education appear to have undervalued student motivation. 2. Motivation is an independent variable in medical education; intrinsic motivation is significantly associated with deep study strategy, high study effort and good academic performance. 3. Motivation is a dependent variable in medical education and is significantly affected by age, maturity, gender, educational background; intrinsic motivation is enhanced by providing students with autonomy, feedback and emotional support. 4. Strength of motivation for medical school can be reliably measured by Strength of Motivation for Medical School questionnaire. The conclusion of this thesis was that it is important to give consideration to motivation in medical education because intrinsic motivation leads to better learning and performance and it can be enhanced through giving students autonomy in learning, feedback about competence and emotional support.

  16. Race and Ethnic Group Differences in Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Chronic Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daphne C; Assari, Shervin; Johnson-Lawrence, Vicki

    2015-09-01

    This study tested whether race and ethnic group differences exist for lifetime major depressive disorder and/or general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions. Data from the National Survey of American Life, which included 3570 African American, 1438 Caribbean Black, and 891 non-Hispanic White adults were analyzed. Outcomes included at least one and multiple chronic medical conditions, from a list of 14 medical conditions (e.g., arthritis, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, stroke, heart disease, etc.). Logistic regressions were fitted to data to determine how the association between major depressive disorder, general anxiety disorder, and one or more chronic medical conditions vary across race and ethnicity. Lifetime major depressive disorder (but not lifetime general anxiety disorder) was associated with at least one chronic medical condition among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks, but not non-Hispanic Whites. Lifetime major depressive disorder was similarly associated with multiple chronic medical conditions among African Americans, Caribbean Blacks, and non-Hispanic Whites. For Caribbean Blacks, stronger associations were found between major depressive disorder and general anxiety disorder with one or more chronic medical conditions compared to African Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. Findings suggest that race and ethnicity may shape the links between comorbid psychiatric disorders and chronic medical conditions. Mental health screening of individuals with chronic medical conditions in primary health-care settings may benefit from tailoring based on race and ethnicity. More research is needed to understand why associations between physical and mental health vary among race and ethnic groups.

  17. Report of study 7.3: cooling and air conditioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, F.

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the study carried out by the study group 7.3 in the triennium 1997-2000. The study was focused on industrial refrigeration and air conditioning for the large building utilising natural gas. The goal of this study, carried out in collaboration of the members of study group 7.3, was to analyse the markets of industrial refrigeration and air conditioning for large buildings to identify possibilities to increase the natural gas share in these sectors. The available technology in the two sectors of the market are described in a single section, i.e. the 'State of the art of the technology'. In this section, technical characteristics, applications, performances, new developments and others topics are discussed for absorbers, gas engines, gas turbines and fuel cells. In the 'Industrial Refrigeration' section an analysis of the present global market for the industrial sector is presented. Economics, advantages and barriers to gas units compared with the electrical units are discussed. Information on existing industrial plants, possible application options and new technology developments are described as well. The 'Air conditioning for the large building' section deals with offices, hotels, commercial buildings, hospitals and shopping centres with a cooling capacity of 350 kW or higher. It appears that the use of natural gas for cooling of large buildings has been increasing during the last decade, thanks to the greater availability of natural gas and the development of new technologies. A marketing survey of gas air-conditioning was carried out in cooperation with a group of Intergas Marketing. Based on the survey, the report describes the market position of natural gas relative to electricity. It provides the strategic prospects for further developing natural gas as a competitive option for air-conditioning of large buildings using a combination of state-of-the-art technologies. It is important to highlight

  18. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Transdiagnostic Behavioral Intervention for Mental Health and Medical Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindo, Lilian; Van Liew, Julia R; Arch, Joanna J

    2017-07-01

    Psychological interventions have a long history of successful treatment of patients suffering from mental health and certain medical conditions. At the same time, psychotherapy research has revealed key areas of growth for optimizing patient care. These include identifying novel treatment delivery methods that increase treatment adherence, developing new strategies to more effectively address the ever-growing population of patients with comorbid conditions, and elucidating the mechanisms by which effective treatments work in order to further refine their design. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is an empirically supported psychotherapy that offers promise for patients suffering from a wide range of mental and physical conditions, while addressing these gaps and challenges in the field. ACT rests on the fundamental premise that pain, grief, disappointment, illness, and anxiety are inevitable features of human life, with the therapeutic goal of helping individuals productively adapt to these types of challenges by developing greater psychological flexibility rather than engaging in counterproductive attempts to eliminate or suppress undesirable experiences. This is achieved through committed pursuit of valued life areas and directions, even in the face of the natural desire to escape or avoid painful and troubling experiences, emotions, and thoughts. ACT is transdiagnostic (applies to more than one condition), process-focused, and flexibly delivered. In a relatively short period of time, ACT has been effectively implemented across a broad range of therapeutic settings, including mental health, primary care, and specialty medical clinics. ACT has also been delivered in a variety of formats, including 1-day group workshops, online and smartphone applications, and telehealth. Focus on how best to package and deliver treatment to meet the unique needs of different patient populations helps to ensure treatment adherence and has fostered successful application of

  19. 42 CFR 418.106 - Condition of participation: Drugs and biologicals, medical supplies, and durable medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... well as an expiration date (if applicable). (2) Disposing. (i) Safe use and disposal of controlled... provided pharmacist services must include evaluation of a patient's response to medication therapy... own facility may only be administered medications by the following individuals: (i) A licensed nurse...

  20. Feasibility of Remote Ischemic Peri-conditioning during Air Medical Transport of STEMI Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gill, Christian; Wayne, Max; Guyette, Francis X; Olafiranye, Oladipupo; Toma, Catalin

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic peri-conditioning (RIPC) has gained interest as a means of reducing ischemic injury in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who are undergoing emergent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, process, and patient-related factors related to the delivery of RIPC during air medical transport of STEMI patients to tertiary pPCI centers. We performed a retrospective review of procedural outcomes of a cohort of STEMI patients who received RIPC as part of a clinical protocol in a multi-state air medical service over 16 months (March 2013 to June 2014). Eligible patients were transported to two tertiary PCI centers and received up to four cycles of RIPC by inflating a blood pressure cuff on an upper arm to 200 mmHg for 5 minutes and subsequently deflating the cuff for 5 minutes. Data regarding feasibility, process variables, patient comfort, and occurrence of hypotension were obtained from prehospital records and prospectively completed quality improvement surveys. The primary outcome was whether at least 3 cycles of RIPC were completed by air medical transport crews prior to pPCI. Secondary outcomes included the number of cycles completed prior to pPCI, time spent with the patient prior to transport (bedside time), patient discomfort level, and incidence of hypotension (systolic blood pressure air medical transport for pPCI, without occurrence of prolonged bedside times. The incidence of excessive RIPC-related discomfort or hemodynamic instability is rare. STEMI patients requiring on average >30 minutes transport for pPCI may be the ideal group for RIPC utilization.

  1. Special medical conditions associated with catatonia in the internal medicine setting: hyponatremia-inducing psychosis and subsequent catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novac, Andrei A; Bota, Daniela; Witkowski, Joanne; Lipiz, Jorge; Bota, Robert G

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of catatonia in the psychiatry consultation service is not infrequent. Usually, the patient either presents to the Emergency Department or develops catatonia on the medical floor. This condition manifests with significant behavioral changes (from mildly decreased speech output to complete mutism) that interfere with the ability to communicate. After structural brain disorders are excluded, one of the diagnoses that always should be considered is catatonia. However, the causes of catatonia are numerous, ranging from psychiatric causes to a plethora of medical illnesses. Therefore, it is not surprising that there are many proposed underlying mechanisms of catatonia and that controversy persists about the etiology of specific cases.There are only 6 reports of hyponatremia-induced catatonia and psychosis in the literature. Here, we present the case of a 30-year-old woman with catatonia and psychosis induced by hyponatremia, and we use this report to exemplify the multitude of biologic causes of catatonia and to propose a new way to look at the neuroanatomical basis of processing, particularly the vertical processing systems we believe are involved in catatonia.

  2. Medical conditions among Iraqi refugees in Jordan: data from the United Nations Refugee Assistance Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Marco; Al-Saedy, Huda; Nyce, Sayre; Ghosn, Jad; Mutuerandu, Timothy; Black, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the range and burden of health services utilization among Iraqi refugees receiving health assistance in Jordan, a country of first asylum. Methods Medical conditions, diagnosed in accordance with the tenth revision of the International classification of diseases, were actively monitored from 1January to 31December 2010 using a pilot centralized database in Jordan called the Refugee Assistance Information System. Findings There were 27 166 medical visits by 7642 Iraqi refugees (mean age: 37.4 years; 49% male; 70% from Baghdad; 6% disabled; 3% with a history of torture). Chronic diseases were common, including essential hypertension (22% of refugees), visual disturbances (12%), joint disorders (11%) and type II diabetes mellitus (11%). The most common reasons for seeking acute care were upper respiratory tract infection (11%), supervision of normal pregnancy (4%) and urinary disorders (3%). The conditions requiring the highest number of visits per refugee were cerebrovascular disease (1.46 visits), senile cataract (1.46) and glaucoma (1.44). Sponsored care included 31 747 referrals or consultations to a specialty service, 18 432 drug dispensations, 2307 laboratory studies and 1090 X-rays. The specialties most commonly required were ophthalmology, dentistry, gynaecology and orthopaedic surgery. Conclusion Iraqi refugees in countries of first asylum and resettlement require targeted health services, health education and sustainable prevention and control strategies for predominantly chronic diseases. PMID:22690034

  3. Does electronic clinical microbiology results reporting influence medical decision making: a pre- and post-interview study of medical specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloembergen Peter

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians view the accuracy of test results and the turnaround time as the two most important service aspects of the clinical microbiology laboratory. Because of the time needed for the culturing of infectious agents, final hardcopy culture results will often be available too late to have a significant impact on early antimicrobial therapy decisions, vital in infectious disease management. The clinical microbiologist therefore reports to the clinician clinically relevant preliminary results at any moment during the diagnostic process, mostly by telephone. Telephone reporting is error prone, however. Electronic reporting of culture results instead of reporting on paper may shorten the turnaround time and may ensure correct communication of results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the implementation of electronic reporting of final microbiology results on medical decision making. Methods In a pre- and post-interview study using a semi-structured design we asked medical specialists in our hospital about their use and appreciation of clinical microbiology results reporting before and after the implementation of an electronic reporting system. Results Electronic reporting was highly appreciated by all interviewed clinicians. Major advantages were reduction of hardcopy handling and the possibility to review results in relation to other patient data. Use and meaning of microbiology reports differ significantly between medical specialties. Most clinicians need preliminary results for therapy decisions quickly. Therefore, after the implementation of electronic reporting, telephone consultation between clinician and microbiologist remained the key means of communication. Conclusions Overall, electronic reporting increased the workflow efficiency of the medical specialists, but did not have an impact on their decision-making.

  4. Medication review and transitions of care: a case report of a decade-old medication error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Rachel; Lizer, Mitsi

    2015-03-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian male with a 25-year history of paranoid schizophrenia was brought to the emergency department because of violence toward the staff in his nursing facility. He was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was admitted to the behavioral health unit for medication stabilization. History included a five-year state psychiatric hospital admission and nursing facility placement. Because of poor cognitive function, the patient was unable to corroborate medication history, so the pharmacy student on rotation performed an in-depth chart review. The review revealed a transcription error in 2003 deleting amantadine 100 mg twice daily and adding amiodarone 100 mg twice daily. Subsequent hospitalization resulted in another transcription error increasing the amiodarone to 200 mg twice daily. All electrocardiograms conducted were negative for atrial fibrillation. Once detected, the consulted cardiologist discontinued the amiodarone, and the primary care provider was notified via letter and discharge papers. An admission four months later revealed that the nursing facility restarted the amiodarone. Amiodarone was discontinued and the facility was again notified. This case reviews how a 10-year-old medication error went undetected in the electronic medical records through numerous medication reconciliations, but was uncovered when a single comprehensive medication review was conducted.

  5. Guideline report. Medical ultrasound imaging: progress and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M

    1989-01-01

    Utilization of medical ultrasound has expanded rapidly during the past several years. In 1988, sales of ultrasound equipment will approach $600 million, which is higher than any other individual imaging modality, including the most capital intensive, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and cath lab angiography. This growth would have been difficult to predict previously, since ultrasound appeared to be a relatively mature imaging modality not too long ago. There are several reasons for this growth. Technological developments have been quite rapid; ultrasound has become easier to use, image quality has improved dramatically, and diagnostic accuracy has been enhanced. There has been a proliferation of new equipment at all ends of the price spectrum, allowing the user a wide choice in instrument performance, multi-function capabilities, and automated features to increase patient throughput. The DRG environment and the prospect for more pre-admission tests have also been a stimulus. Hospital buying activity has expanded, and many more ultrasound exams are now being conducted on an outpatient basis. Sales to freestanding imaging centers and individual physicians have similarly increased. The hospital user is willing to pay a large premium for advanced technical performance and is prepared to retire or replace older technology in less than three years. This replacement cycle is much shorter than the four to five year period which existed prior to 1985. By comparison, some of the more traditional imaging areas, such as radiology, have replacement rates of eight to ten years. The reason for early replacement is obvious. Ultrasound exams in hospitals generate revenues at a rate that justifies the purchase of the most advanced equipment. It also improves the referral rate and positions the hospital as a high quality provider. Even with low utilization rates, an ultrasound instrument can normally pay for itself in less than one year of regular

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 17, Number 5, May 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    locations Number of reports all eventsb Food-borne Vaccine preventable Campylo- bacter Salmonella Shigella Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Varicella c 2009 2010...timeliness of reporting vary by facility. Navy Reporting locations Number of reports all eventsb Food-borne Vaccine preventable Campylo- bacter ...facility. Reporting locations Number of reports all eventsb Food-borne Vaccine preventable Campylo- bacter Salmonella Shigella Hepatitis A Hepatitis B

  7. Evaluating sociodemographic and medical conditions of patients under home care service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Önder

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In our study, we aimed to reveal medical conditions and the sociodemographic conditions of patients under home care service. Methods: Our study is planned on 52 patients who are under home care service at Sarıkamış State Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014. Patients' sex, education, social security status, comorbid diseases and general health status were recorded. Results: Fifty-two patients enrolled. 21 of them (40.4% were men, 31 of them (59.6 % were women. It is revealed that In 36 patients (69.2% did not receive formal education throughout their lives, while16 (30.8% of them had only primary education. All female patients were housewives. The most frequent diseases in home care patients were cerebrovascular disease in 18 (34.6% subjects, Alzheimer's disease in 9 (17.3%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 4 (7.7% d. 38 patients (73.1% needed routine follow-up. Most of the patients (61.5% had green card health insurance. Only 6 patients (11.5% were in need of narcotic analgesics. Thirteen patients had pressure ulcers due to immobilization. Evaluating the exercise capacity of the patients; 43 (82.7% could not dressed themselves, 38 (73.1% could not use phone. Thirty-two patients had urinary incontinence and 31 had fecal incontinence. Conclusion: Today, population of patients who need home care service is increasing due to ease access to home care service and increase in survival. For a better care of patients, home care providers should be well educated and differences on features of patients and medical conditions it should be taken into consideration.

  8. The epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication errors are widely reported for hospitalised patients, but limited data are available for medication errors that occur in community-based and clinical settings. Epidemiological data from poisons information centres enable characterisation of trends in medication errors occurring across the healthcare spectrum. AIM: The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) of Ireland. METHODS: A 3-year prospective study on medication errors reported to the NPIC was conducted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 inclusive. Data on patient demographics, enquiry source, location, pharmaceutical agent(s), type of medication error, and treatment advice were collated from standardised call report forms. Medication errors were categorised as (i) prescribing error (i.e. physician error), (ii) dispensing error (i.e. pharmacy error), and (iii) administration error involving the wrong medication, the wrong dose, wrong route, or the wrong time. RESULTS: Medication errors were reported for 2348 individuals, representing 9.56% of total enquiries to the NPIC over 3 years. In total, 1220 children and adolescents under 18 years of age and 1128 adults (>\\/= 18 years old) experienced a medication error. The majority of enquiries were received from healthcare professionals, but members of the public accounted for 31.3% (n = 736) of enquiries. Most medication errors occurred in a domestic setting (n = 2135), but a small number occurred in healthcare facilities: nursing homes (n = 110, 4.68%), hospitals (n = 53, 2.26%), and general practitioner surgeries (n = 32, 1.36%). In children, medication errors with non-prescription pharmaceuticals predominated (n = 722) and anti-pyretics and non-opioid analgesics, anti-bacterials, and cough and cold preparations were the main pharmaceutical classes involved. Medication errors with prescription medication predominated for

  9. 76 FR 59407 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-26

    ... ``Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information on Non-Standardized Allergenic Extracts in the Diagnosis...

  10. Chronic medical conditions and mental health in older people : disability and psychosocial resources mediate specific mental health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, J; Kempen, GIJM; Penninx, BWJH; Brilman, EI; Beekman, ATF; VanSonderen, E

    1997-01-01

    Background. This study describes the differences in psychological distress, disability and psychosocial resources between types of major medical conditions and sensory impairments (collectively denoted as CMCs); and tests whether disability and psychosocial resources mediate CMC-specific mental heal

  11. Chronic medical conditions and mental health in older people : disability and psychosocial resources mediate specific mental health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, J; Kempen, GIJM; Penninx, BWJH; Brilman, EI; Beekman, ATF; VanSonderen, E

    Background. This study describes the differences in psychological distress, disability and psychosocial resources between types of major medical conditions and sensory impairments (collectively denoted as CMCs); and tests whether disability and psychosocial resources mediate CMC-specific mental

  12. Relevance of medical reports in criminal investigations of cases of suspected child abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janßen, Katharina; Greif, Dominik; Rothschild, Markus A; Banaschak, Sibylle

    2017-01-20

    If a case of physical child abuse is suspected in Germany, the general feeling is often that "it does not matter whether you make a report or not" because, generally, no conviction is made anyway. This study investigates the juridical analysis of complaint cases of physical child abuse [criminal complaint parag. 225 StGB (German penal code) with filial victim]. It focuses on the doctor's role and the impact of their practice in relation to a later conviction. It is based on the analysis of 302 files of the enquiry from 2004-2009 from the department of public prosecution in Cologne, Germany. Besides general epidemiological data on the reporting person, the affected child and the presumed offender, the documents were reassessed for the relevance of medical reports for successful convictions. Only 7% (n = 21) of 302 complaints led to a conviction. In 38.1% (n = 8) of those cases, a medical report was mentioned as a piece of evidence, and just in two cases a (legal) medical report was quoted and mentioned as relevant for the conviction. 50% of the complaint cases with legal medical expertise led to a trial. In contrast, only 30.2% with a common medical report and 7.3% without a report led to a trial. The results show how a medical report existed in only a few cases. In those cases, the rate of performed trials was higher than for those without a medical report, but the report played a minor part when reasoning a verdict.

  13. Indian patients' attitudes towards chairside screening in a dental setting for medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansare, Kaustubh; Raghav, Mamta; Kasbe, Abhiram; Karjodkar, Freny; Sharma, Neeraj; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet; Iyengar, Asha; Patil, Seema; Selvamuthukumar, Sanarpalayam C; Krithika, Chandrasekaran; Glick, Michael; Greenberg, Barbara L

    2015-10-01

    India has a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM), tuberculosis (TB), human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and hepatitis B. United States-based studies indicate provider and patient support for medical screening in the dental setting. We assessed patient attitudes towards, and willingness to participate in, medical screening in the dental setting in India. A 5-point Likert scale survey (with scores ranging from 1=very important/willing to 5=very unimportant/unwilling) was given to a convenience sample of adult patients visiting five university-based dental clinics (clinic group) and one private-practice setting (private group). The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare mean response scores between patient groups. Logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with a favourable outcome. Both patient groups felt it important for dentists to identify increased risk for medical conditions (89.3% vs. 94.9%, respectively; P=0.02). The majority of patients were willing to have a dentist screen for the specified conditions: CVD (80.6% clinic and 84.5% private); DM (84.5% clinic and 77.5% private); TB (76.7% clinic and 73.2% private); hepatitis (73.3% clinic and 67.5% private); and HIV/AIDS (71.0% clinic and 70.5% private). The majority of patients were willing to participate in chairside screening that yielded immediate results (84.6% clinic and 86.1% private), discuss results immediately (85.8% clinic and 87.2% private) and pay 150 Indian rupees (55.9% clinic and 91.7% private). Younger patients (dental settings [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.63; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.26-0.84] and be available for screening that yielded immediate results (adjusted OR=0.63; 95% CI: 0.40-0.99). Indian dental patients were in favour of chairside medical screening. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  14. Family history of cancer, personal history of medical conditions and risk of oral cavity cancer in France: the ICARE study.

    OpenAIRE

    Radoï, Loredana; Paget-Bailly, Sophie; Guida, Florence; Cyr, Diane; Menvielle, Gwenn; Schmaus, Annie; Carton, Matthieu; Cénée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Stücker, Isabelle; Luce, Danièle

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of family history of cancer and personal history of other medical conditions in the aetiology of the oral cavity cancer in France. METHODS: We used data from 689 cases of oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma and 3481 controls included in a population-based case--control study, the ICARE study. Odds-ratios (ORs) associated with family history of cancer and personal medical conditions and their 95% confidence inte...

  15. Emergency Medical Services Utilization in EMS Priority Conditions in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen; Tamim, Hani; Chehadeh, Ahel Al-Hajj; Kazzi, Amin A

    2016-12-01

    Early activation and use of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are associated with improved patient outcomes in EMS priority conditions in developed EMS systems. This study describes patterns of EMS use and identifies predictors of EMS utilization in EMS priority conditions in Lebanon METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of a random sample of adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care center in Beirut with the following EMS priority conditions: chest pain, major trauma, respiratory distress, cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, and airway obstruction. Patient/proxy survey (20 questions) and chart review were completed. The responses to survey questions were "disagree," "neutral," or "agree" and were scored as one, two, or three with three corresponding to higher likelihood of EMS use. A total scale score ranging from 20 to 60 was created and transformed from 0% to 100%. Data were analyzed based on mode of presentation (EMS vs other). Among the 481 patients enrolled, only 112 (23.3%) used EMS. Mean age for study population was 63.7 years (SD=18.8 years) with 56.5% males. Mean clinical severity score (Emergency Severity Index [ESI]) was 2.5 (SD=0.7) and mean pain score was 3.1 (SD=3.5) at ED presentation. Over one-half (58.8%) needed admission to hospital with 21.8% to an intensive care unit care level and with a mortality rate of 7.3%. Significant associations were found between EMS use and the following variables: severity of illness, degree of pain, familiarity with EMS activation, previous EMS use, perceived EMS benefit, availability of EMS services, trust in EMS response times and treatment, advice from family, and unavailability of immediate private mode of transport (P≤.05). Functional screening, or requiring full assistance (OR=4.77; 95% CI, 1.85-12.29); acute symptoms onset ≤ one hour (OR=2.14; 95% CI, 1.08-4.26); and higher scale scores (OR=2.99; 95% CI, 2.20-4.07) were significant predictors of EMS use. Patients

  16. Graduation Resources in Medical Case Reports Written by Native and Non-Native Medical Writers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Abdulhussein Swear

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Appraisal Theory includes three subsystems of evaluation; Attitude, Engagement, and Graduation. This study  focuses on Graduation subsystem which  is used by writers to amplify or diminish the scope of these two subsystems. It consists of Focus and Force options. Focus expressions are usually non-gradable they tend to sharpen or soften the utterances.  Force, on the other hand modulates gradable expressions; which can be emphasized or downtoned the writer's utterances in terms of Intensification and Quantification. This pilot test is conducted to characterize the Force: Graduation of the heteroglossic resources in 20 MCR written in English by NS and NNS (Malaysian medical writers. MCR is a medical genre that has proven recently to be very important in the advancement of medical researches and in serving pedagogical purposes to offer a description to the practical strength of the clinical decision-making. Many incidents of Force: Graduation are collected for the purpose of analysis. The analysis includes investigating   the gradable heteroglossic resources in the MCRs of both groups of writers and examining the differences in employing these resources. The results indicate a little bit more frequent occurrence in the NS medical writers MCRs gradable heteroglossic expressions compared with those of NNS medical writers. Additionally, the use of these resources in the discussion sections of both groups is higher than in the other sections for both writers. Keywords: graduation resources, appraisal theory, corpus-based research

  17. Sports reporting: a comprehensive review of the medical literature regarding North American professional sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Buza, John A; Byram, Ian; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2014-05-01

    The increased physical demands of professional athletes predispose this patient population to a unique set of injuries typically not seen in the general population. This systematic literature review investigates the nature of injury reporting (both orthopedic and nonorthopedic conditions) in the medical literature of professional athletes in the National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Basketball Association (NBA), and the National Hockey League (NHL). Rigorous reporting of sports injuries helps clinicians better understand disease mechanisms relevant to specific sports. The nature of injury reporting will differ within each professional sport and reflect the anatomic emphasis of each sport. An electronic literature search of all publications addressing injuries and medical conditions among professional athletes in the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL was conducted using the Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, and Embase databases through January 2013. Retrieved publications were categorized by journal type, medical type, and area of focus. A total of 536 publications met all inclusion criteria. There were a higher number of articles regarding the NFL (n = 211) and MLB (n = 216) when compared with the NBA (n = 34) or NHL (n = 75). The NFL had significantly more articles addressing nonorthopedic injuries/medical issues than were found with the MLB, NBA, or NHL (109 vs 75, 14, 41, respectively). Both the NFL (33 of 109, 30%) and NHL (6 of 41, 15%) had a relatively high percentage of articles regarding concussions/neurology, and MLB had a relatively high percentage of articles dedicated to vascular medicine (13 of 65, 20%). The proportion of publications dedicated to the knee/lower leg were highest in the NFL (29 of 102, 28%) and NBA (9 of 20, 45%), those dedicated to the shoulder/elbow were highest in MLB (113 of 151, 75%), and those dedicated to the hip/pelvis were highest in the NHL (16 of 34, 47%). The number and type of publications vary among the 4

  18. Sport climbing with pre-existing cardio-pulmonary medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuepper, T; Morrison, A; Gieseler, U; Schoeffl, V

    2009-06-01

    Over the past 25 years sport climbing has developed from an elite extreme sport subculture pursued by few into a mainstream recreational sport enjoyed globally by climbers of all ages, climbing abilities, and with pre-existing health conditions. As the demands and grades of climbing difficulty have increased over this period, most scientific literature on sport climbing focused on acute injuries and overuse syndromes, or performance physiology in healthy adult males. The physiological response to sport climbing is more similar to that of resistance training (i.e., body building) rather than a predominantly aerobic sport (i.e., running, cycling), so that heart rate and blood pressure during a climb will be disproportionately high relative to the 'exercise' of climbing, and breathing may be irregular. Therefore this review sought evidence-based recommendations for recreational sport climbing participation by those individuals with pre-existing cardiopulmonary medical conditions including coronary heart disease, chronic heart failure, cardiac dysrhythmia, pulmonary diseases (i.e., asthma) or hypertension. This review defines the criteria that must be fulfilled for safe sport climbing by those with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions or those with hypertension.

  19. Self-reported responsiveness to direct-to-consumer drug advertising and medication use: results of a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somes Grant W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct-to-consumer (DTC marketing of pharmaceuticals is controversial, yet effective. Little is known relating patterns of medication use to patient responsiveness to DTC. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected in national telephone survey on knowledge of and attitudes toward DTC advertisements. The survey of 1081 U.S. adults (response rate = 65% was conducted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Responsiveness to DTC was defined as an affirmative response to the item: "Has an advertisement for a prescription drug ever caused you to ask a doctor about a medical condition or illness of your own that you had not talked to a doctor about before?" Patients reported number of prescription and over-the-counter (OTC medicines taken as well as demographic and personal health information. Results Of 771 respondents who met study criteria, 195 (25% were responsive to DTC. Only 7% respondents taking no prescription were responsive, whereas 45% of respondents taking 5 or more prescription medications were responsive. This trend remained significant (p trend .0009 even when controlling for age, gender, race, educational attainment, income, self-reported health status, and whether respondents "liked" DTC advertising. There was no relationship between the number of OTC medications taken and the propensity to discuss health-related problems in response to DTC advertisements (p = .4. Conclusion There is a strong cross-sectional relationship between the number of prescription, but not OTC, drugs used and responsiveness to DTC advertising. Although this relationship could be explained by physician compliance with patient requests for medications, it is also plausible that DTC advertisements have a particular appeal to patients prone to taking multiple medications. Outpatients motivated to discuss medical conditions based on their exposure to DTC advertising may require a careful medication history to evaluate for

  20. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 18, Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    paralysis , sei- zures, coma, and in most cases death.2 Currently, there is no eff ective treat- ment for symptomatic rabies, and pro- gression to...m pt om (l in es ) No. of TBI-related medical encounters Memory loss Headache Dizziness Sleep disturbance Insomnia Tinnitus 2010 2009 2008

  1. Do Pregnant Women Report Use of Dispensed Medications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Charlotte; Søndergaard, Charlotte; Thrane, Nana

    2001-01-01

    Surveillance of drug safety in pregnancy often draws on administrative prescription registries. Noncompliance in the use of prescribed medication may be frequent among pregnant women owing to their fear of fetotoxic side effects. To estimate compliance in the use of prescription drugs dispensed...

  2. Towards formal medical reporting: An evaluation in endoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W. Moorman (Peter)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractFor clinical practice, the patient record is the principal repository for information concerning a patient's health care. For centuries, medical notes were brief comments used by their author to trigger a fuller recollection of his patients. In the late nineteenth century, physicians sta

  3. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 21, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    high-fat or high-cholesterol diet, diabetes, and certain medications.1–5 Pregnancy and history of pregnancy are also associated with an increased...should advise service members at greatest risk for gallbladder disease of the modifi able lifestyle changes that could prevent gallstone formation

  4. Medical treatment for a fish bone-induced ileal micro-perforation: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chein-Chung Kuo; Tsu-Kang Jen; Cheng-Hsin Wen; Chih-Ping Liu; Hai-Sung Hsiao; Yao-Chi Liu; Kuan-Ho Chen

    2012-01-01

    Ingested fish bone induced intestinal perforations are seldom diagnosed preoperatively due to incomplete patient history taking and difficulties in image evidence identification.Most literature suggests early surgical intervention to prevent sepsis and complications resulting from fish bone migrations.We report the case of a 44-year-old man suffered from acute abdomen induced by a fish bone micro-perforation.The diagnosis was supported by computed tomography (CT) imaging of fish bone lodged in distal ileum and a history of fish ingestion recalled by the patient.Medical treatment was elected to manage the patient's condition instead of surgical intervention.The treatment resulted in a complete resolution of abdominal pain on hospital day number 4 without complication.Factors affecting clinical treatment decisions include the nature of microperforation,the patient's good overall health condition,and the early diagnosis before sepsis signs develop.Micro-perforation means the puncture of intestine wall without CT evidence of free air,purulent peritoneum or abscess.We subsequently reviewed the literature to support our decision to pursue medical instead of surgical intervention.

  5. Exploring the relationship between self-reported research experience and performance in medical school and internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; Gilliland, William R; Waechter, Donna M; Cruess, David F; DeZee, Kent J; Calloway, Margaret; Artino, Anthony R

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between self-reported research experience and medical students' performance in medical school and internship. We collected data from seven year-groups (1993-1999; N = 1,112) and examined 7 performance outcomes: medical school preclinical grade point average (GPA), medical school clinical GPA, cumulative medical school GPA, U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and 2 scores, and scores on a previously validated program director's survey of intern professionalism and expertise. We then conducted a series of multiple linear regressions to determine the relations between self-reported research experience and our seven outcomes. When compared to those who reported no prior research experience, students who reported research experience performed significantly better on U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 and had a higher medical school preclinical GPA. However, these same students scored significantly lower on intern professionalism and expertise ratings. Self-reported research experience did not show statistically significant correlations with the other outcome variables. The results from our large, multiyear, cohort study suggest that prior research experience may account for some variance in outcomes in the early stages of medical school education, but that variance explained diminishes considerably as trainees progress into the more senior phases of education. On the other hand, prior research experience may be negatively related to students' performance in internship. In all cases, however, effect sizes are small.

  6. Vaccination of adolescents with chronic medical conditions: Special considerations and strategies for enhancing uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Annika M; LaRussa, Philip; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with chronic medical conditions (CMCs), a growing population worldwide, possess a wide array of preventive health care needs. Vaccination is strongly recommended for the vast majority of these adolescents given their increased risk of vaccine preventable infection and associated complications. Not only should they receive routine vaccines, but some also require additional vaccines. Despite these guidelines, evidence suggests that adolescents with CMCs often fail to receive needed vaccines. Many factors contribute to this under-immunization, including lack of knowledge among parents and providers and suboptimal coordination of primary and subspecialty care. This review describes current vaccination recommendations for these adolescents as well as recent data related to infection risk, vaccine efficacy and safety, vaccination coverage, and the unique multilevel factors impacting uptake in this population. It also discusses strategies for improving coverage levels and reducing missed vaccination opportunities, with a particular focus on technology-based interventions. PMID:26212313

  7. Automated semantic indexing of imaging reports to support retrieval of medical images in the multimedia electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, H J; Antipov, I; Hersh, W; Smith, C A; Mailhot, M

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes preliminary work evaluating automated semantic indexing of radiology imaging reports to represent images stored in the Image Engine multimedia medical record system at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The authors used the SAPHIRE indexing system to automatically identify important biomedical concepts within radiology reports and represent these concepts with terms from the 1998 edition of the U.S. National Library of Medicine's Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. This automated UMLS indexing was then compared with manual UMLS indexing of the same reports. Human indexing identified appropriate UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 81% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. SAPHIRE automatically identified UMLS Metathesaurus descriptors for 64% of the important biomedical concepts contained in the report set. The overall conclusions of this pilot study were that the UMLS metathesaurus provided adequate coverage of the majority of the important concepts contained within the radiology report test set and that SAPHIRE could automatically identify and translate almost two thirds of these concepts into appropriate UMLS descriptors. Further work is required to improve both the recall and precision of this automated concept extraction process.

  8. Veterinary Medical Education in Florida. Report and Recommendations of the Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Report No. 3, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Commission, Tallahassee.

    A report on veterinary medical education in Florida and the need for veterinary care in Florida is presented. Overviews of the veterinary profession and veterinary medical education are also given, including the areas of history, careers in the field, licensure, salaries, animal disease research, accreditation, curriculum, enrollment, educational…

  9. Development of a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and its association with both reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sleath B

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Betsy Sleath,1,2 Delesha M Carpenter,1 Susan J Blalock,1 Scott A Davis,1 Ryan P Hickson,1 Charles Lee,3 Stefanie P Ferreri,4 Jennifer E Scott,5 Lisa B Rodebaugh,6 Doyle M Cummings6,7 1Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, 2Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, 3Polyglot Systems, Inc., Morrisville, 4Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, 5Consortium for Implementation Science, Department of Health Policy and Management, Gillings School of Global Public Health, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, 6Department of Family Medicine, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, 7Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Background: Although there are several different general diabetes self-efficacy scales, there is a need to develop a self-efficacy scale that providers can use to assess patient’s self-efficacy regarding medication use. The purpose of this study was to: 1 develop a new diabetes medication self-efficacy scale and 2 examine how diabetes medication self-efficacy is associated with patient-reported problems in using diabetes medications and self-reported adherence. Patients and methods: Adult English-speaking patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from a family medicine clinic and a pharmacy in Eastern North Carolina, USA. The patients were eligible if they reported being nonadherent to their diabetes medicines on a visual analog scale. Multivariable regression was used to examine the relationship between self-efficacy and the number of reported diabetes medication problems and adherence. Results: The diabetes medication self-efficacy scale had strong reliability (Cronbach’s alpha =0.86. Among a sample

  10. Chronic Medical Conditions and Negative Affect; Racial Variation in Reciprocal Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Black-White health paradox can be defined as a lower frequency of depression despite a higher prevalence of economic and social adversities as well as chronic medical conditions (CMC among American Blacks compared to American Whites. Based on this paradox, the CMC - depressive symptoms link is expected to be weaker among Blacks and Whites. We conducted a 10 year longitudinal study to compare Blacks and Whites for bidirectional associations between number of CMC and negative affect.Methods: We used data from the MIDUS (Midlife in the United States, a nationally representative longitudinal study of American adults. A total number of 7,108 individuals with age range 25 to 75 (N = 7,108 were followed for 10 years from 1995 to 2004. Age, gender, and socioeconomic status (education and income measured at baseline were controls. Negative affect and chronic medical conditions were measured at baseline and end of follow up. Race was the moderator. Linear regression analysis was used to test the moderating effect of race on the reciprocal associations between CMC and negative affect, net of covariates.Results: In the pooled sample, while baseline CMC was predictive of an increase in negative affect over time, baseline negative affect was also predictive of an increase in CMC. We found interactions between race and baseline CMC on change in depressive symptoms, as well as race with negative affect on CMC change. Conclusion: Blacks and Whites differ in reciprocal links between CMC and negative affect over time. This finding replicates recent studies on differential links between psychosocial outcomes and physical health based on race. Findings may help us better understand how Black - White health paradox develops across mid and later life.

  11. Prevalence of Medical Conditions Potentially Amenable to Cellular Therapy among Families Privately Storing Umbilical Cord Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazonson, Peter; Kane, Mark; Colberg, Kelin; Harris, Heather; Brown, Heather; Mohr, Andrew; Ziman, Alyssa; Santas, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about the prevalence of conditions potentially amenable to cellular therapy among families storing umbilical cord blood in private cord blood banks. Methods A cross-sectional study of families with at least one child who stored umbilical cord blood in the largest private cord blood bank in the United States was performed. Respondent families completed a questionnaire to determine whether children with stored cord blood or a first-degree relative had one or more of 16 conditions amenable primarily to allogeneic stem cell transplant ("transplant indications") or 16 conditions under investigation for autologous stem cell infusion ("regenerative indications"), regardless of whether they received a transplant or infusion. Results 94,803 families responded, representing 33.3 % of those surveyed. Of respondent families, 16.01 % indicated at least one specified condition. 1.64 % reported at least one first-degree member with a transplant indication potentially treatable with an allogeneic stem cell transplant. The most common transplant indications reported among first-degree family members were Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (0.33 %), Hodgkin's Lymphoma (0.30 %), and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (0.28 %). 4.23 % reported at least one child with a regenerative indication potentially treatable with an autologous stem cell infusion. The most common regenerative indications among children with stored umbilical cord blood were Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder/Apraxia (1.93 %), Other Developmental Delay (1.36 %), and Congenital Heart Defect (0.87 %). Discussion Among families storing umbilical cord blood in private cord blood banks, conditions for which stem cell transplant or infusion may be indicated, or are under investigation, appear to be prevalent, especially for regenerative medicine indications.

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 16, Number 6, June 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Campylo- bacter Giardia Salmonella Shigella Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Varicella 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009...Completeness and timeliness of reporting vary by facility Reporting locations Number of reports all events† Food-borne Vaccine preventable Campylo- bacter

  13. Anti-hypertensive medications and cardiovascular events in older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Mary E; Han, Ling; McAvay, Gail J; Lee, David S H; Peduzzi, Peter; Dodson, John A; Gross, Cary P; Zhou, Bingqing; Lin, Haiqun

    2014-01-01

    Randomized trials of anti-hypertensive treatment demonstrating reduced risk of cardiovascular events in older adults included participants with less comorbidity than clinical populations. Whether these results generalize to all older adults, most of whom have multiple chronic conditions, is uncertain. To determine the association between anti-hypertensive medications and CV events and mortality in a nationally representative population of older adults. Competing risk analysis with propensity score adjustment and matching in the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort over three-year follow-up through 2010. 4,961 community-living participants with hypertension. Anti-hypertensive medication intensity, based on standardized daily dose for each anti-hypertensive medication class participants used. Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, cardiac revascularization, stroke, and hospitalizations for heart failure) and mortality. Of 4,961 participants, 14.1% received no anti-hypertensives; 54.6% received moderate, and 31.3% received high, anti-hypertensive intensity. During follow-up, 1,247 participants (25.1%) experienced cardiovascular events; 837 participants (16.9%) died. Of deaths, 430 (51.4%) occurred in participants who experienced cardiovascular events during follow-up. In the propensity score adjusted cohort, after adjusting for propensity score and other covariates, neither moderate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08 [95% CI, 0.89-1.32]) nor high (1.16 [0.94-1.43]) anti-hypertensive intensity was associated with experiencing cardiovascular events. The hazard ratio for death among all participants was 0.79 [0.65-0.97] in the moderate, and 0.72 [0.58-0.91] in the high intensity groups compared with those receiving no anti-hypertensives. Among participants who experienced cardiovascular events, the hazard ratio for death was 0.65 [0.48-0.87] and 0.58 [0.42-0.80] in the moderate and high intensity groups, respectively. Results were similar in the

  14. Anti-hypertensive medications and cardiovascular events in older adults with multiple chronic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Tinetti

    Full Text Available Randomized trials of anti-hypertensive treatment demonstrating reduced risk of cardiovascular events in older adults included participants with less comorbidity than clinical populations. Whether these results generalize to all older adults, most of whom have multiple chronic conditions, is uncertain.To determine the association between anti-hypertensive medications and CV events and mortality in a nationally representative population of older adults.Competing risk analysis with propensity score adjustment and matching in the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey cohort over three-year follow-up through 2010.4,961 community-living participants with hypertension.Anti-hypertensive medication intensity, based on standardized daily dose for each anti-hypertensive medication class participants used.Cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, cardiac revascularization, stroke, and hospitalizations for heart failure and mortality.Of 4,961 participants, 14.1% received no anti-hypertensives; 54.6% received moderate, and 31.3% received high, anti-hypertensive intensity. During follow-up, 1,247 participants (25.1% experienced cardiovascular events; 837 participants (16.9% died. Of deaths, 430 (51.4% occurred in participants who experienced cardiovascular events during follow-up. In the propensity score adjusted cohort, after adjusting for propensity score and other covariates, neither moderate (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08 [95% CI, 0.89-1.32] nor high (1.16 [0.94-1.43] anti-hypertensive intensity was associated with experiencing cardiovascular events. The hazard ratio for death among all participants was 0.79 [0.65-0.97] in the moderate, and 0.72 [0.58-0.91] in the high intensity groups compared with those receiving no anti-hypertensives. Among participants who experienced cardiovascular events, the hazard ratio for death was 0.65 [0.48-0.87] and 0.58 [0.42-0.80] in the moderate and high intensity groups, respectively. Results were similar

  15. The essential role of medical ethics education in achieving professionalism: the Romanell Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrese, Joseph A; Malek, Janet; Watson, Katie; Lehmann, Lisa Soleymani; Green, Michael J; McCullough, Laurence B; Geller, Gail; Braddock, Clarence H; Doukas, David J

    2015-06-01

    This article-the Romanell Report-offers an analysis of the current state of medical ethics education in the United States, focusing in particular on its essential role in cultivating professionalism among medical learners. Education in ethics has become an integral part of medical education and training over the past three decades and has received particular attention in recent years because of the increasing emphasis placed on professional formation by accrediting bodies such as the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Yet, despite the development of standards, milestones, and competencies related to professionalism, there is no consensus about the specific goals of medical ethics education, the essential knowledge and skills expected of learners, the best pedagogical methods and processes for implementation, and optimal strategies for assessment. Moreover, the quality, extent, and focus of medical ethics instruction vary, particularly at the graduate medical education level. Although variation in methods of instruction and assessment may be appropriate, ultimately medical ethics education must address the overarching articulated expectations of the major accrediting organizations. With the aim of aiding medical ethics educators in meeting these expectations, the Romanell Report describes current practices in ethics education and offers guidance in several areas: educational goals and objectives, teaching methods, assessment strategies, and other challenges and opportunities (including course structure and faculty development). The report concludes by proposing an agenda for future research.

  16. [Hygienic aspects of the lifestyle of medical students under the present conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, N G; Kataeva, V A

    2011-01-01

    The paper gives the results of a study of the lifestyle of medical students. The students' motor activity has been found to be lower and to continue to drop in the undergraduates. Examination of the daily routine has shown that 92% of the students break the study-and-rest routine; the reported reasons for this are a high academic load, a prolonged academic day, a study-work combination, mental stress during examinations, and computer-aided learning. The students' nutrition is inadequate in major nutrients, poor-quality, irregular, and uncontrolled. The college crowd shows a preponderance of bad habits; 85% of cases had these or those combinations of risk factors: smoking, low motor activity, overweight, alcohol consumption, etc.

  17. Economic evaluation of the impact of medication errors reported by U.S. clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samp, Jennifer C; Touchette, Daniel R; Marinac, Jacqueline S; Kuo, Grace M

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors defined as "any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm" have been highlighted as a top national priority in a report issued by the Institute of Medicine. However, little information is available on precise costs of medication errors. This study estimated the cost of medication errors reported by clinical pharmacists using a modified societal perspective. Information on 779 medication errors was collected in the Medication Error Detection, Amelioration and Prevention (MEDAP) study that documented medication errors observed by clinical pharmacists during a consecutive 14-day period. The rate of medication errors, outcomes (number of errors resulting in temporary/permanent patient harm, prolonged hospitalization, or life-sustaining therapy), and interventions (communication, medication changes, patient monitoring, and treatment referrals) were collected. A decision model was developed to estimate the economic impact of medication errors reported by clinical pharmacists. Event probabilities were derived from MEDAP data. Direct costs were obtained through reviews of the literature, hospital charge data, and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement. One-way and Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses were used to explore uncertainty in the values. In the base case, the mean expected cost of a medication error was $88.57. In the Monte Carlo simulation, the mean cost was $89.35 (± $30.17 SD). One-way sensitivity analysis revealed that changes in the probability of medication errors causing hospitalization and the cost of hospitalization had the greatest variability on the outcome ($50.44-$155.81 [probability of hospitalization], $32.59-$136.40 [cost of hospitalization]). Medication errors are costly to the health care system. A better understanding of medication error costs may be used to justify initiatives to reduce the risk and inefficiency associated with these errors. © 2013 American College of Clinical

  18. Survey of nursing perceptions of medication administration practices, perceived sources of errors and reporting behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armutlu, Markirit; Foley, Mary-Lou; Surette, Judy; Belzile, Eric; McCusker, Jane

    2008-01-01

    In January 2003, St. Mary's Hospital Center in Montreal, Quebec, established an interdisciplinary Committee on the Systematic Approach to Medication Error Control to review the whole process of medication administration within the hospital and to develop a systematic approach to medication error control. A cross-sectional survey on medication administration practices, perceived sources of errors and medication error reporting of nurses, adapted from a nursing practice survey and medication variance report (Sim and Joyner 2002), was conducted over a two-week period in February 2004. The results were analyzed by years of experience (greater or less than five years) and patient care unit of practice. The perceived source of error most often cited was transcription (processing), and the second most frequently cited source was the legibility of handwritten medication orders (prescribing). The results demonstrate no significant difference in medication safety practices or in perceptions of errors by years of experience. Nurses appear to adapt to the safety culture of the unit rather quickly, certainly within their first five years on the unit. Good medication error reporting behaviour was noted, with no differences between all comparative groups within both years of experience and unit of practice. Quality improvement initiatives to improve the safety of medication administration practices have included the development of a nursing medication administration handbook, the revision of policies and procedures related to medication administration safety, the standardization of solutions and limited variety of high-risk medication dosages and the reduction of handwritten reorders. The need for ongoing education and information sessions on policies and procedures specific to safe medication practices for all nurses, regardless of years of experience, was identified.

  19. The Relation of Recent Tampon Use, Douching, Coitus, and Vaginal Medications for Reported Cervical Cytology Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) on the pathology report. Assumptions Tampon use is drying to the vaginal epithelium and has been...SUBTITLE 5, FUNDING NUMBERS The Relation of Recent Tamplon Use, Douching, Coitus, and Vaginal Medications for Reported Cervical Cytology Results. 6. AUTHOR...11¾ .. ?j’ 󈧎 U..- THE RELATION OF RECENT TAMPON USE, DOUCHING, COITUS, AND VAGINAL MEDICATIONS TO REPORTED CERVICAL CYTOLOGY RESULTS By MARYANN

  20. Propaganda, News, or Education: Reporting Changing Arctic Sea Ice Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitzell, K.; Meier, W.

    2010-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center provides information on Arctic sea ice conditions via the Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis (ASINA) website. As a result of this effort to explain climatic data to the general public, we have attracted a huge amount of attention from our readers. Sometimes, people write to thank us for the information and the explanation. But people also write to accuse us of bias, slant, or outright lies in our posts. The topic of climate change is a minefield full of political animosity, and even the most carefully written verbiage can appear incomplete or biased to some audiences. Our strategy has been to report the data and stick to the areas in which our scientists are experts. The ASINA team carefully edits our posts to make sure that all statements are based on the science and not on opinion. Often this means using some technical language that may be difficult for a layperson to understand. However, we provide concise definitions for technical terms where appropriate. The hope is that by communicating the data clearly, without an agenda, we can let the science speak for itself. Is this an effective strategy to communicate clearly about the changing climate? Or does it downplay the seriousness of climate change? By writing at a more advanced level and avoiding oversimplification, we require our readers to work harder. But we may also maintain the attention of skeptics, convincing them to read further and become more knowledgeable about the topic.

  1. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  2. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  3. Assessment of medical students’ proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A Ulman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students’ ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students’ confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%. Many students (87.6% felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training.

  4. Agreement between medical record and parent report for evaluation of childhood febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bradley K; Sy, Lina S; Yao, Janis F; Craig Cheetham, T; Espinosa-Rydman, Ana M; Jones, Tonia L; Jacobsen, Steven J

    2013-06-12

    The monitoring of vaccine safety is critical to maintaining the public acceptance of vaccines required to ensure their continued success. Methods used to assess adverse events following immunization (AEFI) must accurately reflect their occurrence. Assessment of AEFI is often done via medical record review (MR) or via patient report (PR). However, these sources of data have not previously been compared for the analysis of AEFI. The objective of this study was to evaluate the concordance between MR and PR for young children identified as having had a febrile seizure (FS), an important AEFI, in an integrated health care system. The variables chosen for analysis were those recommended by the Brighton Collaboration Seizure Working Group for the evaluation of generalized seizure as an AEFI [1]. Parent report from phone interviews and mailed questionnaires was compared to abstracted medical records of 110 children with FS between ages 3 and 60 months. Concordance between PR and MR for characteristics and predisposing factors of FS was assessed by percent total agreement and kappa statistic. Percent total agreement between PR and MR was between 43.6 and 100% for variables studied, with 62.5% of items having >70% agreement. However, kappa was poor to fair for all measures (-0.04 to 0.33). While some variables, such as history of seizures in a sibling or parent and several seizure characteristics, were reported more often by PR, other items, such as maximum fever and several concurrent conditions, were reported more often by MR. These findings demonstrate the limitations of using MR or PR alone to assess febrile seizures in children. This analysis supports the practice of collecting data from both MR and PR to most accurately portray the spectrum of predisposing factors and seizure characteristics when evaluating FS in children whenever feasible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutritional condition of school age children. Clinic, anthropo-medical and alimentary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Esther González Hermida

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: the study of children´s growth in an appropriate indicator of children health condition and should be used as one of the basis in the practice of preventive medicine. Objective: to determine the nutritional al condition of children of third and sixth grade of elementary schools of Health Area V of Cienfuegos Municipality. Methods: descriptive, observational, cross-sectional and relational study of 445 school age children from 4 elementary schools. A clinic assessment was carried out along with an anthropo-medical evaluation. A qualitative survey was developed to assess the frequency of consumption of different alimentary groups. Results: the relation weight/height in the two genders presents a prevalence of normal weight; undernourishment is more common among females, overweight is more usual among boys and obesity can be found in both genders. The variable weight/age showed one bad-nutrition (for defect among females, there was a prevalence of bad-nutrition for excess in both genders. There were no children with height under the third percentile, with prevalence of boys and girls tall and very tall. Bronchial asthma was the most common disease. Conclusions: Food consumption in general, taking into account frequency and kind of food, is not the appropriate. There is a relation between positive clinical findings and the anthropometric assessment of weight/height.

  6. Factors Affecting the Readiness of Medical Doctors and Patients with Chronic Conditions toward the Usage of Smartphones in the Saudi Arabian Healthcare Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Bassam M Al-Mahadeen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the rapid increase in the number of individuals who use smartphones. However, smartphones appear to be increasingly used by healthcare workers, particularly physicians and nurses. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the readiness of medical doctors and patients with chronic conditions in using and adopting smartphones for communication. This study employs the Technology Acceptance Model to examine the behavior of people in using smartphones from the perspe...

  7. Organization of medical aid for workers of industrial enterprises in contemporary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Novokreshchenova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of modern medical care for the working population. It presents the data concern¬ing organization of medical care for workers of oil producing and oil-refining industry, and tendencies of development of medical organizations various in property forms in the system of rendering medical aid for the employees. It has been determined that the processes of medical care for the industrial workers need to be optimized, and it is possible in the united economic-organizing system that allows to provide succession and complete correspondence to medical and social needs of the working population

  8. Medication Errors: A Characterisation of Spontaneously Reported Cases in EudraVigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbould, Victoria; Le Meur, Steven; Goedecke, Thomas; Kurz, Xavier

    2017-07-11

    Medication errors recently became the focus of regulatory guidance in pharmacovigilance to support reporting, evaluation and prevention of medication errors. This study aims to characterise spontaneously reported cases of medication errors in EudraVigilance over the period 2002-2015 before the release of EU good practice guidance. Case reports were identified through the adverse reaction section where a Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA(®)) term is reported and included in the Standardised MedDRA(®) Query (SMQ) for medication errors. These case reports were further categorised by MedDRA(®) terms, geographical region, patient age group and Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system of suspect medicinal product(s). A total of 147,824 case reports were retrieved, 41,355 of which were from the European Economic Area (EEA). Approximately 60% of these case reports were retrieved with the narrow SMQ. The absolute number of medication error case reports and the proportion to the total number of reports in EudraVigilance increased during the study period, with peaks seen around 2005 and 2012 for cases with EEA origin. Fifty-two percent of case reports in which age was provided occurred in adults, 30% in the elderly and 18% in children, with almost half of these in children aged 2 months to 2 years. Case reports of medication errors in EudraVigilance steadily increased between 2005 and 2015, the reasons for which may be multifactorial, including increased awareness, changes to the MedDRA(®) terminology and the 2012 EU pharmacovigilance legislation and associated guidance for stakeholders, or a generally increased risk for errors as more medications become available.

  9. Stylistic features of case reports as a genre of medical discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysanets, Yuliia; Morokhovets, Halyna; Bieliaieva, Olena

    2017-03-13

    The present paper discusses the lexical and grammatical peculiarities of English language medical case reports, taking into account their communicative purposes and intentions. The objective of the research is to clarify the principal mechanisms of producing an effective English language medical case report and thus to provide recommendations and guidelines for medical professionals who will deal with this genre. The analysis of medical case reports will largely focus on the most significant linguistic peculiarities, such as the use of active and passive voice, the choice of particular verb tenses, and pronouns. The selected medical case reports will be considered using methods of lexico-grammatical analysis, quantitative examination, and contextual, structural, narrative, and stylistic analyses. The research revealed a range of important stylistic features of medical case reports which markedly distinguish them from other genres of medical scientific writing: educational and instructive intentions, conciseness and brevity, direct and personal tone, and material presented in a narrative style. The present research has shown that the communicative strategies of the analyzed discourse, mentioned immediately above, are effectively implemented by means of specific lexical units and grammatical structures: the dominance of active voice sentences, past simple tense, personal pronouns, and modal verbs. The research has also detected the occasional use of the present perfect, present simple, and future simple tenses and passive voice which also serve particular communicative purposes of medical case reports. Medical case reports possess a range of unique characteristics which differ from those of research articles and other scientific genres within the framework of written medical discourse. It is to be emphasized that it is highly important for medical professionals to master the major stylistic principles and communicative intentions of medical case report as a genre in

  10. Geological report on water conditions at Platt National Park, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Charles Newton; Schoff, Stuart Leeson

    1939-01-01

    Platt National Park, located in southern Oklahoma, containing 842 acres, was established by Acts of Congress in 1902, 1904, and 1906. The reason for the setting aside of this area was the presence in the area of some 30 'mineral' springs, the water from which contains sulphur, bromide, salt, and other minerals, which are believed to possess medicinal qualities. For many generations the sulphur springs of the Chickasaw Nation had been known for their reputed healing qualities. It had long been the custom for families to come from considerable distances on horseback and in wagons and camp near the springs, in order to drink the water. In course of time a primitive town, known as Sulphur Springs, grew up near a group of springs known since as Pavilion Springs at the mouth of Sulphur Creek, now known as Travertine Creek. This town was still in existence at the time of my first visit to the locality in July, 1901. At this time, in company with Joseph A. Taff, of the United States Geological Survey, I spent a week riding over the country making a preliminary survey looking toward the setting aside of the area for a National Park. After the establishment of the National Park, the old town of Sulphur Springs was abandoned, and when the present boundaries of the park had been established the present town of Sulphur, now county seat of Murray County, grew up. In July 1906, on request of Superintendent Joseph F. Swords, I visited the park and made an examination of the various springs and submitted a report, dated August 15, 1906, to Secretary of the Interior E.A. Hitchcock. Copies of this report are on file in the Regional Office and at Platt National Park. In this report I set forth the approximate amount of flow of the various springs, the character of the water in each, and the conditions of the springs as of that date. I also made certain recommendations regarding proposed improvements of each spring. In this report I say: 'In the town of Sulphur, four wells have been

  11. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sudip Parajuli

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound ‘cypermethrin’. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like hyosciane and chlorpheniramine maleate in the treatment of cypermethrin poisoning.

  12. A study of the changes in how medically related events are reported in Japanese newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Yukiko; Murashige, Naoko; Kodama, Yuko; Hamaki, Tamae; Murata, Kazuhiro; Nakada, Haruka; Komatsu, Tsunehiko; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kami, Masahiro; Matsumura, Tomoko

    2010-01-01

    Media reports of medically related events have a major effect on the healthcare community but there have been few detailed investigations conducted to investigate their content. The Nikkei Telecom 21 database was used to investigate the number of reports concerning medically related events between 1992 and 2007 in Japan's 5 national newspapers. For this period, both the total number of articles and the number of articles containing medically-related keywords were determined. The number of reports relating to medically related occurrences increased sharply from 1999 to 2000 and displayed a decrease from 2003 before increasing again in 2008. As of 2008, such reports account for 0.17% of total newspaper articles. The use of the word 'iryokago' (medical professional negligence or error) drastically increased in 1999 but showed a consistent decrease from 2004. On the other hand the frequency of reports relating to 'litigation' and 'punishment' increased rapidly in 1999 before leveling off. Despite this, the number of articles relating to medically related occurrences that were caused by doctor shortages and system errors increased sharply between 2006 and the present. Results indicate that the manner in which newspapers report medically related events is undergoing major changes.

  13. Pain medication and global cognitive functioning in dementia patients with painful conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooij, B.; Spek, K. van der; Scherder, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dementia patients are at an increased risk for undertreatment of pain, compared with older people without dementia, suggesting a relationship between pain medication prescription and cognitive functioning. Studies on a possible relationship between pain medication and cognitive functioni

  14. Final Report for Project. Quark matter under extreme conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incera, Vivian [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Ferrer, Efrain [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The results obtained in the two years of the grant have served to shine new light on several important questions about the phases of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under extreme conditions that include quark matter at high density, as well quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures, both in the presence of strong magnetic fields. The interest in including an external magnetic field on these studies is motivated by the generation of large magnetic fields in off-central heavy-ion collisions and by their common presence in astrophysical compact objects, the two scenarios where the physics of quark matter becomes relevant. The tasks carried out in this DOE project led us, among other things, to discover the first connection between the physics of very dense quark matter and novel materials as for instance topological insulators and Weyl semimetals; they allowed us to find a physical explanation for and a solution to a standing puzzle in the apparent effect of a magnetic field on the critical temperature of the QCD chiral transition; and they led us to establish by the first time that the core of the observed two-solar-mass neutron stars could be made up of quark matter in certain inhomogeneous chiral phases in a magnetic field and that this was consistent with current astrophysical observations. A major goal established by the Nuclear Science Advisory committee in its most recent report “Reaching for the Horizon” has been “to truly understand how nuclei and strongly interacting matter in all its forms behave and can predict their behavior in new settings.” The results found in this DOE project have all contributed to address this goal, and thus they are important for advancing fundamental knowledge in the area of nuclear physics and for enhancing our understanding of the role of strong magnetic fields in the two settings where they are most relevant, neutron stars and heavy-ion collisions.

  15. 75 FR 27662 - Special Conditions: Boeing 747-468, Installation of a Medical Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... Medical Lift AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed special... installation of a medical lift. The applicable airworthiness regulations do not contain adequate or appropriate... modification includes the installation of a medical lift between the main deck and upper deck. The lift allows...

  16. Reporting and disclosing medical errors: pediatricians' attitudes and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jane; Brownstein, Dena R; Klein, Eileen J; Waterman, Amy; Krauss, Melissa J; Marcuse, Edgar K; Hazel, Erik; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Fraser, Victoria; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2007-02-01

    To characterize pediatricians' attitudes and experiences regarding communicating about errors with the hospital and patients' families. Cross-sectional survey. St Louis, Mo, and Seattle, Wash. University-affiliated hospital and community pediatricians and pediatric residents. Anonymous 68-item survey (paper or Web-based) administered between July 2003 and March 2004. Physician attitudes and experiences about error communication. Four hundred thirty-nine pediatric attending physicians and 118 residents participated (62% response rate). Most respondents had been involved in an error (39%, serious; 72%, minor; 61%, near miss; 7%, none). Respondents endorsed reporting errors to the hospital (97%, serious; 90%, minor; 82%, near miss), but only 39% thought that current error reporting systems were adequate. Most pediatricians had used a formal error reporting mechanism, such as an incident report (65%), but many also used informal reporting mechanisms, such as telling a supervisor (47%) or senior physician (38%), and discussed errors with colleagues (72%). Respondents endorsed disclosing errors to patients' families (99%, serious; 90%, minor; 39%, near miss), and many had done so (36%, serious; 52%, minor). Residents were more likely than attending physicians to believe that disclosing a serious error would be difficult (96% vs 86%; P = .004) and to want disclosure training (69% vs 56%; P = .03). Pediatricians are willing to report errors to hospitals and disclose errors to patients' families but believe current reporting systems are inadequate and struggle with error disclosure. Improving error reporting systems and encouraging physicians to report near misses, as well as providing training in error disclosure, could help prevent future errors and increase patient trust.

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 3, Number 7, October 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    MSMRVol. 03 / No. 07 7 Active Duty Other FIGURE II. Reportable sexually transmitted diseases, US Army medical treatment facilities* Cases per...Training Area in southeastern Queensland. Pre- exercise activities : Assessment of exer- cise-relevant medical threats identified the follow- ing: injuries...eastern Australia during the rainy season, the RRv threat was considered both operationally and medi- cally significant. Pre- exercise activities

  18. Reporting of Medication Information in Applied Studies of People with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Marc; Porter, Lindsay K.; Durgin, Amy; Redner, Ryan N.; Kestner, Kathryn M.; Costello, Mack; Cleary, Kathleen; Edwards, Timothy L.; Hayes, Sarah M.; Poling, Alan

    2011-01-01

    The present research determined if articles describing attempts to improve the behavior of people with autism reported whether or not participants were receiving medication and, if so, whether an interaction between the intervention and the medication was mentioned. Fifty-one articles published from 2004 through 2008 were examined. Information…

  19. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual report, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, M W [ed.

    1975-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 sections of the report. Educational activities, outside lectures by divisional staff, seminars, and publications are also listed. An organizational chart and author index are included. (HLW)

  20. Medical imaging findings in Cobb syndrome: two case reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-bin; XU Lei; ZHAO Bin; CAI Shi-feng; SHI Hao; LI Hui-hua; QU Lei

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cobb syndrome, also known as cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis, is a rare clinical entity characterized by the combination of a vascular skin nevus and an angioma in the spinal canal at the same metamere.1 It was first described by Berenbruch in 1890 and did not receive recognition until Cobb's description2 in 1915. Only few documents about this disease had been reported.1 We present two cases here and review the other reported cases.

  1. Medical attention seeking dance injuries: systematic review of case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand Prakash, Akilesh

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of case reports documenting the epidemiology of unique and rare musculoskeletal injuries in dancers. A systematic review was conducted online using PubMed and Google Scholar, as per PRISMA guidelines up to July 30, 2016. Predefined eligibility criteria were applied, and the data thus compiled was analysed. Study quality was assessed based on CARE guidelines. 72 studies reporting 92 dance injuries were included in the review. The average age of dancers was 23 years (SD = 10 years) with majority being females (65%). Chronic injuries were the most common presentation with lower extremity injuries being the commonest. Foot and knee injuries were the top two articulations involved across injuries and groups. Overall bony injuries were most frequently reported, with stress injury being the most common type. Conservative approach was the most commonly reported treatment approach across case reports. The methodological quality of case reports included in the study varied considerably and lacked uniformity. The evidence provided, though not sufficient for any recommendation, it should alert the physicians and those concerned with the primary care of the dancers to be vigilant of the eccentricity and severity of the injuries, their atypical presentation, mode, mechanism and trend, thereby being prepared for the unexpected.

  2. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; /SLAC; Lee, R.W.; /LLNL, Livermore; Nagler, B.; /Rutherford; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is

  3. Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument - Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, R.F.; Boyce, R.M.; Haller, G.; Hastings, J.B.; Hays, G.; Lee, H.J.; /SLAC; Lee, R.W.; /LLNL, Livermore; Nagler, B.; /Rutherford; Scharfenstein, M.; Marsh, D.; White, W.E.; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), is constructing a Free-Electron Laser (FEL) research facility. The FEL has already met its performance goals in the wavelength range 1.5 nm - 0.15 nm. This facility, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), utilizes the SLAC 2-Mile Linear Accelerator (linac) and will produce sub-picosecond pulses of short wavelength X-rays with very high peak brightness and almost complete transverse coherence. The final one-third of the SLAC linac is used as the source of electrons for the LCLS. The high energy electrons are transported across the SLAC Research Yard, into a tunnel which houses a long undulator. In passing through the undulator, the electrons are bunched by the force of their own synchrotron radiation and produce an intense, monochromatic, spatially coherent beam of X-rays. By varying the electron energy, the FEL X-ray wavelength is tunable from 1.5 nm to 0.15 nm. The LCLS includes two experimental halls as well as X-ray optics and infrastructure necessary to create a facility that can be developed for research in a variety of disciplines such as atomic physics, materials science, plasma physics and biosciences. This Conceptual Design Report, the authors believe, confirms the feasibility of designing and constructing an X-ray instrument in order to exploit the unique scientific capability of LCLS by creating extreme conditions and study the behavior of plasma under those controlled conditions. This instrument will address the Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences, mission objective related to study of Plasma and Warm Dense Matter as described in the report titled LCLS, the First Experiments, prepared by the LCLS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) in September 2000. The technical objective of the LCLS Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) Instrument project is

  4. Evaluation of self-reported medication adherence and its associated factors among epilepsy patients in Hospital Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molugulu, Nagashekhara; Gubbiyappa, Kumar Shiva; Vasudeva Murthy, C. R.; Lumae, Lim; Mruthyunjaya, Anil Tumkur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Reports on medication adherence and its associated factors in patients with epilepsy in South East Asian countries are lacking. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the degree of medication adherence and its relationship with patient's satisfaction, psychosocial factors, quality of life and mental health in a sample of Malaysian epilepsy patients. Methodology: It is a cross-sectional study and was carried out in the outpatient Neurology Department of Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (n=272). Data was collected by administering the structured questionnaire. Results and Discussion: Results showed that 49.3% of the epilepsy patients were non-adherent to their prescribed regimen. Univariate analysis showed significant associations between medication adherence and the following factors: race, seizure frequency, overall patient satisfaction, medication taste and smell, medication cost and physical appearance, medication effectiveness, complexity of medication regimen, patient barrier, patient understanding, patient role functioning, patient positivity, vitality and general interest. Multiple regression analysis indicated that factors that are influencing medication adherence are seizure frequency (P = 0.048), overall patient satisfaction (P = 0.043) and patient understanding about their illness (P = 0.001). The model chosen for testing the relationship between medication adherence and its associated factors give an R2 value of 25.2% with an adjusted R2 of 21.4%. The F value was also significant (P = 0.000). Based on the research findings, the researchers recommends that clinicians need to play a vital role in educating the patients on their disease conditions. By educating the patients on nature of epilepsy, different modalities of treatment and benefits of adherence to treatment will help in the better adherence and management. PMID:27999469

  5. Evaluation of self-reported medication adherence and its associated factors among epilepsy patients in Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molugulu, Nagashekhara; Gubbiyappa, Kumar Shiva; Vasudeva Murthy, C R; Lumae, Lim; Mruthyunjaya, Anil Tumkur

    2016-09-01

    Reports on medication adherence and its associated factors in patients with epilepsy in South East Asian countries are lacking. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the degree of medication adherence and its relationship with patient's satisfaction, psychosocial factors, quality of life and mental health in a sample of Malaysian epilepsy patients. It is a cross-sectional study and was carried out in the outpatient Neurology Department of Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (n=272). Data was collected by administering the structured questionnaire. Results showed that 49.3% of the epilepsy patients were non-adherent to their prescribed regimen. Univariate analysis showed significant associations between medication adherence and the following factors: race, seizure frequency, overall patient satisfaction, medication taste and smell, medication cost and physical appearance, medication effectiveness, complexity of medication regimen, patient barrier, patient understanding, patient role functioning, patient positivity, vitality and general interest. Multiple regression analysis indicated that factors that are influencing medication adherence are seizure frequency (P = 0.048), overall patient satisfaction (P = 0.043) and patient understanding about their illness (P = 0.001). The model chosen for testing the relationship between medication adherence and its associated factors give an R(2) value of 25.2% with an adjusted R(2) of 21.4%. The F value was also significant (P = 0.000). Based on the research findings, the researchers recommends that clinicians need to play a vital role in educating the patients on their disease conditions. By educating the patients on nature of epilepsy, different modalities of treatment and benefits of adherence to treatment will help in the better adherence and management.

  6. Medical Malpractice: Insurance Costs Increased but Varied among Physicians and Hospitals. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report concerns the medical malpractice situation in the United States and contains information on the cost of malpractice insurance for physicians and hospitals. The report contains an executive summary and four chapters. Chapter 1 reviews the background of the problem and the objectives, scope, and methodology of the report. Chapter 2…

  7. Adverse drug reactions reported by consumers for nervous system medications in Europe 2007 to 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2013-01-01

    Reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. In the European Union, more countries have allowed consumers to report ADRs directly to the regulatory agencies. The aim of this study was to characterize ADRs reported by European...... consumer for nervous system medications....

  8. 76 FR 27380 - Proposed Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Report of Medical Examination for Disability Evaluation); Comment... opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the agency. Under the... Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension of...

  9. 78 FR 41125 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting AGENCY... Commission (NRC) is issuing an interim Enforcement Policy that allows the staff to exercise enforcement...'s permanent implant brachytherapy program. This interim policy affects NRC licensees that...

  10. Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1990-02-01

    This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

  11. Reporting of Cardiovascular Medical Device Adverse Events to Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Handa

    2015-09-01

    Comments: Although Japanese MAHs complied with the obligation to report AEs, they often failed to share AEs with healthcare providers. Registry may be a potential solution, although the cooperation of healthcare providers to input data is essential.

  12. Teacher Working Conditions Are Student Learning Conditions: A Report on the 2006 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Governor Easley of North Carolina has made a sustained commitment to listening to educators and reforming schools to create the working conditions necessary for student and teacher success. With three iterations of the working conditions survey and about 150,000 responses to critical questions about their workplace, analyses have been consistent…

  13. NCRP report 160 and what it means for medical imaging and nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolus, Norman E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to briefly explain report 160 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurement and the significance of the report to medical imaging as a whole and nuclear medicine specifically. The implications of the findings of report 160 have had repercussions and will continue to affect all of ionizing radiation medical imaging. The nuclear medicine community should have an understanding of why and how report 160 is important. After reading this article, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with the main focus of report 160, the significant change that has occurred since the 1980s in the ionizing radiation exposure of people in the United States, the primary background source of ionizing radiation in the United States, the primary medical exposure to ionizing radiation in the United States, trends in nuclear medicine procedures and patient exposure, and a comparison of population doses between 2006 and the early 1980s as outlined in report 160.

  14. Trends, productivity losses, and associated medical conditions among toxoplasmosis deaths in the United States, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Patricia L; Kuo, Tony; Javanbakht, Marjan; Sorvillo, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have quantified toxoplasmosis mortality, associated medical conditions, and productivity losses in the United States. We examined national multiple cause of death data and estimated productivity losses caused by toxoplasmosis during 2000-2010. A matched case-control analysis examined associations between comorbid medical conditions and toxoplasmosis deaths. In total, 789 toxoplasmosis deaths were identified during the 11-year study period. Blacks and Hispanics had the highest toxoplasmosis mortality compared with whites. Several medical conditions were associated with toxoplasmosis deaths, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), lymphoma, leukemia, and connective tissue disorders. The number of toxoplasmosis deaths with an HIV codiagnosis declined from 2000 to 2010; the numbers without such a codiagnosis remained static. Cumulative disease-related productivity losses for the 11-year period were nearly $815 million. Although toxoplasmosis mortality has declined in the last decade, the infection remains costly and is an important cause of preventable death among non-HIV subgroups.

  15. The contribution of negative reproductive experiences and chronic medical conditions to depression and pain among Israeli women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Orly; Segal-Engelchin, Dorit; Cwikel, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This study of 302 Israeli women sought to investigate the associations among stressful reproductive experiences (e.g. fertility problems, abortions, and traumatic births), chronic medical conditions, pain, and depression. The specific aims of the study were to examine (1) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and pain on depressive symptoms and (2) the effect of stressful reproductive experiences, chronic medical conditions, and depressive symptoms on pain. Our findings corroborate with previous studies demonstrating that depression and pain are two interrelated, but different phenomena, which have both common and distinct risk factors. The findings are discussed in the light of stress and adaptation theories that point to the long-term effects of stressful life events on emotional and physiological aspects such as depression and pain.

  16. [Acute confusional syndrome in elderly patients hospitalized due to medical condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, F; Marcos, E; Sole, A; Valencia, E; Lora-Tamayo, J; Pujol, R

    2005-10-01

    Delirium or acute confusional syndrome (ACS) is a frequent problem during hospitalization of elderly patients. We study the appearance of delirium and its characteristics in patients admitted to an internal medicine service. Prospective study of 148 patients over 64 years admitted due to medical condition (non-surgical) in the internal medicine service of the University Hospital of Bellvitge. Functionality was quantified with the Barthel index (BI) and comorbidity with the Charlson index (CI). The Confusional Assessment Method was used for the diagnosis of the ACS. Seventy-seven (77) (52%) of the 148 patients were women, with a mean age of 78.5 years. The CI was 2.2. Mean of previous BI was 81.7. Mortality during admission was 8% (12 patients). A total of 42.5% of the patients (63) had ACS (30% prevalent). It was hyperactive in 68%, hypoactive in 16% and mixed in 16%. In 38% of the patients, the ACS had morning predominance and 62% it appeared after the evening. Advanced age was the only significant differences between patients with or without ACS (p patients who survived or who died (p = 0.36). Frequency of appearance of the confusional picture is high in patients admitted to acute hospitals, it being more frequent in the elderly. Measures to prevent the confusional picture in elderly patients who are hospitalized should be increased.

  17. Effect of emergency medicine pharmacists on medication-error reporting in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weant, Kyle A; Humphries, Roger L; Hite, Kimberly; Armitstead, John A

    2010-11-01

    The effect of an emergency medicine (EM) clinical pharmacist on medication-error reporting in an emergency department (ED) was studied. The medication-error reports for patients seen at a university's ED between September 1, 2005, and February 28, 2009, were retrospectively reviewed. Errors reported before the addition of an EM pharmacist (from September 1, 2005, through February 28, 2006) were compared with those reported after the addition of two EM pharmacists (from September 1, 2008, through February 28, 2009). The severity of errors and the provider who reported the errors were characterized. A total of 402 medication errors were reported over the two time periods. Pharmacy personnel captured significantly more errors than did other health care personnel (94.5% versus 5.7%, p pharmacists resulted in 14.8 times as many medication-error reports as were made when no EM pharmacist was in the ED. More errors that actually occurred were captured with two pharmacists providing care (95.7% versus 4.3%, p errors documented were ordering errors (79.8%). Of these, 73.7% were captured after the addition of two EM pharmacists. Performance (40.0%) and knowledge (27.9%) deficits were the most common contributing factors to medication errors. During the study period after the addition of two EM pharmacists in the ED, 371 medication-error reports were completed, compared with 31 reports during the study period before the addition of the pharmacists. Pharmacy personnel reported the majority of medication errors during both study periods.

  18. A study of the changes in how medically related events are reported in Japanese newspapers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Kishi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Yukiko Kishi1, Naoko Murashige2, Yuko Kodama1, Tamae Hamaki1, Kazuhiro Murata3, Haruka Nakada1, Tsunehiko Komatsu3, Hiroto Narimatsu1,4, Masahiro Kami1, Tomoko Matsumura11Division of Social Communication System for Advanced Clinical Research, the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 2Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, Aide of the Minister, Health Sector Reform Office, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Hematology, Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Chiba, Japan, 4Advanced Molecular Epidemiology Research Institute, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Yamagata, JapanAbstract: Media reports of medically related events have a major effect on the healthcare ­community but there have been few detailed investigations conducted to investigate their content. The Nikkei Telecom 21 database was used to investigate the number of reports concerning medically related events between 1992 and 2007 in Japan’s 5 national newspapers. For this period, both the total number of articles and the number of articles containing medically-related keywords were determined. The number of reports relating to medically related occurrences increased sharply from 1999 to 2000 and displayed a decrease from 2003 before increasing again in 2008. As of 2008, such reports account for 0.17% of total newspaper articles. The use of the word ‘iryokago’ (medical professional negligence or error drastically increased in 1999 but showed a consistent decrease from 2004. On the other hand the frequency of reports relating to ‘litigation’ and ‘punishment’ increased rapidly in 1999 before leveling off. Despite this, the number of articles relating to medically related occurrences that were caused by doctor shortages and system errors increased sharply between 2006 and the present. Results indicate that the manner in which newspapers report medically related events is undergoing major changes.Keywords: coverage, incident, doctor shortage

  19. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  20. Relevance of the Flexner Report to contemporary medical education in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Zubair; Burdick, William P; Supe, Avinash; Singh, Tejinder

    2010-02-01

    A century after the publication of Medical Education in the United States and Canada: A Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching (the Flexner Report), the quality of medical education in much of Asia is threatened by weak regulation, inadequate public funding, and explosive growth of private medical schools. Competition for students' fees and an ineffectual accreditation process have resulted in questionable admission practices, stagnant curricula, antiquated learning methods, and dubious assessment practices. The authors' purpose is to explore the relevance of Flexner's observations, as detailed in his report, to contemporary medical education in South Asia, to analyze the consequences of growth, and to recommend pragmatic changes. Major drivers for growth are the supply-demand mismatch for medical school positions, weak governmental regulation, private sector participation, and corruption. The consequences are urban-centric growth, shortage of qualified faculty, commercialization of postgraduate education, untenable assessment practices, emphasis on rote learning, and inadequate clinical exposure. Recommendations include strengthening accreditation standards and processes possibly by introducing regional or national student assessment, developing defensible student assessment systems, recognizing health profession education as a field of scholarship, and creating a tiered approach to faculty development in education. The relevance of Flexner's recommendations to the current status of medical education in South Asia is striking, in terms of both the progressive nature of his thinking in 1910 and the need to improve medical education in Asia today. In a highly connected world, the improvement of Asian medical education will have a global impact.

  1. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 20, Number 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    involves social support, education, group therapy, mind- body medicine, virtual reality, hypnosis, spiritual counseling, cognitive behavioral therapy...culties, bereavement, acculturation diffi - culties) (n=11,145) (Table 2). Rates of any mental health problems (as reported with V-codes) were

  2. Medical and Health Divisions quarterly report, July, August, September, 1948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This quarterly report describes progress in four programs entitled (1) The Metabolic Properties of Plutonium and Allied Materials, (2) Biological Studies of Radiation Effects, (3) Biological Effects of Radiation from External and Internal Sources and (4) Health Chemistry and Physics. Progress in each program is separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  3. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report, Volume 20, Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    1,2,9,10 Th is report also describes the frequency and use of ICD-9 codes for sepsis, septic shock, and bactere - mia among U.S. service members. M E T H...in the 3rd through 8th diagnostic positions of the associated hospitalization records. Of the 178 hospitalizations with bactere - mia in the

  4. Medical and Health Divisions quarterly report, July, August, September, 1948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This quarterly report describes progress in four programs entitled (1) The Metabolic Properties of Plutonium and Allied Materials, (2) Biological Studies of Radiation Effects, (3) Biological Effects of Radiation from External and Internal Sources and (4) Health Chemistry and Physics. Progress in each program is separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  5. Measuring and Reporting Physician's Performance in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan-Fishman, Ana Lucia

    This paper describes a Patient Satisfaction survey and database used to measure and report on physician performance at the Ohio State University Health System (OSUHS). The OSUHS averages 6,000 inpatients in any given month, and more than 7,000 emergency patients and 70,000 outpatient encounters. Data from the Patient Satisfaction measures are…

  6. Medical and Health Divisions quarterly report, January, February, March 1948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1948-05-24

    This quarterly progress report describes four programs namely (1) The Metabolic Properties of Plutonium and Allied Materials (2) Biological studies of radiation effects, (3) Biological effects of radiation from external and internal sources, and (4) Health Physics and Chemistry. Progress for each program has been separately indexed and abstracted for the database.

  7. 29 CFR 1960.28 - Employee reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. (a) The purpose of employee reports is to inform agencies of the existence of, or potential for, unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. A report under... to assure prompt analysis and response to reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions...

  8. The INTERNIST-1/QUICK MEDICAL REFERENCE Project—Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Randolph A.; McNeil, Melissa A.; Challinor, Sue M.; Masarie, Fred E.; Myers, Jack D.

    1986-01-01

    INTERNIST-1 and its successor, QUICK MEDICAL REFERENCE (QMR), are computer programs designed to provide health care professionals with diagnostic assistance in general internal medicine. Both programs rely on the INTERNIST-1 computerized knowledge base, which comprehensively describes 570 diseases in internal medicine. The philosophies behind the development of each program differ. Whereas INTERNIST-1 functions solely as a high-powered diagnostic consultant program, the QMR program acts more as an information tool, providing users with multiple ways of reviewing and manipulating the diagnostic information in the program's knowledge base. At the lowest level, the program can be viewed as an electronic textbook of medicine. In addition, the QMR program has the ability to assist users with generating hypotheses in complex patient cases. The QMR program has not been evaluated formally as an information tool for practicing physicians. A preliminary study indicates that QMR's case-analysis capabilities are of potential benefit in most patients in internal medicine admitted for diagnostic evaluation. PMID:3544509

  9. 42 CFR 486.328 - Condition: Reporting of data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS FOR COVERAGE OF SPECIALIZED SERVICES FURNISHED BY... transplantation data and other information to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, the Scientific... the information to be collected under paragraph (a) of this section, the following definitions...

  10. Report on the Pre-existing Condition Insurance Plan Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Before the Affordable Care Act, Americans with pre-existing conditions who did not receive health coverage through their employers had few affordable options to get...

  11. Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.R.; Bush, P.V.; Dahlin, R.S.

    1996-03-20

    The US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC) initiated this project as part of a program to study the control of fine particles from coal combustion. Our project focus was flue gas conditioning. Various conditioning processes have lowered operating costs and increased collection efficiency at utility particulate control devices. By improving fine particle collection, flue gas conditioning also helps to control the emission of toxic metals, which are concentrated in the fine particle fraction. By combining a review of pertinent literature, laboratory characterization of a variety of fine powders and ashes, pilot-scale studies of conditioning mechanisms, and field experiences, Southern Research Institute has been able to describe many of the key processes that account for the effects that conditioning can have on fine-particle collection. The overall goal of this research project was to explain the mechanisms by which various flue gas conditioning processes alter the performance of particulate control devices. Conditioning involves the modification of one or more of the parameters that determine the magnitude of the forces acting on the fly ash particles. Resistivity, chemistry, cohesivity, size distribution, and particle morphology are among the basic properties of fly ash that significantly influence fine particle collection. Modifications of particulate properties can result in improved or degraded control device performance. These modifications can be caused by (1) changes to the process design or operation that affect properties of the flue gas, (2) addition of particulate matter such as flue-gas desulfurization sorbents to the process effluent stream, (3) injection of reactive gases or liquids into the flue gas. We recommend that humidification be seriously considered as a flue gas conditioning option. 80 refs., 69 figs., 23 tabs.

  12. Rhetorical Structure and Linguistic Features of Case Presentations in Case Reports in Taiwanese and International Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hsuan; Chen, Pi-Ching; Tsai, Jing-Jane

    2012-01-01

    The case presentation is the core section of a medical case report. Issues in the teaching of case report writing have recently been the subject of great interest in medical education, especially in the era of globalization. Given that Taiwanese medical students, residents and junior physicians are requested to write case reports in English and…

  13. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Influenza Vaccination among Adults with Chronic Medical Conditions Vary by Age in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Degan; Qiao, Yanru; Brown, Natalie E.; Wang, Junling

    2017-01-01

    Background People living with chronic health conditions exhibit higher risk for developing severe complications from influenza according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. Although racial and ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination have been documented, it has not been comprehensively determined whether similar disparities are present among the adult population with at least one such condition. Objective To study if racial and ethnic disparities in relation to influenza vaccination are present in adults suffering from at least one chronic condition and if such inequalities differ between age groups. Methods The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2011–2012) was used to study the adult population (age ≥18) who had at least one chronic health condition. Baseline differences in population traits across racial and ethnic groups were identified using a chi-square test. This was conducted among various age groups. In addition, survey logistic regression was utilized to produce odds ratios of receiving influenza vaccination annually between racial and ethnic groups. Results The total sample consisted of 15,499 adults living with at least one chronic health condition. The numbers of non-Hispanic whites (whites), non-Hispanic blacks (blacks), and Hispanics were 8,658, 3,585, and 3,256, respectively. Whites (59.93%) were found to have a higher likelihood of self-reporting their receipt of the influenza vaccine in comparison to the black (48.54%) and Hispanic (48.65%) groups (Pinfluenza vaccine coverage than the white population (59.22%, 77.89) (both P0.05). After controlling for patient characteristics, the difference in influenza vaccine coverage between whites and the minority groups were no longer significant for adults aged 50–64 years. However, the difference were still statistically significant for those aged ≥65 years. Conclusions In the United States, there are significant disparities in influenza vaccination by race and ethnicity for

  14. Electronic health records and online medical records: an asset or a liability under current conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Graham, Judith; Mitchell, Lauren; Heriot, Natalie; Armani, Roksana; Langton, David; Levinson, Michele; Young, Alan; Smith, Julian A; Kotsimbos, Tom; Wilson, John W

    2017-01-20

    Objective The aim of the present study was to audit the current use of medical records to determine completeness and concordance with other sources of medical information.Methods Medical records for 40 patients from each of five Melbourne major metropolitan hospitals were randomly selected (n=200). A quantitative audit was performed for detailed patient information and medical record keeping, as well as data collection, storage and utilisation. Using each hospital's current online clinical database, scanned files and paperwork available for each patient audited, the reviewers sourced as much relevant information as possible within a 30-min time allocation from both the record and the discharge summary.Results Of all medical records audited, 82% contained medical and surgical history, allergy information and patient demographics. All audited discharge summaries lacked at least one of the following: demographics, medication allergies, medical and surgical history, medications and adverse drug event information. Only 49% of records audited showed evidence the discharge summary was sent outside the institution.Conclusions The quality of medical data captured and information management is variable across hospitals. It is recommended that medical history documentation guidelines and standardised discharge summaries be implemented in Australian healthcare services.What is known about this topic? Australia has a complex health system, the government has approved funding to develop a universal online electronic medical record system and is currently trialling this in an opt-out style in the Napean Blue Mountains (NSW) and in Northern Queensland. The system was originally named the personally controlled electronic health record but has since been changed to MyHealth Record (2016). In Victoria, there exists a wide range of electronic health records used to varying degrees, with some hospitals still relying on paper-based records and many using scanned medical records. This

  15. Skin diseases and conditions among students of a medical college in southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Skin disorders, particularly the cosmetic problems are very common among medical students. Gender and place of origin were found to significantly influence the development of certain morbidities.

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 22, Number 10, October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected mosquito of the genus Aedes (A. aegypti or A. albopictus). Acute disease is primarily characterized by... prevent illness due to CHIKV infection. Several studies have reported persis- tent and chronic joint pains lasting months to years aft er the...Surveillance Branch, Silver Spring, MD Acknowledgements: Th e authors thank Rohit Chitale, PhD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 16, Number 7, July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    a zoonotic tick-borne disease that is caused by infection with a spirochetal bacterium of the genus Borrelia. It has a worldwide distribution and is...pollution (indoor and outdoor), infestation-related allergens (e.g., cockroaches, mice, rats), and stress (e.g., violence ).12 This report suggests that...accession standard: a survival analysis of military recruits, 1995 to 1997. Mil Med. 2000 Nov;165(11):852-4. 9. AMSARA, Defense Technology Information

  18. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 19, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    are leading causes of death among individuals in their late teens and early twenties.5,6 Since 1998 in the military, sui- cide has been the second... sexually transmitted infections (e.g., her- pes simplex virus [HSV2]) to receive MHD diagnoses aft er detection of their infec- tions. Th is report...human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted pathogen detected among U.S. service members. An estimated 169,682 incident diagnoses

  19. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 18, Number 2, February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    2,420 3,113 73 274 347 620 2,146 2,766 Genitourinary system (580 - 629, except breast disorders...1,046 30 140 170 204 672 876 Infectious and parasitic diseases (001 - 139) 145 710 855 23 63 86...ill-defined conditions Genitourinary system Breast disorders 0.0 5.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 25.0 30.0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 % o f t ot al

  20. Adverse medical complications: an under-reported contributory cause of death in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J R; Ely, S F; Toriello, A; Hirsch, C S

    2014-04-01

    The current death certification system in the USA fails to accurately track deaths due to adverse medical events. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the under-reporting of deaths due to adverse medical events due to limitations in the current death certification/reporting system, and the benefits of using the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death. Retrospective review and comparison of death certificates and vital statistical coding. The manner of death is certified as a therapeutic complication when death is caused by predictable complications of appropriate therapy, and would not have occurred but for the medical intervention. Based on medical examiner records, complications that caused or contributed to deaths over a five-year period were examined retrospectively. These fatalities were compared with deaths coded as medical and surgical complications by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. The Medical Examiner's Office certified 2471 deaths as therapeutic complications and 312 deaths as accidents occurring in healthcare facilities. In contrast, the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics reported 188 deaths due to complications of medical and surgical care. Use of the term 'therapeutic complication' as the manner of death identified nearly 14 times more deaths than were reported by the New York City Bureau of Vital Statistics. If these therapeutic complications and medical accidents were considered as a 'disease', they would rank as the 10th leading cause of death in New York City, surpassing homicides and suicides in some years. Nationwide policy shifts that use the term 'therapeutic complication' would improve the capture and reporting of these deaths, thus allowing better identification of fatal adverse medical events in order to focus on and assess preventative strategies. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient vs provider reports of aberrant medication-taking behavior among opioid-treated patients with chronic pain who report misusing opioid medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikulina, Valentina; Guarino, Honoria; Acosta, Michelle C; Marsch, Lisa A; Syckes, Cassandra; Moore, Sarah K; Portenoy, Russell K; Cruciani, Ricardo A; Turk, Dennis C; Rosenblum, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    During long-term opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain, monitoring medication adherence of patients with a history of aberrant opioid medication-taking behaviors (AMTB) is an essential practice. There is limited research, however, into the concordance among existing monitoring tools of self-report, physician report, and biofluid screening. This study examined associations among patient and provider assessments of AMTB and urine drug screening using data from a randomized trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention designed to improve medication adherence and pain-related outcomes among 110 opioid-treated patients with chronic pain who screened positive for AMTB and were enrolled in a pain program. Providers completed the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC) and patients completed the Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) and the Chemical Coping Inventory (CCI). In multivariate analyses, ABC scores were compared with COMM and CCI scores, while controlling for demographics and established risk factors for AMTB, such as pain severity. Based on clinical cutoffs, 84% of patients reported clinically significant levels of AMTB and providers rated 36% of patients at elevated levels. Provider reports of AMTB were not correlated with COMM or CCI scores. However, the ABC ratings of experienced providers (nurse practitioners/attending physicians) were higher than those of less experienced providers (fellows) and were correlated with CCI scores and risk factors for AMTB. Associations between patient- and provider-reported AMTB and urine drug screening results were low and largely nonsignificant. In conclusion, concordance between patient and provider reports of AMTB among patients with chronic pain prescribed opioid medication varied by provider level of training.

  2. The Relationship Between Nursing Experience and Education and the Occurrence of Reported Pediatric Medication Administration Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common incidents in the hospitals. They can be harmful, and they are even more detrimental for pediatric patients. This study explored the relationship between nursing experience, education, the frequency and severity of reported pediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs). The data for this study were collected from a larger pan Canadian study. A survey tool was developed to collect self-reported data from nurses. In addition to descriptive statistics, a Poisson regression or a multiple linear regression was completed to address the research questions, and a Boneferrai correction was conducted to adjust for the small sample size. Results demonstrated that on units with more nurses with a higher level of current experience, more PMAEs were reported (p=.001), however; the PMAEs reported by these nurses were not as severe (p=.003). Implications to advance both safe medication delivery in the pediatric setting and safe culture of reporting for both actual and potential errors are identified.

  3. Changes to Hospital Inpatient Volume After Newspaper Reporting of Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2017-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of medical error case reporting by national newspapers on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals. A case-control study was conducted using the article databases of 3 major Japanese newspapers with nationwide circulation between fiscal years 2012 and 2013. Data on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals were obtained from a Japanese government survey between fiscal years 2011 and 2014. Panel data were constructed and analyzed using a difference-in-differences design. Acute care hospitals in Japan. Hospitals named in articles that included the terms "medical error" and "hospital" were designated case hospitals, which were matched with control hospitals using corresponding locations, nurse-to-patient ratios, and bed numbers. Medical error case reporting in newspapers. Changes to hospital inpatient volume after error reports. The sample comprised 40 case hospitals and 40 control hospitals. Difference-in-differences analyses indicated that newspaper reporting of medical errors was not significantly associated (P = 0.122) with overall inpatient volume. Medical error case reporting by newspapers showed no influence on inpatient volume. Hospitals therefore have little incentive to respond adequately and proactively to medical errors. There may be a need for government intervention to improve the posterror response and encourage better health care safety.

  4. Predicting declines in physical function in persons with multiple chronic medical conditions: What we can learn from the medical problem list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayliss Martha S

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care physicians are caring for increasing numbers of persons with comorbid chronic illness. Longitudinal information on health outcomes associated with specific chronic conditions may be particularly relevant in caring for these populations. Our objective was to assess the effect of certain comorbid conditions on physical well being over time in a population of persons with chronic medical conditions; and to compare these effects to that of hypertension alone. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of 4-year longitudinal data from the Medical Outcomes Study. A heterogeneous population of 1574 patients with either hypertension alone (referent or one or more of the following conditions: diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, respiratory illness, musculoskeletal conditions and/or depression were recruited from primary and specialty (endocrinology, cardiology or mental health practices within HMO and fee-for-service settings in three U.S. cities. We measured categorical change (worse vs. same/better in the SF-36® Health Survey physical component summary score (PCS over 4 years. We used logistic regression analysis to determine significant differences in longitudinal change in PCS between patients with hypertension alone and those with other comorbid conditions and linear regression analysis to assess the contribution of the explanatory variables. Results Specific diagnoses of CHF, diabetes and/or chronic respiratory disease; or 4 or more chronic conditions, were predictive of a clinically significant decline in PCS. Conclusions Clinical recognition of these specific chronic conditions or 4 or more of a list of chronic conditions may provide an opportunity for proactive clinical decision making to maximize physical functioning in these populations.

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 24, Number 1, January 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    Thrombocytopenia 287 D69 Malaria complicating pregnancy 647.4 O98.6 Signs, symptoms, or other abnor- malities consistent with malaria 276.2, 518.82, 584.9, 723.1... stress or depression.10,18 To date, there have been no extensive analyses of CT trends during pre-deploy- ment, deployment, post-deployment, and...adjustment disorders, or other deployment-related stressors.5,9 For example, self-reported high levels of fam- ily and personal life stress among active

  6. US Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    jytotoxic Reactions Produced by MUST-Water Constituents • — ^ &,-FT—Bahr, M.D. J. A. Boccia , Ljet MC, USA R. K. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA...Bahr, M.D. Joseph A. Boccia , LTC, MC, USA Robert H. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA Report Control Symbol: RCS-MEDDH-288(R1) Security Classification...Performing 90 Gunter F. Bahr, M.D., Chairman; Joseph A. Boccia , M.D., LTC, MC, USA: Robert H. Shoe- maker, Ph.D., CPT, MSC, USA I Technical

  7. Combined surgical and medical treatment of giant prolactinoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rădoi Mugurel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The operative management of giant pituitary prolactinoma represents a significant challenge for neurosurgeons, due to the degree of local tumor infiltration into adjacent structures such as cavernous sinus. The degree of parasellar tumor extension can be classified according to the Knosp grading system’ while suprasellar extension is qualified in accordance with the modified Hardys classification system. This report describes the case of a male patient with a giant pituitary prolactinoma in which a partial tumor resection via a subfrontal approach was achieved. Typically, resection rates of less than 50% have been reported following surgery on giant pituitary adenomas. Prolactin levels were very high, consistent with invasive giant prolactinoma. Our patient was treated with Cabergoline which eventually normalized the prolactin level and significantly reduced the size of the residual tumor. This case serves to illustrate that in the presence of significant suprasellar and parasellar extension, multi-modal treatment strategies with surgery and dopamine agonist, is the gold standard in the management of locally aggressive pituitary prolactinomas.

  8. Men in extreme conditions: some medical and psychological aspects of the Auschwitz concentration camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radil-Weiss, T

    1983-08-01

    The second world war ended many years ago. Most of those who survived the stay at the German concentration camp at Auschwitz have already died of the consequences of their imprisonment; those still alive are already in the last third of their life. Is there any point in returning to the experiences of those days? Consideration of the mental hygiene of former prisoners cautions us that perhaps we should not do it. But consideration of the general interest holds that we are not entitled to ignore any knowledge that can contribute to social development--including medicine and psychology--even if acquired under unspeakably awful conditions. In addition, since the war new generations have grown up that play an increasingly significant role in various spheres of life but have little concrete information about those events; they can neither rationally nor emotionally understand how the horrors connected with fascism and the war could have happened. In a sense it is encouraging that they cannot grasp such inhuman behavior; nevertheless, we must adhere to the following motto: "Nothing must be forgotten, nobody will be forgotten." We owe it to those millions who did not survive--both the victims of the Holocaust and those who fought against it. These are arguments in favor of returning to the facts that are ineffaceably recorded somewhere in our memories. In doing so, however, we must remember that at times we are revisiting experiences of a boy of 14 as recalled by a 50-year-old man. The material below, examining the medical as well as psychological aspects of imprisonment at Auschwitz, is based on my own memories, as an adolescent imprisoned at Auschwitz. I have tried to move from this individual account to more general statements, although the methodological apparatus on which scientific analysis is usually based is absent.

  9. Association between addressing antiseizure drug side effects and patient-reported medication adherence in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moura LMVR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lidia M V R Moura,1 Thiago S Carneiro,1 Andrew J Cole,1 John Hsu,2,3 Barbara G Vickrey,4 Daniel B Hoch1 1Department of Neurology, 2Mongan Institute for Health Policy, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, 3Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 4Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background and aim: Adherence to treatment is a critical component of epilepsy management. This study examines whether addressing antiepileptic drug (AED side effects at every visit is associated with increased patient-reported medication adherence.Patients and methods: This study identified 243 adults with epilepsy who were seen at two academic outpatient neurology settings and had at least two visits over a 3-year period. Demographic and clinical characteristics were abstracted. Evidence that AED side effects were addressed was measured through 1 phone interview (patient-reported and 2 medical records abstraction (physician-documented. Medication adherence was assessed using the validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4. Complete adherence was determined as answering “no” to all questions.Results: Sixty-two (25% patients completed the interviews. Participants and nonparticipants were comparable with respect to demographic and clinical characteristics; however, a smaller proportion of participants had a history of drug-resistant epilepsy than nonparticipants (17.7% vs 30.9%, P=0.04. Among the participants, evidence that AED side effects were addressed was present in 48 (77% medical records and reported by 51 (82% patients. Twenty-eight (45% patients reported complete medication adherence. The most common reason for incomplete adherence was missed medication due to forgetfulness (n=31, 91%. There was no association between addressing AED side effects (neither physician-documented nor patient-reported and complete medication adherence (P=0.22 and 0.20.Discussion and

  10. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient-reported

  11. North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey Interim Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, North Carolina, under the leadership of Governor Mike Easley and the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards Commission, has worked to improve understanding of a critical factor in student learning and teacher retention: the conditions under which teachers work. In 2006, 66 percent (more than 75,000) school-based licensed…

  12. 76 FR 31327 - Draft National Coastal Condition Report IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services (USFWS), and coastal... conterminous U.S., Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. The NCCR IV data were collected from 3,144 sites from 2003... West Coast) and comparisons of these waters with near-shore condition, trends in regional...

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 23, Number 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    9.7 24,552 61.4 Communications / intelligence 9,036 29.3 187 0.61 3,961 12.8 2,275 7.4 3,148 10.2 18,607 60.4 Health care 3,789 32.1 86 0.73 1,946 16.5...specific 3,269 16.2 Armor/motor transport 712 17.0 Pilot/air crew 1,150 22.0 Repair/engineering 7,555 18.9 Communications / intelligence 6,553 21.3...estimated using radiographic techniques.7 The findings of this analysis were consis- tent with the surgical literature that reports that the incidence

  14. A retrospective analysis of reported errata in five leading medical journals in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya R. Bhatt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although medical publications are frequently used as the source of information, the prevalence of errata remains unclear. The objective of this study was to examine peer-review and publication processes of medical journals as well as to determine the occurrence of reported errata in medical journals and timeliness in identifying and correcting errata. Methods: Five medical journals, New England Journal of Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, Journal of American Medical Association, and Lancet, were evaluated. The characteristics of these journals were obtained from editors’ survey. All these journals report errata noted in their prior publications. We retrospectively analyzed all errata reported from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2012. The mean number of reported errata per issue, the most common errata, and the mean time to report errata were calculated. Results: The journals had high impact factors (14–51, received 3,200 to more than 15,000 submissions in 2012, and utilized two or more external reviewers and usually two or more editors for any accepted articles. All the journals edited the accepted articles, including references, figures, and tables for style. A mean of 1.3 articles with ≥1 errata was reported per issue (a total of 306 articles with errata in 226 issues. Errata in author's information, numeric errata, and errata in the figures and tables were the most common errata. The mean time to report the errata was 122 days. Conclusion: The high-impact journals, with extensive pre-publication review, reported relatively few errata per issue. The delay in reporting errata needs further exploration.

  15. The Relationship Between Burnout Syndrome Among the Medical Staff and Work Conditions in the Polish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głębocka, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Psychologists emphasize that people employed in social service organizations are vulnerable to chronic stress and burnout syndrome caused by a close and unsatisfied interpersonal relationship. However, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of diminished personal accomplishment can be attributed to other external factors. One of them is poor living and occupational conditions. According to a report by OECD, the healthcare system in Poland is the worst among the member countries. The aim of the present study was to define the relationship between occupational burnout and the rating of the Polish healthcare system among the medical staff. The study included 224 participants. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Dehumanized Behavior and the Głębocka and Rużyczka scale of Behavioral Indicators of Patient's Dehumanization were applied. The evaluations of the healthcare system were also collected. The results demonstrate that physicians were the group of most emotionally exhausted and, simultaneously, most life-satisfied persons, while nurses presented the highest level of dehumanization and the lowest level of satisfaction from life achievements. Only did physicians evaluate the healthcare system as a relatively good one. They were also more tolerant of latent dehumanization. A relationship between the dimensions of burnout and the evaluation of healthcare system were observed. The emotionally exhausted or prone to dehumanization persons were more likely to evaluate the Polish healthcare system negatively.

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 8, Number 5, July 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    be improving and the overall completeness of reporting is stable. Analysis and report by Barbara E. Nagaraj, MPH, Analysis Group, Army Medical... Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 0 0 - 1 1 100 Leptospirosis 1 0 0 1 1 100 2 1 50 Lyme

  17. Learning without Borders: A Review of the Implementation of Medical Error Reporting in Medecins Sans Frontieres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Shanks

    Full Text Available To analyse the results from the first 3 years of implementation of a medical error reporting system in Médecins Sans Frontières-Operational Centre Amsterdam (MSF programs.A medical error reporting policy was developed with input from frontline workers and introduced to the organisation in June 2010. The definition of medical error used was "the failure of a planned action to be completed as intended or the use of a wrong plan to achieve an aim." All confirmed error reports were entered into a database without the use of personal identifiers.179 errors were reported from 38 projects in 18 countries over the period of June 2010 to May 2013. The rate of reporting was 31, 42, and 106 incidents/year for reporting year 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The majority of errors were categorized as dispensing errors (62 cases or 34.6%, errors or delays in diagnosis (24 cases or 13.4% and inappropriate treatment (19 cases or 10.6%. The impact of the error was categorized as no harm (58, 32.4%, harm (70, 39.1%, death (42, 23.5% and unknown in 9 (5.0% reports. Disclosure to the patient took place in 34 cases (19.0%, did not take place in 46 (25.7%, was not applicable for 5 (2.8% cases and not reported for 94 (52.5%. Remedial actions introduced at headquarters level included guideline revisions and changes to medical supply procedures. At field level improvements included increased training and supervision, adjustments in staffing levels, and adaptations to the organization of the pharmacy.It was feasible to implement a voluntary reporting system for medical errors despite the complex contexts in which MSF intervenes. The reporting policy led to system changes that improved patient safety and accountability to patients. Challenges remain in achieving widespread acceptance of the policy as evidenced by the low reporting and disclosure rates.

  18. Medical management of aortic coarctation is feasible & durable in selected patients: a case report & literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Asif N; Carter, William; Mousa, Albeir Y

    2015-01-01

    Long-term survival in patients with complete aortic coarctation (AC) without surgical repair has not been well characterized and is rarely documented. We report a case of an 84 year old male with complete aortic coarctation with history of hypertension for more than 40 years. Since the diagnosis was made in early 1950's medical treatment to control hypertension was initiated as patient was deemed high risk for surgical intervention. He has survived to the age of 84 years with minimal medical problems. This report also reviews the few documented cases of prolonged survival in patients with aortic coarctation. This report demonstrates that prolonged survival is possible in patients with documented complete coarctation and awareness of this report may influence the decision to use medical treatment for selected elderly patients with high risk of mortality associated with surgical repair.

  19. Helicopter emergency medical services: a report on the current status in a metropolitan area of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Lee, Sung-Woo; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Cho, Han-Jin; Kim, Jung-Yun

    2011-06-01

    This report introduces and discusses the present state of the helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in the metropolitan area of South Korea. The data of patients transported by HEMS from April 2007 to June 2009 were provided by Seoul Metropolitan Fire and Disaster Management Department. The data of patients subsequently transported to Korea University Guro Hospital were analyzed. During the study period, 725 emergency rescue calls were dispatched and 703 patients were rescued, of which 562 patients were judged by an emergency medical technician to be in a nonemergent condition and were referred to ground emergency medical services and 141 patients were judged as having an emergent situation and were directly transported to a nearby hospital. The data of patients who were transported to Korea University Guro Hospital by HEMS were as follows. The mean age was 51.7±12.1 years; 75.6% were male patients; 28 patients (68.3%) were traumatically injured; the mean of the injury severity score was 13.5±14.7, and 13 patients (46.4%) had an injury severity score of more than 15. No procedures other than basic life support were performed by the emergency medical technicians during transport. The role of HEMS in South Korea is limited to transporting injured patients from locations that cannot be approached by ground emergency medical services. Even though HEMS is essential considering the local mountainous geography of Seoul, Korea, overutilization of HEMS is still suspected in the metropolitan area.

  20. The effect of electronic health records on the use of clinical care guidelines for patients with medically complex conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricton, James; Rindal, D Brad; Rush, William; Flottemesch, Thomas; Vazquez, Gabriela; Thoele, Merry Jo; Durand, Emily; Enstad, Chris; Rhodus, Nelson

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of health information technology provides an opportunity for health care providers to improve the quality and safety of dental care, particularly for patients with medically complex conditions. The authors randomized each of 15 dental clinics (HealthPartners, Bloomington, Minn.) to one of three groups to evaluate the impact of two clinical decision support (CDS) approaches during an 18-month study period. In the first approach--provider activation through electronic dental records (EDRs)--a flashing alert was generated at the dental visit to identify patients with medically complex conditions and to direct the dental care provider to Web-based personalized care guidelines. In the second approach--patient activation through personal health records--a secure e-mail was generated or a letter was mailed to patients before dental visits encouraging them to ask their dental care provider to review the care guidelines specific to their medical conditions. The authors evaluated the rate of reviewing care guidelines among 102 providers. Participants in the provider and patient activation groups increased their use of the system during the first six months, which had a generalized effect of increasing use of the guidelines for all patients, even if they were not part of the study (P electronic alerts. The study results demonstrated that review of clinical care guidelines for patients with medically complex conditions can be improved with CDS systems that involve the use of electronic health records. As the U.S. population ages, dentists must be vigilant in adapting care for patients with medically complex conditions to ensure therapeutic safety and effectiveness. Expanded use of CDS via EDRs can help dental care providers achieve this objective.

  1. University of the Witwatersrand physiotherapy undergraduate curriculum alignment to medical conditions of patients within Gauteng state health facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokgobadibe V. Ntsiea

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The healthcare sector requires graduates with the ability to confidently assess and manage the majority of the medical conditions seen in hospitals.Objective: To establish whether the most prevalent medical conditions treated by physiotherapists in Gauteng (South Africa state health facilities align with the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits physiotherapy curriculum.Methods: This was a retrospective review of condition-related statistics from physiotherapy departments within the Gauteng province state health facilities. Data from all Gauteng government hospitals that had submitted at least 75% of their physiotherapy condition–related statistics to the provincial statistics coordinator from January 2012 to December 2014 were considered and compared to medical conditions covered in the Wits 2015 physiotherapy curriculum to check if all conditions listed in the Gauteng statistics appeared within the Wits curriculum document. The number of teaching hours for the common conditions was noted to check the emphasis given to these conditions in the curriculum.Results: Eighty-three per cent of the hospitals submitted 75% of their monthly statistics. Overall, the most common conditions treated were lower limb fractures (13% followed by stroke (7.6% (n = 705 597. Within the neuro-musculoskeletal category, the most common conditions after lower limb fractures were soft tissue injuries (15.1% (n = 330 511. The most common cardiopulmonary conditions were tuberculosis (24.9%, followed by pneumonia (13.8% (n = 94 895. The most common neurological conditions were stroke (30.9% followed by cerebral palsy (17% (n = 174 024. Within the non-specified categories, the number of intensive care unit (ICU patients was the highest (23%, followed by sputum induction (21% (n = 138 187. The most common conditions that were emphasised within the Wits curriculum as indicated by the teaching hours: fractures, 14.5 (66% of 22 third-year orthopaedics hours

  2. Assessment of patient knowledge of diabetic goals, self-reported medication adherence, and goal attainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitley HP

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication adherence is an integral aspect of disease state management for patients with chronic illnesses, including diabetes mellitus. It has been hypothesized that patients with diabetes who have poor medication adherence may have less knowledge of overall therapeutic goals and may be less likely to attain these goals. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess self-reported medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals (hemoglobin A1C [A1C], low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] and blood pressure [BP], and goal attainment in adult patients with diabetes. Methods: A survey was created to assess medication adherence, knowledge of therapeutic goals, and goal attainment for adult patients with diabetes followed at an internal medicine or a family medicine clinic. Surveys were self-administered prior to office visits. Additional data were collected from the electronic medical record. Statistical analysis was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were enrolled. Knowledge of therapeutic goals was reported by 14%, 34%, and 18% of survived patients for LDL-C, BP, and A1C, respectively. Forty-six percent, 37%, and 40% of patients achieved LDL-C, BP, and A1C goals, respectively. Low prescribing of cholesterol-lowering medications was an interesting secondary finding; 36% of patients not at LDL-C goal had not been prescribed a medication targeted to lower cholesterol. Forty-eight percent of patients were medication non-adherent; most frequently reported reasons for non-adherence were forgot (34% and too expensive (14%. Patients at A1C goal were more adherent than patients not at goal (p=0.025. Conclusion: The majority did not reach goals and were unknowledgeable of goals; however, most were provided prescriptions to treat these parameters. Goal parameters should be revisited often amongst multidisciplinary team members with frequent and open communications. Additionally, it is imperative that practitioners discuss

  3. Medical Judgments Across the Range of Reported Pain Severity: Clinician and Lay Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Chibnall, John T; House, Kylie; Biehl, Joann

    2016-07-01

    While increasing evidence suggests that observers discount high-severity chronic pain, factors that occasion such discounting are poorly understood, particularly regarding health provider vs lay perspectives. This study examined the effects of supporting medical evidence and comorbid psychological distress (pain behavior) on medical student and lay clinical judgments of increasingly severe patient pain reports. In a 2 × 2 × 2 × (7) mixed between- and within-subject design, participants (medical students vs lay) made clinical judgments after reading vignettes describing a hypothetical patient that varied in levels of medical evidence and pain behavior (low vs high) and pain severity (4/10-10/10). Fourth-year medical students (N = 115) and lay persons in the community (N = 300) participated in this research. While both medical student and lay judgments plateaued at high levels of pain severity, judgments regarding cause (medical vs psychological), treatment (opioid prescription), and disability showed growing divergence as levels of reported pain severity increased. Divergence relative to medical and psychological causes of pain was found irrespective of the level of supporting medical evidence; divergence relative to opioid treatment and support for a disability claim was found when supporting medical evidence was low. The results indicate differing expectations of chronic pain treatment for health care providers relative to the lay public that could impact clinical care, especially at high pain severity levels, where lay expectations diverge significantly from those of health professionals. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. THE METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING OF LABOR COSTS OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL IN MARKET CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Katasonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the approximate calculations of working time of physician to work with the patient and documentation. On the base of these calculations they outline the possible ways to optimize the work of the medical staff.

  5. Association of medical students' reports of interactions with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and medical school policies and characteristics: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Yeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Professional societies use metrics to evaluate medical schools' policies regarding interactions of students and faculty with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. We compared these metrics and determined which US medical schools' industry interaction policies were associated with student behaviors.Using survey responses from a national sample of 1,610 US medical students, we compared their reported industry interactions with their schools' American Medical Student Association (AMSA PharmFree Scorecard and average Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP Conflicts of Interest Policy Database score. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to determine the association between policies and students' gift acceptance, interactions with marketing representatives, and perceived adequacy of faculty-industry separation. We adjusted for year in training, medical school size, and level of US National Institutes of Health (NIH funding. We used LASSO regression models to identify specific policies associated with the outcomes. We found that IMAP and AMSA scores had similar median values (1.75 [interquartile range 1.50-2.00] versus 1.77 [1.50-2.18], adjusted to compare scores on the same scale. Scores on AMSA and IMAP shared policy dimensions were not closely correlated (gift policies, r = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.44; marketing representative access policies, r = 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.63. Students from schools with the most stringent industry interaction policies were less likely to report receiving gifts (AMSA score, odds ratio [OR]: 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.72; IMAP score, OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.19-1.04 and less likely to interact with marketing representatives (AMSA score, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.69; IMAP score, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-0.95 than students from schools with the lowest ranked policy scores. The association became nonsignificant when fully adjusted for NIH funding level, whereas adjusting for year of education, size of school, and publicly

  6. Association of medical students' reports of interactions with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries and medical school policies and characteristics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, James S; Austad, Kirsten E; Franklin, Jessica M; Chimonas, Susan; Campbell, Eric G; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-10-01

    Professional societies use metrics to evaluate medical schools' policies regarding interactions of students and faculty with the pharmaceutical and medical device industries. We compared these metrics and determined which US medical schools' industry interaction policies were associated with student behaviors. Using survey responses from a national sample of 1,610 US medical students, we compared their reported industry interactions with their schools' American Medical Student Association (AMSA) PharmFree Scorecard and average Institute on Medicine as a Profession (IMAP) Conflicts of Interest Policy Database score. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to determine the association between policies and students' gift acceptance, interactions with marketing representatives, and perceived adequacy of faculty-industry separation. We adjusted for year in training, medical school size, and level of US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding. We used LASSO regression models to identify specific policies associated with the outcomes. We found that IMAP and AMSA scores had similar median values (1.75 [interquartile range 1.50-2.00] versus 1.77 [1.50-2.18], adjusted to compare scores on the same scale). Scores on AMSA and IMAP shared policy dimensions were not closely correlated (gift policies, r = 0.28, 95% CI 0.11-0.44; marketing representative access policies, r = 0.51, 95% CI 0.36-0.63). Students from schools with the most stringent industry interaction policies were less likely to report receiving gifts (AMSA score, odds ratio [OR]: 0.37, 95% CI 0.19-0.72; IMAP score, OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.19-1.04) and less likely to interact with marketing representatives (AMSA score, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.69; IMAP score, OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.14-0.95) than students from schools with the lowest ranked policy scores. The association became nonsignificant when fully adjusted for NIH funding level, whereas adjusting for year of education, size of school, and publicly versus

  7. UCM at TREC-2012: Does Negation Influence the Retrieval of Medical Reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    UCM at TREC-2012: Does negation influence the retrieval of medical reports? Alberto Dı́az, Miguel Ballesteros Universidad Complutense de Madrid Spain...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Universidad Complutense de Madrid ,Seneca, 2 Avenue,University City,28040 Madrid Spain, 8. PERFORMING... Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Spain laura.plaza@uam.es Abstract This paper details the UCM participation in the TREC 2012 Medical Records Track. We

  8. Implementation of Patient's Rights Charter: a Report from Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsapoor, A R; Salari, P; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    At the aim of explaining the rights of health care recipients and upgrading ethical observance in the field of treatment-the most important field of health care-, the Patient's Rights Charter was declared by Ministry of Health and Medical Education to all medical universities in September 2009. This paper provides a report of strategic planning for implementation of Patient's Rights Charter and a summary of other projects.

  9. Smartphone Applications for Educating and Helping Non-motivating Patients Adhere to Medication That Treats Mental Health Conditions: Aims and Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos P. Kassianos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients prescribed with medication that treats mental health conditions benefit the most compared to those prescribed with other types of medication. However, they are also the most difficult to adhere. The development of mobile health (mHealth applications (“apps” to help patients monitor their adherence is fast growing but with limited evidence on their efficacy. There is no evidence on the content of these apps for patients taking psychotropic medication. The aim of this study is to identify and evaluate the aims and functioning of available apps that are aiming to help and educate patients to adhere to medication that treats mental health conditions.Method: Three platform descriptions (Apple, Google, and Microsoft were searched between October 2015 and February 2016. Included apps need to focus on adherence to medication that treats mental health conditions and use at least a reinforcement strategy. Descriptive information was extracted and apps evaluated on a number of assessment criteria using content analysis.Results: Sixteen apps were identified. All apps included self-monitoring properties like reminders and psycho-educational properties like mood logs. It was unclear how the latter were used or how adherence was measured. Major barriers to medication adherence like patients' illness and medication beliefs and attitudes were not considered nor where information to patients about mediation side effects. Very few apps were tailored and none was developed based on established theories explaining the processes for successful medication adherence like cognitions and beliefs. Reported information on app development and validation was poor.Discussion: A variety of apps with different properties that tackle both intentional and unintentional non-adherence from a different perspective are identified. An evidence-based approach and co-creation with patients is needed. This will ensure that the apps increase the possibility to

  10. Descriptive epidemiology of deployment-related medical conditions and shipboard training-related injuries in a Chinese Navy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, R-R; Wang, J-Q; Pan, L-L; Zhou, W; Liu, J-L; Ju, J-T; Cai, Y-L

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the deployment-related medical conditions and shipboard tactical training-related injuries in a Chinese Navy population. A retrospective study with the Chinese Navy was conducted. The medical records of 1543 Navy crewmembers from 2011 to 2015 were collected. The distribution and incidence rate (IR) of different types of medical conditions were provided and compared between the Aden Gulf deployment and nondeployment periods. The occurrence of military training-related injuries in crewmembers receiving 12-week shipboard tactical training was compared with that of 956 marines and 4371 recruits receiving combat and physical training, respectively. The anatomic locations and types of training-related injury were analyzed. Compared with the nondeployment period, the percentages of the following injuries were significantly higher during deployment: injuries and certain other consequences of external causes (16.97% vs 7.76%), diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (15.40% vs 10.34%) and mental and behavioral disorders (11.23% vs 3.45%); however, respiratory system diseases had a lower percentage (19.84% vs 28.35%). Far seas deployment significantly increased the IRs of acute upper respiratory infection, skin and eye infection, sprains and low back pain as well as aphthous ulcer, insomnia, and seasickness (P Chinese Navy has experienced novel health issues in crewmembers in recent years. Corresponding countermeasures should be taken to address deployment-related medical conditions and shipboard training-related injuries in the future. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Chondroma of Falx: Case Report of a Rare Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Shahriarian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chondroma is a benign tumor which mostly occurs in extremities but also sometimes in brain. Most intracranial chondromas arise from skull base, but chondroma of falx origin is a rare circumstance. Indeed, the intracranial chondromas rise from falx is mostly in relation with syndromic disorders such as Mafuccis syndrome or Olliers syndrome. Here, we reported a rare case of falxian intracranial chondroma in a young man who has normal physical examination and no signs of any syndromic disorder. The goal of this paper was to raise awareness about chondromas and suggest that chondroma be ruled out in any patient with masses arising from falx.

  12. Assessing the validity of self-reported medication adherence among inner-city asthmatic adults: the Medication Adherence Report Scale for Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jessica L; Mann, Devin M; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Home, Robert; Leventhal, Howard; Musumeci-Szabó, Tamara J; Halm, Ethan A

    2009-10-01

    A validated tool to assess adherence with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) could help physicians and researchers determine whether poor asthma control is due to poor adherence or severe intrinsic asthma. To assess the performance of the Medication Adherence Report Scale for Asthma (MARS-A), a 10-item, self-reported measure of adherence with ICS. We interviewed 318 asthmatic adults receiving care at 2 inner-city clinics. Self-reported adherence with ICS was measured by MARS-A at baseline and 1 and 3 months. ICS adherence was measured electronically in 53 patients. Electronic adherence was the percentage of days patients used ICS. Patients with a mean MARS-A score of 4.5 or higher or with electronic adherence of more than 70% were defined as good adherers. We assessed internal validity (Cronbach alpha, test-retest correlations), criterion validity (associations between self-reported adherence and electronic adherence), and construct validity (correlating self-reported adherence with ICS beliefs). The mean patient age was 47 years; 40% of patients were Hispanic, 40% were black, and 18% were white; 53% had prior asthma hospitalizations; and 70% had prior oral steroid use. Electronic substudy patients were similar to the rest of the cohort in age, sex, race, and asthma severity. MARS-A had good interitem correlation in English and Spanish (Cronbach alpha = 0.85 and 0.86, respectively) and good test-retest reliability (r = 0.65, P self-reported adherence predicted high electronic adherence (odds ratio, 10.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-44.5; P self-reported adherence higher in those saying daily ICS use was important and ICS were controller medications (P = .04). MARS-A demonstrated good psychometric performance as a self-reported measure of adherence with ICS among English- and Spanish-speaking, low-income, minority patients with asthma.

  13. Ruthenium behaviour in severe nuclear accident conditions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backman, U.; Lipponen, M.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.; Zilliacus, R. [VVT Processes (Finland)

    2004-08-01

    During routine nuclear reactor operations, ruthenium will accumulate in the fuel in relatively high concentrations. In a steam atmosphere, ruthenium is not volatile, and it is not likely to be released from the fuel. However, in an air ingress accident during reactor power operation or during maintenance, ruthenium may form volatile species, which may be released into the containment. Oxide forms of ruthenium are more volatile than the metallic form. Radiotoxicity of ruthenium is high both in the short and the long term. The results of this project imply that in oxidising conditions during nuclear reactor core degradation, ruthenium release increases as oxidised gaseous species Ru03 and Ru04 are formed. A significant part of the released ruthenium is then deposited on reactor coolant system piping. However, in the presence of steam and aerosol particles, a substantial amount of ruthenium may be released as gaseous Ru04 into the containment atmosphere. (au)

  14. Current situation on the reporting quality of randomized controlled trials in 5 leading Chinese medical journals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wei; Li Tiejun; Wu Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) statement has already proved to be an efficient standard for reporting quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). However, most of the Chinese medical journals have not endorsed the CONSORT statement. The current situation about the reporting quality of RCTs in Chinese medical journals is still unclear. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the reporting quality of RCTs on papers published in 5 leading Chinese medical journals. Methods: We evaluated 232 original RCT papers using a reporting quality scale based on CONSORT statement from 2001 to 2006 in 5 Chinese medical journals (Journal type 1) without adoption of CONSORT and Chinese Journal of Evidence-based Medicine (Journal type 2) which adopted CONSORT in 2004. We measured the inclusion of 26 items for the reporting quality scale and 6 core items of each RCT report, gave score to each item and calculated the total score obtained in each report and the proportion of reports including individual items. The reporting quality of RCT trials from 2001 to 2003 (pre-adoption period) was compared with that from 2004 to 2006 (post-adoption period). Results: The average reporting quality of RCTs was moderate (mean score, 15.18), and the mean score of the 6 core items was low (mean score, 1.09)in 5 leading journals. The difference in the total score and the score of the 6 core items between pre-adoption period (2001-2003) and post-adoption period (2004-2006) was statistically significant (P=0.003; P=0.000). Interaction between journal type and period was not significant (F=0.76; P=0.383). We concluded that the change tendency of reporting quality between Journal type 1 and 2 was not different. But as to the core items of sequence concealment and intention-to-treat analysis,the increases were greater for Journal type 2 when evaluated against Journal type 1 (P=0.038; P=0.016). Conclusion: The reporting quality of RCT trials in 5 leading Chinese

  15. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medication Error Reporting in Primary Care Clinics: A Qualitative Study in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsiah, A; Othman, Noordin; Jamshed, Shazia; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi

    2016-01-01

    To explore and understand participants' perceptions and attitudes towards the reporting of medication errors (MEs). A qualitative study using in-depth interviews of 31 healthcare practitioners from nine publicly funded, primary care clinics in three states in peninsular Malaysia was conducted for this study. The participants included family medicine specialists, doctors, pharmacists, pharmacist assistants, nurses and assistant medical officers. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data was guided by the framework approach. Six themes and 28 codes were identified. Despite the availability of a reporting system, most of the participants agreed that MEs were underreported. The nature of the error plays an important role in determining the reporting. The reporting system, organisational factors, provider factors, reporter's burden and benefit of reporting also were identified. Healthcare practitioners in primary care clinics understood the importance of reporting MEs to improve patient safety. Their perceptions and attitudes towards reporting of MEs were influenced by many factors which affect the decision-making process of whether or not to report. Although the process is complex, it primarily is determined by the severity of the outcome of the errors. The participants voluntarily report the errors if they are familiar with the reporting system, what error to report, when to report and what form to use.

  16. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice towards Medication Errors and Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting among Medicine Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Aghakouchakzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common types of medical error are medication errors (MEs which defined as any preventable event that may be caused by an inappropriate medication usage and lead to an adverse drug reaction (ADR event in patients. In recent years, different approaches have been proposed to reduce MEs, one of which is reporting ADRs. The present study was designed to assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of medicine students towards MEs and ADRs reporting.Method: The validated 12-item questionnaire included subsequently 4 questions, 5 items and the final 3 questions related to the knowledge, attitude, and practice that was given to each participant before and after of the clerkship course. The study population were 40 students of fourth-year of medicine.Results: Demographic features of the participants have no significant difference. Medicine students had a poor KAP towards MEs. Only 8% of respondents had general knowledge about MEs and 50% of students believed MEs are inevitable events, less than 20% of them were acquainted with 5 rules of prescriptions. Students had good knowledge and attitude but poor practice towards ADRs reporting. 55% of participants were aware of their responsibility of ADRs reporting but only 5% of respondents were acquainted with ADRs reporting method and the ADR center in the hospitals.Conclusion: The educational intervention, alteration in medicine student’s curriculum, and hold the interactive clerkship for health care professionals can improve the KAP towards ADRs reporting and diminish of the preventable medication errors.

  17. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

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    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  18. Skin diseases and conditions among students of a medical college in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Nitin; Kumar, Ganesh S; Nelliyanil, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Skin diseases are a common problem among young adults. There is paucity of data about it among medical students. This study aimed to find out the pattern of skin disorders and to describe their association with various socio-demographic factors among medical students. This cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2011 in a medical college in Mangalore, Karnataka. Two-hundred and seventy eight medical students were chosen from the 4(th), 6(th) and 8(th) semester through convenient sampling method. Data on hair and skin morbidities suffered over past 1 year and its associated factors were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Most of the participants 171 (61.5%) were of the age group 20-21 years and majority were females 148 (53.2%). The most common hair/skin morbidities suffered in the past one year were acne 185 (66.6%), hair loss 165 (59.3%), and sun tan 147 (52.9%). Fungal infection (P = 0.051) and severe type of acne (P = 0.041) were seen significantly more among males while hair morbidities like hair loss (P = 0.003), split ends of hairs (P hair loss (P = 0.039) and usage of sunscreen was found to protect from developing sun tans (P = 0.049). Skin disorders, particularly the cosmetic problems are very common among medical students. Gender and place of origin were found to significantly influence the development of certain morbidities.

  19. Do Workers Underreport Morbidity? The Accuracy of Self-reports of Chronic Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Datta Gupta, Nabanita; Jürges, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    We use matched Danish health survey and register data to investigate discrepancies between register-based diagnoses and self-reported morbidity. We hypothesize that false negatives (medical diagnoses existing in the register but not reported in the survey) arise partly because individuals fear...

  20. Concordance between patient self-reports and claims data on clinical diagnoses, medication use, and health system utilization in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Shin Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between claims records in the National Health Insurance Research Database and patient self-reports on clinical diagnoses, medication use, and health system utilization. METHODS: In this study, we used the data of 15,574 participants collected from the 2005 Taiwan National Health Interview Survey. We assessed positive agreement, negative agreement, and Cohen's kappa statistics to examine the concordance between claims records and patient self-reports. RESULTS: Kappa values were 0.43, 0.64, and 0.61 for clinical diagnoses, medication use, and health system utilization, respectively. Using a strict algorithm to identify the clinical diagnoses recorded in claims records could improve the negative agreement; however, the effect on positive agreement and kappa was diverse across various conditions. CONCLUSION: We found that the overall concordance between claims records in the National Health Insurance Research Database and patient self-reports in the Taiwan National Health Interview Survey was moderate for clinical diagnosis and substantial for both medication use and health system utilization.

  1. Caloric Vestibular Stimulation as a Treatment for Conversion Disorder: A Case Report and Medical Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eNoll-Hussong; Sabrina eHolzapfel; Dan ePokorny; Simone D Herberger

    2014-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS) has been demonstrated to modulate transiently a variety of cognitive ...

  2. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medication Error Reporting in Primary Care Clinics: A Qualitative Study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsiah, A.; Othman, Noordin; Jamshed, Shazia; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore and understand participants’ perceptions and attitudes towards the reporting of medication errors (MEs). Methods A qualitative study using in-depth interviews of 31 healthcare practitioners from nine publicly funded, primary care clinics in three states in peninsular Malaysia was conducted for this study. The participants included family medicine specialists, doctors, pharmacists, pharmacist assistants, nurses and assistant medical officers. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the data was guided by the framework approach. Results Six themes and 28 codes were identified. Despite the availability of a reporting system, most of the participants agreed that MEs were underreported. The nature of the error plays an important role in determining the reporting. The reporting system, organisational factors, provider factors, reporter’s burden and benefit of reporting also were identified. Conclusions Healthcare practitioners in primary care clinics understood the importance of reporting MEs to improve patient safety. Their perceptions and attitudes towards reporting of MEs were influenced by many factors which affect the decision-making process of whether or not to report. Although the process is complex, it primarily is determined by the severity of the outcome of the errors. The participants voluntarily report the errors if they are familiar with the reporting system, what error to report, when to report and what form to use. PMID:27906960

  3. Prenatal and Postnatal Medical Conditions and the Risk of Brain Tumors in Children and Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tettamanti, Giorgio; Shu, Xiaochen; Adel Fahmideh, Maral

    2017-01-01

    to medical diagnostic radiation, was obtained from CEFALO, a multicenter case-control study performed in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland through face-to-face interview. Eligible cases of childhood and adolescent brain tumors (CABT) were ages 7 to 19 years, diagnosed between January 1, 2004...... and August 31, 2008, and living in the participating countries (n = 352). The cases were matched by age, sex, and region to 646 population-based controls. RESULTS: Prenatal exposure to medical diagnostic radiation and postnatal exposure to X-rays were not associated with CABTs. A higher risk estimate...

  4. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 7, Number 8, September/October 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    figure 2). Injuries (from all causes) accounted for approximately 20% of all DNBI vis- its (figure 2). Respiratory infections (16%) and dermato ...Medical con- ditions not included in specific categories, respiratory in- fections (particularly during winter months), and dermato - logic conditions

  5. Five year report on the medical follow up of Marshallese receiving special medical care related to 1954 Bravo fallout radiation (January 1992--1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaswani, A.N.; Howard, J.E.

    1999-06-01

    This is the 17th and final report of the Marshall Islands Medical Program as carried out by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The purpose of these publications has been to provide information on the medical status of 253 Marshallese exposed to radiation fallout in 1954. The medical program fulfills a commitment to disclose unique medical information relevant to public health. Details of the Bravo thermonuclear accident that caused the exposure have been published. A 1955 article in the Journal of the American Medical Association, which described the acute medical effects on the population that required special medical care, remains a definitive and relevant description of events. Marshallese participation in this Congressionally mandated program is voluntary. Throughout the 44 years of the program, each participating individual`s relevant medical findings, laboratory data, disease morbidity, and mortality have been published in the BNL reports in a manner preserving patient confidentiality. In each report, there has been an attempt to interpret these findings and to infer the role of radiation exposure in their development. An equally important aspect of the reports has been the presentation of data that allows for analyses of the medical consequences of the Marshallese exposure.

  6. Impact of poverty, not seeking medical care, unemployment, inflation, self-reported illness, and health insurance on mortality in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Andrew Bourne

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : An extensive review of the literature revealed that no study exists that has examined poverty, not seeking medical care, inflation, self-reported illness, and mortality in Jamaica. The current study will bridge the gap by providing an investigation of poverty; not seeking medical care; illness; health insurance coverage; inflation and mortality in Jamaica. Materials and Method : Using two decades (1988-2007, the current study used three sets of secondary data published by the (1 Planning Institute of Jamaica and the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (2 the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (Demographic Statistics and (3 the Bank of Jamaica (Economic Report. Scatter diagrams were used to examine correlations between the particular dependent and independent variables. For the current study, a number of hypotheses were tested to provide explanation morality in Jamaica. Results : The average percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care over the last 2 decades was 41.9%; and the figure has been steadily declining over the last 5 years. In 1990, the most Jamaicans who did not seek medical care were 61.4% and this fell to 52.3% in 1991; 49.1% in 1992 and 48.2% the proceeding year. Based on the percentages, in the early 1990s (1990-1994, the percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care was close to 50% and in the latter part of the decade, the figure was in the region of 30% and the low as 31.6% in 1999. In 2006, the percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care despite being ill was 30% and this increased by 4% the following year. Concomitantly, poverty fell by 3.1 times over the 2 decades to 9.9% in 2007, while inflation increased by 1.9 times, self-reported illness was 15.5% in 2007 with mortality averaging 15,776 year of the 2 decades. There is a significant statistical correlation between not seeking medical-care and prevalence of poverty (r = 0.759, p< 0.05. There is a statistical correlation

  7. WORKING AND HEALTH CONDITIONS REPORTED BY INFORMAL COMMERCE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Andrade Rios

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo describir las características sociodemográficas y laborales y las condiciones de trabajo y salud de los trabajadores del comercio informal en el municipio de Jequie, Bahia. Estudio epidemiológico, un estudio transversal llevó a cabo con 434 trabajadores informales Trade Center Supply Jequie. Los datos se analizaron de forma descriptiva con SPSS 15.0. Se encontró que 54,6% eran varones, con una edad media 42,7 años, 50,9 % estaban casadas, el 44,6 con 1% de grado de la educación incompleta. Las características ocupacionales mostraron que la dificultad en conseguir un trabajo era la razón más informado que llevó a las personas al desarrollo de las actividades informales (39,9 %. Hubo variación en el ingreso promedio mensual y horas de trabajo. De acuerdo con el análisis del modelo de control de la demanda, la mayoría de los trabajadores se enmarcó como alta tensión (28,1 %. El dolor lumbar y la hipertensión fueron los más morbilidades auto-reporte. Sufrieron accidentes en el trabajo 140 personas (32,3%. Se sugiere fortalecer las políticas públicas en materia de salud ocupacional dirigidas a trabajadores informales.

  8. ROLE OF MEDICAL REHABILITATION TREATMENT IN POST-POLIO SYNDROME – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOGARU Gabriela

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The term post-polio syndrome (PPS was introduced in 1985 by Halstead. It is characterized by sudden or progressive muscle weakness, new muscular atrophy, muscle pain, fatigue, functional impotence, cold intolerance, after a period of at least 15 years from acute polio virus infection, a period of neurological and functional stability, in the absence of other medical explanation [1]. The reported prevalence of PPS is between 15% and 80% of all patients with previous polio virus infections [2, 3]. Poliomyelitis continues to be a public health problem, because the consequences of the disease last throughout life. In Europe, there are about 700,000 persons who survived the infection and are still alive. Non-randomized studies with kinesitherapy programs with a duration between 6 weeks and 7 months, involving isokinetic and isometric endurance muscle training, have demonstrated an increase of muscle strength in the case of patients with mild or moderate muscle weakness, and a reduction of muscle fatigue [7, 8, 9]. The differential diagnosis of PPS can be difficult because of the need to exclude both neurological and non-neurological conditions that aggravate the pre-existing motor deficit. Rehabilitation programs using therapeutic means: kinesitherapy, thermotherapy, hydrothermotherapy, occupational therapy represent the only way to limit functional deficit and to improve pain, playing an important role in the long-term management and care of patients.

  9. Designing a national combined reporting form for adverse drug reactions and medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanti, A; Serracino-Inglott, A; Borg, J J

    2015-06-09

    The Maltese Medicines Authority was tasked with developing a reporting form that captures high-quality case information on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and medication errors in order to fulfil its public-health obligations set by the European Union (EU) legislation on pharmacovigilance. This paper describes the process of introducing the first combined ADR/medication error reporting form in the EU for health-care professionals, the analysis of reports generated by it and the promotion of the system. A review of existing ADR forms was carried out and recommendations from the European Medicines Agency and World Health Organization audits integrated. A new, combined ADR/medication error reporting form was developed and pilot tested based on case studies. The Authority's quality system (ISO 9001 certified) was redesigned and a promotion strategy was deployed. The process used in Malta can be useful for countries that need to develop systems relative to ADR/medication error reporting and to improve the quality of data capture within their systems.

  10. Medication Incidents Related to Automated Dose Dispensing in Community Pharmacies and Hospitals - A Reporting System Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; De Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Automated dose dispensing (ADD) is being introduced in several countries and the use of this technology is expected to increase as a growing number of elderly people need to manage their medication at home. ADD aims to improve medication safety and treatment adherence, but it may introduce new safety issues. This descriptive study provides insight into the nature and consequences of medication incidents related to ADD, as reported by healthcare professionals in community pharmacies and hospitals. Methods The medication incidents that were submitted to the Dutch Central Medication incidents Registration (CMR) reporting system were selected and characterized independently by two researchers. Main Outcome Measures Person discovering the incident, phase of the medication process in which the incident occurred, immediate cause of the incident, nature of incident from the healthcare provider's perspective, nature of incident from the patient's perspective, and consequent harm to the patient caused by the incident. Results From January 2012 to February 2013 the CMR received 15,113 incidents: 3,685 (24.4%) incidents from community pharmacies and 11,428 (75.6%) incidents from hospitals. Eventually 1 of 50 reported incidents (268/15,113 = 1.8%) were related to ADD; in community pharmacies more incidents (227/3,685 = 6.2%) were related to ADD than in hospitals (41/11,428 = 0.4%). The immediate cause of an incident was often a change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation. Most reported incidents occurred in two phases: entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag. Conclusion A proportion of incidents was related to ADD and is reported regularly, especially by community pharmacies. In two phases, entering the prescription into the pharmacy information system and filling the ADD bag, most incidents occurred. A change in the patient's medicine regimen or relocation was the immediate causes of an incident

  11. Competencies in premedical and medical education: the AAMC-HHMI report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Robert J; Belitsky, Richard; Long, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Flexner emphasized the importance of science in medicine and medical education. Over the subsequent years, science education in the premedical and medical curricula has changed little, in spite of the vast changes in the biomedical sciences. The National Research Council, in their report Bio 2010, noted that the premedical curriculum caused many students to lose interest in medicine and in the biological sciences in general. Many medical students and physicians have come to view the premedical curriculum as of limited relevance to medicine and designed more as a screening mechanism for medical school admission. To address this, the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute formed a committee to evaluate the premedical and medical school science curricula. The committee made a number of recommendations that are summarized in this essay. Most important were that competencies replace course requirements and that the physical sciences and mathematics be better integrated with the biological sciences and medicine. The goal is that all physicians possess a strong scientific knowledge base and come to appreciate the importance of this to the practice of medicine. While science education needs to evolve, Flexner's vision is as relevant today as it was 100 years ago.

  12. Spiritually Competent Practice with Individuals and Families Dealing with Medical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Len

    2011-01-01

    Counselors and psychotherapists are increasingly expected to provide services that are spiritually competent. Those counseling individuals and families where medical concerns are a focus would do well to consider the implications of spiritual competence in their work. The article defines spiritual competence, describes spiritual competencies, and…

  13. Effectiveness of Mindfulness- and Relaxation-Based eHealth Interventions for Patients with Medical Conditions: a Systematic Review and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasek, Michael; Berg, Jonas; Witt, Claudia M; Barth, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    This systematic review aims to summarize eHealth studies with mindfulness- and relaxation-based interventions for medical conditions and to determine whether eHealth interventions have positive effects on health. A comprehensive search of five databases was conducted for all available studies from 1990 to 2015. Studies were included if the intervention was mainly technology delivered and included a mindfulness- or relaxation-based intervention strategy and if patients with a medical condition were treated. Treatment effects were summarized for different outcomes. A total of 2383 records were identified, of which 17 studies with 1855 patients were included in this systematic review. These studies were conducted in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, cancer, chronic pain, surgery, and hypertension. All but one study were delivered online through a web-based platform; one study delivered the intervention with iPods. The studies indicate that mindfulness- and relaxation-based eHealth interventions can have positive effects on patients' general health and psychological well-being. No effects were found for stress or mindfulness. Only five studies reported economic analyses of eHealth interventions without any clear conclusion. There is some evidence that mindfulness- and relaxation-based eHealth interventions for medical conditions can have positive effects on health outcomes. Therefore, such interventions might be a useful addition to standard medical care. No app studies were retrieved, even though a vast number of smartphone apps exist which aim at increasing users' health. Therefore, more studies investigating those health apps are needed.

  14. Knowledge of adverse drug reaction reporting in first year postgraduate doctors in a medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadhyaya P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Prerna Upadhyaya,1 Vikas Seth,2 Vijay V Moghe,1 Monika Sharma,1 Mushtaq Ahmed11Department of Pharmacology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College, Sitapura, Jaipur, Rajasthan, 2Department of Pharmacology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Safedabad, Barabanki, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, IndiaIntroduction: Poor reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs by doctors is a major hindrance to successful pharmacovigilance. The present study was designed to assess first-year residents’ knowledge of ADR reporting.Methods: First-year postgraduate doctors at a private medical college completed a structured questionnaire. The responses were analyzed by nonparametric methods.Results: All doctors were aware of the term “adverse drug reactions.” Fifty percent of the doctors reported being taught about ADR reporting during their undergraduate teaching, and 50% had witnessed ADRs in their internship training. Ten percent of patients suffering an ADR observed and reported by doctors required prolonged hospitalization for treatment as a result. Only 40% of interns reported the ADRs that they observed, while 60% did not report them. Twenty-eight percent reported ADRs to the head of the department, 8% to an ADR monitoring committee, and 4% to the pharmacovigilance center. Eighty-six percent of the doctors surveyed felt that a good knowledge of undergraduate clinical pharmacology therapeutics would have improved the level of ADR reporting.Conclusion: The knowledge of first-year doctors regarding ADR reporting is quite poor. There is a dire need to incorporate ADR reporting into undergraduate teaching, and to reinforce this during internships and periodically thereafter.Keywords: ADR reporting, pharmacovigilance, first-year postgraduate doctors

  15. Neutralizing Antibody Response after Intramuscular Purified Vero Cell Rabies Vaccination (PVRV in Iranian Patients with Specific Medical Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooneh Rahimi

    Full Text Available Post exposure prophylaxis using one of the WHO-approved vaccines is the method of choice for preventing rabies. Abnormal immune function in patients with some specific medical conditions, such as pregnancy, chronic hepatitis B virus infection, different types of cancers like lymphoma, diabetes I and II, corticosteroid consumption by patients with rheumatoid arthritis and lupus erythematosus, could impair the immunologic response to various vaccines. The immune response to rabies vaccination has never been examined in patients with any of these described medical conditions. This study purposed to evaluate the neutralyzing antibody response after vaccination with purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV according to the WHO-recommended Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP "ESSEN" regimen.Thirty healthy volunteers and 50 volunteers with different medical conditions who were exposed to a suspected rabid animal in the 2nd or 3rd category of exposure received 5 doses of PVRV under the ESSEN protocol. Three blood samples were collected on days 0 (before the first dose, 14, and 35. The anti-rabies antibody titer was measured using the Rapid Fluorescent Foci Inhibition Test (RFFIT and an ELISA Bio-Rad, Platelia, Rabies II kit.All subjects reached NAb titers above 0.5 IU/ml by day 14 after vaccination. On day 35 (1 week after receiving the last rabies vaccine, anti-rabies antibodies were in the protective level (>0.5 IU/ml in both groups. There was no statistically significant difference in anti-rabies antibody response due to the type of exposure (category 2 or 3, and successful seroconversion was confirmed in both groups.In conclusion, the ESSEN protocol using the PVRV vaccine is sufficient for rabies prophylaxis in patients with specific medical conditions.

  16. Central Nervous System Functional Condition In Interns With Different Progress Levels At Military Medical Institution Of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Bochkarjova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of CNS functional condition and cognitive functions of interns with different progress levels at Military Medical School have been analyzed. According to the research results, the rate of excitement, noiseroof feature, functional mobility of nervous processes, development of verbal and logical thinking, verbal and operative memory as well as distribution and shifting of attention are the most important suppositions for successful military-professional training.

  17. The Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale: preliminary validation in cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona Louring;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the psychometric properties of the Danish version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (DMARS-4) adapted to measure adherence to analgesic regimen among cancer patients. METHODS: The validated English version of the Medication Adherence Report Scale was translated...... into Danish following the repeated back-translation procedure. Cancer patients for the study were recruited from specialized pain management facilities. Thirty-three patients responded to the DMARS-4, the Danish Barriers Questionnaire II, The Danish version of Patient Perceived Involvement in Care Scale...... measuring the quality of patient-physician pain communication, and the Danish Brief Pain Inventory pain severity scale. RESULTS: A factor analysis of the DMARS-4 resulted in one factor. Mean (SD) score on the cumulative scale ranging from 4 to 20, with higher scores indicating better medication adherence...

  18. Medication errors: an analysis comparing PHICO's closed claims data and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, David M; Pendrak, Robert F

    2003-07-01

    Clinical pharmacologists are all dedicated to improving the use of medications and decreasing medication errors and adverse drug reactions. However, quality improvement requires that some significant parameters of quality be categorized, measured, and tracked to provide benchmarks to which future data (performance) can be compared. One of the best ways to accumulate data on medication errors and adverse drug reactions is to look at medical malpractice data compiled by the insurance industry. Using data from PHICO insurance company, PHICO's Closed Claims Data, and PHICO's Event Reporting Trending System (PERTS), this article examines the significance and trends of the claims and events reported between 1996 and 1998. Those who misread history are doomed to repeat the mistakes of the past. From a quality improvement perspective, the categorization of the claims and events is useful for reengineering integrated medication delivery, particularly in a hospital setting, and for redesigning drug administration protocols on low therapeutic index medications and "high-risk" drugs. Demonstrable evidence of quality improvement is being required by state laws and by accreditation agencies. The state of Florida requires that quality improvement data be posted quarterly on the Web sites of the health care facilities. Other states have followed suit. The insurance industry is concerned with costs, and medication errors cost money. Even excluding costs of litigation, an adverse drug reaction may cost up to $2500 in hospital resources, and a preventable medication error may cost almost $4700. To monitor costs and assess risk, insurance companies want to know what errors are made and where the system has broken down, permitting the error to occur. Recording and evaluating reliable data on adverse drug events is the first step in improving the quality of pharmacotherapy and increasing patient safety. Cost savings and quality improvement evolve on parallel paths. The PHICO data

  19. Graduate Medical Education in the European Region. First Supplementary Report 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    Data on graduate medical education in Europe are tabulated in this report from the World Health Organization. The information was collected from a short questionnaire distributed in 1976 to countries of the European region using the English language, and in 1977 to those countries using French and Russian. The countries surveyed include: Algeria,…

  20. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 2, March 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    U.S. Military Health System, CY2004 Medical department 1. Excludes transfers and single day chemotherapy or radiation therapy ...bacter Giardia Salmonella cumulative numbers2 for calendar years through March 31, 2005 and 2006 Shigella Hepatitis B Varicella Sentinel reportable

  1. 78 FR 41069 - Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Reporting for Manufacturers; Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  2. Investigation of medical board reports of disability due to mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Yildiz

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: We think that this report might be helpful for regulations related to disabled people, and might guide adult psychiatric services for patients who present to medical boards for disability due to mental health problems. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 253-258

  3. Periocular necrotizing fasciitis associated with kerato-conjunctivitis and treated with medical management: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shome Debraj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 25-year-old systemically healthy male who presented with periocular necrotizing fasciitis (NF in the left eyelid. This was associated with the presence of immunologically mediated marginal kerato-conjunctivitis, in the same eye. This potentially dangerous lid infection and the associated ocular surface infection resolved successfully, with medical management. We report this case to highlight the successful conservative management of periocular NF and the hitherto unreported anterior segment involvement.

  4. [Preliminary Study on Error Control of Medical Devices Test Reports Based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhong; Xu, Honglei; Tu, Rong; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the common errors in medical devices test reports are classified and analyzed. And then the main 11 influence factors for these inspection report errors are summarized. The hierarchy model was also developed and verified by presentation data using MATLAB. The feasibility of comprehensive weights quantitative comparison has been analyzed by using the analytic hierarchy process. In the end, this paper porspects the further research direction.

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 8, October 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    including cattle, swine , and poultry. Meat , eggs, and the unpasteurized milk of in- fected animals are often contaminated. Out- breaks occur when widely...examination for ova and parasites. Salmonella , group D, were isolated from all nine specimens. A questionnaire was completed by 29 (36%) of the 81 cases...Officer, 520th Theater Army Medical Lab (TAML). Report from the field Continued on page 10 Average Reported Cases of Salmonella and Shigella May 1994

  6. 14 CFR 61.29 - Replacement of a lost or destroyed airman or medical certificate or knowledge test report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... destroyed airman certificate, medical certificate, or knowledge test report must state: (1) The name of the... or medical certificate or knowledge test report. 61.29 Section 61.29 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... certificate or knowledge test report. (a) A request for the replacement of a lost or destroyed...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1519n - Informing the medical source of examination scheduling, report content, and signature requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... scheduling, report content, and signature requirements. 404.1519n Section 404.1519n Employees' Benefits... medical source of examination scheduling, report content, and signature requirements. The medical sources... report containing all of the elements in paragraph (c). (e) Signature requirements. All...

  8. The analysis of present condition and the method of medical treatment studies on Scolopendrid Herbal Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim sung-chul

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : We review a result of studies until the present and suggest the method of medical treatment for the clinical treatment of Scolopendrid Herbalacupuncture. Methods : We analysis the paper of the bibliographic studies, the experiment studies and the clinical studies from 2001 developed Scolopendrid Herbalacupuncture and grope for the course of studies. Results : 1. Scolopendrid Herbalacupuncture is proved the clinical safety by the aninmal and human tests. 2. The pharmacological action of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans L. Koch is anti-convulsive action, analgesic action, lowering blood pressure, anti-inflammatory action, anti-tumor action and microbe inhibition 3. Scolopendrid Herbalacupuncture has been a fine effect to the entrapment neuropathy and inflammatory. 4. Scolopendrid Herbalacupuncture was thought effective on a acute phase and to the excessive symptoms. The Sub-chronic toxicity experiment observing the response after hypodermic medication over 90 days, The Genetic-mutagenic toxity experiment and the clinical effect studies are necessary.

  9. Gestational Medication Use, Birth Conditions, and Early Postnatal Exposures for Childhood Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Ching Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to explore (1 whether gestational medication use, mode of delivery, and early postnatal exposure correlate with childhood asthma, (2 the dose responsiveness of such exposure, and (3 their links to early- and late-onset asthma. We conducted a matched case-control study based on the Taiwan Children Health Study, which was a nationwide survey that recruited 12-to-14-year-old school children in 14 communities. 579 mothers of the participants were interviewed by telephone. Exclusive breastfeeding protected children from asthma. Notably, childhood asthma was significantly associated with maternal medication use during pregnancy, vacuum use during vaginal delivery, recurrent respiratory tract infections, hospitalization, main caregiver cared for other children, and early daycare attendance. Exposure to these factors led to dose responsiveness in relationships to asthma. Most of the exposures revealed a greater impact on early-onset asthma, except for vacuum use and daycare attendance.

  10. Self-reported halitosis and emotional state: impact on oral conditions and treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trimarchi Giuseppe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halitosis represents a common dental condition, although sufferers are often not conscious of it. The aim of this study was to examine behavior in a sample of Italian subjects with reference to self-reported halitosis and emotional state, and specifically the presence of dental anxiety. Methods The study was performed on Italian subjects (N = 1052; range 15-65 years. A self-report questionnaire was used to detect self-reported halitosis and other variables possibly linked to it (sociodemographic data, medical and dental history, oral hygiene, and others, and a dental anxiety scale (DAS divided into two subscales that explore a patient's dental anxiety and dental anxiety concerning dentist-patient relations. Associations between self-reported halitosis and the abovementioned variables were examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Correlations between the two groups, with self-perceived halitosis and without, were also investigated with dental anxiety and with the importance attributed to one's own mouth and that of others. Results The rate of self-reported halitosis was 19.39%. The factors linked with halitosis were: anxiety regarding dentist patient relations (relational dental anxiety (OR = 1.04, CI = 1.01-1.07, alcohol consumption (OR = 0.47, CI = 0.34-0.66, gum diseases (OR = 0.39, CI = 0.27-0.55, age > 30 years (OR = 1.01, CI = 1.00-1.02, female gender (OR = 0.71, CI = 0.51-0.98, poor oral hygiene (OR = 0.65, CI = 0.43-0.98, general anxiety (OR = 0.66, CI = 0.49-0.90, and urinary system pathologies (OR = 0.46, CI = 0.30-0.70. Other findings emerged concerning average differences between subjects with or without self-perceived halitosis, dental anxiety and the importance attributed to one's own mouth and that of others. Conclusions Halitosis requires professional care not only by dentists, but also psychological support as it is a problem that leads to avoidance behaviors and thereby limits relationships. It

  11. Patient-reported safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions: a large cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Blakeman, Thomas; Hann, Mark; Bower, Peter

    2017-05-30

    Increasing evidence suggests that patient safety is a serious concern for older patients with long-term conditions. Despite this, there is a lack of research on safety incidents encountered by this patient group. In this study, we sought to examine patient reports of safety incidents and factors associated with reports of safety incidents in older patients with long-term conditions. The baseline cross-sectional data from a longitudinal cohort study were analysed. Older patients (n=3378 aged 65 years and over) with a long-term condition registered in general practices were included in the study. The main outcome was patient-reported safety incidents including availability and appropriateness of medical tests and prescription of wrong types or doses of medication. Binary univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to examine factors associated with patient-reported safety incidents. Safety incidents were reported by 11% of the patients. Four factors were significantly associated with patient-reported safety incidents in multivariate analyses. The experience of multiple long-term conditions (OR=1.09, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.13), a probable diagnosis of depression (OR=1.36, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.74) and greater relational continuity of care (OR=1.28, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.52) were associated with increased odds for patient-reported safety incidents. Perceived greater support and involvement in self-management was associated with lower odds for patient-reported safety incidents (OR=0.95, 95% CI 0.93 to 0.97). We found that older patients with multimorbidity and depression are more likely to report experiences of patient safety incidents. Improving perceived support and involvement of patients in their care may help prevent patient-reported safety incidents. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Practice Guidelines Resources Continuing Education Funding Training & Career Development Division of Intramural Research Research Resources Scientific Reports Technology Transfer What are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites Press ...

  13. Soft Tissue Infection Caused by Rapid Growing Mycobacterium following Medical Procedures: Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Jang, Tsrang-Neng

    2014-01-01

    Non-tubecrulosis mycobacterium infections were increasingly reported either pulmonary or extrapulmonary in the past decades. In Taiwan, we noticed several reports about the soft tissue infections caused by rapid growing mycobacterium such as Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, on newspaper, magazines, or the multimedia. Most of them occurred after a plastic surgery, and medical or non-medical procedures. Here, we reported two cases of these infections following medical procedures...

  14. "If"-Conditionals in Medical Discourse: From Theory to Disciplinary Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Thomas, Shirley; Rowley-Jolivet, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    "If"-conditionals are a highly valuable resource in academic discourses, whether spoken or written, as they can be used to hypothesize, hedge, manage interaction with the addressee, and promote or on the contrary circumscribe the scope of research claims. This article analyses how "if"-conditionals are brought into play in three genres of medical…

  15. Reporting quality of survival analyses in medical journals still needs improvement. A minimal requirements proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraira, Víctor; Muriel, Alfonso; Emparanza, José I; Pijoan, José I; Royuela, Ana; Plana, María Nieves; Cano, Alejandra; Urreta, Iratxe; Zamora, Javier

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed publications with two main objectives: to describe how survival analyses are reported across medical journal specialties and to evaluate changes in reporting across periods and journal specialties. Systematic review of clinical research articles published in 1991 and 2007, in 13 high-impact medical journals. The number of articles performing survival analysis published in 1991 (104) and 2007 (240) doubled (17% vs. 33.5%; P = 0.000), although not uniformly across specialties. The percentage of studies using regression models and the number of patients included also increased. The presentation of results improved, although only the reporting of precision of effect estimates reached satisfactory levels (53.1% in 1991 vs. 94.2% in 2007; P = 0.000). Quality of reporting also varied across specialties; for example, cardiology articles were less likely than oncology ones to discuss sample size estimation (odds ratio = 0.12; 95% confidence interval: 0.05, 0.30). We also detected an interaction effect between period and specialty regarding the likelihood of reporting precision of curves and precision of effect estimates. The application of survival analysis to medical research data is increasing, whereas improvement in reporting quality is slow. We propose a list of minimum requirements for improved application and description of survival analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ERT Conditions for Productive Learning in Networked Learning Environments: Leadership Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    This report provides a concluding account of the activities within the European Research Team: Conditions for Productive Learning in Networked Learning Environmentments......This report provides a concluding account of the activities within the European Research Team: Conditions for Productive Learning in Networked Learning Environmentments...

  17. Screening and brief intervention for unhealthy substance use in patients with chronic medical conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timko, Christine; Kong, Calvin; Vittorio, Lisa; Cucciare, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    This systematic review describes studies evaluating screening tools and brief interventions for addressing unhealthy substance use in primary care patients with hypertension, diabetes or depression. Primary care is the main entry point to the health care system for most patients with comorbid unhealthy substance use and chronic medical conditions. Although of great public health importance, systematic reviews of screening tools and brief interventions for unhealthy substance use in this population that are also feasible for use in primary care have not been conducted. Systematic review. We systematically review the research literature on evidence-based tools for screening for unhealthy substance use in primary care patients with depression, diabetes and hypertension, and utilising brief interventions with this population. Despite recommendations to screen for and intervene with unhealthy substance use in primary care patients with chronic medical conditions, the review found little indication of routine use of these practices. Limited evidence suggested the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C screeners had adequate psychometric characteristics in patients with the selected chronic medical conditions. Screening scores indicating more severe alcohol use were associated with health-risk behaviours and poorer health outcomes, adding to the potential usefulness of screening for unhealthy alcohol use in this population. Studies support brief interventions' effectiveness with patients treated for hypertension or depression who hazardously use alcohol or cannabis, for both substance use and chronic medical condition outcomes. Although small, the international evidence base suggests that screening with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test or Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-C and brief interventions for primary care patients with chronic medical conditions, delivered by nurses or other providers, are

  18. Outcomes of older persons receiving rehabilitation for medical and surgical conditions compared with hip fracture and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M F; Kramer, A M; Lin, M K; Kowalsky, J C; Steiner, J F

    2000-11-01

    Older persons with general medical and surgical conditions increasingly receive posthospital rehabilitation care in nursing homes and rehabilitation hospitals. This study describes the characteristics of such patients, contrasted with patients with traditional rehabilitation diagnoses of hip fracture and stroke. Prospective cohort study. Seventeen skilled nursing facilities and six rehabilitation hospitals in seven states. Medicare patients age 65 or older receiving posthospital rehabilitation. A total of 290 medical/surgical patients were compared with 336 hip fracture and 429 stroke patients. Data were collected prospectively from charts, nursing assessments, and patient interviews. Patient characteristics associated with functional recovery and mortality were estimated using multivariate regression. Medical/surgical patients had greater premorbid activities of daily living (ADL) (P < .001) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) (P < .01) disability, but suffered less decline with the acute event than hip fracture or stroke patients (P < .001). Medical/surgical patients were more likely to recover premorbid ADL function (P < .05) but 1-year mortality was significantly greater (30% vs. 14% hip fracture; 18% stroke; P < .001). Predictors of functional recovery and mortality differed between the three groups. Among medical/surgical patients, premorbid ADL difficulty, cognitive impairment, a pressure ulcer at rehabilitation admission, and depression were associated with failure to recover premorbid function whereas increasing comorbidity and incontinence were associated with mortality. Medical/surgical patients represent a unique rehabilitation population. They experienced greater premorbid functional disability, less acute decline, but greater mortality than patients with traditional rehabilitation diagnoses. Further study of this distinct rehabilitation population may help identify patients most likely to benefit from rehabilitation.

  19. Medication Errors in Hospitals: A Study of Factors Affecting Nursing Reporting in a Selected Center Affiliated with Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HamidReza Mirzaee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication errors are mentioned as the most common important challenges threatening healthcare system in all countries worldwide. This study is conducted to investigate the most significant factors in refusal to report medication errors among nursing staff.Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted on all nursing staff of a selected Education& Treatment Center in 2013. Data was collected through a teacher made questionnaire. The questionnaires’ face and content validity was confirmed by experts and for measuring its reliability test-retest was used. Data was analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics. 16th  version of SPSS was also used for related statistics.Results: The most important factors in refusal to report medication errors respectively are: lack of reporting system in the hospital(3.3%, non-significance of reporting medication errors to hospital authorities and lack of appropriate feedback(3.1%, and lack of a clear definition for a medication error (3%. there was a significant relationship between the most important factors of refusal to report medication errors and work shift (p:0.002, age(p:0.003, gender(p:0.005, work experience(p<0.001 and employment type of nurses(p:0.002.Conclusion: Factors pertaining to management in hospitals as well as the fear of the consequences of reporting are two broad fields among the factors that make nurses not report their medication errors. In this regard, providing enough education to nurses, boosting the job security for nurses, management support and revising related processes and definitions are some factors that can help decreasing medication errors and increasing their report in case of occurrence.

  20. Impact of poverty, not seeking medical care, unemployment, inflation, self-reported illness, and health insurance on mortality in Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Andrew Bourne

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: An extensive review of the literature revealed that no study exists that has examined poverty, not seeking medical care, inflation, self-reported illness, and mortality in Jamaica. The current study will bridge the gap by providing an investigation of poverty; not seeking medical care; illness; health insurance coverage; inflation and mortality in Jamaica. Materials and Method: Using two decades (1988-2007, the current study used three sets of secondary data published by the (1 Planning Institute of Jamaica and the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (2 the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (Demographic Statistics and (3 the Bank of Jamaica (Economic Report. Scatter diagrams were used to examine correlations between the particular dependent and independent variables. For the current study, a number of hypotheses were tested to provide explanation morality in Jamaica. Results: The average percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care over the last 2 decades was 41.9%; and the figure has been steadily declining over the last 5 years. In 1990, the most Jamaicans who did not seek medical care were 61.4% and this fell to 52.3% in 1991; 49.1% in 1992 and 48.2% the proceeding year. Based on the percentages, in the early 1990s (1990-1994, the percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care was close to 50% and in the latter part of the decade, the figure was in the region of 30% and the low as 31.6% in 1999. In 2006, the percent of Jamaicans not seeking medical care despite being ill was 30% and this increased by 4% the following year. Concomitantly, poverty fell by 3.1 times over the 2 decades to 9.9% in 2007, while inflation increased by 1.9 times, self-reported illness was 15.5% in 2007 with mortality averaging 15,776 year of the 2 decades. There is a significant statistical correlation between not seeking medical-care and prevalence of poverty (r = 0.759, p< 0.05. There is a statistical correlation between

  1. Guide to Geriatric Syndromes: Common and Often Related Medical Conditions in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... There are many treatments, such as exercise and physical therapy, that can help improve your gait and walking and prevent falls. Osteoporosis Osteoporosis, or “thinning bones,” is a condition that ...

  2. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis in patients without predisposing medical conditions: a review of the literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elinav, H; Zimhony, O; Cohen, M. J; Marcovich, A. L; Benenson, S

    2009-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect15: 693-697 Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is a rare disease, affecting almost exclusively patients with known predisposing conditions such as diabetes mellitus, immunocompromised status, haemochromatosis or major trauma...

  3. [Pressure ulcer care quality indicator: analysis of medical records and incident report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Cássia Teixeira; Oliveira, Magáli Costa; Pereira, Ana Gabriela da Silva; Suzuki, Lyliam Midori; Lucena, Amália de Fátima

    2013-03-01

    Cross-sectional study that aimed to compare the data reported in a system for the indication of pressure ulcer (PU) care quality, with the nursing evolution data available in the patients' medical records, and to describe the clinical profile and nursing diagnosis of those who developed PU grade 2 or higher Sample consisted of 188 patients at risk for PU in clinical and surgical units. Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and a computerized system of care indicators and statistically analyzed. Of the 188 patients, 6 (3%) were reported for pressure ulcers grade 2 or higher; however, only 19 (10%) were recorded in the nursing evolution records, thus revealing the underreporting of data. Most patients were women, older adults and patients with cerebrovascular diseases. The most frequent nursing diagnosis was risk of infection. The use of two or more research methodologies such as incident reporting data and retrospective review of patients' records makes the results trustworthy.

  4. Self-reported marijuana effects and characteristics of 100 San Francisco medical marijuana club members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D; Jones, R T; Shank, R; Nath, R; Fernandez, E; Goldstein, K; Mendelson, J

    2000-01-01

    In order to assess the relationships between medical marijuana users' reasons for use, side effects, and drug use patterns, 100 participants were recruited from the San Francisco Cannabis Cultivator's Club. Users, averaging 14 years pre-illness use, perceived marijuana to be more effective than other treatments and to have less severe side effects. Urine drug assays showed recent use of other drugs, particularly stimulants. History of substance abuse or dependence and other psychiatric disorders was common. Those with greater past dependence on other drugs thought marijuana to be more effective but also reported worse side effects and quality of life. Quality of life was associated more with marijuana side effects rating than effectiveness. Patients reported potentially serious marijuana side effects on some questionnaires but not others. Inconsistencies in reporting made interpretation of results difficult. Physician supervision of medical marijuana use would allow more effective monitoring of therapeutic and unwanted effects, some unrecognized by patients.

  5. Why mistreatment of medical students is not reported in clinical settings: perspectives of trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Vafadar, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Mistreatment of medical students is a major source of stress for them. Studies indicate a high incidence of such mistreatment, especially in clinical settings. In most cases, students who have been mistreated do not report it to the authorities. This study investigated factors related to the failure to report mistreatment. This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Kerman Medical School, Iran. All students in the internship and clerkship stages, as well as residents, were selected through the census method. Experiences of mistreatment and the reasons for not reporting them were evaluated using a questionnaire. The data were analysed with SPSS 19. Ninety-three per cent of the participants experienced mistreatment, but less than half of them reported it. Residents and interns reported emotional and academic mistreatment, respectively, more than other groups. The most common reason for not reporting mistreatment was that the students did not think reporting would accomplish anything. Our study showed that the experience of mistreatment in the clinical setting is common, but the cases reported to the authorities are far fewer than the actual number of cases. Educational systems should make extensive efforts to detect and prevent mistreatment to improve the teaching-learning environment.

  6. American Academy of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology membership experience with venom immunotherapy in chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Christopher W; Hauswirth, David W; Rank, Matthew; Sher, Lawrence; Larenas-Linnemann, Desiree

    2017-03-01

    Few data exist regarding the use of venom immunotherapy (VIT) in specific high-risk chronic medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. A Web-based survey was sent to American Academy of Asthma Allergy & Immunology members to explore their VIT experience in potential high-risk medical conditions and pregnancy, and in young children. Major problems were defined as "activation of underlying disease and/or VIT not well tolerated (systemic adverse events) and/or VIT discontinued for medical reasons." Results were expressed descriptively. A total of 697 of 5123 surveys (14%) were completed: 87% of the respondents were based in the United States, and 28% worked in an academic setting. Most respondents (71%) believed that pregnancy was a contraindication for starting VIT. Most were comfortable continuing VIT (51%) if the woman became pregnant after starting therapy. Of the allergists who treated children, many would give VIT down to age 5 years (42%) or younger, ages 1-4 years (35%). The following list is of the specific medical condition, the number of allergists who used VIT in patients with this condition, and the percentage who reported major problems: severe asthma, 212 (4.2%); hypertension, 287 (1.1%); coronary artery disease, 222 (3.6%); arrhythmias, 136 (3.4%); cerebrovascular disease, 104 (5.1%); cancer in remission, 166 (0%); cancer stable but still under treatment, 44 (7.2%); a history of bone marrow transplantation, 15 (4.9%); a history of solid organ transplantation, 29 (3.6%); human immunodeficiency virus, 53 (1.4%); acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, 24 (6.2%); stable autoimmune disease, 164 (2.8%); mastocytosis, 66 (18.4%); elevated serum tryptase, 101 (10.8%); immunodeficiency 59 (2.5%). Many allergists were comfortable using VIT in young children and continuing but not starting pregnant women on VIT. VIT was commonly used in patients with hypertension, coronary artery disease, arrhythmias, cancer in remission, and stable autoimmune disease

  7. [Investigation of actual condition of management and disposal of medical radioactive waste in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Horiuchi, Shoji; Imoto, Atsushi

    2009-07-20

    In order to realize the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste like DIS or its clearance as performed in Europe, North America, and Japan, we investigated the situation of medical radioactive waste in Korea and its enforcement. We visited three major Korean facilities in May 2008 and confirmed details of the procedure being used by administering a questionnaire after our visit. From the results, we were able to verify that the governmental agency had established regulations for the clearance of radioactive waste as self-disposal based on the clearance level of IAEA in Korea and that the medical facilities performed suitable management and disposal of radioactive waste based on the regulations and superintendence of a radiation safety officer. The type of nuclear medicine was almost the same as that in Japan, and the half-life of all radiopharmaceuticals was 60 days or less. While performing regulatory adjustment concerning the rational management and disposal of radioactive waste in Korea for reference also in this country, it is important to provide an enforcement procedure with quality assurance in the regulations.

  8. Associations between Medical Conditions and Breast Cancer Risk in Asians: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chun Chuang

    Full Text Available The breast cancer incidence in Asia is rising. To explore whether the etiology of breast cancer is different from the known risk factors from studies in Western countries, we conducted a nested case-control study using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD.All medical conditions based on the first three digits of the ICD-9 and a list of medical conditions based on literature review were retrieved for each case and control. The odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI of the associations between medical conditions and breast cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression and adjusted for occupation, number of breast cancer screening, and the average number of outpatient visits prior the diagnosis. The associations were also estimated for younger (<50 years old and older subjects separately.The analyses included 4,884 breast cancer cases and 19,536 age-matched controls. Prior breast diseases (OR, 95% CI: 2.47, 2.26-2.71, obesity (1.43, 1.04-1.96, endometriosis (1.44, 1.15-1.80, uterine leiomyoma (1.20, 1.03-1.40, hypertensive diseases (1.14, 1.05-1.25, and disorders in lipid metabolism (1.13, 1.04-1.24 were associated with increased breast cancer risk. No heterogeneity was observed between age groups (<50 and ≥50 years old.In addition to benign breast diseases, obesity, endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, hypertensive diseases, and disorders of lipid metabolism were associated with a subsequent breast cancer risk.Our results suggest that estrogen related factors may play an important role in breast cancer risks in the Taiwanese female population.

  9. Mutual Recognition of the Food and Drug Administration and European Community Member State Conformity Assessment Procedures; pharmaceutical GMP inspection reports, medical device quality system evaluation reports, and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports--FDA. Proposed rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations pursuant to an international agreement that is expected to be concluded between the United States and the European Community (EC) (Ref. 1). Under the terms of that agreement, FDA may normally endorse good manufacturing practice (GMP) inspection reports for pharmaceuticals provided by equivalent EC Member State regulatory authorities and medical device quality system evaluation reports and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports provided by equivalent conformity assessment bodies. FDA is taking this action to enhance its ability to ensure the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals and medical devices through more efficient and effective utilization of its regulatory resources. The agency is requesting comments on the proposed rule.

  10. Childhood chronic physical condition, self-reported health, and life satisfaction in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttä, Heidi; Hurtig, Tuula; Taanila, Anja; Honkanen, Meri; Ebeling, Hanna; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigates the prevalence and type of chronic conditions at 7 years of age-with special reference to atopic conditions-and their longitudinal associations with self-reported health and life satisfaction in adolescence. The data were obtained from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (NFBC 1986), which is a longitudinal 1-year birth cohort from an unselected, regionally defined population (n = 9,432). The present study investigated a sample of 8,036 children with data of chronic conditions at 7 years of age and a sample of 6,680 children with data of chronic conditions at 16 years of age. According to parents' report the prevalence of CC at 7 years of age was 14.8 % among boys and 13.2 % among girls, these figures being at 16 years of age 20.7 and 19.4 %, respectively. Atopic conditions were the most common chronic conditions at 7 years of age (12.7 % vs. other chronic conditions 4.7 %). Childhood chronic condition was associated with subsequent self-reported health in adolescence, but not with subsequent self-reported life satisfaction. Chronic condition at 7 years of age increased the risk of reporting health as "poor" even if the chronic condition was no longer prevalent at 16 years of age. Atopic conditions seemed to be linked with self-reported poor/moderate health more often than other chronic conditions among girls. Conclusion Childhood chronic conditions seem to affect adolescent's subjective health, but fortunately, they do not affect adolescents' subjective well-being to such an extent that it could lower their life satisfaction.

  11. Self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Marc O; Finan, Patrick H; Dolman, Andrew J; Subramanian, Subu; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Jamison, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the association between self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain. The potential moderators of the association between reports of side effects and pain-related activity interference were also examined. A total of 111 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain were asked to provide, once a month for a period of 6 months, self-reports of medication use and the presence of any perceived side effects (eg, nausea, dizziness, headaches) associated with their medications. At each of these time points, patients were also asked to provide self-reports of pain intensity, negative affect, and pain-related activity interference. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that month-to-month increases in perceived medication side effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference (P effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference even after controlling for the influence of patient demographics, pain intensity, and negative affect. This study provides preliminary evidence that reports of medication side effects are associated with heightened pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain beyond the influence of other pain-relevant variables. The implications of our findings for clinical practice and the management of patients with chronic pain conditions are discussed.

  12. Responsiveness in Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Are Influences Conditional? Does the Reporter Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschneider, Karen; Pallock, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines conditional and reporter effects of parental responsiveness using survey data from White 8th to 12th graders (N = 440) and their parents (N = 511). Adolescent reports of maternal and paternal responsiveness predicted higher GPAs, fewer delinquent behaviors, and less internal distress. Mothers' and fathers' reports of…

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 23, Number 2, February 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    provides insight into possible surveil- lance artifacts and can help pinpoint areas for improvement. Th e notable drop in lab- oratory testing volume...Excludes individuals medically evacuated from CENTCOM and/or hospitalized in Landstuhl, Germany, within 10 days prior to death. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Ja nu...f h os pi ta liz at io ns Motorcycle accident-related hospitalizations Other MVA-related hospitalizations Deployment-related Conditions of Special

  14. THE RESPONSIBILITY OF PHYSICIAN TO PREPARE A FORENSIC AND MEDICAL REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet TOYGAR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Physicians have responsibilities to prepare forensic and expertise reports besides their role in treatment, diagnosis and preventive medicine. A physician who engaged in treatment should have sufficient knowledge and experience to prepare the requested forensic or medical expertise reports. These expertise reports are usually requested either by criminal law or civil law courts, besides, calculation of the physical disabilities should be demanded at the basis of Armed Forces Pension Fund (OYAK Law and monetary compensation. New Turkish Penal Code highlights the new implementations about severity of injuries caused by trauma. According to the interpretation of Military Supreme Court, the severity of injuries caused by trauma in Military Penal Code is evaluated under the light of Turkish Penal Code. Determination of the rate of disabilities in general body functions and loss of daily activity have been often requested for reports concerning the civil law. Different legislations have been used for reports at the basis of monetary compensation. The purpose of this study is to scrutinize the problems encountered while preparing forensic and medical expertise reports and implementing the relevant and appropriate legal procedure and to emphasize the important points to be considered during the preparation of these expertise reports. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(6.000: 466-475

  15. [Basic study to establish medication safety culture with patient-commitment style in community pharmacy: An examination from meeting reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, Mitsuko; Okuda, Noriko; Kosaka, Naohiro; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Matsuura, Masayoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Yamada, Rika

    2007-12-01

    Our group conducted a Medication Safety Culture Building Drive, enlisting the cooperation of pharmacy patients to clarify obstacles and verify the effect of the measures implemented. Pharmacists at 38 community pharmacies instituted a 3-month trial period of rigorous prescription confirmation by checking filled prescriptions against the accompanying drug information (DI) in the presence of patients at pharmacy counters, whenever prescription drugs were dispensed. During the first month, 29 pharmacies reported carrying out the program with the rate of patient coverage was over 50%; while 8 others reported that rate of patient coverage was less than 50%. Factors standing in the way of checking filled prescriptions with the patients could be characterized as "physical conditions," "prescription content," or "patient attributes." The measures devised to counter these obstacles all fell within the categories of "education of patients and pharmacists," "advance arrangements made in preparation for checking," "methods of checking and nature of items checked," "checking procedure," and "DI literature." After three month, 34 pharmacies reported that the effort had been effective. During the three months, the average implementation rate (patient coverage rate) was improved from 92.5% in April to 96.5% in June (ppatients' and pharmacists' awareness regarding dispensing error prevention, 2) Increase in patients' interest in, and understanding of, their own prescription medications, 3) Increase in patients' understanding about the efforts and in number of patients cooperating with the effort.

  16. Patients' confidence in methods of blood pressure assessment and their reported adherence to antihypertensive medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Paul; Zeng, Jennifer; Tuttle, Laura; Viera, Anthony J

    2017-10-01

    Adherence to antihypertensive medications is often less than optimal. Research suggests that patients have limited confidence regarding whether office blood pressure (BP) assessments represent their 'true' BP, which may further promote poor adherence to BP-lowering medication. We assessed peoples' confidence in the methods of BP assessment and examined the associations between patients' confidence levels and medication adherence comparing office and home BP-monitoring techniques. We surveyed US adults aged 30 years or older (N=1010), all of whom had undergone an office BP measurement within the past 6 months. Respondents who indicated being prescribed antihypertensive medication (N=429) were asked to indicate their level of confidence on a 1-9 scale that BP measurements represented their true BP, and their adherence to antihypertensive medication using the eight-item Morisky Medical Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Respondents had equal confidence that both office BP measurements and home monitoring measurements reflected their true BP (median=7). Respondents indicated that they would have slightly more confidence in ambulatory BP monitoring (median=8). As respondents' confidence in the assessments of BP from office measurements and home monitoring increased from 1 to 9, the mean MMAS-8 score, adjusted for age, race, and education, increased from 5.38 to 6.25 (P=0.053) and from 5.50 to 6.14 (P=0.25), respectively. As patients' confidence in a BP assessment method increases, so too does their reported adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medications. This finding further supports the incorporation of methods in which patients can feel confident that the measurements are representative of their 'true' BP.

  17. 42 CFR 416.47 - Condition for coverage-Medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 416.47 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416...-operative diagnostic studies (entered before surgery), if performed. (4) Findings and techniques of...

  18. Conditions for successful reflective use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Erik W.; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Overeem, Karlijn; Vermunt, Jan D.; Van Der Vleuten, C. P M

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Portfolios are often used as an instrument with which to stimulate students to reflect on their experiences. Research has shown that working with portfolios does not automatically stimulate reflection. In this study we addressed the question: What are the conditions for successful reflective us

  19. A six year review of hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions at the Federal Medical Centre, Owerri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duke A. Onyeabochukwu

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions is relatively common and safe in our centre, but there is need for improvement on the high post-operative morbidity rate. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(2.000: 352-356

  20. Report on the American Association of Medical Physics Undergraduate Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer B; Avery, Stephen; Gueye, Paul; Sandison, George A

    2013-01-07

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) sponsors two summer undergraduate research programs to attract top performing undergraduate students into graduate studies in medical physics: the Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program (SUFP) and the Minority Undergraduate Summer Experience (MUSE). Undergraduate research experience (URE) is an effective tool to encourage students to pursue graduate degrees. The SUFP and MUSE are the only medical physics URE programs. From 2001 to 2012, 148 fellowships have been awarded and a total of $608,000 has been dispersed to fellows. This paper reports on the history, participation, and status of the programs. A review of surveys of past fellows is presented. Overall, the fellows and mentors are very satisfied with the program. The efficacy of the programs is assessed by four metrics: entry into a medical physics graduate program, board certification, publications, and AAPM involvement. Sixty-five percent of past fellow respondents decided to pursue a graduate degree in medical physics as a result of their participation in the program. Seventy percent of respondents are currently involved in some educational or professional aspect of medical physics. Suggestions for future enhancements to better track and maintain contact with past fellows, expand funding sources, and potentially combine the programs are presented.

  1. Survey of ethical issues reported by Indian medical students: basis for design of a new curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anuradha; George, Kuryan; T, Arul Dhas; Pulimood, Anna Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Education in ethics is now a formal part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. However, most courses are structured around principles and case studies more appropriate to western countries. The cultures and practices of countries like India differ from those of western countries. It is, therefore, essential that our teaching should address the issues which are the most relevant to our setting. An anonymised, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey of medical students was carried out to get a picture of the ethical problems faced by students in India. The data were categorised into issues related to professional behaviour and ethical dilemmas. Unprofessional behaviour was among the issues reported as a matter of concern by a majority of the medical students. The survey highlights the need to design the curriculum in a way that reflects the structure of medical education in India, where patients are not always considered socio-culturally equal by students or the medical staff. This perspective must underpin any further efforts to address education in ethics in India.

  2. Parent report and electronic medical record agreement on asthma education provided and children's tobacco smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Kathleen F; Haven, Kristen M; Nuño, Velia Leybas; Magruder, Theresa; Bailey, William C; Gerald, Lynn B

    2013-11-01

    To examine the concordance between parent report and electronic medical record documentation of asthma health education provided during a single clinic visit and second-hand tobacco smoke exposure among children with asthma. Parents of children with asthma were recruited from two types of clinics using different electronic medical record systems: asthma-specialty or general pediatric health department clinics. After their child's outpatient visit, parents were interviewed by trained study staff. Interview data were compared to electronic medical records for agreement in five categories of asthma health education and for the child's environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Kappa statistics were used to identify strength of agreement. Chi square and t-tests were used to examine differences between clinic types. Of 255 parents participating in the study 90.6% were African American and 96.1% were female. Agreement was poor across all clinics but was higher within the asthma specialty clinics than the health department clinics for smoke exposure (κ = 0.410 versus 0.205), asthma diagnosis/disease process (κ = 0.213 versus -0.016) and devices reviewed (κ = 0.253 versus -0.089) with parents generally reporting more education provided. For the 203 children with complete medical records, 40.5% did not have any documentation regarding smoking exposure in the home and 85.2% did not have any documentation regarding exposure elsewhere. We found low concordance between the parent's report and the electronic medical record for smoke exposure and asthma education provided. Un- or under-documented smoke exposure and health education have the potential to affect continuity of care for pediatric patients with asthma.

  3. Self-reported health status of students in-processing into military medical advanced individual training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Valerie J Berg; Mays, Mary Z; Gable, Clayton

    2009-01-01

    It is important to be aware of the health and injury status of students in military training settings in order to adequately plan for their progression through required physical training and provision of health care to meet their needs. This paper describes the self-reported health status of students arriving in two medical training Battalions at Ft. Sam Houston. The results revealed that 43% of arriving soldiers had musculoskeletal symptoms and 35% had symptoms that interfered with their ability to accomplish the normal daily activities required as students. The most common sites of symptoms were knee (17 and 18%), foot/toe (16 and 13%), ankle (9 and 10%), and lower leg (9 and 12%) for the 232nd and 187th Medical Battalions respectively. Risk factors for those with musculoskeletal injury (MSI) symptoms that interfere with their abilities to do their jobs include gender, past history of injury, and self-reported stress and fitness levels. Other risk factors for medical specialties other than combat medic include being older (over 24 yrs of age), active duty status, being overweight, and use of smokeless tobacco. This information can help identify soldiers considered at risk of incurring a MSI during AIT. With this knowledge, physical training can be designed to help soldiers achieve fitness without additional injury and health care facilities can be designed to provide appropriate staffing of the health care professionals needed for evaluation and treatment.

  4. Text mining for the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System: medical text classification using informative feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsis, Taxiarchis; Nguyen, Michael D; Woo, Emily Jane; Markatou, Marianthi; Ball, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) collects spontaneous reports of adverse events following vaccination. Medical officers review the reports and often apply standardized case definitions, such as those developed by the Brighton Collaboration. Our objective was to demonstrate a multi-level text mining approach for automated text classification of VAERS reports that could potentially reduce human workload. We selected 6034 VAERS reports for H1N1 vaccine that were classified by medical officers as potentially positive (N(pos)=237) or negative for anaphylaxis. We created a categorized corpus of text files that included the class label and the symptom text field of each report. A validation set of 1100 labeled text files was also used. Text mining techniques were applied to extract three feature sets for important keywords, low- and high-level patterns. A rule-based classifier processed the high-level feature representation, while several machine learning classifiers were trained for the remaining two feature representations. Classifiers' performance was evaluated by macro-averaging recall, precision, and F-measure, and Friedman's test; misclassification error rate analysis was also performed. Rule-based classifier, boosted trees, and weighted support vector machines performed well in terms of macro-recall, however at the expense of a higher mean misclassification error rate. The rule-based classifier performed very well in terms of average sensitivity and specificity (79.05% and 94.80%, respectively). Our validated results showed the possibility of developing effective medical text classifiers for VAERS reports by combining text mining with informative feature selection; this strategy has the potential to reduce reviewer workload considerably.

  5. Financial impact of radiological reports on medical-legal evaluation of compensation for meniscal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelario, M; Ciuffreda, P; Lupo, P; Bristogiannis, C; Vinci, R; Stoppino, L P; De Filippo, M; Macarini, L

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate any discrepancy between radiological reports for clinical purposes and for medicolegal purposes and to quantify its economic impact on repayments made by private insurance companies for meniscal injuries of the knee. The medical records obtained pertaining to 108 knee injury patients (mean age 43.3 years) assessed over a period of 12 months were analysed. Clinical medical reports, aimed at assessing the lesion, and medicolegal reports, drawn up with a view to quantifying compensation, were compared. Unlike reports for clinical purposes in reports for medicolegal purposes, in the evaluation of meniscal lesions, in addition to morphological features of lesions, chronological, topographical, severity and exclusion criteria were applied. To estimate the economic impact resulting from the biological damage, we consulted an actuarial table based on the 9-point minor incapacity classification system. Meniscal lesions not compatible with a traumatic event and therefore not eligible for an insurance payout were found in 56 patients. Of these, 37 failed exclusion criteria, while 19 failed to meet chronological criteria. This difference resulted in a reduction in compensation made by private insurance companies with savings estimated with a saving between euro 203,715.41 and euro 622,315.39. The use of a clinical report for medicolegal purposes can be a source of valuation error, as chronological and/or dynamic information regarding the trauma mechanism may be lacking. Therefore, the use of a full radiological appraisal allows a better damage's assessment and an adequate compensation for injuries.

  6. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M; Pawlik, Michael T; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6% of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2%), histology (12.4%), and blood analysis (9.6%). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6%) and MRI (30.6%). In 52.2% of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. • Radiology was the most important specialty for finding the final diagnosis. • CT was the most successful problem-solving imaging modality followed by MRI. • MRI and CT had the best solution rates of more than 30%.

  7. The reporting of statistics in medical educational studies: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desbiens Norman A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is confusion in the medical literature as to whether statistics should be reported in survey studies that query an entire population, as is often done in educational studies. Our objective was to determine how often statistical tests have been reported in such articles in two prominent journals that publish these types of studies. Methods For this observational study, we used electronic searching to identify all survey studies published in Academic Medicine and the Journal of General Internal Medicine in which an entire population was studied. We tallied whether inferential statistics were used and whether p-values were reported. Results Eighty-four articles were found: 62 in Academic Medicine and 22 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Overall, 38 (45% of the articles reported or stated that they calculated statistics: 35% in Academic Medicine and 73% in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Conclusion Educational enumeration surveys frequently report statistical tests. Until a better case can be made for doing so, a simple rule can be proffered to researchers. When studying an entire population (e.g., all program directors, all deans, and all medical schools for factual information, do not perform statistical tests. Reporting percentages is sufficient and proper.

  8. Evaluation of the contribution of radiological imaging to the final diagnosis in medical case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, Isabel; Scharf, Gregor; Platz, Natascha; Dendl, Lena M.; Stroszczynski, Christian; Schreyer, Andreas G. [University Hospital Regensburg, Institute of Radiology, Regensburg (Germany); Pawlik, Michael T. [Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, Institute of Anaesthesiology, Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical value and impact of radiological imaging in published medial case reports. We analysed 671 consecutively published case reports of a peer-reviewed medical journal for case reports. The general use of radiological imaging as well as the specific imaging modality used in each case (ultrasound, x-ray, fluoroscopy, CT, MRI) was documented, and most importantly the 'final problem solver', i.e. the diagnostic modality giving the final clue to the patient's diagnosis, was identified. In 511 of 671 (76.1 %) analysed case reports at least one radiological modality was used in the diagnostic cascade. In 28.6 % of all cases the final diagnosis was achieved by radiological imaging. All other cases were solved by the patient's history and physical examination (15.2 %), histology (12.4 %), and blood analysis (9.6 %). When radiology was the 'final problem solver', it was mainly CT (51.6 %) and MRI (30.6 %). In 52.2 % of the case reports the radiological image was included in the article. In case reports published in a prominent general medical journal radiological imaging is an important key player in the diagnostic process. In many cases, it is also the diagnostic tool which ultimately leads to determining the final diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Mood Disorder Due to a General Medical Condition with Manic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes a patient with manic and psychotic symptoms who had a history of neurocysticercosis and presented with an episode of hypertensive hydrocephalus in 2003. Despite her history, she was initially treated for primary psychiatric disease.

  10. Self-Reported Provider Safety in an Urban Emergency Medical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furin, Molly

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency Medical Service (EMS personnel often respond to dangerous scenes and encounter hostile individuals without police support. No recent data describes the frequency of physical or verbal assaults or which providers have increased fear for their safety. This information may help to guide interventions to improve safety. Our objective was to describe self-reported abuse and perceptions of safety and to determine if there are differences between gender, shift, and years of experience in a busy two-tiered, third service urban EMS system. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of an anonymous, cross-sectional work safety survey of EMS providers. This survey included demographics, years of experience, history of verbal and physical assault, safety behavior following an assault and perceptions of safety. Descriptive statistics were generated. Results: Eighty-nine percent (196/ 221 of EMS providers completed the survey. Most were male (72% and between the ages of 25 and 50 years (66%. The majority of providers had worked in this service for more than five years (54%, and many for more than ten years (37%. Verbal assaults were reported by 88% (172/196, 95% CI [82.4%-91.6%]. Although 80% (156/196, 95% CI [73.4%-84.6%] reported physical assaults, only 40% (62/156, 95% CI [32.4%-47.6%] sought medical care and 49% (76/156, 95% CI [41%-56.6%] reported the assault to police. The proportion of those who sought medical care and reported the assault to the police was not the same across years of experience (p<0.0001. Fear for personal safety was reported by 68% (134/196, 95% CI [61.6%-74.5%]. There was no statistical difference in assault by gender; however, females feared more for their safety compared to men (38/50, 76% v 96/142, 68%, p=0.02. The proportion of those who have ever been physically assaulted was not the same across shift worked (p=0.01. Conclusion: The majority of EMS providers surveyed reported an assault and certain groups

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 9, Number 5, July/August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    evaluation, planning, and disease trending5. Analysis and report by Barbara E. Nagaraj, MPH, Analysis Group, Army Medical Surveillance Activity. MSMR10... Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 1 1 100 1 0 0 Leprosy 0 0 - 0 0 - 2 2...7 3 43 Legionellosis 1 1 100 2 0 0 2 0 0 Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 0 0 - 1 0 0 Lyme disease 1 0 0 2 0 0 1

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 17, Number 01, January 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Regional Medical Center in Germany. En route to Landstuhl, the patient required endotracheal intubation due to his worsening mental status. Upon arrival... Endotracheal intubation en route to LRMC Day 4: Arrival to LRMC Unstable, acidotic Smear and rapid test positive for P. falciparum Antimalarials and broad...they reported applications of DEET three or more times per day “most or all of the time”. From 27 June (the date of diagnosis of the index case

  13. Short report: factors that affect specialty choice and career plans of Wisconsin's medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Kjersti E; Getzin, Anne; Bergum, Alison; McBride, Patrick; Rieselbach, Richard; Friedsam, Donna

    2008-12-01

    To identify factors that influence specialty choice among Wisconsin medical students and provide insight into approaches to encourage more students to pursue careers in primary care. The importance of several factors in medical student career choice was surveyed using a Web survey convenience sample of all Wisconsin medical students. Students intending to pursue a career in primary care and in other specialties were compared. Respondents, regardless of specialty choice or gender, identified a similar group of factors as highly influential, and similar group of factors as non-influential in their decision-making. However, significantly more primary care students than other specialty students considered interest in underserved populations, relationships with patients, scope of practice, and role models important in their career choice. Significantly more primary care students than other specialty students responded that salary and competitiveness were "not at all" important. A greater number of other specialty students than primary care students stated that interest in scope of practice, role models, and training years were "not at all" important. Debt-related factors were reported as "not at all" important by nearly one-third of respondents. Although primary care and other specialty students report making their career plans based on the impact of similar factors, significant differences between primary care and other specialty students were reported in key areas. These results validate many previously reported factors, and indicate that salary and years of training may have been overemphasized in understanding student career choice. The results of this survey may be useful for Wisconsin medical schools in order to sustain, support, and foster student interest in primary care.

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 3, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    most oft en with the small - pox vaccine, but has also been reported in temporal association with other ACIP- recommended vaccines as well. Th e...other articles in this issue of the MSMR). Commanders, small unit leaders, training cadre, and supporting medical personnel, particularly at recruit...probable cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis was attempted by using aRate per 100,000 p-yrs aCoast Guard not shown due to small annual case counts

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 4, Number 1, January 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    medical treatment facilities* December, 1997 Total number Environmental Injuries Viral Hepatitis Salmonellosis Shigella Varicella Reporting of...duration may be useful to detect multifocal outbreaks of “emerging” infectious diseases, to assess their sizes and distributions, and to track the...Heat exhaustion 4 51 84 5 144 Salmonellosis 17 38 95 49 199 Heat stroke 6 13 31 2 52 Schistosomiasis 0 0 0 0 0 Hemorrhagic fever 0 0 0 2 2

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 3, Number 4, June 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    sentinel reportable diseases, US Army Medical Treatment Facilities* May, 1997 Total number Environmental Injuries Viral Hepatitis Salmonellosis Shigella...uncommon1,3. During March and April 1997, an outbreak of suspected spider bites occurred among trainees of five basic training companies at Fort Benning...laundry facility cleaned all trainee linen Outbreak Investigation MSMRVol. 03 / No. 04 11 and TA-50 (i.e., individual field equipment). This

  17. ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE): a reactive-Delphi study protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, R; Zullig, L L; Dunbar-Jacob, J; Hughes, D A; Vrijens, B; Wilson, I B; De Geest, S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Medication adherence is fundamental to achieving optimal patient outcomes. Reporting research on medication adherence suffers from some issues—including conceptualisation, measurement and data analysis—that thwart its advancement. Using the ABC taxonomy for medication adherence as the conceptual basis, a steering committee of members of the European Society for Patient Adherence, COMpliance, and Persistence (ESPACOMP) launched an initiative to develop ESPACOMP Medication Adherence Reporting Guidelines (EMERGE). This paper is a protocol for a Delphi study that aims to build consensus among a group of topic experts regarding an item list that will support developing EMERGE. Methods and analysis This study uses a reactive-Delphi design where a group of topic experts will be asked to rate the relevance and clarity of an initial list of items, in addition to suggesting further items and/or modifications of the initial items. The initial item list, generated by the EMERGE steering committee through a structured process, consists of 26 items distributed in 2 sections: 4 items representing the taxonomy-based minimum reporting criteria, and 22 items organised according to the common reporting sections. A purposive sample of experts will be selected from relevant disciplines and diverse geographical locations. Consensus will be achieved through predefined decision rules to keep, delete or modify the items. An iterative process of online survey rounds will be carried out until consensus is reached. Ethics and dissemination An ethics approval was not required for the study according to the Swiss federal act on research involving human beings. The participating experts will be asked to give an informed consent. The results of this Delphi study will feed into EMERGE, which will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and presentations at conferences. Additionally, the steering committee will encourage their endorsement by registering the guidelines at

  18. Report on recent over-exposure accidents with a medical linac in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudoh, Hisaaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    On December 21, 2001, at a hospital in Tokyo, an engineer setting a medical-linac was over-exposed by the equipment due to lack of communication between workers. The exposed dose was initially reported as 1000 mSv (1 Sv), but later revised to 200 mSv at most. The outline of the accident and the statistical data on radiation exposure accidents in Japan and the world are briefly overlooked. (author)

  19. Patient–provider communication, self-reported medication adherence, and race in a postmyocardial infarction population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Ryan J Shaw,1,3 Bimal R Shah,4,5 Eric D Peterson,4,5 Jennifer H Lindquist,1 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 Steven C Grambow,6 Hayden B Bosworth1–3,7 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 3School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 4Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 5Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Durham, NC, USA; 6Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 7Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Objectives: Our objectives were to: 1 describe patient-reported communication with their provider and explore differences in perceptions of racially diverse adherent versus nonadherent patients; and 2 examine whether the association between unanswered questions and patient-reported medication nonadherence varied as a function of patients’ race. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline in-person survey data from a trial designed to improve postmyocardial infarction management of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results: Overall, 298 patients (74% reported never leaving their doctor’s office with unanswered questions. Among those who were adherent and nonadherent with their medications, 183 (79% and 115 (67% patients, respectively, never left their doctor’s office with unanswered questions. In multivariable logistic regression, although the simple effects of the interaction term were different for patients of nonminority race (odds ratio [OR]: 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–3.92 and those of minority race (OR: 1.19; 95% CI: 0.54–2.66, the overall interaction effect was not statistically significant (P=0.24. Conclusion: The quality of patient–provider communication is critical for cardiovascular

  20. Congenital hypoplasia of the medical hallucial sesamoid with avascular necrosis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yoonah; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Choi, Chan Bum [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Avascular necrosis of the hallucial sesamoids is an uncommon cause of metatarsalgia, and the congenital absence of the medial sesamoid is also a rarely reported condition in the podiatric literature. It must be distinguished from other painful conditions of the sesamoid due to the opposite direction of treatment. To our knowledge, there is no reported case of congenital hypoplasia of the medial sesamoid with osteonecrosis. We report a case of nontraumatic metatarsal pains with progressive sclerosis and fragmentation of the medial sesamoid on serial radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography with an incidental finding for the absence of contralateral medial sesamoid in a 33-year-old female.

  1. MOBILE PHONE USE PATTERN AND SELF REPORTED HEALTH PROBLEMS AMONG MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pattern of mobile phone use and self-reported health problems related to over use of the mobile phones are assessed among the medical students of Travancore Medical College, Kollam. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study design: Cross-sectional study. Sample size: 200 students; Sampling technique: Convenient sampling; Data analysis: Data was entered in MS Excel and analysed by SPSS 20. RESULTS A total of 200 students and interns participated in the study and among them 78 were males and 122 were females; 33% of the participants were very frequent users of cell phone (>2 hours in a day; 77% of students are using smart phones and 23% using simple phones; 39.5% of students spending 100-300 Rs per month to recharge and 34.5% spending 300-500 Rs for the same. More than half of the study population (57% check their mobile phones every half an hour. Almost 45% students reported to have earache; headache and blurring of vision are some of the other symptoms reported by them. There is a significant association between the above mentioned health symptoms and frequent use of multimedia in mobile phones. Ringxiety is also significantly associated with frequent use of mobile phones. CONCLUSION There is substantial clue that there is overuse of mobile phones among medical students. Actions must be taken proactively to cut down and limit the mobile phone use

  2. Improving the quality of adverse drug reaction reporting by 4th-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebraugh, Curtis J; Tsong, Yi; Zhou, Feng; Chen, Min; Mackey, Ann Corken; Flowers, Charlene; Toyer, Denise; Flockhart, David A; Honig, Peter K

    2003-03-01

    Evaluate whether a 15-minute lecture intervention will improve adverse drug reaction reporting quality on standard MedWatch forms. Seventy-eight 4th-year medical students were randomized to intervention 'Group-A' or non-intervention 'Group-B' on the first day of a required five-day clinical pharmacology rotation. Group-A participants attended a 15-minute lecture on completing a MedWatch form with quality information considered by the Food and Drug Administration as critical to adequate adverse drug reaction reporting. Group-B participants did not attend this lecture. Both groups then watched a standardized patient interview of a recognizable adverse drug reaction and completed MedWatch forms. Four Safety Evaluators from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rated student responses in a blinded fashion for the primary efficacy variable of Overall Impression and six informational domins using a standardized data quality analysis form that was developed within the Office of Postmarketing Drug Risk Assessment of the FDA. Seventy-eight MedWatch forms were evaluated (Group-A = 40, Group B = 38). Overall MedWatch information quality scores for the intervention group were significantly higher than the non-intervention group (p students. Academic medical centers should consider incorporating adverse drug reaction reporting curriculum into the clinical training of medical students.

  3. Greenhouse Gas Reporting Requirements Related to Stationary Refrigeration and Air Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides links to information about parts of the 2009 Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule that are relevant to owners and importers of stationary refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment.

  4. Disqualifying Medical Conditions of Flying Personnel in Chinese Army and Air Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-wei Wang; Shu-xuan Xu; Xian-rong Xu; Tong-xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ After inpatient aircrews of Chinese Army and Air Force are treated at local hospitals,their health status will be evaluated.If it is aeronantieally adaptable,the conclusion would be flying qualification;if it may impact the flight safety or the flight environment may aggravate the illness,the conclusion would be flight suspension,and then the patient should be forwarded from local hospital to our hospital.After detailed examination,if the conditions of flying personnel are considered not qualified for flight,the conclusion of flying disqualification should be made finally.

  5. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis in patients without predisposing medical conditions: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinav, H; Zimhony, O; Cohen, M J; Marcovich, A L; Benenson, S

    2009-07-01

    Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is a rare disease, affecting almost exclusively patients with known predisposing conditions such as diabetes mellitus, immunocompromised status, haemochromatosis or major trauma. Subsequent to a case of rhinocerebral mucormycosis in a 78-year-old woman without any known risk factor, we reviewed the published English-language literature and found an additional 72 cases. Reviewing all the published case series of mucormycosis involving any site, the proportion of apparently normal hosts among cases of rhinocerebral mucormycosis was found to be 9.06% (95% confidence interval 6.7-11.8). These findings suggest that rhinocerebral mucormycosis in patients without known predisposing factors is more prevalent than was previously believed.

  6. GATEWAY Report Brief: Evaluating Tunable LED Lighting in the Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-08-23

    Summary of a GATEWAY report evaluation of a tunable LED lighting system installed in the new Swedish Medical Behavioral Health Unit in Seattle that incorporates color-tunable luminaires in common areas, and uses advanced controls for dimming and color tuning, with the goal of providing a better environment for staff and patients. The report reviews the design of the tunable lighting system, summarizes two sets of measurements, and discusses the circadian, energy, and commissioning implications as well as lessons learned from the project.

  7. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  8. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedefaw A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abel Gedefaw,1 Birkneh Tilahun,2 Anteneh Asefa3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, 3School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia Background: This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson's bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results: The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47 and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71 years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7% of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2% had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3% had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and <1% of the variation, respectively. Students who had never used tobacco, alcohol, or khat after starting university were twice as likely to score a self-reported cumulative GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95

  9. Implementing telehealth to support medical practice in rural/remote regions: what are the conditions for success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duplantie Julie

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telehealth, as other information and communication technologies (ICTs introduced to support the delivery of health care services, is considered as a means to answer many of the imperatives currently challenging health care systems. In Canada, many telehealth projects are taking place, mostly targeting rural, remote or isolated populations. So far, various telehealth applications have been implemented and have shown promising outcomes. However, telehealth utilisation remains limited in many settings, despite increased availability of technology and telecommunication infrastructure. Methods A qualitative field study was conducted in four remote regions of Quebec (Canada to explore perceptions of physicians and managers regarding the impact of telehealth on clinical practice and the organisation of health care services, as well as the conditions for improving telehealth implementation. A total of 54 respondents were interviewed either individually or in small groups. Content analysis of interviews was performed and identified several effects of telehealth on remote medical practice as well as key conditions to ensure the success of telehealth implementation. Results According to physicians and managers, telehealth benefits include better access to specialised services in remote regions, improved continuity of care, and increased availability of information. Telehealth also improves physicians' practice by facilitating continuing medical education, contacts with peers, and access to a second opinion. At the hospital and health region levels, telehealth has the potential to support the development of regional reference centres, favour retention of local expertise, and save costs. Conditions for successful implementation of telehealth networks include the participation of clinicians in decision-making, the availability of dedicated human and material resources, and a planned diffusion strategy. Interviews with physicians and

  10. [Can ICF core sets be helpful in preparing a social-medical expert report due to incapacity to work?--a first proposal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschneck, M; Legner, R; Armbrust, W; Nowak, D; Cieza, A

    2015-04-01

    Social-medical expert reports from the German statutory pension insurance are essential for the German statutory pension regulatory authority to decide whether to grant services regarding participation as well as retirement pensions due to incapacity to work.The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the ICF Core Sets and other international approaches, such as the EUMASS Core Sets or ICF Core Set for vocational rehabilitation cover the content of the social-medical expert reports as well as to propose an approach how the ICF can be economically used by the social medicine practitioner when writing a social-medical expert report. A retrospective quantitative study design was used to translate a total of 294 social-medical expert reports from patients with low back pain (LBP) or chronic widespread pain (CWP) into the language of the ICF (linking) by 2 independent health professionals and compare the results with the ICF Core Sets for specific health conditions and other international approaches. The content of social-medical expert reports was largely reflected by the condition specific brief ICF Core Sets, brief ICF Core Sets for vocational rehabilitation and EUMASS Core Sets. The weighted Kappa statistic for the agreement between the 2 health professionals who translated the expert reports were in CWP 0.69 with a bootstrapped confidence interval of 0.67-0.71 and in LBP 0.73 (0.71-0.74). The analyses show that the content of social-medical expert reports varies enormously. A combination of a condition specific brief ICF Core Set as well as vocational rehabilitation and EUMASS ICF Core Sets as well as all ICF-categories from the expert reports that were named at least in 50% of it can largely provide a basis for preparing expert reports. Within the scope of implementation the need for a specific ICF Core Set for expert reports of the German statutory pension insurance should be further analyzed and discussed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart

  11. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  12. PubMed search strategies for the identification of etiologic associations between hypothalamic-pituitary disorders and other medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Mattioli, Stefano; Ghigo, Ezio; Gori, Davide

    2013-12-01

    Biomedical literature has enormously grown in the last decades and become broadly available through online databases. Ad-hoc search methods, created on the basis of research field and goals, are required to enhance the quality of searching. Aim of this study was to formulate efficient, evidence-based PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles assessing etiologic associations between a condition of interest and hypothalamic-pituitary disorders (HPD). Based on expert knowledge, 17 MeSH (Medical Subjects Headings) and 79 free terms related to HPD were identified to search PubMed. Using random samples of abstracts retrieved by each term, we estimated the proportion of articles containing pertinent information and formulated two strings (one more specific, one more sensitive) for the detection of articles focusing on the etiology of HPD, that were then applied to retrieve articles identifying possible etiologic associations between HPD and three diseases (malaria, LHON and celiac disease) considered not associated to HPD, and define the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to find one potentially pertinent article. We propose two strings: one sensitive string derived from the combination of articles providing the largest literature coverage in the field and one specific including combined terms retrieving ≥40% of potentially pertinent articles. NNR were 2.1 and 1.6 for malaria, 3.36 and 2.29 for celiac disease, 2.8 and 2.2 for LHON, respectively. For the first time, two reliable, readily applicable strings are proposed for the retrieval of medical literature assessing putative etiologic associations between HPD and other medical conditions of interest.

  13. Final Report on the Mississippi Project CLEAR Voice Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Barnett; Fuller, Ed

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the state of Mississippi conducted a web-based survey of all school-based licensed educators in which they were asked to share their perceptions of the state of teacher working conditions in Mississippi. This report of the Mississippi Teacher Working Conditions Survey, Project CLEAR Voice (Cultivate Learning Environments to Accelerate…

  14. Medication Errors in a Swiss Cardiovascular Surgery Department: A Cross-Sectional Study Based on a Novel Medication Error Report Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar Küng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was (1 to determine frequency and type of medication errors (MEs, (2 to assess the number of MEs prevented by registered nurses, (3 to assess the consequences of ME for patients, and (4 to compare the number of MEs reported by a newly developed medication error self-reporting tool to the number reported by the traditional incident reporting system. We conducted a cross-sectional study on ME in the Cardiovascular Surgery Department of Bern University Hospital in Switzerland. Eligible registered nurses ( involving in the medication process were included. Data on ME were collected using an investigator-developed medication error self reporting tool (MESRT that asked about the occurrence and characteristics of ME. Registered nurses were instructed to complete a MESRT at the end of each shift even if there was no ME. All MESRTs were completed anonymously. During the one-month study period, a total of 987 MESRTs were returned. Of the 987 completed MESRTs, 288 (29% indicated that there had been an ME. Registered nurses reported preventing 49 (5% MEs. Overall, eight (2.8% MEs had patient consequences. The high response rate suggests that this new method may be a very effective approach to detect, report, and describe ME in hospitals.

  15. Pharmacological modulation of caspase-8 in thymus-related medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzesi, Nicola; Fierabracci, Alessandra; Thuy, Trinh Thy; Martelli, Maria Paola; Liberati, Anna Marina; Ayroldi, Emira; Riccardi, Carlo; Delfino, Domenico V

    2014-10-01

    The thymus is a lymphoid organ that governs the development of a diverse T-cell repertoire capable of defending against nonself-antigens and avoiding autoimmunity. However, the thymus can also succumb to different diseases. Hypertrophic diseases, such as thymomas, are typically associated with impairment of negative selection, which leads to autoimmune disease, or disruption of positive selection, which results in immunodeficiency. Hypotrophic diseases of the thymus can manifest during acute infections, cancer, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, or with aging. This condition leads to decreased immune function and can be treated by either replacing lost thymic tissue or by preventing thymic tissue death. Studies have demonstrated the critical role of caspase-8 in regulating apoptosis in the thymus. In this review, we discuss how pharmacological activation and inhibition of caspase-8 can be used to treat hypertrophic and hypotrophic diseases of the thymus, respectively, to improve its function.

  16. Medication-induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy presenting with cardiogenic shock-utility of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO): case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Marte, Geurys; John, Jinu; Sadiq, Adnan; Moskovits, Norbert; Saunders, Paul; Shani, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is a transient condition that affects the myocardium and is seen mostly in post-menopausal women secondary to an emotional or physical stressor; however, certain drugs have been described as cause of this syndrome. We report the case of a young female with medication--induced TTC, who presented with cardiogenic shock as initial manifestation, treated successfully with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). To our knowledge, this is the first case in the literature describing the use of ECMO in cardiogenic shock due to medication-induced TTC.

  17. AN IMPACT OF THE EFFICIENT FUNCTIONING OF THE VENTILATION AND AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM ON THERMAL COMFORT OF THE MEDICAL STAFF IN THE OPERATING ROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Jankowski

    2016-11-01

    operating room were deter-mined on the basis of VelociCalc 8360 and Testo 435 anemometers with a 3-function probe and 3 vane probes with the diameter of 16 mm, 60 mm and 100 mm. Throughout the study, microclimate conditions in the operating rooms were controlled by the EHA MM101 microclimate meter. Test results showed that the microclimate parameters met the requirements of the aforementioned documents. However, individual thermal sensations reported by the medical staff pointed to the lack of thermal comfort and, in extreme cases, e.g. when using lead aprons during operations, perception of the thermal environment as ‘very hot’. The efficiency and type of air distribution in operating rooms has a decisive effect on the results.

  18. The impact of 'social determinants of health' on epilepsy prevalence and reported medication use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, John O; Lu, Bo; Shneker, Bassel F; Moore, J Layne; McAuley, James W

    2009-04-01

    There is a limited understanding of the complex relationship between poverty and epilepsy. To address the complex interaction of environmental and psychosocial factors in epilepsy a 'social determinants of health' model is presented where individual factors are influenced through three pathways (social environment, work and material factors). In the 2005 California Health Interview Survey, 246 of 604 (41%) persons with a history of epilepsy were in poverty, defined as Poverty Level (FPL). Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed persons in poverty are not more likely to report a history of epilepsy compared to those not in poverty. However, persons with a history of epilepsy in poverty were significantly less likely than those not in poverty to report taking medication for epilepsy (OR 0.5) once material factors (annual income and living situation) and healthcare access were controlled for in the final sequential model. Healthcare practitioners must continue to recognize that connection to social services and the cost of medications are significant barriers to optimal care in persons with epilepsy. Improved connection to patient advocacy organizations and medication assistance programs may help close these gaps.

  19. Assistance in dying for older people without a serious medical condition who have a wish to die : a national cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, Natasja J H; van der Heide, Agnes; Kouwenhoven, Pauline S C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34166698X; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/150583265; van Delden, Johannes J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086541331; Rietjens, Judith A C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch euthanasia law regulates physician assistance in dying for patients who are suffering unbearably from a medical condition. We studied the attitudes of the Dutch population to assistance in dying for older persons who have a wish to die without the presence of a serious medical

  20. Assistance in dying for older people without a serious medical condition who have a wish to die: a national cross-sectional survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, N.J.H.; Heide, A. van der; Kouwenhoven, P.S.C.; Thiel, G.J.M.W. van; Delden, J.J.M. van; Rietjens, J.A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Dutch euthanasia law regulates physician assistance in dying for patients who are suffering unbearably from a medical condition. We studied the attitudes of the Dutch population to assistance in dying for older persons who have a wish to die without the presence of a serious medical

  1. Assistance in dying for older people without a serious medical condition who have a wish to die : a national cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, Natasja J H; van der Heide, Agnes; Kouwenhoven, Pauline S C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; van Delden, Johannes J M; Rietjens, Judith A C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch euthanasia law regulates physician assistance in dying for patients who are suffering unbearably from a medical condition. We studied the attitudes of the Dutch population to assistance in dying for older persons who have a wish to die without the presence of a serious medical

  2. Exploring behavioural determinants relating to health professional reporting of medication errors: a qualitative study using the Theoretical Domains Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqubaisi, Mai; Tonna, Antonella; Strath, Alison; Stewart, Derek

    2016-07-01

    Effective and efficient medication reporting processes are essential in promoting patient safety. Few qualitative studies have explored reporting of medication errors by health professionals, and none have made reference to behavioural theories. The objective was to describe and understand the behavioural determinants of health professional reporting of medication errors in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This was a qualitative study comprising face-to-face, semi-structured interviews within three major medical/surgical hospitals of Abu Dhabi, the UAE. Health professionals were sampled purposively in strata of profession and years of experience. The semi-structured interview schedule focused on behavioural determinants around medication error reporting, facilitators, barriers and experiences. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF; a framework of theories of behaviour change) was used as a coding framework. Ethical approval was obtained from a UK university and all participating hospital ethics committees. Data saturation was achieved after interviewing ten nurses, ten pharmacists and nine physicians. Whilst it appeared that patient safety and organisational improvement goals and intentions were behavioural determinants which facilitated reporting, there were key determinants which deterred reporting. These included the beliefs of the consequences of reporting (lack of any feedback following reporting and impacting professional reputation, relationships and career progression), emotions (fear and worry) and issues related to the environmental context (time taken to report). These key behavioural determinants which negatively impact error reporting can facilitate the development of an intervention, centring on organisational safety and reporting culture, to enhance reporting effectiveness and efficiency.

  3. The genetic covariation between fear conditioning and self-report fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettema, John M; Annas, Peter; Neale, Michael C; Fredrikson, Mats; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2008-03-15

    Fear conditioning is a traditional model for the acquisition of phobias, whereas behavioral therapies use processes underlying extinction to treat phobic and other anxiety disorders. Furthermore, fear conditioning has been proposed as an endophenotype for genetic studies of anxiety disorders. Although prior studies have demonstrated that fear conditioning and self-report fears are heritable, no studies have determined whether they share a common genetic basis. We obtained fear conditioning data from 173 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry who also provided self-report ratings of 16 common fears. With multivariate structural equation modeling, we analyzed factor-derived scores for the subjective fear ratings together with the electrophysiologic skin conductance responses during habituation, acquisition, and extinction to determine the extent of their genetic covariation. Phenotypic correlations between experimental and self-report fear measures were modest and, counter-intuitively, negative (i.e., subjects who reported themselves as more fearful had smaller electrophysiologic responses). Best-fit models estimated a significant (negative) genetic correlation between them, although genetic factors underlying fear conditioning accounted for only 9% of individual differences in self-report fears. Experimentally derived fear conditioning measures share only a small portion of the genetic factors underlying individual differences in subjective fears, cautioning against relying too heavily on the former as an endophenotype for genetic studies of phobic disorders.

  4. Pediatric Nurses’ Medication Error: the Self-reporting of Frequency, Types and Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Miladinia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Medication errors (MEs are the most common types of medical errors which effecting on pediatric safety. For decrease MEs, we should to have information about difference aspects of MEs. We have no study which assessed the frequency, types and causes of MEs made by pediatric nurses, in Iran. Material and Methods This was a cross-sectional study, which performed on 53 Pediatric Nurses. Data were collected by a self-structured questionnaire for assessment of MEs contained 3 parts: 1- one question about the fact that, do you had MEs in past 3 months; 2- types of MEs occurred (12 items; 3- causes of MEs from nurses’ perspective (20 items. The MEs in past 3 months gathered through pediatric nurses’ self-report. Descriptive statistics and Chi-square test were used for analysis. Data were analyzed using the SPSS. Results The majority of participants were female (77.3%, and initial (novice nurses (33.9%. The results showed that, 31 (58.4% of nurses were reported at least one MEs history and totally, 131 MEs were occurred in past 3 months. Most prevalent of MEs types were reported: wrong dose (36.6% and wrong drug preparation (14.5%. Also, most prevalent of MEs causes from Nurses’ perspective were reported: poor medication knowledge (96.2% and poor calculation skills (73.5%. Conclusion With using of this study results, we can program for prevention/decrease MEs and enhancing pediatric safety. On the basis of this study, actually we should enhancing level of nurses knowledge by education and to carry out special courses for pediatric nurses.

  5. Factors influencing medication errors according to nurses' decisions to do self-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Rahimi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the most important factors affecting the incidence of errors include workplace stress, working in the intensive care units, tiredness due to work load, and inappropriate nurse physician relationship. Hence, identification of these factors helps nurses to reduce errors and helps reduce other medical consequences and improve in the quality of patient care and patient safety. Regarding the importance of patient safety it is necessary to improve positive relationship between nurse managers and nursing staff. Therefore, an environment of close collaboration, in-service training for new nurses regarding medication errors, and creating a reporting system is necessary. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(1.000: 130-133

  6. Medication error reporting in rural critical access hospitals in the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David M; Friesner, Daniel L; Rathke, Ann M; Doherty-Johnsen, Shelly

    2014-01-01

    Results of a study of medication "quality-related events" (QREs) at critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in a telepharmacy project are reported. Rates and types of medication QREs (i.e., all types of drug therapy problems requiring pharmacist intervention) were evaluated at 17 CAHs receiving telepharmacy services from a central order-entry site in the North Dakota Telepharmacy Project (NDTP). During the 17-month study, remote pharmacists used telepharmacy technology to review medication orders prepared at the CAH sites, identify and address QREs, and code clinical interventions. The collected data were analyzed via chi-square testing. Cumulative monthly medication orders at the CAH study sites ranged from a low of 12,535 in the first month of the study to a high of 18,257. Monthly rates of visual medication verification and clinical intervention ranged from 8.0% to 14.2% and from 1.3% to 3.1%, respectively. Overall, the most frequently identified QREs were transcription errors, which accounted for 2,389 interventions (43.3%); 2,078 interventions (37.7%) targeted prescribing-related QREs. The most frequently cited intervention codes were for dosage adjustments (n = 547), deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis (n = 437), pharmacokinetic consultation (n = 268), renal dosing (n = 182), and the prevention of minor (n = 148) and major (n = 94) adverse drug events. The study results indicate that the NDTP telepharmacy model is effective in identifying and resolving QREs in CAHs. The use of the telepharmacy services increased over the study period, suggesting that CAH practitioners became more comfortable using the technology on a regular basis to enhance patient safety.

  7. Lack of risk-awareness and reporting behavior towards HIV infection through needlestick injury among European medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Hoenigl, Martin; Kessler, Harald H; Stigler, Florian L; Raggam, Reinhard B; Rippel, Karoline E; Langmann, Hubert; Sprenger, Martin; Krause, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Medical students are at risk for occupational needlestick injuries (NSIs) which can result in substantial health consequences and psychological stress. Therefore, an open online survey among final year medical students from Austria, Germany, and the United Kingdom (UK) was conducted. The aim of the study was to evaluate risk-awareness and reporting behavior regarding needlestick injury (NSI), post-exposure prophylaxis, and level of education regarding the transmission of HIV through NSIs. Of 674 medical students, 226 (34%) reported at least one NSI during medical school. Respondents from Austria and Germany experienced a significantly higher number of NSIs in comparison to respondents from the UK. Seventy-six respondents (34%) did not report their most recent injury to an employee health office. Almost one third were not familiar with reporting procedures in case of a NSI and 45% of the study population feared that reporting an injury might have an adverse effect on their study success. 176 respondents (78%) who had suffered a NSI were not aware of the patient's HIV status. Education regarding NSIs and HIV transmission reduced the actual risk of experiencing a NSI significantly. These data indicate that medical students are at high risk of suffering NSIs during medical school. The rate of nonreporting of such injuries to an employee health service is alarmingly high. Improved medical curricula including precise recommendations may contribute to a more efficient prevention of occupational HIV infection in medical students. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Medication incident reporting in residential aged care facilities: Limitations and risks to residents’ safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Amina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medication incident reporting (MIR is a key safety critical care process in residential aged care facilities (RACFs. Retrospective studies of medication incident reports in aged care have identified the inability of existing MIR processes to generate information that can be used to enhance residents’ safety. However, there is little existing research that investigates the limitations of the existing information exchange process that underpins MIR, despite the considerable resources that RACFs’ devote to the MIR process. The aim of this study was to undertake an in-depth exploration of the information exchange process involved in MIR and identify factors that inhibit the collection of meaningful information in RACFs. Methods The study was undertaken in three RACFs (part of a large non-profit organisation in NSW, Australia. A total of 23 semi-structured interviews and 62 hours of observation sessions were conducted between May to July 2011. The qualitative data was iteratively analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results The findings highlight significant gaps in the design of the MIR artefacts as well as information exchange issues in MIR process execution. Study results emphasized the need to: a design MIR artefacts that facilitate identification of the root causes of medication incidents, b integrate the MIR process within existing information systems to overcome key gaps in information exchange execution, and c support exchange of information that can facilitate a multi-disciplinary approach to medication incident management in RACFs. Conclusions This study highlights the advantages of viewing MIR process holistically rather than as segregated tasks, as a means to identify gaps in information exchange that need to be addressed in practice to improve safety critical processes.

  9. Invasive pneumococcal infections among persons with and without underlying medical conditions: Implications for prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollgren Jukka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23 is recommended for persons aged Methods Population-based data on all episodes of IPD (positive blood or cerebrospinal fluid culture reported by Finnish clinical microbiology laboratories during 1995–2002 were linked to data in national health care registries and vital statistics to obtain information on the patient's preceding hospitalisations, co-morbidities, and outcome of illness. Results Overall, 4357 first episodes of IPD were identified in all age groups (average annual incidence, 10.6/100,000. Patients aged 18–49 and 50–64 years accounted for 1282 (29% and 934 (21% of IPD cases, of which 372 (29% and 427 (46% had a current PPV23 indication, respectively. Overall, 536 (12% IPD patients died within one month of first positive culture. Persons aged 18–64 years accounted for 254 (47% of all deaths (case-fatality proportion, 12%. Of those who died 117 (46% did not have a vaccine indication. In a survival model, patients with alcohol-related diseases, non-haematological malignancies, and those aged 50–64 years were most likely to die. Conclusion In the general population of non-elderly adults, almost two-thirds of IPD and half of fatal cases occurred in persons without a recognised PPV23 indication. Policymakers should consider additional prevention strategies such as lowering the age of universal PPV23 vaccination and introducing routine childhood pneumococcal conjugate immunisation which could provide substantial health benefits to this population through indirect vaccine effects.

  10. Are reports of randomized controlled trials improving over time? A systematic review of 284 articles published in high-impact general and specialized medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Matthew J; Jones, Jennifer; Emara, Mohamed; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate reporting undermines findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study assessed and compared articles published in high-impact general medical and specialized journals. Reports of RCTs published in high-impact general and specialized medical journals were identified through a search of MEDLINE from January to March of 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Articles that provided original data on adult patients diagnosed with chronic conditions were included in the study. Data on trial characteristics, reporting of allocation concealment, quality score, and the presence of a trial flow diagram were extracted independently by two reviewers, and discrepancies were resolved by consensus or independent adjudication. Descriptive statistics were used for quantitative variables. Comparisons between general medical and specialized journals, and trends over time were performed using Chi-square tests. Reports of 284 trials were analyzed. There was a significantly higher proportion of RCTs published with adequate reporting of allocation concealment (p = 0.003), presentation of a trial flow diagram (pjournals had higher quality scores than those in specialized journals (p = 0.001), reported adequate allocation concealment more often (p = 0.013), and presented a trial flow diagram more often (pjournals over the last fifteen years. These improvements are likely attributed to concerted international efforts to improve reporting quality such as CONSORT. There is still much room for improvement, especially among specialized journals.

  11. Motivating Physicians to Report Adverse Medical Events in China: Stick or Carrot?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yajiong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Mengyun; Zhang, Zhiruo; Liang, Huigang

    2017-02-22

    Adverse medical events (AMEs) pose serious threats to patient safety. One of the major challenges of AME reporting is low physician engagement. This study attempted to examine how punishment and reward can improve physicians' AME reporting in China. A survey was conducted in a large hospital with 1693 beds in China. Data were collected from 311 physicians. Ordinal and binary logistic regression was used for data analysis. This study reveals that both punishment and reward are positively associated with intention to report AMEs. There is a negative interaction effect between punishment and reward. Although collective punishment is positively associated with intention to report AMEs, collective reward is not. Moreover, the physicians who have fear of negative consequences of AMEs and lack knowledge of AME reporting have lower intention to report AMEs. These findings do not differ between male and female physicians. This survey suggests that punishment and reward have potential to motivate Chinese physicians to report AMEs. However, the implementation strategies of these control mechanisms may not be universally applicable and should be carefully designed on the basis of the specific characteristics of the practice site.

  12. Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

    1997-05-01

    A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

  13. Essentials and guidelines for clinical medical physics residency training programs: executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann I; Willis, Charles E; Burmeister, Jay W; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Das, Rupak K; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Gerbi, Bruce J; Harkness, Beth A; Patton, James A; Peck, Donald J; Pizzutiello, Robert J; Sandison, George A; White, Sharon L; Wichman, Brian D; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Both, Stefan

    2014-05-08

    There is a clear need for established standards for medical physics residency training. The complexity of techniques in imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology continues to increase with each passing year. It is therefore imperative that training requirements and competencies are routinely reviewed and updated to reflect the changing environment in hospitals and clinics across the country. In 2010, the AAPM Work Group on Periodic Review of Medical Physics Residency Training was formed and charged with updating AAPM Report Number 90. This work group includes AAPM members with extensive experience in clinical, professional, and educational aspects of medical physics. The resulting report, AAPM Report Number 249, concentrates on the clinical and professional knowledge needed to function independently as a practicing medical physicist in the areas of radiation oncology, imaging, and nuclear medicine, and constitutes a revision to AAPM Report Number 90. This manuscript presents an executive summary of AAPM Report Number 249.

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 14, Number 3, June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    particularly for conditions that are not completely rehabilitated and may be exacerbated by anticipated stresses of deployment. Th e sharp increase in...secondary. §Urethritis, non-gonococcal (NGU). Cold Heat Reporting location Arthropod-borne Sexually transmitted Environmental Lyme disease Malaria...Primary and secondary. §Urethritis, non-gonococcal (NGU). Cold Heat Reporting location Arthropod-borne Sexually transmitted Environmental Lyme disease

  15. Analysis of obese patients' medical conditions in the pre and postoperative periods of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo, Anderson DA Silva; Zulin, Aline; Scolari, Sandro; Marcon, Sônia Silva; Radovanovic, Cremilde Aparecida Trindade

    2017-01-01

    to compare the clinical conditions of obese patients in the pre and postoperative period of bariatric surgery. we carried out a descriptive, retrospective, quantitative study by consulting the charts of 134 patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the period from 2009 to 2014. We collected the data between September and November 2015. We performed a descriptive statistical analysis and comparative analysis of anthropometric, metabolic, biochemical and clinical variables, considering six months before and after surgery. the majority of the patients were female (91.8%), with a higher prevalence (35%) in the age group 18-29 years old, complete high-school education (65.6%) and grade III obesity (60.4%). Six months after surgery, weight and lipid profile reduction were significant in both genders, but the impact on biochemical, anthropometric, metabolic and clinical parameters was significant only in female subjects, with a reduction in morbidities associated with obesity, such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome and in the use of drugs to control them. bariatric surgery was effective in weight loss, with improvements in anthropometric, metabolic and biochemical parameters and in the reduction of morbidities associated with obesity. comparar as condições clínicas de pacientes obesos em período pré e pós-operatório de cirurgia bariátrica. estudo descritivo, retrospectivo, de abordagem quantitativa, por meio de consulta ao prontuário de 134 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica no período de 2009 a 2014. Os dados foram coletados entre os meses de setembro e novembro de 2015. Foi realizada análise estatística descritiva e comparativa das variáveis antropométricas, metabólicas, bioquímicas e clínicas, considerando seis meses antes e após a cirurgia. a maioria dos pacientes era do sexo feminino (91,8%), com maior prevalência (35%) na faixa etária de 18 aos 29 anos, com ensino médio completo (65

  16. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedefaw, Abel; Tilahun, Birkneh; Asefa, Anteneh

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA) using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson’s bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47) and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71) years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7%) of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2%) had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3%) had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95% confidence interval 1.25–3.02) and less likely to be delayed, have to re-sit an examination, or be warned (adjusted odds ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.77). Conclusion Only 32.8% of the variation in self-reported academic performance was explained by the studied variables. Hence, efficacious mechanisms should be designed to combat the intervenable determinants of self-reported academic performance, like substance use and a low

  17. Structured communication for patient safety in emergency medical services: a legal case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Mark J; Heninger, Jacob R

    2010-01-01

    Providers of emergency medical services (EMS) must communicate vital information during critical phases of operations. Errors in communications, for example, the failure to hear a directive, will compromise safe and effective patient care. This article presents a case that resulted in litigation because of communication failures during the interfacility transfer of a trauma patient who subsequently died in the ambulance. The communication failure involved members of a ground ambulance crew, their dispatcher, and a supervisor. The failure of the emergency medical technician (EMT) who was driving to hear from the treating EMT and her dispatcher vital information pertaining to changes in their destination and of plans to intercept another ambulance, or alternatively, the driver's ignoring this information, led to a delay in care and may have contributed to the patient's death. Factors contributing to the cause of this communication failure may have been related to the nature of the EMS setting: the physical separation between crew members (the driver, and the care provider in the back of the ambulance); the noise of the ground ambulance transport environment, most notably, the siren; and the stress of treating a patient in critical condition. The case highlights the importance of using structured forms of communication, specifically the read-back tool and the critical assertion strategy, to limit failures in communication during EMS operations and in operations in other high-risk medical settings.

  18. Consolidated standards of reporting trials (CONSORT) and the completeness of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published in medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lucy; Shamseer, Larissa; Altman, Douglas G; Weeks, Laura; Peters, Jodi; Kober, Thilo; Dias, Sofia; Schulz, Kenneth F; Plint, Amy C; Moher, David

    2012-11-14

    An overwhelming body of evidence stating that the completeness of reporting of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not optimal has accrued over time. In the mid-1990s, in response to these concerns, an international group of clinical trialists, statisticians, epidemiologists, and biomedical journal editors developed the CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement. The CONSORT Statement, most recently updated in March 2010, is an evidence-based minimum set of recommendations including a checklist and flow diagram for reporting RCTs and is intended to facilitate the complete and transparent reporting of trials and aid their critical appraisal and interpretation. In 2006, a systematic review of eight studies evaluating the "effectiveness of CONSORT in improving reporting quality in journals" was published. To update the earlier systematic review assessing whether journal endorsement of the 1996 and 2001 CONSORT checklists influences the completeness of reporting of RCTs published in medical journals. We conducted electronic searches, known item searching, and reference list scans to identify reports of evaluations assessing the completeness of reporting of RCTs. The electronic search strategy was developed in MEDLINE and tailored to EMBASE. We searched the Cochrane Methodology Register and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews using the Wiley interface. We searched the Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index, and Arts and Humanities Citation Index through the ISI Web of Knowledge interface. We conducted all searches to identify reports published between January 2005 and March 2010, inclusive. In addition to studies identified in the original systematic review on this topic, comparative studies evaluating the completeness of reporting of RCTs in any of the following comparison groups were eligible for inclusion in this review: 1) Completeness of reporting of RCTs published in journals that have and have not endorsed the

  19. Short report : Chronic medical conditions and life satisfaction in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelicic, M; Kempen, GIJM

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chronic disease on life satisfaction in community dwelling elderly. A total of 5279 research participants, mean age 69.57 (SD = 8.04) yrs, were asked to judge their life satisfaction on the Seven Point Satisfaction Rating Scale. They were also admin

  20. Short report : Chronic medical conditions and life satisfaction in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelicic, M; Kempen, GIJM

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of chronic disease on life satisfaction in community dwelling elderly. A total of 5279 research participants, mean age 69.57 (SD = 8.04) yrs, were asked to judge their life satisfaction on the Seven Point Satisfaction Rating Scale. They were also

  1. Structure and content of radiology reports, a quantitative and qualitative study in eight medical centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosmans, Jan M.L. [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium); Faculty of Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.bosmans@uza.be; Weyler, Joost J. [Department of Epidemiology and Social Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium); Parizel, Paul M. [Department of Radiology, Antwerp University Hospital (Belgium); Faculty of Medicine, Antwerp University (Belgium)

    2009-11-15

    Rationale and objectives: In order to determine how the quality of the radiology report can be improved, the variation in content, form and length of the report needs to be examined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate and compare the length and structure of radiology reports (reports of abdominal CT examinations) in eight hospitals in the Netherlands and Flanders, the Dutch speaking part of Belgium. Materials and methods: Eight hundred reports - 100 from each collaborating center - were collected. After exclusion of the reports that did not fulfill the criteria for a standard CT examination of the abdomen, 525 were retained for further study. The structure of each report was analyzed and the constituting parts (technical information, description of the findings, conclusion, advice, remark, note) were determined. The character and word count of the report and its constituting parts were measured and the results were grouped according to the country (Netherlands vs. Belgium/Flanders), the qualification of the radiologist (staff members vs. residents.) and the nature of the hospital (university medical centers vs. community hospitals). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the Netherlands and Flanders, and between staff members and residents. The authors also found a wide variety in the lay-out and the overall content of the radiology report. Conclusion: While most of the differences we found are probably rooted in local tradition, a standard model for the radiology report in centers sharing the same language may be a means to avoid interpretation mistakes by referring physicians, and to promote better care.

  2. Realizing digital signatures for medical imaging and reporting in a PACS environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chung-Yueh; Yang, Tsung-Lung; Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Kao, Tsair

    2013-02-01

    According to Taiwan's legislation pertaining to the protection of electronic data, the creators of electronic medical records (EMR) are solely responsible for the security of EMR. However, actual implementations that fulfill the security standards and requirements for electronic medical record systems are still lacking. Most EMR created from picture archive and communication system are not considered secure, as security protection mechanisms have not yet been granted legal status. This paper describes the details of establishing a digital signature system using Taiwan health professional cards. A digital signature system has been included to ensure quality assurance (QA) operations are controlled by technicians, and reporting capabilities have been provided for radiologist. Six imaging modalities and eight types of radiology reports have also been included in the system. Results indicate that the process of creating QA signatures does not have an adverse effect on the workflow of the facility, requiring less time for the signing and verification of radiology reports. This system has already been used routinely online in a real clinical setting for more than 2 years.

  3. Job Burnout, Work Engagement and Self-reported Treatment for Health Conditions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Leon T; Pienaar, Jaco; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study being reported here was to investigate the relationship of job burnout and work engagement with self-reported received treatment for health conditions (cardiovascular condition, high cholesterol, depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome), while controlling for age, gender, smoking and alcohol use. The sample comprised 7895 employees from a broad range of economic sectors in the South African working population. A cross-sectional survey design was used for the study. Structural equation modelling methods were implemented with a weighted least squares approach. The results showed that job burnout had a positive relationship with self-reported received treatment for depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome. Work engagement did not have any significant negative or positive relationships with the treatment for these health conditions. The results of this study make stakeholders aware of the relationship between job burnout, work engagement and self-reported treatment for health conditions. Evidence for increased reporting of treatment for ill-health conditions due to burnout was found. Therefore, attempts should be made to manage job burnout to prevent ill-health outcomes.

  4. Medical-dental findings and management of a child with infantile Refsum disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bhavini S; Ritwik, Priyanshi; Velasquez, Gisela M; Fenton, Sanford J

    2012-06-01

    Infantile Refsum disease (IRD) is a peroxisome biogenesis disorder (PBD), and is part of a larger group of diseases called leukodystrophies, which are inherited conditions that damage the white matter of the brain and affect motor movements. Multiple signs and symptoms of IRD begin in infancy and progress through early childhood, including hearing and visual impairment, intellectual and growth impairment, seizures, liver involvement, and orofacial and dental abnormalities. This paper presents a case history of a 12-year-old female patient with IRD who underwent dental rehabilitation in the operating room under general anesthesia and includes a 2-year follow-up. Medical, dental, and management considerations in the care of this child's condition are presented. This paper also discusses the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the management of children with special needs.

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 11, November 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    21.9 1,963 0.4 14,353 2.9 1,498,522 99.6 9,661 Nutritional disorders 138,808 28.0 137 0.0 850 0.2 267,998 17.8 651 Oral conditions 65,601 13.2 4,391...N o. o f c as es Marine Corps Air Force Navy Army Severe acute pneumonia (ICD-9: 518.81, 518.82, 480-487, 786.09)a Leishmaniasis (ICD-9...085.0 to 085.9)b Reference: Army Medical Surveillance Activity. Deployment-related condition of special surveillance interest: severe acute pneumonia

  6. Medical Underwriting In Long-Term Care Insurance: Market Conditions Limit Options For Higher-Risk Consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Portia Y; Grabowski, David C; Cohen, Marc; Shi, Xiaomei; Stevenson, David G

    2016-08-01

    A key feature of private long-term care insurance is that medical underwriters screen out would-be buyers who have health conditions that portend near-term physical or cognitive disability. We applied common underwriting criteria based on data from two long-term care insurers to a nationally representative sample of individuals in the target age range (50-71 years) for long-term care insurance. The screening criteria put upper bounds on the current proportion of Americans who could gain coverage in the individual market without changes to medical underwriting practice. Specifically, our simulations show that in the target age range, approximately 30 percent of those whose wealth meets minimum industry standards for suitability for long-term care insurance would have their application for such insurance rejected at the underwriting stage. Among the general population-without considering financial suitability-we estimated that 40 percent would have their applications rejected. The predicted rejection rates are substantially higher than the rejection rates of about 20-25 percent of applicants in the actual market. In evaluating reforms for long-term care financing and their potential to increase private insurance rates, as well as to reduce financial pressure on public safety-net programs, policy makers need to consider the role of underwriting in the market for long-term care insurance.

  7. The Lorazepam and Diazepam Protocol for Catatonia Due to General Medical Condition and Substance in Liaison Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Chuen; Hung, Yi-Yung; Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Objective The lorazepam-diazepam protocol had been proved to rapidly and effectively relieve catatonia in patients with schizophrenia or mood disorder. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of lorazepam-diazepam protocol in catatonia due to general medical conditions (GMC) and substance. Method Patients with catatonia that required psychiatric intervention in various settings of a medical center were included. The lorazepam-diazepam protocol had been used to treat the catatonia due to GMC or substance according to DSM-IV criteria. The treatment response had been assessed by two psychiatrists. Results Eighteen (85.7%) of 21 catatonic patients due to GMC or substance became free of catatonia after the lorazepam-diazepam protocol. Five (23.8%) of the 21 patients had passed away with various causes of death and wide range of time periods after catatonia. Conclusion Our results showed that the lorazepam-diazepam protocol could rapidly and effectively relieve catatonia due to GMC and substance. PMID:28114315

  8. Methodology to Estimate the Longitudinal Average Attributable Fraction of Guideline-recommended Medications for Death in Older Adults With Multiple Chronic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allore, Heather G; Zhan, Yilei; Cohen, Andrew B; Tinetti, Mary E; Trentalange, Mark; McAvay, Gail

    2016-08-01

    Persons with multiple chronic conditions receive multiple guideline-recommended medications to improve outcomes such as mortality. Our objective was to estimate the longitudinal average attributable fraction for 3-year survival of medications for cardiovascular conditions in persons with multiple chronic conditions and to determine whether heterogeneity occurred by age. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey participants (N = 8,578) with two or more chronic conditions, enrolled from 2005 to 2009 with follow-up through 2011, were analyzed. We calculated the longitudinal extension of the average attributable fraction for oral medications (beta blockers, renin-angiotensin system blockers, and thiazide diuretics) indicated for cardiovascular conditions (atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, heart failure, and hypertension), on survival adjusted for 18 participant characteristics. Models stratified by age (≤80 and >80 years) were analyzed to determine heterogeneity of both cardiovascular conditions and medications. Heart failure had the greatest average attributable fraction (39%) for mortality. The fractional contributions of beta blockers, renin-angiotensin system blockers, and thiazides to improve survival were 10.4%, 9.3%, and 7.2% respectively. In age-stratified models, of these medications thiazides had a significant contribution to survival only for those aged 80 years or younger. The effects of the remaining medications were similar in both age strata. Most cardiovascular medications were attributed independently to survival. The two cardiovascular conditions contributing independently to death were heart failure and atrial fibrillation. The medication effects were similar by age except for thiazides that had a significant contribution to survival in persons younger than 80 years. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Medical management of cerebellar abscess: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan C; Dodson, Sean C; Rosen, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    A large abscess of the posterior fossa often warrants surgical intervention. We report a case of a 50-year-old male presenting with a cerebellar abscess measuring 2.8 cm x 1.6 cm located in the left cerebellar hemisphere at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle that was treated conservatively and successfully with antibiotics. Therapeutic management options are discussed in regards to this case specifically as well as a review of the literature. This case illustrates the successful medical management of a cerebellar abscess of otogenic origin in an adult, a unique result in terms of abscess size and age of the patient.

  10. The Medical Nutritional Therapy for Glycogen Storage Diseases:Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-wei LI; Kang YU; Rong-rong LI; Ming LI; Min-jie ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by inherited defects in one of enzymes in glycogenolysis or/and gluconeogenesis. The morbidity of GSDs ranges from 0.04% to 0.05%, according to European data. Since limited data are available, more studies are needed in diagnosis and treatment of GSDs. To date, medical nutritional therapy (MNT) has become an effective measure in improving the clinical outcome of GSDs patients. We reported 4 cases of GSDs with different manifestations, including hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and growth retardation. We also provided individualized nutritional interventions and literature review was conducted as well.

  11. Caloric vestibular stimulation as a treatment for conversion disorder: A case report and medical hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eNoll-Hussong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS has been demonstrated to modulate transiently a variety of cognitive functions associated with brain activations, especially in the temporal-parietal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex, there is evidence to assume an effect in specific mental disorders. Therefore, we go on to hypothesize that lateralized cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating conversion disorder and we present provisional evidence from one patient that supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct, this will be the first time in psychiatry and neurology that a clinically well-known mental disorder, long considered difficult to understand and to treat, is relieved by a simple or common, non-invasive medical procedure.

  12. Caloric vestibular stimulation as a treatment for conversion disorder: a case report and medical hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll-Hussong, Michael; Holzapfel, Sabrina; Pokorny, Dan; Herberger, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation has been demonstrated to modulate a variety of cognitive functions associated with brain activations, especially in the temporal-parietal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex, there is evidence to assume an effect in specific mental disorders. Therefore, we go on to hypothesize that lateralized cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating conversion disorder and we present provisional evidence from one patient that supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct, this will be the first time in psychiatry and neurology that a clinically well-known mental disorder, long considered difficult to understand and to treat, is relieved by a simple or common, non-invasive medical procedure.

  13. Report of the American Medical Student Association's Nutrition Curriculum Project. Essentials of nutrition education in medical schools: a national consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Medical students of the American Medical Student Association established the Nutrition Curriculum Project (NCP) with the goals of ensuring that adequate nutrition information be taught to medical students; ensuring that there be a framework for integration of nutrition topics at all levels of medical education; and formulating and disseminating essential information for nutrition assessment and management in clinical practice. As a first step, the NCP assembled a ten-member advisory board to develop a comprehensive list of nutrition topics deemed essential for the adequate training of physicians. The advisory board consisted of medical and nutrition educators, physicians, and clinical specialists representing major U.S. professional nutrition organizations. The NCP's director coordinated the decision-making process through its three iterations. Final accord on 92 topics was achieved with unanimous approval of the board in 1994. These topics, organized in five major categories, are offered as a guide to the reform of nutrition education and as the basis of a satisfactory nutrition curriculum.

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 1, Number 3, June 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Causes of lost duty days ................. 8 Adenovirus Outbreak — Fort Jackson .................... 9 ARD surveillance update...notifiable conditions, United States Army* (continued) May, 1995 Salmonellosis Shigella Campylobacteriosis Tuberculosis Reporting Active Other Active...Adenovirus Outbreak — Basic Trainees, Fort Jackson, SC negative for group A beta strep. The average hospital stay was 48 - 72 hours without significant

  15. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  16. Do US medical students report more training on evidence-based prevention topics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Erica; Schlair, Sheira; Elon, Lisa; Saraiya, Mona

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the extent to which evidence-based prevention topics are taught in medical school. All class of 2003 medical students (n = 2316) at 16 US schools were eligible to complete three questionnaires: at the beginning of first and third years and in their senior year, with 80.3% responding. We queried these students about 21 preventive medicine topics, concerning the extent of their training and their patient counseling frequency at some of these time points. At the beginning of the third year, self-reported extensive training was low for all preventive medicine topics (range 7-26%). USPSTF-recommended topics received more curricular time (median for topics: 36% if recommended versus 24.5% if not, P = 0.025), as did topics addressed through testing rather than through discussion (median for topics: 37% for testing and 25% for discussion, P = 0.005). Extensive training was always associated with higher counseling frequency, and intention to go into primary care, female gender, a positive attitude toward prevention and positive personal health habits were associated with higher counseling frequency. Although some bemoan the overall low levels of US medical students' prevention-related training and practice, we demonstrate that at least they are preferentially evidence-based, a novel and encouraging finding for preventionists.

  17. Role of Clinical Pharmacists in Early Detection, Reporting and Prevention of Medication Errors in a Medical Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Hassani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug utilization evaluation (DUE is an effective process in order to identifying variability in drug use and subsequent application of effective interventions for improving  patient outcomes. In this study, appropriate uses of drugs were evaluated by pharmacy service.Methods: A prospective, interventional study was designed for determining frequency and type of clinical pharmacists’ interventions and medication errors occurred in the infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital, affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 8 months. Results: During the 8 months of the study period, 498 errors were detected among 419 patients that admitted to infectious disease ward of Loghman hospital. Most common errors were related to DVT prophylaxis, SUP and vancomycin monitoring. Discussion: Our result showed that clinical pharmacy interventions can have an important role in reducing adverse drug events and their activities can be effective for reducing of medication error.

  18. Clinical compliance of viewing conditions in radiology reporting environments against current guidelines and standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, S.; Rainford, L.; Butler, M. L.

    2014-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the importance of environmental conditions in the radiology reporting environment, with many indicating that incorrect parameters could lead to error and misinterpretation. Literature is available with recommendations as to the levels that should be achieved in clinical practice, but evidence of adherence to these guidelines in radiology reporting environments is absent. This study audited the reporting environments of four teleradiologist and eight hospital based radiology reporting areas. This audit aimed to quantify adherence to guidelines and identify differences in the locations with respect to layout and design, monitor distance and angle as well as the ambient factors of the reporting environments. In line with international recommendations, an audit tool was designed to enquire in relation to the layout and design of reporting environments, monitor angle and distances used by radiologists when reporting, as well as the ambient factors such as noise, light and temperature. The review of conditions were carried out by the same independent auditor for consistency. The results obtained were compared against international standards and current research. Each radiology environment was given an overall compliance score to establish whether or not their environments were in line with recommended guidelines. Poor compliance to international recommendations and standards among radiology reporting environments was identified. Teleradiology reporting environments demonstrated greater compliance than hospital environments. The findings of this study identified a need for greater awareness of environmental and perceptual issues in the clinical setting. Further work involving a larger number of clinical centres is recommended.

  19. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  20. Characterizing weekly self-reported antihypertensive medication nonadherence across repeated occasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voils CI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Corrine I Voils,1,2 Heather A King,1 Brian Neelon,1,2 Rick H Hoyle,3 Bryce B Reeve,4 Matthew L Maciejewski,1,2 William S Yancy Jr1,21Health Services Research and Development, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University; 3Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University; 4Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Little is known about weekly variability in medication nonadherence both between and within persons.Purpose: To characterize medication nonadherence across repeated, closely spaced occasions.Methods: This prospective cohort study comprised four unannounced telephone assessment occasions, each separated by approximately 2 weeks. On each occasion, adult outpatients taking at least a single antihypertensive medication completed a measure of extent of, and reasons for, nonadherence.Results: Two hundred and sixty-one participants completed 871 (83% of 1,044 occasions. Nonadherence was reported on 152 (17.5% of 871 occasions by 93 (36% of 261 participants. The most commonly endorsed reasons for nonadherence were forgetting (39.5%, being busy (23.7%, and traveling (19.7%. Among 219 participants completing at least three occasions, 50% of the variability in extent of nonadherence was a result of within-person fluctuations, and 50% was a result of between-person differences.Conclusion: Interventions to reduce nonadherence should be informed by variability in the extent of nonadherence and specific reasons for nonadherence.Keywords: adherence, compliance, hypertension, intraindividual variability

  1. Self-reported attitudes and behaviours of medical students in Pakistan regarding academic misconduct: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghias, Kulsoom; Lakho, Ghulam Rehmani; Asim, Hamna; Azam, Iqbal Syed; Saeed, Sheikh Abdul

    2014-05-29

    Honesty and integrity are key attributes of an ethically competent physician. However, academic misconduct, which includes but is not limited to plagiarism, cheating, and falsifying documentation, is common in medical colleges across the world. The purpose of this study is to describe differences in the self-reported attitudes and behaviours of medical students regarding academic misconduct depending on gender, year of study and type of medical institution in Pakistan. A cross sectional study was conducted with medical students from one private and one public sector medical college. A pre-coded questionnaire about attitudes and behaviours regarding plagiarism, lying, cheating and falsifying documentation was completed anonymously by the students. A total of 465 medical students filled the questionnaire. 53% of private medical college students reported that they recognize copying an assignment verbatim and listing sources as references as wrong compared to 35% of public medical college students. 26% of private medical college students self-report this behaviour as compared to 42% of public medical college students. 22% of private versus 15% of public medical college students and 21% of students in clinical years compared to 17% in basic science years admit to submitting a fake medical certificate to justify an absence. 87% of students at a private medical college believe that cheating in an examination is wrong as compared to 66% of public medical college students and 24% self-report this behaviour in the former group as compared to 41% in the latter. 63% of clinical year students identify cheating as wrong compared to 89% of their junior colleagues. 71% of male versus 84% of female respondents believe that cheating is wrong and 42% of males compared to 23% of females admit to cheating. There are significant differences in medical students' attitudes and behaviours towards plagiarism, lying, cheating and stealing by gender, seniority status and type of institution

  2. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  3. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis associated with gadolinium based contrast agents: A summary of the medical literature reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Dale R. [Department of Radiology, Loma Loma University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, Room 2606, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)], E-mail: dbroome@ahs.llumc.edu

    2008-05-15

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a systemic fibrosing disorder that principally affects the skin, but can involve virtually any tissue in the human body and result in significant disability and even death. Since 2006 numerous retrospective case reports and case series have reported a very strong association of this disease with exposure to gadolinium-based contrast agents (Gd-CA) for MR imaging in the setting of severe or end-stage renal disease. The purpose of this report is to summarize the medical literature reporting of biopsy-proven NSF cases in which the authors specifically investigated patient exposure to Gd-CA. A Pub Med MEDLINE search was performed using the key words-nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy. All case reports and case series of NSF were reviewed to determine if patients had a preceding exposure to Gd-CA and which specific Gd-CA was involved. If the original reports did not clarify the specific Gd-CA, I reviewed follow-up letters to the editors or contacted the authors to clarify which specific Gd-CA were linked to the NSF cases. If several reports originated from the same institution, clarification was also obtained to avoid redundant reporting. As of February 1, 2008 there have been 190 biopsy-proven cases of NSF published in the peer-reviewed literature with the following associations: 157 gadodiamide (Omniscan, GE Healthcare), 8 gadopentetate (Magnevist, Bayer Healthcare), 3 gadoversetamide (OptiMARK, Covidien), and 18 unspecified Gd-CA, and 4 confounded cases with more than one Gd-CA. Five cases of NSF were unassociated with Gd-CA.

  4. Evaluation of need for ontologies to manage domain content for the Reportable Conditions Knowledge Management System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilbeck, Karen L; Lipstein, Julie; McGarvey, Sunanda; Staes, Catherine J

    2014-01-01

    The Reportable Condition Knowledge Management System (RCKMS) is envisioned to be a single, comprehensive, authoritative, real-time portal to author, view and access computable information about reportable conditions. The system is designed for use by hospitals, laboratories, health information exchanges, and providers to meet public health reporting requirements. The RCKMS Knowledge Representation Workgroup was tasked to explore the need for ontologies to support RCKMS functionality. The workgroup reviewed relevant projects and defined criteria to evaluate candidate knowledge domain areas for ontology development. The use of ontologies is justified for this project to unify the semantics used to describe similar reportable events and concepts between different jurisdictions and over time, to aid data integration, and to manage large, unwieldy datasets that evolve, and are sometimes externally managed.

  5. An audit of reported acute transfusion reactions in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeya, Y; Abdul-Kahar, A H; Leong, C F

    2011-06-01

    Transfusion is an irreversible event which carries potential benefits as well as risk to the recipient. The objective of this study was to analyse all reported transfusion reactions of the year 2008 in the Blood Bank Unit of Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). This is a retrospective study that was carried out by retrieving data from the laboratory information system. A total of 27842 transfusions were documented and the total reported transfusion reactions were 149. The incidence of transfusion reaction was 1 in 187 of all transfusions (0.54%); in which 69 (0.25%) were allergic in nature and 61 (0.22%) were febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR). Hypotensive reactions were identified in 6 (0.02%) patients. There were 9 (0.03%) cases reported with haemoglobinuria where no serological evidence of haemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) was found. One HTR (0.003%) was identified and this was due to an error in patient identification in the ward. Other specified reactions like transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), bacterial infections, Graft verses host disease (GVHD) were not reported. The highest frequency of the reactions occurred in the red cell transfusions which accounted for 111 cases. In conclusion, the incidences of transfusion reactions are low when compared to those reported by other centres.

  6. OF MICROBES AND MEN: A SPECIAL REPORT IN THE JOURNAL FOR MINORITY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BILL BOWERS

    2008-11-12

    In support of the mission for the Office of Science and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Spectrum Publishers proposes an editorial project to inform and educate minority undergraduate students in the sciences, minority medical students and minority medical residents of the opportunities and challenges available to them as they complete their training. This editorial project will take the form of a 32-page insert in the Journal for Minority Medical Students. The subject matter will be determined by BER based on mission requirements. The material will be compiled, assembled, edited, revised, designed, printed and distributed as a total package with a vast majority of the work performed by our staff. Our objective is to provide the special report without added (and burdensome) work to the BER staff. The 32-page report will be distributed to our readership of 10,000 future scientists and physicians. In addition, we will prepare the insert so that it can also be used by BER as a stand-alone piece and outreach tool. After publication, we will solicit feedback from our readers through our unique Campus Rep Program of students strategically located on campuses across the nation who will provide valuable editorial feedback. This innovative program will give BER a quick read on the effectiveness of its message. The total cost for this mission-related project is only $30,000.00. Based on our earlier experience with DOE, we are confident that this level of funding will be sufficient to develop an effective educational campaign.

  7. Psychiatric illness presenting with a sexual complaint and management by psychotropic medications: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychman, Michael; Carter, Jeanne; Amsterdam, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Sexual medicine healthcare professionals, who do not normally examine men and women with psychiatric disorders, need to be aware that those with psychiatric disorders can and do present with sexual medicine problems. In particular, psychiatric individuals may present with a variety of delusions including those that have sexual content or sexual implications. The rare disorder of reverse delusional misidentification syndrome may be encountered in schizophrenic patients and may be best managed by the combined team effort of a sexual medicine specialist and psychiatrist. To report a case study that reiterates the assessment and sexual medicine management of a female with sexual dysfunction who believed she was transforming into a male. Case report of a woman who attended an outpatient clinic in an academic medical center. A 60-year-old woman with a history of paranoid schizophrenia presented to a gynecologist for ovarian cancer screening. Evaluation revealed complaints that the patient's ovaries were testes that produced sperm and her clitoris was a penis capable of erection and ejaculation. Gynecological examination revealed only atrophic vaginitis. The patient was treated with local minimally absorbed vaginal estrogens and referred for psychological assessment and counseling. Psychotropic medication compliance was encouraged, weekly psychotherapy was continued, and delusional symptoms were minimized. Sexual medicine healthcare providers should be prepared to manage sex health concerns of men and women with psychiatric disorders, including delusional misidentification syndrome, in conjunction with a psychiatrist.

  8. Frontal white matter alterations in short-term medicated panic disorder patients without comorbid conditions: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Kim

    Full Text Available The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD. A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD.

  9. Factors affecting nursing students' intention to report medication errors: An application of the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Natan, Merav; Sharon, Ira; Mahajna, Marlen; Mahajna, Sara

    2017-11-01

    Medication errors are common among nursing students. Nonetheless, these errors are often underreported. To examine factors related to nursing students' intention to report medication errors, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, and to examine whether the theory is useful in predicting students' intention to report errors. This study has a descriptive cross-sectional design. Study population was recruited in a university and a large nursing school in central and northern Israel. A convenience sample of 250 nursing students took part in the study. The students completed a self-report questionnaire, based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The findings indicate that students' intention to report medication errors was high. The Theory of Planned Behavior constructs explained 38% of variance in students' intention to report medication errors. The constructs of behavioral beliefs, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control were found as affecting this intention, while the most significant factor was behavioral beliefs. The findings also reveal that students' fear of the reaction to disclosure of the error from superiors and colleagues may impede them from reporting the error. Understanding factors related to reporting medication errors is crucial to designing interventions that foster error reporting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of reported e-prescribing near misses in King Saud Medical City, Riyadh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Zaagi IA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Abdulaziz Al-Zaagi,1 Khalid Abdulrahman Aldhwaihi,2 Dalal Salem Al-Dossari,1 Sara Osama Salem,3 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi41Pharmaceutical Care and Medication Safety, King Saud Medical City, 2General Administration of Pharmaceutical Care, Ministry of Health, 3Drug Poisoning Information Center, King Saud Medical City, 4General Administration of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: In the health care context, a “near miss” is a drug presciption error that happened but did not affect the patient. These errors are captured and corrected before reaching the patient fortuitously or purposefully by designed system controls. This study analyzed the reported near misses in a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh city.Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated consecutively collected near miss report forms over a period of 6 months from January 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012.Results: The total number of near miss report forms was 1,025 and each form contained one or more near misses. Of these near miss report forms, 58.73% (n = 602 were related to male patients. Most frequently reported near misses were wrong frequency (n = 266, 25.95%, followed by improper doses (n = 250, 24.39%, wrong drug prescribed (n = 126, 12.29%, wrong duration (n = 97, 9.46%, wrong concentration (n = 92, 8.98%, and wrong dosage form (n = 57, 5.56%. Stages where most near misses were identified included transcription and entering (n = 676, 55.32%, physician ordering (n = 397, 32.49%, and dispensing and delivery (n = 115, 9.41%. Physicians and nurses made most of the near misses (n = 929, 89.1%, whereas pharmacists identified most of the near misses (n = 1,002, 97.3%. Most frequently reported reasons for near misses were lack of staff training (n = 419, 34.12%, communication problems related to drug order (n = 387, 31.5%, staff, workflow and milieu problems (n = 199, 16.2%, and missing drug information (n = 121, 9.85%. Sites related to

  11. Extravasation injury of balanced electrolyte solution simulates the clinical condition of necrotizing fasciitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine D'Acunto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Extravasation injury (EI is an iatrogenic condition that occurs preferentially in neonatal and pediatric patients when the injection of fluid substances by intravenous access is required and it accidentally leaks into the adjacent tissues or in spaces outside of vascular compartment. Different types and amount of substances once undergoing extravasation can affect the EI differently [1]. In some instances immediate measures such as saline washout, local antidotes, enzymatic debridement and surgical interventions can be required in order to prevent the occurrence of a growing injury avoiding the progression of the EI to a medical emergency [6]. Here we report an unusual case of a preterm 2-month-old male patient in which the extravasation of balanced electrolyte solution on the upper right arm resulted in the development of full-thickness skin necrosis appearing as the clinical condition of necrotizing fasciitis. The management of necrotic tissue was performed using escharectomy as well as autograft skin under conditions of general anesthesia.

  12. SysBioMed report: advancing systems biology for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkenhauer, O; Fell, D; De Meyts, P; Blüthgen, N; Herzel, H; Le Novère, N; Höfer, T; Schürrle, K; van Leeuwen, I

    2009-05-01

    generated from bioinformatics resources. Hence, 'the model' is, in reality, an integrated collection of data and models from various (possibly heterogeneous) sources. The present report focuses on a selection of topics, which were identified as appropriate case studies for medical systems biology, and adopts a particular perspective which the authors consider important. We strongly believe that mathematical modelling represents a natural language with which to integrate data at various levels and, in doing so, to provide insight into complex diseases: 1. Modelling necessitates the statement of explicit hypotheses, a process which often enhances comprehension of the biological system and can uncover critical points where understanding is lacking. 2. Simulations can reveal hidden patterns and/or counter-intuitive mechanisms in complex systems. 3. Theoretical thinking and mathematical modelling constitute powerful tools to integrate and make sense of the biological and clinical information being generated and, more importantly, to generate new hypotheses that can then be tested in the laboratory.Medical Systems Biology projects carried out recently across Europe have revealed a need for action: 4. While the need for mathematical modelling and interdisciplinary collaborations is becoming widely recognised in the biological sciences, with substantial implications for the training and research funding mechanisms within this area, the medical sciences have yet to follow this lead. 5. To achieve major breakthroughs in Medical Systems Biology, existing academic funding schemes for large-scale projects need to be reconsidered. 6. The hesitant stance of the pharmaceutical industry towards major investment in systems biology research has to be addressed. 7. Leading medical journals should be encouraged to promote mathematical modelling.

  13. 12 CFR 725.20 - Repayment, security and credit reporting agreements; other terms and conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Repayment, security and credit reporting agreements; other terms and conditions. 725.20 Section 725.20 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL...

  14. Summer student report - Upgrade work for the Fast Beam Condition Monitor at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tsrunchev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Report on summer student internship at CERN. Describes work done towards the replacement of the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F) - activities related to the test beam conducted by the BRIL (Background Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity) experiment in July 2016, analog opto-hybrids testing and XDAQ development for the uTCA readout system currently under development.

  15. Contemporary art and its commercial markets: a report on current conditions and future scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lind, M.; Velthuis, O.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary Art and Its Commercial Markets: A Report on Current Conditions and Future Scenarios maps and analyzes the complex and contested entanglements of contemporary art and its commercial markets. Contemporary art as an asset category and celebrity accessory, the rise of the art fair, and the

  16. Contemporary art and its commercial markets: a report on current conditions and future scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lind, M.; Velthuis, O.

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary Art and Its Commercial Markets: A Report on Current Conditions and Future Scenarios maps and analyzes the complex and contested entanglements of contemporary art and its commercial markets. Contemporary art as an asset category and celebrity accessory, the rise of the art fair, and the

  17. Knowledge, attitude and perception/practices (KAP) of medical practitioners in India towards adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharkar, Mala; Bowalekar, Suresh

    2012-07-01

    The objective was to assess knowledge, attitude and perceptions/practices (KAP) of medical practitioners (MPs) in India towards Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reporting. A questionnaire was designed for assessment of KAP of medical practitioners in India toward ADR reporting. This questionnaire was administered to 2-3 medical practitioners from each zone prior to administering final questionnaire which was approved by Disha Independent Ethics Committee, Mumbai. 1200 medical practitioners (about 300 from each zone) from India were selected randomly. 1000 medical practitioners out of 1200 (90%), selected at random were approached. A total of 870 provided responses to the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 73% of 1200 selected randomly. A total of 47.5% respondents reported that they were aware of Government ADR centers. A total of 59.2% reported that they are familiar with the procedure of reporting ADRs to Government centers. However, only 18.5% of MPs have reported the observed ADRs to Government ADR centers. As against this relatively large number of MPs (87.9%) have reported ADRs observed during their routine practice to medical representatives of pharmaceutical company and NGOs (non-Govt. Organizations). A total of 80.5% of respondents agreed that safety plays an important role and 96% reported that ADR centers are useful. However, only 55.6% of respondents have reported that there is a need for ADR centers. The study reveals that practitioners are aware of ADR reporting; their perception toward ADR reporting is right but it is not reflected when it comes to the act of reporting of ADRs. In our sample of 870 respondents only 18.5 % reported ADRs to some organizations. Only 5% of respondents recorded the details of ADR and reported to the manufacturer and 1% of respondents to government health ministry. Thus, medical practitioners in India appear to have a good knowledge about ADR reporting, the right perception toward ADR reporting. However, as far as

  18. Rating and Classification of Incident Reporting in Radiology in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Mohammad; Aran, Shima; Shaqdan, Khalid W; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a rate of safety incident report of adverse events in a large academic radiology department and to share the various types that may occur. This is a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, institutional review board-approved study. Consent requirement was waived. All incident reports from April 2006-September 2012 were retrieved. Events were further classified as follows: diagnostic test orders, identity document or documentation or consent, safety or security or conduct, service coordination, surgery or procedure, line or tube, fall, medication or intravenous safety, employee general incident, environment or equipment, adverse drug reaction (ADR), skin or tissue, and diagnosis or treatment. Overall rates and subclassification rates were calculated. There were 10,224 incident reports and 4,324,208 radiology examinations (rate = 0.23%). The highest rates of the incident reports were due to diagnostic test orders (34.3%; 3509/10,224), followed by service coordination (12.2%; 1248/10,224) and ADR (10.3%; 1052/4,324,208). The rate of incident reporting was highest in inpatient (0.30%; 2949/970,622), followed by emergency radiology (0.22%; 1500/672,958) and outpatient (0.18%; 4957/2,680,628). Approximately 48.5% (4947/10,202) of incidents had no patient harm and did not affect the patient, followed by no patient harm, but did affect the patient (35.2%, 3589/10,202), temporary or minor patient harm (15.5%, 1584/10,202), permanent or major patient harm (0.6%, 62/10,202), and patient death (0.2%, 20/10,202). Within an academic radiology department, the rate of incident reports was only 0.23%, usually did not harm the patient, and occurred at higher rates in inpatients. The most common incident type was in the category of diagnostic test orders, followed by service coordination, and ADRs.

  19. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 22, Number 12, December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    ned as local or radicular pain associated with conditions of the sacrum or lumbar spine unrelated to major trauma , neoplasms, pregnancy, or... trauma (e.g., traffi c accidents, verte- bral fractures or dislocations), pregnancy, neoplasms, infections, or other infl amma- tory causes of back...recently completed studies. One study, the Prevention of Low Back Pain in the Mili- tary cluster randomized trial, reported that brief psychosocial

  20. Laboratory Medicine Education at U.S. Medical Schools: A 2014 Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian R.; Kamoun, Malek; Hickner, John

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To assess the current state of laboratory medicine education at U.S. medical schools. Method From 2013 to 2014, the authors surveyed the appropriate dean, department chair, or undergraduate education director at each U.S. medical school accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education about the state of laboratory medicine education, curriculum and competency assessment, and barriers to education at his or her institution. The authors used descriptive statistics to analyze the results. Results The authors received 98 (75%) responses. Eighty-two schools (84%) offered course work in laboratory medicine; 76 (78%) required it. The median number of hours of required course work was 12.5, with 8.0 devoted to lectures and 4.5 to small-group, problem-based learning and/or laboratory sessions. Only 8 schools required training in a clinical setting. Fewer than half reported regular, formal review of the laboratory medicine curriculum. The assessment of students’ competency in laboratory medicine was rare (8 schools), and only half of respondents were aware of published curriculum guidelines. Barriers to teaching laboratory medicine included lack of sufficient time in the preclinical curriculum (86; 88%) or clinical curriculum (84; 86%), lack of knowledge of best laboratory practices by residents (70; 72%), lack of student interest (62; 63%), and lack of knowledge by attending physicians (58; 59%). Half of respondents were likely to use a national standardized examination to assess competency in laboratory medicine, if one was available. Conclusions Significant opportunities exist to improve laboratory medicine education, including in the proper use and interpretation of clinical laboratory testing. PMID:26200574