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Sample records for reported insomnia symptoms

  1. Job Strain and Self-Reported Insomnia Symptoms among Nurses: What about the Influence of Emotional Demands and Social Support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Luciana Fernandes; Kröning Luna, Caroline; Rotenberg, Lúcia; Silva-Costa, Aline; Toivanen, Susanna; Araújo, Tania; Griep, Rosane Härter

    2015-01-01

    Job strain, derived from high psychological demands and low job control, is associated with insomnia, but information on the role of emotional demands and social support in this relationship is scarce. The aims of this study were (i) to test the association between job strain and self-reported insomnia symptoms, (ii) to evaluate the combination of emotional demands and job control regarding insomnia symptoms, and (iii) to analyze the influence of social support in these relationships. This cross-sectional study refers to a sample of nurses (N = 3,013 and N = 3,035 for Job Strain and Emotional demand-control model, resp.) working at public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was 34.3%. Job strain was associated with increased odds for insomnia symptoms (OR: 2.20); the same result was observed with the combination of emotional demands and low job control (OR: 1.99). In both models, the inclusion of low social support combined with high demands and low job control led to increased odds for insomnia symptoms, compared to groups with high social support from coworkers and supervisors. Besides job strain, the study of emotional demands and social support are promising with regards to insomnia symptoms, particularly among nurses.

  2. Job Strain and Self-Reported Insomnia Symptoms among Nurses: What about the Influence of Emotional Demands and Social Support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Fernandes Portela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Job strain, derived from high psychological demands and low job control, is associated with insomnia, but information on the role of emotional demands and social support in this relationship is scarce. The aims of this study were (i to test the association between job strain and self-reported insomnia symptoms, (ii to evaluate the combination of emotional demands and job control regarding insomnia symptoms, and (iii to analyze the influence of social support in these relationships. This cross-sectional study refers to a sample of nurses (N = 3,013 and N = 3,035 for Job Strain and Emotional demand-control model, resp. working at public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms was 34.3%. Job strain was associated with increased odds for insomnia symptoms (OR: 2.20; the same result was observed with the combination of emotional demands and low job control (OR: 1.99. In both models, the inclusion of low social support combined with high demands and low job control led to increased odds for insomnia symptoms, compared to groups with high social support from coworkers and supervisors. Besides job strain, the study of emotional demands and social support are promising with regards to insomnia symptoms, particularly among nurses.

  3. Daytime symptom patterns in insomnia sufferers: is there evidence for subtyping insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ortuño, Maria M; Edinger, Jack D; Wyatt, James K

    2011-09-01

    The type and severity of daytime symptoms reported by insomnia sufferers may vary markedly. Whether distinctive daytime symptom profiles are related to different insomnia diagnoses has not been studied previously. Using profile analysis via multidimensional scaling, we investigated the concurrent validity of ICSD-2 insomnia diagnoses by analysing the relationship of prototypical profiles of daytime symptoms with a subset of ICSD-2 diagnoses, such as insomnia associated to a mental disorder, psychophisiological insomnia, paradoxical insomnia, inadequate sleep hygiene, idiopathic insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome. In a sample of 332 individuals meeting research diagnostic criteria for insomnia (221 women, M(age) =46 years.), the profile analysis identified four prototypical patterns of daytime features. Pearson correlation coefficients indicated that the diagnoses of insomnia associated to a mental disorder and idiopathic insomnia were associated with a daytime profile characterized by mood disturbance and low sleepiness; whereas the diagnoses of psychophysiological insomnia and inadequate sleep hygiene were related to a profile marked by poor sleep hygiene, daytime tension and low fatigue. Furthermore, whereas paradoxical insomnia was consistently associated to lower daytime impairment, insomnia associated to a mental disorder appeared as the most severe daytime form of insomnia. This classification of insomnia sufferers along multiple defining dimensions provides initial validation for two basic insomnia subtypes, with a presumably distinct aetiology: insomnia characterized mainly by an 'internal' component, and a 'learned' insomnia. Research to determine which dimensions are critical for inclusion or differential weighting for defining a general typological system for insomnia sufferers is warranted.

  4. Depressive Symptoms: The Interaction between Rumination and Self-Reported Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malmberg, M.; Larsen, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Prior research has found consistent support that rumination and insomnia are important risk factors for depressive symptoms. The aim of the present cross-sectional study is to examine the interaction between these two previously well-established risk factors (i.e., rumination and insomnia

  5. Daytime symptom patterns in insomnia sufferers: is there evidence for subtyping insomnia?

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Ortuño, Maria M.; Edinger, Jack D.; Wyatt, James K.

    2011-01-01

    The type and severity of daytime symptoms reported by insomnia sufferers may vary markedly. Whether distinctive daytime symptom profiles are related to different insomnia diagnoses has not been studied previously. Using profile analysis via multidimensional scaling, we investigated the concurrent validity of ICSD-2 insomnia diagnoses by analysing the relationship of prototypical profiles of daytime symptoms with a subset of ICSD-2 diagnoses, including insomnia associated to a mental disorder,...

  6. Correlations among insomnia symptoms, sleep medication use and depressive symptoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komada, Yoko; Nomura, Takashi; Kusumi, Masayoshi; Nakashima, Kenji; Okajima, Isa; Sasai, Taeko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    Aim:  To elucidate the factors associated with insomnia symptoms and the use of sleep medication, and the correlations among insomnia symptoms, sleep medication use and depressive symptoms in the general population. Methods...

  7. Insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder: effects of cognitive behavior therapy for gad on insomnia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M; Langlois, Frédéric; Ladouceur, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Although clinical practice suggests that sleep complaints are frequent among patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), frequency, severity, types of insomnia complaints, and relationship to GAD diagnosis severity in patients diagnosed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria are not well documented. Clinical data about the impact on insomnia symptoms of treating GAD worries are also lacking. The present study examined these aspects in 44 GAD patients who participated in a treatment study specifically addressing excessive worries through CBT interventions. All patients were assessed using a structured clinical interview and the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule-IV (ADIS-IV). They also completed anxiety and insomnia inventories, including the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), a self-report measure which assesses insomnia type, severity and interference with daily life. Among this sample, 47.7% reported difficulties initiating sleep, 63.6% reported difficulties maintaining sleep, and 56.8% complained of waking too early in the morning. The majority of these patients (86.5%) reported never having experienced insomnia without having excessive worries. However, insomnia severity and GAD severity were not correlated. In this sample, patients with severe GAD did not necessarily report more severe insomnia symptoms. Regarding treatment impact on insomnia complaints, ISI post-treatment scores were significantly lower after treatment. Mean post-treatment scores almost reached ISI's "absence of clinical insomnia" category. Results indicate that this CBT package for GAD does have a significant impact on sleep quality even if sleep disturbances were not specifically addressed during treatment.

  8. Insomnia and complicated grief symptoms in bereaved college students.

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    Hardison, Heather Gaines; Neimeyer, Robert A; Lichstein, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we extended previous research by concentrating on sleep- and grief-related symptoms in a cohort of bereaved college students, in view of the potential for each of these problems to exacerbate the other. A sample of 815 college students completed the Inventory of Complicated Grief (H. G. Prigerson & S. C. Jacobs, 2001), along with an assessment of diagnostic criteria for insomnia and associated sleep behaviors. As predicted, the rate of insomnia was significantly higher (22%) in the bereaved sample than in a nonbereaved comparison group (17%), a difference that was particularly pronounced in terms of middle insomnia. Also as hypothesized, bereaved insomniacs reported higher complicated grief scores than bereaved noninsomniacs, and several specific sleep variables (including sleep-onset insomnia related to nighttime rumination about the loss and sleep-maintenance insomnia associated with dreaming of the deceased) were significantly related to complicated grief symptomatology.

  9. Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptom of insomnia itself. Behavior changes learned through cognitive behavioral therapy are generally the best treatment for persistent insomnia. Sleeping on a regular schedule, exercising regularly, avoiding caffeine and daytime naps, and keeping stress in check ...

  10. Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder. If you have it, you may have trouble falling asleep, staying ... feel refreshed when you wake up. Symptoms of insomnia include: Lying awake for a long time before ...

  11. Prevalence, severity and risk factors for depressive symptoms and insomnia in college undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gress-Smith, Jenna L; Roubinov, Danielle S; Andreotti, Charissa; Compas, Bruce E; Luecken, Linda J

    2015-02-01

    Although the college years represent a high-risk period for depressive symptoms and insomnia, little research has explored their prevalence, comorbidities and risk factors within this developmental period. Two studies were conducted; the first evaluated the prevalence and comorbidity of depressive symptoms and insomnia in 1338 students (ages 18-23 years) from a large Southwestern University. Mild depressive symptoms were endorsed by 19% of students and 14.5% reported moderate to severe symptoms. Forty-seven percent of students reported mild insomnia and 22.5% endorsed moderate to severe insomnia severity. A second study investigated perceived stress as a potential mediator of the relation between self-reported childhood adversity and concurrent depressive symptoms and insomnia. Undergraduates (N = 447) from a Southwestern and Southeastern University reported prior childhood adversity, current perceived stress, insomnia and depressive symptoms. Self-reported childhood adversity predicted higher levels of depressive symptoms and insomnia severity, partially mediated by perceived stress. Results support the high prevalence of depressive symptoms and insomnia among undergraduates. The risk for depressive and insomnia symptoms may be increased among students who experienced greater levels of childhood adversity.

  12. Associations of reported bruxism with insomnia and insufficient sleep symptoms among media personnel with or without irregular shift work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hublin Christer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aims were to investigate the prevalence of perceived sleep quality and insufficient sleep complaints, and to analyze whether self-reported bruxism was associated with perceptions of sleep, and awake consequences of disturbed sleep, while controlling confounding factors relative to poor sleep. Methods A standardized questionnaire was mailed to all employees of the Finnish Broadcasting Company with irregular shift work (n = 750 and to an equal number of randomly selected controls in the same company with regular eight-hour daytime work. Results The response rate in the irregular shift work group was 82.3% (56.6% men and in the regular daytime work group 34.3% (46.7% men. Self-reported bruxism occurred frequently (often or continually in 10.6% of all subjects. Altogether 16.8% reported difficulties initiating sleep (DIS, 43.6% disrupted sleep (DS, and 10.3% early morning awakenings (EMA. The corresponding figures for non-restorative sleep (NRS, tiredness, and sleep deprivation (SLD were 36.2%, 26.1%, and 23.7%, respectively. According to logistic regression, female gender was a significant independent factor for all insomnia symptoms, and older age for DS and EMA. Frequent bruxism was significantly associated with DIS (p = 0.019 and DS (p = 0.021. Dissatisfaction with current work shift schedule and frequent bruxism were both significant independent factors for all variables describing insufficient sleep consequences. Conclusion Self-reported bruxism may indicate sleep problems and their adherent awake consequences in non-patient populations.

  13. Associations of reported bruxism with insomnia and insufficient sleep symptoms among media personnel with or without irregular shift work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Kristiina; Jahkola, Antti; Savolainen, Aslak; Könönen, Mauno; Partinen, Markku; Hublin, Christer; Sinisalo, Juha; Lindholm, Harri; Sarna, Seppo; Ahlberg, Jari

    2008-01-01

    Background The aims were to investigate the prevalence of perceived sleep quality and insufficient sleep complaints, and to analyze whether self-reported bruxism was associated with perceptions of sleep, and awake consequences of disturbed sleep, while controlling confounding factors relative to poor sleep. Methods A standardized questionnaire was mailed to all employees of the Finnish Broadcasting Company with irregular shift work (n = 750) and to an equal number of randomly selected controls in the same company with regular eight-hour daytime work. Results The response rate in the irregular shift work group was 82.3% (56.6% men) and in the regular daytime work group 34.3% (46.7% men). Self-reported bruxism occurred frequently (often or continually) in 10.6% of all subjects. Altogether 16.8% reported difficulties initiating sleep (DIS), 43.6% disrupted sleep (DS), and 10.3% early morning awakenings (EMA). The corresponding figures for non-restorative sleep (NRS), tiredness, and sleep deprivation (SLD) were 36.2%, 26.1%, and 23.7%, respectively. According to logistic regression, female gender was a significant independent factor for all insomnia symptoms, and older age for DS and EMA. Frequent bruxism was significantly associated with DIS (p = 0.019) and DS (p = 0.021). Dissatisfaction with current work shift schedule and frequent bruxism were both significant independent factors for all variables describing insufficient sleep consequences. Conclusion Self-reported bruxism may indicate sleep problems and their adherent awake consequences in non-patient populations. PMID:18307774

  14. Anxiety Mediates the Relationship between Perfectionism and Insomnia Symptoms: A Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umair Akram

    Full Text Available Individuals with insomnia often report aspects of perfectionism and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Investigation of these factors together has been limited. As such, the aim of the present study was to examine the extent to which the association between perfectionism and insomnia symptoms was mediated by anxiety and depression, concurrently and longitudinally.Seventy-six members from the general-population participated at baseline. Data from 57 participants were subsequently analysed at twelve-month follow-up. Insomnia symptoms were assessed using The Insomnia Severity Index (ISI. Perfectionism was assessed using two Multidimensional Perfectionism Scales (F-MPS; HF-MPS. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed using The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Correlational analysis examined longitudinal associations between perfectionism and insomnia symptoms. Hierarchical regression analysis examined whether significant associations remained after controlling for anxiety and depression.Baseline insomnia symptoms were associated with future doubts about action. Further, this relationship was mediated by preceding symptoms of anxiety and concurrent symptoms of insomnia. Similarly, baseline insomnia symptoms were also associated with future parental criticism. However this relationship was partially mediated by preceding symptoms of anxiety, and was not mediated by concurrent insomnia symptoms.Symptoms of insomnia appear to be related to an increase in negative perfectionistic thinking in the form of doubts about action and parental criticism, however these relationships appear to be mediated by symptoms of anxiety. Therefore, treatments for insomnia should address anxiety symptoms with the prospect of preventing the accentuation of aspects of perfectionism due to poor sleep.

  15. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments,...

  16. Use of relaxation techniques and complementary and alternative medicine by American adults with insomnia symptoms: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertisch, Suzanne M; Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Smith, Michael T; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2012-12-15

    Though relaxation training is recommended for insomnia, national patterns of use remain unknown. Similarly, rates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by adults with insomnia are not well established. We sought to elucidate the patterns and reasons for use of relaxation techniques and CAM use by adults with insomnia symptoms. We used the 2007 National Health Interview Survey (n = 23,358) to estimate prevalence of use among adults by self-reported insomnia symptom status. Among adults reporting insomnia symptoms (n = 4,415), we examined reasons for use and disclosure to medical professionals. We employed logistic regression to determine the adjusted associations between relaxation techniques use, CAM use, and insomnia symptoms. Among adults with insomnia symptoms, 23% used relaxation techniques and 45% used CAM annually. After adjustment, adults with insomnia symptoms had higher likelihood of using relaxation techniques (aOR 1.48, 95% CI 1.32, 1.66) and CAM (aOR 1.29, 95% CI 1.15, 1.44) compared with adults without insomnia. Deep breathing exercise was the most commonly used relaxation technique. Fewer than 2% of adults with insomnia used CAM specifically for insomnia. Only 26% of adults with insomnia symptoms disclosed their relaxation techniques use to medical professionals. Being male, lower educational and physical activity levels, income relaxation techniques use among adults with insomnia symptoms. While adults with insomnia symptoms commonly use relaxation techniques and CAM, few are using for their insomnia. Facilitating discussions about relaxation techniques may foster targeted use for insomnia.

  17. Social anxiety and insomnia: the mediating role of depressive symptoms.

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    Buckner, Julia D; Bernert, Rebecca A; Cromer, Kiara R; Joiner, Thomas E; Schmidt, Norman B

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety is commonly associated with insomnia. Given that social anxiety disorder is one of the most prevalent anxiety disorders, socially anxious individuals may be particularly vulnerable to insomnia. However, there is currently very little empirical work on this relationship. This study used bivariate correlations to examine whether social anxiety was related to insomnia in an undergraduate sample (n=176) using the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and the Insomnia Severity Index. Further, we utilized responses from the Beck Depression Inventory to investigate the role of depressive symptoms in the association between social anxiety and insomnia. Hierarchical linear regressions were used to examine the moderational and mediational role of depressive symptoms in the link between social anxiety and insomnia. To increase generalizability to clinical samples, analyses were repeated on a subset of the sample with clinically significant social anxiety symptoms (n=23) compared to a matched control group (n=23). Consistent with expectation, social anxiety was associated with increased insomnia symptoms. Specifically, social anxiety was correlated with sleep dissatisfaction, sleep-related functional impairment, perception of a sleep problem to others, and distress about sleep problems. Importantly, depressive symptoms mediated the relationship between social anxiety and insomnia, thereby at least partially accounting for insomnia among socially anxious individuals. Our data support the contention that social anxiety is associated with insomnia and suggest that depression may play a vital role in this co-occurrence.

  18. The Effects of Transdiagnostic Group CBT for Anxiety on Insomnia Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sarah Kate; Espejo, Emmanuel P; Balliett, Noelle; Werdowatz, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia is a common feature among individuals with anxiety disorders. Studies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety report moderate effects on concomitant insomnia symptoms, but further research is still needed especially toward understanding how CBT for anxiety renders beneficial effects on insomnia. The current study examined changes in insomnia symptoms reported by 51 Veterans who participated in a group-based transdiagnostic CBT for anxiety intervention. In addition, insomnia symptoms were examined in relation to symptoms of general distress (GD), anhedonic depression (AD), and anxious arousal (AA) pre- to post-treatment. Results revealed a small, though statistically significant (p CBT for anxiety can be largely attributed to changes in AA.

  19. Perceived orofacial pain and its associations with reported bruxism and insomnia symptoms in media personnel with or without irregular shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Kristiina; Ahlberg, Jari; Könönen, Mauno; Alakuijala, Anniina; Partinen, Markku; Savolainen, Aslak

    2005-08-01

    A standardized questionnaire was mailed to all employees of the Finnish Broadcasting Company with irregular shift work (n = 750) and to an equal number of randomly selected controls in the same company with regular 8-hour daytime work. The aims were to investigate the prevalence and severity of perceived orofacial pain (Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders Axis II) and to analyze whether current orofacial pain was associated with reported bruxism and insomnia symptoms (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders Revised). The response rate in the irregular shift-work group was 82.3% (56.6% men) and in the regular daytime-work group 34.3% (46.7% men). Current orofacial pain was found overall in 19.6%, of which 88.3% had experienced the pain over 6 months. All claimed that their pain fluctuated. No subjects with chronic orofacial pain reported disabling pain, and grades III and IV were not found. Insomnia symptoms and frequent bruxism were significantly more prevalent in chronic pain grade II than in lower grades. According to logistic regression, current orofacial pain was significantly positively associated with frequent bruxism (p orofacial pain and reported bruxism. The association held with both chronic orofacial pain intensity and current pain. Based on the multivariate analyses, it can be concluded that disrupted sleep and bruxism may be concomitantly involved in the development of orofacial pain.

  20. Associations of Insomnia Symptoms With Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate: The HUNT Study in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauan, Marianne; Strand, Linn B; Laugsand, Lars E

    2016-10-11

    Although elevated heart rate and blood pressure might represent biologically plausible links for the association of insomnia symptoms with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), few large studies have investigated the associations of insomnia symptoms with these factors. Our aim was to investigate the associations of self-reported insomnia symptoms with systolic and diastolic blood pressure and resting heart rate in a large population-based study. Self-reported information on insomnia symptoms, including sleep initiation problems, frequent awakening and early awakenings during night, and measurements of resting heart rate and blood pressure were collected from a total of 50,806 men and women who participated in the third wave of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT-3) in 2006-2008. In multivariable analyses, we adjusted for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle factors, established CVD risk factors, and snoring or breathing pauses. Compared to participants reporting none of the insomnia symptoms, those having all three insomnia symptoms several times a week had lower diastolic blood pressure (-0.80 [95% CI: -1.47 to -0.14] mmHg, p = 0.02), lower systolic blood (-1.69 [95% CI: -2.76 to -0.63) mmHg, p heart rate (0.83 [95% CI: 0.11 to 1.55] beats/minute, p = 0.02). We found a modest positive association of insomnia symptoms with resting heart rate, and a modest inverse association of insomnia with blood pressure. However, the actual differences were small, and likely of less clinical importance. Prospective studies are needed to establish whether the potential link between insomnia and CVD is mediated through changes in heart rate and/or blood pressure.

  1. Do manualized treatments for depression reduce insomnia symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Adriana; Scogin, Forrest; DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; McPherron, Jesse; Arean, Patricia A; Bowman, Daniel; Jamison, Christine S; Karpe, Jennifer A; Latour, David; Reynolds, Charles F; Rohen, Noelle; Pardini, Jamie E L; Thompson, Larry W

    2014-07-01

    Researchers evaluated the effect of manualized treatments for depression on comorbid symptoms of insomnia. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze archival data collected from 14 studies (N = 910) examining the efficacy of psychological treatments for depression in adults. Participants receiving a psychological treatment for depression experienced significantly more relief from symptoms of insomnia with overall, early-, middle-, and late-night sleep than those not receiving such treatment. Symptoms of insomnia in those with an average (or lower) level of depression can be reduced through psychological treatment for depression. However, more severe depressive symptoms do not receive great relief from sleep disturbance and may require an additional treatment component targeting symptoms of insomnia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Insomnia symptoms with objective short sleep duration are associated with systemic inflammation in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Baker, Joshua H; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Gaines, Jordan; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O

    2017-03-01

    Inflammation has been suggested as a potential pathway by which insomnia and short sleep can affect risk of morbidity in adults. However, few studies have examined the association of insomnia with inflammation in adolescents, despite accumulating evidence that pathophysiologic changes may already occur during this critical developmental period. The present study sought to examine the association of insomnia symptoms with systemic inflammation and the role of objective sleep duration in this association. Participants were 378 adolescents (16.9±2.3y, 45.8% female) from the Penn State Child Cohort, a population-based sample who underwent 9-h polysomnography (PSG) followed by a single fasting blood draw to assess plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other inflammatory markers. Insomnia symptoms were defined by a self-report of difficulties falling and/or staying asleep, while objective sleep duration groups were defined as a PSG total sleep time ⩾8, 8-7, and ⩽7h. We assessed the association of insomnia symptoms, objective sleep duration, and their interaction with inflammatory markers, while adjusting for multiple potential confounders. Adolescents reporting insomnia symptoms had significantly higher levels of CRP compared to controls and a significant interaction (pinsomnia symptoms and ⩽7h of sleep (1.79mg/L) as compared to controls or adolescents with insomnia symptoms and ⩾8h of sleep (0.90mg/L and 0.98mg/L, respectively) or controls with ⩽7h of sleep (0.74mg/L; all p-values insomnia symptoms with objective short sleep duration are associated with systemic inflammation as early as adolescence. This study suggests that chronic low-grade inflammation may be a common final pathway towards morbidity in adulthood in this insomnia phenotype.

  3. [association Between Insomnia Symptoms, Daytime Napping, And Falls In Community-dwelling Elderly].

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira,Alexandre Alves; Ceolim, Maria Filomena; Neri,Anita Liberalesso

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on associations between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly, using a population-based cross-sectional design and probability sample with 689 community-dwelling elders. The protocol consisted of self-reported and physical performance variables. The study used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Prevalence rates for insomnia symptoms and daytime napping were 49.9% (n = ...

  4. Association between insomnia symptoms and functional status in U.S. older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spira, Adam P; Kaufmann, Christopher N; Kasper, Judith D; Ohayon, Maurice M; Rebok, George W; Skidmore, Elizabeth; Parisi, Jeanine M; Reynolds, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    We studied the association between insomnia symptoms and late-life functioning, including physical capacity, limitations in household activities, and participation in valued activities. Participants were 6,050 adults independent in self-care activities from a representative sample of older Medicare beneficiaries. They completed objective measures of physical capacity and self-report measures of insomnia symptoms, help and difficulty with household activities, and participation in valued activities. After adjustment, insomnia symptoms were associated with a greater odds of receiving help or having difficulty with selected household activities (laundry, shopping), greater odds of help or difficulty with ≥ 1 household activity [1 symptom vs. 0, odds ratio (OR)=1.27, p going out for enjoyment) and in ≥ 1 valued activity (1 symptom vs. 0, OR = 1.29, p < .05; 2 symptoms vs. 0, OR = 1.50, p < .01). There was no independent association between insomnia symptoms and physical capacity. Among older adults, insomnia symptoms are associated with a greater odds of limitation in household activities and of restricted participation in valued activities. Insomnia interventions may improve functioning and quality of life among elders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Daytime symptom patterns in insomnia sufferers: is there evidence for subtyping insomnia?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SÁNCHEZ‐ORTUÑO, MARIA M; EDINGER, JACK D; WYATT, JAMES K

    2011-01-01

    ...‐2 diagnoses, such as insomnia associated to a mental disorder, psychophisiological insomnia, paradoxical insomnia, inadequate sleep hygiene, idiopathic insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea and restless legs syndrome...

  6. Insomnia in relation to depression and somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Anzi, Freih O

    2006-08-01

    A sample of 358 Kuwaiti volunteer college students responded to the Insomnia Scale, the Somatic Symptoms Inventory, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. The only significant sex difference was in somatic symptoms on which women had a higher mean score than the men. Correlations between scores on the Insomnia Scale and both Depression scales were .51 and .54 and for Somatic Symptoms were .53 and .61 (p < .01) among men and women, respectively. The factor analysis of the intercorrelations yielded a highly loaded general factor for Psychological Disorder in both samples.

  7. A comparison of rates of residual insomnia symptoms following pharmacotherapy or cognitive-behavioral therapy for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Segal, Zindel V; Edinger, Jack D; Krystal, Andrew D

    2007-02-01

    A number of pharmacologic studies have documented that insomnia is among the most commonly reported residual symptoms after remission from depression. Residual symptoms after remission are particularly relevant because these symptoms confer greater risk for subsequent depression. This study was the first to date to examine residual insomnia after cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression and to compare CBT with pharmacotherapy for depression on residual insomnia rates. This naturalistic study examined rates of posttreatment insomnia complaints in patients (N = 94) who had been diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD), according to DSM-IV criteria, and who remitted from MDD after completing at least 20 weeks of either CBT or pharmacotherapy at an outpatient clinic specializing in mood disorders. Participants were randomly assigned to the treatment conditions, but only the data from those who completed treatment and remitted were analyzed. Primary outcome measure was the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Data were collected from October 1, 1999, to September 23, 2003. Groups were compared using a chi(2) for nominal data. The rate of posttreatment insomnia was 22% for sleep-onset insomnia, 26% for sleep-maintenance insomnia, and 17% for early morning awakenings, and the rates did not statistically differ across the 2 treatment groups. Although CBT and pharmacotherapy effectively addressed depression in these patients and addressed insomnia symptoms for many, there were a number of patients with residual insomnia. Whereas there appears to be no difference between CBT and pharmacotherapy with regard to rates of residual insomnia, the rates of such insomnia remaining after these treatments suggest that adjunctive sleep treatment to specifically address insomnia may be necessary for some MDD patients.

  8. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD.

  9. Effects of a Multi-Component Behavioral Intervention (MCI) for Insomnia on Depressive and Insomnia Symptoms in Individuals with High and Low Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirsten; Sidani, Souraya; Epstein, Dana R.

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia and depression are prevalent and co-occurring conditions that are associated with significant impairment of life. Previous research indicates that cognitive-behavioral interventions for insomnia (CBT-I) can improve both insomnia and depressive symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine whether a multi-component behavioral intervention (MCI) improved both insomnia and depressive symptoms in persons presenting with insomnia and high levels of depression. The sample consisted of 3...

  10. Insomnia Symptoms, Nightmares, and Suicide Risk: Duration of Sleep Disturbance Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadorff, Michael R.; Nazem, Sarra; Fiske, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Duration of insomnia symptoms or nightmares was investigated to see if it was related to suicide risk independent of current insomnia symptoms, nightmares, anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic symptoms. The cross-sectional study involved analyses of survey responses from undergraduate students who endorsed either insomnia…

  11. Measurement properties of the Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS in an elderly population in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagerström Cecilia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insomnia is common among elderly people and associated with poor health. The Minimal Insomnia Symptom Scale (MISS is a three item screening instrument that has been found to be psychometrically sound and capable of identifying insomnia in the general population (20-64 years. However, its measurement properties have not been studied in an elderly population. Our aim was to test the measurement properties of the MISS among people aged 65 + in Sweden, by replicating the original study in an elderly sample. Methods Data from a cross-sectional survey of 548 elderly individuals were analysed in terms of assumptions of summation of items, floor/ceiling effects, reliability and optimal cut-off score by means of ROC-curve analysis and compared with self-reported insomnia criteria. Results Corrected item-total correlations ranged between 0.64-0.70, floor/ceiling effects were 6.6/0.6% and reliability was 0.81. ROC analysis identified the optimal cut-off score as ≥7 (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.84; positive/negative predictive values, 0.256/0.995. Using this cut-off score, the prevalence of insomnia in the study sample was 21.7% and most frequent among women and the oldest old. Conclusions Data support the measurement properties of the MISS as a possible insomnia screening instrument for elderly persons. This study make evident that the MISS is useful for identifying elderly people with insomnia-like sleep problems. Further studies are needed to assess its usefulness in identifying clinically defined insomnia.

  12. The Melatonin Receptor Agonist Ramelteon Effectively Treats Insomnia and Behavioral Symptoms in Autistic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Kawabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD, including autistic disorder, frequently suffer from comorbid sleep problems. An altered melatonin rhythm is considered to underlie the impairment in sleep onset and maintenance in ASD. We report three cases with autistic disorder in whom nocturnal symptoms improved with ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist. Insomnia and behavior, assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, improved in two cases with 2 mg ramelteon and in the third case with 8 mg ramelteon. Our findings demonstrate that ramelteon is effective not only for insomnia, but for behavioral problems as well, in patients with autistic disorder.

  13. The melatonin receptor agonist ramelteon effectively treats insomnia and behavioral symptoms in autistic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Fumie; Oka, Yasunori; Ueno, Shu-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including autistic disorder, frequently suffer from comorbid sleep problems. An altered melatonin rhythm is considered to underlie the impairment in sleep onset and maintenance in ASD. We report three cases with autistic disorder in whom nocturnal symptoms improved with ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist. Insomnia and behavior, assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, improved in two cases with 2 mg ramelteon and in the third case with 8 mg ramelteon. Our findings demonstrate that ramelteon is effective not only for insomnia, but for behavioral problems as well, in patients with autistic disorder.

  14. Insomnia symptoms and repressive coping in a sample of older Black and White women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Louis Jessy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined whether ethnic differences in insomnia symptoms are mediated by differences in repressive coping styles. Methods A total of 1274 women (average age = 59.36 ± 6.53 years participated in the study; 28% were White and 72% were Black. Older women in Brooklyn, NY were recruited using a stratified, cluster-sampling technique. Trained staff conducted face-to-face interviews lasting 1.5 hours acquiring sociodemographic data, health characteristics, and risk factors. A sleep questionnaire was administered and individual repressive coping styles were assessed. Fisher's exact test and Spearman and Pearson analyses were used to analyze the data. Results The rate of insomnia symptoms was greater among White women [74% vs. 46%; χ2 = 87.67, p 1,1272 = 304.75, p s = -0.43, p s = -0.18, p Conclusion Relationships between ethnicity and insomnia symptoms are jointly dependent on the degree of repressive coping, suggesting that Black women may be reporting fewer insomnia symptoms because of a greater ability to route negative emotions from consciousness. It may be that Blacks cope with sleep problems within a positive self-regulatory framework, which allows them to deal more effectively with sleep-interfering psychological processes to stressful life events and to curtail dysfunctional sleep-interpreting processes.

  15. Treating the root cause: acupuncture for the treatment of migraine, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Amber E; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind L; Bauer, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the effectiveness of a single intervention, acupuncture, for relieving or abolishing severe migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia and, thus, markedly improving quality of life. A 49-year-old woman was referred for acupuncture treatment of her daily migraines, menopausal vasomotor symptoms, and chronic insomnia. The patient had received polypharmacy treatment for these conditions for several years but had rather limited relief of her symptoms. The patient received 10 weekly or biweekly acupuncture treatments over three months. Her migraines reduced in frequency and intensity after her first acupuncture treatment, and she was able to discontinue use of her migraine medications after her eighth treatment. Subsequently, her menopausal vasomotor symptoms and chronic insomnia resolved. This case illustrates successful treatment of the symptoms of three medical conditions with a single complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine procedure, namely, acupuncture, one of the key elements of traditional Chinese medicine. The patient's medical problems had been treated for years with a multitude of medications, which led to adverse effects and little symptomatic improvement. Providers of complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine and providers practicing allopathic medicine should seek treatment options for their patients that promise to be helpful for various symptoms or diseases, that is, treating the root cause rather than using polypharmacy for various symptoms.

  16. Dissociative symptoms and sleep parameters--an all-night polysomnography study in patients with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Kloet, Dalena; Giesbrecht, Timo; Franck, Erik; Van Gastel, Ann; De Volder, Ilse; Van Den Eede, Filip; Verschuere, Bruno; Merckelbach, Harald

    2013-08-01

    Dissociative disorders encompass a range of symptoms varying from severe absent-mindedness and memory problems to confusion about one's own identity. Recent studies suggest that these symptoms may be the by-products of a labile sleep-wake cycle. In the current study, we explored this issue in patients suffering from insomnia (N=46). We investigated whether these patients have raised levels of dissociative symptoms and whether these are related to objective sleep parameters. Patients stayed for at least one night in a specialized sleep clinic, while sleep EEG data were obtained. In addition, they completed self-report measures on dissociative symptoms, psychological problems, and sleep characteristics. Dissociative symptom levels were elevated in patients suffering from insomnia, and were correlated with unusual sleep experiences and poor sleep quality. Longer REM sleep periods and less time spent awake during the night were predictive of dissociation. This is the first study to show that insomnia patients have raised dissociative symptom levels and that their dissociative symptoms are related to objective EEG parameters. These findings are important because they may inspire sleep-related treatment methods for dissociative disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Association between Sleep Duration, Insomnia Symptoms and Bone Mineral Density in Older Boston Puerto Rican Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinya Niu

    Full Text Available To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD among older Boston Puerto Rican adults.We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47-79 y living in Massachusetts. BMD at 3 hip sites and the lumbar spine were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Sleep duration (≤5 h, 6 h, 7 h, 8 h, or ≥9 h/d and insomnia symptoms (difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awaking, and non-restorative sleep were assessed by a questionnaire. Multivariable regression was used to examine sex-specific associations between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and BMD adjusting for standard confounders and covariates.Men who slept ≥9h/d had significantly lower femoral neck BMD, relative to those reporting 8 h/d sleep, after adjusting for age, education level, smoking, physical activity, depressive symptomatology, comorbidity and serum vitamin D concentration. This association was attenuated and lost significance after further adjustment for urinary cortisol and serum inflammation biomarkers. In contrast, the association between sleep duration and BMD was not significant in women. Further, we did not find any significant associations between insomnia symptoms and BMD in men or women.Our study does not support the hypothesis that shorter sleep duration and insomnia symptoms are associated with lower BMD levels in older adults. However, our results should be interpreted with caution. Future studies with larger sample size, objective assessment of sleep pattern, and prospective design are needed before a conclusion regarding sleep and BMD can be reached.

  18. Sleep Difficulties and Insomnia Symptoms in Norwegian Musicians Compared to the General Population and Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaag, Jonas; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Bjerkeset, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Sleep problems are reported as common among performing artists and musicians. However, epidemiological research comparing musicians to different groups of the general population is lacking. For this study, 4,168 members of the Norwegian Musician's Union were invited to an online survey regarding work and health. Of the 2,121 (51%) respondents, 1,607 were active performing musicians. We measured prevalence of insomnia symptoms using the Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS), and compared this sample to a representative sample of the general Norwegian population (n = 2,645). Overall, musicians had higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms compared to the general population (Prevalence Difference 6.9, 95% Confidence Interval 3.9-10.0). Item response analysis showed that this difference was mainly explained by nonrestorative sleep and dissatisfaction with sleep among musicians. An additional analysis, comparing musicians to the general Norwegian workforce (n = 8,518) on sleep difficulties, confirmed this tendency (Prevalence Difference 6.2, 95% Confidence Interval 4.3-8.1). Musicians performing classical, contemporary, rock, and country music reported the highest prevalence of insomnia, and these genres might be of special interest when developing preventative measures, treatment strategies, and further research on sleep difficulties among musicians.

  19. The Melatonin Receptor Agonist Ramelteon Effectively Treats Insomnia and Behavioral Symptoms in Autistic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kentaro Kawabe; Fumie Horiuchi; Yasunori Oka; Shu-ichi Ueno

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), including autistic disorder, frequently suffer from comorbid sleep problems. An altered melatonin rhythm is considered to underlie the impairment in sleep onset and maintenance in ASD. We report three cases with autistic disorder in whom nocturnal symptoms improved with ramelteon, a selective melatonin receptor agonist. Insomnia and behavior, assessed using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, improved in two cases with 2 mg ramelteo...

  20. [Distributions and associations between duration of sleep, daytime naps and insomnia symptoms among Chinese adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B; Lin, L L; Yu, C Q; Lyu, J; Guo, Y; Bian, Z; Tan, Y L; Pei, P; Chen, J S; Chen, Z M; Li, L M

    2017-04-10

    Objective: To investigate the distribution of sleep duration, daytime naps habits, and insomnia-related symptoms among participants from the China Kadoorie Biobank (CKB) study, and to examine the associations between the sleep-associated factors. Methods: A self-designed computer-based questionnaire was adopted to collect social-demographic information and lifestyle-related factors of the participants. A total of 452 829 Chinese adults aged 30-79 years, without self-reported histories of coronary heart disease, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases or cancer, were included in this study. General linear regression and multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate the distributions on duration of sleep, daytime naps habits, and insomnia-related symptoms in different populations, after adjusted for gender, age, and residential regions. Gender-specific logistic regression model was adopted to examine the associations between the above mentioned sleep-related factors. Results: The average sleep duration of the participants was 7.41 hours per day, with 20.3% of them having daytime naps all year round, but 40.1% only had daytime naps in summer, and 39.6% had no habits of daytime naps. 11.0%, 10.0%, and 2.1% of the participants reported having had symptoms as difficulty in falling asleep, waking up too early or with daytime dysfunction, respectively. There were significant differences on the distributions in sleep-related factors between participants with different gender, age, residential areas, education levels,household income, and marital status (Psleep duration was associated with lower risks of insomnia-related symptoms trend (Psleep duration were more likely to have the habit of taking daytime naps (Psleep duration, habits on daytime naps and insomnia-related symptoms varied according to the differences on social-demographic factors. There were associations existed between the sleeping-related factors, which would influence the promotion on

  1. Longitudinal course and impact of insomnia symptoms in adolescents with and without chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Palermo, Tonya M.; Law, Emily; Churchill, Shervin S.; Walker, Amy

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to: 1) examine trajectories of insomnia symptoms in adolescents with chronic pain compared to their healthy peers, 2) evaluate psychological and behavioral risk factors for longitudinal insomnia symptoms, and 3) evaluate insomnia as a predictor of quality of life, activity limitations, and healthcare utilization over 12 months. Participants included 61 adolescents with chronic pain and 60 youth without chronic pain (12–18 years; 72% female). Questionnaires were completed at e...

  2. Insomnia, sleep quality, pain, and somatic symptoms: sex differences and shared genetic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Siu-Ping; Li, S X; Tang, N L; Yu, M W M; Li, A M; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the sex differences, and the shared genetic and environmental factors underlying the associations of sleep disturbances (insomnia and sleep quality) with pain and somatic symptoms in both adolescents and middle-aged adults. We recruited 259 adolescents (69 with current insomnia) and their parents (256 middle-aged adults, 78 with current insomnia). Insomnia severity and sleep quality were measured by the Insomnia Severity Inventory (ISI) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. Pain and somatic symptoms were measured by the Somatic Symptom Inventory and Visual Analogue Scale for overall pain. Subjects with insomnia scored higher on all measures of pain and somatic symptoms than non-insomnia patients, in both adolescents and adults (Ppain and somatic measures were associated with ISI and PSQI scores after controlling for age, sex, depressive and anxiety symptoms. There was an interaction effect between insomnia and female sex on pain and somatic symptoms (PPain and somatic symptoms ran in family with moderate heritability (range h(2)=0.15-0.42). The phenotypic associations of ISI and PSQI with pain and somatic measures were both contributed by genetic (range p(G)=0.41-0.96) and environmental (range p(E)=0.27-0.40) factors with a major genetic contribution. In summary, insomnia and poor sleep quality are closely associated with pain and somatic symptoms. Insomnia seems to modulate the sex differences in pain and somatic symptoms, especially in the adult population. A shared genetic predisposition might underlie the associations of insomnia and sleep quality with pain and somatic symptoms.

  3. Nocturia, Insomnia Symptoms and Mortality among Older Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Endeshaw, Y. W.; Schwartz, A. V.; Stone, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the association between nocturia (walking up from sleep for urination) and mortality risk among community dwelling older men. Methods: This is a secondary data analysis using data obtained from the Health Aging Body Composition (Health ABC) study. Frequency of nocturia...... episodes per night, in comparison to those with 0-1 episodes (HR [CI] : 1.21 [1.00-1.47], p = 0.055), even after controlling for baseline characteristics which included demographic variables, body mass index, lower urinary tract symptoms, use of loop diuretics, insomnia symptoms, feeling excessively sleepy...... during the day/daytime naps, sleep duration, and use of sleep medications. However, the association between ≥ 3 nocturia episodes per night and mortality risk was no longer statistically significant once prevalent diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease were included in the model (HR [CI]: 1.18 [0...

  4. The relationship between media use in the bedroom, sleep habits and symptoms of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunborg, Geir Scott; Mentzoni, Rune Aune; Molde, Helge; Myrseth, Helga; Skouverøe, Knut Joachim Mår; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2011-12-01

    This postal questionnaire study investigated the use of media in the bedroom and its relationships with sleep habits and symptoms of insomnia. The sample comprised 2500 individuals aged 16-40 years drawn randomly from the Norwegian national register. A total of 816 (34.0%) completed and returned the questionnaire. Respondents were asked how often they used computers, television sets, DVD players, game consoles and mobile telephones and listened to music/radio in their bedrooms. They also reported sleep habits on weekdays and at weekends/days off and symptoms of insomnia. After controlling for gender, age, anxiety and depression, the respondents who used a computer in the bedroom 'often' compared to 'rarely' rose later on weekdays and at weekends/days off, turned off the lights to go to sleep later at weekends/days off, slept more hours at weekends/days off and had a greater discrepancy between turning off the lights to go to sleep on weekdays and at weekends/days off. Respondents who used a mobile telephone in their bedrooms at night 'often' compared to 'rarely' turned off the lights to go to sleep later on weekdays and at weekends/days off, and rose later at weekends/days off. No such differences were found with the use of the other media. There were also no significant differences in symptoms of insomnia. This study indicates that the use of computers and mobile telephones in the bedroom are related to poor sleep habits, but that media use in the bedroom seems to be unrelated to symptoms of insomnia.

  5. Effectiveness of Cognitive- behavioral Group Therapy on Insomnia Symptoms in Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abollahi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Insomnias is associated with considerable problems in educational, vocational, social and familial performance. The purpose of present research was to investigate the effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavior group therapy on improvement of insomnia symptoms in students. Methods: The present clinical trial study was conducted on twenty-four students who were randomly assigned into two groups of case and the control (n = 12. The experimental group was participated in eight sessions of cognitive behavior therapy, while the control group received no intervention. Research tools include the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Severity Index that completed by both participants. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, t-test. Results: Analysis of covariance showed that the performance of cognitive behavioral therapy may improve symptoms and reduce the severity of insomnia in the experimental group compared with the control group (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Group cognitive-behavioral therapy is effective on symptoms of insomnia in students.

  6. Brief Behavioral Interventions for Symptoms of Depression and Insomnia in University Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburk, Jennifer S.; Shepardson, Robyn L.; Krenek, Marketa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe how behavioral activation (BA) for depression and stimulus control (SC) for insomnia can be modified to a brief format for use in a university primary care setting, and to evaluate preliminarily their effectiveness in reducing symptoms of depression and insomnia, respectively, using data collected in routine clinical care.…

  7. [Association between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Alexandre Alves; Ceolim, Maria Filomena; Neri, Anita Liberalesso

    2013-03-01

    This study focused on associations between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly, using a population-based cross-sectional design and probability sample with 689 community-dwelling elders. The protocol consisted of self-reported and physical performance variables. The study used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis with statistical significance set at p insomnia symptoms and daytime napping were 49.9% (n = 339) and 62.8% (n = 432), respectively. 14.4% reported a single fall and 11.9% reported multiple falls. Falls were associated with female gender (OR = 7.73; 95%CI: 3.03-19.72), age > 80 (OR = 3.48; 95%CI: 1.54-7.85), napping (OR = 2.24; 95%CI: 1.24-4.05), and depressive symptoms (OR = 1.98; 95%CI: 1.11-3.53). The association between daytime napping and falls corroborates data from international research. Identifying modifiable risk factors may help programs to prevent falls in the elderly.

  8. Dietary Patterns and Insomnia Symptoms in Chinese Adults: The China Kadoorie Biobank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canqing Yu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Limited attention has been paid to the effect of dietary patterns on sleep problems. In the present study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data of 481,242 adults aged 30–79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank. A laptop-based questionnaire was administered to collect information on food intakes and insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios of each insomnia symptom according to quartiles of each dietary pattern, with adjustment for potential confounders. Two major dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. The traditional northern dietary pattern was characterized by high intakes of wheat and other staple food, whereas the modern dietary pattern was characterized by high intakes of meat, poultry, fish, eggs, fresh fruit, and dairy products. Both dietary patterns were associated with a decreased prevalence of insomnia symptoms (p for trend < 0.001; after adjustment for potential confounders, individuals who had the highest quartile score of traditional northern dietary pattern were 12%–19% less likely to have insomnia symptoms compared to those in the lowest quartile (odds ratio: 0.81–0.88, and the corresponding values for the modern dietary pattern were 0.89–1.01. Furthermore, interactions of these two dietary patterns on insomnia symptoms were observed. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between diet and insomnia.

  9. Dietary Patterns and Insomnia Symptoms in Chinese Adults: The China Kadoorie Biobank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Canqing; Shi, Zumin; Lv, Jun; Guo, Yu; Bian, Zheng; Du, Huaidong; Chen, Yiping; Tao, Ran; Huang, Ying; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Zhengming; Li, Liming

    2017-01-01

    Limited attention has been paid to the effect of dietary patterns on sleep problems. In the present study, we analyzed the cross-sectional data of 481,242 adults aged 30–79 years from the China Kadoorie Biobank. A laptop-based questionnaire was administered to collect information on food intakes and insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios of each insomnia symptom according to quartiles of each dietary pattern, with adjustment for potential confounders. Two major dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. The traditional northern dietary pattern was characterized by high intakes of wheat and other staple food, whereas the modern dietary pattern was characterized by high intakes of meat, poultry, fish, eggs, fresh fruit, and dairy products. Both dietary patterns were associated with a decreased prevalence of insomnia symptoms (p for trend < 0.001); after adjustment for potential confounders, individuals who had the highest quartile score of traditional northern dietary pattern were 12%–19% less likely to have insomnia symptoms compared to those in the lowest quartile (odds ratio: 0.81–0.88), and the corresponding values for the modern dietary pattern were 0.89–1.01. Furthermore, interactions of these two dietary patterns on insomnia symptoms were observed. Further prospective studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between diet and insomnia. PMID:28335373

  10. Effectiveness of Cognitive- behavioral Group Therapy on Insomnia Symptoms in Students

    OpenAIRE

    A Abollahi; AM Nazar; J Hasani; M Darharaj; A Behnam Moghadam

    2015-01-01

    Background & aim: Insomnias is associated with considerable problems in educational, vocational, social and familial performance. The purpose of present research was to investigate the effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavior group therapy on improvement of insomnia symptoms in students. Methods: The present clinical trial study was conducted on twenty-four students who were randomly assigned into two groups of case and the control (n = 12). The experimental group was participated in eight se...

  11. Sleep quantity, quality, and insomnia symptoms of medical students during clinical years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaggaf, Mohammed A.; Wali, Siraj O.; Merdad, Roah A.; Merdad, Leena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine sleep habits and sleep quality in medical students during their clinical years using validated measures; and to investigate associations with academic performance and psychological stress. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, medical students (n=320) were randomly selected from a list of all enrolled clinical-year students in a Saudi medical school from 2011-2012. Students filled a questionnaire including demographic and lifestyle factors, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale. Results: Students acquired on average, 5.8 hours of sleep each night, with an average bedtime at 01:53. Approximately 8% reported acquiring sleep during the day, and not during nighttime. Poor sleep quality was present in 30%, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in 40%, and insomnia symptoms in 33% of students. Multivariable regression models revealed significant associations between stress, poor sleep quality, and EDS. Poorer academic performance and stress were associated with symptoms of insomnia. Conclusion: Sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, and EDS are common among clinical years medical students. High levels of stress and the pressure of maintaining grade point averages may be influencing their quality of sleep. PMID:26837401

  12. Insomnia symptoms and risk for unintentional fatal injuries--the HUNT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Lars Erik; Strand, Linn B; Vatten, Lars J; Janszky, Imre; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon

    2014-11-01

    To assess the association between insomnia symptoms and risk of fatal unintentional injuries. Population-based prospective cohort study with a mean follow-up of 14 y, linking health survey data with information on insomnia symptoms to the National Cause of Death Registry. Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. A total of 54,399 men and women 20-89 y of age who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study between 1995 and 1997. N/A. There were 277 unintentional fatal injuries, including 57 fatal motor vehicle injuries during follow-up. There was a dose-dependent association between the number of insomnia symptoms and risk of unintentional fatal injuries (P for trend 0.001) and fatal motor vehicle injuries (P for trend 0.023), respectively. The proportion of unintentional fatal injuries cases that could have been prevented in the absence of difficulties initiating sleep, difficulties maintaining sleep, and having a feeling of nonrestorative sleep were 8%, 9%, and 8%, respectively. The corresponding estimates for motor vehicle injuries were 34%, 11%, and 10%. Insomnia is a major contributor to both unintentional fatal injuries in general as well as fatal motor vehicle injuries. Increasing public health awareness about insomnia and identifying persons with insomnia may be important in preventing unintentional fatal injuries.

  13. Insomnia and sleepiness in Parkinson disease: associations with symptoms and comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seockhoon; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Albin, Roger L; Frey, Kirk A; Müller, Martijn L T M; Chervin, Ronald D

    2013-11-15

    Insomnia and daytime sleepiness are common complaints in Parkinson disease (PD), but the main causes remain unclear. We examined the potential impact of both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD on sleep problems. Patients with PD (n = 128) were assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Fatigue Severity Scale, Survey of Autonomic Symptoms, and the 39-item Parkinson Disease Questionnaire. A subset of subjects (n = 38, 30%) also completed nocturnal polysomnography and a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Multivariate stepwise logistic regression models revealed that subjective insomnia was independently associated with depressed mood (odds ratio [OR] = 1.79; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.01-3.19]), autonomic symptoms (1.77 [1.08-2.90]), fatigue (1.19 [1.02-1.38]), and age (0.61 [0.39-0.96]). Subjective daytime sleepiness was associated with dosage of dopaminergic medication (1.74 [1.08-2.80]) and fatigue (1.14 [1.02-1.28]). On polysomnography, longer sleep latency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = 0.40, p = 0.01) and part I (non-motor symptoms) of the Unified PD Rating Scale (rho = 0.38, p = 0.02). Decreased sleep efficiency correlated with autonomic symptoms (rho = -0.42, p < 0.0001). However, no significant difference emerged on polysomnography and MSLTs between patients with or without insomnia or daytime sleepiness. Higher rates of apneic events did predict shorter sleep latencies on the MSLTs. Non-motor symptoms appear to be associated with subjective insomnia, whereas fatigue and dopaminergic medication are associated with subjective daytime sleepiness. Objective sleep laboratory data provided little insight into complaints of insomnia and sleepiness, though obstructive sleep apnea predicted worsened sleepiness when measured objectively.

  14. Insomnia Symptoms and Risk for Unintentional Fatal Injuries—The HUNT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugsand, Lars Erik; Strand, Linn B.; Vatten, Lars J.; Janszky, Imre; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess the association between insomnia symptoms and risk of fatal unintentional injuries. Design: Population-based prospective cohort study with a mean follow-up of 14 y, linking health survey data with information on insomnia symptoms to the National Cause of Death Registry. Setting: Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. Participants: A total of 54,399 men and women 20-89 y of age who participated in the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study between 1995 and 1997. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and results: There were 277 unintentional fatal injuries, including 57 fatal motor vehicle injuries during follow-up. There was a dose-dependent association between the number of insomnia symptoms and risk of unintentional fatal injuries (P for trend 0.001) and fatal motor vehicle injuries (P for trend 0.023), respectively. The proportion of unintentional fatal injuries cases that could have been prevented in the absence of difficulties initiating sleep, difficulties maintaining sleep, and having a feeling of nonrestorative sleep were 8%, 9%, and 8%, respectively. The corresponding estimates for motor vehicle injuries were 34%, 11%, and 10%. Conclusion: Insomnia is a major contributor to both unintentional fatal injuries in general as well as fatal motor vehicle injuries. Increasing public health awareness about insomnia and identifying persons with insomnia may be important in preventing unintentional fatal injuries. Citation: Laugsand LE, Strand LB, Vatten LJ, Janszky I, Bjørngaard JH. Insomnia symptoms and risk for unintentional fatal injuries—the HUNT Study. SLEEP 2014;37(11):1777-1786. PMID:25364073

  15. The association between use of electronic media in bed before going to sleep and insomnia symptoms, daytime sleepiness, morningness, and chronotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossum, Ingrid Nesdal; Nordnes, Linn Tinnesand; Storemark, Sunniva Straume; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Pallesen, Ståle

    2014-09-03

    This study investigated whether the use of a television, computer, gaming console, tablet, mobile phone, or audio player in bed before going to sleep was associated with insomnia, daytime sleepiness, morningness, or chronotype. 532 students aged 18-39 were recruited from lectures or via e-mail. Respondents reported the frequency and average duration of their in-bed media use, as well as insomnia symptoms, daytime sleepiness, morningness-eveningness preference and bedtime/rise time on days off. Mean time of media use per night was 46.6 minutes. The results showed that computer usage for playing/surfing/reading was positively associated with insomnia, and negatively associated with morningness. Mobile phone usage for playing/surfing/texting was positively associated with insomnia and chronotype, and negatively associated with morningness. None of the other media devices were related to either of these variables, and no type of media use was related to daytime sleepiness.

  16. Change in Job Strain as A Predictor of Change in Insomnia Symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halonen, Jaana I.; Lallukka, Tea; Pentti, Jaana

    2017-01-01

    .16-1.51). The disappearance of job strain was associated with lower odds of repeated insomnia symptoms (odds ratio compared to no disappearance of job strain 0.78, 95% CI 0.65-0.94). Further adjustment for shift work or sleep apnea did not change these associations. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that job strain...

  17. Association between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and bone mineral density in older Puerto Rican adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms) and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD) among older Boston Puerto Rican adults. Materials/Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47–79 y livi...

  18. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic differences in sleep duration and insomnia-related symptoms in Finnish adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lallukka Tea

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor sleep tends to be patterned by sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors with sleep duration and insomnia-related symptoms across life course. Methods We used cross-sectional Health 2000 Survey (2000–2001 among a total of 5,578 adult Finns, aged 30–79 years, representative of adult Finnish population. Data about sociodemographic and socioeconomic circumstances, insomnia-related symptoms over the previous month as well as average sleep duration were collected by questionnaires. Multinomial logistic regression models were adjusted first for gender and age, second for sociodemographic factors, third additionally for socioeconomic factors, and fourth for all covariates and self-perceived health simultaneously. Results On average 70% of Finnish adults slept 7–8 hours a day. Frequent insomnia-related symptoms were more prevalent among women (14% than men (10%. Not being married, not having children, having low education, low income, being unemployed, and being a disability retiree were associated with frequent insomnia-related symptoms. Similar factors were associated with short and long sleep duration. However, childhood socioeconomic position was mostly unrelated to sleep in adulthood except parental education had some associations with short sleep duration. Conclusions Disadvantaged socioeconomic position in adulthood, in particular income and employment status, is associated with poorer sleep. When promoting optimal sleep duration and better sleep quality, families with low incomes, unemployed people, and disability retirees should be targeted.

  19. Use of a portable biofeedback device to improve insomnia in a combat zone, a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLay, Robert N; Spira, James L

    2009-12-01

    Insomnia is a common problem in situations of stress. Some forms of stress, however, may contraindicate the use of traditional, pharmacological interventions. Working in a combat zone is such a situation. Alternative means of improving sleep are clearly needed for Service Members. We report a case involving a medical provider who was serving in a military, emergency-services facility in Iraq, and who presented with anxiety, depressed mood, and insomnia. Symptoms were sub-threshold for major depressive disorder or acute stress disorder. Mood and anxiety symptoms responded to traditional therapy techniques, but problems with insomnia remained. The patient was given a portable biofeedback device that employs an infrared sensor photoplethysmograph to measure heart rate variability (HRV) from peripheral finger pulse. One week later, sleep was significantly improved. Symptom improvement lasted to at least 6 weeks while in theater. One year later, a check-in with the patient revealed that after returning home, he had been diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD symptoms had resolved after 6 months of psychopharmacology and cognitive behavioral therapy. These results indicate that biofeedback may be a useful means of improving sleep in a combat zone, but that such improvements may not necessarily prevent the development of more serious symptoms later. No clear causality can be inferred from a single case, and further study is needed to determine if this finding have wider applicability.

  20. Acupuncture Treatment of Insomnia-A Report of 28 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时冬丽

    2003-01-01

    @@ Insomnia, also called hyposomnia, refers to the disorder characterized by failure to obtain a normal sleep. For mild cases, the patients are slow to go into sleep, or in an oneirism or with very short sleep. For severe cases, the patients can only have a sleep of 2 to 3 hours or even no sleep during the night, which inserts a serious impact on the normal life of the patients. Using Shenmen (HT 7) and Benshen (GB 13) as the main points, the author has treated 28 cases of insomnia with quick and satisfactory therapeutic effect. A report follows.

  1. Neural Reward Processing Mediates the Relationship between Insomnia Symptoms and Depression in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casement, Melynda D; Keenan, Kate E; Hipwell, Alison E; Guyer, Amanda E; Forbes, Erika E

    2016-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that insomnia may disrupt reward-related brain function-a potentially important factor in the development of depressive disorder. Adolescence may be a period during which such disruption is especially problematic given the rise in the incidence of insomnia and ongoing development of neural systems that support reward processing. The present study uses longitudinal data to test the hypothesis that disruption of neural reward processing is a mechanism by which insomnia symptoms-including nocturnal insomnia symptoms (NIS) and nonrestorative sleep (NRS)-contribute to depressive symptoms in adolescent girls. Participants were 123 adolescent girls and their caregivers from an ongoing longitudinal study of precursors to depression across adolescent development. NIS and NRS were assessed annually from ages 9 to 13 years. Girls completed a monetary reward task during a functional MRI scan at age 16 years. Depressive symptoms were assessed at ages 16 and 17 years. Multivariable regression tested the prospective associations between NIS and NRS, neural response during reward anticipation, and the mean number of depressive symptoms (omitting sleep problems). NRS, but not NIS, during early adolescence was positively associated with late adolescent dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) response to reward anticipation and depressive symptoms. DMPFC response mediated the relationship between early adolescent NRS and late adolescent depressive symptoms. These results suggest that NRS may contribute to depression by disrupting reward processing via altered activity in a region of prefrontal cortex involved in affective control. The results also support the mechanistic differentiation of NIS and NRS. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Association Between Insomnia Symptoms, Daytime Napping, And Falls In Community-dwelling Elderly [associação Entre Sintomas De Insônia, Cochilo Diurno E Quedas Em Idosos Da Comunidade

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira A.A.; Ceolim M.F.; Neri A.L.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on associations between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly, using a population- based cross-sectional design and probability sample with 689 community-dwelling elders. The protocol consisted of self-reported and physical performance variables. The study used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis with statistical significance set at p < 0.05. Prevalence rates for insomnia symptoms and daytime napping were 49.9% (n =...

  3. Insomnia Symptoms, Daytime Naps And Physical Leisure Activities In The Elderly: FIBRA Study Campinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Tonon Monteiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The practice of physical activities contributes to reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improves sleep patterns in the elderly. This research aimed to investigate the association between insomnia symptoms and daytime nap and the participation in physical leisure activities in elderly community residents. Data from the Studies Network of the Fragility in Brazilian Elderly (Campinas site, were used. Information from 689 elderly was analyzed, regarding sociodemographic characterization, physical leisure activity, occurrence of daytime napping and its duration, symptoms of insomnia and use of sleep medication. A significant association was found between the practice of walking and the daytime nap of short duration. Studies indicate that a short nap can benefit the quality of sleep and health of the elderly. Therefore, promoting the practice of walking can be a nursing intervention that favors the sleep patterns of the elderly.

  4. [Insomnia symptoms, daytime naps and physical leisure activities in the elderly: FIBRA Study Campinas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Natália Tonon; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Coelim, Maria Filomena

    2014-04-01

    The practice of physical activities contributes to reducing the risk of chronic diseases and improves sleep patterns in the elderly. This research aimed to investigate the association between insomnia symptoms and daytime nap and the participation in physical leisure activities in elderly community residents. Data from the Studies Network of the Fragility in Brazilian Elderly (Campinas site), were used. Information from 689 elderly was analyzed, regarding sociodemographic characterization, physical leisure activity, occurrence of daytime napping and its duration, symptoms of insomnia and use of sleep medication. A significant association was found between the practice of walking and the daytime nap of short duration. Studies indicate that a short nap can benefit the quality of sleep and health of the elderly. Therefore, promoting the practice of walking can be a nursing intervention that favors the sleep patterns of the elderly.

  5. Insomnia and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder among women veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jaime; Jouldjian, Stella; Washington, Donna L; Alessi, Cathy A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Women will account for 10% of the Veteran population by 2020, yet there has been little focus on sleep issues among women Veterans. In a descriptive study of 107 women Veterans with insomnia (mean age = 49 years, 44% non-Hispanic white), 55% had probable post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (total score ≥33). Probable PTSD was related to more severe self-reported sleep disruption and greater psychological distress. In a regression model, higher PTSD Checklist-Civilian (PCL-C) total score was a significant independent predictor of worse insomnia severity index score while other factors were not. Women Veterans preferred behavioral treatments over pharmacotherapy in general, and efforts to increase the availability of such treatments should be undertaken. Further research is needed to better understand the complex relationship between insomnia and PTSD among women Veterans.

  6. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. Mustian; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J.; Kamen, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-sc...

  7. Subjective-objective sleep discrepancy among older adults: associations with insomnia diagnosis and insomnia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Daniel B; Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H

    2015-02-01

    Discrepancy between subjective and objective measures of sleep is associated with insomnia and increasing age. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia improves sleep quality and decreases subjective-objective sleep discrepancy. This study describes differences between older adults with insomnia and controls in sleep discrepancy, and tests the hypothesis that reduced sleep discrepancy following cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia correlates with the magnitude of symptom improvement reported by older adults with insomnia. Participants were 63 adults >60 years of age with insomnia, and 51 controls. At baseline, participants completed sleep diaries for 7 days while wearing wrist actigraphs. After receiving cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, insomnia patients repeated this sleep assessment. Sleep discrepancy variables were calculated by subtracting actigraphic sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset from respective self-reported estimates, pre- and post-treatment. Mean level and night-to-night variability in sleep discrepancy were investigated. Baseline sleep discrepancies were compared between groups. Pre-post-treatment changes in Insomnia Severity Index score and sleep discrepancy variables were investigated within older adults with insomnia. Sleep discrepancy was significantly greater and more variable across nights in older adults with insomnia than controls, P ≤ 0.001 for all. Treatment with cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia was associated with significant reduction in the Insomnia Severity Index score that correlated with changes in mean level and night-to-night variability in wake after sleep onset discrepancy, P sleep discrepancy patterns may guide more targeted treatments for late-life insomnia.

  8. Treatment of residual insomnia after CBT for PTSD: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeViva, Jason C; Zayfert, Claudia; Pigeon, Wilfred R; Mellman, Thomas A

    2005-04-01

    Insomnia is one of the most common symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence suggests that insomnia may persist for many PTSD patients after other symptoms have responded to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The present article reports the effects of administering a five-session cognitive-behavioral insomnia treatment to 5 patients who responded to CBT for PTSD yet continued to report insomnia. Insomnia treatment was associated with improvements on subjective sleep measures (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Insomnia Severity Index, and Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale) and self-monitored sleep efficiency and related measures in 4 of 5 cases. Results highlight issues specific to treating insomnia in trauma populations and future directions for examining treatment of insomnia associated with PTSD.

  9. Insomnia symptoms and mortality: a register-linked study among women and men from Finland, Norway and Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Podlipskytė, Aurelija; Sivertsen, Børge; Andruškienė, Jurgita; Varoneckas, Giedrius; Lahelma, Eero; Ursin, Reidun; Tell, Grethe S; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2016-02-01

    Evidence on the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality is limited and inconsistent. This study examined the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality in cohorts from three countries to show common and unique patterns. The Finnish cohort comprised 6605 employees of the City of Helsinki, aged 40-60 years at baseline in 2000-2002. The Norwegian cohort included 6236 participants from Western Norway, aged 40-45 years at baseline in 1997-1999. The Lithuanian cohort comprised 1602 participants from the City of Palanga, aged 35-74 years at baseline in 2003. Mortality data were derived from the Statistics Finland and Norwegian Cause of Death Registry until the end of 2012, and from the Lithuanian Regional Mortality Register until the end of 2013. Insomnia symptoms comprised difficulties initiating sleep, nocturnal awakenings, and waking up too early. Covariates were age, marital status, education, smoking, alcohol, physical inactivity, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, depression, shift work, sleep duration, and self-rated health. Cox regression analysis was used. Frequent difficulties initiating sleep were associated with all-cause mortality among men after full adjustments in the Finnish (hazard ratio 2.51; 95% confidence interval 1.07-5.88) and Norwegian (hazard ratio 3.42; 95% confidence interval 1.03-11.35) cohorts. Among women and in Lithuania, insomnia symptoms were not statistically significantly associated with all-cause mortality after adjustments. In conclusion, difficulties initiating sleep were associated with mortality among Norwegian and Finnish men. Variation and heterogeneity in the association between insomnia symptoms and mortality highlights that further research needs to distinguish between men and women, specific symptoms and national contexts, and focus on more chronic insomnia.

  10. Experience of insomnia, symptom attribution and treatment preferences in individuals with moderate to severe COPD: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kauffman KS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Karen S Kauffman,1 Megan Doede,1 Montserrat Diaz-Abad,2 Steven M Scharf,2,3 Wanda Bell-Farrell,2 Valerie E Rogers,1 Jeanne Geiger-Brown1 1Department of Family and Community Health, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3The University of Maryland Sleep Disorders Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are known to have poor sleep quality. Acceptance of and adherence to therapies for sleep problems may depend on how the person with COPD regards the source of his sleep problem, yet little is known about their attribution as to the cause of these sleep symptoms. The objective of this study was to describe the subjective sleep complaints of individuals with COPD along with their attributions as to the cause of these symptoms, and their treatment preferences for insomnia. Three focus groups were conducted (N=18 with participants who have moderate to severe COPD. Focus group data were transcribed, compared and contrasted to identify themes of attribution. Participants reported difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and daytime sleepiness. They attributed their sleep problems primarily to their pulmonary symptoms, but also poor air quality (thick humid air and death anxiety when awake during the night. There was no clear preference for type of treatment to remedy this problem (medication, cognitive therapy, although they indicated that traveling to the clinic was difficult and should be avoided as much as possible. These data suggest that environmental manipulation to improve air quality (eg, air conditioning and modifications to reduce death anxiety could be beneficial to persons with COPD. In-person multi-session therapy may not be acceptable to persons with moderate to severe COPD, however internet-based therapy might make treatment more accessible. Keywords

  11. The effectiveness of community day-long CBT-I workshops for participants with insomnia symptoms: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Naomi; Stewart, Robert; Andiappan, Manoharan; Smith, Anna; Espie, Colin A; Brown, June S L

    2012-06-01

    Insomnia is a very common and disabling symptom. Whilst evidence for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for people diagnosed with insomnia (CBT-I) is strong, few people seek help and not many services offer CBT-I. Less intensive adaptations of CBT-I have been shown to be valuable, and given the size of the problem and low rates of help-seeking, an accessible intervention with a large capacity is needed. Day-long CBT-I psycho-educational workshops (each for up to 30 people), to which members of the public with insomnia symptoms could self-refer, have been developed. This randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of these workshops. Baseline measures were taken from 151 participants, who were then randomised to experimental or waiting-list control groups. Scores of the experimental group and the control group were compared 3 months after baseline. Random effects models found a significant interaction between time and group, indicating differences between the control and experimental groups on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Post hoc analyses indicated that ISI scores decreased significantly in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Promising results were also found on corroborative sleep diary measures. Access to the workshops was good, with 50% of participants having never previously sought help for sleep difficulties from their GP. CBT-I workshops proved to be both accessible and effective in reducing insomnia symptoms in the medium term. They may represent a feasible brief intervention with the potential to address unmet treatment needs of adults complaining of insomnia symptoms.

  12. Insomnia and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Styles Common Yoga Poses Special Situations Yoga and Lymphedema Risk Yoga and Metastatic Breast Cancer Side Effects ... Insomnia and Fatigue Treatment for Insomnia and Fatigue Lymphedema Lymphedema Risk Treating Lymphedema Menopausal Symptoms Mouth Sores ...

  13. Acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in transverse myelitis - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghela, Sonia A; Donnellan, Clare P

    2008-09-01

    This case report describes the use of acupuncture for back pain, knee pain and insomnia in a 49 year old woman with a recent diagnosis of transverse myelitis with paraplegia, sensory disturbance, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. She was receiving intensive in-patient multi-disciplinary rehabilitation but was struggling to participate fully due to pain and poor sleep quality. She received a course of acupuncture in addition to standard care and reported substantial benefits including reduction in pain, improved sleep and mood, and reduction in daytime fatigue. Effective symptom control allowed this patient to participate more fully in her rehabilitation programme. Reduction of knee pain and sleep disturbance was maintained until discharge, 15 weeks after the last acupuncture treatment. This case report suggests that acupuncture may be an option to consider for other patients with pain or sleep disturbance that is interfering with their rehabilitation programme.

  14. Change in organizational justice as a predictor of insomnia symptoms: longitudinal study analysing observational data as a non-randomized pseudo-trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Halonen, Jaana I; Sivertsen, Børge; Pentti, Jaana; Stenholm, Sari; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Oksanen, Tuula; Elovainio, Marko; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2017-01-08

    Despite injustice at the workplace being a potential source of sleep problems, longitudinal evidence remains scarce. We examined whether changes in perceived organizational justice predicted changes in insomnia symptoms. Data on 24 287 Finnish public sector employees (82% women), from three consecutive survey waves between 2000 and 2012, were treated as 'pseudo-trials'. Thus, the analysis of unfavourable changes in organizational justice included participants without insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, with high organizational justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 6307). In the analyses of favourable changes in justice, participants had insomnia symptoms in Waves 1 and 2, low justice in Wave 1 and high or low justice in Wave 2 (N = 2903). In both analyses, the outcome was insomnia symptoms in Wave 3. We used generalized estimating equation models to analyse the data. After adjusting for social and health-related covariates in Wave 1, unfavourable changes in relational organizational justice (i.e. fairness of managerial behaviours) were associated with increased odds of developing insomnia symptoms [odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.30]. A favourable change in relational organizational justice was associated with lower odds of persistent insomnia symptoms (odds ratio = 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.96). Changes in procedural justice (i.e. the fairness of decision-making procedures) were not associated with insomnia symptoms. These data suggest that changes in perceived relational justice may affect employees' sleep quality. Decreases in the fairness of managerial behaviours were linked to increases in insomnia symptoms, whereas rises in fairness were associated with reduced insomnia symptoms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  15. Chronotype and Improved Sleep Efficiency Independently Predict Depressive Symptom Reduction after Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Bei; Ong, Jason C; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Manber, Rachel

    2015-09-15

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to improve both sleep and depressive symptoms, but predictors of depression outcome following CBT-I have not been well examined. This study investigated how chronotype (i.e., morningness-eveningness trait) and changes in sleep efficiency (SE) were related to changes in depressive symptoms among recipients of CBT-I. Included were 419 adult insomnia outpatients from a sleep disorders clinic (43.20% males, age mean ± standard deviation = 48.14 ± 14.02). All participants completed the Composite Scale of Morningness and attended at least 4 sessions of a 6-session group CBT-I. SE was extracted from sleep diary; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) prior to (Baseline), and at the end (End) of intervention. Multilevel structural equation modeling revealed that from Baseline to End, SE increased and BDI decreased significantly. Controlling for age, sex, BDI, and SE at Baseline, stronger evening chronotype and less improvement in SE significantly and uniquely predicted less reduction in BDI from Baseline to End. Chronotype did not predict improvement in SE. In an insomnia outpatient sample, SE and depressive symptoms improved significantly after a CBT-I group intervention. All chronotypes benefited from sleep improvement, but those with greater eveningness and/or less sleep improvement experienced less reduction in depressive symptom severity. This suggests that evening preference and insomnia symptoms may have distinct relationships with mood, raising the possibility that the effect of CBT-I on depressive symptoms could be enhanced by assessing and addressing circadian factors. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  16. Insomnia in Sweden: A Population-Based Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Mallon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Estimate the prevalence of insomnia and examine effects of sex, age, health problems, sleep duration, need for treatment, and usage of sleep medication. Methods. A sample of 1,550 subjects aged 18–84 years was selected for a telephone interview. The interview was completed by 1,128 subjects (72.8%. Results. 24.6% reported insomnia symptoms. Insomnia disorder, that is, insomnia symptoms and daytime consequences, was reported by 10.5%. The prevalence was similar among all age groups, with the exception of women aged 40–49 years who demonstrated a significantly higher prevalence, 21.6%. Having at least one physical or psychiatric disorder was reported by 82.8% of subjects with insomnia disorder. Mean sleep duration for subjects with insomnia disorder was 5.77 hours on weeknights and 7.03 hours on days off/weekends. The corresponding figures for subjects without insomnia disorder were 7.04 hours and 7.86 hours, respectively. Among those with insomnia disorder 62.5% expressed a need for treatment, and 20.0% used prescribed sleep medication regularly. Conclusions. Insomnia disorder is highly prevalent in the population. There are significant associations between insomnia disorder and physical and psychiatric disorders. A majority of subjects with insomnia disorder expressed a need for treatment, indicating a public health problem.

  17. Insomnia in Sweden: A Population-Based Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lena Mallon; Jan-Erik Broman; Torbjörn Åkerstedt; Jerker Hetta

    2014-01-01

    Aims. Estimate the prevalence of insomnia and examine effects of sex, age, health problems, sleep duration, need for treatment, and usage of sleep medication. Methods. A sample of 1,550 subjects aged 18–84 years was selected for a telephone interview. The interview was completed by 1,128 subjects (72.8%). Results. 24.6% reported insomnia symptoms. Insomnia disorder, that is, insomnia symptoms and daytime consequences, was reported by 10.5%. The prevalence was similar among all age groups, wit...

  18. Telehealth cognitive behavior therapy for co-occurring insomnia and depression symptoms in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichstein, Kenneth L; Scogin, Forrest; Thomas, S Justin; DiNapoli, Elizabeth A; Dillon, Haley R; McFadden, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Telehealth has proven effective with a wide range of disorders, but there is a paucity of data on the use of telehealth using cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) with late-life insomnia and depression. This pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of using telehealth to treat older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression living in rural Alabama. Five patients received 10 sessions of CBT for insomnia and depression. Patients were engaged in treatment via Skype from their primary care physician's office. Assessments were conducted at baseline, posttreatment, and 2-month follow-up. Patients exhibited clinically significant improvement in both insomnia (sleep diaries and Insomnia Severity Index) and depression (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at posttreatment, and these gains were well maintained at 2-month follow-up. These preliminary data suggest that telehealth may be an effective means of providing treatment to older adults, including underserved populations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: influence of slight-to-moderate depressive symptom severity and worrying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoen, Astrid B H; Redlich, Else M; de Weerd, Al W

    2014-08-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-known, effective treatment for primary insomnia. However, the majority of sleeping problems occur in the presence of another medical or psychiatric disorder. Depression and general anxiety disorder (with a main feature of excessive generalized worrying) are disorders that frequently co-occur with insomnia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether depressive symptom severity or worrying influences the subjective effectiveness of CBT-I. Patients with a complaint of insomnia received CBT-I. At the beginning of the therapy, patients completed a sleep evaluation list, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II-NL, N = 92), and the Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ, N = 119). Based on the BDI and the PSWQ, the sample was divided into different groups: patients with low versus high depression scores, low worriers versus high worriers, and patients without depressive symptoms who were also classified as low worriers and patients with depressive symptoms who were also classified as high worriers. The sleep evaluation list was completed directly after the treatment and 6 months later. Sleep evaluation scores, subjective total sleep time, subjective sleep onset latency, and subjective wake after sleep onset all changed in a positive way after CBT-I and remained that way over the next 6 months for all patients. These positive effects of CBT-I did not differ between the subgroups. Results suggest that CBT-I improves subjective sleep experiences, regardless of depressive symptom severity or worrying. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Insomnia and mental health in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J; Gardner, Christie E; Bramoweth, Adam D; Williams, Jacob M; Roane, Brandy M; Grieser, Emily A; Tatum, Jolyn I

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is strongly associated with certain mental health problems in the general population. However, there is little research examining this relation in young adults-an age group where many mental health problems first present. This study examined relations between insomnia and mental health symptoms in a college population (N = 373; 60.9% women; mean age of 21 years). Insomnia was assessed via self-report and sleep diaries, and mental health was assessed via the Symptom Check List-90. Analyses revealed insomnia was prevalent (9.4%), and these young adults had significantly more mental health problems than those without insomnia, although some significant results were lost after controlling for comorbid health problems.

  1. Qigong program on insomnia and stress in cancer patients: A case series report

    OpenAIRE

    Seungmo Kim; Sangnam Lee; Osung Kwon; Seonghoon Park; Jungchul Seo; Kyungsoon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the interest in Qigong as an alternative therapy has grown following reports of its ability to regulate psychological factors in cancer patients. This is a case series to evaluate the outcome measures of Qigong when used as an adjunct to standard medical care to treat insomnia and stress in cancer patients. Patients and methods: The Qigong program was applied to four cancer patients with insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The program consisted of 30-min sessions invol...

  2. MANAGEMENT OF INSOMNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Rosdiana Sholehah

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is an essential component of health and well-being. The effects of insomnia, Whether as a primary or secondary symptoms, is a major health concern and should be closely studied and Examined across all age groups. There is growing evidence that the effects of insomnia on Adolescent's functioning is comparable to that of other major psychiatric disorders (eg, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, etc... Insomnia is associated with significant negative Consequences, impairing functioning across a number of emotional, social, cognitive, and physical domains (Carskadon, 1999; Johnson, Roth, Schultz, & Breslau, 2006; Roberts, Roberts, & Duong, 2008b; Wolfson & Carskadon, 1998. Based on the academic literature to date, it is hypothesized that insomnia will be Significantly more prevalent   among   Adolescents   of   the   female   sex   and   among   those   reporting psychological and / or physical health concerns. The analyzes conducted included basic descriptive statistics (frequencies / percentages, bivariate analyzes (Chi-square tests, and a multiple logistic regression. The prevalence rate of insomnia in adolescents was 9.5%, with no significant association found between sex and insomnia. The multivariate analysis Showed Significantly insomnia to be associated with the presence of a chronic condition, selected mood disorders (12 months, in adolescents  who  are  experiencing  "quite  a  bit"  to  "extreme"  life  stress,  and  in adolescents who were living in than other households with both parents. Insomnia was not found to be associated Significantly with sex, selected anxiety disorder (12 months, heavy drinking, heavy cannabis use, and in Adolescents who were only experiencing "some life stress".  heavy cannabis  use  and  having  a selected  anxiety Significantly disorder was associated with insomnia. More informed knowledge can be used to create prevention and treatment strategies to address

  3. Anxiety mediates the relationship between multidimensional perfectionism and insomnia disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Akram, Umair; Ellis, Jason; Myachykov, Andriy; Chapman, Ashley; Barclay, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with insomnia often report aspects of perfectionism alongside symptoms of anxiety and depression. However, there has been limited examination of these factors together. The current study investigated whether individuals with insomnia report increased perfectionism compared to normal-sleepers. Further, the mediating role of anxiety and depression was examined. Participants were 39 individuals with DSM-5 defined Insomnia Disorder, and 39 normal-sleepers, who completed two measures o...

  4. Neural Reward Processing Mediates the Relationship between Insomnia Symptoms and Depression in Adolescence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Casement, Melynda D; Keenan, Kate E; Hipwell, Alison E; Guyer, Amanda E; Forbes, Erika E

    2016-01-01

    .... Adolescence may be a period during which such disruption is especially problematic given the rise in the incidence of insomnia and ongoing development of neural systems that support reward processing...

  5. Zolpidem extended-release improves sleep and next-day symptoms in comorbid insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fava, Maurizio; Asnis, Gregory M; Shrivastava, Ram; Lydiard, Bruce; Bastani, Bijan; Sheehan, David; Roth, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study was designed to assess the efficacy and safety of zolpidem extended-release coadministered with escitalopram in patients with insomnia and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Patients (N = 383) received open-label escitalopram 10 mg/d and were randomized to either adjunct zolpidem extended-release 12.5 mg or placebo. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 8 in subjective total sleep time. Secondary efficacy measures included subjective sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, wake time after sleep onset, sleep quality, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Sleep Impact Scale, the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, and the Sheehan Disability Scale. The last-observation-carried-forward method was used to impute missing values for most efficacy measures. Safety was monitored at each visit. At week 8 and all time points, there was a significant improvement in the zolpidem extended-release/escitalopram group compared with placebo/escitalopram for total sleep time (P escitalopram, compared with placebo/escitalopram, significantly improved insomnia and sleep-related next-day symptoms, but not anxiety symptoms, in patients with comorbid insomnia and generalized anxiety disorder.

  6. [Treatment strategy of insomnia for the patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yuichi

    2012-07-01

    Insomnia has been reported to underlie the development and aggravation of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Treatment of insomnia is important for both the management and prevention of these comorbid disorders. We introduced the treatment strategy of insomnia for the patients with metabolic syndrome. For the better management of insomnia, sleep hygiene education should be given first, and adequate drug therapy should be started thereafter. Cognitive behavioral therapy is useful not only for insomnia symptom but also for the reducing amount of drug and prevention of the recurrence of insomnia. We expect that progress in the management of insomnia would result in the better treatment outcome of metabolic syndrome in general practice.

  7. Prevalence of insomnia and its relationship to menopausal status in middle-aged Korean women.

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    Shin, Chol; Lee, Sangyeol; Lee, Taewook; Shin, Kyungrim; Yi, Hyeryeon; Kimm, Kuchan; Cho, Namhan

    2005-08-01

    Although the prevalence of insomnia and the association of insomnia with menopause have been well reported, not much work has been conducted in population-based research on insomnia and menopause in Korea. The purpose of the present report was to determine overall and different prevalence of insomnia by menopausal status, and the relationship between insomnia and menopause in a population-based sample of middle-aged Korean women. A total of 96.1% of 2497 randomly selected middle-aged Korean women participated. Insomnia was defined as occurring three times a week or more in the previous month. Subjects were categorized into three groups: premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause. The overall prevalence of insomnia in middle-aged Korean women was 14.3%. The most common symptom of insomnia was difficulty maintaining sleep (9.7%), followed by difficulty initiating sleep (7.9%), and early morning awakening (7.5%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that menopause was independently associated with insomnia after adjusting for confounding factors such as age, income, and depression. Perimenopause was significantly associated with a dramatic increase in the risk of insomnia, but there was no significant association for postmenopause. The major finding is that insomnia is significantly associated with the menopausal transition. The prevalence of insomnia increases significantly by the transition from premenopause to perimenopause, but not to postmenopause. A further prospective study is needed to investigate the influence of menopause on insomnia.

  8. Therapeutic efficacy and anti-inflammatory effect of ramelteon in patients with insomnia associated with lower urinary tract symptoms

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    Shimizu N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nobutaka Shimizu,1 Masahiro Nozawa,1 Koichi Sugimoto,2 Yutaka Yamamoto,1 Takafumi Minami,1 Taiji Hayashi,1 Kazuhiro Yoshimura,1 Tokumi Ishii,1 Hirotsugu Uemura11Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Kinki University, Osaka, 2Department of Urology, Sakai Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kinki University, Osaka, JapanObjectives: This study was conducted to examine the therapeutic efficacy and anti-inflammatory effect of ramelteon in elderly patients with insomnia associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, who visited our urology department.Methods: The study included 115 patients (102 men, 13 women who scored ≥4 on the Athens Insomnia Scale and who wished to receive treatment. The assessment scales for therapeutic efficacy included the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS for LUTS and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI for sleep disorders. The high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP test was used to an objective assessment. The patients were treated with ramelteon (8 mg/day for an average of 10 weeks and were then reexamined using the questionnaires and hs-CRP test to evaluate therapeutic efficacy.Results: IPSS total scores declined significantly from 11.39 ± 8.78 to 9.4 ± 7.72. ISI total scores improved significantly from 11.6 ± 5.2 to 9.2 ± 5.3 (P < 0.0001. The levels of hs-CRP decreased significantly from 0.082 (standard deviation [SD] upper limit, 0.222; SD lower limit, −0.059 to 0.06 (SD upper limit, 0.152; SD lower limit, −0.032. The ISI scores ≥ 10 (n = 51 showed a weak correlation with the hs-CRP levels.Conclusion: Ramelteon had a systemic anti-inflammatory effect and improved sleep disorders and LUTS, suggesting that it may be a useful treatment for patients with LUTS-associated insomnia.Keywords: sleep disorders, inflammation, lower urinary tract symptoms, ramelteon

  9. Nonpharmacologic Management of Chronic Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, David L; Khan, Muneeza

    2015-12-15

    Insomnia affects 10% to 30% of the population with a total cost of $92.5 to $107.5 billion annually. Short-term, chronic, and other types of insomnia are the three major categories according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd ed. The criteria for diagnosis are difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, or early awakening despite the opportunity for sleep; symptoms must be associated with impaired daytime functioning and occur at least three times per week for at least one month. Factors associated with the onset of insomnia include a personal or family history of insomnia, easy arousability, poor self-reported health, and chronic pain. Insomnia is more common in women, especially following menopause and during late pregnancy, and in older adults. A comprehensive sleep history can confirm the diagnosis. Psychiatric and medical problems, medication use, and substance abuse should be ruled out as contributing factors. Treatment of comorbid conditions alone may not resolve insomnia. Patients with movement disorders (e.g., restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder), circadian rhythm disorders, or breathing disorders (e.g., obstructive sleep apnea) must be identified and treated appropriately. Chronic insomnia is associated with cognitive difficulties, anxiety and depression, poor work performance, decreased quality of life, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Insomnia can be treated with nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapies. Nonpharmacologic therapies include sleep hygiene, cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation therapy, multicomponent therapy, and paradoxical intention. Referral to a sleep specialist may be considered for refractory cases.

  10. Residual Effects of Sleep Medications Are Commonly Reported and Associated with Impaired Patient-Reported Outcomes among Insomnia Patients in the United States

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    Timothy Fitzgerald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To measure the association of symptoms attributed to residual effects of sleep medication (e.g., drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, and impaired memory on self-reported functioning and satisfaction with these medications. Methods. Individuals using prescription medications for insomnia were invited to complete an Internet-based survey. Respondents were compared according to the presence of self-reported residual effects; relationships between severity of these effects and outcomes were modeled using regression. Measures included the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire, and SATMED-Q. Subgroup analyses were conducted with patients aged ≥65 years. Approximately 80% reported experiencing ≥1 residual effect. The severity of residual effects was associated with increased residual effect-related work impairment, including absenteeism (RR = 1.46, p<0.001, presenteeism (RR = 1.12, p<0.001, overall work impairment (RR = 1.13, p<0.001, and nonwork activity impairment (RR = 1.11, p<0.001. More severe residual symptoms were also associated with increased difficulty in home management (Beta = .31, p<0.001, ability to work (Beta = .31, p<0.001, social relationships, (Beta = .32, p<0.001, close personal relationships (Beta = .30, p<0.001, and lower medication satisfaction (Beta = -.37, p<0.001. Conclusions. Individuals using medications for insomnia commonly experience symptoms considered as residual effects, and these symptoms are associated with greater interference of sleep-related problems at work, at home, and with social relationships.

  11. Association between insomnia symptoms, job strain and burnout syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of 1300 financial workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlaine, Arnaud; Sauvet, Fabien; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Elbaz, Maxime; Delafosse, Jean Yves; Leger, Damien; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Professional burnout is closely related to work stress but less frequently associated with disturbed sleep. This study determines whether job strain and sleep disturbances are associated risk factors of burnout among financial workers. Design Observational study. Participants 1300 employees (725 female) of a financial company. Primary measures Self-reported questionnaires (Maslach Burnout Inventory, Job Content Questionnaire, Sleep questionnaire based on ICSD-3 classification), the Epworth sleepiness scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Result The prevalence of burnout was 10.2% (9.0% moderate and 1.2% severe). 23.3% of workers were considered with high job strain, and 93.1% had a high level of job satisfaction. 16.8% of individuals had insomnia and 97% reported non-restorative sleep. The bivariate analyses demonstrate a higher risk of burnout in participants with insomnia (OR=14.7, 95% CI 9.8 to 21.9), non-restorative sleep (OR=9.9, 95% CI 5.1 to 19.5) and anxiety (OR=10.2, 95% CI 6.8 to 15.3). High job strain was associated with burnout (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6). This association was not maintained after adjustment for sleep parameters. Job satisfaction was another independent risk factor for burnout (OR=124, 95% CI 65 to 237). Conclusions In our sample of financial workers, job strain represents a burnout risk factor only if associated with insomnia. Insomnia can be considered as a relevant clinical marker that should be targeted in mental health prevention programmes at the workplace. PMID:28087546

  12. Association between insomnia symptoms, job strain and burnout syndrome: a cross-sectional survey of 1300 financial workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metlaine, Arnaud; Sauvet, Fabien; Gomez-Merino, Danielle; Elbaz, Maxime; Delafosse, Jean Yves; Leger, Damien; Chennaoui, Mounir

    2017-01-13

    Professional burnout is closely related to work stress but less frequently associated with disturbed sleep. This study determines whether job strain and sleep disturbances are associated risk factors of burnout among financial workers. Observational study. 1300 employees (725 female) of a financial company. Self-reported questionnaires (Maslach Burnout Inventory, Job Content Questionnaire, Sleep questionnaire based on ICSD-3 classification), the Epworth sleepiness scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The prevalence of burnout was 10.2% (9.0% moderate and 1.2% severe). 23.3% of workers were considered with high job strain, and 93.1% had a high level of job satisfaction. 16.8% of individuals had insomnia and 97% reported non-restorative sleep. The bivariate analyses demonstrate a higher risk of burnout in participants with insomnia (OR=14.7, 95% CI 9.8 to 21.9), non-restorative sleep (OR=9.9, 95% CI 5.1 to 19.5) and anxiety (OR=10.2, 95% CI 6.8 to 15.3). High job strain was associated with burnout (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.1 to 3.6). This association was not maintained after adjustment for sleep parameters. Job satisfaction was another independent risk factor for burnout (OR=124, 95% CI 65 to 237). In our sample of financial workers, job strain represents a burnout risk factor only if associated with insomnia. Insomnia can be considered as a relevant clinical marker that should be targeted in mental health prevention programmes at the workplace. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. INSOMNIA, SELF-MEDICATION, AND RELAPSE TO ALCOHOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Kirk J.; Aldrich, Michael S.; Robinson, Elizabeth A. R.; Zucker, Robert A.; Greden, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the frequencies of insomnia and its self-medication with alcohol in a sample of alcoholic patients, as well as the relationship of these variables to alcoholic relapse. Method Subjects were 172 men and women receiving treatment for alcohol dependence. They completed a sleep questionnaire, measures of alcohol problem severity and depression severity, and polysomnograpy after at least two weeks of abstinence. Results Using eight items from the Sleep Disorders Questionnaire, >60% of subjects were classified as having symptomatic insomnia during the six months prior to treatment entry. Compared to patients without insomnia, patients with insomnia were more likely to report frequent alcohol use for sleep (55% vs. 28%; χ2=12.03, df=1, p=0.001), had significantly worse polysomnographic measures of sleep continuity, and had greater severity scores for both alcohol dependence and depression. Among 74 alcoholics who were followed a mean of five months after treatment, 60% with baseline insomnia vs. 30% without baseline insomnia relapsed to any use of alcohol (χ2=6.16, df=1, p=0.02). Insomnia remained a robust predictor of relapse after applying logistic regression analysis to control for other variables. A history of self-medicating insomnia with alcohol did not significantly predict subsequent relapse. Conclusions The majority of alcoholic patients entering treatment reported insomnia symptoms. Given the potential link between insomnia and relapse, routine questions about sleep in clinical and research settings are warranted. PMID:11229980

  14. Relationship between subtypes and symptoms of ADHD, insomnia, and nightmares in connection with quality of life in children

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    Grünwald J

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Julia Grünwald,1 Angelika Anita Schlarb2 1Department of Psychology, Faculty of Science, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, 2Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Faculty of Psychology and Sports Science, University of Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany Objectives: This study examined the links between sleep disorders and subtypes of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD-inattention, ADHD-combined, ADHD-hyperactive/impulsive in childhood. We set up a hypothetical model linking different symptoms of both disorders to construct the underlying and shared pathways. By examining a sample of children with ADHD we firstly tested parts of the model.Methods: A total of 72 children with symptoms of ADHD (aged 6–13 years; 79.2% boys were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, third edition in regards to ADHD and sleep disorders via standardized parent-rated questionnaires. Additionally, quality of life (QoL was assessed. Overall, 46 children fulfilled the criteria of ADHD and were medication-naive.Results: On average, the whole sample had clinically elevated total scores of the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire in the validated German version (CSHQ-DE, indicating an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with ADHD. In accordance to our hypothetical model, children with primarily hyperactive–impulsive ADHD showed the highest CSHQ-DE scores. Moreover, we found a high impact for insomnia in this subgroup and a high comorbid load for the mutual occurrence of insomnia and nightmares. Furthermore, QoL was reduced in our whole sample, and again intensified in children with comorbid insomnia and nightmares.Conclusion: We verified an elevated occurrence of sleep disorders in children with ADHD and were able to link them to specific subtypes of ADHD. These results were in line with our hypothetical model

  15. Yoga for the Treatment of Insomnia among Cancer Patients: Evidence, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustian, Karen M; Janelsins, Michelle; Peppone, Luke J; Kamen, Charles

    Up to 90% of cancer patients report symptoms of insomnia during and after treatment. Symptoms of insomnia include excessive daytime sleepiness, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia symptoms are among the most prevalent, distressing and persistent cancer- and cancer treatment-related toxicities reported by patients, and can be severe enough to increase cancer morbidity and mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia symptoms, they are under-screened, under-diagnosed, and under-treated in cancer patients. When insomnia symptoms are identified, providers are hesitant to prescribe, and patients are hesitant to take pharmaceuticals due to polypharmacy concerns. In addition, sleep medications do not cure insomnia. Yoga is a well-tolerated mode of exercise with promising evidence for its efficacy in improving insomnia symptoms among cancer patients. This article reviews existing clinical research on the effectiveness of yoga for treating insomnia among cancer patients. The article also provides clinical recommendations for prescribing yoga for the treatment of insomnia in this population.

  16. Qigong program on insomnia and stress in cancer patients: A case series report

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    Seungmo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, the interest in Qigong as an alternative therapy has grown following reports of its ability to regulate psychological factors in cancer patients. This is a case series to evaluate the outcome measures of Qigong when used as an adjunct to standard medical care to treat insomnia and stress in cancer patients. Patients and methods: The Qigong program was applied to four cancer patients with insomnia, stress, and anxiety. The program consisted of 30-min sessions involving exercise, patting of the 12 meridians, and spontaneous breathing exercises three times a week for a period of 4 weeks. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was measured as the primary outcome, while the Stress Scale, the State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Functional Assessment Cancer Therapy–General determined the secondary outcomes. Insomnia, stress, and anxiety levels were examined weekly, while quality of life was examined on the first visit and the last visit. Results: The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Stress Scale scores were reduced after conduct of the Qigong program. Conclusion: This study could provide a better understanding of Qigong’s influence on insomnia and stress in cancer patients. However, a larger controlled trial should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  17. Effect of Six-Month Diet Intervention on Sleep among Overweight and Obese Men with Chronic Insomnia Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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    Xiao Tan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence suggests that diet alteration affects sleep, but this has not yet been studied in adults with insomnia symptoms. We aimed to determine the effect of a six-month diet intervention on sleep among overweight and obese (Body mass index, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 men with chronic insomnia symptoms. Forty-nine men aged 30–65 years with chronic insomnia symptoms were randomized into diet (n = 28 or control (n = 21 groups. The diet group underwent a six-month individualized diet intervention with three face-to-face counseling sessions and online supervision 1–3 times per week; 300–500 kcal/day less energy intake and optimized nutrient composition were recommended. Controls were instructed to maintain their habitual lifestyle. Sleep parameters were determined by piezoelectric bed sensors, a sleep diary, and a Basic Nordic sleep questionnaire. Compared to the controls, the diet group had shorter objective sleep onset latency after intervention. Within the diet group, prolonged objective total sleep time, improved objective sleep efficiency, lower depression score, less subjective nocturnal awakenings, and nocturia were found after intervention. In conclusion, modest energy restriction and optimized nutrient composition shorten sleep onset latency in overweight and obese men with insomnia symptoms.

  18. Effect of Six-Month Diet Intervention on Sleep among Overweight and Obese Men with Chronic Insomnia Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiao; Alén, Markku; Wang, Kun; Tenhunen, Jarkko; Wiklund, Petri; Partinen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-11-23

    Growing evidence suggests that diet alteration affects sleep, but this has not yet been studied in adults with insomnia symptoms. We aimed to determine the effect of a six-month diet intervention on sleep among overweight and obese (Body mass index, BMI ≥ 25 kg/m²) men with chronic insomnia symptoms. Forty-nine men aged 30-65 years with chronic insomnia symptoms were randomized into diet (n = 28) or control (n = 21) groups. The diet group underwent a six-month individualized diet intervention with three face-to-face counseling sessions and online supervision 1-3 times per week; 300-500 kcal/day less energy intake and optimized nutrient composition were recommended. Controls were instructed to maintain their habitual lifestyle. Sleep parameters were determined by piezoelectric bed sensors, a sleep diary, and a Basic Nordic sleep questionnaire. Compared to the controls, the diet group had shorter objective sleep onset latency after intervention. Within the diet group, prolonged objective total sleep time, improved objective sleep efficiency, lower depression score, less subjective nocturnal awakenings, and nocturia were found after intervention. In conclusion, modest energy restriction and optimized nutrient composition shorten sleep onset latency in overweight and obese men with insomnia symptoms.

  19. Insomnia and paranoia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Pugh, Katherine; Vorontsova, Natasha; Southgate, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Insomnia is a potential cause of anxiety, depression, and anomalies of experience; separate research has shown that anxiety, depression and anomalies of experience are predictors of paranoia. Thus insomnia may contribute to the formation and maintenance of persecutory ideation. The aim was to examine for the first time the association of insomnia symptoms and paranoia in the general population and the extent of insomnia in individuals with persecutory delusions attending psychiatric services. Assessments of insomnia, persecutory ideation, anxiety, and depression were completed by 300 individuals from the general population and 30 individuals with persecutory delusions and a diagnosis of non-affective psychosis. Insomnia symptoms were clearly associated with higher levels of persecutory ideation. Consistent with the theoretical understanding of paranoia, the association was partly explained by the presence of anxiety and depression. Moderate or severe insomnia was present in more than 50% of the delusions group. The study provides the first direct evidence that insomnia is common in individuals with high levels of paranoia. It is plausible that sleep difficulties contribute to the development of persecutory ideation. The intriguing implication is that insomnia interventions for this group could have the added benefit of lessening paranoia.

  20. Insomnia and paranoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Pugh, Katherine; Vorontsova, Natasha; Southgate, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Insomnia is a potential cause of anxiety, depression, and anomalies of experience; separate research has shown that anxiety, depression and anomalies of experience are predictors of paranoia. Thus insomnia may contribute to the formation and maintenance of persecutory ideation. The aim was to examine for the first time the association of insomnia symptoms and paranoia in the general population and the extent of insomnia in individuals with persecutory delusions attending psychiatric services. Assessments of insomnia, persecutory ideation, anxiety, and depression were completed by 300 individuals from the general population and 30 individuals with persecutory delusions and a diagnosis of non-affective psychosis. Insomnia symptoms were clearly associated with higher levels of persecutory ideation. Consistent with the theoretical understanding of paranoia, the association was partly explained by the presence of anxiety and depression. Moderate or severe insomnia was present in more than 50% of the delusions group. The study provides the first direct evidence that insomnia is common in individuals with high levels of paranoia. It is plausible that sleep difficulties contribute to the development of persecutory ideation. The intriguing implication is that insomnia interventions for this group could have the added benefit of lessening paranoia. PMID:19097752

  1. Can insomnia in pregnancy predict postpartum depression? A longitudinal, population-based study.

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    Signe K Dørheim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia and depression are strongly interrelated. This study aimed to describe changes in sleep across childbirth, and to evaluate whether insomnia in pregnancy is a predictor of postpartum depression. METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based study was conducted among perinatal women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Women received questionnaires in weeks 17 and 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. This paper presents data from 2,088 of 4,662 women with complete data for insomnia and depression in week 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. Sleep times, wake-up times and average sleep durations were self-reported. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS was used to measure insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to measure depressive symptoms. RESULTS: After delivery, sleep duration was reduced by 49 minutes (to 6.5 hours, and mean sleep efficiency was reduced from 84% to 75%. However, self-reported insomnia scores (BIS improved from 17.2 to 15.4, and the reported prevalence of insomnia decreased from 61.6% to 53.8%. High EPDS scores and anxiety in pregnancy, fear of delivery, previous depression, primiparity, and higher educational level were risk factors for both postpartum insomnia and depression. Insomnia did not predict postpartum depression in women with no prior history of depression, whereas women who recovered from depression had residual insomnia. LIMITATIONS: Depression and insomnia were not verified by clinical interviews. Women with depressive symptoms were less likely to remain in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Although women slept fewer hours at night after delivery compared to during late pregnancy, and reported more nights with nighttime awakenings, their self-reported insomnia scores improved, and the prevalence of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria decreased. Insomnia in pregnancy may be a marker for postpartum recurrence of depression among women with previous

  2. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: Beyond perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Sassoon, Stephanie A; Colrain, Ian M; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The menopausal transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40-60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43-57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopausal transition. Sleep quality was assessed with two weeks of sleep diaries and one laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) recording. In multiple regression models controlling for menopausal transition stage, menstrual cycle phase, depression symptoms, and presence of objective hot flashes, a diagnosis of insomnia predicted PSG-measured total sleep time (p insomnia had, on average, 43.5 min less PSG-measured sleep time (p insomnia reported more WASO (p = 0.002), more night-to-night variability in WASO (p insomnia in the approach to menopause have a measurable sleep deficit, with almost 50% of the sample having less than 6h of sleep. Compromised sleep that develops in the context of the menopausal transition should be addressed, taking into account unique aspects of menopause like hot flashes, to avoid the known negative health consequences associated with insufficient sleep and insomnia in midlife women.

  3. Maternal Insomnia and Children's Family Socialization Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Alice M.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Ambler, Antony; Arseneault, Louise; Houts, Renate M.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine concurrent associations between maternal insomnia and different aspects of the family socialization environment. Design: Mothers reported on their symptoms of insomnia in a private standardized interview and interviewers evaluated the family socialization environment using the Coder's Inventory. Setting: Assessments were conducted in participants' homes within the U.K. Patients or Participants: One thousand one hundred sixteen mothers of British children enrolled in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) study were invited to participate when their children were aged 12 years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: After controlling for family socioeconomic status (SES), mothers' relationship status, and maternal depression, maternal insomnia was associated with a poorer family socialization environment (β = −0.10, [95% confidence intervals (CI) = −0.16, −0.04], P Moffitt TE; Ambler A; Arseneault L; Houts RM; Caspi A. Maternal insomnia and children's family socialization environments. SLEEP 2012;35(4):579-582. PMID:22467996

  4. Scalp and Body Acupuncture for Treatment of Senile Insomnia-A Report of 83 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢泽强

    2002-01-01

    @@ The author has in recent years treated 83 cases of senile insomnia with scalp and body acupuncture. Meanwhile, 35 cases in the control group were treated with western and Chinese drugs. The therapeutic results in the treatment group were superior to that of nitrazapam and An Shen Bu Nao Ye (安神补脑液Sedative and Brain-invigorating Fluid) used in the control group. A report of the treatment follows.

  5. Prevalence of insomnia and its impact on daily function amongst Malaysian primary care patients

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    Zailinawati Abu-Hassan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insomnia is a common public health problem and the prevalence and impact of insomnia in primary care attendees is not well documented in the Asian population. Objectives To determine the prevalence of self-reported insomnia symptoms amongst adult primary care attendees and the association with socio-demographic factors; to ascertain the impact of insomnia on daily functioning and to describe the psychological profile of patients with insomnia. Methods In this cross-sectional survey, 2049 adult patients (≥18 year old attending seven primary care clinics in Peninsular Malaysia, completed the questionnaire asking about symptoms of insomnia (defined according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders and DSM IV criteria daytime impairment and psychological symptoms (assessed by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results The response rate was 86.2%. A total of 60% reported insomnia symptoms, 38.9% had frequent insomnia symptoms (>3 times per week, 30.7% had chronic insomnia without daytime consequences and 28.6% had chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction. Indian ethnicity (OR 1.79; 95%CI, 1.28-2.49, age ≥ 50 or older (OR 1.82; 95%CI, 1.10-3.01, anxiety symptoms (OR 1.65; 95%CI, 1.21-2.22 and depression symptoms (OR 1.65; 95%CI, 1.21-2.26 were risk factors for chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction. Amongst those with chronic insomnia with daytime dysfunction, 47.8% had anxiety symptoms (OR, 2.01; 95%CI, 1.57-2.59 and 36.5% had depression symptoms (OR, 2.74; 95%CI, 2.04-3.68 based on HADs score. They also had tendency to doze off while driving and to be involved in road traffic accidents. Conclusions A third of primary care attendees have insomnia symptoms and chronic insomnia, associated with significant daytime dysfunction and psychological morbidity. By identifying those at risk of having chronic insomnia, appropriate interventions can be commenced.

  6. Dissociative symptoms and sleep parameters — an all-night polysomnography study in patients with insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kloet, D.; Giesbrecht, T.; Franck, E.; van Gastel, A.; de Volder, I.; van den Eede, F.; Verschuere, B.; Merckelbach, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dissociative disorders encompass a range of symptoms varying from severe absent-mindedness and memory problems to confusion about one's own identity. Recent studies suggest that these symptoms may be the by-products of a labile sleep-wake cycle. Methods In the current study, we explored

  7. Dissociative symptoms and sleep parameters — an all-night polysomnography study in patients with insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kloet, D.; Giesbrecht, T.; Franck, E.; van Gastel, A.; de Volder, I.; van den Eede, F.; Verschuere, B.; Merckelbach, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dissociative disorders encompass a range of symptoms varying from severe absent-mindedness and memory problems to confusion about one's own identity. Recent studies suggest that these symptoms may be the by-products of a labile sleep-wake cycle. Methods In the current study, we explored t

  8. Insomnia Phenotypes Based on Objective Sleep Duration in Adolescents: Depression Risk and Differential Behavioral Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Fernandez-Mendoza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on previous studies on the role of objective sleep duration in predicting morbidity in individuals with insomnia, we examined the role of objective sleep duration in differentiating behavioral profiles in adolescents with insomnia symptoms. Adolescents from the Penn State Child Cohort (n = 397, ages 12–23, 54.7% male underwent a nine-hour polysomnography (PSG, clinical history, physical examination and psychometric testing, including the Child or Adult Behavior Checklist and Pediatric Behavior Scale. Insomnia symptoms were defined as a self-report of difficulty falling and/or staying asleep and objective “short” sleep duration as a PSG total sleep time ≤7 h. A significant interaction showed that objective short sleep duration modified the association of insomnia symptoms with internalizing problems. Consistently, adolescents with insomnia symptoms and short sleep duration were characterized by depression, rumination, mood dysregulation and social isolation, while adolescents with insomnia symptoms and normal sleep duration were characterized by rule-breaking and aggressive behaviors and, to a lesser extent, rumination. These findings indicate that objective sleep duration is useful in differentiating behavioral profiles among adolescents with insomnia symptoms. The insomnia with objective short sleep duration phenotype is associated with an increased risk of depression earlier in the lifespan than previously believed.

  9. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partinen, Markku; Huutoniemi, Anne; Kajaste, Soili; Lagerstedt, Rea; Markkula, Juha; Mäkinen, Erkki; Paakkari, Ilari; Partonen, Timo; Polo, Päivi; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, Outi; Seppälä, Maaria; Kukkonen-Harjula, Katriina; Tuunainen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia symptoms must be differentiated from insomnia disorder. The correct aiagnosis or insomnia aisoraer is important, as insomnia may also be a symptom of many other diseases. Cognitive behavioral methods are recommended as first-line treatment options. Treatment of acute insomnia with hypnotics should not exceed two weeks. In elderly persons adverse effects of hypnotics may exceed their beneficial effects in long-term use. Antidepressive medications acting on the histamine-1 system may be used in very small doses. The new guideline includes e.g. insomnia in pregnant and menopausal women and in cancer patients, and driving issues.

  10. Association of polymorphism in the promoter of the melatonin receptor 1A gene with schizophrenia and with insomnia symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Jeong; Park, Jin Kyung; Kim, Su Kang; Cho, Ah-Rang; Kim, Jong Woo; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2011-10-01

    Schizophrenia patients commonly have sleep disturbances. In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the melatonin receptor genes (MTNR1A and MTNR1B) were associated with schizophrenia and with sleep problems such as insomnia and hypersomnia in schizophrenia patients. We genotyped two promoter SNPs [rs2119882 (-184T/C) of MTNR1A and rs4753426 (-1193C/T) of MTNR1B] using direct sequencing in 289 schizophrenia patients and 505 control subjects. We found that rs2119882 of MTNR1A was associated with schizophrenia in recessive model [CC vs. TT/TC, p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12-2.55]. Interestingly, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2119882 of MTNR1A was also associated with insomnia symptoms of schizophrenia (recessive model, p = 0.010, OR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.21-4.14), but not with hypersomnia symptoms as determined using the Operational Criteria checklist. However, rs4753426 of MTNR1B was not associated with either schizophrenia or clinical phenotypes. Our results suggest that MTNR1A may be a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and may be associated with insomnia symptoms exhibited in schizophrenia patients.

  11. [Insomnia in the general practitioner's office: from diagnosis to initial interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Isabelle; Brühl, Annette; Delsignore, Aba; Weidt, Steffi

    2014-05-21

    Insomnia is the most frequent type of sleeping disorder and - following pain - the second most common symptom reported in the general practitioner's office. The prevalence of insomnia increases with age. Untreated, insomnia is regarded as risk factor for other comorbid somatic and mental disorders. Therefore, it is important to make a thorough diagnostic and differential diagnostic assessment. Particularly interventions aiming at improving sleep hygiene and therapy using sleep restriction can help alleviate insomnia. Pharmacologically, herbal drugs and antidepressants with sleep inducing effects can be used, for short-term treatment also benzodiazepine/gaba-ergic agonists.

  12. A case series on the use of lavendula oil capsules in patients suffering from major depressive disorder and symptoms of psychomotor agitation, insomnia and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fißler, Maria; Quante, Arnim

    2014-02-01

    Symptoms of agitation, anxiety and insomnia are frequent among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) during the first weeks of psychiatric care. But a substantial number of patients declines taking pharmaceutical medication to avoid side effects. Therefore, an alternative herbal medication is needed. Clinical studies demonstrated that lavender oil capsules, termed Lasea®, have an anxiolytic effect comparable to Lorazepam and significantly reduce insomnia and agitation in non-depressed patients. Therefore, the aim of this retrospective case series was to analyze the effectiveness of Lasea® for patients with MDD and symptoms of anxiety, insomnia and psychomotor agitation. Eight cases were analyzed retrospectively regarding the dosage, length of treatment, possible side effects and effectiveness of Lasea®. All cases were treated at the Department of Psychiatry at Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin in a naturalistic setting. Effectiveness was measured by a change in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) total score and subscores. In 6 cases, the combination of Lasea® and an antidepressant resulted in a reduction of MDD. Lasea® also reduced agitation in 6 cases. Psychological anxiety was reduced in 5, somatic anxiety in 4 cases whereas sleep-onset and sleep-maintenance insomnia improved in 3 cases each. The results demonstrate that Lasea® reduces some of the anxiety related symptoms and sleep disturbances in MDD patients. Furthermore Lasea® significantly reduces psychomotor agitation. Additionally, the results indicate a significant global improvement stemming from the combinational therapy of Lasea® and antidepressant medication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Symptom attribution and symptom reporting in Australian Gulf War veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Breanna K; McFarlane, Alexander C; Clarke, David M; Sim, Malcolm R; Kelsall, Helen L

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the consistent elevated symptom reporting by Gulf War veterans; we compared Australian Gulf War veterans and military-comparison group on symptom attributional styles and the relationship with total number and grouping of somatic and psychological symptoms. Postal questionnaires were completed by Australian Gulf War veterans (n=697) and military-comparison group (n=659) in 2000-2002 and 2011-2012. Data were collected on deployments, military-psychological stressors, symptom reporting, symptom factors and attributional style (normalising, psychologising, somatising, mixed-attribution). Gulf War veterans did not differ in attributional style from comparison group (p>0.05); normalising was the predominant style. Groups were combined for analyses. Psychologisers reported the highest overall symptoms (mean(M)=10.95, standard deviation(SD)=9.15), the most psychophysiological (M=1.71, SD=2.82), cognitive (M=5.79, SD=5.09) and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=1.53, SD=1.73). Psychologisers and somatisers reported significantly more symptoms across overall symptoms, all three symptom factors and psychological distress than normalisers. Normalisers consistently reported fewest overall symptoms (M=2.85, SD=4.49), psychophysiological (M=0.40, SD=0.98), cognitive (M=1.14, SD=2.22), and arthro-neuromuscular symptoms (M=0.72, SD=1.31). Persistent symptoms, rather than remitted, between baseline and follow-up were associated with increased rates of psychologising and mixed-attribution compared with normalising. For incident symptoms a similar pattern was observed, some symptoms also showed increased rates of somatising. In veterans, psychologising was associated with higher symptom reporting, whilst somatisers and mixed-attribution also demonstrated higher reporting than normalisers. Symptom persistence and incidence were associated with symptom attribution. The findings indicate that attributional style is associated with patterns of symptom reporting and

  14. Insomnia and endothelial function - the HUNT 3 fitness study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn B Strand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined insomnia in relation to endothelial function, an indicator of preclinical atherosclerosis. Our aim was to assess the association of insomnia with endothelial function in a large population based study of healthy individuals. METHODS: A total of 4 739 participants free from known cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases, cancer, and sarcoidosis, and who were not using antihypertensive medication were included in the study. They reported how often they had experienced difficulties falling asleep at night, repeated awakenings during the night, early awakenings without being able to go back to sleep, and daytime sleepiness. Endothelial function was measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD derived from the brachial artery. RESULTS: We found no consistent association between the insomnia symptoms and endothelial function in multiadjusted models, but individual insomnia symptoms may be related to endothelial function. Among women who reported early awakenings, endothelial function may be lower than in women without this symptom (p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided no evidence that endothelial function, an early indicator of atherosclerosis, is an important linking factor between insomnia and CHD. Further studies are needed to explore the complex interrelation between sleep and cardiovascular pathology.

  15. The relationship of primary health care use with persistence of insomnia: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Richard A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of insomnia symptoms in the general population is high. Insomnia is linked with high health care use and within primary care there are a number of treatment options available. The objective of this study was to determine the association of persistence and remission of insomnia with primary health care using a longitudinal study. Methods A postal survey of registered adult (over 18 years populations of five UK general practices, repeated after 1 year, linked to primary care records. Baseline survey responders were assessed for persistence of insomnia symptoms at 12 months. The association of primary care consultation or prescription for any mood disorder (defined as anxiety, depression, stress, neurosis, or insomnia in the 12 months between baseline and follow-up surveys with persistence of insomnia was determined. Results 474 participants reporting insomnia symptoms at baseline were followed up at 12 months. 131(28% consulted for mood problem(s or received a relevant prescription. Of these 100 (76% still had insomnia symptoms at one year, compared with 227 (66% of those with no contact with primary care for this condition (OR 1.37; 95% CI 0.83, 2.27. Prescription of hypnotics showed some evidence of association with persistence of insomnia at follow-up (OR 3.18; 95% CI 0.93, 10.92. Conclusion Insomniacs continue to have problems regardless of whether or not they have consulted their primary care clinician or received a prescription for medication over the year. Hypnotics may be associated with persistence of insomnia. Further research is needed to determine more effective methods of identifying and managing insomnia in primary care. There may however be a group who have unmet need such as depression who would benefit from seeking primary health care.

  16. Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS): a new short rating scale for the assessment of psychological symptoms and sleep in insomnia; study design: development and validation of a new short self-rating scale in a sample of 218 patients suffering from insomnia and 94 healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crönlein, Tatjana; Langguth, Berthold; Popp, Roland; Lukesch, Helmut; Pieh, Christoph; Hajak, Göran; Geisler, Peter

    2013-04-22

    The Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS) is a new self-rating scale to assess cognitive, emotional and behavioural aspects of psychophysiological insomnia (PI) with only ten items. A specific purpose of the new scale is the evaluation of the outcome of insomnia- specific cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-I). Internal consistency of the RIS has been validated in 218 patients with PI. For determining sensitivity and specificity, this sample has been compared to 94 healthy controls. Sensitivity to change and pre-post cross-validation with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) has been tested in a separate sample of 38 patients with PI undergoing CBT-I. RIS distinguishes well between controls and patients with PI. Internal consistency was within a good range (Cronbach alpha = .890). RIS was sensitive for detecting improvements after CBT-I in sleep parameters and target symptoms such as sleep-related thinking. The RIS is a valid and feasible instrument for assessing psychological PI-symptoms and sleep parameters.

  17. Possible Insomnia Predicts Some Risky Behaviors among Adolescents when Controlling for Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrett, Christina D.; Gaultney, Jane F.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether previously reported links between sleep and risk taking among adolescents (E. M. O'Brien & J. A. Mindell, 2005) are associated--concurrently, longitudinally, or both--with sleep or underlying depression. The present study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 4,353 adolescents in the United…

  18. Possible Insomnia Predicts Some Risky Behaviors among Adolescents when Controlling for Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrett, Christina D.; Gaultney, Jane F.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether previously reported links between sleep and risk taking among adolescents (E. M. O'Brien & J. A. Mindell, 2005) are associated--concurrently, longitudinally, or both--with sleep or underlying depression. The present study analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of 4,353 adolescents in the United States…

  19. Cognitive processes and their association with persistence and remission of insomnia: findings from a longitudinal study in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell-Clarke, Annika; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Tillfors, Maria; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem that affects about 10% of the population. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between cognitive processes and the persistence and remission from insomnia in the general population. In a longitudinal design, 2333 participants completed a survey on night time and daytime symptoms, and cognitive processes. Follow-up surveys were sent out six months and 18 months after the first assessment. Participants were categorised as having persistent insomnia, being in remission from insomnia or being a normal sleeper. Cognitive processes distinguished between people with persistent insomnia and normal sleepers. Specifically, worry, dysfunctional beliefs, somatic arousal, selective attention and monitoring, and safety behaviours increased the likelihood of reporting persistent insomnia rather than normal sleep. For people with insomnia, more worry about sleep at baseline predicted persistent insomnia but not remission later on. Lower selective attention and monitoring, and use of safety behaviours over time increased the likelihood of remission from insomnia. In general, these results remained, when psychiatric symptoms and medical complaints were added to the models. The findings support that certain cognitive processes may be associated with persistence and remission of insomnia. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An unusual cause of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, N; England, S; Ford-Dunn, S

    2009-07-01

    We report the case of a patient with tonsillar carcinoma, presenting with insomnia and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), which were exacerbated following an increase in benzodiazepine dose. There is a growing body of evidence describing OSAHS in patients treated for head and neck cancer. However, to our knowledge, there are no reports relating to the population of patients with progressive disease, whose management is palliative. We would advise consideration be given to the possibility of OSAHS in a patient presenting with an oropharyngeal tumour and sleep disturbance and would also suggest caution in the prescription of benzodiazepines and other sedative medication to this group of patients.

  1. Personality and Perinatal Maternal Insomnia: A Study Across Childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørheim, Signe K; Garthus-Niegel, Susan; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Personality may influence sleep in perinatal women. A follow-up study was conducted among 3,752 pregnant, then postpartum women at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. The Big Five personality dimensions were measured by the Mini-International Personality Item Pool in week 17 of pregnancy. Insomnia was measured by the Bergen Insomnia Scale in pregnancy week 32 and 8 weeks postpartum, along with self-reported sleep times. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale measured depression, and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist measured anxiety. Adjusted for current anxiety, depression, and demographic variables, the personality traits Neuroticism and Agreeableness were associated with insomnia in pregnancy. No personality traits were associated with postpartum insomnia. Extraversion was associated with longer postpartum sleep duration and better sleep efficiency, and Agreeableness with shorter sleep duration.

  2. Patient-reported symptom distress, and most bothersome issues, before and during cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fangxin Hong,1,2 Traci M Blonquist,1 Barbara Halpenny,3 Donna L Berry,3,4 1Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana‑Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA;2Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services, The Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Introduction: Frequently reported symptoms and treatment side effects may not be the most bothersome issues to patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate patient-reported symptom distress and bothersome issues among participants with cancer. Methods: Participants completed the Symptom Distress Scale-15 before treatment (T1 and during cancer treatment (T2 and reported up to two most bothersome issues among symptoms rated with moderate-to-severe distress. We compared symptom ratings and perceived bother and explored two approaches predicting patients’ most bothersome issues: worst absolute symptom score or worst change from pretreatment. Results: Significantly, (P≤0.0002 more patients reported moderate-to-severe distress at T2 for eight of 13 symptoms. At T1, 81% of patients reported one and 56% reported multiple symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress, while at T2, 89% reported one and 69% reported multiple symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress. Impact on sexual activity/interest, pain, fatigue, and insomnia were the most prevalent symptoms with moderate-to-severe distress. Fatigue, pain, and insomnia were perceived most often as bothersome. When one symptom was rated moderate-to-severe, predictive accuracy of the absolute score was 46% and 48% (T1 & T2 and 38% with the change score (T2–T1. When two or more symptoms were rated moderate-to-severe, predictive accuracy of the absolute score was 76% and 79% (T1 & T2 and 70% with the change score (T2–T1. Conclusion: More

  3. 失眠及其相关精神因素对女性肠易激综合征患者的影响%Influence of insomnia and insomnia-related psychological factors on symptoms of female patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨微微; 汤玉蓉; 徐新寓; 王一琳; 林琳

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of insomnia and insomnia-related psychological factors on the symptoms of female patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Two hundred and forty-five adult female outpatients with IBS who were treated at the Department of Gastroenterology of the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University were included in this study. A questionnaire survey was conducted using a demographic information questionnaire, a symptom questionnaire, athens insomnia scale (AIS), self-rating anxiety scale (SAS), and self-rating depression scale (SDS). According to AIS scores, female patients with IBS were divided into insomnia group and non-insomnia group. The influence of insomnia on typical symptoms, somatic symptoms and psychological symptoms of IBS, and the relationship between psychological factors and IBS were analyzed. RESULTS: The insomnia and non-insomnia groups differed significantly in their rating of abdominal pain/discomfort in terms of severity and duration (P < 0.05), but there was no difference in attack frequency between the two groups. The incidence of somatic symptoms, scores of SAS and SDS, and scores of SAS' and SDS' (sleep-related entries were removed) were all significantly higher in the insomnia group than in the non-insomnia group (all P < 0.01). Severity, attack frequency and duration of abdominal pain/discomfort were all positively correlated with SAS and SDS scores (all P< 0.05). CONCLUSION: Insomnia and insomnia-related psychological factors (anxiety, depression) can aggravate the symptoms of female patients with IBS.%目的:探讨失眠和失眠相关精神因素对女性肠易激综合征(irritable bowel syndrome,IBS)患者症状的影响.方法:收集2009-01/10就诊于南京医科大学第一附属医院消化科门诊的成年女性IBS患者245例,对其进行问卷调查:一般人口学资料、症状问卷、阿森斯失眠量表(athens insomnia scale,AIS)、焦虑自评量表(selfrating anxiety

  4. 失眠症状对突发性耳聋患者影响的临床分析%Clinical analysisof insomnia symptoms in patients with sudden deafness affect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔锦; 孙书臣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize and report on sudden sensorineural hearing loss of 167 patients who with symp-toms of insomnia,and discuss the occurrence of symptoms of insomnia and the relationship between sudden sensorineural hearing loss.Methods statistics undergraduate from 2012 to 2014 in the hospital treated 167 cases of patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss,among which 65 were male,female 102 cases,age from 21 to 84 years old.The average age of 54.1 years.Among them on the chief complaint within 1 week before the onset of symptoms of insomnia of 119 cases.71.25%of the charge hospital-ized patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.And some of these patients psychological assessment and CPC sleep monito-ring.Results about more than 70%of the patients with sudden deafness occurred on the before the onset of insomnia,the more tired,working pressure,tension and other mental factors.To improve sleep after drug treatment,patientsclinical symptoms im-proved significantly.Conclusion in the process of sudden deafness treatment,for the treatment of insomnia can be more active to improve patients complained of the wall of the ear tinnitus and stuffy feeling.%目的总结并报告突聋伴随失眠症状患者167例,并探讨失眠症状的出现与突聋之间的关系。方法统计本科在2012—2014年共住院收治突发性耳聋患者167例,其中男性65例、女性102例,年龄21~84岁,平均年龄54.1岁。其中入院时主诉发病前1周内出现失眠症状者119例,占收住院突聋患者71.25%。对其中部分患者进行心理评估及心肺耦合分析(CPC)睡眠监测。结果约70%以上的突聋患者在发病前均出现了失眠症状,其多为劳累、工作压力大、紧张等精神因素导致。在给予改善睡眠药物治疗后,患者的临床症状改善明显。结论在突发性耳聋治疗过程中,针对失眠症状的治疗可改善患者对耳鸣及耳堵闷感的抱怨程度。

  5. Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Siebern, Allison T; Suh, Sooyeon; Nowakowski, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders, which is characterized by nocturnal symptoms of difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and by daytime symptoms that impair occupational, social, or other areas of functioning. Insomnia disorder can exist alone or in conjunction with comorbid medical and/or psychiatric conditions. The incidence of insomnia is higher in women and can increase during certain junctures of a woman’s life (e.g., pregnancy, postpartum, and menopause). Th...

  6. Predeployment Sleep Duration and Insomnia Symptoms as Risk Factors for New-Onset Mental Health Disorders Following Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SLEEP, Vol. 36, No. 7, 2013 1011 Effects of Predeployment Sleep on Mental Health—Gehrman et al ployed, and the physical abuse item has the most...1998;155: 929 -33. 49. Chen MC, Burley HW, Gotlib IH. Reduced sleep quality in healthy girls at risk for depression. J Sleep Res 2012;21:68-72. 50. Gangwisch...Insomnia with ob- jective short sleep duration and incident hypertension: The Penn State Cohort. Hypertension 2012;60: 929 -35. 53. Vgontzas AN, Liao D

  7. Are Patients with Childhood Onset of Insomnia and Depression More Difficult to Treat Than Are Those with Adult Onsets of These Disorders? A Report from the TRIAD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Jack D.; Manber, Rachel; Buysse, Daniel J.; Krystal, Andrew D.; Thase, Michael E.; Gehrman, Phillip; Fairholme, Christopher P.; Luther, James; Wisniewski, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    . Conclusions: Patients with comorbid depression and insomnia who experienced the first onset of both disorders in childhood are less responsive to the treatments offered herein than are those with adult onsets of these comorbid disorders. Further research is needed to identify therapies that enhance the depression and insomnia treatment responses of those with childhood onsets of these two conditions. Citation: Edinger JD, Manber R, Buysse DJ, Krystal AD, Thase ME, Gehrman P, Fairholme CP, Luther J, Wisniewski S. Are patients with childhood onset of insomnia and depression more difficult to treat than are those with adult onsets of these disorders? A report from the TRIAD study. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017;13(2):205–213. PMID:27784414

  8. Insomnia in school-age children with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smedje Hans

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asperger syndrome (AS and high-functioning autism (HFA are pervasive developmental disorders (PDD in individuals of normal intelligence. Childhood AS/HFA is considered to be often associated with disturbed sleep, in particular with difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep (insomnia. However, studies about the topic are still scarce. The present study investigated childhood AS/HFA regarding a wide range of parent reported sleep-wake behaviour, with a particular focus on insomnia. Methods Thirty-two 8–12 yr old children with AS/HFA were compared with 32 age and gender matched typically developing children regarding sleep and associated behavioural characteristics. Several aspects of sleep-wake behaviour including insomnia were surveyed using a structured paediatric sleep questionnaire in which parents reported their children's sleep patterns for the previous six months. Recent sleep patterns were monitored by use of a one-week sleep diary and actigraphy. Behavioural characteristics were surveyed by use of information gleaned from parent and teacher-ratings in the High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire, and in the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Results Parent-reported difficulties initiating sleep and daytime sleepiness were more common in children with AS/HFA than in controls, and 10/32 children with AS/HFA (31.2% but none of the controls fulfilled our definition of paediatric insomnia. The parent-reported insomnia corresponded to the findings obtained by actigraphy. Children with insomnia had also more parent-reported autistic and emotional symptoms, and more teacher-reported emotional and hyperactivity symptoms than those children without insomnia. Conclusion Parental reports indicate that in childhood AS/HFA insomnia is a common and distressing symptom which is frequently associated with coexistent behaviour problems. Identification and treatment of sleep problems need to be a routine

  9. Application of Cognitive Behavioral Therapies for Comorbid Insomnia and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    This article provides an overview of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia and depression. Included is a discussion of how CBT for insomnia affects depression symptoms and how CBT for depression affects insomnia symptoms. The extant literature is reviewed on ways that depression/insomnia comorbidity moderates CBT response. The article concludes with an introduction to cognitive behavioral social rhythm therapy, a group therapy that integrates tenets of CBT for both disorders.

  10. Symptoms of Insomnia and Sleep Duration and Their Association with Incident Strokes: Findings from the Population-Based MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Katharina Helbig

    Full Text Available To examine the relationship between symptoms of insomnia and sleep duration and incident total (non-fatal plus fatal strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in a large cohort of men and women from the general population in Germany.In four population-based MONICA (monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease/KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg surveys conducted between 1984 and 2001, 17,604 men and women (aged 25 to 74 years were asked about issues like sleep, health behavior, and medical history. In subsequent surveys and mortality follow-ups, incident stroke cases (cerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, unknown stroke type were gathered prospectively until 2009. Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated using sequential Cox proportional hazards regression models.During a mean follow-up of 14 years, 917 strokes (710 non-fatal strokes and 207 fatal strokes were observed. Trouble falling asleep and difficulty staying asleep were not significantly related to any incident stroke outcome in either sex in the multivariable models. Among men, the HR for the association between short (≤5 hours and long (≥10 hours daily sleep duration and total strokes were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.01-2.06 and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16-2.29, after adjustment for basic confounding variables. As for non-fatal strokes and fatal strokes, in the analyses adjusted for age, survey, education, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking habits, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, the increased risks persisted, albeit somewhat attenuated, but no longer remained significant. Among women, in the multivariable analyses the quantity of sleep was also not related to any stroke outcome.In the present study, symptoms of insomnia and exceptional sleep duration were not significantly predictive of incident total strokes, non-fatal strokes, and fatal strokes in

  11. Non-pharmacological treatment of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebern, Allison T; Suh, Sooyeon; Nowakowski, Sara

    2012-10-01

    Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders, which is characterized by nocturnal symptoms of difficulties initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and by daytime symptoms that impair occupational, social, or other areas of functioning. Insomnia disorder can exist alone or in conjunction with comorbid medical and/or psychiatric conditions. The incidence of insomnia is higher in women and can increase during certain junctures of a woman's life (e.g., pregnancy, postpartum, and menopause). This article will focus on an overview of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, evidence of effectiveness for this treatment when insomnia disorder is experienced alone or in parallel with a comorbidity, and a review with promising data on the use of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia when present during postpartum and menopause.

  12. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Women Climacteric Insomnia by Plum-Blossom Needle: A Report of 50 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-qing; LI Nai-rong

    2004-01-01

    To observe the treatment of 50 female patients with climacteric insomnia by plum-blossom needle therapy. According to differentiation of symptoms and signs the head, back, belly and other location were tapping. Besides 50 patients were treated with Western medicine as a control group. The result showed the immediate and long-term effect in plum-blossom needle group was better than that in control group (P<0.01).%梅花针叩刺头部,背部和腹部,并根据辨证配穴治疗更年期综合征以失眠为主症的患者50例,并与西药治疗50例相对照,梅花针组近期疗效和远期疗效均好于对照组(P<0.01).

  13. The burden of insomnia in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima K

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kazuo Mishima,1 Marco daCosta DiBonaventura,2 Hillary Gross2 1Department of Psychophysiology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, Japan; 2Kantar Health, New York, NY, USA Objectives: Several studies have suggested that patients who experience insomnia report a number of significant impairments. However, despite this literature, fewer studies have focused on the burden of insomnia among patients in Japan. The objective of the current study is to extend this work in Japan to further understand the effect of insomnia on health-related quality of life (hrQOL. Further, another objective is to understand general predictors of hrQOL among patients with insomnia. Methods: Data from the 2012 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey, an annual, cross-sectional study of adults aged 18 years or older, were used (N=30,000. All National Health and Wellness Survey respondents were categorized based on the incidence of self-reported insomnia diagnosis and prescription medication usage (clinical insomniacs under treatment versus [vs] good sleepers without insomnia or insomnia symptoms. Comparisons among different groups were made using multiple regression models controlling for demographics and health history. Results: Clinical insomniacs (n=1,018; 3.4% reported significantly worse hrQOL compared with good sleepers (n=20,542 (mental component summary: 34.2 vs 48.0; physical component summary: 48.0 vs 52.8; health utilities: 0.61 vs 0.76; all P<0.05. Health behaviors (smoking, exercise, alcohol use and comorbidities were the strongest predictors of health utilities for clinical insomniacs. For all three clinical insomniac subgroups of interest, those with a physical comorbidity but not a psychiatric one, those with a psychiatric comorbidity but not a physical one, and those without either a physical or psychiatric comorbidity, large decrements in health utilities were observed for respondents who did

  14. Habitual sleep duration and insomnia and the risk of cardiovascular events and all-cause death: report from a community-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Kuo-Liong; Chen, Pei-Chung; Hsu, Hsiu-Ching; Su, Ta-Chen; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between sleep duration and insomnia severity and the risk of all-cause death and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Prospective cohort study. Community-based. A total of 3,430 adults aged 35 years or older. None. During a median 15.9 year (interquartile range, 13.1 to 16.9) follow-up period, 420 cases developed cardiovascular disease and 901 cases died. A U-shape association between sleep duration and all-cause death was found: the age and gender-adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval [CI]) of all-cause death (with 7 h of daily sleep being considered for the reference group) for individuals reporting or = 9 h were 1.15 (0.91-1.45), 1.02 (0.85-1.25), 1.05 (0.88-1.27), and 1.43 (1.16-1.75); P for trend, 0.019. However, the relationship between sleep duration and risk of CVD were linear. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk (95% CI) for all-cause death (using individuals without insomnia) were 1.02 (0.86-1.20) for occasional insomnia, 1.15 (0.92-1.42) for frequent insomnia, and 1.70 (1.16-2.49) for nearly everyday insomnia (P for trend, 0.028). The multivariate adjusted relative risk (95% CI) was 2.53 (1.71-3.76) for all-cause death and 2.07 (1.11-3.85) for CVD rate in participants sleeping > or = 9 h and for those with frequent insomnia. Sleep duration and insomnia severity were associated with all-cause death and CVD events among ethnic Chinese in Taiwan. Our data indicate that an optimal sleep duration (7-8 h) predicted fewer deaths.

  15. Music for insomnia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Kira V; Koenig, Julian; Jennum, Poul; Vuust, Peter

    2015-08-13

    design or being the only published study. As regards risk of bias, most studies were at high risk of bias on at least one domain: one study was at high risk of selection bias and one was judged to be at unclear risk; six studies were at high risk of performance bias; three studies were at high risk of detection bias; one study was at high risk of attrition bias and was study was judged to be at unclear risk; two studies were judged to be at unclear risk of reporting bias; and four studies were at high risk of other bias.Five studies (N = 264) reporting on sleep quality as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were included in the meta-analysis. The results of a random-effects meta-analysis revealed an effect in favour of music listening (mean difference (MD) -2.80; 95% confidence interval (CI) -3.42 to -2.17; Z = 8.77, P music may be effective for improving subjective sleep quality in adults with insomnia symptoms. The intervention is safe and easy to administer. More research is needed to establish the effect of listening to music on other aspects of sleep as well as the daytime consequences of insomnia.

  16. Behavioral and psychosocial factors associated with insomnia in adolescents with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Wilson, Anna C; Lewandowski, Amy S; Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify differences in sleep behaviors, sleep quality, pre-sleep arousal and prevalence of insomnia symptoms in adolescents with chronic pain compared to a healthy age and sex-matched cohort and (2) examine pain intensity, pubertal development, depression, and pre-sleep arousal as risk factors for insomnia symptoms. Participants included 115 adolescents, 12-18 years of age (73.0% female), 59 youth with chronic pain and 56 healthy youth. During a home-based assessment, adolescents completed validated measures of pain, sleep quality, sleep hygiene, pre-sleep arousal, depressive symptoms, and pubertal development. Findings revealed a significantly higher percentage of adolescents with chronic pain reporting symptoms of insomnia (54.2%) compared to healthy adolescents (19.6%), pinsomnia, having chronic pain (OR=6.09) and higher levels of cognitive pre-sleep arousal (OR=1.24). Level of pain intensity did not predict insomnia. While sleep disruption may initially relate to pain, these symptoms may persist into a separate primary sleep disorder over time due to other behavioral and psychosocial factors. Assessment of insomnia may be important for identifying behavioral targets for the delivery of sleep-specific interventions to youth with chronic pain.

  17. Insomnia and physical activity in adults with prediabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasens, Eileen R; Yang, Kyeongra

    2012-08-01

    This secondary analysis study examines the relationship between physical activity and symptoms of insomnia among adults with prediabetes (N = 958) from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The sample of participants were generally obese, middle-aged, and racially diverse. NHANES questions included symptoms of insomnia, sleep duration, and sleep latency. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight; at least 2 days of ActiGraph activity monitor data determined mean steps walked. Men walked more steps than women; however, women had more insomnia symptoms. There were significant associations between insomnia symptoms and increased sleep latency and decreased sleep duration. Multiple regression analysis showed that younger age, lower BMI, higher self-rated health, high school education, and fewer insomnia symptoms were significantly related to increased steps walked. The findings indicate that insomnia in adults with prediabetes may be a barrier to their adapting an active lifestyle.

  18. Insomnia and sleep misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastien, C H; Ceklic, T; St-Hilaire, P; Desmarais, F; Pérusse, A D; Lefrançois, J; Pedneault-Drolet, M

    2014-10-01

    Sleep misperception is often observed in insomnia individuals (INS). The extent of misperception varies between different types of INS. The following paper comprised sections which will be aimed at studying the sleep EEG and compares it to subjective reports of sleep in individuals suffering from either psychophysiological insomnia or paradoxical insomnia and good sleeper controls. The EEG can be studied without any intervention (thus using the raw data) via either PSG or fine quantitative EEG analyses (power spectral analysis [PSA]), identifying EEG patterns as in the case of cyclic alternating patterns (CAPs) or by decorticating the EEG while scoring the different transient or phasic events (K-Complexes or sleep spindles). One can also act on the on-going EEG by delivering stimuli so to study their impact on cortical measures as in the case of event-related potential studies (ERPs). From the paucity of studies available using these different techniques, a general conclusion can be reached: sleep misperception is not an easy phenomenon to quantify and its clinical value is not well recognized. Still, while none of the techniques or EEG measures defined in the paper is available and/or recommended to diagnose insomnia, ERPs might be the most indicated technique to study hyperarousal and sleep quality in different types of INS. More research shall also be dedicated to EEG patterns and transient phasic events as these EEG scoring techniques can offer a unique insight of sleep misperception.

  19. Professional correlates of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Damien; Massuel, Marie-Anne; Metlaine, Arnaud

    2006-02-01

    Insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder that affects daytime functioning, behavior, and quality of life. Several reports have shown that insomnia impacts on the workforce and is associated with an increased risk of absenteeism. However, few workplace studies have been performed. Our study attempted to evaluate the professional correlates of insomnia by comparing a group of workers with insomnia to a matched group of good sleepers. The main objective measure was absenteeism. Accidents, self-esteem at work, job satisfaction, and efficiency at work were also investigated. Pairs of workers with insomnia (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition definition) and good sleepers, matched by age, sex, and occupational status, were interviewed by their occupational physician and also answered a self-administered questionnaire on work-related criteria. Objective data on absenteeism (number of days absent from work) were provided by the employers' health resource databases. Paris and the Ile de France region (France). Seven hundred eighty-five subjects completed the questionnaire. We retained 369 pair (ie, 738 subjects) for analysis. Insomniacs missed work twice as often as good sleepers. The difference between insomniacs and good sleepers in terms of absenteeism was particularly high for blue-collar workers (odds ratio = 3.0) and men (odds ratio = 2.31). Insomniacs had also a higher accident rate while driving and, strikingly, a 3-fold greater risk of having 2 or 3 serious road accidents. They also reported poor self-esteem at work, less job satisfaction, and less efficiency at work, compared with good sleepers. Our study found an objective increase in absenteeism in insomniacs compared with good sleepers.

  20. Role of Combat Exposure and Insomnia in Student Veterans' Adaptation to College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffin, James J; Riggs, Shelley A; Taylor, Daniel J

    2017-08-04

    Since 2002, the number of college student veterans has nearly doubled, although 30-40% of veterans fail to complete their degree. Few research efforts to understand the challenges veterans face transitioning to college in recent years have looked beyond the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder. Insomnia is the most frequently reported symptom of combat veterans and can have serious implications for college students. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of insomnia in student veteran adaptation to college relative to civilian students. College students (N = 588), including 154 veterans, participated in a large online study examining the psychological, relational, and academic functioning of college students. Approximately 61% of the veteran subsample reported combat exposure. Students were administered a Background Information Questionnaire, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Deployment Risk and Resilience Inventory, and the Student Adaptation to College Questionnaire. Data was analyzed using multivariate analysis of covariance and regression to test for direct and indirect effects. Student veterans reported better academic and personal-emotional adaptation than civilian students, while civilians reported better social adjustment than veterans. However, follow-up analyses revealed that these effects might be explained by group differences in gender, income, and marital status. Although combat veterans without insomnia had better academic adjustment than noncombat veterans and civilian students, insomnia seemed to have a greater negative effect on combat veterans' academic adjustment relative to civilian students. Furthermore, insomnia mediated the relationship between combat exposure and veterans' personal-emotional adjustment to college.

  1. Insomnia Self-Management in Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-07

    Cardiac Failure; Heart Failure; Congestive Heart Failure; Heart Failure, Congestive; Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders; Chronic Insomnia; Disorders of Initiating and Maintaining Sleep; Fatigue; Pain; Depressive Symptoms; Sleep Disorders; Anxiety

  2. Is Insomnia Associated with Deficits in Neuropsychological Functioning? Evidence from a Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Mellor, Sidra; Caspi, Avshalom; Gregory, Alice M.; Harrington, HonaLee; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: People with insomnia complain of cognitive deficits in daily life. Results from empirical studies examining associations between insomnia and cognitive impairment, however, are mixed. Research is needed that compares treatment-seeking and community-based insomnia study samples, measures subjective as well as objective cognitive functioning, and considers participants' pre-insomnia cognitive function. Design and Participants: We used data from the Dunedin Study, a representative birth cohort of 1,037 individuals, to examine whether insomnia in early midlife was associated with subjective and objective cognitive functioning. We also tested whether individuals with insomnia who reported seeking treatment for their sleep problems (treatment-seekers) showed greater impairment than other individuals with insomnia (non-treatment-seekers). The role of key confounders, including childhood cognitive ability and comorbid health conditions, was evaluated. Measurements: Insomnia was diagnosed at age 38 according to DSM-IV criteria. Objective neuropsychological assessments at age 38 included the WAIS-IV IQ test, the Wechsler Memory Scale, and the Trail-Making Test. Childhood cognitive functioning was assessed using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R). Results: A total of 949 cohort members were assessed for insomnia symptoms and other study measures at age 38. Although cohort members with insomnia (n = 186, 19.6%) had greater subjective cognitive impairment than their peers at age 38, they did not exhibit greater objective impairment on formal testing. Treatment-seekers, however, exhibited significant objective impairment compared to non-treatment-seekers. Controlling for comorbidity, daytime impairment, and medications slightly decreased this association. Childhood cognitive deficits antedated the adult cognitive deficits of treatment-seekers. Conclusions: Links between insomnia and cognitive impairment may be strongest among

  3. Association between mental health screening by self-report questionnaire and insomnia in medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loayza H. Maria Paz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research points to the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among insomniacs. We carried out a cross-sectional study with medical students with the aim of evaluating the association between insomnia and suspicion of psychiatric disorder; 302 medical students were included (184 males and 118 females; mean age = 20.47±1.89 years. The main association was tested by logistic regression analysis. The overall prevalence of positivity in a screening test for psychiatric disorder was 22.19%; and of insomnia, 28.15%. Difficulty initiating sleep (OR=3.45, difficulty maintaining sleep (OR=7.61, falling asleep later (OR=1.99 and waking up earlier (OR=1.91 were associated with suspicion of psychiatric disorder. As a group, the variables difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, falling asleep after 11 pm, and waking up before 6 am presented an odds ratio of 5.96 for positivity in the screening for psychiatric disorder. Furthermore, difficulty maintaining sleep (OR=2.24 was associated with "being female," and falling asleep later (OR=0.43 was associated with "being male". These results underscore the importance of determining in what cases difficulty sleeping may have severe clinical repercussions or affect performance.

  4. Practice parameters for the psychological and behavioral treatment of insomnia: an update. An american academy of sleep medicine report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, Timothy; Kramer, Milton; Alessi, Cathy; Friedman, Leah; Boehlecke, Brian; Brown, Terry; Coleman, Jack; Kapur, Vishesh; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo; Owens, Judith; Pancer, Jeffrey; Swick, Todd

    2006-11-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent, has associated daytime consequences which impair job performance and quality of life, and is associated with increased risk of comorbidities including depression. These practice parameters provide recommendations regarding behavioral and psychological treatment approaches, which are often effective in primary and secondary insomnia. These recommendations replace or modify those published in the 1999 practice parameter paper produced by the American Sleep Disorders Association. A Task Force of content experts was appointed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to perform a comprehensive review of the scientific literature since 1999 and to grade the evidence regarding non-pharmacological treatments of insomnia. Recommendations were developed based on this review using evidence-based methods. These recommendations were developed by the Standards of Practice Committee and reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Psychological and behavioral interventions are effective in the treatment of both chronic primary insomnia (Standard) and secondary insomnia (Guideline). Stimulus control therapy, relaxation training, and cognitive behavior therapy are individually effective therapies in the treatment of chronic insomnia (Standard) and sleep restriction therapy, multicomponent therapy (without cognitive therapy), biofeedback and paradoxical intention are individually effective therapies in the treatment of chronic insomnia (Guideline). There was insufficient evidence to recommend sleep hygiene education, imagery training and cognitive therapy as single therapies or when added to other specific approaches. Psychological and behavioral interventions are effective in the treatment of insomnia in older adults and in the treatment of insomnia among chronic hypnotic users (Standard).

  5. Concurrent Use of Hypnotic Drugs and Chinese Herbal Medicine Therapies among Taiwanese Adults with Insomnia Symptoms: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kuei-Hua Lee; Yueh-Ting Tsai; Jung-Nien Lai; Shun-Ku Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background. The increased practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) worldwide has raised concerns regarding herb-drug interactions. The purpose of our study is to analyze the concurrent use of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) among Taiwanese insomnia patients taking hypnotic drugs. Methods. The usage, frequency of services, and CHP prescribed among 53,949 insomnia sufferers were evaluated from a random sample of 1 million beneficiaries in the National Health Insurance Research Database. A...

  6. Hazards of insomnia and the effects of acupuncture treatment on insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-fang; Liu, Zhi-dan; Ma, Wen; Shen, Wei-dong

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia is a common disease in modern society; it is made worse by increasingly fierce competition in the workplace and elsewhere, along with rapid economic and social development. Sleep disorders can result in changes in serum biomarkers and decreased immunity, and may cause maladies such as depression and cardiac diseases, as well as many other somatic symptoms. Western medications for treating insomnia can easily lead to addiction and other adverse effects. Fortunately, acupuncture can ease the symptoms of insomnia. This review summarizes the hazards associated with insomnia and the use of acupuncture in its treatment. Furthermore, the authors introduce an effective and low-cost method of treating insomnia with acupuncture. This review indicates that insomnia poses a major threat to mental health through its effects on serum components, heart function and the immune system of patients, which may lead to other physiological disorders. Anxiety and depression are the two main negative emotions affected by insomnia. Acupuncture, which has showed effectiveness against insomnia and its complications, may be an effective and complementary method for the treatment of insomnia and associated maladies.

  7. Prostatic Cyst with Bladder Outlet Obstruction Symptoms. Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    reported a series of transrectal ultrasound on 704 patients with symptoms of bladder ... pelvic pain and prostatitis-like syndrome symptoms, but can rarely result in .... International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) was 20, and his quality of life ...

  8. Sleep diaries of Vietnam War veterans with chronic PTSD: the relationships among insomnia symptoms, psychosocial stress, and nightmares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrman, Philip R; Harb, Gerlinde C; Cook, Joan M; Barilla, Holly; Ross, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Impaired sleep and nightmares are known symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the veteran population. In order to assess prospectively the sleep disturbances in this population, sleep diaries are an effective way to obtain information over an extended period of time. In this investigation, a sample of veterans (N = 105) completed daily sleep diaries for a 6-week period. Greater PTSD severity and nightmare-related distress were correlated with more awakenings, shorter duration of sleep, longer sleep latency, and greater frequency of nightmares. Perceived frequency of daytime stressors was associated with an increased number of nightmares, nightmare-related distress, and longer sleep latency. The use of sleep diaries in future investigations may allow targeted treatments for veteran populations with PTSD and sleep disturbances.

  9. [Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hidehisa; Machino, Akihiko; Shishida, Kazuhiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2015-06-01

    Frequency of insomnia is increasing with age. Benzodiazepine receptor agonist has been prescribed for insomnia in the elderly, but there are some patients who complain the effect is not sufficient. Adherence for sleeping pills is very low in elderly Japanese, because there has been strong stigma against sleeping pills. Complementary and alternative medicine for insomnia is widely used in elderly Japanese. Sedative antidepressants, novel antipsychotics, anti-histamine drugs, and supplements are used for insomnia as complementary and alternative medicine. But evidence of these drugs for insomnia is insufficient. In this paper, we outline the previous reports such as the advantages and disadvantages of these drugs for the treatment of insomnia in the elderly.

  10. Brief behavioral treatment for patients with treatment-resistant insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jihui Wang, Qinling Wei, Xiaoli Wu, Zhiyong Zhong, Guanying Li Department of Psychiatry, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun-Yat Sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI in treating patients with treatment-resistant insomnia.Methods: Seventy-nine adults with treatment-resistant insomnia were randomly assigned to receive either individualized BBTI (delivered in two in-person sessions and two telephone “booster” sessions, n=40 or sleep hygiene education (n=39. The primary outcome was sub­jective (sleep diary measures of self-report symptoms and questionnaire measures of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI, insomnia severity index (ISI, Epworth sleeping scale (ESS, and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS.Results: The repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant time effects between pretreatment and posttreatment in the scale ratings of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, sleep latency (SL, time in bed (TIB, sleep efficiency (SE, and wake after sleep onset (WASO in both groups and group × time interaction (FPSQI =3.893, FESS =4.500, FDBAS =5.530, FISI =15.070, FSL =8.909, FTIB =7.895, FSE =2.926, and FWASO =2.595. The results indicated significant differences between BBTI and sleep hygiene in change scores of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, SL, TIB, SE, and WASO. Effect sizes were moderate to large.Conclusion: BBTI is a simple and efficacious intervention for chronic insomnia in adults. Keywords: brief behavioral treatment, treatment-resistant, insomnia

  11. Prospective study of predictors and consequences of insomnia: personality, lifestyle, mental health, and work-related stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedaa, Øystein; Krossbakken, Elfrid; Grimsrud, Ingse Dagny; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Sivertsen, Børge; Magerøy, Nils; Einarsen, Ståle; Pallesen, Ståle

    2016-04-01

    To prospectively investigate the reciprocal relationships between personality traits, lifestyle factors, mental health, sleepiness, and work-related stressors against insomnia. A total of 799 Norwegian shift-working nurses (mean age 33.2 years, 90% female) participated in this prospective cohort study. They were assessed on self-report instruments (Bergen Insomnia Scale, Diurnal Type Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised, Work-Family Interface Scale, among others) in 2008/2009 (wave 1) and 2011 (wave 3). Structural equation modeling was employed to investigate the bidirectional relationship between a wide range of individual and work-related variables and insomnia. Languidity (β = 0.18***), anxiety (β = 0.11**), depression (β = 0.14***), exposure to bullying behavior (β = 0.08*), and negative spillover between work and family life (work to family, β = 0.08*; family to work, β = 0.07*) predicted increased symptoms of insomnia over time. Morningness (β = -0.09*) and positive spillover from work to family (β = -0.11**) predicted less symptoms of insomnia over time. No support was found for night work as a predictor of increased insomnia. Insomnia was a precursor for anxiety (β = 0.11**), but not for depression (*p work-related factors than as a precursor to them. The scope of factors causing insomnia, and factors protecting against it, should be further investigated. Insomnia should be considered in prediction models for mental illnesses and as an outcome of adverse work-related experiences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Melatonin agonists in primary insomnia and depression-associated insomnia: are they superior to sedative-hypnotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujan; Brzezinski, Amnon; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Spence, D Warren; Cardinali, Daniel P; Brown, Gregory M

    2011-06-01

    Current pharmacological treatment of insomnia involves the use of sedative-hypnotic benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine drugs. Although benzodiazepines improve sleep, their multiple adverse effects hamper their application. Adverse effects include impairment of memory and cognitive functions, next-day hangover and dependence. Non-benzodiazepines are effective for initiating sleep but are not as effective as benzodiazepines for improving sleep quality or efficiency. Furthermore, their prolonged use produces adverse effects similar to those observed with benzodiazepines. Inasmuch as insomnia may be associated with decreased nocturnal melatonin, administration of melatonin is a strategy that has been increasingly used for treating insomnia. Melatonin can be effective for improving sleep quality without the adverse effects associated with hypnotic-sedatives. Ramelteon, a synthetic analog of melatonin which has a longer half life and a stronger affinity for MT1 and MT2 melatonergic receptors, has been reportedly effective for initiating and improving sleep in both adult and elderly insomniacs without showing hangover, dependence, or cognitive impairment. Insomnia is also a major complaint among patients suffering from depressive disorders and is often aggravated by conventional antidepressants especially the specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The novel antidepressant agomelatine, a dual action agent with affinity for melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors and 5-HT2c antagonistic properties, constitutes a new approach to the treatment of major depressive disorders. Agomelatine ameliorates the symptoms of depression and improves the quality and efficiency of sleep. Taken together, the evidence indicates that MT1/MT2 receptor agonists like ramelteon or agomelatine may be valuable pharmacological tools for insomnia and for depression-associated insomnia.

  13. Pharmacotherapeutic options for treatment of insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarnail Singh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a functionally debilitating condition characterized by repeated difficulty with sleep initiation, maintenance, or quality of sleep despite adequate opportunity. If left untreated, it can lead to increased risk of depression, poor memory, reduced concentration, poor work performance, and poor general health. Although gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA ergic system remains the primary target for current insomnia treatments, still over-the-counter (OTC drugs with a different mechanism of action are in use for insomnia. OTC drugs target only one of the parallel arousing systems and may improve mild insomnia for a short period. They are not likely to improve symptoms over long-term and thus are not the ideal agents. Studies evaluating the efficacy and outcomes of sedative hypnotic drugs beyond 1 year are limited. Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for insomnia in the pediatric population. Increased understanding of complex neuronal networks involved in sleep and wake has led to the development of new drugs for insomnia that target a diverse range of receptors. Potential agents under investigations are targeting mechanisms and pathways including histamine (H1 receptor, melatonin, and orexin receptors. This review describes the pharmacotherapy of insomnia and the drugs under development for the treatment of insomnia. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(5.000: 768-773

  14. 天王补心丹加味治疗失眠为主焦虑症%Treatment for 41 Cases of Anxiety Disorders with Insomnia for the Main Symptoms by Tianwang Buxin Bolus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄小容; 周绍华; 司维; 洪霞

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:To observe the effect of Tianwang Buxin Bolus on anxiety disorders with insomnia for the main symptoms, and to compare with the effect of Western medicine. Methods: A total of 80 patients were randomly divided into treatment group ( n =41 ) and control group( n =39 ). The treatment group were treated with Tianwang Buxin Bolus, while the control group were given lorazepam. The effect and the side effect of the two groups were compared. Results: Both of the two methods can improve insomnia. The improvement of other anxiety symptoms in treatment group is obvious, and side effects is less than that of the control group ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion: Tianwang Buxin Bolus has obvious effect on improving anxiety disorders with insomnia for the main symptoms.%目的:观察天王补心丹加味治疗以失眠为主症焦虑症的疗效,与西药抗焦虑药对比.方法:将80例门诊患者分为2组,治疗组41例,采用中药天王补心丹加味治疗,对照组39例,采用劳拉西泮口服治疗,对2组疗效及副作用进行比较.结果:2种方法均可改善失眠,治疗组其他焦虑症状改善较对照组明显,且副作用小于对照组(P<0.05).结论:天王补心丹加味对于改善以失眠为主的焦虑症有明确疗效.

  15. Predictors of improvement in subjective sleep quality reported by older adults following group-based cognitive behavior therapy for sleep maintenance and early morning awakening insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen; Kennaway, David J

    2013-09-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy is an effective nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia. However, individualized administration is costly and often results in substantial variability in treatment response across individual patients, particularly so for older adults. Group-based administration has demonstrated impressive potential for a brief and inexpensive answer to the effective treatment of insomnia in the older population. It is important to identify potential predictors of response to such a treatment format to guide clinicians when selecting the most suitable treatment for their patients. The aim of our study was to identify factors that predict subjective sleep quality of older adults following group-based administration of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Eighty-six adults (41 men; mean age, 64.10 y; standard deviation [SD], 6.80) with sleep maintenance or early morning awakening insomnia were selected from a community-based sample to participate in a 4-week group-based treatment program of CBT-I. Participants were required to complete 7-day sleep diaries and a comprehensive battery of questionnaires related to sleep quality and daytime functioning. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to identify factors predicting subjective sleep quality immediately following treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Sleep diaries reported average nightly sleep efficiency (SE), which was used as the outcome measure of sleep quality. Participants with the greatest SE following treatment while controlling for pretreatment SE were relatively younger and had more confidence in their ability to sleep at pretreatment. These characteristics may be useful to guide clinicians when considering the use of a group-based CBT-I for sleep maintenance or early morning awakening insomnia in older adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Anxiety mediates the effect of smoking on insomnia in people with asthma: evidence from the HUNT3 study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andenæs R

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Randi Andenæs,1 Carolyn E Schwartz1–31Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Faculty of Health Science, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway; 2DeltaQuest Foundation, Inc., Concord, 3Departments of Medicine and Orthopaedic Surgery, Tufts University Medical School, Boston, MA, USAObjective: The aim of this study was to investigate factors related to insomnia in a cohort of people with asthma.Design: This secondary analysis utilized cross-sectional data from the Norwegian Nord-Trøndelag Health Study, a population-based health survey (n=50,807.Participants: We used self-reported data from 1,342 men and women with a physician-confirmed asthma diagnosis ranging in age from 19.5 to 91 years.Measurements: Data on sleep, lifestyle variables (smoking and exercise, anxiety, and depression were included. An insomnia scale and asthma impact scale were constructed using factor analysis. Hierarchical series of multiple regression models were used to investigate direct and mediational relationships between the study variables and insomnia.Results: The hierarchical models revealed significant independent contributions of female sex, higher age, not exercising, asthma impact, anxiety, and depression on insomnia (R2=25.2%. Further, these models suggested that the impact of smoking on insomnia was mediated by anxiety, and that the beneficial impact of exercise was mitigated by depression symptoms.Conclusion: Smokers with asthma have more insomnia, and this relationship may be mediated by anxiety. Further, people with asthma who experience depression symptoms are less likely to benefit from physical exercise as a method to enhance sleep quality. Our findings would suggest that helping smokers to manage their anxiety and depression through behavioral methods may reduce their insomnia symptoms, and enable them to engage in other health-enhancing pursuits, such as physical exercise.Keywords: insomnia, asthma, anxiety

  17. Pedunculopontine arousal system physiology - Implications for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Luster, Brennon; Mahaffey, Susan; Bisagno, Veronica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    We consider insomnia a disorder of waking rather than a disorder of sleep. This review examines the role of the reticular activating system, especially the pedunculopontine nucleus, in the symptoms of insomnia, mainly representing an overactive waking drive. We determined that high frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and channel types in PPN cells. We found three different PPN cell types that have one or both channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. These discoveries point to a specific mechanism and novel therapeutic avenues for insomnia.

  18. The association between self-reported anxiety symptoms and suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Woolley, Stephen B; Goethe, John W

    2009-02-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the association between self-reported anxiety symptoms and self-reported suicidality among a mixed diagnostic sample of psychiatric outpatients. Data were obtained from chart review of 2,778 outpatients who completed a routine diagnostic clinical interview and a standardized self-report of psychiatric symptoms on admission. Bivariate analyses indicated that those with >or= moderate anxiety symptoms were over three times as likely to report >or= moderate difficulty with suicidality. Self-reported anxiety symptoms were associated with a 2-fold increased likelihood of reporting suicidality after controlling for confounding (demographics, depressive symptoms, and diagnoses). These data are consistent with a growing literature demonstrating an association between anxiety symptoms and suicidality, and suggest that this association is not accounted for by coexisting mood symptoms or diagnoses. A single item, self-report may be a useful screening tool for symptoms that are pertinent to assessment of suicide risk.

  19. Alternative remedies for insomnia: a proposed method for personalized therapeutic trials

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    Romero K

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kate Romero,1,2 Balaji Goparaju,1,2 Kathryn Russo,1,2 M Brandon Westover,1 Matt T Bianchi1,2 1Neurology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, 2Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Insomnia is a common symptom, with chronic insomnia being diagnosed in 5–10% of adults. Although many insomnia patients use prescription therapy for insomnia, the health benefits remain uncertain and adverse risks remain a concern. While similar effectiveness and risk concerns exist for herbal remedies, many individuals turn to such alternatives to prescriptions for insomnia. Like prescription hypnotics, herbal remedies that have undergone clinical testing often show subjective sleep improvements that exceed objective measures, which may relate to interindividual heterogeneity and/or placebo effects. Response heterogeneity can undermine traditional randomized trial approaches, which in some fields has prompted a shift toward stratified trials based on genotype or phenotype, or the so-called n-of-1 method of testing placebo versus active drug in within-person alternating blocks. We reviewed six independent compendiums of herbal agents to assemble a group of over 70 reported to benefit sleep. To bridge the gap between the unfeasible expectation of formal evidence in this space and the reality of common self-medication by those with insomnia, we propose a method for guided self-testing that overcomes certain operational barriers related to inter- and intraindividual sources of phenotypic variability. Patient-chosen outcomes drive a general statistical model that allows personalized self-assessment that can augment the open-label nature of routine practice. The potential advantages of this method include flexibility to implement for other (nonherbal insomnia interventions. Keywords: insomnia, over the counter, alternative remedy, herbal, supplement

  20. Mindfulness meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia: a naturalistic 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason C; Shapiro, Shauna L; Manber, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    A unique intervention combining mindfulness meditation with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to have acute benefits at posttreatment in an open label study. The aim of the present study was to examine the long-term effects of this integrated intervention on measures of sleep and sleep-related distress in an attempt to characterize the natural course of insomnia following this treatment and to identify predictors of poor long-term outcome. Analyses were conducted on 21 participants, who provided follow-up data at six and 12 months posttreatment. At each time point, participants completed one week of sleep and meditation diaries and questionnaires related to mindfulness, sleep, and sleep-related distress, including the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale, the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale, the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills, and the Insomnia Episode Questionnaire. Analyses examining the pattern of change across time (baseline, end of treatment, six months, and 12 months) revealed that several sleep-related benefits were maintained during the 12-month follow-up period. Participants who reported at least one insomnia episode (>or=1 month) during the follow-up period had higher scores on the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale (P insomnia episodes. Correlations between mindfulness skills and insomnia symptoms revealed significant negative correlations (P insomnia. These results suggest that most sleep-related benefits of an intervention combining CBT-I and mindfulness meditation were maintained during the 12-month follow-up period, with indications that higher presleep arousal and sleep effort at end of treatment constitute a risk for occurrence of insomnia during the 12 months following treatment.

  1. Risk of type II diabetes and hypertension associated with chronic insomnia among active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 1998-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Paul E; Emasealu, Oseizame V; Rohrbeck, Patricia; Hu, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Chronic insomnia is a common clinical complaint and its incidence in both U.S. military and civilian populations has increased. Several studies have evaluated the association between chronic insomnia and the development of other chronic diseases. This study estimates the incidence of chronic insomnia. In addition, this report examines the association between both hypertension and type II diabetes and chronic insomnia in active component military members. The Defense Medical Surveillance System was used to identify a cohort of individuals with chronic insomnia between 1998 and 2013 and to match them by age and gender with a cohort without insomnia. During 1998-2013, there were 205,740 incident cases of chronic insomnia among active component service members with an overall rate of 90.3 per 10,000 person-years. Individuals in the chronic insomnia cohort were at higher risk for type II diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.17 [95% CI, 1.75-2.69]) and hypertension (adjusted HR, 2.00 [95% CI, 1.85-2.16]). Sleep hygiene education along with evaluation and treatment of persistent symptoms are of public health importance in active duty service members.

  2. Self-reported symptoms associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields: a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçer, Nermin; Pamukçu, Tuğba

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the last years, it has been discussed frequently whether there are any harmful effects of electromagnetic fields on human health. Electromagnetic fields are generated by several natural and man-made sources. Part of the electromagnetic spectrum called Radiofrequency is used in communication systems such as mobile (cellular) phone and computer. The aim of our study was to explore different self-reported symptoms that may be associated with exposure to electromagnetic fields. This survey study was conducted, using a questionnaire, on 350 people aged +9 years in Turkey. The chi-square test was used for data analysis. Self-reported symptoms were headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness, sleep disturbance-insomnia, tension-anxiety, joint and bone pain, lacrimation of the eyes, hearing loss and tinnitus. As a result of the survey, the study has shown that users of mobile phone and computer more often complained of headache, joint and bone pain, hearing loss, vertigo/dizziness, tension-anxiety symptoms according to time of daily usage (p < 0.05). In users of mobile phone and computer, women significantly (p < 0.05) complained more often of headache, vertigo/dizziness, fatigue, forgetfulness and tension-anxiety than men.

  3. Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i. However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4, with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD, were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01765959.

  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia as a preparatory treatment for exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Jenna L; Gros, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is present in a majority of individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, when both disorders are present, disagreements exist about whether to provide exposure therapy for PTSD before insomnia treatment, or vice versa. The current case study describes the psychological treatment of a psychotherapy-naive veteran with comorbid insomnia and PTSD. The patient initially refused exposure therapy for PTSD; thus, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) was a first-step treatment. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia provided insomnia symptom relief psychoeducation and self-monitoring of PTSD symptoms prepared the patient to enter exposure therapy. After six CBTi sessions, the patient completed seven sessions of trauma-specific exposure therapy. At the conclusion of treatment and at 90-day follow up, the patient demonstrated significant reductions in insomnia and PTSD symptoms. Findings support the safe and effective use of CBTi in patients with comorbid insomnia and PTSD to improve sleep and facilitate entry into exposure therapy for PTSD.

  5. How Is Insomnia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other things that may disrupt your sleep schedule. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy CBT for insomnia targets the thoughts and actions ... alone. For people who have insomnia and major depressive disorder, CBT combined with antidepression medicines has shown promise ...

  6. Sleep and Aging: Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aging Insomnia Insomnia is the most common sleep complaint at any age. It affects almost half of ... A-Z | videos A-Z | training | about us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. ...

  7. Military service member and veteran self reports of efficacy of cranial electrotherapy stimulation for anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, insomnia, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Price, Larry R; Nichols, Francine; Marksberry, Jeffrey A; Platoni, Katherine T

    2014-01-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is being prescribed for service members and veterans for the treatment of anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), insomnia and depression. The purpose of this study was to examine service members' and veterans' perceptions of the effectiveness and safety of CES treatment. Service members and veterans (N=1,514) who had obtained a CES device through the Department of Defense or Veterans Affairs Medical Center from 2006-2011 were invited to participate in the web based survey via email. One hundred fifty-two participants returned questionnaires. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants reported clinical improvement of 25% or more from using CES for anxiety (66.7%), PTSD (62.5%), insomnia (65.3%) and depression (53.9%). The majority of these participants reported clinical improvement of 50% or more. Respondents also perceived CES to be safe (99.0%). Those individuals who were not taking any prescription medication rated CES more effective than the combined CES and prescription medication group. CES provides service members and veterans with a safe, noninvasive, nondrug, easy to use treatment for anxiety, PTSD, insomnia, and depression that can be used in the clinical setting or self-directed at home.

  8. Hypnosis for treatment of insomnia in school-age children: a retrospective chart review

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    Slothower Molly P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purposes of this study are to document psychosocial stressors and medical conditions associated with development of insomnia in school-age children and to report use of hypnosis for this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for 84 children and adolescents with insomnia, excluding those with central or obstructive sleep apnea. All patients were offered and accepted instruction in self-hypnosis for treatment of insomnia, and for other symptoms if it was felt that these were amenable to therapy with hypnosis. Seventy-five patients returned for follow-up after the first hypnosis session. Their mean age was 12 years (range, 7–17. When insomnia did not resolve after the first instruction session, patients were offered the opportunity to use hypnosis to gain insight into the cause. Results Younger children were more likely to report that the insomnia was related to fears. Two or fewer hypnosis sessions were provided to 68% of the patients. Of the 70 patients reporting a delay in sleep onset of more than 30 minutes, 90% reported a reduction in sleep onset time following hypnosis. Of the 21 patients reporting nighttime awakenings more than once a week, 52% reported resolution of the awakenings and 38% reported improvement. Somatic complaints amenable to hypnosis were reported by 41%, including chest pain, dyspnea, functional abdominal pain, habit cough, headaches, and vocal cord dysfunction. Among these patients, 87% reported improvement or resolution of the somatic complaints following hypnosis. Conclusion Use of hypnosis appears to facilitate efficient therapy for insomnia in school-age children.

  9. Hypnosis for treatment of insomnia in school-age children: a retrospective chart review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Ran D; Slothower, Molly P

    2006-01-01

    Background The purposes of this study are to document psychosocial stressors and medical conditions associated with development of insomnia in school-age children and to report use of hypnosis for this condition. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed for 84 children and adolescents with insomnia, excluding those with central or obstructive sleep apnea. All patients were offered and accepted instruction in self-hypnosis for treatment of insomnia, and for other symptoms if it was felt that these were amenable to therapy with hypnosis. Seventy-five patients returned for follow-up after the first hypnosis session. Their mean age was 12 years (range, 7–17). When insomnia did not resolve after the first instruction session, patients were offered the opportunity to use hypnosis to gain insight into the cause. Results Younger children were more likely to report that the insomnia was related to fears. Two or fewer hypnosis sessions were provided to 68% of the patients. Of the 70 patients reporting a delay in sleep onset of more than 30 minutes, 90% reported a reduction in sleep onset time following hypnosis. Of the 21 patients reporting nighttime awakenings more than once a week, 52% reported resolution of the awakenings and 38% reported improvement. Somatic complaints amenable to hypnosis were reported by 41%, including chest pain, dyspnea, functional abdominal pain, habit cough, headaches, and vocal cord dysfunction. Among these patients, 87% reported improvement or resolution of the somatic complaints following hypnosis. Conclusion Use of hypnosis appears to facilitate efficient therapy for insomnia in school-age children. PMID:16914044

  10. 原发性失眠患者与有失眠症状抑郁症患者的血清神经肽Y和P物质水平%Serum levels of neuropeptide Y and substance P between patients with primary insomnia and depressive patients with insomnia symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖继武; 黄俏庭; 潘集阳; 刘亚平

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes and differences of the serum levels of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and substance P ( SP) between patients with primary insomnia and depressive patients with insomnia symptoms. Methods: Forty-two primary insomnia patients, 35 depressive patients with insomnia symptoms, and 38 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The diagnoses were made according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) crizteria. The serum NPY and SP concentrations were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were used to assess the severity of clinical symptoms. Results: Compared with the control group, the serum NPY levels in primary insomnia group and patients with depression were significantly lower[(5.8 ±1.8) ug/mL, (5.6 ± 3.9) ug/mL vs. (8.7 ± 5.0) ug/ mL,Ps 0.05). The serum NPY levels were only negatively correlated with the PSQI subjective sleep quality factors (r = -0.24, P <0.05). Conclusion: It suggests that the dysfunction of NPY and SP neurons may occur both in patients with primary insomnia and depressive patients with insomnia symptoms; and the dysfunction of SP neurons in depressive patients with insomnia symptoms may be severer.%目的:探讨原发性失眠症与伴有失眠症状的抑郁症患者血清神经肽Y(NPY)和P物质(SP)水平的变化及差异.方法:选取符合美国精神障碍诊断与统计手册第4版(DSM-Ⅳ)之相应诊断标准的原发性失眠症患者42例、伴有失眠症状的抑郁症患者35例及38例正常对照,以酶联免疫吸附法测定血清NPY及SP水平,以汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)、汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA)及匹茨堡睡眠质量指数量表(PSQI)评定抑郁、焦虑症状和主观睡眠质量状况.结果:原发性失眠症组与伴有失眠症状的抑郁症组血清NPY水平均低于对照组[(5.6±3.9)ug/mL,(5.8±1.8)ug

  11. CHoosing Options for Insomnia in Cancer Effectively (CHOICE): Design of a patient centered comparative effectiveness trial of acupuncture and cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Sheila N; Gehrman, Philip; Barg, Frances K; Xie, Sharon X; Mao, Jun J

    2016-03-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent and persistent side effect of cancer, which if left unaddressed, can be unremitting and negatively influence physical and mental well-being. Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are commonly used non-pharmacological treatments that are efficacious for treating insomnia in cancer patients; however, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of these options. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine which treatments are most effective for which individuals, and patient preference for treatment is a particularly important contributor to adherence and outcomes. Here we describe the design of a clinical trial that begins to determine how best to personalize the treatment of insomnia for cancer survivors. This project is a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial with a nested qualitative study comparing acupuncture and CBT for insomnia and co-morbid symptoms in a heterogeneous sample of 160 cancer survivors. The primary aim is to determine which treatment is associated with the largest reduction in insomnia severity. The secondary aim is to examine the demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics that predict and/or moderate treatment effect. Patients will receive ten treatments of acupuncture or 7 sessions of CBT over eight weeks and complete validated patient-reported outcome measures of sleep and co-morbid symptoms at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at three-months to assess durability of effect. The results of the proposed study have the potential to improve healthcare outcomes by helping cancer survivors and their caregivers make informed and evidence-based decisions, leading to patient-centered and personalized care for cancer survivors with insomnia.

  12. DSM-5 Insomnia and Short Sleep: Comorbidity Landscape and Racial Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, David A; Pillai, Vivek; Arnedt, J Todd; Drake, Christopher L

    2016-12-01

    We estimated rates of cardiometabolic disease, pain conditions, and psychiatric illness associated with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) insomnia disorder (current and in remission) and habitual short sleep (fewer than 6 h), and examined the roles of insomnia and short sleep in racial disparities in disease burden between black and non-Hispanic white Americans. This epidemiological survey study was cross-sectional. The community-based sample consisted of 3,911 subjects (46.0 y ± 13.3; 65.4% female; 25.0% black) across six sleep groups based on DSM-5 insomnia classification (never vs. remitted vs. current) and self-reported habitual sleep duration (normal vs. short). Vascular events, cardiometabolic disease, pain conditions, and psychiatric symptoms were self-reported. Short sleeping insomniacs were at elevated risk for myocardial infarction, stroke, treated hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain, back pain, depression, and anxiety, independent of sex, age, and obesity. Morbidity profiles for insomniacs with normal sleep duration and former insomniacs, irrespective of sleep duration, were similar with elevations in treated hypertension, chronic pain, depression, and anxiety. Regarding racial disparities, cardiometabolic and psychiatric illness burden was greater for blacks, who were more likely to have short sleep and the short sleep insomnia phenotype. Evidence suggested that health disparities may be attributable in part to race-related differences in sleep. Insomnia disorder with short sleep is the most severe phenotype of insomnia and comorbid with many cardiometabolic and psychiatric illnesses, whereas morbidity profiles are highly similar between insomniacs with normal sleep duration and former insomniacs. Short sleep endemic to black Americans increases risk for the short sleep insomnia phenotype and likely contributes to racial disparities in cardiometabolic disease and psychiatric illness.

  13. Concurrent Use of Hypnotic Drugs and Chinese Herbal Medicine Therapies among Taiwanese Adults with Insomnia Symptoms: A Population-Based Study

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    Kuei-Hua Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The increased practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM worldwide has raised concerns regarding herb-drug interactions. The purpose of our study is to analyze the concurrent use of Chinese herbal products (CHPs among Taiwanese insomnia patients taking hypnotic drugs. Methods. The usage, frequency of services, and CHP prescribed among 53,949 insomnia sufferers were evaluated from a random sample of 1 million beneficiaries in the National Health Insurance Research Database. A logistic regression method was used to identify the factors that were associated with the coprescription of a CHP and a hypnotic drug. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs of hip fracture between the two groups. Results. More than 1 of every 3 hypnotic users also used a CHP concurrently. Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San (Augmented Rambling Powder and Suan-Zao-Ren-Tang (Zizyphus Combination were the 2 most commonly used CHPs that were coadministered with hypnotic drugs. The HR of hip fracture for hypnotic-drug users who used a CHP concurrently was 0.57-fold (95% CI = 0.47–0.69 that of hypnotic-drug users who did not use a CHP. Conclusion. Exploring potential CHP-drug interactions and integrating both healthcare approaches might be beneficial for the overall health and quality of life of insomnia sufferers.

  14. Concurrent Use of Hypnotic Drugs and Chinese Herbal Medicine Therapies among Taiwanese Adults with Insomnia Symptoms: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuei-Hua; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Lai, Jung-Nien; Lin, Shun-Ku

    2013-01-01

    Background. The increased practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) worldwide has raised concerns regarding herb-drug interactions. The purpose of our study is to analyze the concurrent use of Chinese herbal products (CHPs) among Taiwanese insomnia patients taking hypnotic drugs. Methods. The usage, frequency of services, and CHP prescribed among 53,949 insomnia sufferers were evaluated from a random sample of 1 million beneficiaries in the National Health Insurance Research Database. A logistic regression method was used to identify the factors that were associated with the coprescription of a CHP and a hypnotic drug. Cox proportional hazards regressions were performed to calculate the hazard ratios (HRs) of hip fracture between the two groups. Results. More than 1 of every 3 hypnotic users also used a CHP concurrently. Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San (Augmented Rambling Powder) and Suan-Zao-Ren-Tang (Zizyphus Combination) were the 2 most commonly used CHPs that were coadministered with hypnotic drugs. The HR of hip fracture for hypnotic-drug users who used a CHP concurrently was 0.57-fold (95% CI = 0.47-0.69) that of hypnotic-drug users who did not use a CHP. Conclusion. Exploring potential CHP-drug interactions and integrating both healthcare approaches might be beneficial for the overall health and quality of life of insomnia sufferers.

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia Comorbid With Psychiatric and Medical Conditions: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jade Q; Appleman, Erica R; Salazar, Robert D; Ong, Jason C

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the most prominent nonpharmacologic treatment for insomnia disorders. Although meta-analyses have examined primary insomnia, less is known about the comparative efficacy of CBT-I on comorbid insomnia. To examine the efficacy of CBT-I for insomnia comorbid with psychiatric and/or medical conditions for (1) remission from insomnia; (2) self-reported sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and subjective sleep quality; and (3) comorbid symptoms. A systematic search was conducted on June 2, 2014, through PubMed, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library, and manual searches. Search terms included (1) CBT-I or CBT or cognitive behavioral [and its variations] or behavioral therapy [and its variations] or behavioral sleep medicine or stimulus control or sleep restriction or relaxation therapy or relaxation training or progressive muscle relaxation or paradoxical intention; and (2) insomnia or sleep disturbance. Studies were included if they were randomized clinical trials with at least one CBT-I arm and had an adult population meeting diagnostic criteria for insomnia as well as a concomitant condition. Inclusion in final analyses (37 studies) was based on consensus between 3 authors' independent screenings. Data were independently extracted by 2 authors and pooled using a random-effects model. Study quality was independently evaluated by 2 authors using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool. A priori main outcomes (ie, clinical sleep and comorbid outcomes) were derived from sleep diary and other self-report measures. At posttreatment evaluation, 36.0% of patients who received CBT-I were in remission from insomnia compared with 16.9% of those in control or comparison conditions (pooled odds ratio, 3.28; 95% CI, 2.30-4.68; P sleep parameters (sleep efficiency: Hedges g = 0.91 [95% CI, 0.74 to 1.08]; sleep onset latency: Hedges g = 0.80 [95% CI, 0.60 to 1.00]; wake after sleep

  16. Determinants of success for computerized cognitive behavior therapy: examination of an insomnia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Norah; Walsh, Kate; Lewycky, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated plausible moderators of outcome in a 6-week computerized treatment for insomnia. Using secondary data from two randomized controlled trials, participants were 228 adults with chronic insomnia. Participants received computerized treatment from their homes. Outcomes were assessed using a sleep diary, as well as several standardized self-report scales. Using linear mixed models with SPSS, treatment was largely robust to comorbid conditions, education, age, and gender. Results showed that psychiatric comorbidity and education moderated the impact of treatment on fatigue and that sleep symptom comorbidity moderated the impact of treatment on maladaptive attitudes about sleep. Implications of these findings are that more widespread use of computerized treatment for insomnia may be warranted.

  17. Self-reported menopausal symptoms, coronary artery calcification, and carotid intima-media thickness in recently menopausal women screened for the Kronos early estrogen prevention study (KEEPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Erin Foran; He, Yunxiao; Black, Dennis M; Brinton, Eliot A; Budoff, Mathew J; Cedars, Marcelle I; Hodis, Howard N; Lobo, Rogerio A; Manson, Joann E; Merriam, George R; Miller, Virginia M; Naftolin, Fredrick; Pal, Lubna; Santoro, Nanette; Zhang, Heping; Harman, S Mitchell; Taylor, Hugh S

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether self-reported menopausal symptoms are associated with measures of subclinical atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional analysis. Multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Recently menopausal women (n = 868) screened for the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS). None. Baseline menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, night sweats, palpitations, mood swings, depression, insomnia, irritability), serum E2 levels, and measures of atherosclerosis were assessed. Atherosclerosis was quantified using coronary artery calcium (CAC) Agatston scores (n = 771) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). Logistic regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CAC. Linear regression model of menopausal symptoms and E2 was used to predict CIMT. Correlation between length of time in menopause with menopausal symptoms, E2, CAC, and CIMT were assessed. In early menopausal women screened for KEEPS, neither E2 nor climacteric symptoms predicted the extent of subclinical atherosclerosis. Palpitations and depression approached significance as predictors of CAC. Other symptoms of insomnia, irritability, dyspareunia, hot flashes, mood swings, night sweats, and vaginal dryness were not associated with CAC. Women with significantly elevated CAC scores were excluded from further participation in KEEPS; in women meeting inclusion criteria, neither baseline menopausal symptoms nor E2 predicted CIMT. Years since menopause onset correlated with CIMT, dyspareunia, vaginal dryness, and E2. Self-reported symptoms in recently menopausal women are not strong predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis. Continued follow-up of this population will be performed to determine whether baseline or persistent symptoms in the early menopause are associated with progression of cardiovascular disease. NCT00154180. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cognitive behavioral therapy vs. Tai Chi for late life insomnia and inflammatory risk: a randomized controlled comparative efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Yokomizo, Megumi; Lavretsky, Helen; Carroll, Judith E; Motivala, Sarosh J; Bootzin, Richard; Nicassio, Perry

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the comparative efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Tai Chi Chih (TCC), and sleep seminar education control (SS) on the primary outcome of insomnia diagnosis, and secondary outcomes of sleep quality, fatigue, depressive symptoms, and inflammation in older adults with insomnia. Randomized controlled, comparative efficacy trial. Los Angeles community. 123 older adults with chronic and primary insomnia. Random assignment to CBT, TCC, or SS for 2-hour group sessions weekly over 4 months with follow-up at 7 and 16 months. Insomnia diagnosis, patient-reported outcomes, polysomnography (PSG), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. CBT performed better than TCC and SS in remission of clinical insomnia as ascertained by a clinician (P sleep quality, sleep parameters, fatigue, and depressive symptoms than TCC and SS (all P values CBT was associated with a reduced risk of high CRP levels (> 3.0 mg/L) at 16 months (odds ratio [OR], 0.26 [95% CI, 0.07-0.97] P sleep quality, fatigue, and depressive symptoms as compared to SS (all P's sleep disturbance in epidemiologic surveys. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. The role of vulnerability in stress-related insomnia, social support and coping styles on incidence and persistence of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrin, Denise C; Chen, Ivy Y; Ivers, Hans; Morin, Charles M

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are more prone to experience situational insomnia under stressful conditions may also be at greater risk to develop subsequent insomnia. While cross-sectional data exist on the link between sleep reactivity (heightened vulnerability to stress-related insomnia) and insomnia, limited data exist on its predictive value. The aim of the study was to evaluate prospectively whether sleep reactivity was associated with increased risk of incident and persistent insomnia in a population-based sample of good sleepers. Social support and coping styles were also investigated as potential moderators. Participants were 1449 adults (Mage  = 47.4 years, standard deviation = 15.1; 41.2% male) without insomnia at baseline and evaluated four times over 3 years. Sleep reactivity was measured using the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (FIRST). Additional measures included depressive symptoms, the frequency and perceived impact of stressful life events, social support and coping styles. After controlling for prior sleep history, depressive symptoms, arousal predisposition, stressful life events and perceived impact, individuals with higher sleep reactivity had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.56 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.13-2.16], 1.41 (95% CI: 0.87-2.30) and 2.02 (95% CI: 1.30-3.15) of developing insomnia symptoms, syndrome and persistent insomnia, respectively. Social support and coping styles did not moderate these associations. Results suggest that heightened vulnerability to insomnia is associated with an increased risk of developing new-onset subsyndromal and persistent insomnia in good sleepers. Knowledge of premorbid differences is important to identify at-risk individuals, as this may help to develop more targeted prevention and intervention strategies for insomnia.

  20. Eszopiclone for late-life insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S McCrae

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Christina S McCrae1, Amanda Ross1, Ashley Stripling2, Natalie D Dautovich21Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, 2Department of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USAAbstract: Insomnia, the most common sleep disturbance in later life, affects 20%–50% of older adults. Eszopiclone, a short-acting nonbenzodiazepine hypnotic agent developed for the treatment of insomnia, has been available in Europe since 1992 and in the US since 2005. Although not yet evaluated for transient insomnia in older adults, eszopiclone has been shown to be safe and efficacious for short-term treatment (2 weeks of chronic, primary insomnia in older adults (64–91 years. Clinical studies in younger adults (mean = 44 years have shown eszopiclone can be used for 6–12 months without evidence of problems. Because the oldest participant in these longer-term trials was 69, it not known whether eszopiclone is effective for older adults [particularly the old old (75–84 years and oldest old (85+] when used over longer periods. This is unfortunate, because older individuals frequently suffer from chronic insomnia. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, which effectively targets the behavioral factors that maintain chronic insomnia, represents an attractive treatment alternative or adjuvant to eszopiclone for older adults. To date, no studies have compared eszopiclone to other hypnotic medications or to nonpharmacological interventions, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, in older adults. All of the clinical trials reported herein were funded by Sepracor. This paper provides an overview of the literature on eszopiclone with special emphasis on its use for the treatment of late-life insomnia. Specific topics covered include pharmacology, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical trial data, adverse events, drug interactions, tolerance/dependence, and economics/cost considerations for older adults. Keywords: aging, eszopiclone

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise.

  2. A mindfulness-based approach to the treatment of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason; Sholtes, David

    2010-11-01

    Mindfulness meditation has emerged as a novel approach to emotion regulation and stress reduction that has several health benefits. Preliminary work has been conducted on mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBT-I), a meditation-based program for individuals suffering from chronic sleep disturbance. This treatment integrates behavioral treatments for insomnia with the principles and practices of mindfulness meditation. A case illustration of a chronic insomnia sufferer demonstrates the application of mindfulness principles for developing adaptive ways of working with the nocturnal symptoms and waking consequences of chronic insomnia.

  3. Psychosocial Correlates of Insomnia in an Adolescent Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Konstantinos E.; Avagianou, Penelope-Alexia; Floros, Georgios D.; Skenteris, Nikolaos; Mouzas, Odysseas D.; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Angelopoulos, Nikiforos V.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the relationship between psychosocial factors and insomnia complaints in an adolescent non-clinical population. It is a cross-sectional study of a stratified sample of 2,195 Greek adolescent high-school students. Subjects were given the Athens insomnia scale, the Symptom Checklist scale (SCL-90-R) and a…

  4. Psychosocial Correlates of Insomnia in an Adolescent Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Konstantinos E.; Avagianou, Penelope-Alexia; Floros, Georgios D.; Skenteris, Nikolaos; Mouzas, Odysseas D.; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Angelopoulos, Nikiforos V.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the nature of the relationship between psychosocial factors and insomnia complaints in an adolescent non-clinical population. It is a cross-sectional study of a stratified sample of 2,195 Greek adolescent high-school students. Subjects were given the Athens insomnia scale, the Symptom Checklist scale (SCL-90-R) and a…

  5. Exposure-response relationship of wind turbine noise with self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems: A nationwide socioacoustic survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Takayuki; Yano, Takashi; Kuwano, Sonoko; Sueoka, Shinichi; Tachibana, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The association of wind turbine noise (WTN) with sleep and physical/mental health has not been fully investigated. To investigate the relationship of WTN with the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems, a socioacoustic survey of 1079 adult residents was conducted throughout Japan (2010-2012): 747 in 34 areas surrounding wind turbine plants and 332 in 16 control areas. During face-to-face interviews, the respondents were not informed of the purpose of the survey. Questions on symptoms such as sleeplessness and physical/mental complaints were asked without specifying reasons. Insomnia was defined as having one or any combination of the following that occurs three or more times a week and bothers a respondent: Difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, premature morning awakening, and feeling of light overnight sleep. Poor health was defined as having high scores for health complaints, as determined using the Total Health Index, exceeding the criteria proposed by the authors of the index. The noise descriptor for WTN was LAeq,n outdoor, estimated from the results of actual measurement at some locations in each site. Multiple logistic analysis was applied to the LAeq,n and insomnia or poor health. The odds ratio (OR) of insomnia was significantly higher when the noise exposure level exceeded 40 dB, whereas the self-reported sensitivity to noise and visual annoyance with wind turbines were also independently associated with insomnia. OR of poor health was not significant for noise exposure, but significant for noise sensitivity and visual annoyance. The above two moderators appear to indicate the features of respondents who are sensitive to stimuli or changes in their homeostasis.

  6. Exposure-response relationship of wind turbine noise with self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems: A nationwide socioacoustic survey in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Kageyama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of wind turbine noise (WTN with sleep and physical/mental health has not been fully investigated. To investigate the relationship of WTN with the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of sleep and health problems, a socioacoustic survey of 1079 adult residents was conducted throughout Japan (2010-2012: 747 in 34 areas surrounding wind turbine plants and 332 in 16 control areas. During face-to-face interviews, the respondents were not informed of the purpose of the survey. Questions on symptoms such as sleeplessness and physical/mental complaints were asked without specifying reasons. Insomnia was defined as having one or any combination of the following that occurs three or more times a week and bothers a respondent: Difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, premature morning awakening, and feeling of light overnight sleep. Poor health was defined as having high scores for health complaints, as determined using the Total Health Index, exceeding the criteria proposed by the authors of the index. The noise descriptor for WTN was LAeq,n outdoor, estimated from the results of actual measurement at some locations in each site. Multiple logistic analysis was applied to the LAeq,n and insomnia or poor health. The odds ratio (OR of insomnia was significantly higher when the noise exposure level exceeded 40 dB, whereas the self-reported sensitivity to noise and visual annoyance with wind turbines were also independently associated with insomnia. OR of poor health was not significant for noise exposure, but significant for noise sensitivity and visual annoyance. The above two moderators appear to indicate the features of respondents who are sensitive to stimuli or changes in their homeostasis.

  7. The Course and Impact of Poststroke Insomnia in Stroke Survivors Aged 18 to 65 Years: Results from the Psychosocial Outcomes In StrokE (POISE Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Glozier

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insomnia symptoms are common in the population and have negative psychosocial and functional sequelae. There are no prospective studies of the course of such symptoms and their impact, if any, in stroke survivors. This prospective cohort study investigated insomnia after stroke in working-age adults and evaluated its impact on psychological and functional outcomes over the subsequent year. Methods: We prospectively recruited 441 young (<65 years consecutive stroke survivors from 20 public hospitals in the New South Wales Stroke Service network. Participants were assessed by self-report and interview at 28 days, 6 months, and 12 months after stroke. Insomnia was defined using a common epidemiological measure of sleep disturbance and daytime consequences. Depression, anxiety, disability, and return to work were assessed through standardized measures. Results: The point prevalence of insomnia at each time point in the year after stroke was stable at 30–37% and more common in females. Fifty-eight (16% of all participants reported “chronic” insomnia, with symptoms at both baseline and 6 months later. At 12 months, this group was more likely to be depressed (OR 6.75, 95% CI 2.78–16.4, anxious (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.54–7.09, disabled (OR 3.60, 95% CI 2.07–6.25, and not have returned to work, compared to those without insomnia over the same period. Conclusions: Chronic insomnia has a negative effect on disability and return to work 1 year after stroke even after adjusting for demographic, psychiatric, and disability factors. Identifying and appropriately targeting insomnia through known effective treatments may improve functional outcomes after stroke.

  8. Self-reported symptoms and healthcare seeking in the general population -exploring "The Symptom Iceberg"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elnegaard, Sandra; Andersen, Rikke Sand; Pedersen, Anette Fischer

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research has illustrated that the decision-making process regarding healthcare seeking for symptoms is complex and associated with a variety of factors, including gender differences. Enhanced understanding of the frequency of symptoms and the healthcare seeking behaviour in the general...... population may increase our knowledge of this complex field. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of self-reported symptoms and the proportion of individuals reporting GP contact, in a large Danish nationwide cohort. A secondary objective was to explore gender differences in GP...... of 44 different symptoms covering a wide area of alarm symptoms and non-specific frequently occurring symptoms were selected based on extensive literature search. Further, items regarding contact to the GP were included. Data on socioeconomic factors were obtained from Statistics Denmark. RESULTS...

  9. Combining mindfulness meditation with cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia: a treatment-development study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason C; Shapiro, Shauna L; Manber, Rachel

    2008-06-01

    This treatment-development study is a Stage I evaluation of an intervention that combines mindfulness meditation with cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Thirty adults who met research diagnostic criteria for Psychophysiological Insomnia (Edinger et al., 2004) participated in a 6-week, multi-component group intervention using mindfulness meditation, sleep restriction, stimulus control, sleep education, and sleep hygiene. Sleep diaries and self-reported pre-sleep arousal were assessed weekly while secondary measures of insomnia severity, arousal, mindfulness skills, and daytime functioning were assessed at pre-treatment and post-treatment. Data collected on recruitment, retention, compliance, and satisfaction indicate that the treatment protocol is feasible to deliver and is acceptable for individuals seeking treatment for insomnia. The overall patterns of change with treatment demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvements in several nighttime symptoms of insomnia as well as statistically significant reductions in pre-sleep arousal, sleep effort, and dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions. In addition, a significant correlation was found between the number of meditation sessions and changes on a trait measure of arousal. Together, the findings indicate that mindfulness meditation can be combined with CBT-I and this integrated intervention is associated with reductions in both sleep and sleep-related arousal. Further testing of this intervention using randomized controlled trials is warranted to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention for this population and the specific effects of each component on sleep and both psychological and physiological arousal.

  10. Comparison of impact of insomnia on depression and quality of life in restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease and primary insomnia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mei Ling; Oldham, Mark A; Park, Kyung Min; Lee, Eun-Sook; Lee, Hochang B; Cho, Yong Won

    2015-11-01

    Although insomnia is common among people with restless legs syndrome (RLS), its impact on the daily suffering of those with RLS remains unclear. This study aimed to compare the differential impact of clinical insomnia on depression and quality of life (QoL) among people with RLS, primary insomnia, and healthy controls. A total of 148 people with RLS, 115 with primary insomnia, and 117 healthy controls were enrolled into this cross-sectional study. Participants completed sleep, depression, and QoL questionnaires. Clinical insomnia was defined as Korean version of the Insomnia Severity Index (K-ISI) ≥ 15. Correlation coefficients between sleep measures and both depression and QoL were calculated. Multivariate regression was used to identify the clinical factors that were most closely associated with depression and QoL among people with RLS and primary insomnia. Participants with RLS had insomnia and sleep quality at intermediate levels between the healthy controls and primary insomnia subjects, but those with clinical insomnia had equivalent depression and QoL scores regardless of RLS diagnosis. Insomnia severity correlated with depression and QoL in RLS and primary insomnia. Multivariate regression, however, revealed that RLS severity was the most overall predictive factor for depression and QoL among those with RLS. Insomnia severity was the strongest predictor in primary insomnia. Insomnia was more closely associated with depression and QoL among people with primary insomnia than those with RLS, but clinical insomnia may have a significant impact in RLS as well. Future RLS studies should account for sleep quality in addition to RLS symptom severity when investigating mood and QoL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep-related cognitive processes, arousal, and emotion dysregulation in insomnia disorder: the role of insomnia-specific rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palagini, Laura; Moretto, Umberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Carney, Colleen

    2017-02-01

    Insomnia-specific rumination has presented in subjects with insomnia. Research has identified hyperarousal as a key factor, with both trait and state components. It has been shown that emotion dysregulation also plays a role in insomnia. Hence, the aim was to investigate how insomnia rumination is associated with both trait- and state-dependent arousal and emotion dysregulation in insomnia. Sixty-eight subjects with insomnia disorder (DSM-5) and 36 good sleepers were evaluated using: Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Daytime Insomnia Symptom Response Scale (DISRS), Arousal Predisposition Scale (APS), Pre-sleep Arousal Scale (PSAS), and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Univariate and multivariate regression analyses and mediation analyses were performed. Subjects with insomnia (F 41, mean age 50.2 ± 10) presented higher scores than good sleepers (F 22, mean age 49.7 ± 14) in all the scales (ISI, DISRS, APS, PSAS, DERS; p cognitive B = 0.22, p cognitive and somatic arousal (p = 0.02), and the association between trait hyperarousal and emotion dysregulation (Z = 2.3, p = 0.04). In insomnia, specific rumination is related to both trait predisposition to arousal and to state-dependent arousal. It is also related to emotion dyregulation. Insomnia-specific ruminative response style may modulate the complex association between trait- and state-dependent arousal factors and arousal and emotion regulation in insomnia. In this framework, a broad range of cognitive processes may be considered when dealing with subjects with insomnia: the use of rumination-oriented psychological strategies could be important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative studty of the drug treatment in depressive patients with anxious or insomnia symptoms%抑郁障碍并存焦虑或失眠症状的药物治疗对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈忠; 王昕; 孟广彦; 杨红梅; 陈贞峨; 陈彦方

    2011-01-01

    目的:对双相和单相抑郁障碍并存焦虑、失眠症状的患者,在应用抗抑郁药治疗的对照研究时,加用苯二氮(艹卓)类药物进行疗效和不良反应观察.方法:将双相和单相抑郁障碍患者各32例,再随机分为文拉法辛合并小剂量舒必利治疗组(合用组)及单用文拉法辛治疗组(对照组),治疗6周.期间对人组治疗前即有焦虑、失眠症状者加用阿普唑仑或氯硝西泮,然后分别在治疗前后用汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)、汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA),匹兹堡睡眠质量指数(PSQI),和治疗中出现的症状量表(TESS)进行疗效和不良反应评定.结果:双相和单相抑郁患者不但抑郁症状明显改善,而且均未发生明显转躁,焦虑和失眠症状也有明显改善.HAMD、HAMA和PSQI的评分均有明显降低(P<0.001).但治疗过程中,不论双相合用组,还是单相合用组,均在连续并用苯二氮(艹卓)类药物4周后,难以减少该类药物用量或停药.结论:双相和单相抑郁患者用文拉法辛并小量舒必利或者单用文拉法辛治疗时,如伴有明显焦虑、失眠,可并用苯二氮(艹卓)类药物以争取更好疗效.%Objective:To compare the effects of antidepressant and benzodiazepines (BZ) in treating bipolar or unipolar depressive patients with anxious or insomnia symptoms. Method: Thirty two patients with bipolar depressive disorder and 32 patients with unipolar depressive disorder were randomly divided into the experimental group treated by venlafaxine and sulpiride and the control group treated by veulafaxine alone for 6 weeks. Because of coexisting anxious and insomnia symptoms, all the patients were also administered with alprazolm or clonazepam during the trial period. The patients were evaluated using symptom rating scales such as Hamilton depression rating scale( HAMD), Hamilton anxiety rating scale( HAMA), Pittsburgh sleep quality index(PSQI) ,and treatment emergent symptoms scale (TESS) before and

  13. [association Between Insomnia And Rheumatoid Arthritis In Elderly].

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Denise Cuoghi de Carvalho Verissimo; Schlosser, Thalyta Cristina Mansano; Santos,Ariene Angelini dos; Neri,Anita Liberalesso; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess symptoms of insomnia in elderly residents in the community and its association with rheumatoid arthritis. Descriptive and cross-sectional study, part of a multicentre research project entitled Fragility in Brazilian elderly . A total number of 689 elderly (68.9% female, average age of 72.2 years) were interviewed using a questionnaire on sociodemographic data and clinical conditions. Two tools to identify symptoms of insomnia (the Nottingham Health profile) and to s...

  14. Severity of self-reported diseases and symptoms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iburg, Kim Moesgaard; Rasmussen, Niels Kristian; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate and rank the relative severity of self-reported diseases and symptoms in Denmark. METHOD: The 1994 Danish Health and Morbidity Survey collected data from 5,472 Danes older than 16 years of age. Interviews (response frequency: 79%) gave information on diseases and symptoms......; a self-administered SF-36 questionnaire (response frequency: 64%) provided information on health-related quality of life. The severity of diseases and symptoms was represented by the health-related quality of life scores that individuals suffering from particular diseases and symptoms obtained...

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  16. Genetic Pathways to Insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie J. Lind

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes current research on the genetics of insomnia, as genetic contributions are thought to be important for insomnia etiology. We begin by providing an overview of genetic methods (both quantitative and measured gene, followed by a discussion of the insomnia genetics literature with regard to each of the following common methodologies: twin and family studies, candidate gene studies, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Next, we summarize the most recent gene identification efforts (primarily GWAS results and propose several potential mechanisms through which identified genes may contribute to the disorder. Finally, we discuss new genetic approaches and how these may prove useful for insomnia, proposing an agenda for future insomnia genetics research.

  17. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder symptom self-report among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    research. Indeed, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental. Disorders, 4th edition ... Undertaken at Moi University's School of Medicine in Eldoret, Kenya. ... self-reported ADHD symptoms among medical students in Eldoret is very high.

  18. FORTY CASES OF INSOMNIA TREATED WITH ACUPUNCTURE, MASSAGE AND MUSIC THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lin-yu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Insomnia is a commonly encountered sleep disorder in clinical practice. The author of the present paper treated 40 cases of insomnia with acupuncture and massage combined with music therapy and achieved satisfied outcomes. Following is the report.

  19. MANAGEMENT OF INSOMNIA USING PHARMOCOLOGY OR NON- PHARMACOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammar Ghaddafi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Insomnia is a symptom rather than a diagnosis that may lead to irritability, dissatisfaction and decrease individual productivity. Insomnia can be divided into primary and secondary symptom which cause by other condition, but the mechanism on how this happened still unclear. In addition, relation between insomnia and other clinical problem is always undefined because it is impossible to find out the relation between causes and consequences of this symptom. Practitioner can choose either pharmacotherapy or non-pharmacotherapy in management of insomnia patient. Side effects and efficacy of pharmacotherapy must be considered before we prescribe a medicine to de patient. We also can Choose non-pharmacotherapy which is without side effects, but can be same effective as pharmacotherapy and even more.

  20. A Neurobiological Model of Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysse, Daniel J; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H; Nofzinger, Eric A

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition resulting in significant costs and morbidity. Previous models of insomnia focusing on psychological and behavioral processes are useful clinically, but lack neurobiological specificity. We propose an insomnia model based on basic and clinical neuroscience findings, and hypothesize that insomnia results from persistent activity in wake-promoting neural structures during NREM sleep. The simultaneous occurrence of sleeping and waking neural activity helps to explain clinical phenomenology and treatment effects in insomnia.

  1. Insomnia and sleep-related breathing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickwire, Emerson M; Collop, Nancy A

    2010-06-01

    Insomnia disorder and obstructive sleep apnea are the two most common sleep disorders among adults. Historically, these conditions have been conceptualized as orthogonal, or insomnia has been considered a symptom of sleep apnea. Insomnia researchers have sought to exclude participants at risk for sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD), and vice versa. In recent years, however, there has been a growing recognition of co-occurring insomnia disorder and SRBD and interest in the prevalence, consequences, and treatment of the two conditions when they co-occur. Although plagued by inconsistent diagnostic criteria and operational definitions, evidence from clinical and research samples consistently suggests high rates of comorbidity between the two disorders. More important, insomnia disorder and SRBD have additive negative effects. To date, only a few studies have explored the combined or sequential treatment of the conditions. Results support the importance of an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to sleep medicine. This article reviews the empirical literature to date and provides clinical recommendations as well as suggestions for future research.

  2. The influence of PTSD, sleep fears, and neighborhood stress on insomnia and short sleep duration in urban, young adult, African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Brown, Tyish; Mellman, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    African Americans residing in stressful urban environments have high rates of insomnia and short sleep duration, both of which are associated with adverse health outcomes. However, limited data exist that explore factors influencing inadequate sleep in this high-risk population. This study sought to evaluate the contributions of demographics, trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, sleep fears, and neighborhood stress to both insomnia and short sleep in urban African American young adults. Data were analyzed from self-report measures completed by 378 participants 18-35 years of age. PTSD symptom severity and sleep fears were independently associated with insomnia severity, and sleep fears was associated with sleep duration. Results have implications for preventative health intervention strategies for urban African American young adults.

  3. Ocular symptoms reported by patients infested with Demodex mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sędzikowska, Aleksandra; Osęka, Maciej; Grytner-Zięcina, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine subjective ocular symptoms occurring in patients infested with Demodex. The number of Demodex mites in the obtained material that correlated with the appearance of ocular symptoms was estimated. The study material were eyelashes collected from 1499 patients. The material were observed under a light microscope. T-test, the logistic regression method, and Pearson correlation coefficient were used for the analysis. Demodex mites were detected in 47% patients. The mean ages of infected women and men were 64 and 59 years, respectively. 64% infected patients complained of one or more ophthalmological symptoms. The most commonly reported symptoms included itching (28%), redness of eyelids (21%), and watery eyes (15%). Positive correlation was found between itching, redness, pain, purulence or eyelash loss and the presence of Demodex. The mentioned symptoms increase the probability of Demodex infestation in a statistically significant manner (pDemodex was revealed by the study. The threshold average number of seven Demodex mites per eight collected eyelashes with which the risk of the occurrence of an ocular symptom increases significantly was defined. In patients with a low number of Demodex mites, symptoms may be absent. The risk of the occurrence of ocular symptom in patients with demodicosis increases with the increase in the average number of Demodex mites.

  4. [Acute delusional disorder with dissociative symptoms--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małyszczak, Krzysztof; Pawłowski, Tomasz; Tersa, Kamila

    2006-01-01

    Delusions are amongst the main symptoms of schizophrenia. Delusional states may be caused by stress, somatic illness, or may be idiopathic, such as the persistent delusional disorder. Determination of a cause is usually difficult, but it is really important for the treatment. A case report of acute delusional disorder complicated by dissociative symptoms, suggesting an organic cause of the disorder is presented. Delirium caused by neuroleptic intoxication was an additional complication. Detailed informations gathered from relatives and psychological examinations made it possible to determine personality disorder as a ground, and stress as a precipitating factor of acute delusional disorder. Hospitalisation and psychological support helped in getting rid of the psychotic symptoms.

  5. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating...... antidepressants may be an effective treatment for insomnia in stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Melatonin and light treatment can stabilize the sleep-wake circadian rhythm and shorten sleep latency in dementias and PD. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be effective in treating insomnia symptoms...

  6. Sleeping Pills for Insomnia: Which Ones Work Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... See our privacy policy . A A Why the Best Insomnia Treatment Is Not A Drug Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs compares the effectiveness and safety of ... pick isn’t a drug at all. CR Best Buy Drugs pick: For chronic insomnia, CR Best ...

  7. On insomnia analysis using methods of artificial intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Skalski, M.

    2011-10-01

    Insomnia generally is defined as a subjective report of difficulty falling sleep, difficulty staying asleep, early awakening, or nonrestorative sleep. It is one of the most common health complaints among the general population. in this paper we try to find relationships between different insomnia cases and predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors following by pharmacological treatment.

  8. Anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzelere, Michele M; Wiseman, Pamela

    2002-06-01

    Evidence for alternative treatments for depression, anxiety, and insomnia are reviewed in this article. Treatment of depression with St. John's wort, L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, S-adenosylmethionine, dehydroepiandosterone, folate, exercise, acupuncture, and meditation are examined. Evidence for the efficacy of kava kava, exercise, relaxation therapies, and acupuncture in treatment anxiety is reviewed. The use of valerian, melatonin, chamomile, passionflower, exercise, acupuncture, and behavioral therapies (i.e., sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation, and sleep hygiene) for insomnia is discussed.

  9. [Prevalence of insomnia in adults aged 18 to 60 years and exposure to electromagnetic fields in households of Barranquilla, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñuela-Epalza, Martha Elena; Páez-Jiménez, Daniela Alejandra; Castro-Cantillo, Laura Del Carmen; Harvey-Ortega, Joyce Carolina; Eljach-Cartagena, Javier Alexander; Banquett-Henao, Luis Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    Insomnia, a sleep disorder that affects both individual and public health, has not been studied in Barranquilla. Prior studies about the effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields on sleep disorders are controversial. To estimate the prevalence of insomnia symptoms in adults aged 18 to 60 years and its relation to the presence and intensity of electromagnetic fields in two neighborhoods of Barranquilla, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 220 households located in two neighborhoods of Barranquilla, one with high exposure to radio and cell phone antennas and the other one with low exposure. After informed consent, a survey was applied among adults residing in 220 households to investigate the presence of insomnia symptoms, socio-demographic data and intake of medicines. When it was allowed, electromagnetic fields were measured with teslameters in bedrooms. The database was created in Excel™ and the data analysis was done with SPSS™, version 18. Insomnia, mainly of the mild type, was present in 74.5% of the total study population while 25.5% reported a normal sleep pattern. According to the sleeping test score we found a higher prevalence of insomnia in the neighborhood with greater exposure to radio antennas and cell towers (85.4%) than in the one with lower exposure (63.3%), prevalence ratio 1.34 (CI 95% 1.14-1.57). This study suggests a higher prevalence of insomnia among persons living in areas with higher exposure to electromagnetic fields where the number of radio antennas and cell towers was greater.

  10. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in posttraumatic stress disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lisa S; Maguen, Shira; Metzler, Thomas J; Schmitz, Martha; McCaslin, Shannon E; Richards, Anne; Perlis, Michael L; Posner, Donn A; Weiss, Brandon; Ruoff, Leslie; Varbel, Jonathan; Neylan, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Examine whether cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improves sleep in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as nightmares, nonsleep PTSD symptoms, depression symptoms, and psychosocial functioning. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL WITH TWO ARMS: CBT-I and monitor-only waitlist control. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center. Forty-five adults (31 females: [mean age 37 y (22-59 y)] with PTSD meeting research diagnostic criteria for insomnia, randomly assigned to CBT-I (n = 29; 22 females) or monitor-only waitlist control (n = 16; nine females). Eight-session weekly individual CBT-I delivered by a licensed clinical psychologist or a board-certified psychiatrist. Measures included continuous monitoring of sleep with diary and actigraphy; prepolysomnography and postpolysomnography and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS); and pre, mid, and post self-report questionnaires, with follow-up of CBT-I participants 6 mo later. CBT-I was superior to the waitlist control condition in all sleep diary outcomes and in polysomnography-measured total sleep time. Compared to waitlist participants, CBT-I participants reported improved subjective sleep (41% full remission versus 0%), disruptive nocturnal behaviors (based on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-Addendum), and overall work and interpersonal functioning. These effects were maintained at 6-mo follow-up. Both CBT-I and waitlist control participants reported reductions in PTSD symptoms and CAPS-measured nightmares. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improved sleep in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder, with durable gains at 6 mo. Overall psychosocial functioning improved following CBT-I. The initial evidence regarding CBT-I and nightmares is promising but further research is needed. Results suggest that a comprehensive approach to treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder should include behavioral sleep medicine. TRIAL NAME: Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Of Insomnia

  11. Treatment options for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Scheid, Dewey C

    2007-08-15

    The frequency of sleep disruption and the degree to which insomnia significantly affects daytime function determine the need for evaluation and treatment. Physicians may initiate treatment of insomnia at an initial visit; for patients with a clear acute stressor such as grief, no further evaluation may be indicated. However, if insomnia is severe or long-lasting, a thorough evaluation to uncover coexisting medical, neurologic, or psychiatric illness is warranted. Treatment should begin with nonpharmacologic therapy, addressing sleep hygiene issues and exercise. There is good evidence supporting the effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy. Exercise improves sleep as effectively as benzodiazepines in some studies and, given its other health benefits, is recommended for patients with insomnia. Hypnotics generally should be prescribed for short periods only, with the frequency and duration of use customized to each patient's circumstances. Routine use of over-the-counter drugs containing antihistamines should be discouraged. Alcohol has the potential for abuse and should not be used as a sleep aid. Opiates are valuable in pain-associated insomnia. Benzodiazepines are most useful for short-term treatment; however, long-term use may lead to adverse effects and withdrawal phenomena. The better safety profile of the newer-generation nonbenzodiazepines (i.e., zolpidem, zaleplon, eszopidone, and ramelteon) makes them better first-line choices for long-term treatment of chronic insomnia.

  12. Treating Acute Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a "Single-Shot" of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jason G; Cushing, Toby; Germain, Anne

    2015-06-01

    Despite considerable evidence supporting cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for chronic insomnia, it remains untested within the context of acute insomnia. This study examined the efficacy of a single session of CBT-I, with an accompanying self-help pamphlet, for individuals with acute insomnia. A pragmatic parallel group randomized controlled trial. Community. Forty adults (mean age 32.9 ± 13.72 y) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) defined insomnia disorder, except a self-reported duration of less than 3 mo (i.e., acute insomnia), who reported no previous exposure to CBT-I and were not currently taking medication for sleep. A single 60- to 70-min session of CBT-I (n = 20), with an accompanying self-help pamphlet, or wait list control group (n = 20). All subjects were offered a full individual course of CBT-I on completion of the study, regardless of group allocation. Subjects completed sleep diaries and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) pretreatment and 1 mo following treatment. There were no between-group differences on baseline ISI scores or subjective sleep continuity. The intervention group reported significantly lower ISI scores than controls (t(38) 2.24, P CBT-I group had remitted by 1 mo compared to 15% of those in the control group. This single session of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is sufficiently efficacious for a significant proportion of those with acute insomnia. The results are discussed in terms of integrating this brief form of CBT-I into the "stepped care" model of insomnia. Testing the efficacy of an early intervention for acute insomnia (SRCTN05891695) http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN05891695. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Overweight children report qualitatively distinct asthma symptoms: analysis of validated symptom measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason E; Hossain, Md Jobayer; Lima, John J

    2015-04-01

    Past studies of asthma in overweight/obese children have been inconsistent. The reason overweight/obese children commonly report worse asthma control remains unclear. To determine qualitative differences in symptoms between lean and overweight/obese children with early-onset, atopic asthma. We conducted a cross-sectional analytic study of lean (20% to 65% body mass index) and overweight/obese (≥85% body mass index) 10- to 17-year-old children with persistent, early-onset asthma. Participants completed 2 to 3 visits to provide a complete history, qualitative and quantitative asthma symptom characterization, and lung function testing. We determined associations between weight status and symptoms using multivariable linear and logistic regression methods. Overweight/obese and lean asthmatic children displayed similar lung function. Despite lower fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (30.0 vs 62.6 ppb; P = .037) and reduced methacholine responsiveness (PC20FEV1 1.87 vs 0.45 mg/mL; P children reported more than thrice frequent rescue treatments (3.7 vs 1.1 treatments/wk; P = .0002) than did lean children. Weight status affected the child's primary symptom reported with loss of asthma control (Fisher exact test; P = .003); overweight/obese children more often reported shortness of breath (odds ratio = 11.8; 95% CI, 1.41-98.7) and less often reported cough (odds ratio = 0.26; 95% CI, 0.08-0.82). Gastroesophageal reflux scores were higher in overweight/obese children (9.6 vs 23.2; P = .003) and appear to mediate overweight/obesity-related asthma symptoms. Overweight/obese children with early-onset asthma display poorer asthma control and a distinct pattern of symptoms. Greater shortness of breath and β-agonist use appears to be partially mediated via esophageal reflux symptoms. Overweight children with asthma may falsely attribute exertional dyspnea and esophageal reflux to asthma, leading to excess rescue medication use. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy

  14. Functional impairments as symptoms in the symptom cluster analysis of patients newly diagnosed with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodeh, Samah J; Lazenby, Mark; Bai, Mei; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Murphy, Terrence; McCorkle, Ruth

    2013-10-01

    Symptoms and subsequent functional impairment have been associated with the biological processes of disease, including the interaction between disease and treatment in a measurement model of symptoms. However, hitherto cluster analysis has primarily focused on symptoms. This study among patients within 100 days of diagnosis with advanced cancer explored whether self-reported physical symptoms and functional impairments formed clusters at the time of diagnosis. We applied cluster analysis to self-reported symptoms and activities of daily living of 111 patients newly diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal (GI), gynecological, head and neck, and lung cancers. Based on content expert evaluations, the best techniques and variables were identified, yielding the best solution. The best cluster solution used a K-means algorithm and cosine similarity and yielded five clusters of physical as well as emotional symptoms and functional impairments. Cancer site formed the predominant organizing principle of composition for each cluster. The top five symptoms and functional impairments in each cluster were Cluster 1 (GI): outlook, insomnia, appearance, concentration, and eating/feeding; Cluster 2 (GI): appetite, bowel, insomnia, eating/feeding, and appearance; Cluster 3 (gynecological): nausea, insomnia, eating/feeding, concentration, and pain; Cluster 4 (head and neck): dressing, eating/feeding, bathing, toileting, and walking; and Cluster 5 (lung): cough, walking, eating/feeding, breathing, and insomnia. Functional impairments in patients newly diagnosed with late-stage cancers behave as symptoms during the diagnostic phase. Health care providers need to expand their assessments to include both symptoms and functional impairments. Early recognition of functional changes may accelerate diagnosis at an earlier cancer stage. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-Reported versus Informant-Reported Depressive Symptoms in Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileviciute, I.; Hartley, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Virtually nothing is known about potential differences in the types of depression symptoms reported by adults with mild intellectual disability (ID) on self-reported questionnaires as compared with the types of symptoms reported by caregivers on informant questionnaires. Moreover, little is known about how the presentation of…

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for insomnia among Portuguese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Odete Pereira; de Figueiredo Pereira, Carlos Manuel; Silva Martins, Diana Isabel; de Serpa, Carla do Rosário Delgado Nunes; Sakellarides, Constantino Theodor

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder at all ages, associated with sociodemographic and environmental factors and lifestyle. The aim of this study was to quantify the prevalence of insomnia and analyze its determinants among Portuguese adolescents. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated 6,919 students from the 7th to the 12th grade from 26 secondary schools, during 2012. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Insomnia was defined based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV criteria. Prevalences were expressed in proportions with 95 % confidence intervals (CI), and the magnitude of association between variables was detailed using odds ratio (OR). The prevalence of symptoms of insomnia was 21.4 %, and the prevalence of insomnia was 8.3 %. After adjustment for gender and age, insomnia was associated with female gender (adjusted OR = 1.82; CI 95 %: 1.56-2.13), age ≥ 16 years (adjusted OR = 1.17; CI 95 %: 1.01-1.35), coffee and alcohol consumption (adjusted OR = 1.40; CI 95 %: 1.20-1.63 and adjusted OR = 1.21; CI 95 %: 1.03-1.41, respectively), and depressive symptoms (adjusted OR = 3.59; CI 95 %: 3.04-4.24). The high prevalence of insomnia in our sample of Portuguese adolescents confirms findings from epidemiologic studies that have shown insomnia to affect from 4.4 to 13.4 % of adolescents. The main risk factors for insomnia among these adolescents are gender (female), age (≥ 16 years), depression, and coffee and alcohol consumption, which is also in concordance with those in the literature.

  17. InMS: Chronic insomnia disorder in multiple sclerosis - a Portuguese multicentre study on prevalence, subtypes, associated factors and impact on quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Pedro; Rodrigues, Elisabete; Fernandes, Carina; Matas, Andreia; Barreto, Rui; Mendonça, Marcelo; Peralta, Rita; Geraldes, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Sleep may be disrupted in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), but the prevalence of chronic insomnia disorder (CID) using standard diagnostic criteria is unknown. To determine the prevalence of CID in an MS population, the frequency of CID subtypes, associated factors and impact on quality of life (QoL). Multicentre, hospital-based cross-sectional study. An adapted version of the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire was applied to a consecutively recruited MS population. The influence of demographic, MS-related features, fatigue, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, nocturnal symptoms, other sleep disorders, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep in CID was evaluated. The relation between CID and QoL was analysed. Of 206 MS patients, 22.3% fulfilled criteria for CID, with initial insomnia in 11.7%, maintenance insomnia in 11.2% and terminal insomnia in 10.2% of patients. CID was more frequent in female patients, those with nocturnal symptoms, medical comorbidities, higher levels of anxiety, depression and fatigue. Multivariable analysis identified female sex, medical comorbidities, anxiety and fatigue as independent factors for CID. CID patients had a significantly lower self-reported QoL. CID is prevalent in MS patients and associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities, as well as fatigue. It has a negative impact on QoL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Insomnia Patients With Objective Short Sleep Duration Have a Blunted Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, Christina J; Edinger, Jack D; Krystal, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether individuals with insomnia and objective short sleep duration CBT-I) when compared to individuals with insomnia and normal sleep duration ≥6 h. Secondary analyses of a randomized, clinical trial with 60 adult participants (n = 31 women) from a single academic medical center. Outpatient treatment lasted 8 weeks, with a final follow-up conducted at 6 months. Mixed-effects models controlling for age, sex, CBT-I treatment group assignment, and treatment provider examined sleep parameters gathered via actigraphy, sleep diaries, and an Insomnia Symptom Questionnaire (ISQ) across the treatment and follow-up period. Six months post-CBT-I treatment, individuals with insomnia and normal sleep duration ≥6 h fared significantly better on clinical improvement milestones than did those with insomnia and short sleep duration sleep duration had significantly higher insomnia remission (ISQ sleep efficiency (SE) on actigraphy (SE > 80%; χ2[1, N = 60] = 21, p sleep onset (MWASO) 50% decline in MWASO (χ2[1, N = 60] = 60, p sleep duration. Additionally, those with insomnia and normal sleep duration had more success decreasing their total wake time (TWT) at the 6-month follow-up compared to those with insomnia and short sleep duration (χ2[2, N = 60] = 44.1, p sleep duration CBT-I than those with insomnia and normal sleep duration ≥6 h. Using an actigraphy TST cutoff of 6 hours to classify sleep duration groups was highly accurate and provided good discriminant value for determining insomnia remission.

  19. Women and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ellen Hirschman

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of insomnia in women is influenced in great part by the complex hormonal cycles they undergo. Patterns of insomnia in younger women may be physiologically different on a hormonal basis from those found in older women. Although significant objective sleep disturbances have been difficult to demonstrate across the menstrual cycle in normal women, the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) includes premenstrual insomnia and premenstrual hypersomnia as sleep disorders within the category of menstrual-associated sleep disorder. On the other hand, during pregnancy and after childbirth, profound fluctuations in steroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis-related hormones produce significant physiological changes, including sleep disruption. During the menopausal transition, significant sleep disruptions are provoked by sleep-disordered breathing, vasomotor disturbance, and mood disorders. Regardless of age, women with chronic insomnia are at higher risk for developing or sustaining depression. Thoughtful management approaches must consider known relationships between menstrual or menopausal status and various sleep disorders, and should rely on pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, or a combination of treatments to achieve successful relief from insomnia. The off-label, first-line use of antidepressants for treating insomnia in the absence of depression is now considered debatable. The long-term efficacy and safety of the newer benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs) for insomnia, whether taken nightly or episodically, are supported by existing clinical experience. US Food and Drug Administration guidelines limiting the use of hypnotics to only a few weeks predate the newer generation BZRAs, and, as such, the guidelines may no longer be truly appropriate for these new agents.

  20. Cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults experiencing insomnia and depression in a community mental health setting: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Paul; McLaren, Suzanne; Klein, Britt; Jenkins, Megan; Harvey, Jack

    2015-11-27

    Cognitive behaviour therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-established treatment; however, the evidence is largely limited to homogenous samples. Although emerging research has indicated that CBT-I is also effective for comorbid insomnia, CBT-I has not been tested among a complex sample of older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression. Furthermore, no study has explored whether modifying CBT-I to target associated depressive symptoms could potentially enhance sleep and mood outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to report a protocol designed to test whether an advanced form of CBT for insomnia and depression (CBT-I-D) is more effective at reducing insomnia and depressive symptoms compared to a standard CBT-I and psychoeducation control group (PCG) for older adults in a community mental health setting. We aim to recruit 150 older adults with comorbid insomnia who have presented to community mental health services for depression. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated via block/cluster randomisation to one of three group therapy conditions: CBT-I, CBT-I-D, or PCG. Participants who receive CBT-I will only practice strategies designed to improve their sleep, whereas participants who receive CBT-I-D will practice additional strategies designed to also improve their mood. This trial will implement a mixed-methods design involving quantitative outcome measures and qualitative focus groups. The primary outcome measures are insomnia and depression severity, and secondary outcomes are anxiety, hopelessness, beliefs about sleep, comorbid sleep conditions, and health. Outcomes will be assessed at pre-intervention (week 0), post-intervention (week 8), and 3-month follow-up (week 20). This CBT study protocol has been designed to address comorbid insomnia and depression for older adults receiving community mental health services. The proposed trial will determine whether CBT-I is more effective for older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression compared to a PCG

  1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia : How, for Whom and What about Acceptance?

    OpenAIRE

    Bothelius, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for survival but a significant minority of the adult population are dissatisfied with their sleep, and 6-10% meet the criteria for insomnia disorder, characterised by difficulties falling asleep at bedtime, waking up in the middle of the night or too early in the morning, and daytime symptoms. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), an evidence-based sleep-focused intervention, has been suggested as the treatment of choice for chronic insomnia. However, access t...

  2. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT CHRONIC INSOMNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A Dian Puspitha Candra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is defined as difficulty to start sleeping, maintain it, or low quality sleeping, if the condition persist for more than one month, it is called chronic insomnia. Diagnosis is made through anamnesa and sleep wake diaries, aktigraphy, polisomnography. Pharmachologycally drugs that have been used to treat insomnia are benzodiazepin reseptor agonis, antihistamine, antidepressant. Non pharmacological ways include behavioural intervention for insomnia, give significant result in decreasing sleep latency, reducing awakness duration during the night and improving total sleeping time.

  3. A Neurobiological Model of Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Buysse, Daniel J.; Germain, Anne; Hall, Martica; Monk, Timothy H.; Nofzinger, Eric A.

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition resulting in significant costs and morbidity. Previous models of insomnia focusing on psychological and behavioral processes are useful clinically, but lack neurobiological specificity. We propose an insomnia model based on basic and clinical neuroscience findings, and hypothesize that insomnia results from persistent activity in wake-promoting neural structures during NREM sleep. The simultaneous occurrence of sleeping and waking neural activity helps ...

  4. The societal costs of insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Alan G

    2010-01-01

    Alan G WadeCPS Research, Glasgow, ScotlandObjective: Insomnia can be broadly defined as difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or sleep that is not refreshing or of poor quality with negative effect on daytime function. Insomnia can be a primary condition or comorbid to an underlying disorder. Subjective measures of insomnia used in population studies, usually based on complaints of unsatisfactory sleep, put the prevalence at about 10%. Insomnia is more common in the elderly and in women...

  5. Insomnia and Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nancy A.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Stevens, Natalie; Nelson, Christy A.; Karlson, Cynthia; McCurdy, Danyale

    2007-01-01

    Most Americans have occasional problems with insomnia. The relationship of insomnia to illness is well known. However, insomnia may also relate to lower levels of well-being. Although there are various definitions of well-being, one of the most clearly articulated and comprehensive models identifies 2 overarching constructs, psychological…

  6. Influence of social factors on patient-reported late symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Trille Kristina; Johansen, Christoffer; Andersen, Elo;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of head and neck cancer and morbidity and mortality after treatment are associated with social factors. Whether social factors also play a role in the prevalence of late-onset symptoms after treatment for head and neck cancer is not clear. METHODS: Three hundred sixty...... ratio [OR] = 3.20; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.18-8.63). For survivors who lived alone, the adjusted ORs were significantly increased for physical functioning (2.17; 95% CI = 1.01-4.68) and trouble with social eating (OR = 2.26; 95% CI = 1.14-4.47). CONCLUSION: Self-reported severe late symptoms...... were more prevalent in survivors with short education and in those living alone, suggesting differences in perception of late symptoms between social groups. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2015....

  7. Relaxation therapy for insomnia: nighttime and day time effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, M K; Lichstein, K L; Epperson, M T; Johnson, C T

    2000-07-01

    We compared day time functioning in college students with and without insomnia and explored changes in day time functioning after progressive relaxation (PR) treatment for insomnia. Students with insomnia (SWI; n = 57) were compared to a control group of students not complaining of insomnia (SNI; n = 61) on self-reported sleep variables and five questionnaires: Insomnia Impact Scale (IIS), Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Scale (DBAS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ). SWI demonstrated significant impairment on all day time functioning and sleep measures compared to SNI. To investigate treatment effects on day time functioning, 28 SWI were randomly assigned to PR. Treated SWI were compared to untreated SWI and SNI at posttreatment. Treated participants improved sleep in comparison to untreated SWI, but failed to show significant improvements in day time functioning. Insomnia treatments focused on improving sleep may not improve day time functioning, or day time gains may emerge more slowly than sleep gains. This study documents the wide range of day time functioning complaints in young adults with insomnia and suggests that the goal of insomnia treatment should be to not only improve sleep but also to improve the subjective experience of day time functioning.

  8. [Insomnia. A severe health care problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Cárdenas, Ana Gabriela; Navarro-Gerrard, Christian; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko; Halabe-Cherem, José

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude which sleep has on personal well-being is similar to the effects of diet and exercise. Sleep deprivation has severe negative effects on an individual's overall health, and this is usually overseen. From 30 to 40 % of the population has presented insomnia at a certain moment of life and from 9 to 15 % have evolved into a chronic and severe insomnia. Recent investigations have related sleep deprivation with obesity, metabolic disorders, heart disease, mental health problems and dementia. Recently, more investigations have focused on the multiple alterations suffered by the immune system in cases of sleep deprivation. In order to make an opportune diagnosis of insomnia, it is vital to obtain a detailed history of the patients' sleep habits. In the physical exam one must search for signs and symptoms which might suggest an organic cause that generates the patient's insomnia. One of the pillars in treatment of these patients consists in acquiring an adequate sleep hygiene based on the optimization of the environment and the behavior that are associated with sleep.

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia enhances depression outcome in patients with comorbid major depressive disorder and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manber, Rachel; Edinger, Jack D; Gress, Jenna L; San Pedro-Salcedo, Melanie G; Kuo, Tracy F; Kalista, Tasha

    2008-04-01

    Insomnia impacts the course of major depressive disorder (MDD), hinders response to treatment, and increases risk for depressive relapse. This study is an initial evaluation of adding cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) to the antidepressant medication escitalopram (EsCIT) in individuals with both disorders. A randomized, controlled, pilot study in a single academic medical center. 30 individuals (61% female, mean age 35 +/- 18) with MDD and insomnia. EsCIT and 7 individual therapy sessions of CBTI or CTRL (quasi-desensitization). Depression was assessed with the HRSD17 and the depression portion of the SCID, administered by raters masked to treatment assignment, at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. The primary outcome was remission of MDD at study exit, which required both an HRSD17 score depression (61.5%) than EsCIT + CTRL (33.3%). EsCIT + CBTI was also associated with a greater remission from insomnia (50.0%) than EsCIT + CTRL (7.7%) and larger improvement in all diary and actigraphy measures of sleep, except for total sleep time. This pilot study provides evidence that augmenting an antidepressant medication with a brief, symptom focused, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia is promising for individuals with MDD and comorbid insomnia in terms of alleviating both depression and insomnia.

  10. Melatonin agonists and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sally A; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Dawson, Drew

    2010-02-01

    The ability of melatonin to shift biological rhythms is well known. As a result, melatonin has been used in the treatment of various circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as advanced and delayed sleep phase disorders, jet lag and shiftwork disorder. The current evidence for melatonin being efficacious in the treatment of primary insomnia is less compelling. The development of agents that are selective for melatonin receptors provides opportunity to further elucidate the actions of melatonin and its receptors and to develop novel treatments for specific types of sleep disorders. The agonists reviewed here - ramelteon, tasimelteon and agomelatine - all appear to be efficacious in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and some types of insomnia. However, further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of action, particularly for insomnia. Clinical application of the agonists requires a good understanding of their phase-dependent properties. Long-term effects of melatonin should be evaluated in large-scale, independent randomized controlled trials.

  11. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Breast Cancer Survivors: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, Debora; Raggi, Alberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is a common sleep disorder in patients with breast cancer and studies show a higher frequency than in the general population but it appears to be understudied and the treatment seems to be a neglected problem. There is a growing body of evidence about the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in breast cancer survivors (BCS). The aim of this review is to examine the best available scientific evidence related to CBT-I and insomnia in patients with breast cancer and to assess the effect of CBT-I on their psychosocial functioning, sleep, quality of life, and mood. Methods: Empirical articles published in peer-reviewed journals from the earliest reports available until August 2015 were considered. The research on PubMed generated 18 papers, three of which did not meet the inclusion criteria. Another paper was retrieved by screening the reference list of the previously selected papers. Results: A total of 16 studies were found that evaluated the effects of CBT-I in breast cancer patients. CBT-I appears to be an effective therapy for insomnia in BCS, improving mood, general and physical fatigue, and global and cognitive dimensions of quality of life. CBT-I may also reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweat problems, frequency of medicated nights, level of depression, and anxiety. Conclusions: CBT-I seems to be an eligible intervention for improving sleep in BCS. Improvements concerning insomnia and sleep quality are durable (usually up to 12 months) and statistically significant. PMID:27536265

  12. COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY FOR INSOMNIA IN BREAST CANCER SURVIVORS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Aricò

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insomnia is a common sleep disorder in patients with breast cancer and studies show a higher frequency than in the general population but it appears to be understudied and the treatment seems to be a neglected problem. There is a growing body of evidence about the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I in breast cancer survivors. The aim of this review is to examine the best available scientific evidence related to CBT-I and insomnia in patients with breast cancer and to assess the effect of CBT-I on their psychosocial functioning, sleep, quality of life, and mood. Methods: Empirical articles published in peer-reviewed journals from the earliest reports available until August 2015 were considered. The research on PubMed generated 18 papers, three of which did not meet the inclusion criteria. Another paper was retrieved by screening the reference list of the previously selected papers. Results: A total of 16 studies were found that evaluated the effects of CBT-I in breast cancer patients. CBT-I appears to be an effective therapy for insomnia in breast cancer survivors, improving mood, general and physical fatigue and global and cognitive dimensions of quality of life. CBT-I may also reduce menopausal symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweat problems, frequency of medicated nights, level of depression, and anxiety. Conclusions: CBT-I seems to be an eligible intervention for improving sleep in breast cancer survivors. Improvements concerning insomnia and sleep quality are durable (usually up to 12 months and statistically significant.

  13. El insomnio The insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sarrais

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El insomnio es una patología muy frecuente en la población general. Se estima que de un 10 a un 15 % de la población adulta padece insomnio crónico y que un 25 a 35 % ha sufrido un insomnio ocasional o transitorio en situaciones estresantes. El objetivo de este trabajo es proporcionar información actualizada sobre el insomnio: clasificación, causas, diagnóstico diferencial, opciones terapéuticas. Para ello hemos realizado una búsqueda en Pubmed con las palabras clave "insomnio", "trastornos del sueño" y "terapia farmacológica". La evaluación del insomnio se basa en una cuidadosa historia clínica en la que se analiza el sueño, antecedentes psiquiátricos y orgánicos personales y familiares, la toma de medicamentos y otras sustancias. Los autores coinciden en afirmar que el tratamiento debe ser primeramente etiológico y secundariamente sintomático.Insomnia is a common pathology in the general population. It is estimated that 10 to 15 percent of the adult population has chronic insomnia and 25 to 35 percent have suffered occasional or transient insomnia due to stressful situations. The aim of this article is to provide a review of insomnia: causes, differential diagnosis, and different options of treatment. To that end we have made a search in Pubmed with the keywords "insomnia", "sleeplessness", "sleep disorders" and "pharmacological therapy". Insomnia evaluation includes a careful sleep history, personal and family history of mental and organic illness, and a registration of drug and medication intake. Authors agree that treatment should be based primarily on etiology, and secondarily on symptomatology.

  14. Autism Symptoms Related to Tyrosinemia Type III: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Yolga Tahiroğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The published literature on tyrosinemia type III consists of only a few case reports. In this report, we present a patient with tyrosinemia type III, autism, and mental retardation. This patient’s speech improved and his autistic symptoms lessened on a tyrosine-restricted diet, although his mental retardation remained unchanged. This is the first published report of a patient with tyrosinemia type III and autism. This observation is significant due to the paucity of published information about tyrosinemia type III. Turk Jem 2008; 12: 55-6

  15. Melatonin for primary insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland, has a key role in regulating circadian rhythms, most importantly, the sleep-wake cycle. Melatonin's action has led to its being tried as a treatment for a wide range of sleep disorders, such as jet lag, primary insomnia, sleep-wake cycle disruption and sleep problems in children with neuro-developmental disorders. Until recently, it had not been licensed in the UK for any indication. Prolonged-release melatonin (Circadin - Lundbeck) has now been licensed as a treatment for primary insomnia. Here we consider whether this product has a place in the management of people with this condition.

  16. Insomnia in central neurologic diseases--occurrence and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Geert; Jennum, Poul; Riemann, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this review is to highlight the impact of insomnia in central neurological disorders by providing information on its prevalence and give recommendations for diagnosis and treatment. Insomnia in neurological disorders is a frequent, but underestimated symptom. Its occurrence may...... the cause of insomnia must be clearly identified. First line treatment aims at the underlying neurologic disease. The few high quality treatment studies show that short term treatment with hypnotics may be recommended in most disorders after having ruled out high risk for adverse effects. Sedating...... associated with most of the central neurological diseases. The prevalence and treatment of insomnia in neurological diseases still need to be studied in larger patient groups with randomized clinical trials to a) better understand their impact and causal relationship and b) to develop and improve specific...

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Insomnia and Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenaver, Luis F.; Coryell, Virginia T.; Smith, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    This article summarizes the literature on cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) in patients with comorbid insomnia and chronic pain. An empirical rationale for the development of CBT-I in chronic pain is provided. The six randomized controlled trials in this area are described and contrasted. The data suggest that CBT-I for patients with comorbid insomnia and chronic pain produces clinically meaningful improvements in sleep symptoms. Effects on pain are inconsistent, but tend to favor functional measures over pain severity. Hybrid interventions for insomnia and pain have demonstrated feasibility, but larger trials must be conducted to determine efficacy relative to CBT-I alone. Future efforts should employ more comprehensive assessments of pain and psychosocial factors. PMID:25477769

  18. The role of insomnia, pre-sleep arousal and psychopathology symptoms in daytime impairment in adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richdale, Amanda L; Baker, Emma; Short, Michelle; Gradisar, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbance and psychopathology are common during adolescence and are highly prevalent in individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between sleep disturbance, psychopathology symptoms, and daytime functioning in adolescents with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD) compared to typically developing (TD) adolescents. Twenty-seven adolescents with HFASD and 27 age- and sex-matched TD adolescents completed questionnaires related to sleep, psychopathology and daytime functioning. Participants also completed a 7-day sleep/wake diary. A subsample of HFASD adolescents (55%) and all the TD adolescents wore an actigraphy monitor concurrently with the sleep diary. Adolescents with HFASD had significantly higher scores for depressed mood, anxiety and pre-sleep arousal compared with TD adolescents and poorer daytime functioning. There were more significant correlations between sleep variables and psychopathology variables, and sleep variables and daytime functioning, in the HFASD group than in the TD group. Standard regression found that sleep variables significantly accounted for 57% of the variance in daytime functioning symptoms of insufficient sleep in the HFASD group, while psychopathology variables accounted for 63% of the variance in daytime functioning. Both sleep disturbance and psychopathology are more prevalent in adolescents with HFASD and are major contributors to poor daytime functioning in these individuals. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Assessment of patient-reported symptoms of anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Matthias; Devine, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Patient self-reported symptoms are of crucial importance to identify anxiety disorders, as well as to monitor their treatment in clinical practice and research. Thus, for evidence-based medicine, a precise, reliable, and valid (ie, “objective”) assessment of the patient's reported “subjective” symptoms is warranted. There is a plethora of instruments available, which can provide psychometrically sound assessments of anxiety, but there are several limitations of current tools that need to be carefully considered for their successful use. Nevertheless, the empirical assessment of mental health status is not as accepted in medicine as is the assessment of biomarkers. One reason for this may be that different instruments assessing the same psychological construct use different scales. In this paper we present some new developments that promise to provide one common metric for the assessment of anxiety, to facilitate the general acceptance of mental health assessments in the future. PMID:25152658

  20. Enhancing CBT for Chronic Insomnia: A Randomised Clinical Trial of Additive Components of Mindfulness or Cognitive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mei Yin; Ree, Melissa J; Lee, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia has resulted in significant reductions in symptoms, most patients are not classified as good sleepers after treatment. The present study investigated whether additional sessions of cognitive therapy (CT) or mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) could enhance CBT in 64 participants with primary insomnia. All participants were given four sessions of standard CBT as previous research had identified this number of sessions as an optimal balance between therapist guidance and patient independence. Participants were then allocated to further active treatment (four sessions of CT or MBT) or a no further treatment control. The additional treatments resulted in significant improvements beyond CBT on self-report and objective measures of sleep and were well tolerated as evidenced by no dropouts from either treatment. The effect sizes for each of these additional treatments were large and clinically significant. The mean scores on the primary outcome measure, the Insomnia Severity Index, were 5.74 for CT and 6.69 for MBT, which are within the good-sleeper range. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between CT and MBT on any outcome measure. These results provide encouraging data on how to enhance CBT for treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using recent developments in cognitive therapy. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using mindfulness-based treatments. Both cognitive therapy and mindfulness produce additional clinically significant change. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Implosive Therapy as a Treatment for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Richard N.; Elenewski, Jeffrey J.

    1980-01-01

    The death implosion produced a decrease in insomnia beyond the strong expectancy effects that resulted from all experimental treatments. The failure to observe changes in reported fear of death was attributed to subjects' anxiety-based reluctance to acknowledge openly such fear. (Author)

  2. [Association between insomnia and rheumatoid arthritis in elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Denise Cuoghi de Carvalho Veríssimo; Schlosser, Thalyta Cristina Mansano; dos Santos, Ariene Angelini; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to assess symptoms of insomnia in elderly residents in the community and its association with rheumatoid arthritis. Descriptive and cross-sectional study, part of a multicentre research project entitled Fragility in Brazilian elderly . A total number of 689 elderly (68.9% female, average age of 72.2 years) were interviewed using a questionnaire on sociodemographic data and clinical conditions. Two tools to identify symptoms of insomnia (the Nottingham Health profile) and to screen cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination) were also applied. For data analysis, we used descriptive statistical techniques and multiple logistic regression, considering a 5% significance level. The association between insomnia symptoms and rheumatoid arthritis was found to be significant in the multivariate analysis; other associated factors were a very poor subjective evaluation of health, being retired, and the presence of depression. Health professionals should investigate carefully the sleep quality in elderly with rheumatoid arthritis, considering its high prevalence in this population.

  3. Prolonged-release melatonin for insomnia – an open-label long-term study of efficacy, safety, and withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemoine P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Lemoine1, Doron Garfinkel2, Moshe Laudon3, Tali Nir3, Nava Zisapel3,41The Clinique Lyon-Lumière, Meyzieu, France; 2Geriatric-Palliative Department, Shoham Geriatric Medical Center, Pardes Hanna, Israel; 3Neurim Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Tel-Aviv, Israel; 4Department of Neurobiology Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, IsraelBackground: Prolonged-release melatonin (PRM 2 mg is indicated for insomnia in patients aged 55 years and older. A recent double-blind placebo-controlled study demonstrated 6-month efficacy and safety of PRM in insomnia patients aged 18–80 and lack of withdrawal and rebound symptoms upon discontinuation.Objective: To investigate the efficacy, safety, and withdrawal phenomena associated with 6–12 months PRM treatment.Methods: Data from a prospective 6–12-month open-label study of 244 community dwelling adults with primary insomnia, who had participated in a placebo-controlled, double-blind dose-ranging trial of PRM. Patients received PRM nightly, followed by a 2-week withdrawal period. Main outcome measures were patient-reported sleep quality ratings (diary, adverse events, vital signs, and laboratory tests recorded at each visit, and withdrawal symptoms (CHESS-84 [Check-list Evaluation of Somatic Symptoms]. Nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin excretion, a measure of the endogenous melatonin production, was assessed upon discontinuing long-term PRM.Results: Of the 244 patients, 36 dropped out, 112 completed 6 months of treatment, and the other 96 completed 12 months of treatment. The mean number of nights by which patients reported sleep quality as "good" or "very good" was significantly higher during PRM than before treatment. There was no evidence of tolerance to PRM. Discontinuation of PRM was not associated with rebound insomnia or withdrawal symptoms; on the contrary, residual benefit was observed. PRM was well tolerated, and there was no suppression of endogenous melatonin production

  4. Fibromyalgia: generalized pain intolerance and manifold symptom reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, L G; Block, S R; Gratwick, G M

    1988-08-01

    We tested the current criteria for fibromyalgia. Pain tolerance was measured at tender point and control point sites using a pressure algometer, and responses to 6 standard psychological self-reports were obtained from 125 patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Among patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism, published symptom criteria for fibromyalgia did not correlate significantly with the number of tender points. Only lower generalized pressure point pain tolerance distinguished fibromyalgia from other generalized nonarticular rheumatism. Generalized nonarticular rheumatism mean scores were much higher than controls on tests measuring the tendency to report physical symptoms, including headaches and functional bowel syndrome. It is probable that patients with fibromyalgia do not differ in any important physical or psychological respect from other patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism except for the presence of tender points. However, the presence of tender points is merely a reflection of the patient's general pressure pain sensitivity and is not indicative of any special localized pathological phenomenon. The concept of fibromyalgia as an entity separate from the rest of generalized nonarticular rheumatism may be an artifact of a physician's approach to the patient. Most patients with generalized nonarticular rheumatism demonstrate an abnormally high frequency of reporting manifold disagreeable symptoms and probably come to the attention of many medical disciplines.

  5. Psychiatric Symptoms in Childhood Wilson’s Disease: Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevcan Karakoç Demirkaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Various psychiatric symptoms/signs have been identified since the identification of Wilson’s disease (WD. Every patient with WD suffers from one or more psychiatric problems (organic dementia, psychosis, and impulsivity across the disease course. Sometimes, insidious symptoms, such as behavioral changes, failure in school performance, and disturbances in hand-eye coordination may be seen before the onset of neurologic presentation. In this report, five patients, who were diagnosed with WD and followed up in the Child Neurology Unit, were assessed by a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4-based semistructured psychiatric interview (Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. All patients had psychiatric symptoms. One patient had a history of a manic episode and the other had a history of a psychotic disorder at the initial stage of WD. Psychiatric symptoms coexist mostly with neurologic signs in patients with WD. In this sense, pediatric neurological consultation and copper screening are lifesaving in excluding organic etiology. However, WD is a lifelong treatment-requiring disease and psychiatric evaluation of the patients is essential.

  6. Bronchodilator responsiveness and reported respiratory symptoms in an adult population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan C Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationship between patient-reported symptoms and objective measures of lung function is poorly understood. AIM: To determine the association between responsiveness to bronchodilator and respiratory symptoms in random population samples. METHODS: 4669 people aged 40 years and older from 8 sites in Canada completed interviewer-administered respiratory questionnaires and performed spirometry before and after administration of 200 ug of inhaled salbutamol. The effect of anthropometric variables, smoking exposure and doctor-diagnosed asthma (DDA on bronchodilator responsiveness in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and in forced vital capacity (FVC were evaluated. Multiple logistic regression was used to test for association between quintiles of increasing changes in FEV1 and in FVC after bronchodilator and several respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Determinants of bronchodilator change in FEV1 and FVC included age, DDA, smoking, respiratory drug use and female gender [p<0.005 to p<0.0001 ]. In subjects without doctor-diagnosed asthma or COPD, bronchodilator response in FEV1 was associated with wheezing [p for trend<0.0001], while bronchodilator response for FVC was associated with breathlessness. [p for trend <0.0001]. CONCLUSIONS: Bronchodilator responsiveness in FEV1 or FVC are associated with different respiratory symptoms in the community. Both flow and volume bronchodilator responses are useful parameters which together can be predictive of both wheezing and breathlessness in the general population.

  7. Trends in self-reported sleep duration and insomnia-related symptoms in Finland from 1972 to 2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronholm, Erkki; Partonen, Timo; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2008-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning habitual sleep reduction and its adverse consequences among general population in modern societies has received wide publicity in the mass media, although scientific evidence supporting the hypothesis is scarce. Similarly, there is an extensively distributed belief, at lea...

  8. Pediatric insomnia: clinical, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Silvia; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric insomnia is an extrinsic sleep disorder subdivided into two categories: behavioral insomnia and insomnia related to medical, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. This review will cover several types of insomnia, comorbidities and specific pediatric therapies according to clinical characteristics and age. Behavioral insomnia should be differentiated from pediatric insomnia due to medical conditions, mostly occurring during the first year of life. Multiple night awakenings and diurnal hypersomnolence are strong indicators of insomnia due to medical conditions. Insomnia during adolescence and pediatric insomnia associated with psychiatric comorbidity, cognitive disabilities and epilepsy, will be discussed in terms of diagnosis, clinical features and implications for treatment.

  9. Manifestations of Insomnia in Sleep Apnea: Implications for Screening and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Sally; Rizzo, Dorrie; Baltzan, Marc; Grad, Roland; Pavilanis, Alan; Creti, Laura; Fichten, Catherine S; Libman, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the presence, type, and severity of insomnia complaints in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to assess the utility of the Sleep Symptom Checklist (SSC) for case identification in primary care. Participants were 88 OSA patients, 57 cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) patients, and 14 healthy controls (Ctrl). Each completed a sleep questionnaire as well as the SSC, which includes insomnia, daytime functioning, psychological, and sleep disorder subscales. Results showed that OSA patients could be grouped according to 3 insomnia patterns: no insomnia (OSA), n = 21; insomnia (OSA-I), n = 30, with a subjective complaint and disrupted sleep; and noncomplaining poor sleepers (OSA-I-NC), n = 37. Comparisons among the OSA, CBT-I, and Ctrl groups demonstrate distinct profiles on the SSC subscales, indicating its potential utility for both case identification and treatment planning.

  10. Are we sleeping on the job? Insomnia among men with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Josephine Drummond

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men and almost half of male cancer survivors in the US have had a prostate cancer diagnosis. Insomnia is common among cancer patients and survivors. There is evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy can be used to effectively manage insomnia among women with breast cancer. The aim of this review was to investigate the prevalence, risk factors and management of insomnia among men with prostate cancer. The effect of insomnia on the psychological health and health-related quality of life of these patients and/or survivors is also discussed. Increased awareness and knowledge of this symptom among men with prostate cancer may facilitate improved diagnosis, and management of insomnia in this large population. This in turn may improve the health-related quality of life of these men. Therefore, research into the effective management of insomnia among men with prostate cancer is essential.

  11. Treating Acute Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a “Single-Shot” of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jason G.; Cushing, Toby; Germain, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Despite considerable evidence supporting cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for chronic insomnia, it remains untested within the context of acute insomnia. This study examined the efficacy of a single session of CBT-I, with an accompanying self-help pamphlet, for individuals with acute insomnia. Design: A pragmatic parallel group randomized controlled trial. Setting: Community. Participants: Forty adults (mean age 32.9 ± 13.72 y) with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) defined insomnia disorder, except a self-reported duration of less than 3 mo (i.e., acute insomnia), who reported no previous exposure to CBT-I and were not currently taking medication for sleep. Interventions: A single 60- to 70-min session of CBT-I (n = 20), with an accompanying self-help pamphlet, or wait list control group (n = 20). All subjects were offered a full individual course of CBT-I on completion of the study, regardless of group allocation. Measurements and Results: Subjects completed sleep diaries and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) pretreatment and 1 mo following treatment. There were no between-group differences on baseline ISI scores or subjective sleep continuity. The intervention group reported significantly lower ISI scores than controls (t(38) 2.24, P CBT-I group had remitted by 1 mo compared to 15% of those in the control group. Conclusions: This single session of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is sufficiently efficacious for a significant proportion of those with acute insomnia. The results are discussed in terms of integrating this brief form of CBT-I into the “stepped care” model of insomnia. Trial Registration: Testing the efficacy of an early intervention for acute insomnia (SRCTN05891695) http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN05891695. Citation: Ellis JG, Cushing T, Germain A. Treating acute insomnia: a randomized controlled trial of a “single-shot” of cognitive

  12. Relation of Airway Responsiveness to Methacholine to Parent and Child Reporting of Symptoms Suggecting Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM FitzGerald

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The lack of a relationship between airway responsiveness and respiratory symptoms in epidemiological studies of children may, in part, reflect inaccuracies in symptom reporting or inadequate knowledge by the parent of the child's symptoms.

  13. Validity of a short insomnia questionnaire: the SDQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violani, C; Devoto, A; Lucidi, F; Lombardo, C; Russo, P M

    2004-06-30

    The SDQ is a brief self-report insomnia questionnaire, which permits the rapid evaluation of insomnia based on the DSM-IV and ICSD-R criteria. The SDQ was developed to provide a fast and valid instrument both for the pre-screening of subjects who complain of insomnia and for epidemiological studies based on standardized definitions of this sleep disorder. Two studies were carried out in order to assess the validity of the SDQ as a self-report measure of insomnia. In the first study the convergent validity of the SDQ was assessed with respect to the global score of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a sample of general practitioners' patients. The second study assessed the sensitivity and the specificity of the SDQ in discriminating between insomniacs or normal sleepers in a sample of college students who were given an extensive sleep evaluation within an insomnia counseling program. The SDQ classifications have a good convergent validity with the global sleep quality scores of the PSQI and its classifications of students who complain of or who do not complain of problems of insomnia have a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 87%. Results indicate that the SDQ is a valid paper and pencil instrument to screen insomnia.

  14. Influence of dialysis modality and membrane flux on insomnia severity in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Marinela Z; Djordjevic, Vladimir V; Jankovic, Slobodan M; Djordjevic, Vidojko M

    2013-11-01

    Insomnia is an important problem in dialysis patients. A greater prevalence of insomnia in chronic kidney disease compared with non-renal patients suggests a role for uraemic toxins in contributing to insomnia. The aim of this study was to examine if dialysis modality and membrane permeability is associated with the frequency and severity of insomnia in haemodialysis patients. In our cross-sectional study, we evaluated 122 patients who were divided into three groups: on-line haemodiafiltration, high flux haemodialysis and low flux haemodialysis. The frequency and severity of insomnia was evaluated with the Insomnia Severity Index. Insomnia was present in 47.5% of all patients. The majority of patients who reported insomnia were receiving low flux haemodialysis (80%), followed by patients on high flux haemodialysis (43.6%) and haemodiafiltration (20.9%). Patients using low flux membranes, had a significantly higher Insomnia Severity Index (11.9 ± 6.6) compared with patients receiving high flux haemodialysis (6.8 ± 6.3) and haemodiafiltration (5.2 ± 7.0). The insomnia severity index did not differ between patients receiving high flux haemodialysis compared with on-line haemodiafiltration. This study indicates that different haemodialysis modalities are associated with insomnia and suggests a potential benefit of using high flux membranes. © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  15. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hachul

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research.

  16. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, H.; Oliveira, D.S.; Bittencourt, L.R.A.; Andersen, M.L.; Tufik, S.

    2014-01-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research. PMID:26483913

  17. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachul, H; Oliveira, D S; Bittencourt, L R A; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2014-06-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but its use in recent years has been questioned because of the reported risks of cardiovascular events and increased incidence of tumors. This controversy has generated significant interest in non-hormonal treatments among both physicians and patients. Our previous research has shown a positive effect of massage therapy on menopausal symptoms. We explored the hypothesis that massage therapy would produce beneficial effects in postmenopausal women through inflammatory and immunological changes. Recent results from self-report questionnaires have shown improvements in sleep pattern and quality of life following massage therapy. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of massage therapy for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, particularly insomnia, and indicate that it is a promising line of research.

  18. Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia on Sleep-Related Cognitions Among Patients With Stable Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, Nancy S; Jeon, Sangchoon; Andrews, Laura; Cline, John; Mohsenin, Vahid; Jacoby, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) improves insomnia and fatigue among chronic heart failure (HF) patients, but the extent to which sleep-related cognitions explain CBT-I outcomes in these patients is unknown. We examined the effects of CBT-I on sleep-related cognitions, associations between changes in sleep-related cognitions and changes in sleep and symptoms after CBT-I, and the extent to which cognitions mediated the effects of CBT-I. Stable New York Heart Association Class II-III HF patients (total n = 51; n = 26 or 51.0% women; M age = 59.1 ± 15.1 years). HF patients were randomized in groups to group CBT-I (n = 30) or attention control (HF self-management education, n = 21) and completed actigraphy, the Insomnia Severity Index, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep (DBAS) and Sleep Disturbance Questionnaires (SDQ), and self-reported fatigue, depression, anxiety, and sleepiness (baseline, immediately after treatment, six months). We used mixed-effects modeling, mediation analysis with a bootstrapping approach, and Pearson correlations. There was a statistically significant group × mult time effect on DBAS. DBAS mediated the effects of CBT-I on insomnia severity and partially mediated CBT-I effects on fatigue. Improvements in dysfunctional cognitions were associated with improved sleep quality, insomnia severity, sleep latency and decreased fatigue, depression, and anxiety, with sustained effects at six months. Improvement in dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions is an important mechanism for CBT-I effects among HF patients who are especially vulnerable to poor sleep and high symptom burden.

  19. Insomnia: the Sleeping Giant of Pediatric Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Emily; Haddad, Cynthia; Shatkin, Jess Parker

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia among children and adolescents is ubiquitous and takes a great toll on youth and their families, impacting academic achievement, mood, social functioning, and a variety of developmental outcomes. Unfortunately, however, pediatric insomnia most often remains unidentified and untreated. When treatment is provided, it is most often in the form of medications, which are not FDA approved for that indication in children and adolescents. A comprehensive literature review was employed to establish the recommendations in this report. This article provides a review of sleep physiology and both current and recommended approaches to assessing and treating pediatric insomnia. Comprehensive assessment, accurate diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of insomnia is imperative to the healthy development of children and adolescents. While clinicians often prescribe a variety of medications to treat pediatric insomnia, there is insufficient data to demonstrate efficacy and endorse their routine use. At this time, behavioral techniques, such as cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia and sleep hygiene education, should remain the first line of treatment. As a second-line consideration, melatonin, a dietary supplement, may be effective. Pediatric insomnia has an enormous impact on children, adolescents, and their families that requires adequate attention from clinicians and parents alike.

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Consensus Sleep Diary in Those With Insomnia Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maich, Kristin H G; Lachowski, Angela M; Carney, Colleen E

    2016-05-27

    The Consensus Sleep Diary (CSD) is a standardized, prospective tool for tracking nightly subjective sleep. The current study evaluated the validity and utility of the CSD, with consideration for challenges inherent to psychometric evaluation of diary measures. Results showed that the CSD indices differentiated good sleepers from those with insomnia and were associated with similar objective indices and a subjective insomnia severity measure. The ability to detect treatment improvements after cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) was tested by comparing pre- and post-CBT-I CSD indices with a subjective rating of insomnia symptom severity. Improvement in insomnia symptom severity was significantly related to improvement on the CSD indices. Completion rate of the CSD amongst participants across all 14 days was 99.8%. These findings provide support for the validity, clinical utility, and usability of the CSD.

  1. Insomnia: prevalence and associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Cátia; Lopes, Daniela; Ferreira, Sofia; Correia, Teresa; Pinto, Isabel C.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays sleep disorders are very common and affect most of the population, the most common may be insomnia. Insomnia is defined as the difficulty of initiating or maintaining sleep it, may also be reflected in an early wake up and by the presence of a non-restful sleep and it is associated with impairment in social and occupational functioning of the individual. Knowing the prevalence and the associated factors of insomnia. This is a cross-sectional epidemiological study. The pop...

  2. Yoga as Treatment for Insomnia Among Cancer Patients and Survivors: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Karen M. Mustian

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer patients and survivors, between 15 to 90%, report some form of insomnia or sleep quality impairment during and post-treatment, such as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia and sleep quality impairment are among the most prevalent and distressing problems reported by cancer patients and survivors, and can be severe enough to increase cancer mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia and sleep quality imp...

  3. Genetic and metabolic characterization of insomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Jeong Ban

    Full Text Available Insomnia is reported to chronically affect 10∼15% of the adult population. However, very little is known about the genetics and metabolism of insomnia. Here we surveyed 10,038 Korean subjects whose genotypes have been previously profiled on a genome-wide scale. About 16.5% reported insomnia and displayed distinct metabolic changes reflecting an increase in insulin secretion, a higher risk of diabetes, and disrupted calcium signaling. Insomnia-associated genotypic differences were highly concentrated within genes involved in neural function. The most significant SNPs resided in ROR1 and PLCB1, genes known to be involved in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, respectively. Putative enhancers, as indicated by the histone mark H3K4me1, were discovered within both genes near the significant SNPs. In neuronal cells, the enhancers were bound by PAX6, a neural transcription factor that is essential for central nervous system development. Open chromatin signatures were found on the enhancers in human pancreas, a tissue where PAX6 is known to play a role in insulin secretion. In PLCB1, CTCF was found to bind downstream of the enhancer and interact with PAX6, suggesting that it can probably inhibit gene activation by PAX6. PLCB4, a circadian gene that is closely located downstream of PLCB1, was identified as a candidate target gene. Hence, dysregulation of ROR1, PLCB1, or PLCB4 by PAX6 and CTCF may be one mechanism that links neural and pancreatic dysfunction not only in insomnia but also in the relevant psychiatric disorders that are accompanied with circadian rhythm disruption and metabolic syndrome.

  4. Effects of a structured problem-solving procedure on pre-sleep cognitive arousal in college students with insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Waters, William F

    2006-01-01

    Pre-sleep cognitive arousal, more specifically worry, is often reported as a distressing symptom that interferes with sleep. Using a controlled group design, a "constructive worry" intervention, similar to Espie and Lindsay's (1987) "worry control" procedure, was tested for its effects on pre-sleep cognitive arousal in an undergraduate population reporting insomnia. After 2 baseline nights, participants (N = 33) either recorded possible solutions to worries (constructive worry group) or recorded worries and completed worry questionnaires (worry group) for 5 nights. As hypothesized, the constructive worry group had decreased pre-sleep cognitive arousal relative to the worry group and relative to baseline scores. This study provides further support for augmenting existing insomnia treatments with cognitive interventions to successfully treat the complaint of pre-sleep cognitive arousal.

  5. The Association between Insomnia and Insomnia Treatment Side Effects on Health Status, Work Productivity, and Healthcare Resource Use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco DiBonaventura

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (1 to compare health outcomes (i.e., health-related quality of life [HRQoL], productivity at work, and healthcare resource use visits between those with insomnia and non-insomnia controls, (2 to compare health outcomes between those treated for insomnia and non-insomnia controls, and (3 to assess the prevalence of side effects of insomnia medications and their relationship with health outcomes. Data from the 2013 US (N = 75,000 and 5EU (N = 62,000 National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS were used. The NHWS is a patient-reported survey administered to a demographically representative sample of adults. Those who met DSM-V criteria for insomnia and, separately, those treated for insomnia were compared with equivalently sized control groups who were identified using a propensity score matching method. Outcomes included HRQoL (Short Form 36v2, productivity at work (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-General Health questionnaire, and healthcare resource use visits in the past 6 months and were analyzed using one-way ANOVAs. Among those with treated insomnia, those with and without side effects were compared on health outcomes using general linear models controlling for confounding variables. Patients with insomnia (n = 4147 and treated insomnia (n = 2860 in the 5EU reported significantly worse HRQoL than controls (health utilities: 0.60 vs. 0.74; 0.60 vs. 0.74, respectively, greater overall work impairment (38.74% vs. 14.86%; 39.50% vs. 15.66%, and more physician visits in the past 6 months (9.10 vs. 4.08; 9.58 vs. 4.11. Similar findings were observed in the US. Among those treated for insomnia, 13.56% and 24.55% in the US and 5EU, respectively, were non-adherent due to side effects. In the US, non-adherence was associated with significantly worse HRQoL (health utilities: 0.60 vs. 0.64, p <.05 and greater overall work impairment (37.71% vs. 29.08%, p <.05, among other significant differences. These relationships

  6. The influence of personality and dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions on the severity of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jang Ho; An, Hoyoung; Jang, Eun Sook; Chung, Seockhoon

    2012-05-30

    Previous findings suggest that personality traits and dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions may perpetuate insomnia, but findings concerning this have been scarce. Thus, we hypothesized that personality and sleep-related cognitions influence the severity of insomnia, and investigated the association personality and sleep-related cognitions had with various sleep-related parameters, including severity of insomnia. Forty-four patients with psychophysiological insomnia were assessed using The Temperament and Character Inventory, the Insomnia Severity Index, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Dysfunctional Belief and Attitudes toward Sleep Scale, the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Insomnia severity was significantly and positively correlated with harm avoidance, self-transcendence and sleep-related cognitions, and negatively correlated with novelty seeking, reward dependence, and cooperativeness. Dysfunctional sleep-related cognitions were positively correlated with insomnia severity and sleep quality. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that sleep-related cognitions, depression and reward dependence scores were significant determinants of insomnia severity, and that sleep-related cognitions and self-transcendence were significant positive determinants of sleep quality. Reward dependence, depression and sleep-related cognitions were associated with insomnia severity, and comparison with previous findings implied that 'internalizing behavior' and depression may be more plausible candidates for the link between personality and insomnia than anxiety. Considering the major role of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) in the treatment of insomnia, assessment of these factors and management of sleep-related cognitions may help alleviate symptoms in patients with insomnia.

  7. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in the Context of Cardiovascular Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Samantha; Redeker, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity, disability and poor quality of life. The prevalence of insomnia symptoms and diagnosis of insomnia are high among those with CVD. Although insomnia appears to be important to CVD, less is known about the effects of insomnia treatment on important biological, sleep, symptom, quality of life, functional and morbidity or mortality outcomes in people with or at-risk for CVD. The purposes of this paper are to review the literature on the effects of CBT-I on insomnia, sleep, daytime symptoms, function, and biological outcomes in the context of CVD and to suggest implications for future research and practice. Limited available evidence suggests that CBT-I improves biomarkers that may contribute to CVD risk. CBT-I shows promise as a way to improve cardiovascular morbidity associated with the negative biological consequences of chronic insomnia, as well as symptom burden, functional performance and quality of life in the large population of people who are living with chronic CVD and insomnia. Additional research is needed to answer basic questions about short and long term outcomes, the role of biomarkers, and optimal delivery methods of CBT-I in cardiac conditions. PMID:26500835

  8. Caffeine consumption, insomnia, and sleep duration: Results from a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Ninad S; Grandner, Michael A; Jackson, Nicholas J; Chakravorty, Subhajit

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia symptoms have been individually associated with both caffeine consumption and sleep duration abnormalities in prior studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether caffeine consumption was associated with insomnia symptoms from a population perspective and whether this relationship depended on habitual sleep duration. Data were extracted from the 2007-2008 National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (N = 4730). Caffeine consumption was quantified as mg/d from 2 typical days of use, 7 to 10 d apart. Insomnia symptoms were evaluated using frequencies of difficulty falling asleep (DFA), difficulty staying asleep (DSA), non-restorative sleep (NRS), and daytime sleepiness (DS). Habitual sleep duration was assessed as the hours of sleep obtained on a typical night. Binomial logistic regression analysis evaluated the relationships of individual insomnia and sleepiness symptoms (DFA, DSA, NRS, and DS) with caffeine consumption and sleep duration variables, after adjusting for covariates. The mean ± SD caffeine consumption was 176.6 ± 201 mg/d. Mean habitual sleep duration was 6.8 ± 1.4 h. Insomnia symptoms were prevalent in 19.1% to 28.4% of the respondents. Although caffeine consumption was associated with all insomnia symptoms in the unadjusted models, the adjusted models demonstrated a trend toward significance with DSA. Sleep duration was inversely associated with the insomnia symptoms in unadjusted and adjusted analysis. Finally, NRS was associated with an interaction between increased caffeine consumption and sleep duration. The association between caffeine use and insomnia symptoms depends on habitual sleep duration at a population level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Linkages between insomnia and suicidality: prospective associations, high-risk subgroups and possible psychological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsper, Catherine; Tang, Nicole K Y

    2014-04-01

    Insomnia can be lethal, increasing the risk of suicide and accidental death by overdose. In this review we present a synthesis of the literature investigating the insomnia-suicide link and the psychological mechanisms underpinning the association. Specifically, we review the findings of prospective epidemiological studies demonstrating the insomnia-suicide link in adult and adolescent community populations. Robust associations between insomnia and suicide are observed in clinically depressed and anxious populations, and there are indications across a number of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies that these linkages are attributable to a disrupted sleep pattern, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and nightmares, independent of depression and anxiety symptoms. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and chronic pain (CP) are highlighted as high-risk subgroups given the elevated rates of insomnia and suicidality in both conditions. Aside from the influence of comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms, emerging evidence has identified impulsivity and emotional dysregulation as possible mechanisms driving the insomnia-suicide link in BPD, and catastrophizing and the sense of defeat/entrapment as potential cognitive pathways through which insomnia aggravates suicidality in CP. Screening for, and interventions that tackle, insomnia and these associated psychological mechanisms, offer a novel avenue for reducing suicidality across a range of clinical and non-clinical populations.

  10. Variations in sleep hygiene practices of women with and without insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Rita E; Shaver, Joan L F; Lentz, Martha J

    2004-08-01

    Sleep hygiene education is a basic component of behavioral treatment for chronic insomnia, yet the actual sleep hygiene practices of people with insomnia have not been well documented. In this descriptive secondary analysis, midlife women ages 41-55 years with either chronic insomnia (n = 92) or good sleep (n = 29) kept diaries of sleep perceptions and sleep hygiene practices during 6 nights of somnographic monitoring at home. In both groups few reported smoking cigarettes (80%), and many averaged 30 min of exercise per day ( approximately 50%). Very few in either group (insomnia reported drinking less caffeine per day, being more abstinent from alcohol, and having smaller variations in day-to-day alcohol intake and bedtimes. Although some women with insomnia limit or refrain from caffeine and alcohol intake, many have not optimized behaviors believed to help prevent or modulate insomnia.

  11. Sleep board review question: insomnia in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. What is the estimated prevalence of insomnia symptoms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea? 1. Less than 1% 2. 5%-10% 3. 20-30% 4. 40%-60% 5. Greater than 80%

  12. Cognitive and Behavioral Factors Associated With Insomnia in Inpatients With Schizophrenia and Related Psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Vivian W; Harvey, Robert H; Sloan, Nancy B; Ree, Melissa; Lin, Ashleigh; Janca, Aleksandar; Waters, Flavie

    2015-10-01

    This study examines cognitive and behavioral factors linked to insomnia in individuals with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders (with and without insomnia) and healthy controls (with and without insomnia). Fifty-five psychiatric inpatients and 66 healthy controls (n = 25 with insomnia in both groups) completed the Insomnia Severity Index, Thought Control Questionnaire for Insomnia-Revised, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale, Sleep Hygiene Knowledge scale, and Beliefs about Causes of Sleep Problems questionnaires. Both insomnia groups demonstrated night-time rumination, aggressive suppression as a thought control strategy, and exaggerated views regarding the health consequences of poor sleep. In addition, the psychiatric group with insomnia frequently reported the causes of insomnia to be related to their illness (rather than to their lifestyle factors) and had an incomplete understanding of good sleep habits. Psychological interventions should be more commonly pursued as a first line of treatment for insomnia in schizophrenia and psychosis, and these should be adapted to address the unique knowledge gaps and cognitive style of patients.

  13. Effectiveness of Cannabidiol Oil for Pediatric Anxiety and Insomnia as Part of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Scott; Opila-Lehman, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anxiety and sleep disorders are often the result of posttraumatic stress disorder and can contribute to an impaired ability to focus and to demonstration of oppositional behaviors. Case Presentation These symptoms were present in our patient, a ten-year-old girl who was sexually abused and had minimal parental supervision as a young child under the age of five. Pharmaceutical medications provided partial relief, but results were not long-lasting, and there were major side effects. A trial of cannabidiol oil resulted in a maintained decrease in anxiety and a steady improvement in the quality and quantity of the patient’s sleep. Discussion Cannabidiol oil, an increasingly popular treatment of anxiety and sleep issues, has been documented as being an effective alternative to pharmaceutical medications. This case study provides clinical data that support the use of cannabidiol oil as a safe treatment for reducing anxiety and improving sleep in a young girl with posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:27768570

  14. Validation of a self-reported HIV symptoms list: the ISS-HIV symptoms scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciardini, Raffaella; Pugliese, Katherina; Francisci, Daniela; Costantini, Andrea; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Cognigni, Miriam; Tontini, Chiara; Lucattini, Stefano; Fucili, Luca; Di Gregorio, Massimiliano; Mirra, Marco; Fragola, Vincenzo; Pompili, Sara; Murri, Rita; Vella, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development and the psychometric properties of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità-HIV symptoms scale (lSS-HIV symptoms scale). The ISS-HIV symptom scale was developed by an Italian working team including researchers, physicians and people living with HIV. The development process went through the following steps: (1) review of HIV/AIDS literature; (2) focus group; (3) pre-test analysis; (4) scale validation. The 22 symptoms of HIV-ISS symptoms scale were clustered in five factors: pain/general discomfort (7 items); depression/anxiety (4 items); emotional reaction/psychological distress (5 items); gastrointestinal discomfort (4 items); sexual discomfort (2 items). The internal consistence reliability was for all factors within the minimum accepted standard of 0.70. The results of this study provide a preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the ISS-HIV symptoms scale. In the new era where HIV infection has been transformed into a chronic diseases and patients are experiencing a complex range of symptoms, the ISS-HIV symptoms scale may represent an useful tool for a comprehensive symptom assessment with the advantage of being easy to fill out by patients and potentially attractive to physicians mainly because it is easy to understand and requires short time to interpret the results.

  15. Your Pathology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Styles Common Yoga Poses Special Situations Yoga and Lymphedema Risk Yoga and Metastatic Breast Cancer Side Effects ... Insomnia and Fatigue Treatment for Insomnia and Fatigue Lymphedema Lymphedema Risk Treating Lymphedema Menopausal Symptoms Mouth Sores ...

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Veterans Using Nonclinician Sleep Coaches: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Cathy; Martin, Jennifer L.; Fiorentino, Lavinia; Fung, Constance H.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Rodriguez Tapia, Juan C.; Song, Yeonsu; Josephson, Karen; Jouldjian, Stella; Mitchell, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To test a new cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) program designed for use by nonclinicians. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. SETTING Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system. PARTICIPANTS Community-dwelling veterans aged 60 and older who met diagnostic criteria for insomnia of 3 months duration or longer (N = 159). INTERVENTION Nonclinician “sleep coaches” delivered a five-session manual-based CBT-I program including stimulus control, sleep restriction, sleep hygiene, and cognitive therapy (individually or in small groups), with weekly telephone behavioral sleep medicine supervision. Controls received five sessions of general sleep education. MEASUREMENTS Primary outcomes, including self-reported (7-day sleep diary) sleep onset latency (SOL-D), wake after sleep onset (WASO-D), total wake time (TWT-D), and sleep efficiency (SE-D); Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); and objective sleep efficiency (7-day wrist actigraphy, SE-A) were measured at baseline, at the posttreatment assessment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. Additional measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9)), and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study 12-item Short-form Survey version 2 (SF-12v2)). RESULTS Intervention subjects had greater improvement than controls between the baseline and posttreatment assessments, the baseline and 6-month assessments, and the baseline and 12-month assessments in SOL-D (−23.4, −15.8, and −17.3 minutes, respectively), TWT-D (−68.4, −37.0, and −30.9 minutes, respectively), SE-D (10.5%, 6.7%, and 5.4%, respectively), PSQI (−3.4, −2.4, and −2.1 in total score, respectively), and ISI (−4.5, −3.9, and −2.8 in total score, respectively) (all P sleep coaches improves sleep in older adults with chronic insomnia. PMID:27550552

  17. Insomnia with physiological hyperarousal is associated with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Bixler, Edward O; Sun, Yuanfeng; Zhou, Junying; Ren, Rong; Li, Tao; Tang, Xiangdong

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that insomnia with objective short sleep duration is associated with a higher risk of hypertension, and it has been speculated that the underlying mechanism is physiological hyperarousal. In this study, we tested whether insomnia with physiological hyperarousal measured by Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), a standard test of sleepiness/alertness, is associated with increased risk of hypertension. Two hundred nineteen chronic insomniacs and 96 normal sleepers were included in this study. Chronic insomnia was defined based on standard diagnostic criteria with symptoms lasting ≥6 months. All subjects underwent 1 night in laboratory polysomnography followed by a standard MSLT. We used the median mean MSLT value (ie, >14 minutes) and the 75th percentile of mean MSLT value (ie, >17 minutes) to define hyperarousal. Hypertension was defined based either on blood pressure measures or on diagnosis treatment by a physician. After controlling for age, sex, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol, and caffeine use, insomnia combined with MSLT >14 minutes increased the odds of hypertension by 300% (odds ratio=3.27; 95% confidence interval=1.20-8.96), whereas insomnia combined with MSLT >17 minutes increased even further the odds of hypertension by 400% (odds ratio=4.33; 95% confidence interval=1.48-12.68) compared with normal sleepers with MSLT ≤14 minutes. Insomnia associated with physiological hyperarousal is associated with a significant risk of hypertension. Long MSLT values may be a reliable index of the physiological hyperarousal and biological severity of chronic insomnia. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Beyond symptom self-report: use of a computer "avatar" to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Catherine E; Radell, Milen L; Shind, Christine; Ebanks-Williams, Yasheca; Beck, Kevin D; Gilbertson, Mark W

    2016-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can occur in the wake of exposure to a traumatic event. Currently, PTSD symptoms are assessed mainly through self-report in the form of questionnaire or clinical interview. Self-report has inherent limitations, particularly in psychiatric populations who may have limited awareness of deficit, reduced attention span, or poor vocabulary and/or literacy skills. Diagnosis and evaluation of treatment efficacy would be aided by behavioral measures. A viable alternative may be virtual environments, in which the participant guides an on-screen "avatar" through a series of onscreen events meant to simulate real-world situations. Here, a sample of 82 veterans, self-assessed for PTSD symptoms was administered such a task, in which the avatar was confronted with situations that might evoke avoidant behavior, a core feature of PTSD. Results showed a strong correlation between PTSD symptom burden and task performance; in fact, the ability to predict PTSD symptom burden based on simple demographic variables (age, sex, combat exposure) was significantly improved by adding task score as a predictor variable. The results therefore suggest that virtual environments may provide a new way to assess PTSD symptoms, while avoiding at least some of the limitations associated with symptom self-report, and thus might be a useful complement to questionnaire or clinical interview, potentially facilitating both diagnosis and evaluation of treatment efficacy.

  19. Behavioral interventions for insomnia: Theory and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Mahendra P.; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is a general clinical term that refers to a difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep. Insomnia is widely prevalent in the general population, especially in the elderly and in those with medical and psychiatric disorders. Hypnotic drug treatments of insomnia are effective but are associated with potential disadvantages. This article presents an overview of behavioral interventions for insomnia. Behavioral interventions for insomnia include relaxation training, stimulus control th...

  20. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Susan Crump

    2011-08-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances, particularly insomnia, are among the most prevalent and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. As a result of extensive interdisciplinary research conducted since 2000, cognitive-behavioral therapy now is considered the standard of care for the treatment of insomnia in the general population and also has been upgraded to "likely to be effective" in the Oncology Nursing Society Putting Evidence Into Practice weight of evidence category. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is a multicomponent psychological and behavioral treatment designed to eliminate the perpetuating factors of insomnia. The most frequently used strategies are stimulus control, sleep restriction and relaxation therapies, paradoxical intention, sleep hygiene, and cognitive restructuring. Although this insomnia treatment recommendation has been well publicized, the nursing literature has not effectively translated the theories and principles of cognitive-behavioral therapy into practical guidelines or considerations for use by oncology staff nurses and advanced practitioners. This article attempts to demystify cognitive-behavioral therapy and provide nurses at different levels of practice a foundation from which to evaluate and potentially deliver this promising insomnia intervention.

  1. Neuroimaging findings in primary insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, J N; Berman Rosa, M; Gouin, J-P; Dang-Vu, T T

    2014-10-01

    State-of-the-art neuroimaging techniques have accelerated progress in the study and understanding of sleep in humans. Neuroimaging studies in primary insomnia remain relatively few, considering the important prevalence of this disorder in the general population. This review examines the contribution of functional and structural neuroimaging to our current understanding of primary insomnia. Functional studies during sleep provided support for the hyperarousal theory of insomnia. Functional neuroimaging also revealed abnormalities in cognitive and emotional processing in primary insomnia. Results from structural studies suggest neuroanatomical alterations in primary insomnia, mostly in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. However, these results are not well replicated across studies. A few magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies revealed abnormalities in neurotransmitter concentrations and bioenergetics in primary insomnia. The inconsistencies among neuroimaging findings on insomnia are likely due to clinical heterogeneity, differences in imaging and overall diversity of techniques and designs employed. Larger samples, replication, as well as innovative methodologies are necessary for the progression of this perplexing, yet promising area of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Correspondence between adolescent report, parent report, and teacher report of manic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuppal, Madhavan; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Sprafkin, Joyce; Gadow, Kenneth D

    2002-01-01

    To examine differences between source-specific manic symptoms. In total, 104 consecutive adolescent outpatient referrals were evaluated for their psychiatric status using a questionnaire based on the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders that was completed by parents, teachers, and youths. Approximately one third of the youths met symptom criteria for mania by at least one informant; however, only 38% of these met such criteria by at least two informants. Youths who had manic symptoms according to two informants were significantly more symptomatic both on mental status exam and in other dimensions of psychopathology than youths who did not have corroborated manic symptoms. Cross-informant agreement was generally poor when symptoms were scored dimensionally. Manic symptoms are relatively nonspecific in outpatient samples. Using more than one informant increases the likelihood of selecting subjects with serious and possibly manic disorders.

  3. Default mode network assessment of resting state functional MRI in insomnia patients with depression symptom%伴有抑郁症状原发性失眠患者静息态磁共振脑默认网络评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王恩锋; 刘立亚; 张红菊; 张晓琦; 窦社伟; 郭慧慧; 史大鹏; 程敬亮; 李永丽

    2015-01-01

    目的 利用静息态磁共振脑功能成像(fMRI)技术,评价伴有不同程度抑郁症状的原发性失眠(primary insomnia,PI)患者脑默认网络差异及其发生的神经网络机制.方法 于2012年1月至2015年6月收集不伴抑郁症状的单纯PI患者15例,PI伴有轻、中度抑郁症状患者各20例,健康对照组(healthy control,HC)40例,以双侧后扣带回/楔前叶为种子点,对比HC与PI伴抑郁症状组间脑默认网络差异;对比PI伴有不同程度抑郁症状各组间脑默认网络差异.分别提取右侧中间扣带回和海马旁回的信号与汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD)评分结果进行相关性分析.结果 与HC组对比,PI伴有抑郁组功能连接增强脑区包括:双侧楔前叶、左枕中回、顶上小叶、额上回;功能连接减弱脑区包括:左侧前扣带回.与单纯PI组相比,PI伴有轻度抑郁症状组功能连接减弱脑区包括:双侧额中回、右侧枕中回/楔前叶、中央后回,无功能连接增强脑区;与伴轻度抑郁症状PI组相比,PI伴有中度抑郁组功能连接增强脑区包括:右侧小脑后叶、中间扣带回、左侧岛叶/额下回、外核、顶下小叶,功能连接减弱脑区包括:左侧颞上回、右侧海马旁回.右侧海马旁回、右侧中间扣带回信号与HAMD评分相关性分析结果分别为:r=-0.697,P=0.006;r=0.224,P=0.441.结论 PI伴有抑郁症状患者存在脑默认网络异常;伴有不同程度抑郁症状PI患者之间存在脑默认网络差异;海马旁回功能连接与HAMD评分显著负相关,中间扣带回功能连接与HAMD评分相关性不显著,但趋势一致.%Objective To assess abnormal default mode network (DMN) and its potential mechanisms in insomnia patients with varying depression symptom via resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Methods We recruited 15 cases of primary insomnia (PI) without depression symptom, 40 cases of insomnia patients with varying depressions, including mild

  4. [Somatic symptoms in those hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutumi, Tomoko; Arai, Motohiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-09-01

    Anxiety and depression greatly affect the prognosis of and burden on subjects seen for dizziness or vertigo, who usually report multiple somatic symptoms. We studied the prevalence of these symptoms in 145 subjects hospitalized for dizziness or vertigo and taking part in 4-day group vestibular rehabilitation. Questionnaires given to determine the prevalence of somatic symptoms assessed headache, insomnia, diarrhea, constipation, stomachache, chest pain, palpitations, dyspnea, general fatigue, and stress. Quantitation used aerical rating scale (NRS). Anxiety and depression were assessed using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Disability due to dizziness was assessed using the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI). We conducted correlational analysis between dizziness and somatic symptoms. The top four average NRS scores for somatic symptoms were dizziness at 3.5 +/- 2.8, general fatigue at 2.8 +/- 2.6, insomnia at 2.4 +/- 2.6, and headache at 1.8 +/- 2.3. These symptoms resembled those reported for subjects with anxiety and depression. The correlation between headache and dizziness NRS scores was R = 0.48 (P dizziness reported several somatic symptoms related to anxiety and depression attributable to dizziness. This underscores the need to treat these somatic symptoms when treating subjects seen chiefly dizziness or vertigo.

  5. Postconcussive symptom report: the relative influence of head injury and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Julie A; Gunstad, John

    2002-12-01

    The present study explored whether any subset of self-reported postconcussion (PCS) symptoms or specific PCS symptom is sensitive and/or specific to head injury in non-self-selected samples of individuals aged 18-21 with head injury and depression (n = 32), head injury without depression (n = 31), depression without head injury (n = 25), and controls (n = 50). All participants completed a self-report PCS symptom scale based on their current symptoms. Results showed that depression, not head-injury status, largely accounted for elevation in PCS symptom reports, including cognitive symptoms. Thus, report of cognitive PCS symptoms is not specific to head injury, raising concerns about using such items to screen for head injury in the general population.

  6. A randomized, controlled pilot trial of hormone therapy for menopausal insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Betania Huber; Martinez, Denis; Wender, Maria Celeste Osório

    2011-12-01

    Insomnia is a frequent climacteric symptom. This pilot, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial compared estradiol associated with trimegestone or placebo in 12 women with perimenopausal insomnia. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was administered, and polysomnography was performed at baseline and after 28 days. Sleep efficiency and median score of the PSQI improved significantly in the hormone therapy group (HT) (p=0.041 and p=0.027, respectively) and not in placebo group. Perimenopausal insomnia improved after short-term HT.

  7. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a VA Mental Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Lawrence M.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Earnheart, Kristie L.; Gorman, Ashley A.; Shirley, Katherine G.

    2008-01-01

    Effective cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia have been developed over the past 2 decades, but they have not been systematically evaluated in some clinical settings. While insomnia is common among veterans with mental health problems, the availability of effective treatments is limited. We report on the group application of a…

  8. Bilateral thalamic infarction with psychiatric symptoms: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Tekin Güveli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Thalamus is a mass of gray matter, which plays a role in the transmission of sensory and motor information to the primary sensory and motor centers of the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia. Vascular lesions of thalamus may occur in different syndromes depending on the affected nuclei. In this report, a case with acute evolving personality and behavior changes and detected bilateral thalamic infarction will be presented. Case: A 40-year-old male patient was brought to the psychiatric ER with complaints of acute excessive sleep and behavioral changing. His neurological examination was normal except for limited cooperation and dysarthria. There was hyperintensity in bilateral paramedian thalamic regions in diffusion MRI and hypointensity in the right side in the ADC. During clinical observation the patient occasionally had visual hallucinations and attempted suicide. The psychiatrist diagnosed the patient with psychotic disorder due to his general medical condition and olanzapine 10 mg / day was prescribed. Etiological tests were normal. The patient was discharged after clinical improvement on the tenth day of hospitalization. Conclusion: Bilateral thalamic infarcts are very rare in all ischemic cerebrovascular diseases and typically result in changing of consciousness, gaze palsy and memory. The most common etiological cause of bilateral thalamic infarct is cardioembolism and the prognosis is generally good. Thalamic infarcts have a clinical spectrum varying according to the location of the lesion and may even just be present with psychiatric symptoms. In acute or subacute personality and behavior changes in a patient with no history of psychiatric disorders, thalamic lesions should be considered.

  9. Ethnic Differences in Somatic Symptom Reporting in Children with Asthma and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Juan C.; Fritz, Gregory K.; Jopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Canino, Glorisa

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between child and parent somatic symptom reporting and pediatric asthma reporting in Latino and non-Latino white children in Rhode Island and Puerto Rico is examined. Findings supported studies that showed Latinos having higher symptom reporting than whites. Findings also provided new insight into the relationship between general…

  10. Prevalence of self-reported hypersensitivity symptoms following intake of alcoholic drinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, A.; Berg, N.D.; Gonzalez-Quintela, A.;

    2008-01-01

    symptoms from the upper and lower airways were significantly more prevalent in persons with AR and asthma (odds ratios between 3.0 and 8.1, P-value self-reported hypersensitivity symptoms following the intake...... of alcoholic drinks are common. These symptoms were markedly more prevalent in persons with AR and asthma. The underlying mechanisms and the clinical significance of these symptoms remain to be elucidated Udgivelsesdato: 2008/1...

  11. Adolescents′ reported hearing symptoms and attitudes toward loud music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Landälv

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the adolescents′ attitudes toward loud music in relation to a set of self-perceived auditory symptoms and psychological variables such as norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment in noisy situations. A questionnaire on hearing and preventive behavior was distributed to 281 upper secondary school students aged 15-19 years. The questionnaire included youth attitude to noise scale, questions about perceived hearing symptoms such as tinnitus and sound sensitivity and finally statements on perceived behavioral norms regarding hearing protection use, risk-taking and risk-judgment in noisy settings. Self-perceived auditory symptoms such as sound sensitivity and permanent tinnitus had a significant relationship with less tolerant attitudes toward loud music. Permanent tinnitus and sound sensitivity together accounted for 15.9% of the variation in attitudes toward loud music. Together with the psychological variables norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment 48.0% of the variation in attitudes could be explained. Although perceived hearing symptoms (sound sensitivity and permanent tinnitus was associated with less tolerant attitudes toward loud music, psychological variables such as norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment were found to be more strongly associated with attitudes toward loud music and should therefore be considered more in future preventive work. Health promotive strategies should focus on changing not merely individual attitudes, but also societal norms and regulations in order to decrease noise induced auditory symptoms among adolescents.

  12. Adolescents' reported hearing symptoms and attitudes toward loud music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landälv, Daniel; Malmström, Lennart; Widén, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the adolescents' attitudes toward loud music in relation to a set of self-perceived auditory symptoms and psychological variables such as norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment in noisy situations. A questionnaire on hearing and preventive behavior was distributed to 281 upper secondary school students aged 15-19 years. The questionnaire included youth attitude to noise scale, questions about perceived hearing symptoms such as tinnitus and sound sensitivity and finally statements on perceived behavioral norms regarding hearing protection use, risk-taking and risk-judgment in noisy settings. Self-perceived auditory symptoms such as sound sensitivity and permanent tinnitus had a significant relationship with less tolerant attitudes toward loud music. Permanent tinnitus and sound sensitivity together accounted for 15.9% of the variation in attitudes toward loud music. Together with the psychological variables norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment 48.0% of the variation in attitudes could be explained. Although perceived hearing symptoms (sound sensitivity and permanent tinnitus) was associated with less tolerant attitudes toward loud music, psychological variables such as norms, preparedness to take risks and risk-judgment were found to be more strongly associated with attitudes toward loud music and should therefore be considered more in future preventive work. Health promotive strategies should focus on changing not merely individual attitudes, but also societal norms and regulations in order to decrease noise induced auditory symptoms among adolescents.

  13. Electromagnetictherapy for Treatment of Insomnia: A clinical Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Sadeghi movahhed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Insomnia is one of the most common sleep disorders in the world. It causes disruption in daily activities and increases the risk of major depression. Hence, clinically the appropriate and persistent treatment of insomnia is very important. Using of hypnotic drugs such as benzodiazepines is the common treatment for insomnia but they show several side effects and it seems that new medications should be used for treatment of sleep disorders. The aim of this study was comparison between the effects of electromagnetic therapy and conventional drug usage in the treatment of insomnia.   Methods: In a blind randomized clinical trial study, 60 people referred to the private office of the psychiatrist and experienced more than 3 months extended primary insomnia were selected. They were diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria and had no other underlying problems. The subjects were divided in two groups: 30 people in each and treated electromagnetically or with Alprazolam for 3 weeks. Before treatment, immediately and one month after treatment, quality of sleep and severity of the insomnia were evaluated by using the standard questionnaires and finally, the results were analyzed statistically.   Results : In this study, 60 individuals participated from whom 28 were male (46.7% and 32 patients were female (53.3%.The mean age was 37.3 years old in a range of 17- 65. The mean point of each questionnaire, before and immediately after treatment significantly didn't show any difference but one month after treatment, there was a significant difference in both groups.   Conclusion : To treat insomnia, electromagnetic therapy appears to be used as a replacement for sedative medicines. It also has more stability in comparison with other sedative medicines and no side effects have been reported yet.

  14. Clinicians' ratings and self-reports of basic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, I Alex; Romeo, Domenico; Scarpellino, Angelo; Siracusano, Alberto

    2002-10-01

    A sample of 34 paranoid or undifferentiated schizophrenic outpatients were given the Rome Basic Disorders Scale, a self-rating questionnaire aimed to the assessment of basic symptoms, as defined by the Bonn Scale. These patients were then interviewed on the same 54 basic symptoms explored with the scale, by two independent clinicians blind to the outpatients' data. Self-ratings compared with clinicians' ratings by Student t for dependent samples yielded only one significant difference (p< .01) for the item measuring hypersensitivity to light. Present findings suggest that the Rome Basic Disorders Scale may be safely self-rated even by collaborative schizophrenic patients.

  15. Associations between sleep hygiene and insomnia severity in college students: cross-sectional and prospective analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, Les A; Park, Aesoon; Stotsky, Miriam T; Taylor, Daniel J

    2014-11-01

    Although a small number of studies characterized cross-sectional associations between sleep hygiene and insomnia severity, no prior study has examined their relationships prospectively. Further, the relationship between sleep hygiene and insomnia severity among college students has rarely been examined. This study examined the prevalence of diverse sleep hygiene behaviors and their associations with insomnia severity in two independent samples of college students from a cross-sectional (N=548; mean age=19; 59% female; 71% White) and a two-wave short-term prospective (N=157; mean age=19; 71% female; 76% White) study. A total of 12% to 13% of students reported clinically significant insomnia. On average, students reported frequent engagement in inconsistent sleep-wake schedules and lounging and worrying/thinking about important matters in the bed. Improper sleep scheduling, behaviors that promote arousal near bedtime, and uncomfortable sleeping environments were positively associated with cross-sectional insomnia severity. After controlling for other well-established risk factors, only improper sleep scheduling remained significant. Prospectively, baseline improper sleep scheduling predicted insomnia severity at a 2-month follow-up after controlling for baseline insomnia severity and other well-established risk factors. Together, findings suggest a potential unique role of improper sleep scheduling in insomnia among college students.

  16. 针灸治疗慢性失眠的疗效研究%Study on the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on chronic insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮经文; 郑佩仪; 胡跃华

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate therapeutic effect of acupuncture on chronic insomnia.Methods Head-acupuncture, galvano-acupuncture, and body acupuncture were used to treat the chronic insomnia. Statistical analysis was conducted therapeutic effect by using self-made Sleep Index Form(FormⅠ ) and the self-made clinical symptoms Form(FormⅡ ). Results P< 0.01. Therapeutic effect after treatment compared with that before treatment. Conclusion Acupuncture is effective in treating insomnia without obvious adverse effects.

  17. Symptoms and side effects in chronic non-cancer pain: patient report vs. systematic assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Torsten; Christrup, Lona Louring; Højsted, J

    2011-01-01

    relieving distressing symptoms and managing the side effects of analgesics are essential in order to improve quality of life and functional capacity in chronic non-cancer pain patients. A quick, reliable and valid tool for assessing symptoms and side effects is needed in order to optimize treatment....... We aimed to investigate the symptoms reported by chronic non-cancer pain patients after open-ended questioning vs. a systematic assessment using a list of symptoms, and to assess whether the patients could distinguish between the symptoms and the side effects induced by analgesics....

  18. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia and sleep hygiene in fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M Pilar; Miró, Elena; Sánchez, Ana I; Díaz-Piedra, Carolina; Cáliz, Rafael; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2014-08-01

    Sleep disturbances play an important role in the exacerbation of pain and other troubling symptoms reported by patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The objective of this trial was to analyze the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) versus a sleep hygiene (SH) education program at improving sleep and other clinical manifestations in FM. Sixty-four FM women with insomnia were randomly assigned to the CBT-I or the SH groups, and 59 completed the treatments (30 in the CBT-I group and 29 in the SH group). Participants completed several self-report questionnaires at pre-, post-treatment and follow-ups. The CBT-I group reported significant improvements at post-treatment in several sleep variables, fatigue, daily functioning, pain catastrophizing, anxiety and depression. The SH group only improved significantly in subjective sleep quality. Patients in the CBT-I group showed significantly greater changes than those in the SH group in most outcome measures. The findings underscore the usefulness of CBT-I in the multidisciplinary management of FM.

  19. Cognitive Behavioral Insomnia Therapy for Those With Insomnia and Depression: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Edinger, Jack D; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Lachowski, Angela M; Bogouslavsky, Olya; Krystal, Andrew D; Shapiro, Colin M

    2017-04-01

    To compare cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) + antidepressant medication (AD) against treatments that target solely depression or solely insomnia. A blinded, randomized split-plot experimental study. Two urban academic clinical centers. 107 participants (68% female, mean age 42 ± 11) with major depressive disorder and insomnia. Randomization was to one of three groups: antidepressant (AD; escitalopram) + CBT-I (4 sessions), CBT-I + placebo pill, or AD + 4-session sleep hygiene control (SH). Subjective sleep was assessed via 2 weeks of daily sleep diaries (use of medication was covaried in all analyses); although there were no statistically significant group differences detected, all groups improved from baseline to posttreatment on subjective sleep efficiency (SE) and total wake time (TWT) and the effect sizes were large. Objective sleep was assessed via overnight polysomnographic monitoring at baseline and posttreatment; analyses revealed both CBT groups improved on TWT (p = .03), but the AD + SH group worsened. There was no statistically significant effect for PSG SE (p = .07). There was a between groups medium effect observed for the AD + SH and CBT + placebo group differences on diary TWT and both PSG variables. All groups improved significantly from baseline to posttreatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17); the groups did not differ. Although all groups self-reported sleeping better after treatment, only the CBT-I groups improved on objective sleep, and AD + SH's sleep worsened. This suggests that we should be treating sleep in those with depression with an effective insomnia treatment and relying on self-report obscures sleep worsening effects. All groups improved on depression, even a group with absolutely no depression-focused treatment component (CBT-I + placebo). The depression effect in CBT-I only group has been reported in other studies, suggesting that we should further investigate the antidepressant properties of

  20. Alcohol use, anxiety, and insomnia in older adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, M Cristina; Amspoker, Amber B; Nadorff, Michael R; Kunik, Mark E; Cully, Jeffrey A; Wilson, Nancy; Calleo, Jessica; Kraus-Schuman, Cynthia; Stanley, Melinda A

    2014-09-01

    To examine alcohol consumption among older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD); its relationship to demographic variables, insomnia, worry, and anxiety; and its moderating role on the anxiety-insomnia relationship. We expected alcohol use to be similar to previous reports, correlate with higher anxiety and insomnia, and worsen the anxiety-insomnia relationship. Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial. Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center and Baylor College of Medicine. 223 patients, 60 years and older, with GAD. Frequency of alcohol use, insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), worry (Penn State Worry Questionnaire - Abbreviated, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale), and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory - Trait subscale, Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale [SIGH-A]). Most patients endorsed alcohol use, but frequency was low. Presence and frequency were greater than in previous reports of primary care samples. Alcohol use was associated with higher education, female gender, less severe insomnia, and lower worry (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Severity Scale) and anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Trait subscale; SIGH-A). Whites reported more drinks/week than African-Americans. More drinks/week were associated with higher education and lower anxiety (SIGH-A). Weaker relationships between worry/anxiety and insomnia occurred for those drinking. Drink frequency moderated the positive association between the Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated and insomnia, which was lower with higher frequency of drinking. Older adults with GAD use alcohol at an increased rate, but mild to moderate drinkers do not experience sleep difficulties. A modest amount of alcohol may minimize the association between anxiety/worry and insomnia among this group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Insomnia and Personality—A Network Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Kim; Blanken, Tessa F.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Studies on personality traits and insomnia have remained inconclusive about which traits show the most direct associations with insomnia severity. It has moreover hardly been explored how traits relate to specific characteristics of insomnia. We here used network analysis in a large sample (N = 2089) to obtain an integrated view on the associations of personality traits with both overall insomnia severity and different insomnia characteristics, while distinguishing direct from indirect associations. We first estimated a network describing the associations among the five factor model personality traits and overall insomnia severity. Overall insomnia severity was associated with neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness. Subsequently, we estimated a separate network describing the associations among the personality traits and each of the seven individual items of the Insomnia Severity Index. This revealed relatively separate clusters of daytime and nocturnal insomnia complaints, that both contributed to dissatisfaction with sleep, and were both most directly associated with neuroticism and conscientiousness. The approach revealed the strongest direct associations between personality traits and the severity of different insomnia characteristics and overall insomnia severity. Differentiating them from indirect associations identified the targets for improving Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia with the highest probability of effectively changing the network of associated complaints. PMID:28257084

  2. Insomnia and Personality—A Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Dekker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on personality traits and insomnia have remained inconclusive about which traits show the most direct associations with insomnia severity. It has moreover hardly been explored how traits relate to specific characteristics of insomnia. We here used network analysis in a large sample (N = 2089 to obtain an integrated view on the associations of personality traits with both overall insomnia severity and different insomnia characteristics, while distinguishing direct from indirect associations. We first estimated a network describing the associations among the five factor model personality traits and overall insomnia severity. Overall insomnia severity was associated with neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness. Subsequently, we estimated a separate network describing the associations among the personality traits and each of the seven individual items of the Insomnia Severity Index. This revealed relatively separate clusters of daytime and nocturnal insomnia complaints, that both contributed to dissatisfaction with sleep, and were both most directly associated with neuroticism and conscientiousness. The approach revealed the strongest direct associations between personality traits and the severity of different insomnia characteristics and overall insomnia severity. Differentiating them from indirect associations identified the targets for improving Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia with the highest probability of effectively changing the network of associated complaints.

  3. Insomnia and Personality-A Network Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Kim; Blanken, Tessa F; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2017-01-01

    Studies on personality traits and insomnia have remained inconclusive about which traits show the most direct associations with insomnia severity. It has moreover hardly been explored how traits relate to specific characteristics of insomnia. We here used network analysis in a large sample (N = 2089

  4. The mediating and moderating effects of sleep hygiene practice on anxiety and insomnia in hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tsui-Lan; Chang, Lu-I; Chung, Min-Huey

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to test the mediating and moderating effects of sleep hygiene practice on the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity in hospital nurses. A cross-sectional survey was employed, and a convenience sample was recruited from one regional hospital in Taiwan. Participants completed the following self-report questionnaires over a 3-month period in 2009: the Insomnia Severity Index, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Sleep Hygiene Awareness and Practice Scale. The results indicated that nurses with more anxiety tended to have higher insomnia severity. Further, nurses with poor sleep hygiene practice had more insomnia. Sleep hygiene practice partially mediated the effects of anxiety on insomnia severity. Also, sleep hygiene practice was a moderator in the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity with age and work units as covariates. Sleep hygiene practice mediated and moderated the relationship between anxiety and insomnia severity after controlling the variables of age and work units. Continuing to learn and train sleep hygiene practice might promote nurses' sleep hygiene, and thereby ameliorate anxiety and reduce the risk of insomnia.

  5. Prevalence of Insomnia and Factors Associated with it Among the Elderly People of Sarangdanda VDC in Panchthar District

    OpenAIRE

    Raj Kumar Subedi

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is one of the major and unsolved problems in older people. Most of the sleep studies report that the different forms of insomnia like Difficulty Initiating Sleep (DIS), Difficulty Maintaining Sleep (DMS) and Non-Restorative Sleep (NRS) are common among the elderly that are associated to many factors. The objective of the study was to measure the prevalence of insomnia and the factors associated to it among the elderly people. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 142 elderly pe...

  6. Tinnitus and insomnia: is hyperarousal the common denominator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Schredl, Michael; Delb, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    Tinnitus is an auditory sensation that is generated by aberrant activation within the auditory system. Sleep disturbances are a frequent problem in the tinnitus population. They are known to worsen the distress caused by the tinnitus which in turn worsens sleep quality. Beyond that, disturbed sleep is a risk factor for mental health problems and distressing tinnitus is often associated with enhanced depressivity, anxiety, and somatic symptom severity. Moreover there is evidence that therapies which alleviate tinnitus-related distress have a positive influence on sleep quality and help interrupt this vicious cycle. This suggests that distressing tinnitus and insomnia may both be promoted by similar physiological mechanisms. One candidate mechanism is hyperarousal caused by enhanced activation of the sympathetic nervous system. There is increasing evidence for hyperarousal in insomnia patients, and animal models of tinnitus and insomnia show conspicuous similarities in the activation pattern of limbic and autonomous brain regions. In this article we review the evidence for this hypothesis which may have implications for therapeutic intervention in tinnitus patients with comorbid insomnia.

  7. Prevalence and consequences of insomnia in pediatric population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Kaczor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia presents an increasing and significant health issue in paediatric population. As the problem had grown over past decade, it became recognised by the specialists dealing with children and adolescents. In a recent study American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry members were asked about their experience with patients complaining about sleep disturbances. Doctors reported that sleep was a problem for 1/3 of their patients out of which 1/4 required pharmacotherapy [1]. Multiple studies concerning adults confirmed significance of healthy sleep in optimal cognitive, emotional, social and biological functioning. Adequate sleep is important in prophylaxis of many chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke [2]. Due to increasing prevalence of insomnia in children and adolescents growing attention is paid to its short and long term consequences in this group. This review summarises available data on chronic insomnia prevalence and its consequences in population under 18 years old.

  8. Increased Prevalence of Insomnia and Changes in Hypnotics Use in England over 15 Years: Analysis of the 1993, 2000, and 2007 National Psychiatric Morbidity Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calem, Maria; Bisla, Jatinder; Begum, Aysha; Dewey, Michael; Bebbington, Paul E.; Brugha, Traolach; Cooper, Claudia; Jenkins, Rachel; Lindesay, James; McManus, Sally; Meltzer, Howard; Spiers, Nicola; Weich, Scott; Stewart, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate changes over 15 years in the prevalence of insomnia and its association with demographic characteristics and hypnotic medication use. Design: Analysis of 3 cross-sectional national mental health surveys carried out in 1993, 2000, and 2007, which used comparable sampling methods and identical insomnia assessments. Setting: Adults living in private households in England. Patients or Participants: 20,503 people aged 16-64 years. Measurements and Results: Insomnia was defined according to 4 different criteria, using relevant questions from the revised Clinical Interview Schedule. Modest increases in insomnia prevalence were found over the survey periods (any symptoms increasing from 35.0% in 1993 to 38.6% in 2007; insomnia diagnosis from 3.1% to 5.8%, respectively). In all 3 surveys, similar strengths of association in relation to all criteria were found, with female gender, increased age, lower educational attainment, depression, unemployment, economic inactivity, and widowed, divorced, or separated status. Prevalence of hypnotic use was double in 2000 (0.8%) compared to 1993 (0.4%); from limited information on selected medications, there was no such increase between 2000 and 2007. The reasons reported for any sleep disturbance over the last month were generally similar across surveys, the most marked change being illness/discomfort increasing as an explanation from 14.3% to 17.4% to 19.0%. Conclusions: In the English general population, insomnia (by any definition) showed a modest but steady increase in prevalence over a 15-year period. Strengths of associations with demographic factors and self-reported reasons for sleep disturbance remained reasonably stable over this period. Citation: Calem M; Bisla J; Begum A; Dewey M; Bebbington PE; Brugha T; Cooper C; Jenkins R; Lindesay J; McManus S; Meltzer H; Spiers N; Weich S; Stewart R. Increased prevalence of insomnia and changes in hypnotics use in England over 15 years: analysis of the

  9. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression among Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Frazier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the prevalence of self-reported depressive symptoms and the self reported somatic depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II among patients hospitalized for acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and explored the impact of gender on both. A convenience sample of 789 adults (248 women and 541 men was recruited for the study during hospital admission for ACS and participants were screened for self-reported depressive symptoms. BDI-II scores of ≥14 indicate a moderate level of depressive symptoms and this cut-off score was used to categorize patients into depressed and non-depressed groups. Pearson chi-square tests for independence (categorical variables and t tests for independent samples (continuous variables were used for gender comparisons. Results showed that depressive symptoms during ACS episodes were different between women and men. Women reported greater overall depressive symptoms (BDI-II mean = 11.89, S.D. = 9.68 than men (BDI-II mean = 9.00, S.D. = 7.93 (P<0.000. Significantly more women (7.66% were identified positive for somatic depressive symptoms (sleep and appetite disturbances and fatigue than men (2.22% (P=0.0003. Findings support that there are gender differences in depressive symptoms experienced by patients hospitalized for ACS. Somatic symptoms of depression may be important indicators of depression especially among female ACS patients.

  10. Peer victimization as reported by children, teachers, and parents in relation to children's health symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mæhle Magne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Victims of bullying in school may experience health problems later in life. We have assessed the prevalence of children's health symptoms according to whether peer victimization was reported by the children, by their teachers, or by their parents. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 419 children in grades 1-10 the frequency of peer victimization was reported by children, teachers and parents. Emotional and somatic symptoms (sadness, anxiety, stomach ache, and headache were reported by the children. Frequencies of victimization reported by different informants were compared by the marginal homogeneity test for paired ordinal data, concordance between informants by cross-tables and Spearman's rho, and associations of victimization with health symptoms were estimated by logistic regression. Results The concordance of peer victimization reported by children, teachers, and parents varied from complete agreement to complete discordance also for the highest frequency (weekly/daily of victimization. Children's self-reported frequency of victimization was strongly and positively associated with their reports of emotional and somatic symptoms. Frequency of victimization reported by teachers or parents showed similar but weaker associations with the children's health symptoms. Conclusion The agreement between children and significant adults in reporting peer victimization was low to moderate, and the associations of reported victimization with the children's self-reported health symptoms varied substantially between informants. It may be useful to assess prospectively the effects of employing different sources of information related to peer victimization.

  11. Prolonged-release melatonin improves sleep quality and morning alertness in insomnia patients aged 55 years and older and has no withdrawal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Patrick; Nir, Tali; Laudon, Moshe; Zisapel, Nava

    2007-12-01

    Melatonin, secreted nocturnally by the pineal gland, is an endogenous sleep regulator. Impaired melatonin production and complaints on poor quality of sleep are common among the elderly. Non-restorative sleep (perceived poor quality of sleep) and subsequently poor daytime functioning are increasingly recognized as a leading syndrome in the diagnostic and therapeutic process of insomnia complaints. The effects of 3-weeks prolonged-release melatonin 2 mg (PR-melatonin) versus placebo treatment were assessed in a multi-center randomized placebo-controlled study in 170 primary insomnia outpatients aged > or =55 years. Improvements in quality of sleep (QOS) the night before and morning alertness (BFW) were assessed using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire and changes in sleep quality (QON) reported on five categorical unit scales. Rebound insomnia and withdrawal effects following discontinuation were also evaluated. PR-melatonin significantly improved QOS (-22.5 versus -16.5 mm, P = 0.047), QON (0.89 versus 0.46 units; P = 0.003) and BFW (-15.7 versus -6.8 mm; P = 0.002) compared with placebo. The improvements in QOS and BFW were strongly correlated (Rval = 0.77, P insomnia or withdrawal effects following treatment discontinuation. The incidence of adverse events was low and most side-effects were judged to be of minor severity. PR-melatonin is the first drug shown to significantly improve quality of sleep and morning alertness in primary insomnia patients aged 55 years and older-suggesting more restorative sleep, and without withdrawal symptoms upon discontinuation.

  12. Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in an Alzheimer's disease case successfully treated with natural medicine: association with gonadotropins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niitsu, Tomihisa; Okamoto, Hideki; Iyo, Masaomi

    2013-06-01

    Pharmacotherapies for the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia are limited; novel agents for the symptoms are still needed. Herein, we report the case of an 80-year-old male patient with Alzheimer's disease whose severe agitation, insomnia and sexual delusions were successfully treated with a traditional natural Japanese (Kampo) medicine, keishi-ka-ryukotsu-borei-to. We found that administrating keishi-ka-ryukotsu-borei-to increased his serum luteinizing hormone level, which could be inversely associated with his behavioural and psychological symptoms. This report suggests that keishi-ka-ryukotsu-borei-to is a possible alternative treatment for the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, especially sexual delusions.

  13. Cognitive schemas as longitudinal predictors of self-reported adolescent depressive symptoms and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Jordan S; Lumley, Margaret N; Lerman, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    Given that depression risk intensifies in adolescence, examining associates of depressive symptoms during the shift from childhood to adolescence is important for expanding knowledge about the etiology of depression symptoms and disorder. A longitudinal youth report was employed to examine the trajectory of both the content and structure of positive and negative schemas in adolescence and also whether these schemas could prospectively predict depressive symptoms and youth-reported resilience. One hundred and ninety-eight participants (aged 9 to 14) were recruited from four schools to complete measures of youth depressive symptoms, resilience, and schema content and structure. Those who consented to a follow-up study completed the same measures online (50 participants completed). Negative and positive schema content and structure were related over time. After controlling depressive symptoms/resilience at Time 1, negative schema content was the only significant predictor (trend level) of depressive symptoms and resilience at Time 2. Implications for cognitive theories and clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocyst with isolated thoracic symptoms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher Robert

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts represent a rare complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Case presentation A 55-year-old man with a history of chronic pancreatitis was admitted with intermittent dyspnea, dysphagia and weight loss. Chest X-ray, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large paracardial pancreatic pseudocyst causing cardiac and esophageal compression. Conclusion Mediastinal pancreatic pseudocysts are a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. These pseudocysts may lead to isolated thoracic symptoms. For accurate diagnostic and therapy planning, a multimodal imaging approach is necessary.

  15. Multiple Cavernous Angiomas Associated With Psychotic Symptoms: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayadnasiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Multiple cerebral cavernous angiomas (CCA have genetic origin. They are uncommon entity and rarely occurring with psychiatric manifestations. Case Presentation A 28- year-old man presented with delusional disorder some months after diagnosis of CCA for which a neurosurgical intervention had been performed. According to clinical and neuroimaging findings, we discuss the possible correlation of CCA with psychotic symptoms of this patient. Conclusions Possibly, abnormal brain development secondary to a genetic abnormality or peri-natal insult predisposed patient to two different neuropsychiatric conditions.

  16. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary: development and content validity of a novel patient-reported outcome instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, Mark; Swensen, Andrine R; Nyirady, Judit; Kim, Edward; Gwaltney, Chad J; Strober, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    Chronic plaque psoriasis has a profound impact on a patient's daily life. To understand the effects of psoriasis treatments, it is essential to assess the patient's experience of symptoms and how they impact their daily life. The goal of this study was to develop and establish the content validity of a new patient reported outcome (PRO) psoriasis measure. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary was developed by (i) identifying key plaque psoriasis-related symptoms and impacts through qualitative patient interviews (n = 29); (ii) developing an initial set of items that captured the key patient experiences; and (iii) conducting cognitive interviews to test patient understanding of items selected for inclusion in the new psoriasis symptom measure (n = 16). Patients noted a variety of symptoms, with plaque-related pain (including related concepts of burning and stinging), changes in skin appearance, and itching reported by all patients. Patients also expressed notable embarrassment and avoidance of social situations, due to the appearance of plaques, and limited mobility. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary assesses the severity and impact of symptoms using a 24-hour recall period to reduce recall bias and error. The Psoriasis Symptom Diary was developed to assess important symptoms and disease-related impacts in a manner consistent with guidelines for establishing the content validity of new PRO instruments. Following quantitative psychometric testing, the Psoriasis Symptom Diary may support efficacy endpoints in clinical trials. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. Mental Health Antecedents of Early Midlife Insomnia: Evidence from a Four-Decade Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Mellor, Sidra; Gregory, Alice M.; Caspi, Avshalom; Harrington, HonaLee; Parsons, Michael; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia is a highly prevalent condition that constitutes a major public health and economic burden. However, little is known about the developmental etiology of adulthood insomnia. Design: We examined whether indicators of psychological vulnerability across multiple developmental periods (psychiatric diagnoses in young adulthood and adolescence, childhood behavioral problems, and familial psychiatric history) predicted subsequent insomnia in adulthood. Setting and Participants: We used data from the ongoing Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study, a population-representative birth cohort study of 1,037 children in New Zealand who were followed prospectively from birth (1972–1973) through their fourth decade of life with a 95% retention rate. Measurements: Insomnia was diagnosed at age 38 according to DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric diagnoses, behavioral problems, and family psychiatric histories were assessed between ages 5 and 38. Results: In cross-sectional analyses, insomnia was highly comorbid with multiple psychiatric disorders. After controlling for this concurrent comorbidity, our results showed that individuals who have family histories of depression or anxiety, and who manifest lifelong depression and anxiety beginning in childhood, are at uniquely high risk for age-38 insomnia. Other disorders did not predict adulthood insomnia. Conclusions: The link between lifelong depression and anxiety symptoms and adulthood insomnia calls for further studies to clarify the neurophysiological systems or behavioral conditioning processes that may underlie this association. Citation: Goldman-Mellor S, Gregory AM, Caspi A, Harrington H, Parsons M, Poulton R, Moffitt TE. Mental health antecedents of early midlife insomnia: evidence from a four-decade longitudinal study. SLEEP 2014;37(11):1767-1775. PMID:25364072

  18. [Sleep in older adults: association between chronic insomnia and cognitive functioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimov, Iris; Vadas, Limor

    2009-05-01

    Chronic insomnia and cognitive impairment are both common complaints among older adults. Even so, only a few studies have examined the effects of chronic insomnia on cognitive functioning among the elderly, and the results of these studies are contradictory. The authors therefore examined whether insomnia is associated with changes in cognitive functioning among elderly people. The study population comprised two groups: 64 older adult subjects without sleep disorders, and 48 older adult insomniacs. All subjects were living independently in the community and were in good clinical condition. The cognitive capacity of each subject was tested at the subject's home using the computerized "MindFit" test (CogniFit, Inc.). The results demonstrate that chronic insomnia in older adults is associated with impairment in cognitive functioning. Specifically, we found that older people suffering from late-life insomnia exhibit significantly reduced performance in memory span, allocating attention to a target, time estimation, working memory and integration of two dimensions. The present findings suggest that late-life insomnia may be one of the factors contributing to the decline in cognitive functioning seen among older people. Thus, it is particularly important for health care practitioners to screen for, evaluate and treat insomnia symptoms in the elderly. The findings of this study offer hope that treatment of insomnia in older adults can have beneficial effects in improving cognitive functioning in these patients. Therefore, attention to and effective treatment of chronic insomnia in older persons may not only improve the quality of their nighttime sleep, but conceivabLy, may also maintain cognitive function, thus improving their overall quality of life.

  19. Subjective memory complaints among patients on sick leave are associated with symptoms of fatigue and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kristine Aasvik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to identify symptoms associated with subjective memory complaints among subjects who are currently on sick leave due to symptoms of chronic pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety and insomnia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, subjects (n = 167 who were currently on sick leave were asked to complete an extensive survey consisting of the following: items addressing their sociodemographics, one item from the SF-8 health survey measuring pain, Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index and Everyday Memory Questionnaire – Revised. General linear modeling (GLM was used to analyze variables associated with SMCs. Results: Symptoms of fatigue (p-value <= 0.001 and anxiety (p-value = 0.001 were uniquely and significantly associated with perceived memory failures. The associations with symptoms of pain, depression and insomnia were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Subjective memory complaints should be recognized as part of the complex symptomatology among patients who report multiple symptoms, especially in cases of fatigue and anxiety. Self-report questionnaires measuring perceived memory failures may be a quick and easy way to incorporate and extend this knowledge into clinical practice.

  20. Subjective memory complaints among patients on sick leave are associated with symptoms of fatigue and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasvik, Julie K.; Woodhouse, Astrid; Jacobsen, Henrik B.; Borchgrevink, Petter C.; Stiles, Tore C.; Landrø, Nils I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify symptoms associated with subjective memory complaints (SMCs) among subjects who are currently on sick leave due to symptoms of chronic pain, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study, subjects (n = 167) who were currently on sick leave were asked to complete an extensive survey consisting of the following: items addressing their sociodemographics, one item from the SF-8 health survey measuring pain, Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Insomnia Severity Index, and Everyday Memory Questionnaire – Revised. General linear modeling was used to analyze variables associated with SMCs. Results: Symptoms of fatigue (p-value < 0.001) and anxiety (p-value = 0.001) were uniquely and significantly associated with perceived memory failures. The associations with symptoms of pain, depression, and insomnia were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Subjective memory complaints should be recognized as part of the complex symptomatology among patients who report multiple symptoms, especially in cases of fatigue and anxiety. Self-report questionnaires measuring perceived memory failures may be a quick and easy way to incorporate and extend this knowledge into clinical practice. PMID:26441716

  1. Comorbid insomnia and cognitive behavior therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Suma P

    2015-01-01

    Insomnia most commonly presents comorbidly in association with medical and psychiatric disorders. Comorbid insomnia, however, remains under treated in the majority of patients. Concerns about drug interactions, adverse events, and dependence as well as the assumption that treating the insomnia as a secondary presentation that will resolve when the primary condition improves are all factors that contribute to the under treatment of comorbid insomnia. This article presents the growing research evidence that highlights the benefits and importance of targeting the insomnia that presents comorbidly with medical and psychiatric conditions utilizing the nonpharmacological and effective treatment of cognitive behavior therapy.

  2. Self-reported symptoms 8weeks after discharge: A comparison of takotsubo syndrome and myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallström, Sara; Ulin, Kerstin; Omerovic, Elmir; Ekman, Inger

    2016-12-01

    Takotsubo syndrome is a form of acute, reversible heart failure that has gained increasing attention. It affects mostly postmenopausal women, and its acute onset and symptoms mimic acute myocardial infarction. The distinct feature of takotsubo syndrome is the ballooning of a ventricle, but the complete pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully understood. Both short-term and long-term survival are affected, but little is known about the illness experience and self-reported residual symptoms after discharge from hospital. To measure and compare self-reported residual symptoms between patients with takotsubo syndrome and those with acute myocardial infarction. Questionnaire data measuring self-reported symptoms were collected from 48 patients with takotsubo syndrome and 79 patients with acute myocardial infarction 8weeks after discharge. A multivariate adjusted complete case regression model was used to compare the frequency and severity of symptoms. Self-reported symptoms 8weeks after discharge differed little between patients with takotsubo syndrome and those with acute myocardial infarction. Both groups reported symptoms, including pain, fatigue, breathlessness, and sleep disturbance. At onset there were significant differences between the groups concerning previous diabetes mellitus, cardiac troponin T, ejection fraction and Killip class. There were no significant between-group differences in frequency or severity of symptoms after adjusting for these differences. Patients with takotsubo syndrome experience residual symptoms after discharge. Symptoms in several cardiovascular diseases predict quality of life, re-admission, and mortality. Symptom management should be integrated into follow-up care for patients with takotsubo syndrome. One way of achieving this is through person-centered care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of diagnosis on treatment recommendations in chronic insomnia--a report from the APA/NIMH DSM-IV field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysse, D J; Reynolds, C F; Kupfer, D J; Thorpy, M J; Bixler, E; Kales, A; Manfredi, R; Vgontzas, A; Stepanski, E; Roth, T; Hauri, P; Stapf, D

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether sleep specialists and nonspecialists recommend different treatments for different insomnia diagnoses according to two different diagnostic classifications. Two hundred sixteen patients with chronic insomnia at five sites were each interviewed by two clinicians: one sleep specialist and one nonsleep specialist. All interviewers indicated diagnoses using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV); sleep specialists also indicated diagnoses according to the International Classification for Sleep Disorders (ICSD). Interviewers then indicated how strongly they would recommend each item in a standard list of treatment and diagnostic interventions for each patient. We examined differences in treatment recommendations among the six most common DSM-IV diagnoses assigned by sleep specialists at different sites (n = 192), among the six most common ICSD diagnoses assigned by sleep specialists at different sites (n = 153), and among the six most common DSM-IV diagnoses assigned by nonspecialists at different sites (n = 186). In each analysis, specific treatment and polysomnography recommendations differed significantly for different diagnoses, using either DSM-IV or ICSD criteria. Conversely, different diagnoses were associated with different rank orderings of specific treatment and diagnostic recommendations. Sleep specialist and nonspecialist interviewers each distinguished treatment recommendations among different diagnoses, but in general, nonspecialists more strongly recommended medications and relaxation treatments. Significant site-related differences in treatment recommendations also emerged. Differences in treatment recommendations support the distinction between different DSM-IV and ICSD diagnoses, although they do not provide formal validation. Site-related differences suggest a lack of consensus in how these disorders are conceptualized and treated.

  4. Patient-reported symptoms during radiotherapy. Clinically relevant symptom burden in patients treated with palliative and curative intent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, Philipp [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum Palliativmedizin, Wuerzburg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ehrmann, Katja [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Medizinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Soziologie und Rehabilitationswissenschaften, Wuerzburg (Germany); Hartmannsgruber, Johann [Praxis Landshut, Kinderzahnheilkunde, Landshut (Germany); Metz, Michaela; Steigerwald, Sabrina; Flentje, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Oorschot, Birgitt van [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum Palliativmedizin, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    The benefits of patient-reported symptom assessment combined with integrated palliative care are well documented. This study assessed the symptom burden of palliative and curative-intent radiation oncology patients. Prior to first consultation and at the end of RT, all adult cancer patients planned to receive fractionated percutaneous radiotherapy (RT) were asked to answer the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; nine symptoms from 0 = no symptoms to 10 = worst possible symptoms). Mean values were used for curative vs. palliative and pre-post comparisons, and the clinical relevance was evaluated (symptom values ≥ 4). Of 163 participating patients, 151 patients (90.9%) completed both surveys (116 curative and 35 palliative patients). Before beginning RT, 88.6% of palliative and 72.3% of curative patients showed at least one clinically relevant symptom. Curative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (38.6%), followed by tiredness (35.0%), anxiety (32.4%), depression (30.0%), pain (26.3%), lack of appetite (23.5%), dyspnea (17.8%), drowsiness (8.0%) and nausea (6.1%). Palliative patients most frequently named decreased general wellbeing (62.8%), followed by pain (62.8%), tiredness (60.0%), lack of appetite (40.0%), anxiety (38.0%), depression (33.3%), dyspnea (28.5%), drowsiness (25.7%) and nausea (14.2%). At the end of RT, the proportion of curative and palliative patients with a clinically relevant symptom had increased significantly to 79.8 and 91.4%, respectively; whereas the proportion of patients reporting clinically relevant pain had decreased significantly (42.8 vs. 62.8%, respectively). Palliative patients had significantly increased tiredness. Curative patients reported significant increases in pain, tiredness, nausea, drowsiness, lack of appetite and restrictions in general wellbeing. Assessment of patient-reported symptoms was successfully realized in radiation oncology routine. Overall, both groups showed a high symptom burden

  5. Insomnia causes, consequences, and therapeutics: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Christopher L; Roehrs, Timothy; Roth, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    There is growing interest in insomnia both from the perspective of recent advances in clinical management as well as research aimed at elucidating its pathophysiology. This theoretical overview of insomnia describes the negative impact, etiological considerations, and pharmacological and behavioral treatments for the disorder, with an emphasis on areas receiving increased research attention. Insomnia, the most prevalent sleep disorder, affects 10-15% of the general population. In population-based studies severe insomnia has been shown to last for a median of 4 years. In addition, insomnia has a significant negative impact on an individual's work, physical, and social performance as well as overall quality of life. Furthermore, the economic cost of insomnia related to lost productivity, work-related accidents, absenteeism, and health-care costs are enormous. There is increasing evidence linking the precipitation of insomnia to stress, and converging evidence from cognitive, endocrine, neurological, and behavioral domains provide clear evidence for hyper-arousal in insomnia. However, there remains no consensus regarding the specific etiological mechanisms of this disorder. Although the pathophysiology of primary insomnia remains an enigma, numerous treatments both pharmacological and behavioral have been developed and found to be efficacious in controlled studies. Despite the wide availability of pharmacological treatments and increased knowledge of behavioral interventions, the vast majority of individuals with insomnia do not appear to be receiving adequate treatment. The inadequate treatment of insomnia leads to several important and under-recognized consequences including subsequent development of psychiatric disease and increased substance use.

  6. MANAJEMENT OF INSOMNIA IN GERIATRIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cokorda Istri Devi Larayanthi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is an unconscious condition that is relatively more responsive to internal stimuli. Insomnia is a sleep disorder with characteristic difficulty of initiating sleep or difficulty in maintaining sleep. Insomnia is divided into 2 primary insomnia and secondary insomnia. Conection with age, the function of organs in the body decreases. So that geriatric patients are susceptible to illnesses, especially insomnia. Many of the causes of insomnia in geriatric mental disorders, psychiatric, general medical conditions, medications, certain substances, and others. Management of insomnia in geriatric patients were divided into 3 method: 1 manage underlying cause, 2 nonpharmacological therapies such as cognitive behavior therapy (CBT, and 3 pharmacological therapies such as benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine that eszopiclone and Ramelteon. Pharmacological treatment in geriatrics should follow the rule "start low, go slow", starting dose of ½ of the adult dose, and its use in the short term.

  7. Behavioral interventions for insomnia: Theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahendra P; Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2012-10-01

    Insomnia is a general clinical term that refers to a difficulty in initiating or maintaining sleep. Insomnia is widely prevalent in the general population, especially in the elderly and in those with medical and psychiatric disorders. Hypnotic drug treatments of insomnia are effective but are associated with potential disadvantages. This article presents an overview of behavioral interventions for insomnia. Behavioral interventions for insomnia include relaxation training, stimulus control therapy, sleep restriction therapy, sleep hygiene, paradoxical intention therapy, cognitive restructuring, and other approaches. These are briefly explained. Research indicates that behavioral interventions are efficacious, effective, and likely cost-effective treatments for insomnia that yield reliable, robust, and long-term benefits in adults of all ages. Detailed guidance is provided for the practical management of patients with insomnia.

  8. Brief Report: Autism Symptoms in Infants with Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jane E; Tonnsen, Bridgette L; McCary, Lindsay M; Caravella, Kelly E; Shinkareva, Svetlana V

    2016-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common known genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although 50-75 % of children with FXS meet ASD criteria, no studies have compared ASD symptoms in infants with FXS versus other high risk groups, such as siblings of children with ASD (ASIBs). Using the Autism Observation Scale for Infants, our findings indicate that 53 % of 12-month infants with FXS fall in the "at risk" category compared to 17 and 6 % for age-matched ASIBs and controls, respectively. Elevated atypical motor behaviors were associated with elevated risk for FXS. Cross-syndrome comparisons are essential to understanding the heterogeneity of ASD and identifying candidate markers that will facilitate differential diagnosis of ASD in genetic disorders such as FXS.

  9. Associação entre sintomas de insônia, cochilo diurno e quedas em idosos da comunidade Asociación entre síntomas de insomnio, siesta breve diurna y caídas en ancianos de una comunidad desfavorecida Association between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Liberalesso Neri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essa pesquisa investigou associações entre sintomas de insônia, cochilo diurno, e quedas em idosos da comunidade. Estudo transversal de base populacional e amostra probabilística envolvendo 689 idosos da comunidade. O protocolo continha variáveis de autorrelato e de desempenho físico. Foi utilizada a análise de regressão logística univariada e multivariada, e o nível de significância estatística adotado foi de p 80 anos (OR = 3,48; IC95%: 1,54-7,85, cochilo diurno (OR = 2,24; IC95%: 1,24-4,05 e sintomas depressivos (OR = 1,98; IC95%: 1,11-3,53. A associação entre cochilo diurno e quedas replicam dados de pesquisa internacional. Identificar fatores de risco modificáveis pode auxiliar programas de prevenção de quedas.Esta investigación se centró en las asociaciones entre síntomas de insomnio, siesta breve diurna, y caídas en ancianos de una comunidad desfavorecida. Estudio transversal de base poblacional y muestreo probabilístico involucrando a 689 ancianos de una comunidad desfavorecida. El protocolo contenía variables de autorrelato y de desempeño físico. Se utilizó un análisis de regresión logística univariada y multivariada, y el nivel de significancia estadística adoptado fue de p 80 años (OR = 3,48; IC95%: 1,54-7,85, siesta breve diurna (OR = 2,24; IC95%: 1,24-4,05 y síntomas depresivos (OR = 1,98; IC95%: 1,11-3,53. La asociación entre siesta breve diurna y caídas replican datos de investigaciones internacionales. Identificar factores de riesgo modificables pueden auxiliar en programas de prevención de caídas.This study focused on associations between insomnia symptoms, daytime napping, and falls in community-dwelling elderly, using a population-based cross-sectional design and probability sample with 689 community-dwelling elders. The protocol consisted of self-reported and physical performance variables. The study used univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis with statistical significance

  10. Sleep disorders and depression: brief review of the literature, case report, and nonpharmacologic interventions for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antonina Luca,1 Maria Luca,2 Carmela Calandra2 1Department GF Ingrassia, Section of Neuroscience, 2Department of Medical and Surgery Specialties, Psychiatry Unit, University Hospital Policlinico-Vittorio Emanuele, Catania, Sicily, Italy Abstract: Sleep disorders are so frequently associated with depression that, in the absence of sleep complaints, a diagnosis of depression should be made with caution. Insomnia, in particular, may occur in 60%–80% of depressed patients. Depressive symptoms are important risk factors for insomnia, and depression is considered an important comorbid condition in patients with chronic insomnia of any etiology. In addition, some drugs commonly prescribed for the treatment of depression may worsen insomnia and impair full recovery from the illness. The aim of this paper is to review briefly and discuss the following topics: common sleep disturbances during depression (in particular pavor nocturnus, nightmares, hypersomnia, and insomnia; circadian sleep disturbances; and treatment of depression by manipulation of the sleep-wake rhythm (chronotherapy, light therapy, cycles of sleep, and manipulation of the sleep-wake rhythm itself. Finally, we present a case report of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from insomnia associated with depression who was successfully treated with sleep deprivation. Keywords: sleep disorders, depression, insomnia, sleep-wake rhythm

  11. Self-report of physical symptoms associated with using mobile phones and other electrical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena H; Pääkkönen, Rauno J

    2009-09-01

    The aim of our work was to study the working-age population's self-reported physical symptoms associated with using mobile phones and other electrical devices. A qualitative method was applied using an open-ended question in a questionnaire, which included questions about the possible influence of new technical equipment on health. We then created subgroups of respondents for different self-reported symptoms associated with mobile phones and other electrical devices. The research questions were: (1) how the respondents described physical symptoms associated with using mobile phones and other electrical devices and (2) how the answers can be classified into subgroups based on symptoms or devices. We identified the following categories: (1) respondents with different self-reported symptoms which they associated with using mobile phones (headache, earache, or warmth sensations), (2) respondents who had skin symptoms when they stayed in front of a computer screen, (3) respondents who mentioned physical symptoms associated with using mobile phones and other electrical devices. Total prevalence of self-reported physical symptoms associated with using mobile phones and other electrical devices (categories 1 and 2) was 0.7%. In the future it will be possible to obtain new knowledge of these topics by using qualitative methods.

  12. The association between neuroticism and self-reported common somatic symptoms in a population cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmalen, Judith G. M.; Neeleman, Jan; Gans, Reinold O. B.; de Jonge, Peter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypotheses that (1) neuroticism is associated with self-reported somatic symptoms; (2) this association is especially found with regard to psychosomatic symptoms; and (3) it is not solemnly explained by somatic reflections of psychological distress. METHODS: We studied the cro

  13. Psychiatric disorders as first symptom in AIDS patients. A three-case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, P B; Indaco, A; Perrella, O; Di Pietro, G; Morlino, M; Orefice, G

    1990-04-01

    The authors report three cases of AIDS presenting with psychiatric symptoms. In two cases the initial symptoms were behavioral disorders and grandiose delusion; in the third case, which started with depression, an opportunistic infection of the central nervous system was diagnosed.

  14. Factors Associated With Concussion-like Symptom Reporting in High School Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L.; Silverberg, Noah D.; Mannix, Rebekah; Maxwell, Bruce A.; Atkins, Joseph E.; Zafonte, Ross; Berkner, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Every state in the United States has passed legislation for sport-related concussion, making this health issue important for physicians and other health care professionals. Safely returning athletes to sport after concussion relies on accurately determining when their symptoms resolve. Objective To evaluate baseline concussion-like symptom reporting in uninjured adolescent student athletes. Design, Setting, and Participants In this cross-sectional, observational study, we studied 31 958 high school athletes from Maine with no concussion in the past 6 months who completed a preseason baseline testing program between 2009 and 2013. Results Symptom reporting was more common in girls than boys. Most students with preexisting conditions reported one or more symptoms (60%-82% of boys and 73%-97% of girls). Nineteen percent of boys and 28% of girls reported having a symptom burden resembling an International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) diagnosis of postconcussional syndrome (PCS). Students with preexisting conditions were even more likely to endorse a symptom burden that resembled PCS (21%-47% for boys and 33%-72% for girls). Prior treatment of a psychiatric condition was the strongest independent predictor for symptom reporting in boys, followed by a history of migraines. For girls, the strongest independent predictors were prior treatment of a psychiatric condition or substance abuse and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The weakest independent predictor of symptoms for both sexes was history of prior concussions. Conclusions and Relevance In the absence of a recent concussion, symptom reporting is related to sex and preexisting conditions. Consideration of sex and preexisting health conditions can help prevent misinterpretation of symptoms in student athletes who sustain a concussion. PMID:26457403

  15. Brief report: Borderline personality symptoms and perceived caregiver criticism in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Diana J; Malkin, Mallory L; Freeman, Megan J; Young, John; Gratz, Kim L

    2015-06-01

    Despite findings of an association between adolescent psychopathology and perceived parental criticism, the relation between adolescent borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms and perceived parental criticism has not been examined. Given the centrality of interpersonal sensitivity to BPD (relative to other forms of psychopathology), we hypothesized that adolescent BPD symptoms would be uniquely related to perceived caregiver criticism, above and beyond other forms of psychopathology and general emotion dysregulation. Adolescents (N = 109) in a residential psychiatric treatment facility completed self-report measures of BPD symptoms, perceived caregiver criticism, emotion dysregulation, and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Results revealed a unique relation of adolescent BPD symptoms to perceived caregiver criticism, above and beyond age, gender, and other forms of psychopathology. Findings suggest that adolescent BPD symptoms may have unique relevance for adolescents' perceptions of caregivers' attitudes and behaviors, increasing the likelihood of negative perceptions.

  16. [The general practitioner and insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, L; Bruwier, G; De Bock, I; Poirrier, R

    2006-01-01

    A complaint of insomnia has to be analysed, and differentiated from hypochondria and, overall, from hypersomnia. Once confirmed and assessed as acute or chronic, it is often considered a disorder of hyperarousal, that is an imbalance between a central nervous system activating and a central nervous system inhibiting system with subcontinuous overflow from the former. An acute insomnia is less than one month of duration. As a disease, insomnia has to be categorized as a secondary or a primary disorder. Thereafter, it remains to assess the extent of social, psychological and economical interactions. These factors intervene as consequences or perpetuating factors. The capacity to assess the whole situation is really the great strength of the general practitioner who, more than anybody else, is on home ground. Laboratory findings and specialist examination come only as supporting evidence for causal links. A polysomnography realized in a sleep disorder center provides data reinforcing or correcting the diagnosis. From a sound assessment of the disease, the treatment has to be deduced by following a rigorous reasoning, devoid of guilty feelings as they are suggested to patients by mass-media talking, as well as freed from fashionable non medical practices. Today, we know that chronic insomnia is a disease with potential severe consequences and that it does not heal spontaneously.

  17. Group cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: Effects on sleep and depressive symptomatology in a sample with comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell-Clarke, Annika; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Tillfors, Maria; Holländare, Fredrik; Engström, Ingemar

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the effects of group CBT for insomnia (CBT-I) on insomnia and depressive symptomatology in a comorbid sample through a randomised controlled trial with a 6 month follow-up. 64 participants were recruited through advertisements and randomised to receive CBT-I or an active control (relaxation training: RT) during four group sessions. Insomnia Severity Index and BDI-II were the primary outcome measures, assessed pre-treatment, post-treatment and at 6 month follow-up. Insomnia and depressive diagnoses, and functional impairment were assessed before and after treatment, whereas sleep diary data was gathered continuously from one week before treatment until after treatment. CBT-I was more efficient than RT in reducing insomnia severity and equally effective in reducing depressive symptoms, although CBT-I was associated with a higher proportion of remitted persons than RT, regarding both insomnia and depression diagnoses. Also, CBT-I was associated with less functional impairment, shorter sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset but both treatments had equal improvements of sleep quality, early morning awakenings and total sleep time. Group CBT-I is an efficient form of insomnia-treatment for people with insomnia comorbid with depressive symptomatology. The mixed results regarding depression outcomes warrants replication and further studies into treatment mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The exploratory power of sleep effort, dysfunctional beliefs and arousal for insomnia severity and polysomnography-determined sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertenstein, Elisabeth; Nissen, Christoph; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd; Baglioni, Chiara; Spiegelhalder, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Differences between subjective sleep perception and sleep determined by polysomnography (PSG) are prevalent, particularly in patients with primary insomnia, indicating that the two measures are partially independent. To identify individualized treatment strategies, it is important to understand the potentially different mechanisms influencing subjective and PSG-determined sleep. The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent three major components of insomnia models, i.e., sleep effort, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and presleep arousal, are associated with subjective insomnia severity and PSG-determined sleep. A sample of 47 patients with primary insomnia according to DSM-IV criteria and 52 good sleeper controls underwent 2 nights of PSG and completed the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale, the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale, the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale and the Insomnia Severity Index. Regression analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of the three predictors on subjective insomnia severity and PSG- determined total sleep time. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, depressive symptoms and group status. The results showed that subjective insomnia severity was associated positively with sleep effort. PSG-determined total sleep time was associated negatively with somatic presleep arousal and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep. This pattern of results provides testable hypotheses for prospective studies on the impact of distinct cognitive and somatic variables on subjective insomnia severity and PSG-determined total sleep time.

  19. Clinical Observation on Intractable Insomnia Treated by Point Pressure in 42 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆萍

    2002-01-01

    @@ The author have in recent years treated 42 cases of intractable insomnia (with a history of over 2 years) by point pressure, yielding quite satisfactory results when compared with those treated with clonazepam. This is reported as follows.

  20. Recommended patient-reported core set of symptoms and quality-of-life domains to measure in ovarian cancer treatment trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Kristine A; Donovan, Heidi S; Cella, David; Gaines, Martha E; Penson, Richard T; Plaxe, Steven C; von Gruenigen, Vivian E; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Reeve, Bryce B; Wenzel, Lari

    2014-07-01

    There is no consensus as to what symptoms or quality-of-life (QOL) domains should be measured as patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in ovarian cancer clinical trials. A panel of experts convened by the National Cancer Institute reviewed studies published between January 2000 and August 2011. The results were included in and combined with an expert consensus-building process to identify the most salient PROs for ovarian cancer clinical trials. We identified a set of PROs specific to ovarian cancer: abdominal pain, bloating, cramping, fear of recurrence/disease progression, indigestion, sexual dysfunction, vomiting, weight gain, and weight loss. Additional PROs identified in parallel with a group charged with identifying the most important PROs across cancer types were anorexia, cognitive problems, constipation, diarrhea, dyspnea, fatigue, nausea, neuropathy, pain, and insomnia. Physical and emotional domains were considered to be the most salient domains of QOL. Findings of the review and consensus process provide good support for use of these ovarian cancer-specific PROs in ovarian cancer clinical trials.

  1. Self-reported Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Older Chinese Adults in Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lydia W; Dong, XinQi

    2017-07-01

    Discrimination is part of life for many Americans, especially ethnic minorities. Focusing on older Chinese Americans, this study examines the association between self-reported discrimination and depressive symptoms and identifies subgroups that are more likely to report experiencing discrimination. We conducted cross-sectional analysis of data collected from adults (age 60+ years) of Chinese origin residing in the Greater Chicago area (N = 3,004). Self-reported discrimination was assessed by the Experiences of Discrimination instrument and was dichotomized (yes vs no). Depressive symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Logistic regression of self-reported discrimination and negative binominal regression of depressive symptoms were conducted. About 21.5% of the sample reported having experienced discrimination. The odds of reporting discrimination are higher for those who are younger, have higher education and income, are more acculturated, have been in the United States longer, live outside Chinatown, and have higher levels of neuroticism and conscientiousness. Self-reported discrimination is significantly and positively associated with depressive symptoms, independent of sociodemographic characteristics, migration-related variables, and personality factors. Findings suggest a robust relationship between self-reported discrimination and depressive symptoms in older Chinese Americans. They further suggest that the relatively advantaged groups-younger, higher socioeconomic status, more acculturated, and living outside Chinatown-are more likely to report experiencing discrimination.

  2. Are dysfunctional attitudes and beliefs about sleep unique to primary insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crönlein, Tatjana; Wagner, Stefanie; Langguth, Berthold; Geisler, Peter; Eichhammer, Peter; Wetter, Thomas C

    2014-12-01

    Dysfunctional thinking about sleep is a central aspect in the perpetuation of primary insomnia and a target symptom of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Insomnia symptoms also occur in other sleep disorders, but it is not known to what extent it is related to dysfunctional thinking about sleep. The Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep Scale (DBAS) was administered to inpatients at a sleep center. The following groups were included: 34 patients with primary insomnia (PI), 30 patients with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), 31 patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS), 26 patients with SAS comorbid with RLS (SAS + RLS), and 24 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia or narcolepsy. Eighty-four healthy subjects served as a control group. The DBAS scores were compared across the different sleep disorders and correlated with polysomnographic (PSG) variables, subjective sleep parameters, scores of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS; measuring psychological symptoms of insomnia). Compared to healthy controls, DBAS scores were increased in PI, RLS and RLS + SAS. There was a low correlation between DBAS scores and PSG variables, moderate correlations between DBAS and subjective sleep parameters and BDI scores (r = 0.528), and a high correlation between DBAS and the RIS score (r = 0.603). The observation of increased DBAS scores in other sleep disorders besides primary insomnia underscores the usefulness of a broadened diagnostic procedure and suggests that CBT-I modules may be a complementary treatment tool for these disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Influences of mood on information processing styles in high and low symptom reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Constantinou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Negative mood, which has been strongly linked to the presence of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS, is also suggested to modulate the way information is processed (analytic vs. schematic processing style. The present study investigated whether negative mood influences the information processing style differentially in people reporting frequent MUS in daily life. Participants and procedure Forty female participants (22 low, 18 high habitual symptom reporters completed a semantic priming task, as an index of schematic processing, after positive and after negative mood induction in a counterbalanced order. The priming task consisted of neutral or unpleasant body-related and body-unrelated words to assess the specificity of processing style shifts. Results The analyses indicated a non-significant tendency for negative mood to increase priming effects compared to positive mood for the high habitual symptom reporters, while the opposite pattern was found for the low symptom reporters. This differential effect of mood was only seen for neutral body-related words. Conclusions The current findings suggest that negative mood can trigger schematic processes assumed to be crucial for the emergence of MUS, which may explain the profound link between unpleasantness and elevated symptom reporting in high symptom reporters.

  4. Prepontine Schwannoma Presenting With Atypical Facial Symptoms - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Kumar Bali

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Face is an important landmark and any pathological condition affecting it has tremendous bearing on psychological make up of the patient. This report describes a rare case of a young female who presented with Hemifacial dysaesthesia complicated by ipsilateral masticatory complex dyskinesia.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS AND COMORBID SYMPTOMS OF OLDER ADULTS REPORTING DEATH IDEATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Kimberly A.; Simning, Adam; Conwell, Yeates; Marlow, Tom; Skoog, Ingmar; Waern, Margda

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether death ideation in late life is associated with markers of elevated risk for suicide, or reflects normal psychological processes in later life. Design/Setting Population based cross sectional study in Gothenburg, Sweden. Participants The sample consists of 345 men and women aged 85 (born 1901-02) and living in Gothenburg, Sweden. Main Outcome Measures The Paykel Scale measured the most severe level of suicidality over an individual’s lifetime. Other key measures were severity of depression and anxiety and frequency of death/suicidal ideation over the previous month. Results Latent class analysis revealed distinct groups of older adults who reported recent death ideation. Recent death ideation did not occur apart from other risk factors for suicide; instead individuals reporting recent death ideation also reported either 1) recent high levels of depression and anxiety, or 2) more distant histories of serious suicidal ideation (indicative of worst point severity of suicidal ideation)—both of which elevate risk for eventual suicide. Conclusions Our results indicate a heterogeneous presentation of older adults who report death ideation, with some presenting with acute distress and suicidal thoughts, and others presenting with low distress but histories of serious suicidal ideation. The presence of death ideation is associated with markers of increased risk for suicide, including “worst point” active suicidal ideation. PMID:23567393

  6. Mobile Devices and Insomnia: Understanding Risks and Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed N; Nock, Rebecca; Gooneratne, Nalaka S

    2015-12-01

    Mobile devices (smartphones and tablet computers) have become widely prevalent due to rapid improvements in function and decreasing costs. As of 2014, 90 % of US adults have a mobile phone, with 58 % having a smartphone, 32 % owning some type of e-reader, and 42 % of US adults owning a tablet computer. Mobile devices are particularly well-suited for the study of common conditions such as sleep difficulties because of their ubiquity. Around 35 to 49 % of the US adult population have problems falling asleep or have daytime sleepiness. These sleep disorders are often under-recognized because of patient-physician communication difficulties, low rates of medical awareness resulting in underreporting of insomnia symptoms, and limited primary care physician (PCP) training in insomnia recognition. Mobile devices have the potential to bridge some of these gaps, but they can also lead to sleep difficulties when used inappropriately.

  7. Employment type, workplace interpersonal conflict, and insomnia: a cross-sectional study of 37,646 employees in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Nakata, Aknori; Ikeda, Tomoko; Otsuka, Yasumasa; Kawahito, Junko

    2014-01-01

    This study explored whether workplace interpersonal conflict (WIC) is associated with insomnia, and whether the relationship between WIC and insomnia differs across different employment groups. A total of 37,646 Japanese full-time employees participated in a cross-sectional survey. Employment types included permanent employment and 2 forms of temporary employment: direct-hire and temporary work agent (TWA). Insomnia symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and early morning awakening were measured. Insomnia was defined as having experienced 1 or more of these symptoms on ≥3 nights per week over the past 12 months. Results showed that WIC was significantly associated with an increased risk of insomnia (odds ratio OR = 1.63; 95% confidence interval CI = 1.55-1.71), controlling for confounders. However, the relationship between WIC and the risk of insomnia was significantly stronger for TWAs than for permanent employees (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.13-3.45). A frequent exposure to WIC may increase the risk of insomnia, particularly for TWAs.

  8. A Population-Based Study on Nighttime Road Traffic Noise and Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evandt, Jorunn; Oftedal, Bente; Hjertager Krog, Norun; Nafstad, Per; Schwarze, Per E; Marit Aasvang, Gunn

    2017-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate how nighttime road traffic noise relates to self-reported symptoms of insomnia and sleep medication use. We used questionnaire data from the population-based study Health and Environment in Oslo (HELMILO) (2009-2010; n = 13019). The insomnia symptoms difficulties falling asleep, awakenings during the night, and waking up too early in the morning as well as self-reported sleep medication use were included as outcomes. Modeled noise levels (Lnight) were assigned to each participant's home address. For selecting covariates to the statistical model, we used a directed acyclic graph. The associations between noise and sleep were analyzed using logistic regression models. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found an odds ratio (OR) of 1.05 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.09) for the association between traffic noise and difficulties falling asleep, in the total study population. For the association between traffic noise and awakenings during the night, the OR was 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00-1.08) and for waking up too early, the OR was 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11). The effect estimates are given per 5-dB increase in traffic noise level (Lnight). Self-reported sleep medication use was not statistically significantly associated with traffic noise exposure. In an adult population from Oslo, traffic noise was associated with difficulties falling asleep and waking up too early. These findings indicate that sleep quantity may be compromised for individuals living in areas highly exposed to nighttime traffic noise.

  9. Chronic insomnia cases detection with the help of Athens Insomnia Scale and SF-36 health survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Skalski, M.; Fornal-Pawlowska, Malgorzata

    2011-10-01

    Standardization of the diagnostic process of insomnia is a highly important task in clinical practice, epidemiological considerations and treatment outcomes assessment. In this paper we describe standard surveys relationships within cluster groups with the same insomnia degrees.

  10. NEEDLING BODY ACUPOINTS COMBINED WITH OTOPOINT-PELLET PRESSING THERAPY FOR TREATMENT OF 43 CASES OF INSOMNIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英; 郭喜军

    2001-01-01

    Insomnia is characterized by difficulty in falling asleep, being liable to wake up during sleep, and even being unable to sleep during whole night. The author of the present paper employed body aeupoints combined with otopoint-pellet pressing to treat insomnia and achieved satisfactory results. Here is the report.

  11. The GoodNight study--online CBT for insomnia for the indicated prevention of depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, John A; Glozier, Nick; Griffiths, Kathleen; Ritterband, Lee; Thorndike, Frances; Mackinnon, Andrew; Hehir, Kanupriya Kalia; Bennett, Anthony; Bennett, Kylie; Christensen, Helen

    2014-02-13

    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) delivered through the Internet is effective as a treatment in reducing insomnia in individuals seeking help for insomnia. CBT-I also lowers levels of depression in this group. However, it is not known if targeting insomnia using CBT-I will lower depressive symptoms, and thus reduce the risk of major depressive episode onset, in those specifically at risk for depression. Therefore, this study aims to examine whether Internet delivery of fully automated self-help CBT-I designed to reduce insomnia will prevent depression. A sample of 1,600 community-dwelling adults (aged 18-64), who screen positive for both subclinical levels of depressive symptoms and insomnia, will be recruited via various media and randomised to either a 9-week online insomnia treatment programme, Sleep Healthy Using The internet (SHUTi), or an online attention-matched control group (HealthWatch). The primary outcome variable will be depression symptom levels at the 6-month post-intervention on the Patient Heath Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). A secondary outcome will be onset of major depressive episodes assessed at the 6-month post-intervention using 'current' and 'time from intervention' criteria from the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. This trial is the first randomised controlled trial of an Internet-based insomnia intervention as an indicated preventative programme for depression. If effective, online provision of a depression prevention programme will facilitate dissemination. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), Registration number: ACTRN12611000121965.

  12. Behavioral approach system activity and self-reported somatic symptoms in fibromyalgia: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-García, Juan A; Robles Jurado, Manuel J

    2014-01-01

    The first objective was to investigate the behavioural activity in the systems of Gray's theory; these are the Behavioural Inhibition System (BIS) and Behavioural Approach System (BAS), in fibromyalgia (FM) patients. The second aim was to assess in FM patients whether there is an association between BIS or BAS with self-reported somatic symptoms. Twenty FM patients and 20 healthy controls completed questionnaire measures of BIS and BAS activity (Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire), self-reported somatic symptoms (Somatic Symptoms Scale Revised), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule) and health status (EuroQoL Visual Analogue Scale). The results showed that FM patients had lower Sensitivity to Reward (SR) scores than controls. The SR score correlated with different somatic symptoms groups. The partial correlation (controlling for other variables measured) showed that the SR score correlated specifically with musculoskeletal symptoms. Furthermore, in regression analysis, SR score significantly predicted musculoskeletal symptoms, after controlling for other variables measured in this study. Our findings suggest that FM patients show BAS hypoactivity. This BAS activity in FM is similar to patients with depression, where a lower BAS functioning has also been found. The BAS activity predicts the musculoskeletal self-reported symptoms in FM better than other measures included in this study. Although this is a preliminary study, it suggests the importance of BAS activity in FM.

  13. 'Rules' for boys, 'guidelines' for girls: Gender differences in symptom reporting during childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Alice; Sweeting, Helen; Hunt, Kate

    2010-02-01

    The emergence of higher reported morbidity in females compared with males is a feature of adolescent health in a large proportion of the world's industrialised countries. In this paper, qualitative data from twenty-five single-sex focus groups (90 participants in total) conducted with 10-, 13-, and 15-year olds in two Scottish schools is used to explore whether symptom reporting is influenced by perceived societal gender- and age-related expectations and the social context of symptom experiences. The degree to which these factors can help explain quantitative evidence of increases in gender differences in symptom reporting during adolescence is also examined. Accounts suggested gender-related expectations act as strict 'rules' for boys and less prohibitive 'guidelines' for girls. An unexpected finding was the extent of similarity between these 'rules' and 'guidelines'. Both boys and girls presented themselves as pressured to react to symptoms in stoic, controlled and independent ways, particularly when in the company of their peers, and both perceived that boys and girls could incur negative consequences if seen to have physical (e.g. stomach ache) or, especially, psychological symptoms (e.g. feeling like crying). These qualitative findings do not suggest that girls are simply more willing than boys to report their symptoms as they get older, which is one potential explanation for the quantitative evidence of increasing gender differences in symptom reporting in adolescence. Rather, the findings suggest a need to highlight both the potentially damaging effects of gender stereotypes which make boys reluctant to seek help for physical and, particularly, psychological symptoms, and the misconception that girls are not similarly reluctant to report illness.

  14. Ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Akira; Honda, Michitaka; Hayashino, Yasuaki

    2014-04-01

    Ramelteon is the first selective melatonin receptor agonist and currently is approved in the United States and Japan for the treatment of insomnia. Our meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia in adults. We included both published and unpublished data from randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of ramelteon in adults with insomnia in the analysis. Our primary outcomes were sleep quality, subjective sleep latency (sSL), and subjective total sleep time (sTST). Secondary outcomes included latency to persistent sleep (LPS), total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), proportion of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO), subjective WASO, number of nighttime awakenings (NAW), subjective NAW, and adverse events. Thirteen trials involving 5812 patients with insomnia or insomnia symptoms with a mean study duration of 38 days were pooled. Ramelteon was associated with reduced sSL (weighted mean difference [WMD], -4.30 min [95% confidence interval {CI}, -7.01 to -1.58]) and improved sleep quality (standardized mean differences, -0.074 [95% CI, -0.13 to -0.02]) but was not associated with increased sTST. Ramelteon also was associated with improvement in LPS, SE, and TST. The only significant adverse event was somnolence. Short-term use of ramelteon was associated with improvement in some sleep parameters in patients with insomnia, but its clinical impact is small. Long-term trials are needed before solid conclusions can be established.

  15. Cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia occurring within the context of medical and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael T; Huang, Mary I; Manber, Rachel

    2005-07-01

    Insomnia is a pervasive problem for many patients suffering from medical and psychiatric conditions. Even when the comorbid disorders are successfully treated, insomnia often fails to remit. In addition to compromising quality of life, untreated insomnia may also aggravate and complicate recovery from the comorbid disease. Cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has an established efficacy for primary insomnia, but less is known about its efficacy for insomnia occurring in the context of medical and psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this article is to present a rationale for using CBT-I in medical and psychiatric disorders, review the extant outcome literature, highlight considerations for adapting CBT-I procedures in specific populations, and suggest directions for future research. Outcome studies were identified for CBT-I in mixed medical and psychiatric conditions, cancer, chronic pain, HIV, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and alcoholism. Other disorders discussed include: bipolar disorder, eating disorders, generalized anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The available data demonstrate moderate to large treatment effects (Cohen's d, range=0.35-2.2) and indicate that CBT-I is a promising treatment for individuals with medical and psychiatric comorbidity. Although the literature reviewed here is limited by a paucity of randomized, controlled studies, the available data suggest that by improving sleep, CBT-I might also indirectly improve medical and psychological endpoints. This review underscores the need for future research to test the efficacy of adaptations of CBT-I to disease specific conditions and symptoms.

  16. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  17. "Stomach Insomnia"on the pathogenesis of insomnia%“胃不和则卧不安”的失眠病机浅论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭丽进; 李海元

    2014-01-01

    大量文献对“胃不和则卧不安”进行了诸多的论述,文章就其在失眠病症的一些病机予浅论,希望能为临床中的失眠病症诊疗有一定的指导作用。%Extensive literature on "Stomach Insomnia" had a lot of discussion, this paper discusses the pathogenesis of some sleep disorders, hoping for the clinical treatment of insomnia symptoms have some guidance.

  18. Advances in the management of chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay-Stacey, Margaret; Attarian, Hrayr

    2016-07-06

    Chronic insomnia is a common condition that affects people worldwide and has negative effects on patients' health and wellbeing. The treatment of insomnia can be complex and time consuming for patients and providers. Although behavioral interventions are the first line therapy, there are barriers to access for these treatments. However, in recent years, alternative ways of providing these behavioral therapies that make them more widely available have been investigated. Drugs also play an important role in the treatment of insomnia and new drugs have been introduced as options for treating patients with sleep initiation and sleep maintenance insomnia. In this review, we will discuss advances in the past six years in both non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic treatments for patients with chronic insomnia. We will also review the controversies surrounding some of the current drug treatments, as well as the role that technology and personal activity monitoring devices may play in treating insomnia.

  19. Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with neurocognitive symptoms: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuadra-Urteaga Jose

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a neurological disorder of unknown cause associated with thyroid autoimmunity. The disease occurs primarily in the fifth decade of life and may present in two types - a sudden vasculitic type or a progressive subacute type associated to cognitive dysfunction, confusion and memory loss. Case presentation We report the case of a 62-year-old Hispanic woman, previously healthy, who developed a subacute onset of declining upper brain function. Serologic studies demonstrated high levels of antithyroid antibodies. Electroencephalographic and magnetic resonance image findings were consistent with Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Conclusion Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a diagnosis of exclusion. This unusual disorder is often under-recognized because of the multiple and protracted neurocognitive manifestations; therefore, it is important to be aware of the clinical manifestations to make a correct diagnosis.

  20. Insomnia in special populations: effects of aging, menopause, chronic pain, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Soares, Cláudio N; Gaeta, Raymond; Benca, Ruth M

    2004-12-01

    Chronic insomnia is highly common in adults, and certain population groups are particularly prone to sleep disturbances, including the elderly, women in menopausal transition, persons with chronic pain, and those with depression. Diagnosis and treatment of insomnia in such patients may be problematic because of (1) the presence of one or more comorbid medical illnesses, as in the elderly or patients with a chronic pain syndrome, (2) the presence of depressive symptoms, or (3) the patient's underlying physiologic status (eg, hormone fluctuations due to perimenopause). Effective management of sleep disturbances in these special populations requires an integrative approach to evaluation in the context of the underlying condition and to concurrent treatment of the sleep disturbance and any coexisting medical condition or associated symptom. The contributors to this article discuss insomnia as it is experienced by each of these populations and present representative case examples and proposed treatment plans for each.

  1. Nonpharmacologic therapy for insomnia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Seema

    2008-02-01

    Nonpharmacologic modalities may be used alone or in combination with pharmacologic therapy for effective treatment of insomnia in the elderly. Nondrug treatments involve behavioral, cognitive, and physiologic interventions. Common methods of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia include: relaxation, stimulus control, sleep restriction, cognitive interventions or therapy, sleep education and sleep hygiene, light therapy, and chronotherapy. Evidence suggests that nonpharmacologic treatments are effective and well suited for the clinical management of insomnia in the elderly.

  2. Management of insomnia: update and new approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Riemann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Thomas Unbehaun, Kai Spiegelhalder, Verena Hirscher, Dieter RiemannDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg Medical Center, Freiburg, GermanyAbstract: Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide. A number of studies evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches. To obtain long-term effects in the management of chronic insomnia, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the treatment of first choice, encom...

  3. Management of insomnia: update and new approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Unbehaun, Thomas; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hirscher, Verena; Riemann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide. A number of studies evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches. To obtain long-term effects in the management of chronic insomnia, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the treatment of first choice, encompassing education about sleep and sleep hygiene, sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation techniques, and cognitive strategies to combat nocturnal ruminations. Short-term...

  4. The role of vulnerability in stress‐related insomnia, social support and coping styles on incidence and persistence of insomnia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jarrin, Denise C; Chen, Ivy Y; Ivers, Hans; Morin, Charles M

    2014-01-01

    ...‐related insomnia) and insomnia, limited data exist on its predictive value. The aim of the study was to evaluate prospectively whether sleep reactivity was associated with increased risk of incident and persistent insomnia in a population...

  5. Profile of suvorexant in the management of insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Eliza L Sutton Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Suvorexant, approved in late 2014 in the United States and Japan for the treatment of insomnia characterized by difficulty achieving and/or maintaining sleep, is a dual orexin receptor antagonist and the first drug in its class to reach the market. Its development followed from the 1998 discovery of orexins (also called hypocretins, excitatory neuropeptides originating from neurons in the hypothalamus involved in regulation of sleep and wake, feeding behavior and energy regulation, motor activity, and reward-seeking behavior. Suvorexant objectively improves sleep, shortening the time to achieve persistent sleep and reducing wake after sleep onset, although at approved doses (≤20 mg the benefit was subjectively assessed as modest. Its half-life of 12 hours is relatively long for a modern hypnotic; however, at approved doses (≤20 mg next-day sedation and driving impairment were much less apparent than at higher doses. Suvorexant is metabolized by the hepatic CYP3A system and should be avoided in combination with strong CYP3A inhibitors. Drug levels are higher in women and obese people; hence, dosing should be conservative in obese women. Administration with food delays drug absorption and is not advised. No dose adjustment is needed for advanced age, renal impairment, or mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment. Suvorexant in contraindicated in narcolepsy and has not been studied in children. In alignment with the changes begun in 2013 in the labeling of other hypnotics, the United States Food and Drug Administration advises that the lowest dose effective to treat symptoms be used and that patients be advised of the possibility of next-day impairment in function, including driving. Infrequent but notable side effects included abnormal dreams, sleep paralysis, and suicidal ideation that were dose-related and reported to be mild. Given its mechanism of

  6. The accuracy of patient-reported measures for GI symptoms: a comparison of real time and retrospective reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, J M; Jaccard, J; Keefer, L; Firth, R; Carosella, A M; Sitrin, M; Brenner, D

    2014-12-01

    Obtaining accurate information about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms is critical to achieving the goals of clinical research and practice. The accuracy of patient data is especially important for functional GI disorders (e.g., IBS) whose symptoms lack a biomarker and index illness severity and treatment response. Retrospective patient-reported data are vulnerable to forgetting and various cognitive biases whose impact has not been systematically studied in patients with GI disorders. The aim of this study was to document the accuracy of patient-reported GI symptoms over a reporting period (1 week) most representative of the time frame used in research and clinical care. Subjects were 273 Rome III-diagnosed IBS patients (mean age = 39 years, 89% F) who completed end of day GI symptom ratings for 7 days using an electronic diary. On Day 8, Subjects recalled the frequency and/or intensity of IBS symptoms over the past 7 days. Reports were then compared against a validation criterion based on aggregated end of day ratings. At the group level, subjects recalled most accurately abdominal pain and urgency intensity at their worst, urgency days, and stool frequency. When data were analyzed at the individual level, a subgroup of subjects had difficulty recalling accurately symptoms that showed convergence between recall and real time reports at the group level. Although many patients' recollection for specific GI symptoms (e.g., worst pain, stool frequency) is reasonably accurate, a non-trivial number of other symptoms (e.g., typical pain) are vulnerable to distortion from recall biases that can reduce sensitivity of detecting treatment effects in clinical and research settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Self-perceptions in relation to self-reported depressive symptoms in boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Samirah; Manassis, Katharina; Wilansky-Traynor, Pamela

    2011-08-01

    Low self-esteem is associated with depressive symptoms in children. However, the association between domains of self-esteem (e.g., self perceptions) and depressive symptoms may vary by gender. This study evaluated self-perceptions in relation to self-reported depressive symptoms in boys and girls. School children in grades 3 to 6 (n = 140; 54% boys; 46% girls) completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) and The Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC) as part of a school-based intervention targeting anxious and depressive symptoms. The CDI was re-administered about 1 month later. Pearson correlations between the subscales of the SPPC and the average CDI T-scores were determined. Significant correlations were entered in stepwise regressions to predict depressive symptoms for the whole sample and then separately for boys and girls. Self-perceived scholastic competence, physical appearance, and behavioral conduct accounted for 19.8% of the variance in self-reported depressive symptoms overall. Behavioral conduct was a more salient predictor in boys (adjusted R(2) =0.146) whereas scholastic competence and physical appearance were more salient in girls (adjusted R(2) =0.203). Although replication is needed, boys and girls appear to have different self-perceptions in relation to depressive symptoms. Understanding these differences may help to inform clinical interventions.

  8. Sleep patterns and insomnia among adolescents: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysing, Mari; Pallesen, Ståle; Stormark, Kjell M; Lundervold, Astri J; Sivertsen, Børge

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine sleep patterns and rates of insomnia in a population-based study of adolescents aged 16-19 years. Gender differences in sleep patterns and insomnia, as well as a comparison of insomnia rates according to DSM-IV, DSM-V and quantitative criteria for insomnia (Behav. Res. Ther., 41, 2003, 427), were explored. We used a large population-based study in Hordaland county in Norway, conducted in 2012. The sample included 10,220 adolescents aged 16-18 years (54% girls). Self-reported sleep measurements included bedtime, rise time, time in bed, sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, rate and frequency and duration of difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and rate and frequency of tiredness and sleepiness. The adolescents reported short sleep duration on weekdays (mean 6:25 hours), resulting in a sleep deficiency of about 2 h. A majority of the adolescents (65%) reported sleep onset latency exceeding 30 min. Girls reported longer sleep onset latency and a higher rate of insomnia than boys, while boys reported later bedtimes and a larger weekday-weekend discrepancy on several sleep parameters. Insomnia prevalence rates ranged from a total prevalence of 23.8 (DSM-IV criteria), 18.5 (DSM-V criteria) and 13.6% (quantitative criteria for insomnia). We conclude that short sleep duration, long sleep onset latency and insomnia were prevalent in adolescents. This warrants attention as a public health concern in this age group.

  9. Symptom Monitoring With Patient-Reported Outcomes During Routine Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Deal, Allison M; Kris, Mark G; Scher, Howard I; Hudis, Clifford A; Sabbatini, Paul; Rogak, Lauren; Bennett, Antonia V; Dueck, Amylou C; Atkinson, Thomas M; Chou, Joanne F; Dulko, Dorothy; Sit, Laura; Barz, Allison; Novotny, Paul; Fruscione, Michael; Sloan, Jeff A; Schrag, Deborah

    2016-02-20

    There is growing interest to enhance symptom monitoring during routine cancer care using patient-reported outcomes, but evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is limited. We randomly assigned patients receiving routine outpatient chemotherapy for advanced solid tumors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to report 12 common symptoms via tablet computers or to receive usual care consisting of symptom monitoring at the discretion of clinicians. Those with home computers received weekly e-mail prompts to report between visits. Treating physicians received symptom printouts at visits, and nurses received e-mail alerts when participants reported severe or worsening symptoms. The primary outcome was change in health-related quality of life (HRQL) at 6 months compared with baseline, measured by the EuroQol EQ-5D Index. Secondary endpoints included emergency room (ER) visits, hospitalizations, and survival. Among 766 patients allocated, HRQL improved among more participants in the intervention group than usual care (34% v 18%) and worsened among fewer (38% v 53%; P < .001). Overall, mean HRQL declined by less in the intervention group than usual care (1.4- v 7.1-point drop; P < .001). Patients receiving intervention were less frequently admitted to the ER (34% v 41%; P = .02) or hospitalized (45% v 49%; P = .08) and remained on chemotherapy longer (mean, 8.2 v 6.3 months; P = .002). Although 75% of the intervention group was alive at 1 year, 69% with usual care survived the year (P = .05), with differences also seen in quality-adjusted survival (mean of 8.7 v. 8.0 months; P = .004). Benefits were greater for participants lacking prior computer experience. Most patients receiving intervention (63%) reported severe symptoms during the study. Nurses frequently initiated clinical actions in response to e-mail alerts. Clinical benefits were associated with symptom self-reporting during cancer care. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. [Relationship between self-reported ADHD symptoms and WAIS-IV performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiling, J; Petermann, F; Daseking, M

    2013-11-01

    This study has examined the relationship between cognitive functions and self-reported symptoms in ADHD adults. Cognitive functions were investigated with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV) in N=113 ADHD adults. The severity of self-reported symptoms was based on a screening questionnaire (ADHS-E). Results indicated only weak correlations between self-reported ADHD symptoms and WAIS-IV performance. The ADHS-E scale "Emotion & Affect" accounted for a small but significant variance on most WAIS-IV indices and turned out to be the most important variable to explain performance. The findings suggest that concurrent and discrepant information contribute to a differentiated examination on adult ADHD and that both objective performance diagnostics and self-reports complement each other within the diagnostic process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for comorbid insomnia and osteoarthritis pain in primary care: the lifestyles randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Michael V; McCurry, Susan M; Shortreed, Susan M; Balderson, Benjamin H; Baker, Laura D; Keefe, Francis J; Rybarczyk, Bruce D; Von Korff, Michael

    2013-06-01

    To assess whether older persons with osteoarthritis (OA) pain and insomnia receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for pain and insomnia (CBT-PI), a cognitive-behavioral pain coping skills intervention (CBT-P), and an education-only control (EOC) differed in sleep and pain outcomes. Double-blind, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 9-month follow-up. Group Health and University of Washington, 2009 to 2011. Three hundred sixty-seven older adults with OA pain and insomnia. Six weekly group sessions of CBT-PI, CBT-P, or EOC delivered in participants' primary care clinics. Primary outcomes were insomnia severity and pain severity. Secondary outcomes were actigraphically measured sleep efficiency and arthritis symptoms. CBT-PI reduced insomnia severity (score range 0-28) more than EOC (adjusted mean difference = -1.89, 95% confidence interval = -2.83 to -0.96; P CBT-P (adjusted mean difference = -2.03, 95% CI = -3.01 to -1.04; P sleep efficiency (score range 0-100) more than EOC (adjusted mean difference = 2.64, 95% CI = 0.44-4.84; P = .02). CBT-P did not improve insomnia severity more than EOC, but improved sleep efficiency (adjusted mean difference = 2.91, 95% CI = 0.85-4.97; P = .006). Pain severity and arthritis symptoms did not differ between the three arms. A planned analysis in participants with severe baseline pain revealed similar results. Over 9 months, CBT of insomnia was effective for older adults with OA pain and insomnia. The addition of CBT for insomnia to CBT for pain alone improved outcomes. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Clinical diagnoses in 216 insomnia patients using the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), DSM-IV and ICD-10 categories: a report from the APA/NIMH DSM-IV Field Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buysse, D J; Reynolds, C F; Kupfer, D J; Thorpy, M J; Bixler, E; Manfredi, R; Kales, A; Vgontzas, A; Stepanski, E; Roth, T

    1994-10-01

    Three diagnostic classifications for sleep disorders have been developed recently: the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD), the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th edition (DSM-IV), and the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10). No data have yet been published regarding the frequency of specific diagnoses within these systems or how the diagnostic systems relate to each other. To address these issues, we examined clinical sleep disorder diagnoses (without polysomnography) in 257 patients (216 insomnia patients and 41 medical/psychiatric patients) evaluated at five sleep centers. A sleep specialist interviewed each patient and assigned clinical diagnoses using ICSD, DSM-IV and ICD-10 classifications. "Sleep disorder associated with mood disorder" was the most frequent ICSD primary diagnosis (32.3% of cases), followed by "Psychophysiological insomnia" (12.5% of cases). The most frequent DSM-IV primary diagnoses were "Insomnia related to another mental disorder" (44% of cases) and "Primary insomnia" (20.2% of cases), and the most frequent ICD-10 diagnoses were "Insomnia due to emotional causes" (61.9% of cases) and "Insomnia of organic origin" (8.9% of cases). When primary and secondary diagnoses were considered, insomnia related to psychiatric disorders was diagnosed in over 75% of patients. The more narrowly defined ICSD diagnoses nested logically within the broader DSM-IV and ICD-10 categories. We found substantial site-related differences in diagnostic patterns. These results confirm the importance of psychiatric and behavioral factors in clinicians' assessments of insomnia patients across all three diagnostic systems. ICSD and DSM-IV sleep disorder diagnoses have similar patterns of use by experienced clinicians.

  13. Postconcussive symptom report in polytrauma: influence of mild traumatic brain injury and psychiatric distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron-Perrine, Brigid; Hennrick, Heather; Spencer, Robert J; Pangilinan, Percival H; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have evaluated the influence of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) on neuropsychological test performance and on report of postconcussive symptoms. However, most studies that examine postconcussion syndrome (PCS) do not address the issue of "polytrauma," which is common in military mTBI. This study investigated simultaneously demographic, injury-related, and psychiatric symptom predictors of PCS report in a veteran, polytrauma sample. In prediction of overall report of PCS symptoms with demographic, traumatic brain injury, psychiatric and sleep variables, 60% of the variance was explained. Semipartial correlations revealed that post-traumatic stress disorder uniquely explained 7% of the variance, depression 2%, and sleep dissatisfaction 3%; injury and demographic characteristics accounted for no unique variance. In all 5 hierarchical multiple regressions (prediction of total Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory score and 4 individual factor scores), the total models were significant (p < 0.001). Accurate diagnosis and treatment necessitates an integrative analysis of PCS, psychiatric, behavioral, and health symptom report in addition to neuropsychological functioning in the polytrauma population. This study demonstrated that emotional distress was uniquely predictive of total report of PCS and that no injury-related characteristics were predictive. This is of particular relevance in a Veteran population given the high rates of both mTBI and psychiatric disturbance.

  14. Combining Mindfulness Meditation with Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Insomnia: A Treatment-Development Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Jason C.; Shapiro, Shauna L.; Manber, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    This treatment-development study is a Stage I evaluation of an intervention that combines mindfulness meditation with cognitive-behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Thirty adults who met research diagnostic criteria for Psychophysiological Insomnia (Edinger et al., 2004) participated in a 6-week, multi-component group intervention using mindfulness meditation, sleep restriction, stimulus control, sleep education, and sleep hygiene. Sleep diaries and self-reported pre-sleep arousal were asse...

  15. Effectiveness of abbreviated CBT for insomnia in psychiatric outpatients: sleep and depression outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, J Nile; Rybarczyk, Bruce; Nay, William T; Danish, Steven; Lund, Hannah G

    2013-10-01

    To test the efficacy of cogntive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) as a supplement treatment for psychiatric outpatients. Comorbid insomnia is prevalent among individuals with varied psychiatric disorders and evidence indicates that CBT-I may be effective for reducing insomnia and other psychiatric symptoms. The present study randomly assigned 30 psychiatric outpatients (mean duration of treatment = 3.6 years) with low sleep quality and residual depressive symptoms to two sessions of CBT-I or a treatment as usual control group. Assessment included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) for insomnia and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) for depression at pretreatment and 4 and 8 weeks posttreatment. Patients who received CBT-I demonstrated within group changes in PSQI and the PHQ-9 scores at both 4 and 8 weeks posttreatment, but did not show between-group differences. Additionally, 38% of the treatment participants achieved normal sleep at follow-up compared with none in the control condition. This study provides preliminary evidence that abbreviated behavioral treatment has beneficial effects on residual insomnia and depression in long-term psychiatric outpatients. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Group cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J; Leibowitz, J; Whittington, C; Espie, C A; Pilling, S

    2016-04-01

    Insomnia disorder is common and often co-morbid with mental health conditions. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia is effective, but is rarely implemented as a discrete treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of brief CBT groups for insomnia compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for insomnia delivered by mental health practitioners in a primary-care mental health service. A total of 239 participants were randomized to either a five-session CBT group or to TAU. Assessments of sleep and of symptoms of depression and anxiety were carried out at baseline, post-treatment and at 20 weeks. Primary outcome was sleep efficiency post-treatment. Group CBT participants had better sleep outcomes post-treatment than those receiving TAU [sleep efficiency standardized mean difference 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.92]. The effect at 20 weeks was smaller with a wide confidence interval (0.27, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.56). There were no important differences between groups at either follow-up period in symptoms of anxiety or depression. Dedicated CBT group treatment for insomnia improves sleep more than treating sleep as an adjunct to other mental health treatment.

  17. Effects of a tart cherry juice beverage on the sleep of older adults with insomnia: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Wilfred R; Carr, Michelle; Gorman, Colin; Perlis, Michael L

    2010-06-01

    This study ascertained whether a proprietary tart cherry juice blend (CherryPharm, Inc., Geneva, NY, USA) associated with anecdotal reports of sleep enhancement improves subjective reports of insomnia compared to a placebo beverage. The pilot study used a randomized, double-blind, crossover design where each participant received both treatment and placebo for 2 weeks with an intervening 2-week washout period. Sleep continuity (sleep onset, wake after sleep onset, total sleep time, and sleep efficiency) was assessed by 2-week mean values from daily sleep diaries and disease severity by the Insomnia Severity Index in a cohort of 15 older adults with chronic insomnia who were otherwise healthy. The tart cherry juice beverage was associated with statistically significant pre- to post-treatment improvements on all sleep variables. When compared to placebo, the study beverage produced significant reductions in insomnia severity (minutes awake after sleep onset); no such improvements were observed for sleep latency, total sleep time, or sleep efficiency compared to placebo. Effect sizes were moderate and in some cases negligible. The results of this pilot study suggest that CherryPharm, a tart cherry juice blend, has modest beneficial effects on sleep in older adults with insomnia with effect sizes equal to or exceeding those observed in studies of valerian and in some, but not all, studies of melatonin, the two most studied natural products for insomnia. These effects, however, were considerably less than those for evidence-based treatments of insomnia: hypnotic agents and cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia.

  18. Insomnia is a frequent finding in adults with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Wendt Lennart

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asperger syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder belonging to autism spectrum disorders with prevalence rate of 0,35% in school-age children. It has been most extensively studied in childhood while there is scarcity of reports concerning adulthood of AS subjects despite the lifelong nature of this syndrome. In children with Asperger syndrome the initiation and continuity of sleep is disturbed because of the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS. It is probable that sleep difficulties are present in adulthood as well. Our hypothesis was that adults with AS suffer from difficulty in initiating and maintaining sleep and nonrestorative sleep (insomnia. Methods 20 AS without medication were compared with 10 healthy controls devoid of neuropsychiatric anamnesis. Clinical examination, blood test battery and head MRI excluded confounding somatic illnesses. Structured psychiatric interview for axis-I and axis-II disorders were given to both groups as well as Beck Depression Inventory and Wechsler adult intelligence scale, revised version. Sleep quality was assessed with sleep questionnaire, sleep diary during 6 consecutive days and description of possible sleep problems by the participants own words was requested. Results compared with controls and with normative values of good sleep, AS adults had frequent insomnia. In sleep questionnaire 90% (18/20, in sleep diary 75% (15/20 and in free description 85% (17/20 displayed insomnia. There was a substantial psychiatric comorbidity with only 4 AS subject devoid of other axis-I or axis-II disorders besides AS. Also these persons displayed insomnia. It can be noted that the distribution of psychiatric diagnoses in AS subjects was virtually similar to that found among patient with chronic insomnia. Conclusions the neuropsychiatric deficits inherent of AS predispose both to insomnia and to anxiety and mood disorders. Therefore a careful assessment of sleep quality should be an

  19. Patient-reported symptoms of radiation dermatitis during breast cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Park, Won; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Im-Ryung; Kang, Danbee; Cho, Juhee

    2017-07-01

    To find out which symptoms most frequently and severely affect breast cancer patients during radiotherapy and how patients manage the symptoms and unmet needs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 111 patients who receive radiotherapy for breast cancer from January to April 2015 at Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, South Korea. Participants were asked about symptoms and discomfort due to radiotherapy, management methods for radiation dermatitis, unmet needs for radiation dermatitis care, and clinical and socio-demographic information. Of total, 108 out of 111 patients (97.3%) reported symptoms related to radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most commonly reported uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. On average, patients reported 8.6 radiotherapy-induced skin problems (range, 0-11). Of total, 59 (53.2%) patients stated that they wanted care for radiation dermatitis, and 80.0, 59.4, and 51% of patients searched for information, used products, and visited the hospital to manage radiotherapy-related skin problems. Patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation were 11.73, 7.02, 5.10, 4.27, and 2.80 times more likely to have management needs than patients without those symptoms, respectively, adjusting age, current cycle of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and type of surgery. Most of the breast cancer patients experience multiple symptoms associated with radiation dermatitis. Hyperpigmentation was the most common and uncomfortable symptom followed by erythema. Majority of patients wanted management for radiation dermatitis and patients who experienced dryness, burning feelings, irritation, roughness, and hyperpigmentation had higher needs for radiation dermatitis management.

  20. Depressive Symptoms in Mothers and Daughters: Attachment Style Moderates Reporter Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Stephanie; Wortel, Sanne; Ramirez, Jennifer; Oshin, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Parents and adolescents show only modest agreement when reporting on depressive symptoms. Drawing from attachment theory and previous research on informant discrepancies, we tested hypotheses about how adolescent attachment style may impact reporting agreement in a sample of 184 low-income mother-adolescent daughter dyads (adolescent mean age = 15.4 (SD = 1.05), maternal mean age = 41.4 (SD = 7.60); 58 % Latina, 26 % African-American/Black, 16 % as non-Hispanic, White). Mothers and adolescents reported on their own and each others' depressive symptoms and adolescents reported on attachment style. Using a moderated Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM) to calculate reporter bias and accuracy estimates, we tested whether attachment style moderated maternal and adolescent accuracy in theoretically consistent ways. Mothers and adolescents showed similar levels of accuracy and bias when reporting on each other. Consistent with hypotheses, we found that adolescents who reported high levels of preoccupation were less accurate when reporting on their mothers because they tended to observe symptoms that their mothers did not endorse. Conversely, mothers were the most accurate in these dyads, potentially because preoccupied adolescents tend to elevate displays of emotional distress. Reporting accuracy was not affected by a dismissive style. These results add to literature indicating that parent-child reporting discrepancies often reflect meaningful information about relationships, and highlight the need to consider different sources of reporting bias and accuracy in assessment and treatment.

  1. Patient-reported speech in noise difficulties and hyperacusis symptoms and correlation with test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyridakou, Chrysa; Luxon, Linda M; Bamiou, Doris E

    2012-07-01

    To compare self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and hyperacusis in adults with auditory processing disorders (APDs) and normal controls; and to compare self-reported symptoms to objective test results (speech in babble test, transient evoked otoacoustic emission [TEOAE] suppression test using contralateral noise). A prospective case-control pilot study. Twenty-two participants were recruited in the study: 10 patients with reported hearing difficulty, normal audiometry, and a clinical diagnosis of APD; and 12 normal age-matched controls with no reported hearing difficulty. All participants completed the validated Amsterdam Inventory for Auditory Disability questionnaire, a hyperacusis questionnaire, a speech in babble test, and a TEOAE suppression test using contralateral noise. Patients had significantly worse scores than controls in all domains of the Amsterdam Inventory questionnaire (with the exception of sound detection) and the hyperacusis questionnaire (P correction. Strong correlations were observed between self-reported symptoms of difficulty hearing speech in noise and speech in babble test results in the right ear (ρ = 0.624, P = .002), and between self-reported symptoms of hyperacusis and TEOAE suppression test results in the right ear (ρ = -0.597 P = .003). There was no significant correlation between the two tests. A strong correlation was observed between right ear speech in babble and patient-reported intelligibility of speech in noise, and right ear TEOAE suppression by contralateral noise and hyperacusis questionnaire. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. [association Between Insomnia And Rheumatoid Arthritis In Elderly]. [associação Entre Sintomas De Insônia E Artrite Reumatóide Em Idosos.

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas D.C.; Schlosser T.C.; dos Santos A.A.; Neri A.L.; Ceolim M.F.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess symptoms of insomnia in elderly residents in the community and its association with rheumatoid arthritis. Descriptive and cross-sectional study, part of a multicentre research project entitled Fragility in Brazilian elderly . A total number of 689 elderly (68.9% female, average age of 72.2 years) were interviewed using a questionnaire on sociodemographic data and clinical conditions. Two tools to identify symptoms of insomnia (the Nottingham Health profile) and to s...

  3. Self-reported concussion symptoms and training routines in mixed martial arts athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher J; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) is a full-contact, fighting sport that has risen in popularity over recent years, resulting in an increase in both training facilities and sport participants. To date, little research has examined the complications and vulnerability to head trauma, or concussive symptomatology, in MMA athletes. In this study, we assessed relationships between training routines and concussive symptoms, as well as medical care, in MMA athletes. A sample (N = 119) of MMA athletes reported concussive symptoms, training routines, and medical histories through an online survey. Nearly 15% of the MMA athletes reported history of a knockout, and nearly one-third reported a technical knockout. Subjective ratings of concussive symptoms were high for these athletes, with many of them waiting only a brief time after such incidents to return to competition. These findings have important implications for informing the medical treatment and safety decision for returning to participation for these athletes.

  4. Increased symptom reporting persists in 1990-1991 Gulf War veterans 20 years post deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwini, Stella M; Forbes, Andrew B; Kelsall, Helen L; Ikin, Jillian F; Sim, Malcolm R

    2015-12-01

    Following the 1990-1991 Gulf War, Gulf War veterans (veterans) reported health symptoms more commonly than non-deployed groups. This article examines symptom persistence, incidence and prevalence 20 years on. In 2000-2003 and 2011-2012, a 63-item symptom checklist was administered to 697 veterans and 659 comparison group. Symptomatology was compared using log-binomial regression. Both veterans and comparison group reported significantly increased prevalence (3-52%) over time in more than half the symptoms, with a similar overall rate of increase. Half the symptoms had higher incidence (risk-ratios ranged 1.43-1.50) and a quarter were more persistent (risk-ratios ranged 1.12-1.20) in veterans than the comparison group. Symptomatology increased in both groups over time, but persisted to a similar extent and had higher incidence among veterans than the comparison group. The gap in symptom prevalence between the two groups remained unchanged. These findings suggest enduring health consequences of Gulf War service. © 2015 Commonwealth of Australia. American Journal of Industrial Medicine © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The role of perceived control over anxiety in prospective symptom reports across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Jennifer N; Rohan, Kelly J; Nillni, Yael I; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    The present investigation tested the role of psychological vulnerabilities to anxiety in reported menstrual symptom severity. Specifically, the current study tested the incremental validity of perceived control over anxiety-related events in predicting menstrual symptom severity, controlling for the effect of anxiety sensitivity, a documented contributor to menstrual distress. It was expected that women with lower perceived control over anxiety-related events would report greater menstrual symptom severity, particularly in the premenstrual phase. A sample of 49 normally menstruating women, aged 18-47 years, each prospectively tracked their menstrual symptoms for one cycle and completed the Anxiety Control Questionnaire (Rapee, Craske, Brown, & Barlow Behav Ther 27:279-293. doi: 10.1016/S0005-7894(96)80018-9 , 1996) in their follicular and premenstrual phases. A mixed model analysis revealed perceived control over anxiety-related events was a more prominent predictor of menstrual symptom severity than anxiety sensitivity, regardless of the current cycle phase. This finding provides preliminary evidence that perceived control over anxiety-related events is associated with the perceived intensity of menstrual symptoms. This finding highlights the role of psychological vulnerabilities in menstrual distress. Future research should examine whether psychological interventions that target cognitive vulnerabilities to anxiety may help reduce severe menstrual distress.

  6. Brain injury severity, litigation status, and self-report of postconcussive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsanadis, John; Montoya, Eduardo; Hanks, Robin A; Millis, Scott R; Fichtenberg, Norman L; Axelrod, Bradley N

    2008-12-01

    The Postconcussive Symptom Questionnaire (PCSQ) was developed to assess the symptoms associated with the controversial diagnosis of postconcussion syndrome. We examined item endorsement on the PCSQ in two groups. The first group was made up of individuals diagnosed with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. The second group was made up of individuals meeting criteria for mild traumatic brain injury who exhibited no evidence of neurological injury. In addition, they demonstrated poor effort during neuropsychological examination. Significant differences in item endorsement were found the majority of individual items as well as on the PCSQ indices. The poor effort mild traumatic brain injury group consistently reported more symptoms with greater severity. The results raise further questions about the validity of postconcussion symptoms.

  7. Acupressure therapy for insomnia in adolescents: a polysomnographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carotenuto M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marco Carotenuto,1 Beatrice Gallai,2 Lucia Parisi,3 Michele Roccella,3 Maria Esposito11Sleep Clinic for Developmental Age, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Unit of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Perugia, Perugia, 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo, Palermo, ItalyBackground: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of acupressure therapy in a sample of adolescents with insomnia using a standard polysomnographic evaluation.Methods: For this study, 25 adolescents affected by psychophysiological insomnia (mean age 15.04 ± 1.18 years, 12 boys were enrolled. A device known as the Sea-Band® was used by the patients in order to improve their symptoms related to difficulty in falling asleep. All subjects enrolled underwent two sets of consecutive overnight polysomnographic studies in the Sleep Laboratory of the Clinic of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, comprising two studies at baseline (before treatment and another two studies at the end of 6 months of treatment.Results: At the end of 6 months of treatment, there was a significant increase in all macrostructural parameters of sleep duration, and a reduction in sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, and stage 2 sleep. Moreover, the study group showed a significant increase in percent sleep efficiency (P < 0.001 and in slow wave sleep representation.Conclusion: Acupressure is a noninvasive, safe, and effective method for the management of insomnia in adolescents, with good compliance and no adverse effects.Keywords: insomnia, adolescence, acupressure, polysomnography

  8. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Maria; Byraki, Anna; Ahlberg, Jari; Heymans, Martijn W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, Jan; Lobbezoo, Frank; Aarab, Ghizlane

    2017-03-10

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomized placebo-controlled trial sixty-four OSAS patients (52.0± 9.6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with "insomnia", "excessive daytime sleepiness", "psychiatric sleep disorder", "periodic limb movements", "sleep apnea", "sleep paralysis", "daytime dysfunction", "hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming", "restless sleep", "negative conditioning", and "automatic behaviour" (range of P values: 0.000-0.014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0.090-0.897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Exploratory factor analysis of self-reported symptoms in a large, population-based military cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliese Paul D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background US military engagements have consistently raised concern over the array of health outcomes experienced by service members postdeployment. Exploratory factor analysis has been used in studies of 1991 Gulf War-related illnesses, and may increase understanding of symptoms and health outcomes associated with current military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The objective of this study was to use exploratory factor analysis to describe the correlations among numerous physical and psychological symptoms in terms of a smaller number of unobserved variables or factors. Methods The Millennium Cohort Study collects extensive self-reported health data from a large, population-based military cohort, providing a unique opportunity to investigate the interrelationships of numerous physical and psychological symptoms among US military personnel. This study used data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a large, population-based military cohort. Exploratory factor analysis was used to examine the covariance structure of symptoms reported by approximately 50,000 cohort members during 2004-2006. Analyses incorporated 89 symptoms, including responses to several validated instruments embedded in the questionnaire. Techniques accommodated the categorical and sometimes incomplete nature of the survey data. Results A 14-factor model accounted for 60 percent of the total variance in symptoms data and included factors related to several physical, psychological, and behavioral constructs. A notable finding was that many factors appeared to load in accordance with symptom co-location within the survey instrument, highlighting the difficulty in disassociating the effects of question content, location, and response format on factor structure. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential strengths and weaknesses of exploratory factor analysis to heighten understanding of the complex associations among symptoms. Further research is needed to

  10. Causes and Treatment of Insomnia among Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jack R.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    As much as 13 percent of the adolescent population may suffer from chronic insomnia, which can impair the victim's daily existence and affect personal life, school performance, and school attendance. The prevalence of adolescent insomnia, and its cause, diagnosis, and treatment are examined. (Author/CB)

  11. Insomnia among Adolescents: Implications for Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Jack R.

    Adolescent underachievers may be, in fact, victims of insomnia or other types of sleep disorders. Insomnia is a greatly overlooked affliction that affects approximately 13% of the adolescent population, creating daytime side-effects that could impair intellectual functioning, such as imposing learning constraints. Poor sleepers among the…

  12. Nocturnal Regrets and Insomnia in Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ralph E.; Renaud, Olivier; Van Der Linden, Martial

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance for general health, emotion-related factors have rarely been considered in the etiology of late-life insomnia. This study explored the relations between impulsivity, regret experiences, use of different thought-control strategies, and insomnia severity in a sample of older adults whose age ranged from 51 to 98 years.…

  13. [Non-pharmacological treatment of insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Chronic insomnia, i. e. complaints about prolonged sleep onset, difficulties in maintaining sleep, early morning awakening and associated impairments of daytime functioning afflicts approximately 10 % of the population in most Western industrialized countries. Chronic insomnia can be due to somatic disorders, mental disorders, intake of medications, legal or illicit drugs. One third of all patients with chronic insomnias suffers from primary insomnia, a diagnosis which is given when none of the above mentioned factors can be identified as a causal factor. In medical practice, insomnia usually is treated with hypnotic drugs or other sedative drugs such as antidepressants. In the last 20 years it was shown that cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia can be applied successfully independent of causal factors. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBT-I) encompasses psychoeducation about sleep and sleep hygiene, relaxation techniques, i. e. progressive muscle relaxation, specific behavioral techniques like stimulus control or sleep restriction and cognitive techniques to reduce nocturnal ruminations. Several published meta-analyses from the last two decades showed that these techniques, especially in their combined form, can be considered as evidence-based. It was shown that they are as effective as pharmacological therapy in the short-term and in the long-run even superior to pharmacotherapy. Cognitive-behavioral techniques for the therapy of insomnia can be used very successfully by trained physicians and psychotherapists.

  14. Forty-eight cases of insomnia treated with acupuncture and cupping on the back%针刺加背部走罐治疗失眠48例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡仲波; ZHANG Nan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Insomnia also known as sleepless, is a condition that occurs when a person in unable to get normal sleep.With the quickening rhythm of modern life,increasing working and economic pressures, more and more people are suffering from insomnia, and the quality of life is influenced.In recent years, the author has treated 48 cases of insomnia with acupuncture and cupping on the back.The report is as follows.

  15. Risk of Dementia in Patients with Insomnia and Long-term Use of Hypnotics: A Population-based Retrospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Pin-Liang Chen; Wei-Ju Lee; Wei-Zen Sun; Yen-Jen Oyang; Jong-Ling Fuh

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypnotics have been reported to be associated with dementia. However, the relationship between insomnia, hypnotics and dementia is still controversial. We sought to examine the risk of dementia in patients with long-term insomnia and the contribution of hypnotics. METHODS: Data was collected from Taiwan's Longitudinal Health Insurance Database. The study cohort comprised all patients aged 50 years or older with a first diagnosis of insomnia from 2002 to 2007. The comparison cohort...

  16. Evaluation of a brief treatment program of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Nicole; Lack, Leon; Wright, Helen; Kennaway, David J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a brief 4-w group-administered treatment program of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) for older adults with sleep maintenance insomnia. Randomized controlled trial of CBT-I compared to waitlist control with comparisons at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 3-mo follow-up. Flinders University Sleep and Circadian Rhythm Research Laboratory, Adelaide, South Australia. One-hundred eighteen adults with sleep maintenance insomnia (mean age = 63.76 y, standard deviation = 6.45 y, male = 55). A 4-w, group-based treatment program of CBT-I including bedtime restriction therapy, sleep education, and cognitive restructuring. Seven-day sleep diaries, actigraphy, and several self-report measures to assess perceived insomnia severity, daytime functioning, and confidence in and beliefs about sleep. The brief group-administered CBT-I program produced improvements in the timing and quality of sleep including later bedtimes, earlier out-of-bed times, reduced wake after sleep onset, and improved sleep efficiency. Participants also reported a reduction of the Insomnia Severity Index, Flinders Fatigue Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Daytime Feeling and Functioning Scale, Sleep Anticipatory Anxiety Questionnaire, the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes Scale, and increased Sleep Self-Efficacy Scale. The treatment program used in the current study has demonstrated potential for a brief, inexpensive, and effective treatment of sleep maintenance insomnia in the older adult population.

  17. Yoga as Treatment for Insomnia Among Cancer Patients and Survivors: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M. Mustian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Between 15-90% of cancer patients and survivors report some form of insomnia or sleep quality impairment during and post-treatment, such as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia and sleep quality impairment are among the most prevalent and distressing problems reported by cancer patients and survivors, and can be severe enough to increase cancer mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia and sleep quality impairment, they are under-diagnosed and under-treated in cancer patients and survivors. When sleep problems are present, providers and patients are often hesitant to prescribe or take pharmaceuticals for sleep problems due to polypharmacy concerns, and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia can be very difficult and impractical for patients to adhere to throughout the cancer experience. Research suggests yoga is a well-tolerated exercise intervention with promising evidence for its efficacy in improving insomnia and sleep quality impairment among survivors. This article provides a systematic review of existing clinical research on the effectiveness of yoga for treating insomnia and sleep quality impairment among cancer patients and survivors.

  18. Yoga as Treatment for Insomnia Among Cancer Patients and Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustian, Karen M

    2013-11-01

    Many cancer patients and survivors, between 15 to 90%, report some form of insomnia or sleep quality impairment during and post-treatment, such as excessive daytime napping, difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, and waking up too early. Insomnia and sleep quality impairment are among the most prevalent and distressing problems reported by cancer patients and survivors, and can be severe enough to increase cancer mortality. Despite the ubiquity of insomnia and sleep quality impairment, they are under-diagnosed and under-treated in cancer patients and survivors. When sleep problems are present, providers and patients are often hesitant to prescribe or take pharmaceuticals for sleep problems due to poly pharmacy concerns, and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia can be very difficult and impractical for patients to adhere to throughout the cancer experience. Research suggests yoga is a well-tolerated exercise intervention with promising evidence for its efficacy in improving insomnia and sleep quality impairment among survivors. This article provides a systematic review of existing clinical research on the effectiveness of yoga for treating insomnia and sleep quality impairment among cancer patients and survivors.

  19. Cognitive behavior therapy for chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael T; Neubauer, David N

    2003-01-01

    Approximately 20% of patients presenting in general medical settings have severe and persistent insomnia. Studies consistently find that trouble initiating and maintaining sleep are independent risk factors for medical and psychiatric morbidity, but insomnia is often underdetected and undertreated in primary care settings. Cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches for chronic insomnia and related sleep disorders have been shown to be effective in various patient populations. This article reviews the most common cognitive-behavioral interventions for insomnia, and discusses their efficacy and durability. Possible adaptations for the integration of these approaches into primary care settings and a description of the emerging field of behavioral sleep medicine as a resource for health care providers treating patients with chronic insomnia are also presented.

  20. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamadera, Wataru

    2015-06-01

    Insomnia is very common in older adults, but is generally related to medical and psychiatric illness, medication, circadian rhythm change. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia(CBT-I) is a brief, sleep-focused, multimodal intervention by psychological and behavioral procedures. The most common approach includes a behavioral (sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation) component combined cognitive and educational (cognitive strategies, sleep hygiene education) component. CBT-I has adequate evidence from clinical trials to support the management of insomnia. CBT-I has proved successful for older adults with primary and comorbid insomnia and for those with dependency on hypnotics. Proper treatment of insomnia is effective and can improve overall physical and mental health and quality of life in the elderly patient.

  1. Relationship between patient-reported symptoms, limitations in daily activities, and psychological impact in varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rajiv; Lal, Brajesh Kumar; Daugherty, Claire

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between patient-reported symptoms, functional limitations, and psychological impact of varicose veins (VVs) vs pathophysiologic mechanism, incorporating demographic and behavioral factors. We conducted a pooled analysis from two clinical studies (Efficacy and Safety Study of Polidocanol Injectable Foam for the Treatment of Saphenofemoral Junction Incompetence [VANISH-1] and Polidocanol Endovenous Microfoam Versus Vehicle for the Treatment of Saphenofemoral Junction Incompetence [VANISH-2]) in patients with VVs (superficial venous reflux only). Health outcomes were classified on the basis of the Wilson-Cleary conceptual framework continuum linking clinical and anatomic factors (Clinical, Etiology, Anatomy, and Pathophysiology [CEAP] clinical class and great saphenous vein [GSV] diameter, respectively) to patient-reported outcomes: Varicose Vein Symptoms Questionnaire (VVSymQ) score; modified Venous Insufficiency Epidemiologic and Economic Study on Quality of Life/Symptoms (m-VEINES-QOL/Sym) limitations in daily activities (functional limitations hereafter) score; and m-VEINES-QOL/Sym psychological impact score. Association of clinical and anatomic categories with each of the patient-reported outcomes was assessed using analysis of variance for statistical significance and standardized mean differences for clinical meaningfulness. Hierarchical regression modeling was applied to evaluate the direct association of the VVSymQ symptom score with the m-VEINES-QOL/Sym functional limitations score and the indirect association with the m-VEINES-QOL/Sym psychological impact score, adjusting for clinical, behavioral, and demographic factors. Among 516 patients, approximately three-fourths were women (mean age, 49 years), approximately 70% were overweight or obese, 42% were C2 and 32% were C3, and 88% reported never or only intermittently wearing compression stockings. VVSymQ (symptom) scores did not vary by GSV

  2. The effect of optimism on depression: the mediating and moderating role of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk Yan Sing; Wong, Wing S

    2011-11-01

    This article aims to clarify if insomnia exerts a mediating or moderating effect on the optimism-depression association in Chinese college students. 529 Chinese college students completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R) and the Multidimensional Scale of Social Support (MSPSS). The results failed to show any moderating effect but after adjustment for age, gender and social support, a mediating effect was observed. In conclusion, insomnia qualifies as a mediator, suggesting considerable variance in depressive symptoms of college students could be due to change in their sleep status.

  3. Symptoms and Health Complaints and Their Association with Perceived Stressors among Students at Nine Libyan Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid El Ansari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available University students are exposed to many stressors. We assessed the associations between two stressors (educational related and general overall, socio-demographic characteristics (five variables, health behaviours/lifestyle factors (six variables, as well as religiosity and quality of life as independent variables, with self-reported symptoms/health complaints as dependent variables (eight health complaints. A sample of 2100 undergraduate students from nine institutions (six universities, three colleges located in seven cities in Libya completed a general health questionnaire. The most prevalent symptoms were headaches, depressive mood, difficulties to concentrate and sleep disorder/insomnia that have been reported by 50%–60% of the students. The majority of students (62% reported having had three or more symptoms sometimes or very often in the last 12 months. There was a positive association between perceived stressors and health symptoms, which remained significant after adjustment for gender and many other relevant factors for headache (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.15–2.02, depressive mood (OR 2.20; 95% CI 1.64–2.94 and sleep disorder/ insomnia (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.19–2.03. Other factors independently associated with most health symptoms were female gender and poor self-perceived health. Stress management programmes and a reduction of educational related stressors might help to prevent stress-related symptoms and health complaints in this student population.

  4. Occlusal management for a patient with aural symptoms of unknown etiology: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torii Kengo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the discrepancy between the habitual occlusal position (HOP and the flat bite plate-induced occlusal position (BPOP (regarded as the muscular physiological reference position has been recently reported to be related to symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, it still remains unclear whether the occlusal equilibration in the reference position is effective to resolve TMD-related discrepancy and symptoms. Aural symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo et cetera have been included under TMD symptoms. Methods To examine the effect of occlusal equilibration for the treatment of TMDs, occlusal equilibration was performed for a patient with aural symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus and vertigo of unknown etiology in the right ear. An occlusal analysis was performed on this patient with dental models mounted on an articulator after relieving painful symptoms by an appliance therapy and a discrepancy was identified (p Results At completion of treatment, the discrepancy was not significant (p > 0.25, and the patient's right condyle had shifted 2.8 mm posteromedially in the horizontal plane, and the left condyle had shifted 1.0 mm laterally in the voluntarily closed position from the previous HOP. The aural symptoms of the patient were resolved, and there has been no recurrence to date after a two-year follow-up period. Conclusion An occlusal analysis should be performed in patients exhibiting TMD symptoms to identify the presence or absence of any discrepancy between the HOP and the BPOP. If a discrepancy exists, occlusal equilibration should be attempted in the reference position.

  5. Quality of life and symptom prevalence as reported by children with cancer in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Saad Huijer, Huda; Sagherian, Knar; Tamim, Hani

    2013-12-01

    To date, there are no studies on quality of life (QoL) and symptom prevalence reported by pediatric oncology patients in Lebanon. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the QoL, symptom prevalence and symptom management among a sample of pediatric oncology patients. The study design was cross-sectional. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) cancer module and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale were administered in Arabic using face-to-face interviews to a convenience sample of 85 pediatric cancer patients (7-18 years) at a tertiary hospital in Lebanon. The mean age of the study group was 12.5 years with leukemia being the most common cancer (43.5%). The lowest scores on the PedsQL subscales were in nausea (score = 64.82; SD = 25.76) and worry (score = 68.14; SD = 30.07), thus indicating more problems in these areas. A comparison based on age showed significant differences in pain and hurt, nausea, and worry. In children (7-12 years), lack of appetite, pain, and nausea were mostly prevalent whereas adolescents (13-18 years) experienced lack of energy, irritability, and pain. In both age groups, pain and nausea were the most frequently treated symptoms. Overall, the participants had good health-related QoL as indicated by most of the PedsQL subscales. Symptom management was found to be inadequate and in some cases ineffective. More attention should be given to the management of symptoms in general using pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques. Of particular importance is the importance of providing psychological support to alleviate symptom burden and improve QoL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospective randomized study of patients with insomnia and mild sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilleminault, Christian; Davis, Kala; Huynh, Nelly T

    2008-11-01

    Patients with insomnia may present with mild and often unrecognized obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). To evaluate both subjective and objective outcomes of patients with complaints of insomnia and mild OSA who receive surgical treatment for OSA versus behavioral treatment with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Prospective study with crossover design of 30 patients with complaints of insomnia and mild OSA. Thirty subjects, matched for age and gender, were randomized with stratification to receive either CBT-I or surgical treatment of OSA as primary treatment. Patients were reassessed after completing the initial intervention and reassigned if agreeable to the alternative treatment option and assessed again on completion of both treatment arms. Outcome measures included clinical impression, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score, Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) score, and polysomnography (PSG) results. Surgery resulted in greater improvements in total sleep time (TST), slow wave sleep and REM sleep duration, respiratory disturbance index, apnea-hypopnea index, minimum oxygen saturation, FSS, and ESS. CBT-I also improved TST and resulted in shorter sleep latency. Surgical intervention for the management of patients with complaints of insomnia and mild OSA demonstrated greater improvement in both subjective and objective outcome measures. Initial treatment of underlying OSA in patients with insomnia was more successful in improving insomnia than CBT-I alone. However CBT-I as initial treatment improved TST compared to baseline; following surgical intervention, it had the additional benefit of further increasing TST and helped to control sleep onset difficulties that may be related to conditioning due to unrecognized symptoms of mild OSA.

  7. Melatonergic drugs for therapeutic use in insomnia and sleep disturbances of mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Zakaria, Rahimah; Othaman, Zahiruddin; Brzezinski, Amnon; Prasad, Atul; Brown, Gregory M

    2012-03-01

    Insomnia is common among elderly people and nearly 30 to 40% of the adult population also suffer from insomnia. Pharmacological treatment of insomnia include the use of benzodiazepine and non-benzodiazepine drugs like zolpidem, zaleplon, Zopiclone. Although these drugs improve sleep, their usage is also associated with number of adverse effects, Melatonin, the hormone secreted by the pineal gland of all animals and human beings has been used for treatment of insomnias, since the timing of its secretion in humans as well as in most of the animals coincides with the increase of nocturnal sleep propensity. Because of its short half life, melatonin slow release preparations were introduced for treatment of insomnia. Recently ramelteon, a selective MT1, MT2 receptor agonist with greater efficacy of action in treating insomnia has been used clinically and has been found effective in improving sleep quality, sleep efficacy and also in reducing the sleep onset time when compared to melatonin or slow melatonin preparations. The mechanism of action of ramelteon in improving sleep is discussed in the paper. Another melatonergic drug agomelatine besides acting on MT1/MT2 receptors also displays 5-HT2c antagonism and this drug has been found effective as a novel antidepressant for treating major depressive disorders. Agomelatine besides causing remission of depressive symptoms also improves sleep quality and efficiency. Other antidepressants depressants that are in clinical use today do not improve sleep. There are other melatonergic drugs like tasimelteon, 6-chloromelatonin. But ramelteon and agomelatine deserve special attention for treatment of insomnia and sleep disturbances associated with depressive disorders and have promising role for treatment of sleep disorders.

  8. The relations among body consciousness, somatic symptom report, and information processing speed in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, S.P. van der; Vree, B.P.W. de; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Bleijenberg, G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the potential influence of body consciousness and levels of somatic symptom report upon information processing speed in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). BACKGROUND: According to a model of a fixed information processing capacity, it was

  9. Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animals#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self-reported acute health symptoms and exposure to companion animalsWhitney S. Krueger1,2, Elizabeth D. Hilborn2, Timothy J. Wade21Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA2Environmental Public Health Division, Office of Research and Development, U...

  10. Self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among Danish women with cosmetic breast implants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Kim; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Fryzek, Jon P

    2004-01-01

    No epidemiological evidence of an association between silicone breast implants and connective tissue disease has been found. Based on case reports, it has been hypothesized that silicone breast implants may be associated with a unique rheumatic symptom cluster termed "atypical connective tissue d...

  11. Parent-Reported Gastro-Intestinal Symptoms in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Susie; Carcani-Rathwell, Iris; Charman, Tony; Pickles, Andrew; Loucas, Tom; Meldrum, David; Simonoff, Emily; Sullivan, Peter; Baird, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether parentally-reported gastro-intestinal (GI) symptoms are increased in a population-derived sample of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) compared to controls. Participants included 132 children with ASD and 81 with special educational needs (SEN) but no ASD, aged 10-14 years plus 82…

  12. Self-reported sick leave and long-term health symptoms of Q-fever patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morroy, G.; Bor, H.; Polder, J.J.; Hautvast, J.L.; Hoek, W. van der; Schneeberger, P.M.; Wijkmans, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In The Netherlands, 1168 Q-fever patients were notified in 2007 and 2008. Patients and general practitioners (GPs) regularly reported persisting symptoms after acute Q-fever, especially fatigue and long periods of sick leave, to the public health authorities. International studies on sma

  13. Hyperactive-Impulsive Symptoms Associated with Self-Reported Sleep Quality in Nonmedicated Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Neha; Hong, Nuong; Wigal, Timothy L.; Gehricke, Jean-G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with ADHD often report sleep problems. Though most studies on ADHD and sleep examined children or nonclinically diagnosed adults, the present study specifically examines nonmedicated adults with ADHD to determine whether inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms are associated with sleep problems. Method: A total of 22…

  14. Three-Year Follow-Up of Insomnia and Hypnotics after Controlled Internet Treatment for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Kerstin; Jernelöv, Susanna; Rück, Christian; Lindefors, Nils; Kaldo, Viktor

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the long-term effects of therapist-guided Internet-based insomnia treatment on insomnia severity and sleep medication use, compared with active control. This study was an 8 week randomized controlled trial with follow-up posttreatment and at 6, 12, and 36 months, set at the Internet Psychiatry Clinic, Stockholm, Sweden. Participants were 148 media-recruited nondepressed adults with insomnia. Interventions were Guided Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (ICBT-i) or active control treatment (ICBT-ctrl). Primary outcome was insomnia severity, measured with the Insomnia Severity Index. Secondary outcomes were sleep medication use and use of other treatments. The large pretreatment to posttreatment improvements in insomnia severity of the ICBT-i group were maintained during follow-up. ICBT-ctrl exhibited significantly less improvement posttreatment (between-Cohen d = 0.85), but after 12 and 36 months, there was no longer a significant difference. The within-group effect sizes from pretreatment to the 36-months follow-up were 1.6 (ICBT-i) and 1.7 (ICBT-ctrl), and 74% of the interviewed participants no longer had insomnia diagnosis after 36 mo. ICBT-ctrl used significantly more sleep medication (P = 0.017) and underwent significantly more other insomnia treatments (P CBT for insomnia has long-term effects. After 36 months, the groups did not differ in insomnia severity, but ICBT-ctrl had used more sleep medication and undergone more other additional insomnia treatments during the follow-up period. The trial was registered, together with a parallel trial, at Clinicaltrials.gov as "Internet-CBT for Insomnia" registration ID: NCT01256099. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Randomized placebo-controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy and armodafinil for insomnia after cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Joseph A; Garland, Sheila N; Heckler, Charles E; Perlis, Michael L; Peoples, Anita R; Shayne, Michelle; Savard, Josée; Daniels, Nina P; Morrow, Gary R

    2015-01-10

    Insomnia is a distressing and often persisting consequence of cancer. Although cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the treatment of choice in the general population, the use of CBT-I in patients with cancer is complicated, because it can result in transient but substantial increases in daytime sleepiness. In this study, we evaluated whether CBT-I, in combination with the wakefulness-promoting agent armodafinil (A), results in better insomnia treatment outcomes in cancer survivors than CBT-I alone. We report on a randomized trial of 96 cancer survivors (mean age, 56 years; female, 87.5%; breast cancer, 68%). The primary analyses examined whether ≥ one of the 7-week intervention conditions (ie, CBT-I, A, or both), when compared with a placebo capsule (P) group, produced significantly greater clinical gains. Insomnia was assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index and sleep quality by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory. All patients received sleep hygiene instructions. Analyses controlling for baseline differences showed that both the CBT-I plus A (P = .001) and CBT-I plus P (P = .010) groups had significantly greater reductions in insomnia severity postintervention than the P group, with effect sizes of 1.31 and 1.02, respectively. Similar improvements were seen for sleep quality. Gains on both measures persisted 3 months later. CBT-I plus A was not significantly different from CBT-I plus P (P = .421), and A alone was not significantly different from P alone (P = .584). CBT-I results in significant and durable improvements in insomnia and sleep quality. A did not significantly improve the efficacy of CBT-I or independently affect insomnia or sleep quality. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. The beneficial effects of massage therapy for insomnia in postmenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Hachul,H.; Oliveira, D. S.; L.R.A. Bittencourt; Andersen, M. L.; Tufik, S.

    2014-01-01

    With increases life expectancy, the incidence of undesirable manifestations of menopause has increased as well. The effects of lost ovarian function include progressive decrease in estradiol secretion, trophic changes in the breast, vasomotor symptoms, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. Insomnia, which has physiological consequences and can result in a loss of quality of life, is prevalent in women after menopause. Hormone therapy has been widely used to reduce menopausal symptoms, but...

  17. Self-Reported Health Symptoms and Conditions Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Naval Health Research Center Self-reported Health Symptoms and Conditions Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in A Large...California 92106 Self-Reported Health Symptoms and Conditions Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort ISABEL G...symptom and condition reporting in relation to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among members of the US military. METHODS: CAM was

  18. Drug therapy for depression insomnia%抑郁性失眠的药物治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈发展; 陆峥

    2011-01-01

    Insomnia is the most common symptom of depression with a heavy burden. The treatment for depression insomnia, which is used as evaluation index of antidepressant treatment, is the key to the treatment of depressive disorder.This review describes the progress of the drug therapy for depression insomnia.%失眠是抑郁障碍患者最常见的症状,可导致较重的疾病负担.针对抑郁性失眠的治疗是抑郁障碍治疗的关键,通常作为抗抑郁治疗的疗效评估指标.本文综述抑郁性失眠的药物治疗进展.

  19. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON TREATMENT OF 61 CASES OF INSOMNIA WITH AURICULAR PLASTER THERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家彤; 王月

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of auricular plaster (otopoint-pressure) therapy in thetreatment of insomnia. Methods: In this paper, 61 cases of insomnia patients including 16 males and 45 females weretreated with Ershenmen (MA-TF 1), Zhen (MA-AT), Yuanzhong (MA-AT), Nao Dian and E (MA-AT), combined withother otopoints according to symptoms. The otopoint was stuck with a piece of plaster adhered with vaccaria seeds andpressured by the patient him- or her-self. The treatment was given twice a week, with 7 times being a therapeuticcourse. Results: After 1 - 2 courses of treatment, 19 (31.15%) cases were cured, 34 (55.74 % ) had improvementand 8 (13.11%) had no changes, with the total effective rate being 86.9%. Conclusion: Auricular plaster therapyworks well in the treatment of insomnia patient.

  20. Understanding mental and physical fatigue complaints in those with depression and insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Moss, Taryn G; Lachowski, Angela M; Atwood, Molly E

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is a concern for both people with insomnia and with depression, yet it remains poorly understood. Participants (N = 62) included those meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text revision) criteria for insomnia and major depressive disorder (MDD). Multiple regression examined sleep, mood, activity, and cognitive factors as predictors of mental and physical fatigue. Only the cognitive factors (i.e., unhelpful beliefs about sleep and symptom-focused rumination) were predictive of both physical and mental fatigue. Beliefs about not being able to function and needing to avoid activities after a poor night of sleep were related to both types of fatigue. Targeting these beliefs via cognitive therapy and encouraging patients to test maladaptive beliefs about sleep may enhance fatigue response in those with MDD and insomnia.

  1. Treatment of chronic insomnia with yoga: a preliminary study with sleep-wake diaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2004-12-01

    There is good evidence for cognitive and physiological arousal in chronic insomnia. Accordingly, clinical trial studies of insomnia treatments aimed at reducing arousal, including relaxation and meditation, have reported positive results. Yoga is a multicomponent practice that is also known to be effective in reducing arousal, although it has not been well evaluated as a treatment for insomnia. In this preliminary study, a simple daily yoga treatment was evaluated in a chronic insomnia population consisting of sleep-onset and/or sleep-maintenance insomnia and primary or secondary insomnia. Participants maintained sleep-wake diaries during a pretreatment 2-week baseline and a subsequent 8-week intervention, in which they practiced the treatment on their own following a single in-person training session with subsequent brief in-person and telephone follow-ups. Sleep efficiency (SE), total sleep time (TST), total wake time (TWT), sleep onset latency (SOL), wake time after sleep onset (WASO), number of awakenings, and sleep quality measures were derived from sleep-wake diary entries and were averaged in 2-week intervals. For 20 participants completing the protocol, statistically significant improvements were observed in SE, TST, TWT, SOL, and WASO at end-treatment as compared with pretreatment values.

  2. Factor structure of the Athens Insomnia Scale and its associations with demographic characteristics and depression in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; King, Bryan H; Chang, Yu-Ping

    2010-03-01

    The eight-item Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS-8) is an instrument that has been used frequently to assess insomnia problems. Previous research on adults has found that the AIS-8 functioned as a sole component. This study aimed to examine the prevalence rates of insomnia problems on the AIS-8, the factor structure of the AIS-8 in adolescents and its associations with demographic characteristics and depression in adolescents. A total of 8319 adolescent students (4334 girls and 3985 boys, mean age = 14.7 years, standard deviation = 1.7 years) in southern Taiwan were recruited into this study and completed the AIS-8. We performed an exploratory factor analysis to examine the factor structure of the AIS-8, and used the parallel analysis for making decisions regarding factor retention. We also used multiple regression analysis models to determine the associations between insomnia and demographic characteristics and depression. The results found that a high proportion of adolescents had insomnia problems as measured by the AIS-8. The AIS-8 was composed of two different factors when used among a large adolescent population, including insomnia symptoms (factor 1) and subjective sleep and daytime distress (factor 2). While being male, being younger, and having depression were associated positively with the severity of insomnia symptoms (factor 1), being older, living in urban areas, and having depression were associated positively with the severity of subjective sleep and daytime distress (factor 2). Clinicians and researchers should consider the different meanings of the two factors of the AIS-8 when using this tool to assess insomnia problems in adolescents.

  3. Impact of Cabin Ozone Concentrations on Passenger Reported Symptoms in Commercial Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Allen, Joseph G.; Weschler, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to elevated ozone concentrations at high altitudes, the adverse effect of ozone on air quality, human perception and health may be more pronounced in aircraft cabins. The association between ozone and passenger-reported symptoms has not been investigated under real conditions since smoking...... was banned on aircraft and ozone converters became more common. Indoor environmental parameters were measured at cruising altitude on 83 US domestic and international flights. Passengers completed a questionnaire about symptoms and satisfaction with the indoor air quality. Average ozone concentrations were...

  4. A case report of pulsatile tinnitus as a symptom of brain arteriovenous malformation

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    M. Sayadnasiri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile tinnitus is the result of blood flow related sounds transmitted to the inner ear and coincides with heartbeat. Although pulsatile tinnitus is a rare entity, this symptom is most often indicative of a serious underlying disease in central nervous system. Unfortunately, this symptom is often not properly assessed by clinician that leads to delayed diagnosis of underlying brain pathology. In this report, a patient is presented with chief complaint of tinnitus that had many medical visits for 2 years. Finally, a cerebral vascular malformation was diagnosed with regards to physical examination and neuroimaging findings.

  5. Gentle Hatha yoga and reduction of fibromyalgia-related symptoms: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrud, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether gentle Hatha yoga reduced fibromyalgia-related symptoms for a convenience sample of 10 participants ranging in age from 39 to 64 years who received yoga instruction 2 times per week for 8 weeks. Respondents completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire 1 time per week and provided weekly journal reports regarding their health status. Pre- and post-intervention manual tender point evaluations were also conducted. Findings provide evidence of association between participating in gentle Hatha yoga classes and reduced fibromyalgia - related symptoms. Additional randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes and greater empirical rigor are needed to more fully understand this relationship.

  6. Sleep and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Antonia; Reichmann, Heinz

    2013-04-01

    Beyond the cardinal motor symptoms, bradykinesia, rigidity, tremor and postural instability, defining the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, there is a big spectrum of non-motor features that patients may suffer from and that may reduce their quality of life. Non-motor symptoms are not only frequent but also often under-reported by patients and caregivers. As they are frequently under-recognized by clinicians, they remain consequently under-treated. This review wants to give a short overview of the importance of non-motor symptoms on patients' quality of life and helpful assessment tools that might facilitate recognition of non-motor features during clinical setting. Given the wide range of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease, we concentrate on common issues such as depression and sleep disorders like sleep-onset insomnia or sleep maintenance insomnia and restless legs syndrome. Thereby, we present some recent studies that have investigated the efficacy of dopaminergic drugs, especially dopamine agonists, revealing possible treatment strategies and thus improving disease management.

  7. Symptom reporting in cancer patients II: relations to social desirability, negative affect, and self-reported health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, M; Heitmann, K; Kussmann, J; Lorenz, W

    1999-10-15

    Patients' appraisal of somatic symptoms is correlated with their negative affect. The authors have investigated whether social desirability is associated with patients' symptom and health behavior reporting. One hundred fourteen surgical cancer patients who participated in either an outpatient or an inpatient follow-up care program filled out the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-C30, the New Social Desirability Scale, and a health behavior checklist. Patients' reports of somatic symptoms were correlated inversely with social desirability (r = -0.50) and positively with negative affect (r = 0.72). When objective health and demographic variables (e.g., prognosis, adjuvant therapy prior to follow-up, and gender) were entered first in hierarchical multiple regression analyses, social desirability and negative affect accounted for an additional 16% and 36% of the symptom variance, respectively. Similar results were found when global quality of life was the dependent variable. Self-reported health behaviors were explained only through the set of health and demographic variables (14%), and social desirability and negative affect did not account for additional variance. On the average, patients reported that they had a median of 4.7 (out of a list of 21) self-initiated health behaviors, and 11% of the patients admitted to having used unproven therapies. Symptom reports do not give a pure picture of patients' health status, but they are strongly correlated with social desirability and negative affect. Detection of such psychologic variables is essential to understanding the dynamics of quality of life. In applied settings, quality-of-life measures should be used together with conventional criteria. As practical experience and scientific understanding grow, the relative positioning of these patient-oriented versus clinic-oriented endpoints will become clear. Copyright 1999 American Cancer Society.

  8. Group cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia: a meta-analysis

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    Beatriz Navarro-Bravo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: insomnia is a highly prevalent disorder in the general population and in clinical practice. Although pharmacological treatment is the most widespread choice, psychological treatment appears to have longer lasting effects. The main objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the cognitive-behavioural group therapy treatment for insomnia. Method: a systematic search for cognitive-behavioural therapy clinical trials in Pubmed, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Scielo, WOK, Cochrane, Scopus and Embase. 153 articles were reviewed, of which 9 met inclusion criteria for the metaanalysis. Adding up the data from all 9 trials, a total of 699 people completed the post-test phase. Results: after finishing cognitive-behavioural therapy, significant improvements regarding insomnia were found according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Insomnia Severity Index, sleep latency, wake after sleep onset and sleep efficiency. There were no significant improvements in total sleep time. Conclusions: the results from experimental studies on cognitive-behavioural therapy as an insomnia treatment clearly suggest a positive impact on symptoms, as assessed using both validated scales and sleep diaries.

  9. Searching for new options for treating insomnia: are melatonin and ramelteon beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Alfredo

    2006-07-01

    Insomnia is one of the most common complaints faced in clinical practice. The limited pharmacological options available make the treatment of this complaint a challenge. All of the available benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine hypnotics have the potential to induce addiction, cause withdrawal symptoms, or trigger rebound insomnia. Further, the evidence supporting the utility of commonly prescribed options such as antidepressants and antipsychotics is limited. Melatonin is a hormone that has been associated with soporific effects. Based on this premise, a melatonin receptor agonist was created. Ramelteon was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2005 and is the only medication indicated for the long-term treatment of insomnia. A critical review with a clinical perspective of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials was conducted to determine the efficacy of melatonin and ramelteon for the treatment of insomnia. Based on this review, it appears that more placebo-controlled trials are indicated before valid judgments concerning the efficacy of both melatonin and ramelteon can be made. In the meantime, there is some support for the use of melatonin for the treatment of insomnia, and findings concerning ramelteon also appear promising. Nevertheless, clinicians who prescribe melatonin or ramelteon should be cautious and carefully monitor both potential benefits and adverse effects, since data on melatonin are based on studies with multiple limitations and only three controlled trials have been done with ramelteon.

  10. Mindfulness in schizophrenia: Associations with self-reported motivation, emotion regulation, dysfunctional attitudes, and negative symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Naomi T; Horan, William P; Green, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions are gaining empirical support as alternative or adjunctive treatments for a variety of mental health conditions, including anxiety, depression, and substance use disorders. Emerging evidence now suggests that mindfulness-based treatments may also improve clinical features of schizophrenia, including negative symptoms. However, no research has examined the construct of mindfulness and its correlates in schizophrenia. In this study, we examined self-reported mindfulness in patients (n=35) and controls (n=25) using the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. We examined correlations among mindfulness, negative symptoms, and psychological constructs associated with negative symptoms and adaptive functioning, including motivation, emotion regulation, and dysfunctional attitudes. As hypothesized, patients endorsed lower levels of mindfulness than controls. In patients, mindfulness was unrelated to negative symptoms, but it was associated with more adaptive emotion regulation (greater reappraisal) and beliefs (lower dysfunctional attitudes). Some facets of mindfulness were also associated with self-reported motivation (behavioral activation and inhibition). These patterns of correlations were similar in patients and controls. Findings from this initial study suggest that schizophrenia patients may benefit from mindfulness-based interventions because they (a) have lower self-reported mindfulness than controls and (b) demonstrate strong relationships between mindfulness and psychological constructs related to adaptive functioning.

  11. The association between insomnia and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Scholtes, Cathy; Riemann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Insomnia, the most common sleep complaint in the general population, is defined by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or nonrestorative sleep, accompanied by some form of daytime impairment. In the current review, we present an overview of recent studies on the association between insomnia and cardiovascular disease. It can be concluded that there is growing evidence for the hypothesis that insomnia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease independently of classic coronary risk factors. Furthermore, insomnia is likely to be associated with hypertension and elevated resting heart rate, both known to lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the existing evidence is not totally consistent and most findings have not been replicated unequivocally. The major limitations of the cited studies include the failure to use state-of-the-art criteria for insomnia diagnosis, the failure to control for depression, and the use of hypnotic medication and sleep apnea as potential confounders. However, the results suggest that insomnia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease mediated by hypertension or elevated resting heart rate. Consequently, more effort should be dedicated to cope with the high prevalence of insomnia in the general population.

  12. 'Folk theories' about the causes of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Soehner, Adriane; Lombrozo, Tania; Bélanger, Lynda; Rifkin, Jamie; Morin, Charles M

    2013-10-01

    The present study investigates 'folk theories' about the causes of insomnia. Participants with insomnia (n = 69) completed a qualitative and quantitative assessment of their folk theories. The qualitative assessment was to speak aloud for 1 minute in response to: 'What do you think causes your insomnia?'. The quantitative assessment involved completing the 'Causal Attributions of My Insomnia Questionnaire' (CAM-I), developed for this study. The three most common folk theories for both the causes of one's own insomnia as well as insomnia in others were 'emotions', 'thinking patterns' and 'sleep-related emotions'. Interventions targeting these factors were also perceived as most likely to be viable treatments. Seventy-five percent of the folk theories of insomnia investigated with the CAM-I were rated as more likely to be alleviated by a psychological versus a biological treatment. The results are consistent with research highlighting that folk theories are generally coherent and inform a range of judgments. Future research should focus on congruence of 'folk theories' between treatment providers and patients, as well as the role of folk theories in treatment choice, engagement, compliance and outcome.

  13. Violence against women, symptom reporting, and treatment for reproductive tract infections in Kerala state, Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, S; Morrison, Sharon; Zhu, Limei

    2007-03-01

    In this article we examine factors associated with women's self-reports of reproductive ill health symptoms and factors associated with seeking and receiving treatment for the symptoms. We focus on indicators of women's societal position, especially empowerment (indicated by experience of and attitudes toward violence against women), autonomy, and education. We used data from the National Family Health Survey-2 from Kerala state in Southern India. Based on our results we suggest that violence against women, whether actually experienced or internalized as acceptance of its justification, is associated with increased ill health symptoms, and the acceptance of violence is associated with decreased chance of treatment. Women's higher formal education appeared to reduce treatment seeking for reproductive ill health, perhaps due to the stigma associated with sexually transmitted disease (STD) in this cultural setting. Women's work participation had no significant impact, nor did indicators of women's economic and personal autonomy.

  14. [Narcolepsy in childhood and adolescence: symptoms, diagnosis, and therapy. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrmann, Jochen; Siegler, Dominik; Ignacy, Evelin; Reimer, Inga

    2017-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare, multifactorial disease of the hypothalamus characterized by its leading symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Sleep-EEG and a HLA-DR-genotype serve to secure the diagnosis. We report here on a 14-year-old girl suffering from anxieties, depression, school refusal, social withdrawal as well as very frequent attacks of sleep during the day and cataplexy. Currently, there is no approved drug for children and adolescents suffering from narcolepsy. Our patient benefited significantly and quickly from an off-label treatment with methylphenidate in combination with psychoeducation, cognitive behavioral therapy, and family therapy. Narcolepsy is a very rare but probably underestimated differential diagnosis applied to unclear daytime sleepiness, anxieties, or depression in childhood and adolescence. Both the key symptoms and the comorbid symptoms improve significantly under treatment with stimulants, albeit at a higher dosage.

  15. Resolution of Concussion Symptoms After Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernsey, David T; Leder, Adena; Yao, Sheldon

    2016-03-01

    A concussion is the result of a biomechanical force directed toward the head, causing neurologic dysfunction. The inflammatory response and the production of reactive oxygen species are proposed mechanisms for the symptoms and long-term sequelae of concussion. Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) may help reduce inflammation by improving glymphatic flow. The authors describe the effect of OMT on a patient with mild concussion symptoms, including nausea, dizziness, tinnitus, and imbalance. The patient was evaluated with the Sensory Organization Test before and after undergoing a 25-minute session of OMT. After the session, the patient reported resolution of symptoms, and his sensory organization test score improved by 6 points. The role of OMT must be further investigated as an essential and cost-effective tool in the management of concussions.

  16. Prevalence and bother of patient-reported lower urinary tract symptoms in the muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Laura A; Askeland, Eric J; Mathews, Katherine D; Erickson, Bradley A; Cooper, Christopher S

    2016-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the less severe Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and eventual loss of ambulation, and result from mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is essential for skeletal muscle functioning but its role in smooth muscle function is not as well established. In a retrospective review, our group previously demonstrated that roughly half of these patients have at least one documented urologic diagnosis, most commonly being lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and nephrolithiasis. To better understand the frequency of LUTS and the degree to which they impact quality of life in this patient population, we performed a cross-sectional evaluation. Following IRB approval, a survey modified from multiple validated surveys was distributed to DMD and BMD patients. The survey contained questions derived from multiple validated questionnaires, including the American Urological Association Symptom Score and the Dysfunctional Voiding Symptoms Score, which assessed both the frequency of lower urinary tract symptoms (i.e. urinary urgency, frequency, enuresis, dysuria, and bowel function) as well as how bothersome patients found these symptoms. Of the 56 respondents (mean age 15.3; range 4-33), 40 (71.4%) reported at least one LUTS, most commonly urgency (n = 31, 55%) and hesitancy of stream (n = 32, 57%) (Figure). Although the majority of the patients reported being happy with their symptoms, 16% (n = 9) expressed dissatisfaction. We did not find any correlation between LUTS and disease progression, as measured by years non-ambulatory, on chi-square analysis. In this cross-sectional study of the frequency and degree of bother of LUTS in D/BMD patients, we found that a high percentage experience LUTS. Despite this high prevalence, the majority report that they are not especially bothered by these symptoms; however, over 16% express dissatisfaction with their current LUTS. With this patient

  17. DEFINICIÓN, PREVALENCIA Y FACTORES DE RIESGOS DE INSOMNIO EN LA POBLACIÓN GENERAL Prevalence insomnia risk factors in the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Rueda Sánchez

    2008-03-01

    variables de confusión potenciales y se utilicen técnicas avanzadas de análisis.Background. Several factors associated to insomnia has been reported, but few studies have evaluated them in a combined form, for what is not known their influence as a confusion factor. Objective. To evaluate insomnia definition and determine the prevalence in the general population and to establish the force of association of several known risk factors. Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study of 1.505 random selected adult households of Bucaramanga , Colombia . The survey included aspects about sleep perception and insomnia symptoms, socio-demographic factors, lifestyle and health condition. To adjust the potential confusion, models of polynomial logistic regression were generated. Results. 11.4 percent (IC95% 9.7-13.1 of adults report sleep problems; 63.6 percent (IC95% 61.0-66.3 report at least an insomnia symptom without consequences on the following day, and 26.2 percent (IC95% 23.7-28.7 reported to have at least an insomnia symptom with next day consequences. The risk factors associated to insomnia with daytime symptoms are age (OR 2.079, to suffer current physical abuse (OR 17.704 and to have difficulties in several aspects of life (labor, economic, couple, or family, among others; OR 4.437, while it is a protective factor to have secondary or university education (OR 0.649 and 0.511, respectively. Insomnia was not associated with history of serious illnesses, gender, socio-economic status or alcohol or coffee consumption. Conclusion. The best insomnia definition is the combination of insomnia symptoms and its consequences during the day. The insomnia prevalence is high, being associated with some factors previously described in the literature, but not with others, indicating the necessity that when carrying out studies all the potential variables of confusion should be included and advanced techniques of analysis used.

  18. Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans report symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness one year after deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. McAndrew, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Veterans returning from service in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF experience chronic pain. What is not known is whether for some OIF/OEF Veterans this pain is part of a larger condition of diffuse multisystem symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness (CMI. We use data from a prospective longitudinal study of OIF/OEF Veterans to determine the frequency of CMI. We found that 1 yr after deployment, 49.5% of OIF/OEF Veterans met criteria for mild to moderate CMI and 10.8% met criteria for severe CMI. Over 90% of Veterans with chronic pain met criteria for CMI. CMI was not completely accounted for either by posttraumatic stress disorder or by predeployment levels of physical symptoms. Veterans with symptoms consistent with CMI reported significantly worse physical health function than Veterans who did not report symptoms consistent with CMI. This study suggests that the presence of CMI should be considered in the evaluation of OIF/OEF Veterans. Further, it suggests that the pain management for these Veterans may need to be tailored to take CMI into consideration.

  19. The Association between Hair Cortisol and Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression in Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikenius, Ellen; Moe, Vibeke; Kjellevold, Marian; Smith, Lars; Lyle, Robert; Waagbø, Rune; Page, Christian Magnus; Myhre, Anne Margrethe

    2016-01-01

    Depression has been linked to an imbalance in cortisol. Until recently, cortisol has been studied by measuring concentrations at single time points in blood or saliva samples. Cortisol concentrations vary with circadian rhythm and experiences, from time point to time point. The measurement of hair cortisol concentration (HCC) is a new method of accessing mean, long-term cortisol concentrations. Recent studies show positive associations between depression and HCC, and prenatal maternal cortisol is thought to influence the developing fetus. We therefore examined the association between HCC and self-reported symptoms of depression in second trimester pregnant women. Participants were 181 women, recruited between September 2011 and October 2013 to the Little-in-Norway (LiN)-study. These women answered the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Rating Scale (EPDS) on self-reported symptoms of depression, and one cm maternal scalp hair was collected and analyzed for cortisol concentrations. Multiple regression analyses did not show depressive symptoms as a predictor for HCC in our selection of pregnant women, while gestational age was significantly related. In conclusion, our study indicated that symptoms of depression during pregnancy did not predict HCC, but further studies of clinically depressed, pregnant women using gestational age as an adjustment variable are warranted. PMID:27584584

  20. Undertreatment of symptoms in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, René N; Blackhall, Leslie; Weisbord, Steven D; Holley, Jean L

    2010-02-01

    Hemodialysis patients suffer a large symptom burden, and little is known about how effectively symptoms are treated. To assess the management of treatable symptoms in hemodialysis patients, we administered a 30-item questionnaire on physical and emotional symptoms to patients receiving outpatient hemodialysis at the University of Virginia. We asked patients whether they were prescribed therapy for potentially treatable symptoms and assessed who prescribed the therapy. By means of chart review, we also documented whether medications were prescribed for these symptoms. We approached 87 patients and enrolled 62 (71%). The most commonly reported, potentially treatable symptoms included bone/joint pain, insomnia, mood disturbance, sexual dysfunction, paresthesia, and nausea. Only 45% of patients with bone/joint pain reported receiving an analgesic medication. Twenty-three percent of patients with trouble falling asleep and 53% of patients with nausea reported receiving a medication to alleviate this symptom. Chart review revealed that 58% of patients who reported the presence of bone/joint pain were prescribed an analgesic, 23% of patients with trouble falling asleep were prescribed a sleep aid, and 42% of patients with nausea received an antiemetic. Primary care providers were more likely than nephrologists to provide for all symptoms except nausea and numbness or tingling in the feet, and this difference was significant for the treatment of worrying (3/3 vs. 0/3, P=0.05) and nervousness (4/5 vs. 0/5, P=0.02). Potentially treatable symptoms in hemodialysis are undertreated. Pharmacologic therapy, particularly for emotional symptoms, was more commonly prescribed by primary care providers than nephrologists. Additional study of the barriers to symptom treatment and interventions that increase nephrologist and primary care provider symptom management are needed. Copyright 2010 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. All rights reserved.

  1. Internet-based survey of factors associated with subjective feeling of insomnia, depression, and low health-related quality of life among Japanese adults with sleep difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aritake, Sayaka; Asaoka, Shoichi; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Shimura, Akiyoshi; Futenma, Kunihiro; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine what symptom components or conditions of insomnia are related to subjective feelings of insomnia, low health-related quality of life (HRQOL), or depression. Data from 7,027 Japanese adults obtained using an Internet-based questionnaire survey was analyzed to examine associations between demographic variables and each sleep difficulty symptom item on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) with the presence/absence of subjective insomnia and scores on the Short Form-8 (SF-8) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Prevalence of subjective insomnia was 12.2% (n = 860). Discriminant function analysis revealed that item scores for sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep medication use on the PSQI and CES-D showed relatively high discriminant function coefficients for identifying positivity for the subjective feeling of insomnia. Among respondents with subjective insomnia, a low SF-8 physical component summary score was associated with higher age, depressive state, and PSQI items for sleep difficulty and daytime dysfunction, whereas a low SF-8 mental component summary score was associated with depressive state, PSQI sleep latency, sleeping medication use, and daytime dysfunction. Depressive state was significantly associated with sleep latency, sleeping medication use, and daytime dysfunction. Among insomnia symptom components, disturbed sleep quality and sleep onset insomnia may be specifically associated with subjective feelings of the disorder. The existence of a depressive state could be significantly associated with not only subjective insomnia but also mental and physical QOL. Our results also suggest that different components of sleep difficulty, as measured by the PSQI, might be associated with mental and physical QOL and depressive status.

  2. "I'd eat a bucket of nails if you told me it would help me sleep:" perceptions of insomnia and its treatment in patients with stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Laura Kierol; Coviello, Jessica; Hurley, Elisabeth; Rose, Leonie; Redeker, Nancy S

    2013-01-01

    Poor sleep, including insomnia, is common among patients with heart failure (HF). However, little is known about the efficacy of interventions for insomnia in this population. Prior to developing interventions, there is a need for better understanding of patient perceptions about insomnia and its treatment. To evaluate HF patients' perceptions about 1) insomnia and its consequences; 2) predisposing, precipitating, and perpetuating factors for insomnia; 3) self-management strategies and treatments for insomnia; and 4) preferences for insomnia treatment. The study, guided by the "3 P" model of insomnia, employed a parallel convergent mixed methods design in which we obtained qualitative data through focus groups and quantitative data through questionnaires (sleep quality, insomnia severity, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep; sleep-related daytime symptoms and functional performance). Content analysis was used to evaluate themes arising from the focus group data, and descriptive statistics were used to analyze the quantitative data. The results of both forms of data collection were compared and synthesized. HF patients perceived insomnia as having a negative impact on daytime function and comorbid health problems, pain, nocturia, and psychological factors as perpetuating factors. They viewed use of hypnotic medications as often necessary but disliked negative daytime side effects. They used a variety of strategies to manage their insomnia, but generally did not mention their sleep concerns to physicians whom they perceived as not interested in sleep. HF patients believe insomnia is important and multi-factorial. Behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, for insomnia may be efficacious in modifying perpetuating factors and likely to be acceptable to patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Change in Dysfunctional Beliefs About Sleep in Behavior Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidelman, Polina; Talbot, Lisa; Ivers, Hans; Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M; Harvey, Allison G

    2016-01-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial, 188 participants were randomized to behavior therapy (BT), cognitive therapy (CT), or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia. The aims of this study were threefold: (a) to determine whether change in dysfunctional beliefs about sleep was related to change in sleep, insomnia symptoms, and impairment following treatment; (b) to determine whether BT, CT, and CBT differ in their effects on dysfunctional beliefs; and (c) to determine whether the treatments differ in their effects on particular kinds of dysfunctional beliefs. Beliefs, sleep, insomnia symptoms, and sleep-related psychosocial impairment were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6- and 12-month follow-up. Greater change in dysfunctional beliefs occurring over the course of BT, CT, or CBT was associated with greater improvement in insomnia symptoms and impairment at posttreatment and both follow-ups. All groups experienced a significant decrease in dysfunctional beliefs during treatment, which were sustained through 6- and 12-month follow-up. Compared with the BT group, a greater proportion of participants in the CT and/or CBT groups endorsed dysfunctional beliefs below a level considered clinically significant at posttreatment and 12-month follow-up. The results demonstrate the importance of targeting dysfunctional beliefs in insomnia treatment, suggest that beliefs may be significantly modified with BT alone, and indicate that cognitive interventions may be particularly powerful in enhancing belief change. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Effects of Two Concussions on the Neuropsychological Functioning and Symptom Reporting of High School Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, William T; Geling, Olga; Arnold, Monica; Oshiro, Ross

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effects of two sports-related concussions on neuropsychological functioning and symptom reporting, the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was administered to 483 high school athletes. Three groups of athletes were determined based on the number of previous concussions: no concussion (n = 409), 1 concussion (n = 58), and 2 concussions (n = 16). The results showed that the three groups did not differ in terms of their ImPACT composite scores (Verbal Memory, Visual Memory, Reaction Time, and Processing Speed) and the Total Symptom Score. As there are only a few studies that have reported the sequelae of 2 concussions in high school athletes, it is premature to declare that a repeated concussion does not have persistent neurocognitive effects on high school athletes.

  5. Self-reported difficulties with everyday function, cognitive symptoms and cognitive function in people with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laverick, Rosanna; Haddow, Lewis J; Daskalopoulou, Marina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We determined factors associated with self-reported decline in activities of daily living (ADLs) and symptoms of cognitive impairment in HIV positive (HIV+) adults in five European clinics. METHODS: HIV+ adults underwent computerized and pen-and-paper neuropsychological tests and ques......BACKGROUND: We determined factors associated with self-reported decline in activities of daily living (ADLs) and symptoms of cognitive impairment in HIV positive (HIV+) adults in five European clinics. METHODS: HIV+ adults underwent computerized and pen-and-paper neuropsychological tests...... when assessing HIV-associated cognitive impairment in clinical care or research studies.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work...

  6. Current and new thinking in the management of comorbid insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, David N

    2009-02-01

    Insomnia occurs predominantly in conjunction with a medical or psychiatric illness. New thinking regarding the treatment of comorbid insomnia has moved the field away from practices that called for treating the comorbid condition to resolve the coexisting insomnia to one in which the insomnia is treated as a separate condition. Although 10 medications currently are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia, only 2, eszopiclone and zolpidem, have been evaluated for efficacy in patients with chronic comorbid insomnia. Studies suggest clear benefits in comorbid insomnia. Nonpharmacologic treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, sleep hygiene, and relaxation training, have also been investigated for comorbid insomnia, with studies suggesting these approaches may be effective either alone or in conjunction with medications. While behavioral issues should be optimized, clinicians need to customize treatments for patients with comorbid insomnia based on coexisting medical and psychiatric morbidities, age, medical history, current medications, and lifestyle issues.

  7. Insomnia types and sleep microstructure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouvarda, I; Grassi, A; Mendez, M O; Bianchi, A M; Parrino, L; Milioli, G; Terzano, M; Maglaveras, N; Cerutti, S

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to investigate sleep microstructure as expressed by Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP), and its possible alterations in pathological sleep. Three groups, of 10 subjects each, are considered: a) normal sleep, b) psychophysiological insomnia, and c) sleep misperception. One night sleep PSG and sleep macro- micro structure annotations were available per subject. The statistical properties and the dynamics of CAP events are in focus. Multiscale and non-linear methods are presented for the analysis of the microstructure event time series, applied for each type of CAP events, and their combination. The results suggest that a) both types of insomnia present CAP differences from normal sleep related to hyperarousal, b) sleep misperception presents more extensive differences from normal, potentially reflecting multiple sleep mechanisms, c) there are differences between the two types of insomnia as regard to the intertwining of events of different subtypes. The analysis constitutes a contribution towards new markers for the quantitative characterization of insomnia, and its subtypes.

  8. Insomnia: clinical experience with zolpidem (sanval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakov Iosifovich Levin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the present view of the problem of insomnia and gives a classification of sleep disorders and basic methods for their drug and non-drug therapy. Emphasis is placed on the role of the objective sleep study - polysomnography. The use of the current hypnotics belonging to a three Zs group and the minimization of administration of benzodiazepines are most important in pharmacotherapy for insomnia. The results of a clinical polysomnographic study of the effect of Zolpidem (Sanval in patients with insomnia are presented. The subjective evaluation of the beneficial effect of a 10-day course of Sanval is confirmed by the objective studies of the sleep pattern undergoing positive changes in the most important indicators, such as the process of falling asleep, the time of intrasleep awakenings, and the duration of Δ-sleep. The high safety and good tolerability of Sanval permit the latter to be assessed as an effective agent for the treatment of insomnia.

  9. Treatment Options for Insomnia | Ramakrishnan | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frequency of sleep disruption and the degree to which insomnia ... to uncover coexisting medical, neurologic, or psychiatric illness is warranted. ... Routine use of over-the-counter drugs containing antihistamines should be discouraged.

  10. Clinical Experience in TCM Treatment of Insomnia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Insomnia is a sleeping disorder that affects 1 in 10 Americans and around 50% of the seniors. It is often more prevalent in women. Since September 11, 2005 these estimations have increased. Insomnia can affect not only your energy level and mood, but your health as well because sleep helps bolster your immune system. Insomnia is characterized by: 1) difficulty in falling asleep; 2) waking up frequently during the night with difficulty of returning to sleep; 3) waking up too early in the morning; and 4) with unrefreshing sleep, the patient has a low spirit, palpation, poor memory, viscera function disorder. All these seriously affect the patient's life and work. The following is an account of the authors' clinical TCM experience in treating insomnia.

  11. Clinical management of behavioral insomnia of childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Vriend1, Penny Corkum21Clinical Psychology PhD Program, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; 2Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, CanadaAbstract: Behavioral insomnia is highly prevalent, affecting approximately 25% of children. It involves difficulties initiating and maintaining sleep and frequently results in inadequate sleep, leading to an array of negative effects for both the child and the child’s family. In this paper, we describe a variety of empirically supported behavioral interventions for insomnia from infancy through adolescence. We explore how biological, cognitive, and psychosocial developmental changes contribute to behavioral insomnia and how these changes may affect sleep and behavioral interventions. We also discuss barriers that prevent families from accessing interventions, including why many empirically-supported behavioral interventions are overlooked by health care providers.Keywords: sleep, behavioral insomnia, treatment, infants, children, adolescents

  12. Pharmacotherapy Treatment Options for Insomnia: A Primer for Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Asnis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Insomnia is a prevalent disorder with deleterious effects such as decreased quality of life, and a predisposition to a number of psychiatric disorders. Fortunately, numerous approved hypnotic treatments are available. This report reviews the state of the art of pharmacotherapy with a reference to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I as well. It provides the clinician with a guide to all the Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved hypnotics (benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepines, ramelteon, low dose sinequan, and suvorexant including potential side effects. Frequently, chronic insomnia lasts longer than 2 years. Cognizant of this and as a result of longer-term studies, the FDA has approved all hypnotics since 2005 without restricting the duration of use. Our manuscript also reviews off-label hypnotics (sedating antidepressants, atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and antihistamines which in reality, are more often prescribed than approved hypnotics. The choice of which hypnotic to choose is discussed partially being based on which segment of sleep is disturbed and whether co-morbid illnesses exist. Lastly, we discuss recent label changes required by the FDA inserting a warning about “sleep-related complex behaviors”, e.g., sleep-driving for all hypnotics. In addition, we discuss FDA mandated dose reductions for most zolpidem preparations in women due to high zolpidem levels in the morning hours potentially causing daytime carry-over effects.

  13. Prevalence of self-reported symptoms and consequences related to inhalation of airborne chemicals in a Danish general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Dirksen, Asger; Elberling, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and consequences of self-reported symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals in a Danish general population.......To estimate the prevalence and consequences of self-reported symptoms related to inhalation of airborne chemicals in a Danish general population....

  14. 柴胡加龙骨牡蛎汤加减治疗顽固性失眠1例%Chaihu Longgu Oyster Soup in Treating Intractable Insomnia:Report of 1 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹国英

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a case of intractable insomnia, emotional factors are the main causes of insomnia patients. Treatment should be Shaoyang, Yang and purging heat, soothing the nerves. Chaihu Longgu Oyster soup combined with more enhanced the Shugan Jieyu prescription treatment, for more than 3 months, to heal insomnia. The medicine has Yangxin Anshen Ding Zhi Kai Yu, the ef icacy of treatment for insomnia, liver qi stagnation of every good ef ect.%本文介绍1例顽固性失眠,患者失眠情志因素是其主要病因。治宜和解少阳,通阳泄热,重镇安神。柴胡加龙骨牡蛎汤合用更增强其疏肝解郁,用以上方药治疗3个月,失眠告愈。上药均具有养心开郁,安神定志的功效,用治肝郁气滞之失眠每收良效。

  15. Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  16. Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that keep you awake. The behavioral part of CBT-I helps you develop good sleep habits and avoid behaviors that keep you from ... evidence that CBT-I has negative side effects. CBT-I requires steady practice, and some approaches may cause you to lose sleep at first. But stick with it, and you' ...

  17. Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ... 2/2016 Updated by: Fred K. Berger, MD, addiction and forensic psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, ...

  18. The conceptualization and development of a patient-reported neurogenic bladder symptom score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welk B

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Blayne Welk,1 Sarah A Morrow,2 Wendy Madarasz,3 Patrick Potter,4 Keith Sequeira41Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 3St Joseph's Health Care, London Ontario, Canada; 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Western University, London, ON, CanadaBackground: There is no single patient-reported instrument that was developed specifically to assess symptoms and bladder-related consequences for neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to identify and consolidate items for a novel measurement tool for this population.Methods: Item generation was based on a literature review of existing instruments, open-ended semistructured interviews with patients, and expert opinion. Judgment-based item reduction was performed by a multidisciplinary expert group. The proposed questionnaire was sent to external experts for review.Results: Eight neurogenic quality of life measures and 29 urinary symptom-specific instruments were identified. From these, 266 relevant items were extracted and used in the creation of the new neurogenic symptom score. Qualitative interviews with 16 adult patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction as a result of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, or spina bifida were completed. Dominant themes included urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, urgency, and bladder spasms. Using the literature review and interview data, 25 proposed items were reviewed by 12 external experts, and the questions evaluated based on importance on a scale of 1 (not important to 5 (very important. Retained question domains had high mean importance ratings of 3.1 to 4.3 and good agreement with answer hierarchy.Conclusion: The proposed neurogenic bladder symptom score is a novel patient-reported outcome measure. Further work is underway to perform a data-based item reduction and to assess the validity and reliability of this instrument

  19. A case report of a patient with upper extremity symptoms: differentiating radicular and referred pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daub Clifford W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar upper extremity symptoms can present with varied physiologic etiologies. However, due to the multifaceted nature of musculoskeletal conditions, a definitive diagnosis using physical examination and advanced testing is not always possible. This report discusses the diagnosis and case management of a patient with two episodes of similar upper extremity symptoms of different etiologies. Case Presentation On two separate occasions a forty-four year old female patient presented to a chiropractic office with a chief complaint of insidious right-sided upper extremity symptoms. During each episode she reported similar pain and parasthesias from her neck and shoulder to her lateral forearm and hand. During the first episode the patient was diagnosed with a cervical radiculopathy. Conservative treatment, including manual cervical traction, spinal manipulation and neuromobilization, was initiated and resolved the symptoms. Approximately eighteen months later the patient again experienced a severe acute flare-up of the upper extremity symptoms. Although the subjective complaint was similar, it was determined that the pain generator of this episode was an active trigger point of the infraspinatus muscle. A diagnosis of myofascial referred pain was made and a protocol of manual trigger point therapy and functional postural rehabilitative exercises improved the condition. Conclusion In this case a thorough physical evaluation was able to differentiate between radicular and referred pain. By accurately identifying the pain generating structures, the appropriate rehabilitative protocol was prescribed and led to a successful outcome for each condition. Conservative manual therapy and rehabilitative exercises may be an effective treatment for certain cases of cervical radiculopathy and myofascial referred pain.

  20. Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, Josiane; Spechler, Philip A; Potvin, Stéphane; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Desrivières, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; McEwen, Sarah C; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Vetter, Nora C; Walter, Henrik; Schumann, Gunter; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia J

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the neural correlates of psychotic-like experiences in youths during tasks involving inhibitory control, reward anticipation, and emotion processing. A secondary aim was to test whether these neurofunctional correlates of risk were predictive of psychotic symptoms 2 years later. Functional imaging responses to three paradigms-the stop-signal, monetary incentive delay, and faces tasks-were collected in youths at age 14, as part of the IMAGEN study. At baseline, youths from London and Dublin sites were assessed on psychotic-like experiences, and those reporting significant experiences were compared with matched control subjects. Significant brain activity differences between the groups were used to predict, with cross-validation, the presence of psychotic symptoms in the context of mood fluctuation at age 16, assessed in the full sample. These prediction analyses were conducted with the London-Dublin subsample (N=246) and the full sample (N=1,196). Relative to control subjects, youths reporting psychotic-like experiences showed increased hippocampus/amygdala activity during processing of neutral faces and reduced dorsolateral prefrontal activity during failed inhibition. The most prominent regional difference for classifying 16-year-olds with mood fluctuation and psychotic symptoms relative to the control groups (those with mood fluctuations but no psychotic symptoms and those with no mood symptoms) was hyperactivation of the hippocampus/amygdala, when controlling for baseline psychotic-like experiences and cannabis use. The results stress the importance of the limbic network's increased response to neutral facial stimuli as a marker of the extended psychosis phenotype. These findings might help to guide early intervention strategies for at-risk youths.

  1. Symptoms in smokers trying to quit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgason Asgeir R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To describe the prevalence and intensity of different symptoms in relation to tobacco abstinence. To explore latent dimensions between symptoms in smokers trying to quit. Design A cross sectional study using a questionnaire to retrospectively assess symptoms over a period of 12 months. Setting Swedish telephone quitline, a nationwide free of charge service. Participants All 741 individuals who had called the quitline and signed up for smoking cessation treatment between February 2000 to November 2001 and reported to have been smoke free for at least 24 hours during the previous 12 month period from first contact. Measurements Assessments were made by self-report, and abstinence was defined as "not a single puff of smoke during the last week". A factor analysis approach where individual items aggregate into factors was used to explore the relationship between the different symptoms. Findings High intensity of symptoms related to unsuccessful quitting attempts and included craving, irritability, apprehension/anxiety, difficulties concentrating, restlessness, depression/depressed mood, and insomnia. The factor loadings of all 17 symptoms resulted in three factors with factor 1, psychological being the most important. High scores on this factor relates to unsuccessful quitting attempts. Using Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT for 5 weeks or longer, reduced symptoms included in factor 1. The other two factors were factor 2 physiological and factor 3 neurological. Conclusion Symptoms that are psychological and/or neurological in nature are interrelated and appear to be the most significant obstacles for successful quitting attempts in a population-based setting. These symptoms may be successfully treated with NRT.

  2. Symptoms in smokers trying to quit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgason Asgeir R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To describe the prevalence and intensity of different symptoms in relation to tobacco abstinence. To explore latent dimensions between symptoms in smokers trying to quit. Design A cross sectional study using a questionnaire to retrospectively assess symptoms over a period of 12 months. Setting Swedish telephone quitline, a nationwide free of charge service. Participants All 741 individuals who had called the quitline and signed up for smoking cessation treatment between February 2000 to November 2001 and reported to have been smoke free for at least 24 hours during the previous 12 month period from first contact. Measurements Assessments were made by self-report, and abstinence was defined as "not a single puff of smoke during the last week". A factor analysis approach where individual items aggregate into factors was used to explore the relationship between the different symptoms. Findings High intensity of symptoms related to unsuccessful quitting attempts and included craving, irritability, apprehension/anxiety, difficulties concentrating, restlessness, depression/depressed mood, and insomnia. The factor loadings of all 17 symptoms resulted in three factors with factor 1, psychological being the most important. High scores on this factor relates to unsuccessful quitting attempts. Using Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT for 5 weeks or longer, reduced symptoms included in factor 1. The other two factors were factor 2 physiological and factor 3 neurological. Conclusion Symptoms that are psychological and/or neurological in nature are interrelated and appear to be the most significant obstacles for successful quitting attempts in a population-based setting. These symptoms may be successfully treated with NRT.

  3. Insomnia in women approaching menopause: beyond perception

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Fiona C.; Willoughby, Adrian R.; Sassoon, Stephanie A.; Colrain, Ian M.; de Zambotti, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The menopause transition is marked by increased prevalence in disturbed sleep and insomnia, present in 40–60% of women, but evidence for a physiological basis for their sleep complaints is lacking. We aimed to quantify sleep disturbance and the underlying contribution of objective hot flashes in 72 women (age range: 43–57 years) who had (38 women), compared to those who had not (34 women), developed clinical insomnia in association with the menopause transition. Sleep quality was assessed wit...

  4. The effects of foot reflexology on fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.M.; Sohng, K.Y. [Kangwon Tourism College, Kangwon-Do (Republic of Korea). Department of Nursing

    2005-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of foot reflexology on fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers' pneumoconiosis. This study was a quasi-experimental study of pre-test and post-test design in a non-equivalent control group. The subjects of this study consisted of both the experimental group of twenty-nine and the control group of thirty coal workers' pneumoconiosis patients. Data was collected from December 10, 2002 to February 15, 2003. Foot reflexology was performed for 60 minutes twice a week through five weeks in the experimental group, but none in the control group. To evaluate the effects of foot reflexology, the scores of fatigue and insomnia were measured before and after the experiment in both groups. Fatigue was evaluated by Fatigue Symptoms Inventory. Insomnia was measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS). Data of this experiment was analyzed by Chi-square test, t-test, unpaired t-test and Repeated Measures ANOVA with the SAS Program. The scores of fatigue and insomnia decreased in the experimental group but not in the control group. There was a significant difference of fatigue and insomnia between the two groups. It is suggested that foot reflexology might have beneficial effects on reducing fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers' pneumoconiosis, and can be recommended as a nursing intervention program for patients with coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

  5. Self-report of basic symptoms among psychotic and nonpsychotic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, N; Pezzarossa, B; Curini, A; Rubino, I A

    1999-10-01

    Basic symptoms, as defined and described by the Bonn Scale, were assessed by means of a new self-report inventory, the Rome Basic Disorders Scale. On all the subscales, psychiatric outpatients (n = 105; most frequent diagnoses: Schizophrenia, Anxiety Disorders, and Mood Disorders) scored significantly higher (p < .001) than nonclinical controls (n = 105). Psychiatric patients with at least one diagnosis on the psychotic sets of Foulds' hierarchical inventory (n = 45), compared with the rest of the psychiatric sample (n = 60), had significantly higher scores on nearly all subscales. Two groups of inpatients with Schizophrenia (n = 20) and Mood Disorders (n = 20) were tested on Day 2 and 9 of hospitalization in an emergency ward. Schizophrenic patients had significantly higher scores on most of the subscales, but only on Day 9; on Day 2 depressed and manic patients scored significantly higher on four subscales. Until now basic symptoms had not been studied during the intrapsychotic phase, mainly because of their transformation into first-rank symptoms; present findings suggest that basic symptoms are active also at the height of the psychotic breakdown and that they are more responsive to treatment in Depression and Mania than in Schizophrenia.

  6. Nonpharmacologic approaches to the management of insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, R Gregory; Gragnani, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    Insomnia is one of the more common complaints patients present to their physicians. Sleep problems affect up to one-third of all Americans, and the loss of workplace productivity and increased healthcare utilization result in costs approaching $100 billion a year. Patients with acute insomnia generally respond well to various sedative hypnotic medications, but chronic insomnia is a different challenge. Physicians and patients may raise concerns about the long-term use of sedative hypnotic medications. Even in light of these concerns, however, the chronic insomnia remains, ostensibly leaving the physician few choices. A number of promising nonpharmacologic strategies are available that physicians can easily implement. Through the use of self-rating instruments and a sleep log, physicians can bring the sleep problem into better focus and monitor the efficacy of clinical interventions. Certain behavioral techniques, such as sleep hygiene, stimulus control, and sleep restriction, can be effective remedies for chronic insomnia. The use of cranial electric stimulation for insomnia is also showing promising results. Through careful assessment and the adoption of simple nonpharmacologic strategies, the physician's interventions may result in a good night's sleep.

  7. Management of insomnia: update and new approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unbehaun, Thomas; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hirscher, Verena; Riemann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder worldwide. A number of studies evaluated the efficacy of pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches. To obtain long-term effects in the management of chronic insomnia, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the treatment of first choice, encompassing education about sleep and sleep hygiene, sleep restriction, stimulus control, relaxation techniques, and cognitive strategies to combat nocturnal ruminations. Short-term effects can easily be achieved by the administration of hypnotic drugs. Gaining access to all types of treatment can still be considered a problem, especially CBT-I seems to be available only at specialized centers but not in general health care. New approaches to treatment delivery seem to be necessary to provide adequate care for patients who may seek help or have not entered the health care system yet. Internet-based treatment options and stepped-care models might be feasible options for the future. Otherwise, the direct and indirect costs associated with insomnia might further increase for our societies, in addition to the personal impact on aspects of quality of life and impaired daytime functioning for each individual with insomnia. Besides, well-established psychological and pharmacological treatment options, alternative treatments like acupuncture might constitute new nonpharmacological possibilities. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this and other new approaches to treat insomnia.

  8. Diagnosing major depressive disorder I: A psychometric evaluation of the DSM-IV symptom criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; McGlinchey, Joseph B; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona

    2006-03-01

    The diagnostic criteria for depression were developed on the basis of clinical experience rather than empirical study. Although they have been available and widely used for many years, few studies have examined the psychometric properties of the DSM criteria for major depression. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we examined whether criteria such as insomnia, fatigue, and impaired concentration that are also diagnostic criteria for other disorders are less specific than the other DSM-IV depression symptom criteria. We also conducted a regression analysis to determine whether all criteria are independently associated with the diagnosis of major depressive disorder. A total of 1538 psychiatric outpatients were administered a semistructured diagnostic interview. We inquired about all of the symptoms of depression for all patients. All of the DSM-IV symptom criteria for major depressive disorder were significantly associated with the diagnosis. Contrary to our prediction, symptoms such as insomnia, fatigue, and impaired concentration, which are also criteria of other disorders, generally performed as well as the criteria that are unique to depression such as suicidality, worthlessness, and guilt. The results of the regression analysis, which controlled for symptom covariation, indicated that five symptoms (increased weight, decreased weight, psychomotor retardation, indecisiveness, and suicidal thoughts) were not independently associated with the diagnosis of depression. The implications of these results for revising the diagnostic criteria for major depression are discussed.

  9. The relationship between insomnia and disability in workers with mild traumatic brain injury/concussion: Insomnia and disability in chronic mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Pratt, Brandy; Mollayeva, Shirin; Shapiro, Colin M; Cassidy, J David; Colantonio, Angela

    2016-04-01

    The principal aim of this study was to, for the first time, examine the relationship between insomnia and perceived disability among workers with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/concussion. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Clinic of the largest rehabilitation teaching hospital in Canada. Data from questionnaires, insurer records and clinical investigations were analysed. The Insomnia Severity Index measured the primary independent variable, and the Sheehan Disability Scale measured disability outcomes, classified as 'mild/moderate' or 'marked/extreme'. Two-sided t-tests and Chi-squared tests were used for bivariate associations. A binomial logistic regression model was fit using previously identified variables. The sample comprised 92 workers (45.1 ± 9.9 years old, 61% male) with mTBI/concussion at median time 196 days after injury. When compared with workers reporting lower disability, workers with higher disability were found with more severe insomnia, depression, anxiety and pain. In the multivariable analysis, the odds of reporting higher global disability increased with increasing insomnia and pain [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.16 (95% CI 1.03-1.31) and 1.117 (95% CI 1.01-1.24), respectively]. Insomnia was the only significant covariate in a fully adjusted work disability model. None of the variables studied were statistically significant in the social and family life disability models. Greater attention should be given to the diagnosis and management of insomnia in persons with mTBI/concussion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-reported neck symptoms and use of personal computers, laptops and cell phones among Finns aged 18-65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible relation between self-reported neck symptoms (aches, pain or numbness) and use of computers/cell phones. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional study by posting a questionnaire to 15,000 working-age persons, and 15.1% of all respondents (6121) reported that they very often experienced physical symptoms in the neck. The results showed that they also had many other symptoms very often, and 49% used a computer daily at work and 83.9% used cell phones. We compared physical/mental symptoms of persons with symptoms in the neck quite often or more, with others. We found significant differences in the physical/mental symptoms and use of cell phones and computers. The results suggest taking into account in the future that those persons' symptoms in the neck can be associated with use of cell phones or computers. We investigated the possible relation between neck symptoms and use of computers/cell phones. We found that persons, who very often had symptoms in the neck, had also other symptoms very often (e.g. exhaustion at work). Their use of information and communication technology (e.g. computers) can associate with their symptoms.

  11. Insomnia and styles of parental authority in college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, G S

    1994-06-01

    This study explored the hypothesis that styles of parental authority are related to insomnia in college students. To do this, I asked a large group of university students (N = 757) to respond to a questionnaire that included the items of Buri's Parental Authority Questionnaire and the Coren Insomnia Scale. Analysis suggested that more strict and uncompromising discipline engaged in by authoritarian parents was associated with higher insomnia in young adults, while the firm though flexible and warm discipline associated with the authoritative parents was associated with less insomnia. Further, as fathers' permissiveness increased, insomnia decreased, while mothers' permissiveness seemed to be unrelated to insomnia.

  12. Unraveling the relationship between trait negative affectivity and habitual symptom reporting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katleen Bogaerts

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In two studies, we aimed at further elucidating the relationship between trait negative affectivity (NA and habitual symptom reporting (HSR by relating these variables to measures of executive function, trait questionnaires, and effects of emotion induction. METHODS: Healthy female participants (N = 75 were selected on their scores for trait NA and for the Checklist for Symptoms in Daily Life. Three groups were compared: (1 low NA-low HSR; (2 high NA-low HSR; and (3 high NA-high HSR (low NA-high HSR did not occur. In study 1, participants underwent a Parametric Go/No-go Task and a Stroop Color-Word test, and trait questionnaires measured alexithymia and absorption. Forty-five participants (N = 15 in each group were further engaged in study 2 to induce state NA using an affective picture paradigm. RESULTS: Impaired inhibition on the Stroop and Go/No go Task characterized high trait NA, but not high HSR, whereas alexithymia and absorption were elevated in HSR, regardless of trait NA. Negative picture viewing induced elevated state NA in all groups, but only high HSR also reported more bodily symptoms. This effect was moderated, but not mediated by state NA. CONCLUSION: High trait NA is a vulnerability factor but not a sufficient condition to develop HSR. Deficient inhibition is related to the broad trait of NA, whereas the moderating effect of state NA on symptom reporting is specific for high HSR. Understanding processes related to alexithymia and absorption may specifically help to explain elevated HSR.

  13. Sudden deafness as an initial presenting symptom of posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J; Yoon, Y J

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on two patients with posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction whose only presenting complaint was acute unilateral hearing loss. In the two cases reported, sudden hearing loss was an initial symptom, with no other neurological signs. Infarction in the territory of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery was diagnosed using brain magnetic resolution imaging. The patients had some degree of hearing improvement 3 or 4 days after initial treatment. In this article, new cases of posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction presenting as sudden deafness, without prominent neurological signs, are described. Otologists should be aware that hearing loss can sometimes appear as a warning sign of impending posterior inferior cerebellar artery infarction.

  14. Cross-cultural and comparative epidemiology of insomnia: the Diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM), International classification of diseases (ICD) and International classification of sleep disorders (ICSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka-Fai; Yeung, Wing-Fai; Ho, Fiona Yan-Yee; Yung, Kam-Ping; Yu, Yee-Man; Kwok, Chi-Wa

    2015-04-01

    To compare the prevalence of insomnia according to symptoms, quantitative criteria, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th and 5th Edition (DSM-IV and DSM-5), International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10), and International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 2nd Edition (ICSD-2), and to compare the prevalence of insomnia disorder between Hong Kong and the United States by adopting a similar methodology used by the America Insomnia Survey (AIS). Population-based epidemiological survey respondents (n = 2011) completed the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ), a validated scale generating DSM-IV, DSM-5, ICD-10, and ICSD-2 insomnia disorder. The weighted prevalence of difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, waking up too early, and non-restorative sleep that occurred ≥3 days per week was 14.0%, 28.3%, 32.1%, and 39.9%, respectively. When quantitative criteria were included, the prevalence dropped the most from 39.9% to 8.4% for non-restorative sleep, and the least from 14.0% to 12.9% for difficulty falling asleep. The weighted prevalence of DSM-IV, ICD-10, ICSD-2, and any of the three insomnia disorders was 22.1%, 4.7%, 15.1%, and 22.1%, respectively; for DSM-5 insomnia disorder, it was 10.8%. Compared with 22.1%, 3.9%, and 14.7% for DSM-IV, ICD-10, and ICSD-2 in the AIS, cross-cultural difference in the prevalence of insomnia disorder is less than what is expected. The prevalence is reduced by half from DSM-IV to DSM-5. ICD-10 insomnia disorder has the lowest prevalence, perhaps because excessive concern and preoccupation, one of its diagnostic criteria, is not always present in people with insomnia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Psychotic symptoms as a complication of electroconvulsive therapy - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosik-Wójcińska, Anna; Chojnacka, Magdalena; Święcicki, Łukasz

    2017-02-26

    We report a patient who experienced atypical symptoms in the course of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). During ECT treatment patient experienced psychotic symptoms which should be differentiated with prolonged delirium and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. 46-year-old female was referred to hospital with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder with no psychotic features in the course of recurrent depression. Despite several changes of pharmacological treatment no improvement was achieved, therefore it was decided to initiate ECT. Physical and neurological examination revealed no deviations from the norm. The results of other tests (CT and EEG) were normal. 4 bilateral, bitemporal ECT procedures were performed. The course of each procedure was typical, the same doses of anesthetic medication and pulse dose was administered throughout all of the procedures. The duration of seizure was 32-40 s. Despite this mental symptoms observed during the course of the treatment differed from known to the authors from both their own experience and from literature. Delusions of reference, persecution, agitation, oneiric delusions and olfactory hallucinations which appeared after the 4th ECT session maintained for 14 days and resolved after treatment with olanzapine. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on delusions of reference and persecution, oneiric delusions and olfactory hallucinations associated with the course of ECT.

  16. Role of Sertraline in insomnia associated with post traumatic brain injury (TBI depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of disability (1, 2. Sleep disturbances, such as insomnia, are very common following traumatic brain injury and have been reported in frequencies from 40% (3 to as high as 84% (4. Sleep disruption can be related to the TBI itself but may also be secondary to neuropsychiatric (e.g., depression or neuromuscular (e.g., pain conditions associated with TBI or to the pharmacological management of the injury and its consequences. Post-TBI insomnia has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including daytime fatigue, tiredness, difficulty functioning: impaired performance at work, memory problems, mood problems, greater functional disability, reduced participation in activities of daily living, less social and recreational activity, less employment potential, increased caregiver burden, greater sexual dysfunction, and also lower ratings of health, poor subjective wellbeing. These negative consequences can hamper the person’s reintegration into the community, adjustment after injury, and overall QOL. (5 The connection between depression and insomnia has not been investigated within the post TBI population to a great extent. For the general population, clinically significant insomnia is often associated with the presence of an emotional disorder (6. Fichtenberg et al. (2002 (7, in his study established that the strongest relationship with the diagnosis of insomnia belonged to depression. Given the high prevalence of depression during the first 2 years following TBI (8, a link between depression and insomnia among TBI patients makes innate sense. The present study aims at assessing role of sertralline in post TBI insomnia associated with depression.

  17. Pilot Study of the Tart Cherry Juice for the Treatment of Insomnia and Investigation of Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losso, Jack N; Finley, John W; Karki, Namrata; Liu, Ann G; Prudente, Alfredo; Tipton, Russell; Yu, Ying; Greenway, Frank L

    2017-03-27

    Insomnia is common in the elderly and is associated with chronic disease, but use of hypnotics increases the incidence of falls. Montmorency tart cherry juice has improved insomnia by self-report questionnaire. Is insomnia confirmed by polysomnography and is tryptophan availability a potential mechanism for treating insomnia? A placebo-controlled balanced crossover study with subjects older than 50 years and insomnia were randomized to placebo (2 weeks) or cherry juice (2 weeks) (240 mL 2 times/d) separated by a 2-week washout. Sleep was evaluated by polysomnography and 5 validated questionnaires. Serum indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio, and prostaglandin E2 were measured. In vitro, Caco-2 cells were stimulated with interferon-gamma, and the ability of cherry juice procyanidin to inhibit IDO which degrades tryptophan and stimulates inflammation was measured. The content of procyanidin B-2 and other major anthocyanins in cherry juice were determined. Eleven subjects were randomized; 3 with sleep apnea were excluded and referred. The 8 completers with insomnia increased sleep time by 84 minutes on polysomnography (P = 0.0182) and sleep efficiency increased on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P = 0.03). Other questionnaires showed no significant differences. The serum kynurenine-to-tryptophan ratio decreased, as did the level of prostaglandin E2 (both P juice procyanidin B-2 dose-dependently inhibited IDO. Cherry juice increased sleep time and sleep efficiency. Cherry juice procyanidin B-2 inhibited IDO, increased tryptophan availability, reduced inflammation, and may be partially responsible for improvement in insomnia.

  18. Determinants of depression and insomnia among institutionalized elderly people in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Suzana; Hassan, Junaidah; Sundar, Vatana V; Kong, Ai Yun Wenty; Ping Chin, Sook; Ahmad, Samsul Anuar; Kuan Lee, Lai

    2011-09-01

    Depression and insomnia are common psychiatric disorders among elderly people and reported to be related to several social and health factors. However, their occurrences in relation to food intake have rarely been investigated. Therefore, this study was to identify determinants of depression and insomnia, with emphasised on food intake among 71 elderly people residing in a government funded institution in Malaysia. An interview based questionnaire was used to obtain information on socio-demography, health and functional status, depression, insomnia and food intake. A total of 71.8% subjects had depression and 53% had insomnia. Subjects who had insomnia [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 19.55, 95% CI=4.04-94.64], needed help/unable to perform >4 items of IADL (AOR=16.65, 95% CI=3.95-70.22), had hypertension (AOR=7.66, 95% CI=1.37-42.76), had >50% wastage of poultry or fish (AOR=3.66, 95% CI=1.06-12.60) and wastage of vegetables (AOR 3.31, 95% CI=1.03-10.60) were more likely to have depression. Subjects who had depression (AOR 19.55, 95% CI=4.04-94.64), needed help/unable to perform >4 items of IADL (AOR 2.97, 95% CI=1.12-7.84), needed help/unable to handle financial matters (AOR 5.01, 95% CI=1.37-18.27) and had >50% wastage of vegetables (AOR 3.91, 95% CI=1.42-10.82) were at a higher risk to develop insomnia. Depression and insomnia affected more than half of the subjects, interrelated, and associated with functional inability, socioeconomic factor and high food wastage of specific foods.

  19. Insomnia, daytime sleepiness and cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in the elderly: a 6-year prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jaussent

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